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Sample records for adult murine hematopoiesis

  1. Characterization of a Novel Murine Retrovirus Mixture That Facilitates Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Lauren M.; Jude, Brooke A.; Ter-Grigorov, Victor S.; Hartley, Janet W.; Morse III, Herbert C.; Trainin, Zeev; Toder, Vladimir; Chervonsky, Alexander V.; Golovkina, Tatyana V.

    2002-01-01

    A new virus previously arose in BALB/c females mated repeatedly to C57BL/6 (B6) males and then injected with fixed, activated B6 male spleen cells (V. S. Ter-Grigorov, O. Krifuks, E. Liubashevsky, A. Nyska, Z. Trainin, and V. Toder, Nat. Med. 3:37-41, 1997). In the present study, BALB/cJ mice inoculated with virus-containing plasma from affected mice developed splenomegaly, which was caused by increased numbers of Sca-1+ Lin− hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their differentiated progeny. Biological and molecular analyses of a new virus revealed a mixture of murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs). These MuLVs comprised ecotropic and mink lung cell focus-forming (MCF) virus classes and are termed Rauscher-like MuLVs because they bear numerous similarities to the ecotropic and MCF viruses of the Rauscher MuLV complex but do not include a spleen focus-forming virus. The ecotropic virus component alone transferred some disease characteristics, while MCF virus alone did not. Thus, we have described a novel virus mixture, termed Rauscher-like MuLV, that causes an increase in hematopoiesis due to activation of pluripotent HSC. Experiments using mice and a protocol that replicated the pregnancy and immunization strategy of the original experiment demonstrated that endogenous BALB/c mouse ecotropic and xenotropic MuLVs are activated by these treatments. Emv1 was expressed in the spleens of multiparous mice but not in those of virgin mice, and Bxv1Emv1-pseudotyped MuLVs were recovered following injection of fixed, activated B6 cells. Thus, multiple pregnancies and allostimuli appear to have provided the signals required for activation of and recombination among endogenous viruses and could have resulted in generation of the Rauscher-like MuLV mixture. PMID:12414952

  2. Stable multilineage xenogeneic replacement of definitive hematopoiesis in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hess, Isabell; Boehm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bony fishes are the most numerous and phenotypically diverse group of vertebrates inhabiting our planet, making them an ideal target for identifying general principles of tissue development and function. However, lack of suitable experimental platforms prevents the exploitation of this rich source of natural phenotypic variation. Here, we use a zebrafish strain lacking definitive hematopoiesis for interspecific analysis of hematopoietic cell development. Without conditioning prior to transplantation, hematopoietic progenitor cells from goldfish stably engraft in adult zebrafish homozygous for the c-myb(I181N) mutation. However, in competitive repopulation experiments, zebrafish hematopoietic cells exhibit an advantage over their goldfish counterparts, possibly owing to subtle species-specific functional differences in hematopoietic microenvironments resulting from over 100 million years of independent evolution. Thus, our unique animal model provides an unprecedented opportunity to genetically and functionally disentangle universal and species-specific contributions of the microenvironment to hematopoietic progenitor cell maintenance and development. PMID:26777855

  3. Fibrillin-1 microfibrils influence adult bone marrow hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Silvia; Bigarella, Carolina L; Del Solar, Maria; Ghaffari, Saghi; Ramirez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that fibrillin-1 assemblies regulate the fate of skeletal stem cells (aka, mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs]) by modulating TGFβ activity within the microenvironment of adult bone marrow niches. Since MSCs can also influence hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) activities, here we investigated adult hematopoiesis in mice with Cre-mediated inactivation of the fibrillin-1 (Fbn1) gene in the mesenchyme of the forming limbs (Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice). Analyses of 3-month-old Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice revealed a statistically significant increase of circulating red blood cells, which a differentiation assay correlated with augmented erythropoiesis. This finding, together with evidence of fibrillin-1 deposition in erythroblastic niches, supported the notion that this extracellular matrix protein normally restricts differentiation of erythroid progenitors. Whereas flow cytometry measurements identified a decreased HSC frequency in mutant relative to wild type mice, no appreciable differences were noted with regard to the relative abundance and differentiation potential of myeloid progenitor cells. Together these findings implied that fibrillin-1 normally promotes HSC expansion but does not influence cell lineage commitment. Since local TGFβ hyperactivity has been associated with abnormal osteogenesis in Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice, 1-month-old mutant and wild type animals were systemically treated for 8weeks with either a pan-TGF-β-neutralizing antibody or an antibody of the same IgG1 isotype. The distinct outcomes of these pharmacological interventions strongly suggest that fibrillin-1 differentially modulates TGFβ activity in HSC vs. erythroid niches.

  4. The Epigenetic Regulator CXXC Finger Protein 1 is Essential for Murine Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Dobrota, Erika; Tate, Courtney; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Khan, Shehnaz; Haneline, Laura; HogenEsch, Harm; Skalnik, David G.

    2014-01-01

    CXXC finger protein 1 (Cfp1), encoded by the Cxxc1 gene, binds to DNA sequences containing an unmethylated CpG dinucleotide and is an epigenetic regulator of both cytosine and histone methylation. Cxxc1-null mouse embryos fail to gastrulate, and Cxxc1-null embryonic stem cells are viable but cannot differentiate, suggesting that Cfp1 is required for chromatin remodeling associated with stem cell differentiation and embryogenesis. Mice homozygous for a conditional Cxxc1 deletion allele and carrying the inducible Mx1-Cre transgene were generated to assess Cfp1 function in adult animals. Induction of Cre expression in adult animals led to Cfp1 depletion in hematopoietic cells, a failure of hematopoiesis with a nearly complete loss of lineage-committed progenitors and mature cells, elevated levels of apoptosis, and death within two weeks. A similar pathology resulted following transplantation of conditional Cxxc1 bone marrow cells into wild type recipients, demonstrating this phenotype is intrinsic to Cfp1 function within bone marrow cells. Remarkably, the Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+ population of cells in the bone marrow, which is enriched for hematopoietic stem cells and multi-potential progenitor cells, persists and expands in the absence of Cfp1 during this time frame. Thus, Cfp1 is necessary for hematopoietic stem and multi-potential progenitor cell function and for the developmental potential of differentiating hematopoietic cells. PMID:25470594

  5. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Are the Major Source of Multilineage Hematopoiesis in Adult Animals.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Catherine M; Babovic, Sonja; Upadhaya, Samik; Knapp, David J H F; Lavin, Yonit; Lau, Colleen M; Goloborodko, Anton; Feng, Jue; Fujisaki, Joji; Ding, Lei; Mirny, Leonid A; Merad, Miriam; Eaves, Connie J; Reizis, Boris

    2016-09-20

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sustain long-term reconstitution of hematopoiesis in transplantation recipients, yet their role in the endogenous steady-state hematopoiesis remains unclear. In particular, recent studies suggested that HSCs provide a relatively minor contribution to immune cell development in adults. We directed transgene expression in a fraction of HSCs that maintained reconstituting activity during serial transplantations. Inducible genetic labeling showed that transgene-expressing HSCs gave rise to other phenotypic HSCs, confirming their top position in the differentiation hierarchy. The labeled HSCs rapidly contributed to committed progenitors of all lineages and to mature myeloid cells and lymphocytes, but not to B-1a cells or tissue macrophages. Importantly, labeled HSCs gave rise to more than two-thirds of all myeloid cells and platelets in adult mice, and this contribution could be accelerated by an induced interferon response. Thus, classically defined HSCs maintain immune cell development in the steady state and during systemic cytokine responses. PMID:27590115

  6. Aurora kinase A is required for hematopoiesis but is dispensable for murine megakaryocyte endomitosis and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Goldenson, Benjamin; Kirsammer, Gina; Stankiewicz, Monika J.; Wen, Qiang Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is a therapeutic target in acute megakaryocytic leukemia. However, its requirement in normal hematopoiesis and megakaryocyte development has not been extensively characterized. Based on its role as a cell cycle regulator, we predicted that an Aurka deficiency would lead to severe abnormalities in all hematopoietic lineages. Here we reveal that loss of Aurka in hematopoietic cells causes profound cell autonomous defects in the peripheral blood and bone marrow. Surprisingly, in contrast to the survival defects of nearly all hematopoietic lineages, deletion of Aurka was associated with increased differentiation and polyploidization of megakaryocytes both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, in contrast to other cell types examined, megakaryocytes continued DNA synthesis after loss of Aurka. Thus, like other cell cycle regulators such as Aurkb and survivin, Aurka is required for hematopoiesis, but is dispensable for megakaryocyte endomitosis. Our work supports a growing body of evidence that the megakaryocyte endomitotic cell cycle differs significantly from the proliferative cell cycle. PMID:25670627

  7. Arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 is essential for sustaining normal adult hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fan; Cheng, Guoyan; Hamard, Pierre-Jacques; Greenblatt, Sarah; Wang, Lan; Man, Na; Perna, Fabiana; Xu, Haiming; Tadi, Madhavi; Luciani, Luisa; Nimer, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic regulators play critical roles in normal hematopoiesis, and the activity of these enzymes is frequently altered in hematopoietic cancers. The major type II protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 catalyzes the formation of symmetric dimethyl arginine and has been implicated in various cellular processes, including pluripotency and tumorigenesis. Here, we generated Prmt5 conditional KO mice to evaluate the contribution of PRMT5 to adult hematopoiesis. Loss of PRMT5 triggered an initial but transient expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs); however, Prmt5 deletion resulted in a concurrent loss of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), leading to fatal BM aplasia. PRMT5-specific effects on hematopoiesis were cell intrinsic and depended on PRMT5 methyltransferase activity. We found that PRMT5-deficient hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells exhibited severely impaired cytokine signaling as well as upregulation of p53 and expression of its downstream targets. Together, our results demonstrate that PRMT5 plays distinct roles in the behavior of HSCs compared with HPCs and is essential for the maintenance of adult hematopoietic cells. PMID:26258414

  8. RCAD/Ufl1, a Ufm1 E3 ligase, is essential for hematopoietic stem cell function and murine hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Zhu, X; Zhang, Y; Cai, Y; Chen, J; Sivaprakasam, S; Gurav, A; Pi, W; Makala, L; Wu, J; Pace, B; Tuan-Lo, D; Ganapathy, V; Singh, N; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    The Ufm1 conjugation system is a novel ubiquitin-like modification system, consisting of Ufm1, Uba5 (E1), Ufc1 (E2) and poorly characterized E3 ligase(s). RCAD/Ufl1 (also known as KIAA0776, NLBP and Maxer) was reported to function as a Ufm1 E3 ligase in ufmylation (Ufm1-mediated conjugation) of DDRGK1 and ASC1 proteins. It has also been implicated in estrogen receptor signaling, unfolded protein response (UPR) and neurodegeneration, yet its physiological function remains completely unknown. In this study, we report that RCAD/Ufl1 is essential for embryonic development, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) survival and erythroid differentiation. Both germ-line and somatic deletion of RCAD/Ufl1 impaired hematopoietic development, resulting in severe anemia, cytopenia and ultimately animal death. Depletion of RCAD/Ufl1 caused elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress and evoked UPR in bone marrow cells. In addition, loss of RCAD/Ufl1 blocked autophagic degradation, increased mitochondrial mass and reactive oxygen species, and led to DNA damage response, p53 activation and enhanced cell death of HSCs. Collectively, our study provides the first genetic evidence for the indispensable role of RCAD/Ufl1 in murine hematopoiesis and development. The finding of RCAD/Ufl1 as a key regulator of cellular stress response sheds a light into the role of a novel protein network including RCAD/Ufl1 and its associated proteins in regulating cellular homeostasis. PMID:25952549

  9. Early hematopoiesis and macrophage development.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Kathleen E; Frame, Jenna M; Palis, James

    2015-12-01

    The paradigm that all blood cells are derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has been challenged by two findings. First, there are tissue-resident hematopoietic cells, including subsets of macrophages that are not replenished by adult HSCs, but instead are maintained by self-renewal of fetal-derived cells. Second, during embryogenesis, there is a conserved program of HSC-independent hematopoiesis that precedes HSC function and is required for embryonic survival. The presence of waves of HSC-independent hematopoiesis as well as fetal HSCs raises questions about the origin of fetal-derived adult tissue-resident macrophages. In the murine embryo, historical examination of embryonic macrophage and monocyte populations combined with recent reports utilizing genetic lineage-tracing approaches has led to a model of macrophage ontogeny that can be integrated with existing models of hematopoietic ontogeny. The first wave of hematopoiesis contains primitive erythroid, megakaryocyte and macrophage progenitors that arise in the yolk sac, and these macrophage progenitors are the source of early macrophages throughout the embryo, including the liver. A second wave of multipotential erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) also arises in the yolk sac. EMPs colonize the fetal liver, initiating myelopoiesis and forming macrophages. Lineage tracing indicates that this second wave of macrophages are distributed in most fetal tissues, although not appreciably in the brain. Thus, fetal-derived adult tissue-resident macrophages, other than microglia, appear to predominately derive from EMPs. While HSCs emerge at midgestation and colonize the fetal liver, the relative contribution of fetal HSCs to tissue macrophages at later stages of development is unclear. The inclusion of macrophage potential in multiple waves of hematopoiesis is consistent with reports of their functional roles throughout development in innate immunity, phagocytosis, and tissue morphogenesis and remodeling

  10. Perivascular deletion of murine Rac reverses the ratio of marrow arterioles and sinusoid vessels and alters hematopoiesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ciuculescu, Marioara F; Park, Shin-Young; Canty, Kimberly; Mathieu, Ronald; Silberstein, Leslie E; Williams, David A

    2015-05-14

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are localized within specialized microenvironments throughout the BM. Nestin-expressing (Nestin(+)) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are important in the perivascular space. Rac is critical for MSC cell shape in vitro, whereas its function in MSCs in vivo remains poorly characterized. We hypothesized that deletion of Rac in the Nestin(+) cells would perturb the perivascular space, altering HSC localization and hematopoiesis. Nestin-Cre-directed excision of Rac1 in Rac3(-/-) mice reduces Nestin(+) cells in the marrow. We observed a 2.7-fold decrease in homing of labeled wild-type hematopoietic cells into Rac1(Δ/Δ)Rac3(-/-) mice compared with control mice. Rac1(Δ/Δ)Rac3(-/-) mice demonstrated a marked decrease in arterioles and an increase in the number and volume of venous sinusoids in the marrow that was associated with a reduction in the numbers of immunophenotypically and functionally-defined long-term HSCs in the marrow, a decrease in colony-forming cells and a reduction in circulating progenitors. Rac-deleted animals demonstrated a significant increase in trabecular bone. These data demonstrate that Rac GTPases play an important role in the integrity of perivascular space. Increased trabecular bone and sinusoidal space and decreased arteriolar volume in this model were associated with decreased HSC, underscoring the complexity of regulation of hematopoiesis in the perivascular space.

  11. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    PubMed

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  12. RUNX1B Expression Is Highly Heterogeneous and Distinguishes Megakaryocytic and Erythroid Lineage Fate in Adult Mouse Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Julia E.; Sroczynska, Patrycja; Tsoulaki, Olga; Leong, Hui Sun; Fadlullah, Muhammad Z. H.; Miller, Crispin; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-01-01

    The Core Binding Factor (CBF) protein RUNX1 is a master regulator of definitive hematopoiesis, crucial for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) emergence during ontogeny. RUNX1 also plays vital roles in adult mice, in regulating the correct specification of numerous blood lineages. Akin to the other mammalian Runx genes, Runx1 has two promoters P1 (distal) and P2 (proximal) which generate distinct protein isoforms. The activities and specific relevance of these two promoters in adult hematopoiesis remain to be fully elucidated. Utilizing a dual reporter mouse model we demonstrate that the distal P1 promoter is broadly active in adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) populations. By contrast the activity of the proximal P2 promoter is more restricted and its upregulation, in both the immature Lineage- Sca1high cKithigh (LSK) and bipotential Pre-Megakaryocytic/Erythroid Progenitor (PreMegE) populations, coincides with a loss of erythroid (Ery) specification. Accordingly the PreMegE population can be prospectively separated into “pro-erythroid” and “pro-megakaryocyte” populations based on Runx1 P2 activity. Comparative gene expression analyses between Runx1 P2+ and P2- populations indicated that levels of CD34 expression could substitute for P2 activity to distinguish these two cell populations in wild type (WT) bone marrow (BM). Prospective isolation of these two populations will enable the further investigation of molecular mechanisms involved in megakaryocytic/erythroid (Mk/Ery) cell fate decisions. Having characterized the extensive activity of P1, we utilized a P1-GFP homozygous mouse model to analyze the impact of the complete absence of Runx1 P1 expression in adult mice and observed strong defects in the T cell lineage. Finally, we investigated how the leukemic fusion protein AML1-ETO9a might influence Runx1 promoter usage. Short-term AML1-ETO9a induction in BM resulted in preferential P2 upregulation, suggesting its expression may be important to

  13. Role of Polycomb RYBP in Maintaining the B-1-to-B-2 B-Cell Lineage Switch in Adult Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Calés, Carmela; Pavón, Leticia; Starowicz, Katarzyna; Pérez, Claudia; Bravo, Mónica; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Koseki, Haruhiko; Vidal, Miguel

    2015-12-28

    Polycomb chromatin modifiers regulate hematopoietic pluripotent stem and progenitor cell self-renewal and expansion. Polycomb complex redundancy and biochemical heterogeneity complicate the unraveling of the functional contributions of distinct components. We have studied the hematopoietic activity of RYBP, a direct interactor and proposed modulator of RING1A/RING1B-dependent histone H2A monoubiquitylation (H2AUb). Using a mouse model to conditionally inactivate Rybp in adult hematopoiesis, we have found that RYBP deletion results in a reversion of B-1-to-B-2 B-cell progenitor ratios, i.e., of the innate (predominantly fetal) to acquired (mostly adult) immunity precursors. Increased numbers of B-1 progenitors correlated with a loss of pre-proB cells, the B-2 progenitors. RYBP-deficient stem and progenitor cell populations (LKS) and isolated common lymphoid progenitors (CLP) gave rise to increased numbers of B-1 progenitors in vitro. Rybp inactivation, however, did not result in changes of global H2AUb and did not interact genetically with Ring1A or Ring1B deletions. These results show that a sustained regulation of the B-1-to-B-2 switch is needed throughout adult life and that RYBP plays an important role in keeping B-2 dominance, most likely independently of its Polycomb affiliation.

  14. Role of Polycomb RYBP in Maintaining the B-1-to-B-2 B-Cell Lineage Switch in Adult Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Pavón, Leticia; Starowicz, Katarzyna; Pérez, Claudia; Bravo, Mónica; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Koseki, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb chromatin modifiers regulate hematopoietic pluripotent stem and progenitor cell self-renewal and expansion. Polycomb complex redundancy and biochemical heterogeneity complicate the unraveling of the functional contributions of distinct components. We have studied the hematopoietic activity of RYBP, a direct interactor and proposed modulator of RING1A/RING1B-dependent histone H2A monoubiquitylation (H2AUb). Using a mouse model to conditionally inactivate Rybp in adult hematopoiesis, we have found that RYBP deletion results in a reversion of B-1-to-B-2 B-cell progenitor ratios, i.e., of the innate (predominantly fetal) to acquired (mostly adult) immunity precursors. Increased numbers of B-1 progenitors correlated with a loss of pre-proB cells, the B-2 progenitors. RYBP-deficient stem and progenitor cell populations (LKS) and isolated common lymphoid progenitors (CLP) gave rise to increased numbers of B-1 progenitors in vitro. Rybp inactivation, however, did not result in changes of global H2AUb and did not interact genetically with Ring1A or Ring1B deletions. These results show that a sustained regulation of the B-1-to-B-2 switch is needed throughout adult life and that RYBP plays an important role in keeping B-2 dominance, most likely independently of its Polycomb affiliation. PMID:26711264

  15. From transplantation to transgenics: mouse models of developmental hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christopher E; Lizama, Carlos O; Zovein, Ann C

    2014-08-01

    The mouse is integral to our understanding of hematopoietic biology. Serving as a mammalian model system, the mouse has allowed for the discovery of self-renewing multipotent stem cells, provided functional assays to establish hematopoietic stem cell identity and function, and has become a tool for understanding the differentiation capacity of early hematopoietic progenitors. The advent of genetic technology has strengthened the use of mouse models for identifying critical pathways in hematopoiesis. Full genetic knockout models, tissue-specific gene deletion, and genetic overexpression models create a system for the dissection and identification of critical cellular and genetic processes underlying hematopoiesis. However, the murine model has also introduced perplexity in understanding developmental hematopoiesis. Requisite in utero development paired with circulation has historically made defining sites of origin and expansion in the murine hematopoietic system challenging. However, the genetic accessibility of the mouse as a mammalian system has identified key regulators of hematopoietic development. Technological advances continue to generate extremely powerful tools that when translated to the murine system provide refined in vivo spatial and temporal control of genetic deletion or overexpression. Future advancements may add the ability of reversible genetic manipulation. In this review, we describe the major contributions of the murine model to our understanding of hematopoiesis.

  16. Hematopoiesis in snakes (Ophidia).

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, Z; Tabarowski, Z; Sano-Martins, I S; Spadacci-Morena, D D; Witkowska-Pelc, E; Krzysztofowicz, E; Spodaryk, K

    2002-01-01

    Locations of the hematopoietic tissue have been described in the following ophidian species: Bothrops jararaca, Bothrops jararacusu, Waglerophis merremii, Elaphe teniura teniura, Boa constrictor, and Python reticulatus. Studies were carried out on perfusion fixed vertebrae, ribs, spleen, liver, thymus, and kidney. Routine histological technique was applied using both light and electron microscopy. Hematopoietic tissue was found in the following locations of the vertebrae: neural spine, neural arch, postzygophysis processes, hypapophysis, vertebral centre. Moreover, intense hematopoiesis was found inside the ribs. In the spleen and thymus, only lymphopoiesis was found. Hematopoietic islets in the spleen were sporadically found only in young specimens. No hematopoiesis was observed in the liver and kidney. In the studied species, there were no differences in the location of hematopoietic tissue. A new model of mature and immature blood cell release to the lumen of marrow sinuses different from that known to operate in higher vertebrates is proposed.

  17. Inhibition of Thrombopoietin/Mpl Signaling in Adult Hematopoiesis Identifies New Candidates for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Adrian; Kamp, Christel; Brugman, Martijn H.; Breuer, Daniel C.; Büsche, Guntram; Baum, Christopher; Modlich, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (Thpo) signals via its receptor Mpl and regulates megakaryopoiesis, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) maintenance and post-transplant expansion. Mpl expression is tightly controlled and deregulation of Thpo/Mpl-signaling is linked to hematological disorders. Here, we constructed an intracellular-truncated, signaling-deficient Mpl protein which is presented on the cell surface (dnMpl). The transplantation of bone marrow cells retrovirally transduced to express dnMpl into wildtype mice induced thrombocytopenia, and a progressive loss of HSC. The aplastic BM allowed the engraftment of a second BM transplant without further conditioning. Functional analysis of the truncated Mpl in vitro and in vivo demonstrated no internalization after Thpo binding and the inhibition of Thpo/Mpl-signaling in wildtype cells due to dominant-negative (dn) effects by receptor competition with wildtype Mpl for Thpo binding. Intracellular inhibition of Mpl could be excluded as the major mechanism by the use of a constitutive-dimerized dnMpl. To further elucidate the molecular changes induced by Thpo/Mpl-inhibition on the HSC-enriched cell population in the BM, we performed gene expression analysis of Lin-Sca1+cKit+ (LSK) cells isolated from mice transplanted with dnMpl transduced BM cells. The gene expression profile supported the exhaustion of HSC due to increased cell cycle progression and identified new and known downstream effectors of Thpo/Mpl-signaling in HSC (namely TIE2, ESAM1 and EPCR detected on the HSC-enriched LSK cell population). We further compared gene expression profiles in LSK cells of dnMpl mice with human CD34+ cells of aplastic anemia patients and identified similar deregulations of important stemness genes in both cell populations. In summary, we established a novel way of Thpo/Mpl inhibition in the adult mouse and performed in depth analysis of the phenotype including gene expression profiling. PMID:26147434

  18. Mapping hematopoiesis in a fully regenerative vertebrate: the axolotl.

    PubMed

    Lopez, David; Lin, Li; Monaghan, James R; Cogle, Christopher R; Bova, Frank J; Maden, Malcolm; Scott, Edward W

    2014-08-21

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-derived cells are involved in wound healing responses throughout the body. Unfortunately for mammals, wound repair typically results in scarring and nonfunctional reparation. Among vertebrates, none display such an extensive ability for adult regeneration as urodele amphibians, including 1 of the more popular models: the axolotl. However, a lack of knowledge of axolotl hematopoiesis hinders the use of this animal for the study of hematopoietic cells in scar-free wound healing and tissue regeneration. We used white and cytomegalovirus:green fluorescent protein(+) transgenic white axolotl strains to map sites of hematopoiesis and develop hematopoietic cell transplant methodology. We also established a fluorescence-activated cell sorter enrichment technique for major blood lineages and colony-forming unit assays for hematopoietic progenitors. The liver and spleen are both active sites of hematopoiesis in adult axolotls and contain transplantable HSCs capable of long-term multilineage blood reconstitution. As in zebrafish, use of the white axolotl mutant allows direct visualization of homing, engraftment, and hematopoiesis in real time. Donor-derived hematopoiesis occurred for >2 years in recipients generating stable hematopoietic chimeras. Organ segregation, made possible by embryonic microsurgeries wherein halves of 2 differently colored embryos were joined, indicate that the spleen is the definitive site of adult hematopoiesis.

  19. Mapping hematopoiesis in a fully regenerative vertebrate: the axolotl.

    PubMed

    Lopez, David; Lin, Li; Monaghan, James R; Cogle, Christopher R; Bova, Frank J; Maden, Malcolm; Scott, Edward W

    2014-08-21

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-derived cells are involved in wound healing responses throughout the body. Unfortunately for mammals, wound repair typically results in scarring and nonfunctional reparation. Among vertebrates, none display such an extensive ability for adult regeneration as urodele amphibians, including 1 of the more popular models: the axolotl. However, a lack of knowledge of axolotl hematopoiesis hinders the use of this animal for the study of hematopoietic cells in scar-free wound healing and tissue regeneration. We used white and cytomegalovirus:green fluorescent protein(+) transgenic white axolotl strains to map sites of hematopoiesis and develop hematopoietic cell transplant methodology. We also established a fluorescence-activated cell sorter enrichment technique for major blood lineages and colony-forming unit assays for hematopoietic progenitors. The liver and spleen are both active sites of hematopoiesis in adult axolotls and contain transplantable HSCs capable of long-term multilineage blood reconstitution. As in zebrafish, use of the white axolotl mutant allows direct visualization of homing, engraftment, and hematopoiesis in real time. Donor-derived hematopoiesis occurred for >2 years in recipients generating stable hematopoietic chimeras. Organ segregation, made possible by embryonic microsurgeries wherein halves of 2 differently colored embryos were joined, indicate that the spleen is the definitive site of adult hematopoiesis. PMID:24802774

  20. Differential expression of murine adult hemoglobins in early ontogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzyniak, C.J.; Lewis, S.E.; Popp, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A hemoglobin mutation is described that permits study of the expression of the two adult ..beta..-globin genes throughout fetal and postnatal development. Mice with a mutation at the Hbb/sup s/, ..beta..-globin locus, were used to study the relative levels of ..beta..-s2major and ..beta..-sminor globins specified by the mutant Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype during development. At 11.5 days of gestation ..beta..-sminor comprised over 80% and ..beta..-s2major under 20% of the adult beta-globin. The relative level of ..beta..-sminor decreased through fetal development; at birth ..beta..-sminor represented 33.7% of the ..beta..-globin. The adult values of 71.0% ..beta..-s2major and 29.0% ..beta..-sminor globin are expressed in mice six days after birth. Because the two ..beta..-globin genes are expressed in mice of the Hbb/sup 2s/ haplotype, both the ..beta..-smajor and ..beta..-sminor genes must be expressed in mice of the Hbb/sup s/ haplotype. Expression of the ..beta..-sminor gene is elevated to 35.6% in Hbb/sup s2/ mice that have been bled repeatedly. Thus, the 5' ..beta..-s2major and 3' ..beta..-sminor genes of the Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype and, presumably the 5' ..beta..-smajor and 3' ..beta..-sminor genes of the Hbb/sup s/ haplotype, are regulated independently and are homologous to the 5' ..beta..-dmajor and 3' ..beta..-dminor genes of the Hbb/sup d/ haplotype. Mice of the Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype are better than mice of the Hbb/sup d/ haplotytpe for studying the mechanisms of hemoglobin switching because the Hbb/sup s2/ each of the three embryonic and two adult hemoglobins can be separated by electrophoresis. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  1. In vitro human embryonic stem cell hematopoiesis mimics MYB-independent yolk sac hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Vanhee, Stijn; De Mulder, Katrien; Van Caeneghem, Yasmine; Verstichel, Greet; Van Roy, Nadine; Menten, Björn; Velghe, Imke; Philippé, Jan; De Bleser, Dominique; Lambrecht, Bart N; Taghon, Tom; Leclercq, Georges; Kerre, Tessa; Vandekerckhove, Bart

    2015-02-01

    Although hematopoietic precursor activity can be generated in vitro from human embryonic stem cells, there is no solid evidence for the appearance of multipotent, self-renewing and transplantable hematopoietic stem cells. This could be due to short half-life of hematopoietic stem cells in culture or, alternatively, human embryonic stem cell-initiated hematopoiesis may be hematopoietic stem cell-independent, similar to yolk sac hematopoiesis, generating multipotent progenitors with limited expansion capacity. Since a MYB was reported to be an excellent marker for hematopoietic stem cell-dependent hematopoiesis, we generated a MYB-eGFP reporter human embryonic stem cell line to study formation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro. We found CD34(+) hemogenic endothelial cells rounding up and developing into CD43(+) hematopoietic cells without expression of MYB-eGFP. MYB-eGFP(+) cells appeared relatively late in embryoid body cultures as CD34(+)CD43(+)CD45(-/lo) cells. These MYB-eGFP(+) cells were CD33 positive, proliferated in IL-3 containing media and hematopoietic differentiation was restricted to the granulocytic lineage. In agreement with data obtained on murine Myb(-/-) embryonic stem cells, bright eGFP expression was observed in a subpopulation of cells, during directed myeloid differentiation, which again belonged to the granulocytic lineage. In contrast, CD14(+) macrophage cells were consistently eGFP(-) and were derived from eGFP-precursors only. In summary, no evidence was obtained for in vitro generation of MYB(+) hematopoietic stem cells during embryoid body cultures. The observed MYB expression appeared late in culture and was confined to the granulocytic lineage.

  2. Developmental hematopoiesis: ontogeny, genetic programming and conservation.

    PubMed

    Ciau-Uitz, Aldo; Monteiro, Rui; Kirmizitas, Arif; Patient, Roger

    2014-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sustain blood production throughout life and are of pivotal importance in regenerative medicine. Although HSC generation from pluripotent stem cells would resolve their shortage for clinical applications, this has not yet been achieved mainly because of the poor mechanistic understanding of their programming. Bone marrow HSCs are first created during embryogenesis in the dorsal aorta (DA) of the midgestation conceptus, from where they migrate to the fetal liver and, eventually, the bone marrow. It is currently accepted that HSCs emerge from specialized endothelium, the hemogenic endothelium, localized in the ventral wall of the DA through an evolutionarily conserved process called the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition. However, the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition represents one of the last steps in HSC creation, and an understanding of earlier events in the specification of their progenitors is required if we are to create them from naïve pluripotent cells. Because of their ready availability and external development, zebrafish and Xenopus embryos have enormously facilitated our understanding of the early developmental processes leading to the programming of HSCs from nascent lateral plate mesoderm to hemogenic endothelium in the DA. The amenity of the Xenopus model to lineage tracing experiments has also contributed to the establishment of the distinct origins of embryonic (yolk sac) and adult (HSC) hematopoiesis, whereas the transparency of the zebrafish has allowed in vivo imaging of developing blood cells, particularly during and after the emergence of HSCs in the DA. Here, we discuss the key contributions of these model organisms to our understanding of developmental hematopoiesis.

  3. Unperturbed vs. post-transplantation hematopoiesis: both in vivo but different

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Katrin; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation has yielded tremendous information on experimental properties of HSCs. Yet, it remains unclear whether transplantation reflects the physiology of hematopoiesis. A limitation is the difficulty in accessing HSC functions without isolation, in-vitro manipulation and readout for potential. New genetic fate mapping and clonal marking techniques now shed light on hematopoiesis under physiological conditions. Recent findings Transposon-based genetic marks were introduced across the entire hematopoietic system to follow the clonal dynamics of these tags over time. A polyclonal source downstream from stem cells was found responsible for the production of at least granulocytes. In independent experiments, HSCs were genetically marked in adult mice, and the kinetics of label emergence throughout the system was followed over time. These experiments uncovered that during physiological steady-state hematopoiesis large numbers of HSCs yield differentiated progeny. Individual HSCs were active only rarely, indicating their very slow periodicity of differentiation rather than quiescence. Summary Noninvasive genetic experiments in mice have identified a major role of stem and progenitor cells downstream from HSCs as drivers of adult hematopoiesis, and revealed that post-transplantation hematopoiesis differs quantitatively from normal steady-state hematopoiesis. PMID:27213498

  4. Crustacean hematopoiesis and the astakine cytokines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xionghui; Söderhäll, Irene

    2011-06-16

    Major contributions to research in hematopoiesis in invertebrate animals have come from studies in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the freshwater crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus. These animals lack oxygen-carrying erythrocytes and blood cells of the lymphoid lineage, which participate in adaptive immune defense, thus making them suitable model animals to study the regulation of blood cells of the innate immune system. This review presents an overview of crustacean blood cell formation, the role of these cells in innate immunity, and how their synthesis is regulated by the astakine cytokines. Astakines are among the first invertebrate cytokines shown to be involved in hematopoiesis, and they can stimulate the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of hematopoietic tissue cells. The astakines and their vertebrate homologues, prokineticins, share similar functions in hematopoiesis; thus, studies of astakine-induced hematopoiesis in crustaceans may not only advance our understanding of the regulation of invertebrate hematopoiesis but may also provide new evolutionary perspectives about this process.

  5. Assessment of DNA synthesis in Islet-1{sup +} cells in the adult murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Florian Mehrkens, Dennis Starbatty, Jutta Nicol, Philipp Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Islet-1 was expressed in the adult heart. • Islet-1-positive cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. • Sinoatrial node cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. - Abstract: Rationale: Islet-1 positive (Islet-1{sup +}) cardiac progenitor cells give rise to the right ventricle, atria and outflow tract during murine cardiac development. In the adult heart Islet-1 expression is limited to parasympathetic neurons, few cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, within the proximal aorta and pulmonary artery and sinoatrial node cells. Its role in these cells is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that Islet-1{sup +} cells retain proliferative activity and may therefore play a role in regenerating specialized regions in the heart. Methods and results: DNA synthesis was analyzed by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine ({sup 3}H-thymidine) in Isl-1-nLacZ mice, a transgenic model with an insertion of a nuclear beta-galactosidase in the Islet-1 locus. Mice received daily injections of {sup 3}H-thymidine for 5 days. DNA synthesis was visualized throughout the heart by dipping autoradiography of cryosections. Colocalization of an nLacZ-signal and silver grains would indicate DNA synthesis in Islet-1{sup +} cells. Whereas Islet{sup −} non-myocyte nuclei were regularly marked by accumulation of silver grains, colocalization with nLacZ-signals was not detected in >25,000 cells analyzed. Conclusions: Islet-1{sup +} cells are quiescent in the adult heart, suggesting that, under normal conditions, even pacemaking cells do not proliferate at higher rates than normal cardiac myocytes.

  6. Partial Characterization of the Sox2+ Cell Population in an Adult Murine Model of Digit Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vineet; Siu, Bernard F.; Chao, Hsu; Hirschi, Karen K.; Raborn, Eric; Johnson, Scott A.; Tottey, Stephen; Hurley, Katherine B.; Medberry, Chris J.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue regeneration in response to injury in adult mammals is generally limited to select tissues. Nonmammalian species such as newts and axolotls undergo regeneration of complex tissues such as limbs and digits via recruitment and accumulation of local and circulating multipotent progenitors preprogrammed to recapitulate the missing tissue. Directed recruitment and activation of progenitor cells at a site of injury in adult mammals may alter the default wound-healing response from scar tissue toward regeneration. Bioactive molecules derived from proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been shown to recruit a variety of progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo to the site of injury. The present study further characterized the population of cells accumulating at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products in a well-established model of murine digit amputation. After a mid-second phalanx digit amputation in 6–8-week-old adult mice, treatment with ECM degradation products resulted in the accumulation of a heterogeneous population of cells, a subset of which expressed the transcription factor Sox2, a marker of pluripotent and adult progenitor cells. Sox2+ cells were localized lateral to the amputated P2 bone and coexpressed progenitor cell markers CD90 and Sca1. Transgenic Sox2 eGFP/+ and bone marrow chimeric mice showed that the bone marrow and blood circulation did not contribute to the Sox2+ cell population. The present study showed that, in addition to circulating progenitor cells, resident tissue-derived cells also populate at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products. Although future work is necessary to determine the contribution of Sox2+ cells to functional tissue at the site of injury, recruitment and/or activation of local tissue-derived cells may be a viable approach to tissue engineering of more complex tissues in adult mammals. PMID:22530556

  7. Label-Retaining Cells in the Adult Murine Salivary Glands Possess Characteristics of Adult Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chibly, Alejandro M.; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction. PMID:25238060

  8. Label-retaining cells in the adult murine salivary glands possess characteristics of adult progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chibly, Alejandro M; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction.

  9. Long noncoding RNAs in hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Hu, Wenqian

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian development is under tight control to ensure precise gene expression. Recent studies reveal a new layer of regulation of gene expression mediated by long noncoding RNAs. These transcripts are longer than 200nt that do not have functional protein coding capacity. Interestingly, many of these long noncoding RNAs are expressed with high specificity in different types of cells, tissues, and developmental stages in mammals, suggesting that they may have functional roles in diverse biological processes. Here, we summarize recent findings of long noncoding RNAs in hematopoiesis, which is one of the best-characterized mammalian cell differentiation processes. Then we provide our own perspectives on future studies of long noncoding RNAs in this field. PMID:27508063

  10. Identification and enrichment of colony-forming cells from the adult murine pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Lepore, D.A.; Roeszler, K.; Wagner, J.; Ross, S.A.; Bauer, K.; Thomas, P.Q. , E-Mail: paul.thomas@mcri.edu.au

    2005-08-01

    Stem and progenitor cells have been identified in many adult tissues including bone marrow, the central nervous system, and skin. While there is direct evidence to indicate the activity of a progenitor cell population in the pituitary gland, this putative subpopulation has not yet been identified. Herein we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel clonogenic cell type in the adult murine pituitary, which we have termed Pituitary Colony-Forming Cells (PCFCs). PCFCs constitute 0.2% of pituitary cells, and generate heterogeneous colonies from single cells. PCFCs exhibit variable proliferative potential, and may exceed 11 population doublings in 14 days. Enrichment of PCFCs to 61.5-fold with 100% recovery can be obtained through the active uptake of the fluorescent dipeptide, {beta}-Ala-Lys-N{epsilon}-AMCA. PCFCs are mostly contained within the large, agranular subpopulation of AMCA{sup +} cells, and constitute 28% of this fraction, corresponding to 140.5-fold enrichment. Interestingly, the AMCA{sup +} population contains rare cells that are GH{sup +} or PRL{sup +}. GH{sup +} cells were also identified in PCFC single cell colonies, suggesting that PCFCs have the potential to differentiate into GH{sup +} cells. Together, these data show that the pituitary contains a rare clonogenic population which may correspond to the somatotrope/lactotrope progenitors suggested by previous experiments.

  11. Alternatively activated macrophages determine repair of the infarcted adult murine heart

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Manabu; Shintani, Yasunori; Shintani, Yusuke; Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo; Yashiro, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Alternatively activated (also known as M2) macrophages are involved in the repair of various types of organs. However, the contribution of M2 macrophages to cardiac repair after myocardial infarction (MI) remains to be fully characterized. Here, we identified CD206+F4/80+CD11b+ M2-like macrophages in the murine heart and demonstrated that this cell population predominantly increases in the infarct area and exhibits strengthened reparative abilities after MI. We evaluated mice lacking the kinase TRIB1 (Trib1–/–), which exhibit a selective depletion of M2 macrophages after MI. Compared with control animals, Trib1–/– mice had a catastrophic prognosis, with frequent cardiac rupture, as the result of markedly reduced collagen fibril formation in the infarct area due to impaired fibroblast activation. The decreased tissue repair observed in Trib1–/– mice was entirely rescued by an external supply of M2-like macrophages. Furthermore, IL-1α and osteopontin were suggested to be mediators of M2-like macrophage–induced fibroblast activation. In addition, IL-4 administration achieved a targeted increase in the number of M2-like macrophages and enhanced the post-MI prognosis of WT mice, corresponding with amplified fibroblast activation and formation of more supportive fibrous tissues in the infarcts. Together, these data demonstrate that M2-like macrophages critically determine the repair of infarcted adult murine heart by regulating fibroblast activation and suggest that IL-4 is a potential biological drug for treating MI. PMID:27140396

  12. Hematopoiesis and hematopoietic organs in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Grigorian, Melina; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-03-01

    Hemocytes (blood cells) are motile cells that move throughout the extracellular space and that exist in all clades of the animal kingdom. Hemocytes play an important role in shaping the extracellular environment and in the immune response. Developmentally, hemocytes are closely related to the epithelial cells lining the vascular system (endothelia) and the body cavity (mesothelia). In vertebrates and insects, common progenitors, called hemangioblasts, give rise to the endothelia and blood cells. In the adult animal, many differentiated hemocytes seem to retain the ability to proliferate; however, in most cases investigated closely, the bulk of hemocyte proliferation takes place in specialized hematopoietic organs. Hematopoietic organs provide an environment where undifferentiated blood stem cells are able to self-renew, and at the same time generate offspring that differentiate into different blood cell types. Hematopoiesis in vertebrates, taking place in the bone marrow, has been subject to intensive research by immunologists and stem cell biologists. Much less is known about blood cell formation in invertebrate animals. In this review, we will survey structural and functional properties of invertebrate hematopoietic organs, with a main focus on insects and other arthropod taxa. We will then discuss similarities, at the molecular and structural level, that are apparent when comparing the development of blood cells in hematopoietic organs of vertebrates and arthropods. Our comparative review is intended to elucidate aspects of the biology of blood stem cells that are more easily missed when focusing on one or a few model species.

  13. The Proteome of Native Adult Müller Glial Cells From Murine Retina.

    PubMed

    Grosche, Antje; Hauser, Alexandra; Lepper, Marlen Franziska; Mayo, Rebecca; von Toerne, Christine; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Hauck, Stefanie M

    2016-02-01

    To date, the proteomic profiling of Müller cells, the dominant macroglia of the retina, has been hampered because of the absence of suitable enrichment methods. We established a novel protocol to isolate native, intact Müller cells from adult murine retinae at excellent purity which retain in situ morphology and are well suited for proteomic analyses. Two different strategies of sample preparation - an in StageTips (iST) and a subcellular fractionation approach including cell surface protein profiling were used for quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS) comparing Müller cell-enriched to depleted neuronal fractions. Pathway enrichment analyses on both data sets enabled us to identify Müller cell-specific functions which included focal adhesion kinase signaling, signal transduction mediated by calcium as second messenger, transmembrane neurotransmitter transport and antioxidant activity. Pathways associated with RNA processing, cellular respiration and phototransduction were enriched in the neuronal subpopulation. Proteomic results were validated for selected Müller cell genes by quantitative real time PCR, confirming the high expression levels of numerous members of the angiogenic and anti-inflammatory annexins and antioxidant enzymes (e.g. paraoxonase 2, peroxiredoxin 1, 4 and 6). Finally, the significant enrichment of antioxidant proteins in Müller cells was confirmed by measurements on vital retinal cells using the oxidative stress indicator CM-H2DCFDA. In contrast to photoreceptors or bipolar cells, Müller cells were most efficiently protected against H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species formation, which is in line with the protein repertoire identified in the proteomic profiling. Our novel approach to isolate intact glial cells from adult retina in combination with proteomic profiling enabled the identification of novel Müller glia specific proteins, which were validated as markers and for their functional impact in glial

  14. FANCA safeguards interphase and mitosis during hematopoiesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Sater, Zahi; Cerabona, Donna; Potchanant, Elizabeth Sierra; Sun, Zejin; Enzor, Rikki; He, Ying; Robertson, Kent; Goebel, W Scott; Nalepa, Grzegorz

    2015-12-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA/BRCA) signaling network controls multiple genome-housekeeping checkpoints, from interphase DNA repair to mitosis. The in vivo role of abnormal cell division in FA remains unknown. Here, we quantified the origins of genomic instability in FA patients and mice in vivo and ex vivo. We found that both mitotic errors and interphase DNA damage significantly contribute to genomic instability during FA-deficient hematopoiesis and in nonhematopoietic human and murine FA primary cells. Super-resolution microscopy coupled with functional assays revealed that FANCA shuttles to the pericentriolar material to regulate spindle assembly at mitotic entry. Loss of FA signaling rendered cells hypersensitive to spindle chemotherapeutics and allowed escape from the chemotherapy-induced spindle assembly checkpoint. In support of these findings, direct comparison of DNA crosslinking and anti-mitotic chemotherapeutics in primary FANCA-/- cells revealed genomic instability originating through divergent cell cycle checkpoint aberrations. Our data indicate that FA/BRCA signaling functions as an in vivo gatekeeper of genomic integrity throughout interphase and mitosis, which may have implications for future targeted therapies in FA and FA-deficient cancers.

  15. Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis: Genetics, phenotype, and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.; Stephens, K.; Dale, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis (ADCH; cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disorder manifested by transient neutropenia that recurs every three weeks. To facilitate mapping the ADCH gene by genetic linkage analysis, we studied 9 ADCH families with 42 affected individuals. Pedigrees revealed AD inheritance with no evidence for decreased penetrance. Similar intra- and interfamilial variable expression was observed, with no evidence to support heterogeneity. At least 3 families displayed apparent new mutations. Many adults developed chronic neutropenia, while offspring always cycled during childhood. Children displayed recurrent oral ulcers, gingivitis, lymphadenopathy, fever, and skin and other infections with additional symptoms. Interestingly, there were no cases of neonatal infection. Some children required multiple hospitalizations for treatment. Four males under age 18 died of Clostridium sepsis following necrotizing enterocolitis; all had affected mothers. No other deaths due to ADCH were found; most had improvement of symptoms and infections as adults. Adults experienced increased tooth loss prior to age 30 (16 out of 27 adults, with 9 edentulous). No increase in myelodysplasia, malignancy, or congenital anomalies was observed. Recombinant G-CSF treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of symptoms and infections. The results suggest that ADCH is not a benign disorder, especially in childhood, and abdominal pain requires immediate evaluation. Diagnosis of ADCH requires serial blood counts in the proband and at least one CBC in relatives to exclude similar disorders. Genetic counseling requires specific histories as well as CBCs of each family member at risk to determine status regardless of symptom history, especially to assess apparent new mutations.

  16. Pulmonary extramedullary hematopoiesis involving the pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Monga, Varun; Silverman, Margarida

    2015-02-24

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) occurs as a complication of hematologic disorders such as myelofibrosis, sickle cell anemia and thalassemia. The extramedullary tissue usually involves liver, spleen and lymph nodes, less frequently the chest. We present a recent case of a man with myeloproliferative neoplasm who developed pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to EMH in the lung and pulmonary artery. Radiation therapy was considered the best approach, but it didn't work and the patient died a week after radiation therapy was completed. We also review herein the present literature. PMID:25852851

  17. Infection-induced changes in hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Glatman Zaretsky, Arielle; Engiles, Julie B.; Hunter, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    The bone marrow is an important site for the interrelated processes of hematopoiesis, granulopoiesis, erythropoiesis and lymphopoiesis. A wide variety of microbial challenges are associated with profound changes in this compartment that impact on hematopoietic differentiation and mobilization of a variety of cell types. This article reviews some of the key pathways that control BM homeostasis, the infectious and inflammatory processes that affect the BM, and how addressing the knowledge gaps in this area has the potential to widen our comprehension of immune homeostasis. PMID:24363432

  18. Mutant U2AF1 Expression Alters Hematopoiesis and Pre-mRNA Splicing In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Cara Lunn; Ley, James N.; White, Brian S.; Kim, Sanghyun; Tibbitts, Justin; Shao, Jin; Ndonwi, Matthew; Wadugu, Brian; Duncavage, Eric J.; Okeyo-Owuor, Theresa; Liu, Tuoen; Griffith, Malachi; McGrath, Sean; Magrini, Vincent; Fulton, Robert S.; Fronick, Catrina; O’Laughlin, Michelle; Graubert, Timothy A.; Walter, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Heterozygous somatic mutations in the spliceosome gene U2AF1 occur in ~11% of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), the most common adult myeloid malignancy. It is unclear how these mutations contribute to disease. We examined in vivo hematopoietic consequences of the most common U2AF1 mutation using a doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse model. Mice expressing mutant U2AF1(S34F) display altered hematopoiesis and changes in pre-mRNA splicing in hematopoietic progenitor cells by whole transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq). Integration with human RNA-seq datasets determined that common mutant U2AF1-induced splicing alterations are enriched in RNA processing genes, ribosomal genes, and recurrently-mutated MDS and acute myeloid leukemia-associated genes. These findings support the hypothesis that mutant U2AF1 alters downstream gene isoform expression, thereby contributing to abnormal hematopoiesis in MDS patients. PMID:25965570

  19. In Vitro Colony Assays for Characterizing Tri-potent Progenitor Cells Isolated from the Adult Murine Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Jacob R; LeBon, Jeanne M; Luo, Angela; Quijano, Janine C; Wedeken, Lena; Jou, Kevin; Riggs, Arthur D; Tirrell, David A; Ku, H Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells from the adult pancreas could be a potential source of therapeutic beta-like cells for treating patients with type 1 diabetes. However, it is still unknown whether stem and progenitor cells exist in the adult pancreas. Research strategies using cre-lox lineage-tracing in adult mice have yielded results that either support or refute the idea that beta cells can be generated from the ducts, the presumed location where adult pancreatic progenitors may reside. These in vivo cre-lox lineage-tracing methods, however, cannot answer the questions of self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation-two criteria necessary to define a stem cell. To begin addressing this technical gap, we devised 3-dimensional colony assays for pancreatic progenitors. Soon after our initial publication, other laboratories independently developed a similar, but not identical, method called the organoid assay. Compared to the organoid assay, our method employs methylcellulose, which forms viscous solutions that allow the inclusion of extracellular matrix proteins at low concentrations. The methylcellulose-containing assays permit easier detection and analyses of progenitor cells at the single-cell level, which are critical when progenitors constitute a small sub-population, as is the case for many adult organ stem cells. Together, results from several laboratories demonstrate in vitro self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells from mice. The current protocols describe two methylcellulose-based colony assays to characterize mouse pancreatic progenitors; one contains a commercial preparation of murine extracellular matrix proteins and the other an artificial extracellular matrix protein known as a laminin hydrogel. The techniques shown here are 1) dissociation of the pancreas and sorting of CD133(+)Sox9/EGFP(+) ductal cells from adult mice, 2) single cell manipulation of the sorted cells, 3) single colony analyses using microfluidic q

  20. Infections of neonatal and adult mice with murine CMV HaNa1 strain upon oronasal inoculation: New insights in the pathogenesis of natural primary CMV infections.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun; Zhang, Shunchuan; Nauwynck, Hans

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, naturally acquired infections of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are generally asymptomatic. Animal models mimicking the natural primary HCMV infections in infants and adults are scarce. Here, neonatal and adult BALB/c mice were inoculated oronasally with a Belgian isolate HaNa1 of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). None of the mice showed clinical symptoms. In neonatal mice, a typical systemic infection occurred. In adult mice, viral replication was restricted to the nasal mucosa and submandibular glands. Infectious virus was not detected in trachea, oral mucosa, pharynx, esophagus, small intestines of both neonatal and adult mice at all time points. Nose was demonstrated to be the entry site. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that in nose infected cells were olfactory neurons and sustentacular cells in olfactory epithelium and were macrophages and dendritic cells in nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT). Neonatal and adult mice developed similar antibody response pattern, though former magnitude was lower. In summary, we have established intranasal (without anesthesia) infections of neonatal and adult mice with murine CMV HaNa1 strain, which mimic the range and extent of virus replication during natural primary HCMV infections in healthy infants and adults. These findings might bring new insights in the pathogenesis of natural primary CMV infections. PMID:26474525

  1. Hypocellularity in the Murine Model for Down Syndrome Ts65Dn Is Not Affected by Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    López-Hidalgo, Rosa; Ballestín, Raul; Vega, Jessica; Blasco-Ibáñez, José M.; Crespo, Carlos; Gilabert-Juan, Javier; Nácher, Juan; Varea, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused by the presence of an extra copy of the chromosome 21 and it is the most common aneuploidy producing intellectual disability. Neural mechanisms underlying this alteration may include defects in the formation of neuronal networks, information processing and brain plasticity. The murine model for DS, Ts65Dn, presents reduced adult neurogenesis. This reduction has been suggested to underlie the hypocellularity of the hippocampus as well as the deficit in olfactory learning in the Ts65Dn mice. Similar alterations have also been observed in individuals with DS. To determine whether the impairment in adult neurogenesis is, in fact, responsible for the hypocellularity in the hippocampus and physiology of the olfactory bulb, we have analyzed cell proliferation and neuronal maturation in the two major adult neurogenic niches in the Ts656Dn mice: the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Additionally, we carried out a study to determine the survival rate and phenotypic fate of newly generated cells in both regions, injecting 5′BrdU and sacrificing the mice 21 days later, and analyzing the number and phenotype of the remaining 5′BrdU-positive cells. We observed a reduction in the number of proliferating (Ki67 positive) cells and immature (doublecortin positive) neurons in the subgranular and SVZ of Ts65Dn mice, but we did not observe changes in the number of surviving cells or in their phenotype. These data correlated with a lower number of apoptotic cells (cleaved caspase 3 positive) in Ts65Dn. We conclude that although adult Ts65Dn mice have a lower number of proliferating cells, it is compensated by a lower level of cell death. This higher survival rate in Ts65Dn produces a final number of mature cells similar to controls. Therefore, the reduction of adult neurogenesis cannot be held responsible for the neuronal hypocellularity in the hippocampus or for the olfactory learning deficit of Ts65Dn mice

  2. Aging, clonal hematopoiesis and preleukemia: not just bad luck?

    PubMed

    Shlush, Liran I; Zandi, Sasan; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Schuh, Andre C

    2015-11-01

    Chronological human aging is associated with a number of changes in the hematopoietic system, occurring at many levels from stem to mature cells, and the marrow microenvironment as well. This review will focus mainly on the aging of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), and on the associated increases in the incidence of hematological malignancies. HSPCs manifest reduced function and acquire molecular changes with chronological aging. Furthermore, while for many years it has been known that the human hematopoietic system becomes increasingly clonal with chronological aging (clonal hematopoiesis), only in the last few years has it become clear that clonal hematopoiesis may result from the accumulation of preleukemic mutations in HSPCs. Such mutations confer a selective advantage that leads to clonal hematopoiesis, and that may occasionally result in the development of leukemia, and define the existence of both preleukemic stem cells, and of 'preleukemia' as a clinical entity. While it is well appreciated that clonal hematopoiesis is very common in the elderly, several questions remain unanswered: why and how does clonal hematopoiesis develop? How is clonal hematopoiesis related to the age-related changes observed in the hematopoietic system? And why do only some individuals with clonal hematopoiesis develop leukemia?

  3. Ablating hedgehog signaling in tenocytes during development impairs biomechanics and matrix organization of the adult murine patellar tendon enthesis.

    PubMed

    Breidenbach, Andrew P; Aschbacher-Smith, Lindsey; Lu, Yinhui; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Liu, Chia-Feng; Liu, Han; Wylie, Chris; Rao, Marepalli; Shearn, Jason T; Rowe, David W; Kadler, Karl E; Jiang, Rulang; Butler, David L

    2015-08-01

    Restoring the native structure of the tendon enthesis, where collagen fibers of the midsubstance are integrated within a fibrocartilaginous structure, is problematic following injury. As current surgical methods fail to restore this region adequately, engineers, biologists, and clinicians are working to understand how this structure forms as a prerequisite to improving repair outcomes. We recently reported on the role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a novel enthesis marker, in regulating early postnatal enthesis formation. Here, we investigate how inactivating the Hh pathway in tendon cells affects adult (12-week) murine patellar tendon (PT) enthesis mechanics, fibrocartilage morphology, and collagen fiber organization. We show that ablating Hh signaling resulted in greater than 100% increased failure insertion strain (0.10 v. 0.05 mm/mm, p<0.01) as well as sub-failure biomechanical deficiencies. Although collagen fiber orientation appears overtly normal in the midsubstance, ablating Hh signaling reduces mineralized fibrocartilage by 32%, leading to less collagen embedded within mineralized tissue. Ablating Hh signaling also caused collagen fibers to coalesce at the insertion, which may explain in part the increased strains. These results indicate that Ihh signaling plays a critical role in the mineralization process of fibrocartilaginous entheses and may be a novel therapeutic to promote tendon-to-bone healing.

  4. Osteomyelosclerosis, anemia and extramedullary hematopoiesis in mice lacking the transcription factor NFATc2

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Wolfgang; Rauner, Martina; Haase, Michael; Kujawski, Satu; Arabanian, Laleh S.; Habermann, Ivonne; Hofbauer, Lorenz C.; Ehninger, Gerhard; Kiani, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Background Nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT) are transcription factors that are central to cytokine production in activated T cells and regulate the development and differentiation of various tissues. NFATc2 is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells and regulated during myeloid commitment in a lineage-specific manner. The biological role of NFATc2 in hematopoiesis is, however, unclear. Design and Methods In the present study, we analyzed steady-state hematopoiesis in young (<3 months) and old (>12 months) mice lacking NFATc2. Complete blood counts were performed in the peripheral blood, bone marrow and spleen. Using cytological and histological analyses, the blood cell differential was determined. Colony-formation assays were used to determine the differentiation potential of hematopoietic cells. Bone cell cultures were derived from the bone marrow, and bone remodeling markers were determined in the serum. Results NFATc2−/− mice older than 12 months were anemic and thrombocytopenic. The bone marrows of these mice showed a markedly reduced number of hematopoietic cells, of which megakaryocytic and erythroid lineages were most affected. While the number of hematopoietic progenitor cells in NFATc2-deficent bone marrow was reduced, the myeloid differentiation potential of these cells remained intact. Aged NFATc2−/− mice showed ossification of their bone marrow space and developed extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen. Ex vivo differentiation assays revealed an intrinsic defect of NFATc2-deficient stromal cells, in which NFATc2−/− osteoblasts differentiated more efficiently than wild-type cells, whereas osteoclast differentiation was impaired. Conclusions Our data suggest that NFATc2 may play a role in the maintenance of steady-state hematopoiesis and bone remodeling in adult organisms. PMID:21750088

  5. A model utilizing adult murine stem cells for creation of personalized islets for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Song, L J; Gerber, D A; Fair, J H; Rice, L; LaPaglia, M; Andreoni, K A

    2004-05-01

    Clinical islet cell transplantation has demonstrated great promise for diabetes treatment. Two major obstacles are the organ donor shortage and the immunoresponse. The purpose of this study was to create a model using the patient's own adult stem cell sources, possibly in combination with non-self cells, such as pancreatic, hepatic, or embryonic stem cells, to create "personalized" islets. We hypothesize that the reconstructed islets have the normal capability to produce insulin and glucagon with reduced immunoresponses after transplantation. Stem cells are a proliferating population of master cells that have the ability for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. The recently developed photolithograph-based, biologic, microelectromechanic system (BioMEMS) technique supplies a useful tool for biomedical applications. Our lab has developed a novel method that integrates the adult stem cell and BioMEMS to reconstruct personalized islets. We selected islet-derived progenitor cells (IPC) for repairing and reconstructing STZ-diabetic islets. A6(+)/PYY(+) or A6(+)/ngn3(+) cells were selected to manipulate the neoislets. After 3 to 4 weeks in culture, the reconstructed cells formed islet-like clusters containing insulin or glucagon producing cells. The pilot results showed the ability of these reconstructed islets to correct hyperglycemia when transplanted into a STZ-diabetic isograft mouse model. Although several technical problems remain with the mouse model, namely, the difficulty to collect enough islets from a single mouse because of animal size, the mouse isograft model is suitable for personalized islet development.

  6. PDGFRα demarcates the cardiogenic clonogenic Sca1+ stem/progenitor cell in adult murine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Noseda, Michela; Harada, Mutsuo; McSweeney, Sara; Leja, Thomas; Belian, Elisa; Stuckey, Daniel J; Abreu Paiva, Marta S; Habib, Josef; Macaulay, Iain; de Smith, Adam J; al-Beidh, Farah; Sampson, Robert; Lumbers, R Thomas; Rao, Pulivarthi; Harding, Sian E; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; Barahona, Mauricio; Schneider, Michael D

    2015-05-18

    Cardiac progenitor/stem cells in adult hearts represent an attractive therapeutic target for heart regeneration, though (inter)-relationships among reported cells remain obscure. Using single-cell qRT-PCR and clonal analyses, here we define four subpopulations of cardiac progenitor/stem cells in adult mouse myocardium all sharing stem cell antigen-1 (Sca1), based on side population (SP) phenotype, PECAM-1 (CD31) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα) expression. SP status predicts clonogenicity and cardiogenic gene expression (Gata4/6, Hand2 and Tbx5/20), properties segregating more specifically to PDGFRα(+) cells. Clonal progeny of single Sca1(+) SP cells show cardiomyocyte, endothelial and smooth muscle lineage potential after cardiac grafting, augmenting cardiac function although durable engraftment is rare. PDGFRα(-) cells are characterized by Kdr/Flk1, Cdh5, CD31 and lack of clonogenicity. PDGFRα(+)/CD31(-) cells derive from cells formerly expressing Mesp1, Nkx2-5, Isl1, Gata5 and Wt1, distinct from PDGFRα(-)/CD31(+) cells (Gata5 low; Flk1 and Tie2 high). Thus, PDGFRα demarcates the clonogenic cardiogenic Sca1(+) stem/progenitor cell.

  7. PDGFRα demarcates the cardiogenic clonogenic Sca1+ stem/progenitor cell in adult murine myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Noseda, Michela; Harada, Mutsuo; McSweeney, Sara; Leja, Thomas; Belian, Elisa; Stuckey, Daniel J.; Abreu Paiva, Marta S.; Habib, Josef; Macaulay, Iain; de Smith, Adam J.; al-Beidh, Farah; Sampson, Robert; Lumbers, R. Thomas; Rao, Pulivarthi; Harding, Sian E.; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Eirik Jacobsen, Sten; Barahona, Mauricio; Schneider, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor/stem cells in adult hearts represent an attractive therapeutic target for heart regeneration, though (inter)-relationships among reported cells remain obscure. Using single-cell qRT–PCR and clonal analyses, here we define four subpopulations of cardiac progenitor/stem cells in adult mouse myocardium all sharing stem cell antigen-1 (Sca1), based on side population (SP) phenotype, PECAM-1 (CD31) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα) expression. SP status predicts clonogenicity and cardiogenic gene expression (Gata4/6, Hand2 and Tbx5/20), properties segregating more specifically to PDGFRα+ cells. Clonal progeny of single Sca1+ SP cells show cardiomyocyte, endothelial and smooth muscle lineage potential after cardiac grafting, augmenting cardiac function although durable engraftment is rare. PDGFRα− cells are characterized by Kdr/Flk1, Cdh5, CD31 and lack of clonogenicity. PDGFRα+/CD31− cells derive from cells formerly expressing Mesp1, Nkx2-5, Isl1, Gata5 and Wt1, distinct from PDGFRα−/CD31+ cells (Gata5 low; Flk1 and Tie2 high). Thus, PDGFRα demarcates the clonogenic cardiogenic Sca1+ stem/progenitor cell. PMID:25980517

  8. Essential role for focal adhesion kinase in regulating stress hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Ramdas, Baskar; Hanneman, Philip; Martin, Joseph; Beggs, Hilary E.

    2010-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that has been extensively studied in fibroblasts; however its function in hematopoiesis remains an enigma. FAK is thought to be expressed in myeloid and erythroid progenitors, and its expression is enhanced in response to cytokines such as granu-locyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Furthermore, bone marrow cells cultured in granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor show active migration and chemoattractant-induced polarization, which correlates with FAK induction. While loss of FAK in mice results in embryonic lethality, we have deleted FAK in the adult bone marrow. We show an essential role for FAK in regulating hemolytic, myelotoxic, as well as acute inflammatory stress responses in vivo. In vitro, loss of FAK in erythroid and myeloid progenitor's results in impaired cytokine induced growth and survival, as well as defects in the activation and expression of antiapoptotic proteins caspase 3 and Bcl-xL. Additionally, reduced migration and adhesion of myeloid cells on extracellular matrix proteins, as well as impaired activation of Rac GTPase is also observed in the absence of FAK. Our studies reveal an essential role for FAK in integrating growth/survival and adhesion based functions in myeloid and erythroid cells predominantly under conditions of stress. PMID:20664055

  9. Pharmacological analysis of epithelial chloride secretion mechanisms in adult murine airways.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Ambra; Ferrera, Loretta; Philp, Amber R; Caci, Emanuela; Zegarra-Moran, Olga; Galietta, Luis J V; Flores, Carlos A

    2016-06-15

    Defective epithelial chloride secretion occurs in humans with cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic defect due to loss of function of CFTR, a cAMP-activated chloride channel. In the airways, absence of an active CFTR causes a severe lung disease. In mice, genetic ablation of CFTR function does not result in similar lung pathology. This may be due to the expression of an alternative chloride channel which is activated by calcium. The most probable protein performing this function is TMEM16A, a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC). Our aim was to assess the relative contribution of CFTR and TMEM16A to chloride secretion in adult mouse trachea. For this purpose we tested pharmacological inhibitors of chloride channels in normal and CF mice. The amplitude of the cAMP-activated current was similar in both types of animals and was not affected by a selective CFTR inhibitor. In contrast, a CaCC inhibitor (CaCCinh-A01) strongly blocked the cAMP-activated current as well as the calcium-activated chloride secretion triggered by apical UTP. Although control experiments revealed that CaCCinh-A01 also shows inhibitory activity on CFTR, our results indicate that transepithelial chloride secretion in adult mouse trachea is independent of CFTR and that another channel, possibly TMEM16A, performs both cAMP- and calcium-activated chloride transport. The prevalent function of a non-CFTR channel may explain the absence of a defect in chloride transport in CF mice. PMID:27063443

  10. Ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract (IMUNOR) decreases nitric oxide formation and hematopoiesis-stimulating cytokine production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Vacek, Antonín; Lojek, Antonín; Holá, Jirina; Streitová, Denisa

    2007-10-01

    A low-molecular-weight (<12 kDa) ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, IMUNOR, was tested in experiments in vitro on non-stimulated and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages in order to assess modulation of nitric oxide (NO) production (measured indirectly as the concentration of nitrites), hematopoiesis-stimulating activity of the supernatant of the macrophage cells (ascertained by counting cell colonies growing from progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) in vitro), and the release of hematopoiesis-stimulating cytokines. No hematopoiesis-stimulating activity and cytokine or NO production were found in the supernatant of non-stimulated macrophages. It was found that IMUNOR does not influence this status. Supernatant of LPS-stimulated macrophages was characterized by hematopoiesis-stimulating activity, as well as by the presence of nitrites, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). A key role in the hematopoiesis-stimulating activity of the supernatant of LPS-stimulated macrophages could be ascribed to G-CSF since the formation of the colonies could be abrogated nearly completely by monoclonal antibodies against G-CSF. IMUNOR was found to suppress all the mentioned manifestations of the LPS-activated macrophages. When considering these results together with those from our previous in vivo study revealing stimulatory effects of IMUNOR on radiation-suppressed hematopoiesis, a hypothesis may be formulated which postulates a homeostatic role of IMUNOR, consisting in stimulation of impaired immune and hematopoietic systems but also in cutting back the production of proinflammatory mediators in cases of overstimulation which threats with undesirable consequences.

  11. Rumba and Haus3 are essential factors for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells during zebrafish hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Du, Linsen; Xu, Jin; Li, Xiuling; Ma, Ning; Liu, Yanmei; Peng, Jinrong; Osato, Motomi; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zilong

    2011-02-01

    The hallmark of vertebrate definitive hematopoiesis is the establishment of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) pool during embryogenesis. This process involves a defined ontogenic switching of HSPCs in successive hematopoietic compartments and is evolutionarily conserved from teleost fish to human. In zebrafish, HSPCs originate from the ventral wall of the dorsal aorta (VDA), from which they subsequently mobilize to an intermediate hematopoietic site known as the caudal hematopoietic tissue (CHT) and finally colonize the kidney for adult hematopoiesis. Despite substantial understanding of the ontogeny of HSPCs, the molecular basis governing migration, colonization and maintenance of HSPCs remains to be explored fully. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two zebrafish mutants, rumba(hkz1) and samba(hkz2), that are defective in generating definitive hematopoiesis. We find that HSPC initiation in the VDA and subsequent homing to the CHT are not affected in these two mutants. However, the further development of HSPCs in the CHT is compromised in both mutants. Positional cloning reveals that Rumba is a novel nuclear C2H2 zinc-finger factor with unknown function and samba encodes an evolutionarily conserved protein that is homologous to human augmin complex subunit 3 (HAUS3). Furthermore, we show that these two factors independently regulate cell cycle progression of HSPCs and are cell autonomously required for HPSC development in the CHT. Our study identifies Rumba and Haus3 as two essential regulators of HSPC maintenance during zebrafish fetal hematopoiesis.

  12. Organotypical tissue cultures from adult murine colon as an in vitro model of intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bareiss, Petra M.; Metzger, Marco; Sohn, Kai; Rupp, Steffen; Frick, Julia S.; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Lang, Florian; Schwarz, Heinz; Skutella, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Together with animal experiments, organotypical cell cultures are important models for analyzing cellular interactions of the mucosal epithelium and pathogenic mechanisms in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional culture model from the adult mouse colon for cell biological investigations in an in vivo-like environment. These explant cultures were cultured for up to 2 weeks and maintained typical characteristics of the intestinal mucosa, including a high-prismatic epithelium with specific epithelial cell-to-cell connections, a basal lamina and various connective tissue cell types, as analyzed with immunohistological and electron microscopic methods. The function of the epithelium was tested by treating the cultures with dexamethasone, which resulted in a strong upregulation of the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 similar to that found in vivo. The culture system was investigated in infection experiments with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Wildtype but not Δcph1/Δefg1-knockout Candida adhered to, penetrated and infiltrated the epithelial barrier. The results demonstrate the potential usefulness of this intestinal in vitro model for studying epithelial cell-cell interactions, cellular signaling and microbiological infections in a three-dimensional cell arrangement. PMID:18320204

  13. Glomerular parietal epithelial cells of adult murine kidney undergo EMT to generate cells with traits of renal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    G, Swetha; Chandra, Vikash; Phadnis, Smruti; Bhonde, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glomerular parietal epithelial cells (GPECs) are known to revert to embryonic phenotype in response to renal injury. However, the mechanism of de-differentiation in GPECs and the underlying cellular processes are not fully understood. In the present study, we show that cultured GPECs of adult murine kidney undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to generate cells, which express CD24, CD44 and CD29 surface antigens. Characterization by qRT-PCR and immunostaining of these clonogenic cells demonstrate that they exhibit metastable phenotype with co-expression of both epithelial (cytokeratin-18) and mesenchymal (vimentin) markers. Transcript analysis by qRT-PCR revealed high expression of metanephric mesenchymal (Pax-2, WT-1, Six-1, Eya-1, GDNF) and uteric bud (Hoxb-7, C-Ret) genes in these cells, indicating their bipotent progenitor status. Incubation of GPECs with EMT blocker Prostaglandin E2, resulted in low expression of renal progenitor markers reflecting the correlation between EMT and acquired stemness in these cells. Additional in vitro renal commitment assays confirmed their functional staminality. When injected into E13.5 kidney rudiments, the cells incorporated into the developing kidney primordia and co-culture with E13.5 spinal cord resulted in branching and tubulogenesis in these cells. When implanted under renal capsule of unilaterally nephrectomized mice, these cells differentiated into immature glomeruli and vascular ducts. Our study demonstrates that EMT plays a major role in imparting plasticity to terminally differentiated GPECs by producing metastable cells with traits of kidney progenitors. The present study would improve our understanding on epithelial cell plasticity, furthering our knowledge of its role in renal repair and regeneration. PMID:19840197

  14. Lifestyle effects on hematopoiesis and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K

    2015-02-27

    Diet, exercise, stress, and sleep are receiving attention as environmental modifiers of chronic inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis, the culprit condition of myocardial infarction and stroke. Accumulating data indicate that psychosocial stress and a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet aggravate cardiovascular disease, whereas regular physical activity and healthy sleeping habits help prevent it. Here, we raise the possibility that inflammation-associated leukocyte production plays a causal role in lifestyle effects on atherosclerosis progression. Specifically, we explore whether and how potent real-life disease modifiers influence hematopoiesis' molecular and cellular machinery. Lifestyle, we hypothesize, may rearrange hematopoietic topography, diverting production from the bone marrow to the periphery, thus propagating a quantitative and qualitative drift of the macrophage supply chain. These changes may involve progenitor-extrinsic and intrinsic communication nodes that connect organ systems along neuroimmune and immunometabolic axes, ultimately leading to an altered number and phenotype of lesional macrophages. We propose that, in conjunction with improved public health policy, future therapeutics could aim to modulate the quantitative and qualitative output, as well as the location, of the hematopoietic tree to decrease the risk of atherosclerosis complications. PMID:25722442

  15. Developmental hematopoiesis in normal human fetal blood.

    PubMed

    Forestier, F; Daffos, F; Catherine, N; Renard, M; Andreux, J P

    1991-06-01

    Using an easy and safe procedure for fetal blood sampling in utero, we studied 3,415 fetuses for prenatal diagnosis. Retrospectively, 2,860 normal blood samples, performed from the 18th week of gestation to the end of pregnancy, were selected. Differentials were evaluated in 732 cases. Burst-forming unit erythroid (BFU-E) and erythropoietin (Epo) were measured in 27 and 163 cases, respectively. Total nucleated cell and platelet counts did not change from the 18th to the 30th week of gestation. The lymphocytes represented the main population and the decrease of normoblastic cells made up for the increase in neutrophils. The increase of red blood cells and hemoglobin was substantial during the studied period. At mid trimester threefold more BFU-E were obtained than at birth. Epo levels remained stable throughout the pregnancy and no correlation was found between Epo and gestational age. These normal values of fetal erythropoiesis will improve our knowledge of physiology and provide a better insight into developmental hematopoiesis.

  16. Lifestyle effects on hematopoiesis and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K

    2015-02-27

    Diet, exercise, stress, and sleep are receiving attention as environmental modifiers of chronic inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis, the culprit condition of myocardial infarction and stroke. Accumulating data indicate that psychosocial stress and a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet aggravate cardiovascular disease, whereas regular physical activity and healthy sleeping habits help prevent it. Here, we raise the possibility that inflammation-associated leukocyte production plays a causal role in lifestyle effects on atherosclerosis progression. Specifically, we explore whether and how potent real-life disease modifiers influence hematopoiesis' molecular and cellular machinery. Lifestyle, we hypothesize, may rearrange hematopoietic topography, diverting production from the bone marrow to the periphery, thus propagating a quantitative and qualitative drift of the macrophage supply chain. These changes may involve progenitor-extrinsic and intrinsic communication nodes that connect organ systems along neuroimmune and immunometabolic axes, ultimately leading to an altered number and phenotype of lesional macrophages. We propose that, in conjunction with improved public health policy, future therapeutics could aim to modulate the quantitative and qualitative output, as well as the location, of the hematopoietic tree to decrease the risk of atherosclerosis complications.

  17. Genetics, phenotype, and natural history of autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E. |; Dale, D.C.

    1996-12-30

    Cyclic hematopoiesis (CH, or cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disease manifested by transient severe neutropenia that recurs approximately every 21 days. The hematologic profile of families with the autosomal dominant form (ADCH) has not been well characterized, and it is unknown if the phenotype is distinct from the more common sporadic congenital or acquired forms of CH. We studied nine ADCH families whose children displayed typical CH blood patterns. Pedigrees confirmed dominant inheritance without evidence of heterogeneity or decreased penetrance; three pedigrees suggested new mutations. Families were Caucasian with exception of one with a Cherokee Native American founder. A wide spectrum of symptom severity, ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening illness, was observed within families. The phenotype changed with age. Children displayed typical neutrophil cycles with symptoms of mucosal ulceration, lymphadenopathy, and infections. Adults often had fewer and milder symptoms, sometimes accompanied by mild chronic neutropenia without distinct cycles. While CH is commonly described as {open_quotes}benign{close_quotes}, four children in three of the nine families died of Clostridium or E. coli colitis, documenting the need for urgent evaluation of abdominal pain. Misdiagnosis with other neutropenias was common but can be avoided by serial blood counts in index cases. Genetic counseling requires specific histories and complete blood counts in relatives at risk to assess status regardless of symptoms, especially to determine individuals with new mutations. We propose diagnostic criteria for ADCH in affected children and adults. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of neutropenia and morbidity. The differential diagnosis from other forms of familial neutropenia is reviewed. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Conditional Knockout of Myocyte Focal Adhesion Kinase Abrogates Ischemic Preconditioning in Adult Murine Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Perricone, Adam J.; Bivona, Benjamin J.; Jackson, Fannie R.; Vander Heide, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Our laboratory has previously demonstrated the importance of a cytoskeletal‐based survival signaling pathway using in vitro models of ischemia/reperfusion (IR). However, the importance of this pathway in mediating stress‐elicited survival signaling in vivo is unknown. Methods and Results The essential cytoskeletal signaling pathway member focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was selectively deleted in adult cardiac myocytes using a tamoxifen‐inducible Cre‐Lox system (α‐MHC‐MerCreMer). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot were performed to confirm FAK knockout (KO). All mice were subjected to a 40‐minute coronary occlusion followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Ischemic preconditioning (IP) was performed using a standard protocol. Control groups included wild‐type (WT) and tamoxifen‐treated α‐MHC‐MerCreMer+/−/FAKWT/WT (experimental control) mice. Infarct size was expressed as a percentage of the risk region. In WT mice IP significantly enhanced the expression of activated/phosphorylated FAK by 36.3% compared to WT mice subjected to a sham experimental protocol (P≤0.05; n=6 hearts [sham], n=4 hearts [IP]). IP significantly reduced infarct size in both WT and experimental control mice (43.7% versus 19.8%; P≤0.001; 44.7% versus 17.5%; P≤0.001, respectively). No difference in infarct size was observed between preconditioned FAK KO and nonpreconditioned controls (37.1% versus 43.7% versus 44.7%; FAK KO versus WT versus experimental control; P=NS). IP elicited a 67.2%/88.8% increase in activated phosphatidylinositol‐3‐kinase (PI3K) p85/activated Akt expression in WT mice, but failed to enhance the expression of either in preconditioned FAK KO mice. Conclusions Our results indicate that FAK is an essential mediator of IP‐elicited cardioprotection and provide further support for the hypothesis that cytoskeletal‐based signaling is an important component of stress‐elicited survival signaling. PMID:24080910

  19. Embryonic hematopoiesis in vertebrate somites gives rise to definitive hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Juhui; Fan, Xiaoying; Wang, Yixia; Jin, Hongbin; Song, Yixiao; Han, Yang; Huang, Shenghong; Meng, Yaping; Tang, Fuchou; Meng, Anming

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) replenish all types of blood cells. It is debating whether HSCs in adults solely originate from the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, more specifically, the dorsal aorta, during embryogenesis. Here, we report that somite hematopoiesis, a previously unwitnessed hematopoiesis, can generate definitive HSCs (dHSCs) in zebrafish. By transgenic lineage tracing, we found that a subset of cells within the forming somites emigrate ventromedially and mix with lateral plate mesoderm-derived primitive hematopoietic cells before the blood circulation starts. These somite-derived hematopoietic precursors and stem cells (sHPSCs) subsequently enter the circulation and colonize the kidney of larvae and adults. RNA-seq analysis reveals that sHPSCs express hematopoietic genes with sustained expression of many muscle/skeletal genes. Embryonic sHPSCs transplanted into wild-type embryos expand during growth and survive for life time with differentiation into various hematopoietic lineages, indicating self-renewal and multipotency features. Therefore, the embryonic origin of dHSCs in adults is not restricted to the AGM.

  20. Clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Clonal hematopoiesis (CH) in aplastic anemia (AA) has been closely linked to the evolution of late clonal disorders, including paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which are common complications after successful immunosuppressive therapy (IST). With the advent of high-throughput sequencing of recent years, the molecular aspect of CH in AA has been clarified by comprehensive detection of somatic mutations that drive clonal evolution. Genetic abnormalities are found in ∼50% of patients with AA and, except for PIGA mutations and copy-neutral loss-of-heterozygosity, or uniparental disomy (UPD) in 6p (6pUPD), are most frequently represented by mutations involving genes commonly mutated in myeloid malignancies, including DNMT3A, ASXL1, and BCOR/BCORL1. Mutations exhibit distinct chronological profiles and clinical impacts. BCOR/BCORL1 and PIGA mutations tend to disappear or show stable clone size and predict a better response to IST and a significantly better clinical outcome compared with mutations in DNMT3A, ASXL1, and other genes, which are likely to increase their clone size, are associated with a faster progression to MDS/AML, and predict an unfavorable survival. High frequency of 6pUPD and overrepresentation of PIGA and BCOR/BCORL1 mutations are unique to AA, suggesting the role of autoimmunity in clonal selection. By contrast, DNMT3A and ASXL1 mutations, also commonly seen in CH in the general population, indicate a close link to CH in the aged bone marrow, in terms of the mechanism for selection. Detection and close monitoring of somatic mutations/evolution may help with prediction and diagnosis of clonal evolution of MDS/AML and better management of patients with AA. PMID:27121470

  1. Intracranial extramedullary hematopoiesis. CT and bone marrow scan findings

    SciTech Connect

    Urman, M.; O'Sullivan, R.A.; Nugent, R.A.; Lentle, B.C. )

    1991-06-01

    This case concerns a patient with intracranial extramedullary hematopoiesis (EH) suspected on a CT scan and subsequently confirmed with In-111 chloride and Tc-99m SC bone marrow scans. The bone marrow scans also provided additional information by demonstrating other sites of EH in the paravertebral tissues and bone marrow expansion into the distal extremities.

  2. Biological effects of T315I-mutated BCR-ABL in an embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoiesis model.

    PubMed

    Melkus, Michael; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Valogne, Yannick; Flamant, Stephane; Chomel, Jean-Claude; Sorel, Nathalie; Bonnet, Marie-Laure; Deininger, Michael W; Mitjavila-Garcia, Maria-Teresa; Turhan, Ali G

    2013-04-01

    The occurrence of T315I mutation during the course of targeted therapies of chronic myeloid leukemia is a major concern because it confers resistance to all currently approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The exact phenotype of the hematopoietic stem cell and the hierarchical level of the occurrence of this mutation in leukemic hematopoiesis has not been determined. To study the effects of T315I-mutated breakpoint cluster region-abelson (BCR-ABL) in a primitive hematopoietic stem cell, we have used the murine embryonic stem cell (mESC)-derived hematopoiesis model. Native and T315I-mutated BCR-ABL were introduced retrovirally in mESC-derived embryonic bodies followed by induction of hematopoiesis. In several experiments, T315I-mutated and nonmutated BCR-ABL-transduced embryonic bodies rapidly generated hematopoietic cells on OP-9 feeders, with evidence of hematopoietic stem cell markers. After injection into NOD/SCID mice, these cells induced myeloid and lymphoid leukemias, whereas transplantation of control (nontransduced) hematopoietic cells failed to produce any hematopoietic reconstitution in vivo. Moreover, the expression of native and T315I-mutated BCR-ABL conferred to mESC-derived hematopoietic cells a self-renewal capacity demonstrated by the generation of leukemias after secondary transplantations. Secondary leukemias were more aggressive with evidence of extramedullary tumors. The expression of stem cell regulator Musashi-2 was found to be increased in bone marrow of leukemic mice. These data show that T315I-mutated BCR-ABL is functional at the stem cell level, conferring to mESC-derived leukemic cells a long-term hematopoietic repopulation ability. This model could be of interest to test the efficiency of drugs at the stem cell level in leukemias with T315I mutation.

  3. Effects of exogenous, nonleukemogenic, ecotropic murine leukemia virus infections on the immune systems of adult C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J S; Giese, N A; Elkins, K L; Yetter, R A; Holmes, K L; Hartley, J W; Morse, H C

    1995-01-01

    Mouse AIDS (MAIDS) develops in mice infected with a mixture of replication-competent ecotropic and mink lung cell focus-inducing murine leukemia viruses and an etiologic replication-defective virus. Helper viruses are not required for induction of MAIDS, but the time course of disease is accelerated in their presence. To understand the possible contributions of ectropic murine leukemia viruses to MAIDS pathogenesis, we biologically cloned a series of viruses from the MAIDS-inducing LP-BM5 virus mixture. These viruses were examined for replication in tissues of infected mice and for effects on the immune system. All virus stocks replicated efficiently in mice. Infected animals showed slight lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly due primarily to B-cell proliferation associated with differentiation to immunoglobulin secretion resulting in twofold increases in serum immunoglobulin M levels; however, B-cell responses to helper T-cell-independent antigens were increased rather than decreased as in MAIDS. Analyses of CD8+ T-cell function showed that cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses to alloantigens were comparable in control and infected mice. Finally, we showed that infection resulted in enhanced expression of transcripts for interleukin-10, interleukin-4, and gamma interferon. These cytokines can all contribute to B-cell activation and may promote the expansion of a target cell population for the MAIDS defective virus. PMID:7769677

  4. Extramedullary hematopoiesis: a rare occurrence in the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Bizzoni, Andrea; Lombardi, Davide; Maroldi, Roberto; Incardona, Paolo; Nicolai, Piero

    2010-04-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) is a systemic reaction to inadequate hematopoiesis. We report two exceedingly rare cases of EMH involving the paranasal sinuses. The first patient, a 30-year-old man, presented with a maxillary sinus mass. The lesion was excised by endoscopic surgery: definitive histology identified foci of EMH within an inflammatory fibromyxoid pseudotumor. The second case occurred in a 29-year-old man affected by intermediate beta-thalassemia. He was hospitalized with a diagnosis of sphenoid sinus mucocele secondary to an ethmoid lesion. The patient underwent endoscopic excision of the mass and drainage of the sphenoid mucocele. At definitive histology, a diagnosis of EMH was established. Herein, the presenting modalities, imaging profile, and treatment options of this rare EMH localization are reviewed.

  5. Long noncoding RNAs during normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Hu, Wenqian; Gromatzky, Austin A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly recognized to contribute to cellular development via diverse mechanisms during both health and disease. Here, we highlight recent progress on the study of lncRNAs that function in the development of blood cells. We emphasize lncRNAs that regulate blood cell fates through epigenetic control of gene expression, an emerging theme among functional lncRNAs. Many of these noncoding genes and their targets become dysregulated during malignant hematopoiesis, directly implicating lncRNAs in blood cancers such as leukemia. In a few cases, dysregulation of an lncRNA alone leads to malignant hematopoiesis in a mouse model. Thus, lncRNAs may be not only useful as markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancers of the blood, but also as potential targets for novel therapies.

  6. Long noncoding RNAs during normal and malignant hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R.; Hu, Wenqian; Gromatzky, Austin A.

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly recognized to contribute to cellular development via diverse mechanisms during both health and disease. Here, we highlight recent progress on the study of lncRNAs that function in the development of blood cells. We emphasize lncRNAs that regulate blood cell fates through epigenetic control of gene expression, an emerging theme among functional lncRNAs. Many of these noncoding genes and their targets become dysregulated during malignant hematopoiesis, directly implicating lncRNAs in blood cancers such as leukemia. In a few cases, dysregulation of an lncRNA alone leads to malignant hematopoiesis in a mouse model. Thus, lncRNAs may be not only useful as markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancers of the blood, but also as potential targets for novel therapies. PMID:24609766

  7. Leukemic blast cells and controversies in models of hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Gluzman, D F; Sklyarenko, L M; Zavelevich, M P; Koval, S V; Ivanovskaya, T S

    2015-03-01

    Classical and up-to-date models of hematopoietic lineage determination are briefly reviewed with the focus on myeloid-based models challenging the existence of the common progenitor for T cells, B cells and NK cells. The analysis of immunophenotype of leukemic blast cells seems to be a promising approach for interpreting some controversies in the schemes of normal hematopoiesis. The literature data as well as our own findings in the patients with various types of acute leukemias are in favor of the concept postulating that common myeloid-lymphoid progenitors giving rise to T and B cell branches retain the myeloid potential. The similarity of some immunophenotypic features of blast cells in pro-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute monoblastic leukemia is consistent with monocyte origin postulated in the studies of normal hematopoiesis. Study of acute leukemias may be the challenging area of research allowing for new insight into the origin of hematopoietic cell lineages. PMID:25804223

  8. Cell state-specific metabolic dependency in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Hua; Israelsen, William J.; Lee, Dongjun; Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Jeanson, Nathaniel T.; Clish, Clary B; Cantley, Lewis C.; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Scadden, David T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The balance between oxidative and non-oxidative glucose metabolism is essential for a number of pathophysiological processes. By deleting enzymes that affect aerobic glycolysis with different potencies, we examine how modulating glucose metabolism specifically affects hematopoietic and leukemic cell populations. We find that deficiency in the M2 pyruvate kinase isoform (PKM2) reduces levels of metabolic intermediates important for biosynthesis and impairs progenitor function without perturbing hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), whereas lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDHA) deletion significantly inhibits the function of both HSC and progenitors during hematopoiesis. In contrast, leukemia initiation by transforming alleles putatively affecting either HSC or progenitors is inhibited in the absence of either PKM2 or LDHA, indicating that the cell state-specific responses to metabolic manipulation in hematopoiesis do not apply to the setting of leukemia. This finding suggests that fine-tuning the level of glycolysis may be therapeutically explored for treating leukemia while preserving HSC function. PMID:25215489

  9. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Wu, Tongyu; Johnson, Kirby D.; Lahvic, Jamie L.; Ranheim, Erik A.; Zon, Leonard I.; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5) enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5−/− AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most common targets for FDA-approved drugs, we analyzed the GPCR gene ensemble to identify GATA-2-regulated GPCRs. Of the 20 GATA-2-activated GPCR genes, four were GATA-1-activated, and only Gpr65 expression resembled Gata2. Contrasting with the paradigm in which GATA-2-activated genes promote hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell genesis/function, our mouse and zebrafish studies indicated that GPR65 suppressed hematopoiesis. GPR65 established repressive chromatin at the +9.5 site, restricted occupancy by the activator Scl/TAL1, and repressed Gata2 transcription. Thus, a Gata2 cis element creates a GATA-2-GPCR circuit that limits positive regulators that promote hematopoiesis. PMID:26905203

  10. Histone demethylase KDM2B regulates lineage commitment in normal and malignant hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Andricovich, Jaclyn; Kai, Yan; Peng, Weiqun; Foudi, Adlen; Tzatsos, Alexandros

    2016-01-01

    The development of the hematopoietic system is a dynamic process that is controlled by the interplay between transcriptional and epigenetic networks to determine cellular identity. These networks are critical for lineage specification and are frequently dysregulated in leukemias. Here, we identified histone demethylase KDM2B as a critical regulator of definitive hematopoiesis and lineage commitment of murine hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). RNA sequencing of Kdm2b-null HSPCs and genome-wide ChIP studies in human leukemias revealed that KDM2B cooperates with polycomb and trithorax complexes to regulate differentiation, lineage choice, cytokine signaling, and cell cycle. Furthermore, we demonstrated that KDM2B exhibits a dichotomous role in hematopoietic malignancies. Specifically, we determined that KDM2B maintains lymphoid leukemias, but restrains RAS-driven myeloid transformation. Our study reveals that KDM2B is an important mediator of hematopoietic cell development and has opposing roles in tumor progression that are dependent on cellular context. PMID:26808549

  11. Expansion of human and murine hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells ex vivo without genetic modification using MYC and Bcl-2 fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Bird, Gregory A; Polsky, Avital; Estes, Patricia; Hanlon, Teri; Hamilton, Haley; Morton, John J; Gutman, Jonathan; Jimeno, Antonio; Turner, Brian C; Refaeli, Yosef

    2014-01-01

    The long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) population can self-renew in vivo, support hematopoiesis for the lifetime of the individual, and is of critical importance in the context of bone marrow stem cell transplantation. The mechanisms that regulate the expansion of HSCs in vivo and in vitro remain unclear to date. Since the current set of surface markers only allow for the identification of a population of cells that is highly enriched for HSC activity, we will refer to the population of cells we expand as Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor cells (HSPCs). We describe here a novel approach to expand a cytokine-dependent Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell (HSPC) population ex vivo by culturing primary adult human or murine HSPCs with fusion proteins including the protein transduction domain of the HIV-1 transactivation protein (Tat) and either MYC or Bcl-2. HSPCs obtained from either mouse bone marrow, human cord blood, human G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood, or human bone marrow were expanded an average of 87 fold, 16.6 fold, 13.6 fold, or 10 fold, respectively. The expanded cell populations were able to give rise to different types of colonies in methylcellulose assays in vitro, as well as mature hematopoietic populations in vivo upon transplantation into irradiated mice. Importantly, for both the human and murine case, the ex vivo expanded cells also gave rise to a self-renewing cell population in vivo, following initial transplantation, that was able to support hematopoiesis upon serial transplantation. Our results show that a self-renewing cell population, capable of reconstituting the hematopoietic compartment, expanded ex vivo in the presence of Tat-MYC and Tat-Bcl-2 suggesting that this may be an attractive approach to expand human HSPCs ex vivo for clinical use. PMID:25170611

  12. Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells: A Potential Developmental Link Between Germinal Lineage and Hematopoiesis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Virant-Klun, Irma

    2016-01-15

    It has been suggested that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) could become specified from a population of migrating primordial germ cells (PGCs), precursors of gametes, during embryogenesis. Some recent experimental data demonstrated that the cell population that is usually considered to be PGCs, moving toward the gonadal ridges of an embryo, contains a subset of cells coexpressing several germ cell and hematopoietic markers and possessing hematopoietic activity. Experimental data showed that bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) generates PGCs from mouse bone marrow-derived pluripotent stem cells. Interestingly, functional reproductive hormone receptors have been identified in HSPCs, thus indicating their potential role in reproductive function. Several reports have demonstrated fertility restoration and germ cell generation after bone marrow transplantation in both animal models and humans. A potential link between HSPCs and germinal lineage might be represented by very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), which have been found in adult human bone marrow, peripheral blood, and umbilical cord blood, express a specific pattern of pluripotency, germinal lineage, and hematopoiesis, and are proposed to persist in adult tissues and organs from the embryonic period of life. Stem cell populations, similar to VSELs, expressing several genes related to pluripotency and germinal lineage, especially to PGCs, have been discovered in adult human reproductive organs, ovaries and testicles, and were related to primitive germ cell-like cell development in vitro, thus supporting the idea of VSELs as a potential link between germinal lineage and hematopoiesis.

  13. Augmented efficacy with the combination of blockade of the Notch-1 pathway, bortezomib and romidepsin in a murine MT-1 adult T-cell leukemia model.

    PubMed

    Yu, P; Petrus, M N; Ju, W; Zhang, M; Conlon, K C; Nakagawa, M; Maeda, M; Bamford, R N; Waldmann, T A

    2015-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive malignancy caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1. There is no accepted curative therapy for ATL. We have reported that certain ATL patients have increased Notch-1 signaling along with constitutive activation of the nuclear factor-κB pathway. Physical and functional interaction between these two pathways provides the rationale to combine the γ-secretase inhibitor compound E with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Moreover, romidepsin, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, has demonstrated major antitumor action in leukemia/lymphoma. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the single agents and the combination of these agents in a murine model of human ATL, the MT-1 model. Single and double agents inhibited tumor growth as monitored by tumor size (P<0.05), and prolonged survival of leukemia-bearing mice (P<0.05) compared with the control group. The combination of three agents significantly enhanced the antitumor efficacy as assessed by tumor size, tumor markers in the serum (human soluble interleukin-2 receptor-α and β2-microglobulin) and survival of the MT-1 tumor-bearing mice, compared with all other treatment groups (P<0.05). Improved therapeutic efficacy obtained by combining compound E, bortezomib and romidepsin supports a clinical trial of this combination in the treatment of ATL.

  14. Lysophosphatidic acid acts as a nutrient-derived developmental cue to regulate early hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haisen; Yue, Rui; Wei, Bin; Gao, Ge; Du, Jiulin; Pei, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Primitive hematopoiesis occurs in the yolk sac blood islands during vertebrate embryogenesis, where abundant phosphatidylcholines (PC) are available as important nutrients for the developing embryo. However, whether these phospholipids also generate developmental cues to promote hematopoiesis is largely unknown. Here, we show that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a signaling molecule derived from PC, regulated hemangioblast formation and primitive hematopoiesis. Pharmacological and genetic blockage of LPA receptor 1 (LPAR1) or autotoxin (ATX), a secretory lysophospholipase that catalyzes LPA production, inhibited hematopoietic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells and impaired the formation of hemangioblasts. Mechanistic experiments revealed that the regulatory effect of ATX-LPA signaling was mediated by PI3K/Akt-Smad pathway. Furthermore, during in vivo embryogenesis in zebrafish, LPA functioned as a developmental cue for hemangioblast formation and primitive hematopoiesis. Taken together, we identified LPA as an important nutrient-derived developmental cue for primitive hematopoiesis as well as a novel mechanism of hemangioblast regulation. PMID:24829209

  15. The NFKB Inducing Kinase Modulates Hematopoiesis During Stress.

    PubMed

    González-Murillo, África; Fernández, Lucía; Baena, Sara; Melen, Gustavo J; Sánchez, Rebeca; Sánchez-Valdepeñas, Carmen; Segovia, José C; Liou, Hsiou-Chi; Schmid, Roland; Madero, Luís; Fresno, Manuel; Ramírez, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    The genetic programs that maintain hematopoiesis during steady state in physiologic conditions are different from those activated during stress. Here, we show that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with deficiencies in components of the alternative NFκB pathway (the NFκB inducing kinase, NIK, and the downstream molecule NFκB2) had a defect in response to stressors such as supraphysiological doses of cytokines, chemotherapy, and hematopoietic transplantation. NIK-deficient mice had peripheral blood and bone marrow leukocyte numbers within normal ranges (except for the already reported defects in B-cell maturation); however, HSCs showed significantly slower expansion capacity in in vitro cultures compared to wild-type HSCs. This was due to a delayed cell cycle and increased apoptosis. In vivo experiments showed that NIK-deficient HSCs did not recover at the same pace as controls when challenged with myeloablative chemotherapy. Finally, NIK-deficient HSCs showed a significantly decreased competitive repopulation capacity in vivo. Using HSCs from mice deficient in one of two downstream targets of NIK, that is, either NFκB2 or c-Rel, only NFκB2 deficiency recapitulated the defects detected with NIK-deficient HSCs. Our results underscore the role of NIK and the alternative NFκB pathway for the recovery of normal levels of hematopoiesis after stress.

  16. Thalassemia, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and spinal cord compression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Syed Sarmad; Junaid, Muhammad; Rashid, Mamoon Ur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) refers to hematopoiesis outside of the medulla of the bone. Chronic anemia states such as thalassemia can cause hematopoietic tissue to expand in certain locations. We report a case of spinal cord compression due to recurrent spinal epidural EMH, which was treated with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy. Pakistan has one of the highest incidence and prevalence of thalassemia in the world. We describe published literature on diagnosis and management of such cases. Case Description: An 18-year-old male presented with bilateral lower limb paresis. He was a known case of homozygous beta thalassemia major. He had undergone surgery for spinal cord compression due to EMH 4 months prior to presentation. Symptom resolution was followed by deterioration 5 days later. He was operated again at our hospital with complete resection of the mass. He underwent local radiotherapy to prevent recurrence. At 2 years follow-up, he showed complete resolution of symptoms. Follow-up imaging demonstrated no residual mass. Conclusion: The possibility of EMH should be considered in every patient with ineffective erythropoiesis as a cause of spinal cord compression. Treatment of such cases is usually done with blood transfusions, which can reduce the hematopoietic drive for EMH. Other options include surgery, hydroxyurea, radiotherapy, or a combination of these on a case to case basis. PMID:27069747

  17. The Hippo pathway regulates hematopoiesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Milton, Claire C; Grusche, Felix A; Degoutin, Joffrey L; Yu, Eefang; Dai, Qi; Lai, Eric C; Harvey, Kieran F

    2014-11-17

    The Salvador-Warts-Hippo (Hippo) pathway is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ growth and cell fate. It performs these functions in epithelial and neural tissues of both insects and mammals, as well as in mammalian organs such as the liver and heart. Despite rapid advances in Hippo pathway research, a definitive role for this pathway in hematopoiesis has remained enigmatic. The hematopoietic compartments of Drosophila melanogaster and mammals possess several conserved features. D. melanogaster possess three types of hematopoietic cells that most closely resemble mammalian myeloid cells: plasmatocytes (macrophage-like cells), crystal cells (involved in wound healing), and lamellocytes (which encapsulate parasites). The proteins that control differentiation of these cells also control important blood lineage decisions in mammals. Here, we define the Hippo pathway as a key mediator of hematopoiesis by showing that it controls differentiation and proliferation of the two major types of D. melanogaster blood cells, plasmatocytes and crystal cells. In animals lacking the downstream Hippo pathway kinase Warts, lymph gland cells overproliferated, differentiated prematurely, and often adopted a mixed lineage fate. The Hippo pathway regulated crystal cell numbers by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. Yorkie and its partner transcription factor Scalloped were found to regulate transcription of the Runx family transcription factor Lozenge, which is a key regulator of crystal cell fate. Further, Yorkie or Scalloped hyperactivation induced ectopic crystal cells in a non-cell-autonomous and Notch-pathway-dependent fashion. PMID:25454587

  18. Eicosanoid Regulation of Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Pelus, Louis M.

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a potentially curative treatment for numerous hematologic malignancies. The transplant procedure as performed today takes advantage of HSC trafficking; either egress of HSC from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood, i.e. mobilization, for acquisition of the hematopoietic graft, and/or trafficking of HSC from the peripheral blood to bone marrow niches in the recipient patient, i.e. HSC homing. Numerous studies, many of which are reviewed herein, have defined hematopoietic regulatory mechanisms mediated by the 20-carbon lipid family of eicosanoids, and recent evidence strongly supports a role for eicosanoids in regulation of hematopoietic trafficking, adding a new role whereby eicosanoids regulate hematopoiesis. Short-term exposure of HSC to the eicosanoid prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases CXCR4 receptor expression, migration and in vivo homing of HSC. In contrast, cannabinoids reduce hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) CXCR4 expression and induce HPC mobilization when administered in vivo. Leukotrienes have been shown to alter CD34+ cell adhesion, migration, and regulate HSC proliferation, suggesting that eicosanoids have both opposing and complimentary roles in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Since numerous FDA approved compounds regulate eicosanoid signaling or biosynthesis, the utility of eicosanoid based therapeutic strategies to improve hematopoietic transplantation can be rapidly evaluated. PMID:20882043

  19. The Hippo pathway regulates hematopoiesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Milton, Claire C; Grusche, Felix A; Degoutin, Joffrey L; Yu, Eefang; Dai, Qi; Lai, Eric C; Harvey, Kieran F

    2014-11-17

    The Salvador-Warts-Hippo (Hippo) pathway is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ growth and cell fate. It performs these functions in epithelial and neural tissues of both insects and mammals, as well as in mammalian organs such as the liver and heart. Despite rapid advances in Hippo pathway research, a definitive role for this pathway in hematopoiesis has remained enigmatic. The hematopoietic compartments of Drosophila melanogaster and mammals possess several conserved features. D. melanogaster possess three types of hematopoietic cells that most closely resemble mammalian myeloid cells: plasmatocytes (macrophage-like cells), crystal cells (involved in wound healing), and lamellocytes (which encapsulate parasites). The proteins that control differentiation of these cells also control important blood lineage decisions in mammals. Here, we define the Hippo pathway as a key mediator of hematopoiesis by showing that it controls differentiation and proliferation of the two major types of D. melanogaster blood cells, plasmatocytes and crystal cells. In animals lacking the downstream Hippo pathway kinase Warts, lymph gland cells overproliferated, differentiated prematurely, and often adopted a mixed lineage fate. The Hippo pathway regulated crystal cell numbers by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. Yorkie and its partner transcription factor Scalloped were found to regulate transcription of the Runx family transcription factor Lozenge, which is a key regulator of crystal cell fate. Further, Yorkie or Scalloped hyperactivation induced ectopic crystal cells in a non-cell-autonomous and Notch-pathway-dependent fashion.

  20. The Dtk receptor tyrosine kinase, which binds protein S, is expressed during hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Crosier, P S; Freeman, S A; Orlic, D; Bodine, D M; Crosier, K E

    1996-02-01

    Dtk (Tyro 3/Sky/Rse/Brt/Tif) belongs to a recently recognized subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that also includes Ufo (Axl/Ark) and Mer (Eyk). Ligands for Dtk and Ufo have been identified as protein S and the related molecule Gas6, respectively. This study examined expression of Dtk during ontogeny of the hematopoietic system and compared the pattern of expression with that of Ufo. Both receptors were abundantly expressed in differentiating embryonic stem cells, yolk sac blood islands, para-aortic splanchnopleural mesoderm, fractionated AA4+ fetal liver cells, and fetal thymus from day 14 until birth. Although Ufo was expressed at moderate levels in adult bone marrow, expression of Dtk in this tissue was barely detectable. In adult bone marrow subpopulations fractionated using counterflow centrifugal elutriation, immunomagnetic bead selection for lineage-depletion and FACS sorting for c-kit expression, very low levels of Dtk and/or Ufo were detected in some cell fractions. These results suggest that Dtk and Ufo are likely to be involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis, particularly during the embryonic stages of blood cell development.

  1. Comparison of in vitro mineralization by murine embryonic and adult stem cells cultured in an osteogenic medium.

    PubMed

    Shimko, Daniel A; Burks, Chris A; Dee, Kay C; Nauman, Eric A

    2004-01-01

    Nearly half a million bone-grafting procedures occurred in the United States in the year 2000. Tissue-engineered bone substitutes may mitigate difficulties associated with current grafting options. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could be a potential cell source for bone substitutes; however, direct comparisons between ESCs and other cell sources are lacking. Here we provide a direct, long-term, in vitro comparison of mineralization processes in adult, marrow-derived, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and ESCs from the 129/Sv+c/+p mouse strain. MSCs were observed to grow at a slower rate than ESCs. MSCs expressed seven times more alkaline phosphatase (AP) per cell than did ESCs and immediately showed type I collagen and osteocalcin production. ESCs also produced type I collagen and osteocalcin, but production was delayed. Mineral deposition by ESCs was nearly 50 times higher than by MSCs. Spectroscopic analysis showed the calcium-to-phosphorus ratio (Ca:P) of the ESC mineral (1.26:1) to be significantly higher than that of the MSCs (0.29:1), but still 25% lower than hydroxyapatite (1.67:1). Addition of basic fibroblast growth factor significantly inhibited AP expression, mineral deposition, and Ca:P ratios in MSCs and had little effect on ESCs. These functional characteristics may assist with cell selection for purposes of bone tissue engineering.

  2. Enhanced habit-based learning and decreased neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus in a murine model of chronic social stress.

    PubMed

    Ferragud, A; Haro, A; Sylvain, A; Velázquez-Sánchez, C; Hernández-Rabaza, V; Canales, J J

    2010-06-26

    Stress can induce preferential engagement of habit learning mediated by the basal ganglia, relative to learning that involves complex spatial associations contributed by the hippocampal formation. We explored in mice the influence that chronic episodes of social stress exert on the selection of cognitive/spatial vs. habit-based learning strategies. Male mice were exposed to repeated episodes of social confrontation and were categorized as dominant, subordinate or undetermined according to quantitative ethologically relevant parameters of aggression. Mice were then trained in a conditional discrimination task in the T-maze in the presence of allocentric cues until five correct choices were made. The T-maze was then turned 180 degrees and mice were categorized as "cue-learners" or "place-learners" on the basis of their first response in the probe test. Mice showed a graded preference for place vs. cue learning strategies depending on their social categorization (control>undetermined>dominant>subordinate), which ranged from 55% in controls to only 10% in subordinate mice. The response of subordinate mice differed significantly from controls. Hippocampal neurogenesis was studied in the different groups of mice. In keeping with the tendency to engage habit learning, 2,5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation in the DG was reduced in mice that experienced agonistic encounters, and so was the expression of doublecortin, a marker for immature neurons. These observations suggest that chronic social stress impairs neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, weakens spatial learning and strengthens habit-like responses.

  3. Interferon-gamma but not TNF alpha promotes neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth of murine adult neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Galaxy; Goldshmit, Yona; Turnley, Ann M

    2004-05-01

    Neural trauma, such as traumatic brain injury or stroke, results in a vigorous inflammatory response at and near the site of injury, with cytokine production by endogenous glial cells and invading immune cells. Little is known of the effect that these cytokines have on neural stem cell function. Here we examine the effects of two inflammatory cytokines, interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), on adult neural stem cells. Neural stem cells grown in the presence of either cytokine failed to generate neurospheres. Cytotoxicity assays showed that TNF alpha but not IFN gamma was toxic to the neural stem cells under proliferative conditions. Under differentiating conditions, neither cytokine was toxic; however, IFN gamma enhanced neuronal differentiation, rapidly increasing beta III-tubulin positive cell numbers 3-4 fold and inhibiting astrocyte generation. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth and the number of neurites per neuron was enhanced in cells differentiated in the presence of IFN gamma. Therefore, both inflammatory cytokines examined have substantial, but different effects on neural stem cell function and suggests that regulation of the inflammatory environment following brain injury may influence the ability of neural stem cells to repair the damage. PMID:15081598

  4. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  5. Maintenance of the functional integrity of mouse hematopoiesis by EED and promotion of leukemogenesis by EED haploinsufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Kenichiro; Ueda, Takeshi; Yamasaki, Norimasa; Nakata, Yuichiro; Sera, Yasuyuki; Nagamachi, Akiko; Miyama, Takahiko; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Takubo, Keiyo; Kanai, Akinori; Oda, Hideaki; Wolff, Linda; Honda, Zen-ichiro; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Matsubara, Akio; Suda, Toshio; Inaba, Toshiya; Honda, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) participates in transcriptional repression through methylation of histone H3K27. The WD-repeat protein embryonic ectoderm development (EED) is a non-catalytic but an essential component of PRC2 and its mutations were identified in hematopoietic malignancies. To clarify the role(s) of EED in adult hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis, we generated Eed conditional knockout (EedΔ/Δ) mice. EedΔ/Δ mice died in a short period with rapid decrease of hematopoietic cells. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) were markedly decreased with impaired bone marrow (BM) repopulation ability. Cell cycle analysis of HSPCs demonstrated increased S-phase fraction coupled with suppressed G0/G1 entry. Genes encoding cell adhesion molecules are significantly enriched in EedΔ/Δ HSPCs, and consistently, EedΔ/Δ HSPCs exhibited increased attachment to a major extracellular matrix component, fibronectin. Thus, EED deficiency increases proliferation on one side but promotes quiescence possibly by enhanced adhesion to the hematopoietic niche on the other, and these conflicting events would lead to abnormal differentiation and functional defect of EedΔ/Δ HSPCs. In addition, Eed haploinsufficiency induced hematopoietic dysplasia, and Eed heterozygous mice were susceptible to malignant transformation and developed leukemia in cooperation with Evi1 overexpression. Our results demonstrated differentiation stage-specific and dose-dependent roles of EED in normal hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. PMID:27432459

  6. Understanding hematopoiesis from a single-cell standpoint.

    PubMed

    Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Lucas, Daniel; Beerman, Isabel; Kent, David G; Perié, Leïla

    2016-06-01

    The cellular diversity of the hematopoietic system has been extensively studied, and a plethora of cell surface markers have been used to discriminate and prospectively purify different blood cell types. However, even within phenotypically identical fractions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells or lineage-restricted progenitors, significant functional heterogeneity is observed when single cells are analyzed. To address these challenges, researchers are now using techniques to follow single cells and their progeny to improve our understanding of the underlying functional heterogeneity. On November 19, 2015, Dr. David Kent and Dr. Leïla Perié, two emerging young group leaders, presented their recent efforts to dissect the functional properties of individual cells with a webinar series organized by the International Society for Experimental Hematology. Here, we provide a summary of the presented methods for cell labeling and clonal tracking and discuss how these different techniques have been employed to study hematopoiesis.

  7. Evidence that hematopoiesis may be a stochastic process in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abkowitz, J L; Catlin, S N; Guttorp, P

    1996-02-01

    To study the behavior of hematopoietic stem cells in vivo, hematopoiesis was simulated by assuming that all stem cell decisions (that is, replication, apoptosis, initiation of a differentiation/maturation program) were determined by chance. Predicted outcomes from simulated experiments were compared with data obtained in autologous marrow transplantation studies of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) heterozygous female Safari cats. With this approach, we prove that stochastic differentiation can result in the wide spectrum of discrete outcomes observed in vivo, and that clonal dominance can occur by chance. As the analyses also suggest that the frequency of feline hematopoietic stem cells is only 6 per 10(7) nucleated marrow cells, and that sem cells do not replicate on average more frequently than once every three weeks, these large-animal data challenge clinical strategies for marrow transplantation and gene therapy.

  8. Synovial tumefactive extramedullary hematopoiesis associated to polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Argüelles Cabrera, Hugo; Carrasco Juan, José Luis; García Castro, María Candelaria; González Gaitano, Manuel; Bonilla Arjona, Alfonso; Díaz-Flores, Lucio

    2007-01-01

    The case of a 66-year-old male patient with a chronic myeloproliferative type polycythemia vera disorder, who after 2 years of evolution is developing a tumefactive extramedullary hematopoiesis (TEH) located in the synovial of the articulation in the right knee, is described. The tumor histologically consists of a relatively lax and edematous synovial structure diffusely infiltrated by mature and semimature hematopoietic cellular population. The simultaneous study of the bone marrow reveals medullar spaces full of hematopoietic cellularity, with a predominance of megakaryocytic and red series, and with the addition of severe reticulin fibrosis, facts that suggest a progression toward myelofibrosis. The TEH developed in tissues without a reticulum endothelial system is very uncommon. We provide data about the first case located in the synovial membrane and we review the literature regarding this pathologic entity.

  9. The GIY-YIG Type Endonuclease Ankyrin Repeat and LEM Domain-Containing Protein 1 (ANKLE1) Is Dispensable for Mouse Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Juliane; Meixner, Arabella; Brachner, Andreas; Foisner, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat and LEM-domain containing protein 1 (ANKLE1) is a GIY-YIG endonuclease with unknown functions, mainly expressed in mouse hematopoietic tissues. To test its potential role in hematopoiesis we generated Ankle1-deficient mice. Ankle1Δ/Δ mice are viable without any detectable phenotype in hematopoiesis. Neither hematopoietic progenitor cells, myeloid and lymphoid progenitors, nor B and T cell development in bone marrow, spleen and thymus, are affected in Ankle1Δ/Δ-mice. Similarly embryonic stress erythropoiesis in liver and adult erythropoiesis in bone marrow and spleen appear normal. To test whether ANKLE1, like the only other known GIY-YIG endonuclease in mammals, SLX1, may contribute to Holliday junction resolution during DNA repair, Ankle1-deficient cells were exposed to various DNA-damage inducing agents. However, lack of Ankle1 did not affect cell viability and, unlike depletion of Slx1, Ankle1-deficiency did not increase sister chromatid exchange in Bloom helicase-depleted cells. Altogether, we show that lack of Ankle1 does neither affect mouse hematopoiesis nor DNA damage repair in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, indicating a redundant or non-essential function of ANKLE1 in mouse. PMID:27010503

  10. Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) in laboratory animals: offering an insight into stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shao-Chih; Liu, Hua-Hsing; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chen, Pin-Ru; Liu, Ming-Chao; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chang, Ko-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) is a pathological process secondary to underlying bone marrow (BM) insufficiency in adults. It is characterized by the emergence of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors scattered around the affected tissue, most likely in the spleen, liver, and lymph node, etc. EMH in patients frequently receives less medical attention and is neglected unless a compressive or obstructive hematopoietic mass appears to endanger the patient's life. However, on a biological basis, EMH reflects the alteration of relationships among hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and their original and new microenvironments. The ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to mobilize from the bone marrow and to accommodate and function in extramedullary tissues is rather complicated and far from our current understanding. Fortunately, many reports from the studies of drugs and genetics using animals have incidentally found EMH to be involved. Thereby, the molecular basis of EMH could further be elucidated from those animals after cross-comparison. A deeper understanding of the extramedullary hematopoietic niche could help expand stem cells in vitro and establish a better treatment in patients for stem cell transplantation. PMID:25646951

  11. Smyd5 plays pivotal roles in both primitive and definitive hematopoiesis during zebrafish embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Tomoaki; Tsunesumi, Shin-ichiro; Sagara, Hiroshi; Munakata, Miyo; Hisaki, Yoshihiro; Sekiya, Takao; Furukawa, Yoichi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of histone tails plays a pivotal role in the regulation of a wide range of biological processes. SET and MYND domain-containing protein (SMYD) is a methyltransferase, five family members of which have been identified in humans. SMYD1, SMYD2, SMYD3, and SMYD4 have been found to play critical roles in carcinogenesis and/or the development of heart and skeletal muscle. However, the physiological functions of SMYD5 remain unknown. To investigate the function of Smyd5 in vivo, zebrafish were utilised as a model system. We first examined smyd5 expression patterns in developing zebrafish embryos. Smyd5 transcripts were abundantly expressed at early developmental stages and then gradually decreased. Smyd5 was expressed in all adult tissues examined. Loss-of-function analysis of Smyd5 was then performed in zebrafish embryos using smyd5 morpholino oligonucleotide (MO). Embryos injected with smyd5-MO showed normal gross morphological development, including of heart and skeletal muscle. However, increased expression of both primitive and definitive hematopoietic markers, including pu.1, mpx, l-plastin, and cmyb, were observed. These phenotypes of smyd5-MO zebrafish embryos were also observed when we introduced mutations in smyd5 gene with the CRISPR/Cas9 system. As the expression of myeloid markers was elevated in smyd5 loss-of-function zebrafish, we propose that Smyd5 plays critical roles in hematopoiesis. PMID:27377701

  12. Effects of Dosimetrically Guided I-131 Therapy on Hematopoiesis in Patients With Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bikas, Athanasios; Schneider, Mark; Desale, Sameer; Atkins, Frank; Mete, Mihriye; Burman, Kenneth D; Wartofsky, Leonard; Van Nostrand, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of dosimetrically-guided I-131 treatment on hematopoiesis. Statistically significant decreases in CBC parameters following a specific time-pattern were shown.

  13. Practical Murine Hematopathology: A Comparative Review and Implications for Research

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Karyn E; Mikkola, Amy M; Stepanek, Aaron M; Vernet, Andyna; Hall, Christopher D; Sun, Chia C; Yildirim, Eda; Staropoli, John F; Lee, Jeannie T; Brown, Diane E

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic parameters are important markers of disease in human and veterinary medicine. Biomedical research has benefited from mouse models that recapitulate such disease, thus expanding knowledge of pathogenetic mechanisms and investigative therapies that translate across species. Mice in health have many notable hematologic differences from humans and other veterinary species, including smaller erythrocytes, higher percentage of circulating reticulocytes or polychromasia, lower peripheral blood neutrophil and higher peripheral blood and bone marrow lymphocyte percentages, variable leukocyte morphologies, physiologic splenic hematopoiesis and iron storage, and more numerous and shorter-lived erythrocytes and platelets. For accurate and complete hematologic analyses of disease and response to investigative therapeutic interventions, these differences and the unique features of murine hematopathology must be understood. Here we review murine hematology and hematopathology for practical application to translational investigation. PMID:25926395

  14. Intestinal obstruction caused by extramedullary hematopoiesis and ascites in primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiu-Qing; Zheng, Zong-Heng; Jin, Yi; Tao, Jin; Abassa, Kodjo-Kunale; Wen, Zhuo-Fu; Shao, Chun-Kui; Wei, Hong-Bo; Wu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder. It is characterized by bone marrow fibrosis, extramedullary hematopoiesis with hepatosplenomegaly and leukoerythroblastosis in the peripheral blood. The main clinical manifestations of PMF are anemia, bleeding, hepatosplenomegaly, fatigue, and fever. Here we report a rare case of PMF with anemia, small bowel obstruction and ascites due to extramedullary hematopoiesis and portal hypertension. The diagnosis was difficult to establish before surgery and the differential diagnosis is discussed. PMID:25206301

  15. Gene expression profiling to define the cell intrinsic role of the SKI proto-oncogene in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chalk, Alistair M; Liddicoat, Brian J J; Walkley, Carl R; Singbrant, Sofie

    2014-12-01

    The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced gene signatures associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation. Here we provide detailed experimental methods and analysis for the gene expression profiling described in our recently published study of Singbrant et al. (2014) in Haematologica. Our data sets (available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE39457) provide a resource for exploring the underlying molecular mechanisms of the involvement of the proto-oncogene SKI in hematopoietic stem cell function and development of myeloid neoplasms.

  16. A multiscale model of the bone marrow and hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ariosto S; Anderson, Alexander R.A.

    2013-01-01

    The bone marrow is necessary for renewal of all hematopoietic cells and critical for maintenance of a wide range of physiologic functions. Multiple human diseases result from bone marrow dysfunction. It is also the site in which “liquid” tumors, including leukemia and multiple myeloma, develop as well as a frequent site of metastases. Understanding the complex cellular and microenvironmental interactions that govern normal bone marrow function as well as diseases and cancers of the bone marrow would be a valuable medical advance. Our goal is the development of a spatially-explicit in silico model of the bone marrow to understand both its normal function and the evolutionary dynamics that govern the emergence of bone marrow malignancy. Here we introduce a multiscale computational model of the bone marrow that incorporates three distinct spatial scales, cell, hematopoietic subunit, whole marrow. Implemented as a fixed lattice 3D cellular automaton, it reproduces the spatial characteristics of the normal bone marrow and is validated against data from the daily production of mature blood cells and response of hematopoiesis after irradiation. The major mechanisms modeled in this work are: (1) replication, specialization and migration of hematopoietic cells, (2) optimized spatial configuration of sinuses and hematopoietic compartments and, (3) intravasation of mature hematopoietic cells into sinuses. Our results, using parameter estimates from literature, recapitulates normal bone marrow function and suggest an explanation for the fractal-like structure of trabeculae and sinuses in the marrow, which would be an optimization of the hematopoietic function in order to maximize the number of mature blood cells produced daily within the volumetric restrictions of the marrow. PMID:21631151

  17. Emergence of Clonal Hematopoiesis in the Majority of Patients with Acquired Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Babushok, Daria V.; Perdigones, Nieves; Perin, Juan C.; Olson, Timothy S.; Ye, Wenda; Roth, Jacquelyn J.; Lind, Curt; Cattier, Carine; Li, Yimei; Hartung, Helge; Paessler, Michele E.; Frank, Dale M.; Xie, Hongbo M.; Cross, Shanna; Cockroft, Joshua D.; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Monos, Dimitrios; Biegel, Jaclyn A.; Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a non-malignant disease caused by autoimmune destruction of early hematopoietic cells. Clonal hematopoiesis is a late complication, seen in 20–25% of older patients. We hypothesized that clonal hematopoiesis in aAA is a more general phenomenon, which can arise early in disease even in younger patients. To evaluate clonal hematopoiesis in aAA, we used comparative whole exome sequencing of paired bone marrow and skin in 22 patients. We found somatic mutations in sixteen patients (72.7%) with a median disease duration of 1 year; twelve (66.7%) were patients with pediatriconset aAA. Fifty-eight mutations in 51 unique genes were primarily in pathways of immunity and transcriptional regulation. Most frequently mutated was PIGA, with 7 mutations. Only two mutations were in genes recurrently-mutated in MDS. Two patients had oligoclonal loss of HLA alleles, linking immune escape to clone emergence. Two patients had activating mutations in key signaling pathways (STAT5B(p.N642H), CAMK2G(p.T306M)). Our results suggest that clonal hematopoiesis in aAA is common, with two mechanisms emerging― immune escape and increased proliferation. Our findings expand conceptual understanding of this non-neoplastic blood disorder. Future prospective studies of clonal hematopoiesis in aAA will be critical for understanding outcomes, and for designing personalized treatment strategies. PMID:25800665

  18. Expression of Scl in mesoderm rescues hematopoiesis in the absence of Oct-4

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Kimi Y.; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Rogers, Jason H.; Tran, Tam; Hromas, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In embryonic stem cells, Oct-4 concentration is critical in determining the development of endoderm, mesoderm, and trophectoderm. Although Oct-4 expression is essential for mesoderm development, it is unclear whether it has a role in the development of specific mesodermal tissues. In this study, we have examined the importance of Oct-4 in the generation of hematopoietic cells using an inducible Oct-4 ESC line. We demonstrate that Oct-4 has a role in supporting hematopoiesis after specifying brachyury-positive mesoderm. When we suppressed Oct-4 expression before or after mesoderm specification, no hematopoietic cells are detected. However, hematopoiesis can be rescued in the absence of Oct-4 after mesoderm specification if the essential hematopoietic transcription factor stem cell leukemia is expressed. Our results suggest that, for hematopoiesis to occur, Oct-4 is required for the initial specification of mesoderm and subsequently is required for the development of hematopoietic cells from uncommitted mesoderm. PMID:19321862

  19. Spliceosomal gene mutations in myelodysplasia: molecular links to clonal abnormalities of hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daichi; Bradley, Robert K.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Genomic analyses of the myeloid malignancies and clonal disorders of hematopoiesis that may give rise to these disorders have identified that mutations in genes encoding core spliceosomal proteins and accessory regulatory splicing factors are among the most common targets of somatic mutations. These spliceosomal mutations often occur in a mutually exclusive manner with one another and, in aggregate, account for the most frequent class of mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) in particular. Although substantial progress has been made in understanding the effects of several of these mutations on splicing and splice site recognition, functional connections linking the mechanistic changes in splicing induced by these mutations to the phenotypic consequences of clonal and aberrant hematopoiesis are not yet well defined. This review describes our current understanding of the mechanistic and biological effects of spliceosomal gene mutations in MDSs as well as the regulation of splicing throughout normal hematopoiesis. PMID:27151974

  20. Reporter gene technologies for imaging cell fates in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kusy, Sophie; Contag, Christopher H

    2014-01-01

    Advances in noninvasive imaging technologies that allow for in vivo dynamic monitoring of cells and cellular function in living research subjects have revealed new insights into cell biology in the context of intact organs and their native environment. In the field of hematopoiesis and stem cell research, studies of cell trafficking involved in injury repair and hematopoietic engraftment have made great progress using these new tools. Stem cells present unique challenges for imaging since after transplantation, they proliferate dramatically and differentiate. Therefore, the imaging modality used needs to have a large dynamic range, and the genetic regulatory elements used need to be stably expressed during differentiation. Multiple imaging technologies using different modalities are available, and each varies in sensitivity, ease of data acquisition, signal to noise ratios (SNR), substrate availability, and other parameters that affect utility for monitoring cell fates and function. For a given application, there may be several different approaches that can be used. For mouse models, clinically validated technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been joined by optical imaging techniques such as in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and fluorescence imaging (FLI), and all have been used to monitor bone marrow and stem cells after transplantation into mice. Photoacoustic imaging that utilizes the sound created by the thermal expansion of absorbed light to generate an image best represents hybrid technologies. Each modality requires that the cells of interest be marked with a genetic reporter that acts as a label making them uniquely visible using that technology. For each modality, there are several labels to choose from. Multiple methods for applying these different labels are available. This chapter provides an overview of the imaging technologies and commonly used labels for each, as well as detailed

  1. Spinal osteoblastic meningioma with hematopoiesis: radiologic-pathologic correlation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Elizabeth J; Schlauderaff, Abraham; Rand, Scott D; Eckardt, Gerald W; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-10-01

    Spinal meningiomas associated with bone formation and hematopoiesis are rare tumors with only 3 prior case reports in the literature. We describe a case report of a woman who presented with back pain and an isolated event of urinary incontinence. A calcified spinal canal mass at T8 was identified on computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging. A gross total resection of the tumor was performed and pathologic examination showed a meningioma, World Health Organization grade 1, containing bone and bone marrow elements. A review of previously reported cases and a discussion of possible mechanisms of bone and hematopoiesis development in meningioma are presented. PMID:27649951

  2. Engineering vascularized bone: osteogenic and proangiogenic potential of murine periosteal cells.

    PubMed

    van Gastel, Nick; Torrekens, Sophie; Roberts, Scott J; Moermans, Karen; Schrooten, Jan; Carmeliet, Peter; Luttun, Aernout; Luyten, Frank P; Carmeliet, Geert

    2012-11-01

    One of the key challenges in bone tissue engineering is the timely formation of blood vessels that promote the survival of the implanted cells in the construct. Fracture healing largely depends on the presence of an intact periosteum but it is still unknown whether periosteum-derived cells (PDC) are critical for bone repair only by promoting bone formation or also by inducing neovascularization. We first established a protocol to specifically isolate murine PDC (mPDC) from long bones of adult mice. Mesenchymal stem cells were abundantly present in this cell population as more than 50% of the mPDC expressed mesenchymal markers (CD73, CD90, CD105, and stem cell antigen-1) and the cells exhibited trilineage differentiation potential (chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic). When transplanted on a collagen-calcium phosphate scaffold in vivo, mPDC attracted numerous blood vessels and formed mature bone which comprises a hematopoiesis-supportive stroma. We explored the proangiogenic properties of mPDC using in vitro culture systems and showed that mPDC promote the survival and proliferation of endothelial cells through the production of vascular endothelial growth factor. Coimplantation with endothelial cells demonstrated that mPDC can enhance vasculogenesis by adapting a pericyte-like phenotype, in addition to their ability to stimulate blood vessel ingrowth from the host. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that periosteal cells contribute to fracture repair, not only through their strong osteogenic potential but also through their proangiogenic features and thus provide an ideal cell source for bone regeneration therapies.

  3. Xyloside effects on in vitro hematopoiesis: Functional and biochemical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, S.L.; Bentley, S.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Xyloside supplementation of long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMCs) has been reported to result in greatly enhanced proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells. This was presumed to be the result of xyloside-mediated perturbation of proteoglycan synthesis by marrow-derived stromal cells. To investigate this phenomenon, we first studied the effects of xyloside supplementation on proteoglycan synthesis by D2XRadII bone marrow stromal cells, which support hematopoietic stem cell proliferation in vitro. D2XRadII cells were precursor labelled with 35S-sulfate, and proteoglycans separated by ion exchange chromatography, isopyknic CsCl gradient centrifugation, and gel filtration HPLC. Xyloside-supplemented cultures showed an approximately fourfold increase in total 35S incorporation, mainly as free chondroitin-dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) glycosaminoglycan chains in the culture media. Both xyloside supplemented and nonsupplemented cultures synthesized DS1, DS2, and DS3 CS/DS proteoglycans as previously described. In contrast to previous reports, xyloside was found to inhibit hematopoietic cell growth in LTBMC. Inhibitory effects were observed both in cocultures of IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cell lines with supportive stromal cell lines and in primary murine LTBMCs. Xyloside was found to have a marked inhibitory effect on the growth of murine hematopoietic stem cells and IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cell lines in clonal assay systems and in suspension cultures. In contrast, dialyzed concentrated conditioned media from LTBMCs had no such inhibitory effects. These findings suggest that xyloside-mediated inhibition of hematopoietic cell growth in LTBMC resulted from a direct effect of xyloside on proteoglycan synthesis by hematopoietic cells.

  4. Inhibitory effects of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 on the aorta-gonad-mapharsen hematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Naoki; Nobuhisa, Ikuo; Mochita, Miyuki; Taga, Tetsuya . E-mail: taga@kaiju.medic.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-01-01

    Definitive hematopoiesis starts in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mouse embryo. Our previous studies revealed that STAT3, a gp130 downstream transcription factor, is required for AGM hematopoiesis and that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) phosphorylates serine-727 of STAT3. HIPK2 is a serine/threonine kinase known to be involved in transcriptional repression and apoptosis. In the present study, we examined the role of HIPK2 in hematopoiesis in mouse embryo. HIPK2 transcripts were found in fetal hematopoietic tissues such as the mouse AGM region and fetal liver. In cultured AGM cells, HIPK2 protein was detected in adherent cells. Functional analyses of HIPK2 were carried out by introducing wild-type and mutant HIPK2 constructs into AGM cultures. Production of CD45{sup +} hematopoietic cells was suppressed by forced expression of HIPK2 in AGM cultures. This suppression required the kinase domain and nuclear localization signals of HIPK2, but the kinase activity was dispensable. HIPK2-overexpressing AGM-derived nonadherent cells did not form cobblestone-like colonies in cultures with stromal cells. Furthermore, overexpression of HIPK2 in AGM cultures impeded the expansion of CD45{sup low}c-Kit{sup +} cells, which exhibit the immature hematopoietic progenitor phenotype. These data indicate that HIPK2 plays a negative regulatory role in AGM hematopoiesis in the mouse embryo.

  5. Regulation of larval hematopoiesis in Drosophila melanogaster: a role for the multi sex combs gene.

    PubMed Central

    Remillieux-Leschelle, Nathalie; Santamaria, Pedro; Randsholt, Neel B

    2002-01-01

    Drosophila larval hematopoietic organs produce circulating hemocytes that ensure the cellular host defense by recognizing and neutralizing non-self or noxious objects through phagocytosis or encapsulation and melanization. Hematopoietic lineage specification as well as blood cell proliferation and differentiation are tightly controlled. Mutations in genes that regulate lymph gland cell proliferation and hemocyte numbers in the body cavity cause hematopoietic organ overgrowth and hemocyte overproliferation. Occasionally, mutant hemocytes invade self-tissues, behaving like neoplastic malignant cells. Two alleles of the Polycomb group (PcG) gene multi sex combs (mxc) were previously isolated as such lethal malignant blood neoplasm mutations. PcG genes regulate Hox gene expression in vertebrates and invertebrates and participate in mammalian hematopoiesis control. Hence we investigated the need for mxc in Drosophila hematopoietic organs and circulating hemocytes. We show that mxc-induced hematopoietic hyperplasia is cell autonomous and that mxc mainly controls plasmatocyte lineage proliferation and differentiation in lymph glands and circulating hemocytes. Loss of the Toll pathway, which plays a similar role in hematopoiesis, counteracted mxc hemocyte proliferation but not mxc hemocyte differentiation. Several PcG genes tested in trans had no effects on mxc hematopoietic phenotypes, whereas the trithorax group gene brahma is important for normal and mutant hematopoiesis control. We propose that mxc provides one of the regulatory inputs in larval hematopoiesis that control normal rates of plasmatocyte and crystal lineage proliferation as well as normal rates and timing of hemocyte differentiation. PMID:12454071

  6. The histone H2A deubiquitinase Usp16 regulates hematopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yue; Jones, Amanda E.; Yang, Wei; Liu, Shanrun; Dai, Qian; Liu, Yudong; Swindle, C. Scott; Zhou, Dewang; Zhang, Zhuo; Ryan, Thomas M.; Townes, Tim M.; Klug, Christopher A.; Chen, Dongquan; Wang, Hengbin

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms play important regulatory roles in hematopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. Subunits of polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), the major histone H2A ubiquitin ligase, are critical for both normal and pathological hematopoiesis; however, it is unclear which of the several counteracting H2A deubiquitinases functions along with PRC1 to control H2A ubiquitination (ubH2A) level and regulates hematopoiesis in vivo. Here we investigated the function of Usp16 in mouse hematopoiesis. Conditional deletion of Usp16 in bone marrow resulted in a significant increase of global ubH2A level and lethality. Usp16 deletion did not change HSC number but was associated with a dramatic reduction of mature and progenitor cell populations, revealing a role in governing HSC lineage commitment. ChIP- and RNA-sequencing studies in HSC and progenitor cells revealed that Usp16 bound to many important hematopoietic regulators and that Usp16 deletion altered the expression of genes in transcription/chromosome organization, immune response, hematopoietic/lymphoid organ development, and myeloid/leukocyte differentiation. The altered gene expression was partly rescued by knockdown of PRC1 subunits, suggesting that Usp16 and PRC1 counterbalance each other to regulate cellular ubH2A level and gene expression in the hematopoietic system. We further discovered that knocking down Cdkn1a (p21cip1), a Usp16 target and regulated gene, rescued the altered cell cycle profile and differentiation defect of Usp16-deleted HSCs. Collectively, these studies identified Usp16 as one of the histone H2A deubiquitinases, which coordinates with the H2A ubiquitin ligase PRC1 to regulate hematopoiesis, and revealed cell cycle regulation by Usp16 as key for HSC differentiation. PMID:26699484

  7. Phenotypic, Morphological and Adhesive Differences of Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Cultured on Murine versus Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Doreen; Friedrichs, Jens; Ritter, Steffi; Käubler, Theresa; Werner, Carsten; Bornhäuser, Martin; Corbeil, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Xenogenic transplantation models have been developed to study human hematopoiesis in immunocompromised murine recipients. They still have limitations and therefore it is important to delineate all players within the bone marrow that could account for species-specific differences. Here, we evaluated the proliferative capacity, morphological and physical characteristics of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) after co-culture on murine or human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). After seven days, human CD34+CD133– HSPCs expanded to similar extents on both feeder layers while cellular subsets comprising primitive CD34+CD133+ and CD133+CD34– phenotypes are reduced fivefold on murine MSCs. The number of migrating HSPCs was also reduced on murine cells suggesting that MSC adhesion influences cellular polarization of HSPC. We used atomic force microscopy-based single-cell force spectroscopy to quantify their adhesive interactions. We found threefold higher detachment forces of human HSPCs from murine MSCs compared to human ones. This difference is related to the N-cadherin expression level on murine MSCs since its knockdown abolished their differential adhesion properties with human HSPCs. Our observations highlight phenotypic, morphological and adhesive differences of human HSPCs when cultured on murine or human MSCs, which raise some caution in data interpretation when xenogenic transplantation models are used. PMID:26498381

  8. Role of the clathrin adaptor PICALM in normal hematopoiesis and polycythemia vera pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yuichi; Maeda, Manami; Pasham, Mithun; Aguet, Francois; Tacheva-Grigorova, Silvia K.; Masuda, Takeshi; Yi, Hai; Lee, Sung-Uk; Xu, Jian; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Ericsson, Maria; Mullally, Ann; Heuser, John; Kirchhausen, Tom; Maeda, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Clathrin-dependent endocytosis is an essential cellular process shared by all cell types. Despite this, precisely how endocytosis is regulated in a cell-type-specific manner and how this key pathway functions physiologically or pathophysiologically remain largely unknown. PICALM, which encodes the clathrin adaptor protein PICALM, was originally identified as a component of the CALM/AF10 leukemia oncogene. Here we show, by employing a series of conditional Picalm knockout mice, that PICALM critically regulates transferrin uptake in erythroid cells by functioning as a cell-type-specific regulator of transferrin receptor endocytosis. While transferrin receptor is essential for the development of all hematopoietic lineages, Picalm was dispensable for myeloid and B-lymphoid development. Furthermore, global Picalm inactivation in adult mice did not cause gross defects in mouse fitness, except for anemia and a coat color change. Freeze-etch electron microscopy of primary erythroblasts and live-cell imaging of murine embryonic fibroblasts revealed that Picalm function is required for efficient clathrin coat maturation. We showed that the PICALM PIP2 binding domain is necessary for transferrin receptor endocytosis in erythroblasts and absolutely essential for erythroid development from mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in an erythroid culture system. We further showed that Picalm deletion entirely abrogated the disease phenotype in a Jak2V617F knock-in murine model of polycythemia vera. Our findings provide new insights into the regulation of cell-type-specific transferrin receptor endocytosis in vivo. They also suggest a new strategy to block cellular uptake of transferrin-bound iron, with therapeutic potential for disorders characterized by inappropriate red blood cell production, such as polycythemia vera. PMID:25552701

  9. Notch1 acts via Foxc2 to promote definitive hematopoiesis via effects on hemogenic endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Il Ho; Lu, Yi-Fen; Zhao, Long; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Kume, Tsutomu; Datta, Sumon M.; Arora, Natasha; Guiu, Jordi; Lagha, Mounia; Kim, Peter G.; Do, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Jae Ho; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Zon, Leonard I.; Bigas, Anna; Burns, Caroline E.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic and vascular development share many common features, including cell surface markers and sites of origin. Recent lineage-tracing studies have established that definitive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells arise from vascular endothelial–cadherin+ hemogenic endothelial cells of the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region, but the genetic programs underlying the specification of hemogenic endothelial cells remain poorly defined. Here, we discovered that Notch induction enhances hematopoietic potential and promotes the specification of hemogenic endothelium in differentiating cultures of mouse embryonic stem cells, and we identified Foxc2 as a highly upregulated transcript in the hemogenic endothelial population. Studies in zebrafish and mouse embryos revealed that Foxc2 and its orthologs are required for the proper development of definitive hematopoiesis and function downstream of Notch signaling in the hemogenic endothelium. These data establish a pathway linking Notch signaling to Foxc2 in hemogenic endothelial cells to promote definitive hematopoiesis. PMID:25587036

  10. Sympathoadrenergic modulation of hematopoiesis: a review of available evidence and of therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Marco; Marino, Franca; Maestroni, Georges J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Innervation of the bone marrow (BM) has been described more than one century ago, however the first in vivo evidence that sympathoadrenergic fibers have a role in hematopoiesis dates back to less than 25 years ago. Evidence has since increased showing that adrenergic nerves in the BM release noradrenaline and possibly also dopamine, which act on adrenoceptors and dopaminergic receptors (DR) expressed on hematopoietic cells and affect cell survival, proliferation, migration and engraftment ability. Remarkably, dysregulation of adrenergic fibers to the BM is associated with hematopoietic disturbances and myeloproliferative disease. Several adrenergic and dopaminergic agents are already in clinical use for non-hematological indications and with a usually favorable risk-benefit profile, and are therefore potential candidates for non-conventional modulation of hematopoiesis. PMID:26300737

  11. Demand-adapted regulation of early hematopoiesis in infection and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Hitoshi; Boettcher, Steffen; Manz, Markus G

    2012-03-29

    During systemic infection and inflammation, immune effector cells are in high demand and are rapidly consumed at sites of need. Although adaptive immune cells have high proliferative potential, innate immune cells are mostly postmitotic and need to be replenished from bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We here review how early hematopoiesis has been shaped to deliver efficient responses to increased need. On the basis of most recent findings, we develop an integrated view of how cytokines, chemokines, as well as conserved pathogen structures, are sensed, leading to divisional activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, all aimed at efficient contribution to immune responses and rapid reestablishment of hematopoietic homeostasis. We also outline how chronic inflammatory processes might impinge on hematopoiesis, potentially fostering hematopoietic stem cell diseases, and, how clinical benefit is and could be achieved by learning from nature.

  12. Feedback signals in myelodysplastic syndromes: increased self-renewal of the malignant clone suppresses normal hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Walenda, Thomas; Stiehl, Thomas; Braun, Hanna; Fröbel, Julia; Ho, Anthony D; Schroeder, Thomas; Goecke, Tamme W; Rath, Björn; Germing, Ulrich; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are triggered by an aberrant hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). It is, however, unclear how this clone interferes with physiologic blood formation. In this study, we followed the hypothesis that the MDS clone impinges on feedback signals for self-renewal and differentiation and thereby suppresses normal hematopoiesis. Based on the theory that the MDS clone affects feedback signals for self-renewal and differentiation and hence suppresses normal hematopoiesis, we have developed a mathematical model to simulate different modifications in MDS-initiating cells and systemic feedback signals during disease development. These simulations revealed that the disease initiating cells must have higher self-renewal rates than normal HSCs to outcompete normal hematopoiesis. We assumed that self-renewal is the default pathway of stem and progenitor cells which is down-regulated by an increasing number of primitive cells in the bone marrow niche--including the premature MDS cells. Furthermore, the proliferative signal is up-regulated by cytopenia. Overall, our model is compatible with clinically observed MDS development, even though a single mutation scenario is unlikely for real disease progression which is usually associated with complex clonal hierarchy. For experimental validation of systemic feedback signals, we analyzed the impact of MDS patient derived serum on hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro: in fact, MDS serum slightly increased proliferation, whereas maintenance of primitive phenotype was reduced. However, MDS serum did not significantly affect colony forming unit (CFU) frequencies indicating that regulation of self-renewal may involve local signals from the niche. Taken together, we suggest that initial mutations in MDS particularly favor aberrant high self-renewal rates. Accumulation of primitive MDS cells in the bone marrow then interferes with feedback signals for normal hematopoiesis--which then results in cytopenia.

  13. Effect of systemic heparan sulfate haploinsufficiency on steady state hematopoiesis and engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shekels, Laurie L; Buelt-Gebhardt, Melissa; Gupta, Pankaj

    2015-06-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans on stromal and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) help form the stem cell niche, co-localize molecules that direct stem cell fate, and modulate HSPC homing and retention. Inhibition of HS function mobilizes marrow HSPC. In vitro, HSPC maintenance is influenced by stromal HS structure and concentration. Because inhibition of HS activity or synthesis may be developed for HSPC transplantation, it is important to examine if systemic HS deficiency influences hematopoiesis in vivo. In a transgenic mouse model of HS haploinsufficiency, we examined endogenous hematopoiesis and engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow. Endogenous hematopoiesis was normal except gender-specific alterations in peripheral blood monocyte and platelet counts. Donor engraftment was achieved in all mice following myeloablative irradiation, but HS deficiency in the stromal microenvironment, on HSPC, or both (the 3 test conditions), was associated with a trend towards lower donor engraftment percentage in the bone marrow. Following non-myeloablative irradiation, competitive engraftment was achieved in 22% of mice in the test conditions, vs 50% of control animals (P = 0.03). HS deficiency did not re-direct donor engraftment from bone marrow to spleen or liver. Normal HS levels in the stromal microenvironment and HSPC are required for HSPC engraftment following non-myeloablative conditioning. PMID:25976459

  14. Impact of fluorescent silicon nanoparticles on circulating hemolymph and hematopoiesis in an invertebrate model organism.

    PubMed

    Xing, Rui; Li, Kai-Le; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Su, Yuan-Yuan; Yan, Si-Qi; Zhang, Kai-Long; Wu, Si-Cong; Sima, Yang-Hu; Zhang, Ke-Qin; He, Yao; Xu, Shi-Qing

    2016-09-01

    Silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs) have attractive potential applications in biological and medical fields, and yet their impact on animals is still controversial, and there have been no reports of their effects on hematopoiesis. In this study, the effects of SiNPs on hemocytes and hematopoiesis were investigated by administering SiNPs via a vascular injection into an invertebrate model, the silkworm. Our results show that the ability of SiNPs to enter different types of circulating hemocytes and their impact on those hemocytes differed significantly. Rapid accumulation of SiNPs was observed in granulocytes, oenocytoids, and spherulocytes, which have immune functions in the circulating hemolymph, whereas SiNPs did not easily enter prohemocytes, which can differentiate into granulocytes, oenocytoids, and spherulocytes and replenish them. The SiNPs that entered the hemocytes initiated autophagy and apoptosis via the lysosomal/mitochondrial pathway. High-dose SiNPs weakly stimulated lysosomal activity in hematopoietic organs, but did not lead to a significant increase in reactive oxygen species or severe autophagy or apoptosis in the organ tissues. We suggest that the damage caused by high-dose SiNPs to hematopoiesis is self-healing, because few SiNPs entered the hematopoietic stem cells in the circulating hemolymph, so the damage to the hematopoietic tissues was limited. PMID:27348562

  15. Each cell counts: Hematopoiesis and immunity research in the era of single cell genomics.

    PubMed

    Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Elefant, Naama; Amit, Ido

    2015-02-01

    Hematopoiesis and immunity are mediated through complex interactions between multiple cell types and states. This complexity is currently addressed following a reductionist approach of characterizing cell types by a small number of cell surface molecular features and gross functions. While the introduction of global transcriptional profiling technologies enabled a more comprehensive view, heterogeneity within sampled populations remained unaddressed, obscuring the true picture of hematopoiesis and immune system function. A critical mass of technological advances in molecular biology and genomics has enabled genome-wide measurements of single cells - the fundamental unit of immunity. These new advances are expected to boost detection of less frequent cell types and fuzzy intermediate cell states, greatly expanding the resolution of current available classifications. This new era of single-cell genomics in immunology research holds great promise for further understanding of the mechanisms and circuits regulating hematopoiesis and immunity in both health and disease. In the near future, the accuracy of single-cell genomics will ultimately enable precise diagnostics and treatment of multiple hematopoietic and immune related diseases.

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species Affect Transglutaminase Activity and Regulate Hematopoiesis in a Crustacean.

    PubMed

    Junkunlo, Kingkamon; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene; Noonin, Chadanat

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as a prime signal in the commitment to hematopoiesis in both mammals and Drosophila In this study, the potential function of ROS during hematopoiesis in the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus was examined. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was used to decrease ROS in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. An increase in ROS was observed in the anterior proliferation center (APC) after LPS injection. In the absence of NAC, the LPS-induced increase in ROS levels resulted in the rapid restoration of the circulating hemocyte number. In the presence of NAC, a delay in the recovery rate of the hemocyte number was observed. NAC treatment also blocked the spread of APC and other hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells, maintaining these cells at an undifferentiated stage. Extracellular transglutaminase (TGase) has been shown previously to play a role in maintaining HPT cells in an undifferentiated form. In this study, we show that extracellular TGase activity increased when the ROS level in HPT or APC cells was reduced after NAC treatment. In addition, collagen, a major component of the extracellular matrix and a TGase substrate were co-localized on the HPT cell surface. Taken together, the results of this study show that ROS are involved in crayfish hematopoiesis, in which a low ROS level is required to maintain hematopoietic progenitor cells in the tissue and to reduce hemocyte release. The potential roles of TGase in this process are investigated and discussed. PMID:27339892

  17. Assessment of sites of marrow and extramedullary hematopoiesis by hybrid imaging in primary myelofibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ojeda-Uribe, Mario; Morel, Olivier; Ungureanu, Constantin; Desterke, Christophe; Le Bousse-Kerdilès, Marie-Caroline; Boulahdour, Hatem

    2016-09-01

    We investigated noninvasive procedures by hybrid imaging to assess the sites of active or inactive hematopoiesis in patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). To this end, we used two radionuclides, technetium 99m ((99m) Tc) and indium 111-chloride ((111) In-Cl3 ), coupled with single-photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). We studied five patients with PMF and one with secondary myelofibrosis (MF). The classical pattern of lower fixation of both tracers at the axial skeleton where the myelofibrotic process occurs and the reactivation of sites of active hematopoiesis at the distal skeleton were confirmed. Coupling both radionuclides to SPECT/CT imaging allowed for more precise visualization of the sites of extramedullary hematopoiesis as those observed in the spleen and liver. Splenic high uptake of (111) In-Cl3 coupled with SPECT/CT represents a pathognomonic feature of PMF. We conclude that, the hybrid imaging procedures that we studied might constitute an alternative noninvasive method for the screening of the whole-body marrow and, by this way, to assess the impact of targeted therapies in PMF patients in whom it is well known that the distribution of the hematopoietic active areas is disturbed. Hybrid imaging could also be useful for diagnostic purposes in cases of early PMF or in suspected cases of myelofibrosis secondary to polycythemia vera or essential thrombocythemia. PMID:27518041

  18. Femur Window Chamber Model for In Vivo Cell Tracking in the Murine Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonghong; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; DaCosta, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow is a complex organ that contains various hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. These cells are involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, immune regulation and tumor regulation. Commonly used methods for understanding cellular actions in the bone marrow, such as histology and blood counts, provide static information rather than capturing the dynamic action of multiple cellular components in vivo. To complement the standard methods, a window chamber (WC)-based model was developed to enable serial in vivo imaging of cells and structures in the murine bone marrow. This protocol describes a surgical procedure for installing the WC in the femur, in order to facilitate long-term optical access to the femoral bone marrow. In particular, to demonstrate its experimental utility, this WC approach was used to image and track neutrophils within the vascular network of the femur, thereby providing a novel method to visualize and quantify immune cell trafficking and regulation in the bone marrow. This method can be applied to study various biological processes in the murine bone marrow, such as hematopoiesis, stem cell transplantation, and immune responses in pathological conditions, including cancer. PMID:27500928

  19. Elk3 deficiency causes transient impairment in post-natal retinal vascular development and formation of tortuous arteries in adult murine retinae.

    PubMed

    Weinl, Christine; Wasylyk, Christine; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Beck, Susanne C; Riehle, Heidemarie; Stritt, Christine; Roux, Michel J; Seeliger, Mathias W; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Nordheim, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Serum Response Factor (SRF) fulfills essential roles in post-natal retinal angiogenesis and adult neovascularization. These functions have been attributed to the recruitment by SRF of the cofactors Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors MRTF-A and -B, but not the Ternary Complex Factors (TCFs) Elk1 and Elk4. The role of the third TCF, Elk3, remained unknown. We generated a new Elk3 knockout mouse line and showed that Elk3 had specific, non-redundant functions in the retinal vasculature. In Elk3(-/-) mice, post-natal retinal angiogenesis was transiently delayed until P8, after which it proceeded normally. Interestingly, tortuous arteries developed in Elk3(-/-) mice from the age of four weeks, and persisted into late adulthood. Tortuous vessels have been observed in human pathologies, e.g. in ROP and FEVR. These human disorders were linked to altered activities of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the affected eyes. However, in Elk3(-/-) mice, we did not observe any changes in VEGF or several other potential confounding factors, including mural cell coverage and blood pressure. Instead, concurrent with the post-natal transient delay of radial outgrowth and the formation of adult tortuous arteries, Elk3-dependent effects on the expression of Angiopoietin/Tie-signalling components were observed. Moreover, in vitro microvessel sprouting and microtube formation from P10 and adult aortic ring explants were reduced. Collectively, these results indicate that Elk3 has distinct roles in maintaining retinal artery integrity. The Elk3 knockout mouse is presented as a new animal model to study retinal artery tortuousity in mice and human patients.

  20. Elk3 Deficiency Causes Transient Impairment in Post-Natal Retinal Vascular Development and Formation of Tortuous Arteries in Adult Murine Retinae

    PubMed Central

    Weinl, Christine; Wasylyk, Christine; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Beck, Susanne C.; Riehle, Heidemarie; Stritt, Christine; Roux, Michel J.; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Nordheim, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Serum Response Factor (SRF) fulfills essential roles in post-natal retinal angiogenesis and adult neovascularization. These functions have been attributed to the recruitment by SRF of the cofactors Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors MRTF-A and -B, but not the Ternary Complex Factors (TCFs) Elk1 and Elk4. The role of the third TCF, Elk3, remained unknown. We generated a new Elk3 knockout mouse line and showed that Elk3 had specific, non-redundant functions in the retinal vasculature. In Elk3(−/−) mice, post-natal retinal angiogenesis was transiently delayed until P8, after which it proceeded normally. Interestingly, tortuous arteries developed in Elk3(−/−) mice from the age of four weeks, and persisted into late adulthood. Tortuous vessels have been observed in human pathologies, e.g. in ROP and FEVR. These human disorders were linked to altered activities of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the affected eyes. However, in Elk3(−/−) mice, we did not observe any changes in VEGF or several other potential confounding factors, including mural cell coverage and blood pressure. Instead, concurrent with the post-natal transient delay of radial outgrowth and the formation of adult tortuous arteries, Elk3-dependent effects on the expression of Angiopoietin/Tie-signalling components were observed. Moreover, in vitro microvessel sprouting and microtube formation from P10 and adult aortic ring explants were reduced. Collectively, these results indicate that Elk3 has distinct roles in maintaining retinal artery integrity. The Elk3 knockout mouse is presented as a new animal model to study retinal artery tortuousity in mice and human patients. PMID:25203538

  1. Single episode of mild murine malaria induces neuroinflammation, alters microglial profile, impairs adult neurogenesis, and causes deficits in social and anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Guha, Suman K; Tillu, Rucha; Sood, Ankit; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Nanavaty, Ishira N; Sengupta, Arjun; Sharma, Shobhona; Vaidya, Vidita A; Pathak, Sulabha

    2014-11-01

    Cerebral malaria is associated with cerebrovascular damage and neurological sequelae. However, the neurological consequences of uncomplicated malaria, the most prevalent form of the disease, remain uninvestigated. Here, using a mild malaria model, we show that a single Plasmodium chabaudi adami infection in adult mice induces neuroinflammation, neurogenic, and behavioral changes in the absence of a blood-brain barrier breach. Using cytokine arrays we show that the infection induces differential serum and brain cytokine profiles, both at peak parasitemia and 15days post-parasite clearance. At the peak of infection, along with the serum, the brain also exhibited a definitive pro-inflammatory cytokine profile, and gene expression analysis revealed that pro-inflammatory cytokines were also produced locally in the hippocampus, an adult neurogenic niche. Hippocampal microglia numbers were enhanced, and we noted a shift to an activated profile at this time point, accompanied by a striking redistribution of the microglia to the subgranular zone adjacent to hippocampal neuronal progenitors. In the hippocampus, a distinct decline in progenitor turnover and survival was observed at peak parasitemia, accompanied by a shift from neuronal to glial fate specification. Studies in transgenic Nestin-GFP reporter mice demonstrated a decline in the Nestin-GFP(+)/GFAP(+) quiescent neural stem cell pool at peak parasitemia. Although these cellular changes reverted to normal 15days post-parasite clearance, specific brain cytokines continued to exhibit dysregulation. Behavioral analysis revealed selective deficits in social and anxiety-like behaviors, with no change observed in locomotor, cognitive, and depression-like behaviors, with a return to baseline at recovery. Collectively, these findings indicate that even a single episode of mild malaria results in alterations of the brain cytokine profile, causes specific behavioral dysfunction, is accompanied by hippocampal microglial

  2. EphB2 and EphB3 play an important role in the lymphoid seeding of murine adult thymus.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, David; García-Ceca, Javier; Farias-de-Oliveira, Desio A; Terra-Granado, Eugenia; Montero-Herradón, Sara; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinicius; Savino, Wilson; Zapata, Agustín

    2015-12-01

    Adult thymuses lacking either ephrin type B receptor 2 (EphB2) or EphB3, or expressing a truncated form of EphB2, the forward signal-deficient EphB2LacZ, have low numbers of early thymic progenitors (ETPs) and are colonized in vivo by reduced numbers of injected bone marrow (BM) lineage-negative (Lin(-)) cells. Hematopoietic progenitors from these EphB mutants showed decreased capacities to colonize wild type (WT) thymuses compared with WT precursors, with EphB2(-/-) cells exhibiting the greatest reduction. WT BM Lin(-) cells also showed decreased colonizing capacity into mutant thymuses. The reduction was also more severe in EphB2(-/-) host thymuses, with a less severe phenotype in the EphB2LacZ thymus. These results suggest a major function for forward signaling through EphB2 and, to a lesser extent, EphB3, in either colonizing progenitor cells or thymic stromal cells, for in vivo adult thymus recruitment. Furthermore, the altered expression of the molecules involved in thymic colonization that occurs in the mutant thymus correlates with the observed colonizing capacities of different mutant mice. Reduced production of CCL21 and CCL25 occurred in the thymus of the 3 EphB-deficient mice, but their expression, similar to that of P-selectin, on blood vessels, the method of entry of progenitor cells into the vascular thymus, only showed a significant reduction in EphB2(-/-) and EphB3(-/-) thymuses. Decreased migration into the EphB2(-/-) thymuses correlated also with reduced expression of both ephrinB1 and ephrinB2, without changes in the EphB2LacZ thymuses. In the EphB3(-/-) thymuses, only ephrinB1 expression appeared significantly diminished, confirming the relevance of forward signals mediated by the EphB2-ephrinB1 pair in cell recruitment into the adult thymus.

  3. Adult murine prostate basal and luminal cells are self-sustained lineages that can both serve as targets for prostate cancer initiation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nahyun; Zhang, Boyu; Zhang, Li; Ittmann, Michael; Xin, Li

    2012-01-01

    Summary The prostate epithelial lineage hierarchy and the cellular origin for prostate cancer remain inadequately defined. Using a lineage tracing approach, we show that adult rodent prostate basal and luminal cells are independently self-sustained in vivo. Disrupting the tumor suppressor Pten in either lineage led to prostate cancer initiation. However, the cellular composition and onset dynamics of the resulting tumors are distinctive. Prostate luminal cells are more responsive to Pten null-induced mitogenic signaling. In contrast, basal cells are resistant to direct transformation. Instead, loss of Pten activity induces the capability of basal cells to differentiate into transformation-competent luminal cells. Our study suggests that deregulation of epithelial differentiation is a critical step for the initiation of prostate cancers of basal cell origin. PMID:22340597

  4. Vaccination of adult and newborn mice of a resistant strain (C57BL/6J) against challenge with leukemias induced by Moloney murine leukemia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    Adult or newborn C57BL/6J mice were immunized with isogenic Moloney strain MuLV-induced leukemia cells irradiated with 10,000 rads or treated with low concentrations of formalin. Groups of immunized and control mice were challenged with a range of doses of viable leukemia cells, and tumor deaths were recorded for 90 days after challenge. Then, the doses of challenge cells which produced 50% tumor deaths were calculated for immunized and control mice. The logarithm of their ratio quantified the degree of protection provided by immunization. For adult C57BL/6J mice, a single immunization with MuLV-induced leukemia cells was not effective; either cells plus Bacillus Calmette-Guerin or Corynebacterium parvum, or else two immunizations with irradiated leukemia cells were needed to produce statistically significant increases in the values of the doses of challenge cells which produced 50% tumor deaths. Cross-protection was obtained by immunization with other isogenic MuLV-induced leukemias, but not by immunization with isogenic carcinogen-induced tumors or with an isogenic spontaneous leukemia. For newborn mice, a single injection of irradiated leukemia cells provided 1.3 to 1.5 logs of protection, and admixture of B. Calmette-Guerin or C. parvum increased this protection to 2.4 to 2.7 logs. Since irradiated and frozen-thawed MuLV-induced leukemia cells contained viable MuLV, leukemia cells treated with 0.5 or 1.0% formalin were tested as an alternative. A single injection of formalin-treated isogenic leukemia cells admixed with C. parvum provided between 1.7 and 2.8 logs of protection. These results demonstrate that a single vaccination of newborn animals against a highly antigenic virally induced leukemia produces strong protection against a subsequent challenge with viable leukemia cells.

  5. Distribution of the lipolysis stimulated receptor in adult and embryonic murine tissues and lethality of LSR-/- embryos at 12.5 to 14.5 days of gestation.

    PubMed

    Mesli, Samir; Javorschi, Sandrine; Bérard, Annie M; Landry, Marc; Priddle, Helen; Kivlichan, David; Smith, Andrew J H; Yen, Frances T; Bihain, Bernard E; Darmon, Michel

    2004-08-01

    The lipolysis stimulated receptor (LSR) recognizes apolipoprotein B/E-containing lipoproteins in the presence of free fatty acids, and is thought to be involved in the clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL). The distribution of LSR in mice was studied by Northern blots, quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence. In the adult, LSR mRNA was detectable in all tissues tested except muscle and heart, and was abundant in liver, lung, intestine, kidney, ovaries and testes. During embryogenesis, LSR mRNA was detectable at 7.5 days post-coitum (E7) and increased up to E17 in parallel to prothrombin, a liver marker. In adult liver, immunofluorescence experiments showed a staining at the periphery of hepatocytes as well as in fetal liver at E12 and E15. These results are in agreement with the assumption that LSR is a plasma membrane receptor involved in the clearance of lipoproteins by liver, and suggest a possible role in steroidogenic organs, lung, intestine and kidney). To explore the role of LSR in vivo, the LSR gene was inactivated in 129/Ola ES cells by removing a gene segment containing exons 2-5, and 129/Ola-C57BL/6 mice bearing the deletion were produced. Although heterozygotes appeared normal, LSR homozygotes were not viable, with the exception of three males, while the total progeny of genotyped wild-type and heterozygote pups was 345. Mortality of the homozygote embryos was observed between days 12.5 and 15.5 of gestation, a time at which their liver was much smaller than that of their littermates, indicating that the expression of LSR is critical for liver and embryonic development.

  6. Human and Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cell Aging Is Associated with Functional Impairments and Intrinsic Megakaryocytic/Erythroid Bias

    PubMed Central

    Rundberg Nilsson, Alexandra; Soneji, Shamit; Adolfsson, Sofia; Bryder, David; Pronk, Cornelis Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aging within the human hematopoietic system associates with various deficiencies and disease states, including anemia, myeloid neoplasms and reduced adaptive immune responses. Similar phenotypes are observed in mice and have been linked to alterations arising at the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) level. Such an association is, however, less established in human hematopoiesis and prompted us here to detail characteristics of the most primitive human hematopoietic compartments throughout ontogeny. In addition, we also attempted to interrogate similarities between aging human and murine hematopoiesis. Coupled to the transition from human cord blood (CB) to young and aged bone marrow (BM), we observed a gradual increase in frequency of candidate HSCs. This was accompanied by functional impairments, including decreased lymphoid output and reduced proliferative potential. Downstream of human HSCs, we observed decreasing levels of common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs), and increasing frequencies of megakaryocyte/erythrocyte progenitors (MEPs) with age, which could be linked to changes in lineage-affiliated gene expression patterns in aged human HSCs. These findings were paralleled in mice. Therefore, our data support the notion that age-related changes also in human hematopoiesis involve the HSC pool, with a prominent skewing towards the megakaryocytic/erythroid lineages, and suggests conserved mechanisms underlying aging of the blood cell system. PMID:27368054

  7. Relationships between hematopoiesis and hepatogenesis in the midtrimester fetal liver characterized by dynamic transcriptomic and proteomic profiles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanbiao; Zhang, Xuequn; Huang, Jian; Zeng, Yan; Liu, Wei; Geng, Chao; Li, Ka Wan; Yang, Dong; Wu, Songfeng; Wei, Handong; Han, Zeguang; Qian, Xiaohong; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2009-10-28

    In fetal hematopoietic organs, the switch from hematopoiesis is hypothesized to be a critical time point for organogenesis, but it is not yet evidenced. The transient coexistence of hematopoiesis will be useful to understand the development of fetal liver (FL) around this time and its relationship to hematopoiesis. Here, the temporal and the comparative transcriptomic and proteomic profiles were observed during the critical time points corresponding to the initiation (E11.5), peak (E14.5), recession (E15.5), and disappearance (3 ddp) of mouse FL hematopoiesis. We found that E11.5-E14.5 corresponds to a FL hematopoietic expansion phase with distinct molecular features, including the expression of new transcription factors, many of which are novel KRAB (Kruppel-associated box)-containing zinc finger proteins. This time period is also characterized by extensive depression of some liver functions, especially catabolism/utilization, immune and defense, classical complement cascades, and intrinsic blood coagulation. Instead, the other liver functions increased, such as xenobiotic and sterol metabolism, synthesis of carbohydrate and glycan, the alternate and lectin complement cascades and extrinsic blood coagulation, and etc. Strikingly, all of the liver functions were significantly increased at E14.5-E15.5 and thereafter, and the depression of the key pathways attributes to build the hematopoietic microenvironment. These findings signal hematopoiesis emigration is the key to open the door of liver maturation.

  8. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  9. Effective treatment of a murine model of adult T-cell leukemia using 211At-7G7/B6 and its combination with unmodified anti-Tac (daclizumab) directed toward CD25.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Zhang, Meili; Garmestani, Kayhan; Talanov, Vladimir S; Plascjak, Paul S; Beck, Barbara; Goldman, Carolyn; Brechbiel, Martin W; Waldmann, Thomas A

    2006-08-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) consists of an overabundance of T cells, which express CD25. Therapeutic efficacy of astatine-211 ((211)At)-labeled murine monoclonal antibody 7G7/B6 alone and in combination with daclizumab was evaluated in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice given injections of MET-1 human T-cell leukemia cells. Daclizumab and 7G7/B6 are directed toward different epitopes of CD25. Either a single dose of 12 microCi (0.444 MBq) (211)At-7G7/B6 per mouse given intravenously or receptor-saturating doses of daclizumab given at 100 microg weekly for 4 weeks intravenously inhibited tumor growth as monitored by serum levels of human beta-2 microglobulin (beta(2)mu) and by prolonged survival of leukemia-bearing mice compared with the control groups (P < .001). The combination of 2 agents enhanced the antitumor effect when compared with groups treated with 12 microCi (0.444 MBq) of (211)At-7G7/B6 (P < .05) or daclizumab alone (P < .05). The median survival duration of the PBS group was 62.6 days and 61.5 days in the radiolabeled nonspecific antibody (211)At-11F11-treated group. In contrast, 91% of mice in the combination group survived through day 94. These results that demonstrate a significantly improved therapeutic efficacy by combining (211)At-7G7/B6 with daclizumab support a clinical trial of this regimen in patients with ATL. PMID:16569769

  10. MicroRNA-124 Targets Tip110 Expression and Regulates Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Huang, Xinxin; Timani, Khalid Amine; Broxmeyer, Hal E; He, Johnny J

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNA (miR) regulates hematopoiesis through targeting different genes post-transcriptionally. We have recently shown that Tip110 expression is downregulated during hematopoietic stem cell differentiation. However, the underlying mechanisms are not known. In this study, we identified a conserved miR-124-binding site on the Tip110 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) and showed that Tip110 was downregulated by miR-124 through its 3'-UTR. We then examined the relationship among miR-124 and Tip110 expression and differentiation of human cord blood CD34(+) cells. We found that miR-124 was expressed in a low level in human cord blood CD34(+) cells, but it was considerably upregulated during culturing and differentiation of these cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that miR-124 expression decreased Tip110 expression and promoted differentiation of human cord blood CD34(+) cells, while miR-124 knockdown increased Tip110 expression, slowed down differentiation of human cord blood CD34(+) cells, and caused an expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro. Finally, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Tip110 transgenic mice, performed the exon array analysis, and found that Tip110 altered a number of genes in the hematopoiesis pathways. Dnmt3a as de novo methyltransferase was also significantly upregulated. That miR-124 was markedly upregulated during human cord blood CD34(+) cell differentiation could be the result of direct loss of its promoter methylation from Dnmt3a. Taken together, our study demonstrates that miR-124 regulates Tip110 expression and differentiation of human cord blood CD34(+) cells and suggests important roles of miR-124/Tip110 in hematopoiesis. PMID:25928721

  11. The effects of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases on disorders of hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clay; Gasparetto, Maura; Jordan, Craig; Pollyea, Daniel A; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoiesis involves the orderly production of millions of blood cells per second from a small number of essential bone marrow cells termed hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Ethanol suppresses normal hematopoiesis resulting in leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia and may also predispose to the development of diseases such as myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute leukemia. Currently the exact mechanisms by which ethanol perturbs hematopoiesis are unclear. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene family plays a major role in the metabolism of reactive aldehydes derived from ethanol in the liver and other organs. At least one of the ALDH isoforms, ALDH1A1, is expressed at high levels in HSCs in humans, mice, and other organisms. Recent data indicate that ALDH1A1 and possibly other ALDH isoforms may metabolize reactive aldehydes in HSCs and other hematopoietic cells as they do in the liver and elsewhere. In addition, loss of these ALDHs leads to perturbation of a variety of cell processes that may predispose HSCs to disorders in growth and leukemic transformation. From these findings, we suggest a hypothesis that the cytopenias and possible increased risk of MDS and acute leukemia in heavy alcohol users is due to polymorphisms in genes responsible for metabolism of alcohol derived reactive aldehydes and repair of their DNA adducts in HSCs and other hematopoietic cells. In the article, we will summarize the biological properties of hematopoietic cells and diseases related to ethanol consumption, discuss molecular characteristics of ethanol metabolism, and describe a model to explain how ethanol derived reactive aldehydes may promote HSC damage. PMID:25427917

  12. Expression of migration-related genes is progressively upregulated in murine Lineage-Sca-1+c-Kit+ population from the fetal to adult stages of development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) follow a genetically programmed pattern of migration during development. Extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules, as well as chemokines and their receptors, are important in adult HSC migration. However, little is known about the role these molecules play at earlier developmental stages. Methods We have analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) array the expression pattern of extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules as well as chemokines and chemokine receptors in Lineage-Sca-1+c-Kit+ (LSK) cells at different stages of development, in order to characterize the role played by these molecules in LSK. Data were represented by volcano plots to show the differences in expression pattern at the time points studied. Results Our results show marked changes in the expression pattern of extracellular matrix, adhesion molecules, chemokines and their receptors with developmental age, particularly in later stages of development. Ten molecules were significantly increased among the LSK populations studied. Our screen identified the upregulation of Col4a1, as well as molecules involved in its degradation (Mmp2, Timp2), with development. Other genes identified were Sell, Tgfbi, and Entpd1. Furthermore, we show that the expression of the chemokines Ccl4, Ccl9, Il18 and the chemokine receptor Cxcr4 increases in LSK cells during development. Conclusions Several genes are upregulated in the LSK population in their transition to the bone marrow microenvironment, increasing at later stages of development. This gene pattern should be emulated by embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic progenitors in order to improve their properties for clinical applications such as engraftment. PMID:20637061

  13. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation analysis implicates neuronal and inflammatory signaling pathways in adult murine hepatic tumorigenesis following perinatal exposure to bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Weinhouse, Caren; Sartor, Maureen A; Faulk, Christopher; Anderson, Olivia S; Sant, Karilyn E; Harris, Craig; Dolinoy, Dana C

    2016-07-01

    Developmental exposure to the endocrine-active compound bisphenol A (BPA) has been linked to epigenotoxic and potential carcinogenic effects in rodent liver, prostate, and mammary glands. A dose-dependent increase in hepatic tumors in 10-month mice perinatally exposed to one of three doses of BPA (50 ng, 50 µg, or 50 mg BPA/kg chow) was previously reported. These tumors represent early-onset disease and lack classical sexual dimorphism in incidence. Here, adult epigenome-wide liver DNA methylation profiles to identify gene promoters associated with perinatal BPA exposure and disease in 10-month mice with and without liver tumors were investigated. Mice with hepatic tumors showed 12,822 (1.8%) probes with differential methylation as compared with non-tumor animals, of which 8,656 (67.5%) were hypomethylated. A significant enrichment of differential methylation in Gene Ontology (GO) terms and biological processes related to morphogenesis and development, and epigenomic alteration were observed. Pathway enrichment revealed a predominance of hypermethylated neuronal signaling pathways linked to energy regulation and metabolic function, supporting metabolic consequences in the liver via BPA-induced disruption of neuronal signaling pathways. Hypothesis-driven pathway analysis revealed mouse and human genes linked to BPA exposure related to intracellular Jak/STAT and MAPK signaling pathways. Taken together, these findings are indicators of the relevance of the hepatic tumor phenotype seen in BPA-exposed mice to human health. This work demonstrated that epigenome-wide discovery experiments in animal models were effective tools for identification and understanding of paralagous epimutations salient to human disease. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:435-446, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27334623

  14. A presacral solitary fibrous tumor with extramedullary hematopoiesis: radiologic and pathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Sergio; d'Amore, Emanuele S G; Beghetto, Mario; Borgo, Davide Dal; Franceschetti, Ilaria; Capalbo, Mirella

    2013-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) are rare, ubiquitous neoplasms of mesenchymal origin, with distinctive histopathological and immunohistochemical features. We herein report an unusual case of a presacral SFT diagnosed in an asymptomatic 40-year-old woman preoperatively investigated with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Post-operative pathology examination showed a SFT containing foci of extramedullary hematopoiesis. Revision of preoperative imaging did not evidenced any findings suggesting this unusual association. The patient was free from local recurrence and metastases one year after operation. Differential radiological and histological diagnoses of solid presacral masses is briefly discussed.

  15. The role of micro-ribonucleic acids in normal hematopoiesis and leukemic T-lymphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Slavov, S N; Gimenes Teixeira, H L; Rego, E M

    2010-07-01

    Micro-ribonucleic acids (microRNAs) are small molecules containing 20-23 nucleotides. Despite their small size, it is likely that almost every cellular process is regulated by them. Moreover, aberrant microRNA expression has been involved in the development of various diseases, including cancer. Although many data are available about the role of microRNAs in various lymphoproliferative disorders, their impact on the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia of T-cell progenitors is largely unknown. In this review, we present recent information about how specific microRNAs are expressed and regulated during malignant T-lymphopoiesis and about their role during normal hematopoiesis.

  16. Mouse gene targeting reveals an essential role of mTOR in hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fukun; Zhang, Shuangmin; Grogg, Matthew; Cancelas, Jose A; Varney, Melinda E; Starczynowski, Daniel T; Du, Wei; Yang, Jun-Qi; Liu, Wei; Thomas, George; Kozma, Sara; Pang, Qishen; Zheng, Yi

    2013-09-01

    mTOR integrates signals from nutrients and growth factors to control protein synthesis, cell growth, and survival. Although mTOR has been established as a therapeutic target in hematologic malignancies, its physiological role in regulating hematopoiesis remains unclear. Here we show that conditional gene targeting of mTOR causes bone marrow failure and defects in multi-lineage hematopoiesis including myelopoiesis, erythropoiesis, thrombopoiesis, and lymphopoiesis. mTOR deficiency results in loss of quiescence of hematopoietic stem cells, leading to a transient increase but long-term exhaustion and defective engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells in lethally irradiated recipient mice. Furthermore, ablation of mTOR causes increased apoptosis in lineage-committed blood cells but not hematopoietic stem cells, indicating a differentiation stage-specific function. These results demonstrate that mTOR is essential for hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and multi-lineage hematopoiesis.

  17. Mouse gene targeting reveals an essential role of mTOR in hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fukun; Zhang, Shuangmin; Grogg, Matthew; Cancelas, Jose A.; Varney, Melinda E.; Starczynowski, Daniel T.; Du, Wei; Yang, Jun-Qi; Liu, Wei; Thomas, George; Kozma, Sara; Pang, Qishen; Zheng, Yi

    2013-01-01

    mTOR integrates signals from nutrients and growth factors to control protein synthesis, cell growth, and survival. Although mTOR has been established as a therapeutic target in hematologic malignancies, its physiological role in regulating hematopoiesis remains unclear. Here we show that conditional gene targeting of mTOR causes bone marrow failure and defects in multi-lineage hematopoiesis including myelopoiesis, erythropoiesis, thrombopoiesis, and lymphopoiesis. mTOR deficiency results in loss of quiescence of hematopoietic stem cells, leading to a transient increase but long-term exhaustion and defective engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells in lethally irradiated recipient mice. Furthermore, ablation of mTOR causes increased apoptosis in lineage-committed blood cells but not hematopoietic stem cells, indicating a differentiation stage-specific function. These results demonstrate that mTOR is essential for hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and multi-lineage hematopoiesis. PMID:23716557

  18. Arrested Hematopoiesis and Vascular Relaxation Defects in Mice with a Mutation in Dhfr.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Julie A I; Knezevic, Kathy; Liu, Jia Jenny; Glaros, Elias N; Thai, Thuan; Qiao, Qiao; Campbell, Heather; Packham, Deborah; Huang, Yizhou; Papathanasiou, Peter; Tunningley, Robert; Whittle, Belinda; Yeung, Amanda W S; Chandrakanthan, Vashe; Hesson, Luke; Chen, Vivien; Wong, Jason W H; Purton, Louise E; Ward, Robyn L; Thomas, Shane R; Pimanda, John E

    2016-04-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a critical enzyme in the folate metabolism pathway and also plays a role in regulating nitric oxide (NO) signaling in endothelial cells. Although both coding and noncoding mutations with phenotypic effects have been identified in the human DHFR gene, no mouse model is currently available to study the consequences of perturbing DHFR in vivo In order to identify genes involved in definitive hematopoiesis, we performed a forward genetic screen and produced a mouse line, here referred to as Orana, with a point mutation in the Dhfr locus leading to a Thr136Ala substitution in the DHFR protein. Homozygote Orana mice initiate definitive hematopoiesis, but expansion of progenitors in the fetal liver is compromised, and the animals die between embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5) and E14.5. Heterozygote Orana mice survive to adulthood but have tissue-specific alterations in folate abundance and distribution, perturbed stress erythropoiesis, and impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation of the aorta consistent with the role of DHFR in regulating NO signaling. Orana mice provide insight into the dual roles of DHFR and are a useful model for investigating the role of environmental and dietary factors in the context of vascular defects caused by altered NO signaling.

  19. The Rothmund-Thomson syndrome helicase RECQL4 is essential for hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Monique F.; DeLuca, Elisabetta; Wall, Meaghan; Quach, Julie M.; Chalk, Alistair M.; Deans, Andrew J.; Heierhorst, Jörg; Purton, Louise E.; Izon, David J.; Walkley, Carl R.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations within the gene encoding the DNA helicase RECQL4 underlie the autosomal recessive cancer-predisposition disorder Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, though it is unclear how these mutations lead to disease. Here, we demonstrated that somatic deletion of Recql4 causes a rapid bone marrow failure in mice that involves cells from across the myeloid, lymphoid, and, most profoundly, erythroid lineages. Apoptosis was markedly elevated in multipotent progenitors lacking RECQL4 compared with WT cells. While the stem cell compartment was relatively spared in RECQL4-deficent mice, HSCs from these animals were not transplantable and even selected against. The requirement for RECQL4 was intrinsic in hematopoietic cells, and loss of RECQL4 in these cells was associated with increased replicative DNA damage and failed cell-cycle progression. Concurrent deletion of p53, which rescues loss of function in animals lacking the related helicase BLM, did not rescue BM phenotypes in RECQL4-deficient animals. In contrast, hematopoietic defects in cells from Recql4Δ/Δ mice were fully rescued by a RECQL4 variant without RecQ helicase activity, demonstrating that RECQL4 maintains hematopoiesis independently of helicase activity. Together, our data indicate that RECQL4 participates in DNA replication rather than genome stability and identify RECQL4 as a regulator of hematopoiesis with a nonredundant role compared with other RecQ helicases. PMID:24960165

  20. TopBP1 Governs Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Survival in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Li, Dantong; Ma, Ke; Zhang, Wenjuan; Xu, Tao; Fu, Cong; Jing, Changbin; Jia, Xiaoe; Wu, Shuang; Sun, Xin; Dong, Mei; Deng, Min; Chen, Yi; Zhu, Wenge; Peng, Jinrong; Wan, Fengyi; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I; Pan, Weijun

    2015-07-01

    In vertebrate definitive hematopoiesis, nascent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) migrate to and reside in proliferative hematopoietic microenvironment for transitory expansion. In this process, well-established DNA damage response pathways are vital to resolve the replication stress, which is deleterious for genome stability and cell survival. However, the detailed mechanism on the response and repair of the replication stress-induced DNA damage during hematopoietic progenitor expansion remains elusive. Here we report that a novel zebrafish mutantcas003 with nonsense mutation in topbp1 gene encoding topoisomerase II β binding protein 1 (TopBP1) exhibits severe definitive hematopoiesis failure. Homozygous topbp1cas003 mutants manifest reduced number of HSPCs during definitive hematopoietic cell expansion, without affecting the formation and migration of HSPCs. Moreover, HSPCs in the caudal hematopoietic tissue (an equivalent of the fetal liver in mammals) in topbp1cas003 mutant embryos are more sensitive to hydroxyurea (HU) treatment. Mechanistically, subcellular mislocalization of TopBP1cas003 protein results in ATR/Chk1 activation failure and DNA damage accumulation in HSPCs, and eventually induces the p53-dependent apoptosis of HSPCs. Collectively, this study demonstrates a novel and vital role of TopBP1 in the maintenance of HSPCs genome integrity and survival during hematopoietic progenitor expansion.

  1. Functions of flt3 in zebrafish hematopoiesis and its relevance to human acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    He, Bai-Liang; Shi, Xiangguo; Man, Cheuk Him; Ma, Alvin C. H.; Ekker, Stephen C.; Chow, Howard C. H.; So, Chi Wai Eric; Choi, William W. L.; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Yiyue

    2014-01-01

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is expressed in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) but its role during embryogenesis is unclear. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), internal tandem duplication (ITD) of FLT3 at the juxtamembrane (JMD) and tyrosine kinase (TKD) domains (FLT3-ITD+) occurs in 30% of patients and is associated with inferior clinical prognosis. TKD mutations (FLT3-TKD+) occur in 5% of cases. We made use of zebrafish to examine the role of flt3 in developmental hematopoiesis and model human FLT3-ITD+ and FLT3-TKD+ AML. Zebrafish flt3 JMD and TKD were remarkably similar to their mammalian orthologs. Morpholino knockdown significantly reduced the expression of l-plastin (pan-leukocyte), csf1r, and mpeg1 (macrophage) as well as that of c-myb (definitive HSPCs), lck, and rag1 (T-lymphocyte). Expressing human FLT3-ITD in zebrafish embryos resulted in expansion and clustering of myeloid cells (pu.1+, mpo+, and cebpα+) which were ameliorated by AC220 and associated with stat5, erk1/2, and akt phosphorylation. Human FLT3-TKD (D835Y) induced significant, albeit modest, myeloid expansion resistant to AC220. This study provides novel insight into the role of flt3 during hematopoiesis and establishes a zebrafish model of FLT3-ITD+ and FLT3-TKD+ AML that may facilitate high-throughput screening of novel and personalized agents. PMID:24591202

  2. A Cdx4-Sall4 regulatory module controls the transition from mesoderm formation to embryonic hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Paik, Elizabeth J; Mahony, Shaun; White, Richard M; Price, Emily N; Dibiase, Anthony; Dorjsuren, Bilguujin; Mosimann, Christian; Davidson, Alan J; Gifford, David; Zon, Leonard I

    2013-01-01

    Deletion of caudal/cdx genes alters hox gene expression and causes defects in posterior tissues and hematopoiesis. Yet, the defects in hox gene expression only partially explain these phenotypes. To gain deeper insight into Cdx4 function, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) combined with gene-expression profiling in zebrafish, and identified the transcription factor spalt-like 4 (sall4) as a Cdx4 target. ChIP-seq revealed that Sall4 bound to its own gene locus and the cdx4 locus. Expression profiling showed that Cdx4 and Sall4 coregulate genes that initiate hematopoiesis, such as hox, scl, and lmo2. Combined cdx4/sall4 gene knockdown impaired erythropoiesis, and overexpression of the Cdx4 and Sall4 target genes scl and lmo2 together rescued the erythroid program. These findings suggest that auto- and cross-regulation of Cdx4 and Sall4 establish a stable molecular circuit in the mesoderm that facilitates the activation of the blood-specific program as development proceeds. PMID:24286030

  3. Arrested Hematopoiesis and Vascular Relaxation Defects in Mice with a Mutation in Dhfr

    PubMed Central

    Thoms, Julie A. I.; Knezevic, Kathy; Liu, Jia Jenny; Glaros, Elias N.; Thai, Thuan; Qiao, Qiao; Campbell, Heather; Packham, Deborah; Huang, Yizhou; Papathanasiou, Peter; Tunningley, Robert; Whittle, Belinda; Yeung, Amanda W. S.; Chandrakanthan, Vashe; Hesson, Luke; Chen, Vivien; Wong, Jason W. H.; Purton, Louise E.; Ward, Robyn L.

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a critical enzyme in the folate metabolism pathway and also plays a role in regulating nitric oxide (NO) signaling in endothelial cells. Although both coding and noncoding mutations with phenotypic effects have been identified in the human DHFR gene, no mouse model is currently available to study the consequences of perturbing DHFR in vivo. In order to identify genes involved in definitive hematopoiesis, we performed a forward genetic screen and produced a mouse line, here referred to as Orana, with a point mutation in the Dhfr locus leading to a Thr136Ala substitution in the DHFR protein. Homozygote Orana mice initiate definitive hematopoiesis, but expansion of progenitors in the fetal liver is compromised, and the animals die between embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5) and E14.5. Heterozygote Orana mice survive to adulthood but have tissue-specific alterations in folate abundance and distribution, perturbed stress erythropoiesis, and impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation of the aorta consistent with the role of DHFR in regulating NO signaling. Orana mice provide insight into the dual roles of DHFR and are a useful model for investigating the role of environmental and dietary factors in the context of vascular defects caused by altered NO signaling. PMID:26830229

  4. TC1(C8orf4) Regulates Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells and Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Jungtae; Park, Surim; Song, Kyuyoung; Lee, Inchul

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is a complex process requiring multiple regulators for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) and differentiation to multi-lineage blood cells. TC1(C8orf4) is implicated in cancers, hematological malignancies and inflammatory activation. Here, we report that Tc1 regulates hematopoiesis in mice. Myeloid and lymphoid cells are increased markedly in peripheral blood of Tc1–deleted mice compared to wild type controls. Red blood cells are small-sized but increased in number. The bone marrow of Tc1−/− mice is normocellular histologically. However, Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+ (LSK) cells are expanded in Tc1−/− mice compared to wild type controls. The expanded population mostly consists of CD150−CD48+ cells, suggesting the expansion of lineage-restricted hematopoietic progenitor cells. Colony forming units (CFU) are increased in Tc1−/− mice bone marrow cells compared to controls. In wild type mice bone marrow, Tc1 is expressed in a limited population of HSPC but not in differentiated cells. Major myeloid transcriptional regulators such as Pu.1 and Cebpα are not up-regulated in Tc1−/− mice bone marrow. Our findings indicate that TC1 is a novel hematopoietic regulator. The mechanisms of TC1-dependent HSPC regulation and lineage determination are unknown. PMID:24937306

  5. TopBP1 Governs Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Survival in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; Li, Dantong; Ma, Ke; Zhang, Wenjuan; Xu, Tao; Fu, Cong; Jing, Changbin; Jia, Xiaoe; Wu, Shuang; Sun, Xin; Dong, Mei; Deng, Min; Chen, Yi; Zhu, Wenge; Peng, Jinrong; Wan, Fengyi; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I.; Pan, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrate definitive hematopoiesis, nascent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) migrate to and reside in proliferative hematopoietic microenvironment for transitory expansion. In this process, well-established DNA damage response pathways are vital to resolve the replication stress, which is deleterious for genome stability and cell survival. However, the detailed mechanism on the response and repair of the replication stress-induced DNA damage during hematopoietic progenitor expansion remains elusive. Here we report that a novel zebrafish mutantcas003 with nonsense mutation in topbp1 gene encoding topoisomerase II β binding protein 1 (TopBP1) exhibits severe definitive hematopoiesis failure. Homozygous topbp1cas003 mutants manifest reduced number of HSPCs during definitive hematopoietic cell expansion, without affecting the formation and migration of HSPCs. Moreover, HSPCs in the caudal hematopoietic tissue (an equivalent of the fetal liver in mammals) in topbp1cas003 mutant embryos are more sensitive to hydroxyurea (HU) treatment. Mechanistically, subcellular mislocalization of TopBP1cas003 protein results in ATR/Chk1 activation failure and DNA damage accumulation in HSPCs, and eventually induces the p53-dependent apoptosis of HSPCs. Collectively, this study demonstrates a novel and vital role of TopBP1 in the maintenance of HSPCs genome integrity and survival during hematopoietic progenitor expansion. PMID:26131719

  6. Regulation of Hematopoiesis and Methionine Homeostasis by mTORC1 Inhibitor NPRL2.

    PubMed

    Dutchak, Paul A; Laxman, Sunil; Estill, Sandi Jo; Wang, Chensu; Wang, Yun; Wang, Yiguang; Bulut, Gamze B; Gao, Jinming; Huang, Lily J; Tu, Benjamin P

    2015-07-21

    Nitrogen permease regulator-like 2 (NPRL2) is a component of a conserved complex that inhibits mTORC1 (mammalian Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1) in response to amino acid insufficiency. Here, we show that NPRL2 is required for mouse viability and that its absence significantly compromises fetal liver hematopoiesis in developing embryos. Moreover, NPRL2 KO embryos have significantly reduced methionine levels and exhibit phenotypes reminiscent of cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency. Consistent with this idea, NPRL2 KO liver and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) show defective processing of the cobalamin-transport protein transcobalamin 2, along with impaired lysosomal acidification and lysosomal gene expression. NPRL2 KO MEFs exhibit a significant defect in the cobalamin-dependent synthesis of methionine from homocysteine, which can be rescued by supplementation with cyanocobalamin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a role for NPRL2 and mTORC1 in the regulation of lysosomal-dependent cobalamin processing, methionine synthesis, and maintenance of cellular re-methylation potential, which are important during hematopoiesis.

  7. Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Express Several Functional Sex Hormone Receptors—Novel Evidence for a Potential Developmental Link Between Hematopoiesis and Primordial Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Borkowska, Sylwia; Suszynska, Ewa; Suszynska, Malwina; Poniewierska-Baran, Agata; Maj, Magda; Pedziwiatr, Daniel; Adamiak, Mateusz; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Kakar, Sham S.; Ratajczak, Janina; Kucia, Magda

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated that hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) share several markers with the germline, a connection supported by reports that prolactin, androgens, and estrogens stimulate hematopoiesis. To address this issue more directly, we tested the expression of receptors for pituitary-derived hormones, such as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), on purified murine bone marrow (BM) cells enriched for HSPCs and tested the functionality of these receptors in ex vivo signal transduction studies and in vitro clonogenic assays. We also tested whether administration of pituitary- and gonad-derived sex hormones (SexHs) increases incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) into HSPCs and expansion of hematopoietic clonogenic progenitors in mice and promotes recovery of blood counts in sublethally irradiated animals. We report for the first time that HSPCs express functional FSH and LH receptors and that both proliferate in vivo and in vitro in response to stimulation by pituitary SexHs. Furthermore, based on our observations that at least some of CD45− very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) may become specified into CD45+ HSPCs, we also evaluated the expression of pituitary and gonadal SexHs receptors on these cells and tested whether these quiescent cells may expand in vivo in response to SexHs administration. We found that VSELs express SexHs receptors and respond in vivo to SexHs stimulation, as evidenced by BrdU accumulation. Since at least some VSELs share several markers characteristic of migrating primordial germ cells and can be specified into HSPCs, this observation sheds new light on the BM stem cell hierarchy. PMID:25607657

  8. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells express several functional sex hormone receptors-novel evidence for a potential developmental link between hematopoiesis and primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Borkowska, Sylwia; Suszynska, Ewa; Suszynska, Malwina; Poniewierska-Baran, Agata; Maj, Magda; Pedziwiatr, Daniel; Adamiak, Mateusz; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Kakar, Sham S; Ratajczak, Janina; Kucia, Magda; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2015-04-15

    Evidence has accumulated that hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) share several markers with the germline, a connection supported by reports that prolactin, androgens, and estrogens stimulate hematopoiesis. To address this issue more directly, we tested the expression of receptors for pituitary-derived hormones, such as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), on purified murine bone marrow (BM) cells enriched for HSPCs and tested the functionality of these receptors in ex vivo signal transduction studies and in vitro clonogenic assays. We also tested whether administration of pituitary- and gonad-derived sex hormones (SexHs) increases incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) into HSPCs and expansion of hematopoietic clonogenic progenitors in mice and promotes recovery of blood counts in sublethally irradiated animals. We report for the first time that HSPCs express functional FSH and LH receptors and that both proliferate in vivo and in vitro in response to stimulation by pituitary SexHs. Furthermore, based on our observations that at least some of CD45(-) very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) may become specified into CD45(+) HSPCs, we also evaluated the expression of pituitary and gonadal SexHs receptors on these cells and tested whether these quiescent cells may expand in vivo in response to SexHs administration. We found that VSELs express SexHs receptors and respond in vivo to SexHs stimulation, as evidenced by BrdU accumulation. Since at least some VSELs share several markers characteristic of migrating primordial germ cells and can be specified into HSPCs, this observation sheds new light on the BM stem cell hierarchy.

  9. Murine hematopoietic reconstitution after tagging and selection of retrovirally transduced bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    García-Hernández, B.; Castellanos, A.; López, A.; Orfao, A.; Sánchez-García, I.

    1997-01-01

    A major problem facing the effective treatment of patients with cancer is how to get the specific antitumor agent into every tumor cell. In this report we describe the use of a strategy that, by using retroviral vectors encoding a truncated human CD5 cDNA, allows the selection of only the infected cells, and we show the ability to obtain, before bone marrow transplantation, a population of 5-fluouraci-treated murine bone marrow cells that are 100% marked. This marked population of bone marrow cells is able to reconstitute the hematopoietic system in lethally irradiated mice, indicating that the surface marker lacks deleterious effects on the functionality of bone marrow cells. No gross abnormalities in hematopoiesis were detected in mice repopulated with CD5-expressing cells. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of the hematopoietic cells no longer expresses the surface marker CD5 in the 9-month-old recipient mice. This transcriptional inactivity of the proviral long terminal repeat (LTR) was accompanied by de novo methylation of the proviral sequences. Our results show that the use of the CD5 as a retrovirally encoded marker enables the rapid, efficient, and nontoxic selection in vitro of infected primary cells, which can entirely reconstitute the hematopoietic system in mice. These results should now greatly enhance the power of studies aimed at addressing questions such as generation of cancer-negative hematopoiesis. PMID:9371830

  10. Spinal Cord Compression Secondary to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Arthur; Carberry, Nathan; Solli, Elena; Gillick, John; Islam, Humayun; Hillard, Virany

    2016-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) is a rare cause of spinal cord compression (SCC). EMH represents the growth of blood cells outside of the bone marrow and occurs in a variety of hematologic illnesses, including various types of anemia and myeloproliferative disorders. Although EMH usually occurs in the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes, it may also occur within the spinal canal. When this occurs, the mass effect can compress the spinal cord, potentially leading to the development of neurological deficits. We present a case of SCC secondary to EMH. This report illustrates the importance of considering EMH in the differential diagnosis of SCC, even in the absence of signs of its most common etiologies. PMID:27462228

  11. Postnatal Hematopoiesis and Gut Microbiota in NOD Mice Deviate from C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Hasselby, Jane Preuss; Wiese, Maria; Lundsager, Mia; Buschard, Karsten Stig; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal studies in different mouse strains reveal that early life colonization affects the development of adaptive immunity in mice. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes, but neonatal studies of NOD mice are lacking. We hypothesized that NOD mice deviate from another much used mouse strain, C57BL/6, with respect to postnatal microbiota and/or hematopoiesis and compared this in newborn mice of dams housed under the same conditions. A distinct bacteria profile rich in staphylococci was found at postnatal days (PND) 1–4 in NOD mice. Furthermore, a distinct splenic cell profile high in a granulocytic phenotype was evident in the neonatal NOD mice whereas neonatal C57BL/6 mice showed a profile rich in monocytes. Neonatal expression of Reg3g and Muc2 in the gut was deviating in NOD mice and coincided with fewer bacteria attaching to the Mucosal surface in NOD compared to C57BL/6 mice. PMID:26783537

  12. The transcriptional regulation of the Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor (csf1r) gene during hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Bonifer, Constanze; Hume, David A

    2008-01-01

    The colony-stimulating-factor 1 receptor (CSF-1 R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor that is absolutely required for macrophage differentiation and thus occupies a central role in hematopoiesis. Mice deficient for the csf1r gene show multiple defects in macrophage development, reproduction and tissue remodeling. Moreover, deregulation of this gene is a hallmark of many tumors. This includes repression of expression in acute myeloid leukemia and aberrant activation in certain solid tumors, such as breast cancer. Expression of this gene therefore needs to be tightly controlled. This review summarizes experiments providing a detailed picture of how transcription of csf1r gene expression is regulated. Aside from the direct relevance to hematopoiesis, studies of csf1r transcriptional regulation provide a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms that control mammalian cell fate.

  13. Endothelio-mesenchymal interaction controls runx1 expression and modulates the notch pathway to initiate aortic hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Charlotte; Drevon, Cécile; Canto, Pierre-Yves; Villain, Gaelle; Bollérot, Karine; Lempereur, Aveline; Teillet, Marie-Aimée; Vincent, Christine; Castillo, Catalina Rosselló; Torres, Miguel; Piwarzyk, Eileen; Speck, Nancy A.; Souyri, Michèle; Jaffredo, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are produced by a small cohort of hemogenic endothelial cells (ECs) during development through the formation of intra-aortic hematopoietic cell (HC) clusters (HCs). The Runx1 transcription factor plays a key role in the EC to HC and HSC transition. We show that Runx1 expression in hemogenic ECs and the subsequent initiation of HC formation are tightly controlled by the sub-aortic mesenchyme, although the mesenchyme is not a source of HCs. Runx1 and Notch signaling are involved in this process, with Notch signaling decreasing with time in HCs. Inhibiting Notch signaling readily increases HC production in mouse and chicken embryos. In the mouse however, this increase is transient. Collectively, we show complementary roles of hemogenic ECs and mesenchymal compartments in triggering aortic hematopoiesis. The sub-aortic mesenchyme induces Runx1 expression in hemogenic-primed endothelial cells and collaborates with Notch dynamics to control aortic hematopoiesis. PMID:23537631

  14. Cocaine exposure impairs multilineage hematopoiesis of human hematopoietic progenitor cells mediated by the sigma-1 receptor [corrected].

    PubMed

    Nixon, Christopher C; Schwartz, Brandon H; Dixit, Dhaval; Zack, Jerome A; Vatakis, Dimitrios N

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to cocaine is a significant source of fetal and neonatal developmental defects. While cocaine associated neurological and cardiac pathologies are well-documented, it is apparent that cocaine use has far more diverse physiological effects. It is known that in some cell types, the sigma-1 receptor mediates many of cocaine's cellular effects. Here we present a novel and concise investigation into the mechanism that underlies cocaine associated hematopoietic pathology. Indeed, this is the first examination of the effects of cocaine on hematopoiesis. We show that cocaine impairs multilineage hematopoiesis from human progenitors from multiple donors and tissue types. We go on to present the first demonstration of the expression of the sigma-1 receptor in human CD34 + human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these cocaine-induced hematopoietic defects can be reversed through sigma-1 receptor blockade. PMID:25728014

  15. Parallels between immune driven-hematopoiesis and T cell activation: 3 signals that relay inflammatory stress to the bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Libregts, Sten F.W.M.; Nolte, Martijn A.

    2014-12-10

    Quiescence, self-renewal, lineage commitment and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) towards fully mature blood cells are a complex process that involves both intrinsic and extrinsic signals. During steady-state conditions, most hematopoietic signals are provided by various resident cells inside the bone marrow (BM), which establish the HSC micro-environment. However, upon infection, the hematopoietic process is also affected by pathogens and activated immune cells, which illustrates an effective feedback mechanism to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) via immune-mediated signals. Here, we review the impact of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines on the quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSCs and more committed progenitors. As modulation of HSPC function via these immune-mediated signals holds an interesting parallel with the “three-signal-model” described for the activation and differentiation of naïve T-cells, we propose a novel “three-signal” concept for immune-driven hematopoiesis. In this model, the recognition of PAMPs and DAMPs will activate HSCs and induce proliferation, while costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines confer a second and third signal, respectively, which further regulate expansion, lineage commitment and differentiation of HSPCs. We review the impact of inflammatory stress on hematopoiesis along these three signals and we discuss whether they act independently from each other or that concurrence of these signals is important for an adequate response of HSPCs upon infection. - Highlights: • Inflammation and infection have a direct impact on hematopoiesis in the bone marrow. • We draw a striking parallel between immune-driven hematopoiesis and T cell activation. • We review how PAMPs and DAMPs, costimulation and cytokines influence HSPC function.

  16. Impact of Viral Infections on Hematopoiesis: From Beneficial to Detrimental Effects on Bone Marrow Output

    PubMed Central

    Pascutti, Maria Fernanda; Erkelens, Martje N.; Nolte, Martijn A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the bone marrow (BM) to generate copious amounts of blood cells required on a daily basis depends on a highly orchestrated process of proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). This process can be rapidly adapted under stress conditions, such as infections, to meet the specific cellular needs of the immune response and the ensuing physiological changes. This requires a tight regulation in order to prevent either hematopoietic failure or transformation. Although adaptation to bacterial infections or systemic inflammation has been studied and reviewed in depth, specific alterations of hematopoiesis to viral infections have received less attention so far. Viruses constantly pose a significant health risk and demand an adequate, balanced response from our immune system, which also affects the BM. In fact, both the virus itself and the ensuing immune response can have a tremendous impact on the hematopoietic process. On one hand, this can be beneficial: it helps to boost the cellular response of the body to resolve the viral infection. But on the other hand, when the virus and the resulting antiviral response persist, the inflammatory feedback to the hematopoietic system will become chronic, which can be detrimental for a balanced BM output. Chronic viral infections frequently have clinical manifestations at the level of blood cell formation, and we summarize which viruses can lead to BM pathologies, like aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, lymphoproliferative disorders, and malignancies. Regarding the underlying mechanisms, we address specific effects of acute and chronic viral infections on blood cell production. As such, we distinguish four different levels in which this can occur: (1) direct viral infection of HSPCs, (2) viral recognition by HSPCs, (3) indirect effects on HSPCs by inflammatory mediators, and (4) the role of the BM microenvironment on hematopoiesis upon virus

  17. Impact of Viral Infections on Hematopoiesis: From Beneficial to Detrimental Effects on Bone Marrow Output

    PubMed Central

    Pascutti, Maria Fernanda; Erkelens, Martje N.; Nolte, Martijn A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the bone marrow (BM) to generate copious amounts of blood cells required on a daily basis depends on a highly orchestrated process of proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). This process can be rapidly adapted under stress conditions, such as infections, to meet the specific cellular needs of the immune response and the ensuing physiological changes. This requires a tight regulation in order to prevent either hematopoietic failure or transformation. Although adaptation to bacterial infections or systemic inflammation has been studied and reviewed in depth, specific alterations of hematopoiesis to viral infections have received less attention so far. Viruses constantly pose a significant health risk and demand an adequate, balanced response from our immune system, which also affects the BM. In fact, both the virus itself and the ensuing immune response can have a tremendous impact on the hematopoietic process. On one hand, this can be beneficial: it helps to boost the cellular response of the body to resolve the viral infection. But on the other hand, when the virus and the resulting antiviral response persist, the inflammatory feedback to the hematopoietic system will become chronic, which can be detrimental for a balanced BM output. Chronic viral infections frequently have clinical manifestations at the level of blood cell formation, and we summarize which viruses can lead to BM pathologies, like aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, lymphoproliferative disorders, and malignancies. Regarding the underlying mechanisms, we address specific effects of acute and chronic viral infections on blood cell production. As such, we distinguish four different levels in which this can occur: (1) direct viral infection of HSPCs, (2) viral recognition by HSPCs, (3) indirect effects on HSPCs by inflammatory mediators, and (4) the role of the BM microenvironment on hematopoiesis upon virus

  18. Germ line variants predispose to both JAK2 V617F clonal hematopoiesis and myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hinds, David A; Barnholt, Kimberly E; Mesa, Ruben A; Kiefer, Amy K; Do, Chuong B; Eriksson, Nicholas; Mountain, Joanna L; Francke, Uta; Tung, Joyce Y; Nguyen, Huong Marie; Zhang, Haiyu; Gojenola, Linda; Zehnder, James L; Gotlib, Jason

    2016-08-25

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify novel predisposition alleles associated with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and JAK2 V617F clonal hematopoiesis in the general population. We recruited a web-based cohort of 726 individuals with polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis and 252 637 population controls unselected for hematologic phenotypes. Using a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array platform with custom probes for the JAK2 V617F mutation (V617F), we identified 497 individuals (0.2%) among the population controls who were V617F carriers. We performed a combined GWAS of the MPN cases plus V617F carriers in the control population (n = 1223) vs the remaining controls who were noncarriers for V617F (n = 252 140). For these MPN cases plus V617F carriers, we replicated the germ line JAK2 46/1 haplotype (rs59384377: odds ratio [OR] = 2.4, P = 6.6 × 10(-89)), previously associated with V617F-positive MPN. We also identified genome-wide significant associations in the TERT gene (rs7705526: OR = 1.8, P = 1.1 × 10(-32)), in SH2B3 (rs7310615: OR = 1.4, P = 3.1 × 10(-14)), and upstream of TET2 (rs1548483: OR = 2.0, P = 2.0 × 10(-9)). These associations were confirmed in a separate replication cohort of 446 V617F carriers vs 169 021 noncarriers. In a joint analysis of the combined GWAS and replication results, we identified additional genome-wide significant predisposition alleles associated with CHEK2, ATM, PINT, and GFI1B All SNP ORs were similar for MPN patients and controls who were V617F carriers. These data indicate that the same germ line variants endow individuals with a predisposition not only to MPN, but also to JAK2 V617F clonal hematopoiesis, a more common phenomenon that may foreshadow the development of an overt neoplasm. PMID:27365426

  19. The Sirt1 activator SRT3025 expands hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and improves hematopoiesis in Fanconi anemia mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Deater, Matthew; Schubert, Kathryn; Marquez-Loza, Laura; Pelz, Carl; Sinclair, David A; Grompe, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Fanconi anemia is a genetic bone marrow failure syndrome. The current treatment options are suboptimal and do not prevent the eventual onset of aplastic anemia requiring bone marrow transplantation. We previously showed that resveratrol, an antioxidant and an activator of the protein deacetylase Sirt1, enhanced hematopoiesis in Fancd2 mutant mice and improved the impaired stem cell quiescence observed in this disease. Given that Sirt1 is important for the function of hematopoietic stem cells, we hypothesized that Sirt1 activation may improve hematopoiesis. Indeed, Fancd2(-/-) mice and wild-type mice treated with the selective Sirt1 activator SRT3025 had increased numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, platelets and white blood cells. SRT3025 was also protective against acetaldehyde-induced hematopoietic damage. Unlike resveratrol, however, SRT3025 did not affect stem cell quiescence, suggesting distinct mechanisms of action. Conditional deletion of Sirt1 in hematopoietic cells did not abrogate the beneficial effects of SRT3025, indicating that the drug did not act by directly stimulating Sirt1 in stem cells, but must be acting indirectly via extra-hematopoietic effects. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis revealed the down-regulation of Egr1-p21 expression, providing a potential mechanism for improved hematopoiesis. Overall, our data indicate that SRT3025 or related compounds may be beneficial in Fanconi anemia and other bone marrow failure syndromes.

  20. Expression profile analysis of aorta-gonad-mesonephros region-derived stromal cells reveals genes that regulate hematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, Kenji; Ohta, Takayuki; Hinohara, Atsushi; Tahara, Tomoyuki; Hagiwara, Tetsuya; Maeda, Yoshitake; Yoneya, Takashi; Sohma, Yoshiaki; Heike, Toshio; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Inagaki, Yoshimasa Nishikawa, Mitsuo

    2008-12-05

    The aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region is involved in the generation and maintenance of the first definitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). A mouse AGM-derived cell line, AGM-S3, was shown to support the development of HSCs. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms regulating early hematopoiesis, we obtained subclones from AGM-S3, one of which was hematopoiesis supportive (S3-A9) and the other one of which was non-supportive (S3-A7), and we analyzed their gene expression profiles by gene chip analysis. In the present study, we found that Glypican-1 (GPC1) was highly expressed in the supportive subclone AGM-S3-A9. Over-expression of GPC1 in non-supportive cells led to the proliferation of progenitor cells in human cord blood when cocultured with the transfected-stromal cells. Thus, GPC1 may have an important role in the establishment of a microenvironment that supports early events in hematopoiesis.

  1. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 2. Expression of receptor mRNA in resting and lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Hofer, M; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M

    2010-01-01

    Expression of mRNA for adenosine receptor subtypes A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) in normal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages has been investigated using the method of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results have shown a very low, unquantifiable expression of adenosine A(1) receptor mRNA in both normal and LPS-activated macrophages. The other three adenosine receptor mRNAs have been found to be expressed at various but always quantifiable levels. Activation of the macrophages by LPS induced upregulation of the expression of adenosine receptor A(2a) and A(2b) mRNA, whereas the expression of adenosine receptor A(3) mRNA was downregulated. Unstimulated macrophages exhibited a high expression of the A(2b) adenosine receptor mRNA. The findings are discussed from the point of view of the antiinflammatory and hematopoiesis-stimulating roles of the adenosine receptor signaling.

  2. Dose-dependent role of the cohesin complex in normal and malignant hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Viny, Aaron D.; Ott, Christopher J.; Spitzer, Barbara; Rivas, Martin; Meydan, Cem; Papalexi, Efthymia; Yelin, Dana; Shank, Kaitlyn; Reyes, Jaime; Chiu, April; Romin, Yevgeniy; Boyko, Vitaly; Thota, Swapna; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Melnick, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Cohesin complex members have recently been identified as putative tumor suppressors in hematologic and epithelial malignancies. The cohesin complex guides chromosome segregation; however, cohesin mutant leukemias do not show genomic instability. We hypothesized that reduced cohesin function alters chromatin structure and disrupts cis-regulatory architecture of hematopoietic progenitors. We investigated the consequences of Smc3 deletion in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Biallelic Smc3 loss induced bone marrow aplasia with premature sister chromatid separation and revealed an absolute requirement for cohesin in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. In contrast, Smc3 haploinsufficiency increased self-renewal in vitro and in vivo, including competitive transplantation. Smc3 haploinsufficiency reduced coordinated transcriptional output, including reduced expression of transcription factors and other genes associated with lineage commitment. Smc3 haploinsufficiency cooperated with Flt3-ITD to induce acute leukemia in vivo, with potentiated Stat5 signaling and altered nucleolar topology. These data establish a dose dependency for cohesin in regulating chromatin structure and HSC function. PMID:26438361

  3. Single-Cell Network Analysis Identifies DDIT3 as a Nodal Lineage Regulator in Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Cristina; Teles, José; Fugazza, Cristina; May, Gillian; Wang, Dapeng; Guo, Yanping; Soneji, Shamit; Brown, John; Edén, Patrik; Ohlsson, Mattias; Peterson, Carsten; Enver, Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Summary We explore cell heterogeneity during spontaneous and transcription-factor-driven commitment for network inference in hematopoiesis. Since individual genes display discrete OFF states or a distribution of ON levels, we compute and combine pairwise gene associations from binary and continuous components of gene expression in single cells. Ddit3 emerges as a regulatory node with positive linkage to erythroid regulators and negative association with myeloid determinants. Ddit3 loss impairs erythroid colony output from multipotent cells, while forcing Ddit3 in granulo-monocytic progenitors (GMPs) enhances self-renewal and impedes differentiation. Network analysis of Ddit3-transduced GMPs reveals uncoupling of myeloid networks and strengthening of erythroid linkages. RNA sequencing suggests that Ddit3 acts through development or stabilization of a precursor upstream of GMPs with inherent Meg-E potential. The enrichment of Gata2 target genes in Ddit3-dependent transcriptional responses suggests that Ddit3 functions in an erythroid transcriptional network nucleated by Gata2. PMID:26051941

  4. Effects of combined sunitinib and extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy on bone marrow hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Johnny; Timmins, Jonathan; Ozao-Choy, Junko; Packer, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in deploying stereotactic body radiotherapy in combination with immune therapy for patients with extracranial oligometastases. In addition to angiogenesis inhibition, sunitinib appears to mediate antitumor immunity through effects on circulating monocytic cells. The current study investigated the effects of combined sunitinib and stereotactic radiotherapy on hematopoiesis. As part of a phase I/II clinical trial utilizing concurrent sunitinib (25–50 mg on days 1–28) and image-guided radiation therapy (40–50 Gy in 10 fractions starting on days 8–19) for patients with metastatic cancer, the complete blood count, platelet count and automatic differential were performed pretreatment and on days 8 and 19. On average, sunitinib monotherapy for 7 days resulted in a 33% decrease in monocytes and an 18% decrease in neutrophils (P<0.01 for all). Compared to sunitinib alone, combined sunitinib and radiation resulted in a further decrease in neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets (P<0.05). Following sunitinib and radiation treatment, a greater than average decrease in monocytes (≥200/µl) was associated with a significant increase in progression-free and overall survival times. This exploratory study provides further evidence that monocytes represent a potential biomarker in patients with solid tumors treated with sunitinib.

  5. Effects of combined sunitinib and extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy on bone marrow hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Johnny; Timmins, Jonathan; Ozao-Choy, Junko; Packer, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in deploying stereotactic body radiotherapy in combination with immune therapy for patients with extracranial oligometastases. In addition to angiogenesis inhibition, sunitinib appears to mediate antitumor immunity through effects on circulating monocytic cells. The current study investigated the effects of combined sunitinib and stereotactic radiotherapy on hematopoiesis. As part of a phase I/II clinical trial utilizing concurrent sunitinib (25–50 mg on days 1–28) and image-guided radiation therapy (40–50 Gy in 10 fractions starting on days 8–19) for patients with metastatic cancer, the complete blood count, platelet count and automatic differential were performed pretreatment and on days 8 and 19. On average, sunitinib monotherapy for 7 days resulted in a 33% decrease in monocytes and an 18% decrease in neutrophils (P<0.01 for all). Compared to sunitinib alone, combined sunitinib and radiation resulted in a further decrease in neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets (P<0.05). Following sunitinib and radiation treatment, a greater than average decrease in monocytes (≥200/µl) was associated with a significant increase in progression-free and overall survival times. This exploratory study provides further evidence that monocytes represent a potential biomarker in patients with solid tumors treated with sunitinib. PMID:27602153

  6. CD137 ligand reverse signaling skews hematopoiesis towards myelopoiesis during aging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qianqiao; Koh, Liang Kai; Jiang, Dongsheng; Schwarz, Herbert

    2013-09-01

    CD137 is a costimulatory molecule expressed on activated T cells. Its ligand, CD137L, is expressed on the surface of hematopoietic progenitor cells, and upon binding to CD137 induces reverse signaling into hematopoietic progenitor cells promoting their activation, proliferation and myeloid differentiation. Since aging is associated with an increasing number of myeloid cells we investigated the role of CD137 and CD137L on myelopoiesis during aging. Comparing 3 and 12 months old WT, CD137‐/‐ and CD137L‐/‐ mice we found significantly more granulocytes and monocytes in the bone marrow of older WT mice, while this age‐dependent increase was absent in CD137‐/‐ and CD137L‐/‐ mice. Instead, the bone marrow of 12 months old CD137‐/‐ and CD137L‐/‐ mice was characterized by an accumulation of hematopoietic progenitor cells, suggesting that the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells became arrested in the absence of CD137L signaling. CD137L signaling is initiated by activated CD137‐expressing, CD4+ T cells. These data identify a novel molecular mechanisms underlying immune aging by demonstrating that CD137‐expressing CD4+ T cells in the bone marrow engage CD137L on hematopoietic progenitor cells, and that this CD137L signaling biases hematopoiesis towards myelopoiesis during aging.

  7. Parp-2 is required to maintain hematopoiesis following sublethal γ-irradiation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Farrés, Jordi; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Martínez, Carlos; Lozano, Juan J.; Llacuna, Laura; Ampurdanés, Coral; Ruiz-Herguido, Cristina; Dantzer, Françoise; Schreiber, Valérie; Villunger, Andreas; Bigas, Anna; Yélamos, José

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells self-renew for life to guarantee the continuous supply of all blood cell lineages. Here we show that Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (Parp-2) plays an essential role in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) survival under steady-state conditions and in response to stress. Increased levels of cell death were observed in HSPC from untreated Parp-2−/− mice, but this deficit was compensated by increased rates of self-renewal, associated with impaired reconstitution of hematopoiesis upon serial bone marrow transplantation. Cell death after γ-irradiation correlated with an impaired capacity to repair DNA damage in the absence of Parp-2. Upon exposure to sublethal doses of γ-irradiation, Parp-2−/− mice exhibited bone marrow failure that correlated with reduced long-term repopulation potential of irradiated Parp-2−/− HSPC under competitive conditions. In line with a protective role of Parp-2 against irradiation-induced apoptosis, loss of p53 or the pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Puma restored survival of irradiated Parp-2−/− mice, whereas loss of Noxa had no such effect. Our results show that Parp-2 plays essential roles in the surveillance of genome integrity of HSPC by orchestrating DNA repair and restraining p53-induced and Puma-mediated apoptosis. The data may affect the design of drugs targeting Parp proteins and the improvement of radiotherapy-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:23678004

  8. Adenosine A(3) receptor agonist acts as a homeostatic regulator of bone marrow hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Holá, Jirina; Vacek, Antonín; Streitová, Denisa

    2007-07-01

    The present study was performed to define the optimum conditions of the stimulatory action of the adenosine A(3) receptor agonist, N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA), on bone marrow hematopoiesis in mice. Effects of 2-day treatment with IB-MECA given at single doses of 200nmol/kg twice daily were investigated in normal mice and in mice whose femoral bone marrow cells were either depleted or regenerating after pretreatment with the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. Morphological criteria were used to determine the proliferation state of the granulocytic and erythroid cell systems. Significant negative correlation between the control proliferation state and the increase of cell proliferation after IB-MECA treatment irrespective of the cell lineage investigated was found. The results suggest the homeostatic character of the induced stimulatory effects and the need to respect the functional state of the target tissue when investigating effects of adenosine receptor agonists under in vivo conditions.

  9. Mitotic History Reveals Distinct Stem Cell Populations and Their Contributions to Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Säwén, Petter; Lang, Stefan; Mandal, Pankaj; Rossi, Derrick J.; Soneji, Shamit; Bryder, David

    2016-01-01

    Summary Homeostasis of short-lived blood cells is dependent on rapid proliferation of immature precursors. Using a conditional histone 2B-mCherry-labeling mouse model, we characterize hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and progenitor proliferation dynamics in steady state and following several types of induced stress. HSC proliferation following HSC transplantation into lethally irradiated mice is fundamentally different not only from native hematopoiesis but also from other stress contexts. Whereas transplantation promoted sustained, long-term proliferation of HSCs, both cytokine-induced mobilization and acute depletion of selected blood cell lineages elicited very limited recruitment of HSCs to the proliferative pool. By coupling mCherry-based analysis of proliferation history with multiplex gene expression analyses on single cells, we have found that HSCs can be stratified into four distinct subtypes. These subtypes have distinct molecular signatures and differ significantly in their reconstitution potentials, showcasing the power of tracking proliferation history when resolving functional heterogeneity of HSCs. PMID:26997272

  10. Asrij maintains the stem cell niche and controls differentiation during Drosophila lymph gland hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Vani; Khadilkar, Rohan J; Magadi, Srivathsa S; Srivathsa, M S; Inamdar, Maneesha S

    2011-01-01

    Several signaling pathways control blood cell (hemocyte) development in the Drosophila lymph gland. Mechanisms that modulate and integrate these signals are poorly understood. Here we report that mutation in a conserved endocytic protein Asrij affects signal transmission and causes aberrant lymph gland hematopoiesis. Mammalian Asrij (Ociad1) is expressed in stem cells of the blood vascular system and is implicated in several cancers. We found that Drosophila Asrij is a pan-hemocyte marker and localizes to a subset of endocytic vesicles. Loss of asrij causes hyperproliferation of lymph gland lobes coupled with increased hemocyte differentiation, thereby depleting the pool of quiescent hemocyte precursors. This co-relates with fewer Col+ cells in the hematopoietic stem cell niche of asrij mutants. Asrij null mutants also show excess specification of crystal cells that express the RUNX factor Lozenge (Lz), a target of Notch signaling. Asrij mutant lymph glands show increased N in sorting endosomes suggesting aberrant trafficking. In vitro assays also show impaired traffic of fluorescent probes in asrij null hemocytes. Taken together our data suggest a role for Asrij in causing increased Notch signaling thereby affecting hemocyte differentiation. Thus, conserved endocytic functions may control blood cell progenitor quiescence and differentiation. PMID:22110713

  11. Hematopoiesis in the Grey Collic Dog STUDIES OF THE REGULATION OF ERYTHROPOIESIS

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, John W.; Dale, David C.; Elin, Ronald J.

    1974-01-01

    Hematopoiesis in the grey collie dog undergoes periodic fluctuations which involve reticulocytes, granulocytes, platelets, lymphocytes, and monocytes. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and can be transmitted or abolished by appropriate bone marrow transplantation experiments, thus demonstrating this to be a primary marrow defect. Investigation of humoral regulation in this setting indicates that serum erythropoietin (ESF) also undergoes cyclic fluctuation and that shortly after the increase and peak in serum ESF levels recognizable red cell precursors appear in the marrow. Erythropoiesis in the grey collie is reciprocally related to the blood O2 carrying capacity. With phlebotomy, ESF activity and reticulocytes increase but continue to cycle, while hypertransfusion eliminates reticulocyte production completely. Neither phlebotomy nor hypertransfusion alter the underlying cycle time (11-12 days) nor influence the peaks of peripheral blood granulocytes. Thus, in these experiments, no direct evidence of competition between reticulocyte and granulocyte production is observed. In vitro studies of canine hemoglobin synthesis fail to demonstrate evidence of an inhibitor to ESF. These results indicate that periodic fluctuation of serum ESF is an integral part of the grey collie syndrome and are most consistent with some form of feedback regulation of ESF production. PMID:4430726

  12. Molecular Analysis of Neutrophil Differentiation from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Delineates the Kinetics of Key Regulators of Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Colin L; Teng, Ruifeng; Wang, Hongmei; Merling, Randall K; Lee, Janet; Choi, Uimook; Koontz, Sherry; Wright, Daniel G; Malech, Harry L

    2016-06-01

    In vitro generation of mature neutrophils from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) requires hematopoietic progenitor development followed by myeloid differentiation. The purpose of our studies was to extensively characterize this process, focusing on the critical window of development between hemogenic endothelium, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), and myeloid commitment, to identify associated regulators and markers that might enable the stem cell field to improve the efficiency and efficacy of iPSC hematopoiesis. We utilized a four-stage differentiation protocol involving: embryoid body (EB) formation (stage-1); EB culture with hematopoietic cytokines (stage-2); HSPC expansion (stage-3); and neutrophil maturation (stage-4). CD34(+) CD45(-) putative hemogenic endothelial cells were observed in stage-3 cultures, and expressed VEGFR-2/Flk-1/KDR and VE-cadherin endothelial markers, GATA-2, AML1/RUNX1, and SCL/TAL1 transcription factors, and endothelial/HSPC-associated microRNAs miR-24, miR-125a-3p, miR-126/126*, and miR-155. Upon further culture, CD34(+) CD45(-) cells generated CD34(+) CD45(+) HSPCs that produced hematopoietic CFUs. Mid-stage-3 CD34(+) CD45(+) HSPCs exhibited increased expression of GATA-2, AML1/RUNX1, SCL/TAL1, C/EBPα, and PU.1 transcription factors, but exhibited decreased expression of HSPC-associated microRNAs, and failed to engraft in immune-deficient mice. Mid-stage-3 CD34(-) CD45(+) cells maintained PU.1 expression and exhibited increased expression of hematopoiesis-associated miR-142-3p/5p and a trend towards increased miR-223 expression, indicating myeloid commitment. By late Stage-4, increased CD15, CD16b, and C/EBPɛ expression were observed, with 25%-65% of cells exhibiting morphology and functions of mature neutrophils. These studies demonstrate that hematopoiesis and neutrophil differentiation from human iPSCs recapitulates many features of embryonic hematopoiesis and neutrophil production in marrow, but reveals

  13. Effects of the murine skull in optoacoustic brain microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Shoham, Shy; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great promise behind the recent introduction of optoacoustic technology into the arsenal of small-animal neuroimaging methods, a variety of acoustic and light-related effects introduced by adult murine skull severely compromise the performance of optoacoustics in transcranial imaging. As a result, high-resolution noninvasive optoacoustic microscopy studies are still limited to a thin layer of pial microvasculature, which can be effectively resolved by tight focusing of the excitation light. We examined a range of distortions introduced by an adult murine skull in transcranial optoacoustic imaging under both acoustically- and optically-determined resolution scenarios. It is shown that strong low-pass filtering characteristics of the skull may significantly deteriorate the achievable spatial resolution in deep brain imaging where no light focusing is possible. While only brain vasculature with a diameter larger than 60 µm was effectively resolved via transcranial measurements with acoustic resolution, significant improvements are seen through cranial windows and thinned skull experiments.

  14. H4 Histamine Receptors Mediate Cell Cycle Arrest in Growth Factor-Induced Murine and Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Petit-Bertron, Anne-France; Machavoine, François; Defresne, Marie Paule; Gillard, Michel; Chatelain, Pierre; Mistry, Prakash

    2009-01-01

    The most recently characterized H4 histamine receptor (H4R) is expressed preferentially in the bone marrow, raising the question of its role during hematopoiesis. Here we show that both murine and human progenitor cell populations express this receptor subtype on transcriptional and protein levels and respond to its agonists by reduced growth factor-induced cell cycle progression that leads to decreased myeloid, erythroid and lymphoid colony formation. H4R activation prevents the induction of cell cycle genes through a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway that is not associated with apoptosis. It is mediated specifically through H4R signaling since gene silencing or treatment with selective antagonists restores normal cell cycle progression. The arrest of growth factor-induced G1/S transition protects murine and human progenitor cells from the toxicity of the cell cycle-dependent anticancer drug Ara-C in vitro and reduces aplasia in a murine model of chemotherapy. This first evidence for functional H4R expression in hematopoietic progenitors opens new therapeutic perspectives for alleviating hematotoxic side effects of antineoplastic drugs. PMID:19662098

  15. Conserved hemopoietic transcription factor Cg-SCL delineates hematopoiesis of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Hao; Chen, Hao; Sun, Mingzhe; Liang, Zhongxiu; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-04-01

    Hemocytes are the effective immunocytes in bivalves, which have been reported to be derived from stem-like cells in gill epithelium of oyster. In the present work, a conserved haematopoietic transcription factor Tal-1/Scl (Stem Cell Leukemia) was identified in Pacific oyster (Cg-SCL), and it was evolutionarily close to the orthologs in deuterostomes. Cg-SCL was highly distributed in the hemocytes as well as gill and mantle. The hemocyte specific genes Integrin, EcSOD and haematopoietic transcription factors GATA3, C-Myb, c-kit, were down-regulated when Cg-SCL was interfered by dsRNA. During the larval developmental stages, the mRNA transcripts of Cg-SCL gradually increased after fertilization and peaked at early trochophore larvae stage (10 hpf, hours post fertilization), then sharply decreased in late trochophore larvae stage (15 hpf) before resuming in umbo larvae (120 hpf). Whole-mount immunofluorescence assay further revealed that the immunoreactivity of Cg-SCL appeared in blastula larvae with two approximate symmetric spots, and this expression pattern lasted in gastrula larvae. By trochophore, the immunoreactivity formed a ring around the dorsal region and then separated into two remarkable spots at the dorsal side in D-veliger larvae. After bacterial challenge, the mRNA expression levels of Cg-SCL were significantly up-regulated in the D-veliger and umbo larvae, indicating the available hematopoietic regulation in oyster larvae. These results demonstrated that Cg-SCL could be used as haematopoietic specific marker to trace potential developmental events of hematopoiesis during ontogenesis of oyster, which occurred early in blastula stage and maintained until D-veliger larvae.

  16. MDS-associated somatic mutations and clonal hematopoiesis are common in idiopathic cytopenias of undetermined significance

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Brian; Hall, Jeff M.; Witte, John S.; Xu, Yin; Reddy, Prashanti; Lin, Keming; Flamholz, Rachel; Dabbas, Bashar; Yung, Aine; Al-Hafidh, Jenan; Balmert, Emily; Vaupel, Christine; El Hader, Carlos; McGinniss, Matthew J.; Nahas, Shareef A.; Kines, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Establishing a diagnosis in patients suspected of having a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) can be challenging and could be informed by the identification of somatic mutations. We performed a prospective study to examine the frequency and types of mutations encountered in 144 patients with unexplained cytopenias. Based on bone marrow findings, 17% were diagnosed with MDS, 15% with idiopathic cytopenias of undetermined significance (ICUS) and some evidence of dysplasia, and 69% with ICUS and no dysplasia. Bone marrow DNA was sequenced for mutations in 22 frequently mutated myeloid malignancy genes. Somatic mutations were identified in 71% of MDS patients, 62% of patients with ICUS and some dysplasia, and 20% of ICUS patients and no dysplasia. In total, 35% of ICUS patients carried a somatic mutation or chromosomal abnormality indicative of clonal hematopoiesis. We validated these results in a cohort of 91 lower-risk MDS and 249 ICUS cases identified over a 6-month interval. Mutations were found in 79% of those with MDS, in 45% of those with ICUS with dysplasia, and in 17% of those with ICUS without dysplasia. The spectrum of mutated genes was similar with the exception of SF3B1 which was rarely mutated in patients without dysplasia. Variant allele fractions were comparable between clonal ICUS (CCUS) and MDS as were mean age and blood counts. We demonstrate that CCUS is a more frequent diagnosis than MDS in cytopenic patients. Clinical and mutational features are similar in these groups and may have diagnostic utility once outcomes in CCUS patients are better understood. PMID:26429975

  17. Hyaluronan Expressed by the Hematopoietic Microenvironment Is Required for Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis*

    PubMed Central

    Goncharova, Valentina; Serobyan, Naira; Iizuka, Shinji; Schraufstatter, Ingrid; de Ridder, Audrey; Povaliy, Tatiana; Wacker, Valentina; Itano, Naoki; Kimata, Koji; Orlovskaja, Irina A.; Yamaguchi, Yu; Khaldoyanidi, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of hyaluronan (HA) to the regulatory network of the hematopoietic microenvironment was studied using knock-out mice of three hyaluronan synthase genes (Has1, Has2, and Has3). The number of hematopoietic progenitors was decreased in bone marrow and increased in extramedullary sites of Prx1-Cre;Has2flox/flox;Has1−/−;Has3−/− triple knock-out (tKO) mice as compared with wild type (WT) and Has1−/−;Has3−/− double knock-out (dKO) mice. In line with this observation, decreased hematopoietic activity was observed in long term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC) from tKO mice, whereas the formation of the adherent layer and generation of hematopoietic cells in WT and dKO cultures was not different. 4-Methylumbelliferone (4MU) was used to pharmacologically inhibit the production of HA in LTBMC. Treatment with 4MU inhibited HA synthesis, decreased expression of HAS2 and HAS3, and eliminated hematopoiesis in LTBMC, and this effect was alleviated by the addition of exogenous HA. Exogenous HA also augmented the cell motility in LTBMC, which correlated with the HA-stimulated production of chemokines and growth factors. Conditioned media from HA-induced LTBMC enhanced the chemotaxis of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) in response to SDF-1. Exposure of endothelial cells to 4MU decreased their ability to support HSPC rolling and adhesion. In addition, migration of transplanted HSPC into the marrow of 4MU-pretreated mice was lower than in untreated mice. Collectively, the results suggest that HA depletion reduces the ability of the microenvironment to support HSPC, and confirm a role for HA as a necessary regulatory element in the structure of the hematopoietic microenvironment. PMID:22654110

  18. AML suppresses hematopoiesis by releasing exosomes that contain microRNAs targeting c-MYB.

    PubMed

    Hornick, Noah I; Doron, Ben; Abdelhamed, Sherif; Huan, Jianya; Harrington, Christina A; Shen, Rongkun; Cambronne, Xiaolu A; Chakkaramakkil Verghese, Santhosh; Kurre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are paracrine regulators of the tumor microenvironment and contain complex cargo. We previously reported that exosomes released from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells can suppress residual hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) function indirectly through stromal reprogramming of niche retention factors. We found that the systemic loss of hematopoietic function is also in part a consequence of AML exosome-directed microRNA (miRNA) trafficking to HSPCs. Exosomes isolated from cultured AML or the plasma from mice bearing AML xenografts exhibited enrichment of miR-150 and miR-155. HSPCs cocultured with either of these exosomes exhibited impaired clonogenicity, through the miR-150- and miR-155-mediated suppression of the translation of transcripts encoding c-MYB, a transcription factor involved in HSPC differentiation and proliferation. To discover additional miRNA targets, we captured miR-155 and its target transcripts by coimmunoprecipitation with an attenuated RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-trap, followed by high-throughput sequencing. This approach identified known and previously unknown miR-155 target transcripts. Integration of the miR-155 targets with information from the protein interaction database STRING revealed proteins indirectly affected by AML exosome-derived miRNA. Our findings indicate a direct effect of AML exosomes on HSPCs that, through a stroma-independent mechanism, compromises hematopoiesis. Furthermore, combining miRNA target data with protein-protein interaction data may be a broadly applicable strategy to define the effects of exosome-mediated trafficking of regulatory molecules within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27601730

  19. Histological Analyses Demonstrate the Temporary Contribution of Yolk Sac, Liver, and Bone Marrow to Hematopoiesis during Chicken Development

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Priscila Tavares; de Oliveira, Barbara Cristina Euzébio Pereira Dias; Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    The use of avian animal models has contributed to the understanding of many aspects of the ontogeny of the hematopoietic system in vertebrates. However, specific events that occur in the model itself are still unclear. There is a lack of consensus, among previous studies, about which is the intermediate site responsible for expansion and differentiation of hematopoietic cells, and the liver's contribution to the development of this system. Here we aimed to evaluate the presence of hematopoiesis in the yolk sac and liver in chickens, from the stages of intra-aortic clusters in the aorta-genital ridges-mesonephros (AGM) region until hatching, and how it relates to the establishment of the bone marrow. Gallus gallus domesticus L. embryos and their respective yolk sacs at embryonic day 3 (E3) and up to E21 were collected and processed according to standard histological techniques for paraffin embedding. The slides were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Lennert's Giemsa, and Sirius Red at pH 10.2, and investigated by light microscopy. This study demonstrated that the yolk sac was a unique hematopoietic site between E4 and E12. Hematopoiesis occurred in the yolk sac and bone marrow between E13 and E20. The liver showed granulocytic differentiation in the connective tissue of portal spaces at E15 and onwards. The yolk sac showed expansion of erythrocytic and granulocytic lineages from E6 to E19, and E7 to E20, respectively. The results suggest that the yolk sac is the major intermediate erythropoietic and granulopoietic site where expansion and differentiation occur during chicken development. The hepatic hematopoiesis is restricted to the portal spaces and represented by the granulocytic lineage. PMID:24621665

  20. ZIP8 Zinc Transporter: Indispensable Role for Both Multiple-Organ Organogenesis and Hematopoiesis In Utero

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez-Peralta, Marina; He, Lei; Jorge-Nebert, Lucia F.; Wang, Bin; Miller, Marian L.; Eppert, Bryan L.; Afton, Scott; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2012-01-01

    Previously this laboratory characterized Slc39a8-encoded ZIP8 as a Zn2+/(HCO3–)2 symporter; yet, the overall physiological importance of ZIP8 at the whole-organism level remains unclear. Herein we describe the phenotype of the hypomorphic Slc39a8(neo/neo) mouse which has retained the neomycin-resistance gene in intron 3, hence causing significantly decreased ZIP8 mRNA and protein levels in embryo, fetus, placenta, yolk sac, and several tissues of neonates. The Slc39a8(neo) allele is associated with diminished zinc and iron uptake in mouse fetal fibroblast and liver-derived cultures; consequently, Slc39a8(neo/neo) newborns exhibit diminished zinc and iron levels in several tissues. Slc39a8(neo/neo) homozygotes from gestational day(GD)-11.5 onward are pale, growth-stunted, and die between GD18.5 and 48 h postnatally. Defects include: severely hypoplastic spleen; hypoplasia of liver, kidney, lung, and lower limbs. Histologically, Slc39a8(neo/neo) neonates show decreased numbers of hematopoietic islands in yolk sac and liver. Low hemoglobin, hematocrit, red cell count, serum iron, and total iron-binding capacity confirmed severe anemia. Flow cytometry of fetal liver cells revealed the erythroid series strikingly affected in the hypomorph. Zinc-dependent 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, required for heme synthesis, was not different between Slc39a8(+/+) and Slc39a8(neo/neo) offspring. To demonstrate further that the mouse phenotype is due to ZIP8 deficiency, we bred Slc39a8(+/neo) with BAC-transgenic BTZIP8-3 line (carrying three extra copies of the Slc39a8 allele); this cross generated viable Slc39a8(neo/neo)_BTZIP8-3(+/+) pups showing none of the above-mentioned congenital defects–proving Slc39a8(neo/neo) causes the described phenotype. Our study demonstrates that ZIP8-mediated zinc transport plays an unappreciated critical role during in utero and neonatal growth, organ morphogenesis, and hematopoiesis. PMID:22563477

  1. Functional consequences of perturbed CXCL12 signal processing: analyses of immature hematopoiesis in GRK6-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Chudziak, Doreen; Spohn, Gabriele; Karpova, Darja; Dauber, Katrin; Wiercinska, Eliza; Miettinen, Johanna A; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Bönig, Halvard

    2015-03-15

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in bone marrow (BM) in an environment rich in CXCL12, the ligand for CXCR4, which is constitutively expressed on all immature hematopoietic cells in BM. This ligand-receptor pair critically controls HSPC retention and (relative) quiescence in BM. Interestingly, in a chemokine-abundant environment, CXCR4 surface expression and CXCL12 sensitivity of BM-residing HSPCs are continuously maintained. The mechanisms underlying this peculiar pattern of G-protein signal integration by BM-HSPCs are unknown. G-protein receptor kinases (GRKs) control receptor function by phosphorylating the intracellular domains upon ligand-induced activation, which results in receptor internalization and transient refractoriness. Using, therefore, a GRK6-deficient (GRK6(-/-)) mouse, we sought to address how perturbed ligand-induced CXCR4 (in)activation affects HSPC behavior in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, GRK6(-/-) HSPCs were characterized by hyper-responsiveness to CXCL12, as expected. In vivo, GRK6(-/-) immature hematopoiesis was characterized by a marked expansion of immature hematopoiesis in spleens and a modest repopulation defect in serial competitive transplantation. Enforced mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and AMD3100 was normal, as was hematopoietic regeneration after noncompetitive transplantation or pharmacological myelosuppression. These observations illustrate that GRK-mediated restriction of CXCR4 signal input after ligand engagement is largely dispensable for BM-resident HSPCs, which may explain how continuous CXCL12 responsiveness of BM-HSPCs can be maintained.

  2. Pheromone-induced cell proliferation in the murine subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sachiko; Soini, Helena A; Foley, John; Novotny, Milos V; Lai, Cary

    2014-08-01

    Enhancement of adult neurogenesis in female mice was previously demonstrated through exposure to soiled bedding from males, although the identity of relevant chemosignals has remained unknown. The farnesenes and SBT (2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole) are male murine pheromones that dominant males secrete at higher levels. Previous studies have shown that they induce oestrus in female mice. We have recently shown that these pheromones strongly increase cell proliferation in the SVZ (subventricular zone) of adult female mice. In addition, we found that a female murine pheromone, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, facilitates similar changes in males. 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is a female pheromone that is secreted when females are housed in large groups and it was originally found to suppress oestrus in females. We found that it does not have suppressive effect on the cell proliferation in the SVZ of females. Similarly, male murine pheromones, SBT and the farnesenes, do not show a suppressive effect on the cell proliferation in the SVZ of males. Our results demonstrated that pheromonal communication between males and females has strong stimulatory effect on both the reproductive physiology and brain cell proliferation, but intrasex pheromonal exchanges do not reduce progenitor proliferation in these brain regions.

  3. The adult murine heart has a sparse, phagocytically active macrophage population that expands through monocyte recruitment and adopts an ‘M2’ phenotype in response to Th2 immunologic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mylonas, Katie J.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; Castellan, Raphael F.P.; Ruckerl, Dominik; McGregor, Kieran; Phythian-Adams, Alexander T.; Hewitson, James P.; Campbell, Sharon M.; MacDonald, Andrew S.; Allen, Judith E.; Gray, Gillian A.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue resident macrophages have vital homeostatic roles in many tissues but their roles are less well defined in the heart. The present study aimed to identify the density, polarisation status and distribution of macrophages in the healthy murine heart and to investigate their ability to respond to immune challenge. Histological analysis of hearts from CSF-1 receptor (csf1-GFP; MacGreen) and CX3CR1 (Cx3cr1GFP/+) reporter mice revealed a sparse population of GFP positive macrophages that were evenly distributed throughout the left and right ventricular free walls and septum. F4/80+CD11b+ cardiac macrophages, sorted from myocardial homogenates, were able to phagocytose fluorescent beads in vitro and expressed markers typical of both ‘M1’ (IL-1β, TNF and CCR2) and ‘M2’ activation (Ym1, Arg 1, RELMα and IL-10), suggesting no specific polarisation in healthy myocardium. Exposure to Th2 challenge by infection of mice with helminth parasites Schistosoma mansoni, or Heligmosomoides polygyrus, resulted in an increase in cardiac macrophage density, adoption of a stellate morphology and increased expression of Ym1, RELMα and CD206 (mannose receptor), indicative of ‘M2’ polarisation. This was dependent on recruitment of Ly6ChighCCR2+ monocytes and was accompanied by an increase in collagen content. In conclusion, in the healthy heart resident macrophages are relatively sparse and have a phagocytic role. Following Th2 challenge this population expands due to monocyte recruitment and adopts an ‘M2’ phenotype associated with increased tissue fibrosis. PMID:25700973

  4. The role of G-CSF and IL-6 in the granulopoiesis-stimulating activity of murine blood serum induced by perorally administered ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, IMUNOR.

    PubMed

    Vacek, Antonín; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jirina; Weiterová, Lenka; Streitová, Denisa; Svoboda, Jaroslav

    2007-05-01

    IMUNOR, a low-molecular weight (< 12 kD) ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, has been previously found to have significant stimulatory effects on murine hematopoiesis supressed by ionizing radiation or cytotoxic drugs. This communication shows data on the mechanisms of these effects. Using ELISA assay, significantly increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were observed. On the contrary, no detectable levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CFC) and interleukin-3 (IL-3) have been found in blood serum of IMUNOR-treated mice. Incubation of the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with antibodies against G-CSF caused abrogation of the ability of the sera to stimulate in vitro growth of colonies originating from granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC). In contrast, incubation of the serum with antibodies against IL-6 did not change its colony-stimulating activity. It may be inferred from these findings that G-CSF is probably the main cytokine responsible for the granulopoiesis-stimulating effects of IMUNOR. When the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with G-CSF inactivated by anti-G-CSF antibodies (but with elevated IL-6) was added to cultures of bone marrow cells together with a suboptimum concentration of IL-3, a significant increase in the numbers of GM-CFC colonies was found. Moreover, conjoint inactivation of G-CSF and IL-6 significantly decreased the numbers of GM-CFC colonies in comparison with those observed when only G-CSF was inactivated. This observation strongly suggests that though IMUNOR-induced IL-6 is not able to induce the growth of GM-CFC colonies alone, it is able to potentiate the hematopoiesis-stimulating effect of IL-3. These findings represent a new knowledge concerning the hematopoiesis-stimulating action of IMUNOR, a promising immunomodulatory agent.

  5. [Bone metabolism and cardiovascular function update. Inter-communication between bone marrow hematopoiesis and skeletal/vascular network].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Yoshio

    2014-07-01

    The hematopoiesis takes place in the bone marrow. Because bone marrow is the "marrow" of the bone, bone marrow does not exist without bone. The specialized microenvironment for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to be appropriately functional is called "niche" . In the recent ten years since the bone-forming osteoblast was identified as a HSC niche, the entire mesenchymal lineage cells from mesenchymal stem cells to end-terminal osteocytes have been recognized as niche cells or niche-modulators. Among these, mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells are located at perivascular area. The very recent study showed the difference between arteriolar and sinusoidal niches. It is likely that the vascular network and the bone tissue are connected by the mesenchymal lineage cells as a complex of bone forming system, and HSCs utilize this complex as a series of niche.

  6. Focal extra-axial hemorrahagic mass with subdural hemorrhage secondare to extramedullary hematopoiesis in idiopathic myelodysplastic sindrome.

    PubMed

    Di Ieva, A; Di Lieva, A; Aimar, E; Tancioni, F; Levi, D; Debernardi, A; Pisano, P; Rahal, D; Nozza, A; Magagnoli, M; Gaetani, P

    2007-03-01

    Idiopathic myelodysplastic syndrome is a disease characterized by a clonal stem cell disorder in which megacaryocitic and granulocytic lineages are mainly involved; extramedullary myeloid metaplasia is due to abnormal location of myeloid tissue in other organs than bone marrow. Rarely the central nervous system is involved. When it happens, it is typical to find masses around the brain and pachymeningeal thickening, but it is very rare to find it associated with subdural haemorrhage, as in the case we describe in the present article. Considering our case and the literature we can suggest that radiological images associated with the clinical history of the patient suggestive for extramedullary hematopoiesis can be sufficient for a correct diagnosis and for a radiotherapy treatment, demanding surgery in the case of diagnostic doubts, massive hemorrahages or neurological decifits caused by the focal lesions.

  7. Blood morphology and the levels of selected cytokines related to hematopoiesis in occupational short-term exposure to lead.

    PubMed

    Dobrakowski, Michał; Boroń, Marta; Czuba, Zenon P; Birkner, Ewa; Chwalba, Artur; Hudziec, Edyta; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2016-08-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of a short-term exposure to lead on the blood morphology and the levels of selected cytokines related to hematopoiesis in occupationally exposed workers. The study population included 37 males occupationally exposed to lead for 36 to 44days. Their blood lead level raised from 10.7±7.67μg/dl at baseline to the level of 49.1±14.1μg/dl at the end of the study. The level of hemoglobin and values of MCH and MCHC were decreased due to a short-term exposure to lead by 2%, 2%, and 1%, respectively. The counts of WBC, LYM, and MXD increased significantly by 5%, 7%, and 35%. Similarly, the count of PLT increased by 7%, while PDW, MPV, and P-LCR decreased by 6%, 3%, and 9%, respectively. The levels of IL-7, G-CSF, HGF, PDGF AB/BB, SCF, and PECAM-1, decreased significantly by 30%, 33%, 8%, 30%, 25%, and 20%, respectively. A short-term occupational exposure to lead results in a decreased hemoglobin level and increased counts of WBC and PLT. Changes in counts and proportions of different types of leukocytes and decreased values of PLT indices, such as PDW, MPV, and P-LCR, due to the subacute lead-exposure may be associated with lead-induced decreased levels of cytokines related to hematopoiesis, including SCF, G-CSF, IL-7, and PDGF. PMID:27298078

  8. Functional Consequences of Perturbed CXCL12 Signal Processing: Analyses of Immature Hematopoiesis in GRK6-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chudziak, Doreen; Spohn, Gabriele; Karpova, Darja; Dauber, Katrin; Wiercinska, Eliza; Miettinen, Johanna A.; Papayannopoulou, Thalia

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in bone marrow (BM) in an environment rich in CXCL12, the ligand for CXCR4, which is constitutively expressed on all immature hematopoietic cells in BM. This ligand-receptor pair critically controls HSPC retention and (relative) quiescence in BM. Interestingly, in a chemokine-abundant environment, CXCR4 surface expression and CXCL12 sensitivity of BM-residing HSPCs are continuously maintained. The mechanisms underlying this peculiar pattern of G-protein signal integration by BM-HSPCs are unknown. G-protein receptor kinases (GRKs) control receptor function by phosphorylating the intracellular domains upon ligand-induced activation, which results in receptor internalization and transient refractoriness. Using, therefore, a GRK6-deficient (GRK6−/−) mouse, we sought to address how perturbed ligand-induced CXCR4 (in)activation affects HSPC behavior in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, GRK6−/− HSPCs were characterized by hyper-responsiveness to CXCL12, as expected. In vivo, GRK6−/− immature hematopoiesis was characterized by a marked expansion of immature hematopoiesis in spleens and a modest repopulation defect in serial competitive transplantation. Enforced mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and AMD3100 was normal, as was hematopoietic regeneration after noncompetitive transplantation or pharmacological myelosuppression. These observations illustrate that GRK-mediated restriction of CXCR4 signal input after ligand engagement is largely dispensable for BM-resident HSPCs, which may explain how continuous CXCL12 responsiveness of BM-HSPCs can be maintained. PMID:25316534

  9. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib induces testicular toxicity by upregulation of oxidative stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and deregulation of germ cell development in adult murine testis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Fu, Jianfang; Zhang, Shun; Zhao, Jie; Xie, Nianlin; Cai, Guoqing

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how chemotherapeutic agents mediate testicular toxicity is crucial in light of compelling evidence that male infertility, one of the severe late side effects of intensive cancer treatment, occurs more often than they are expected to. Previous study demonstrated that bortezomib (BTZ), a 26S proteasome inhibitor used to treat refractory multiple myeloma (MM), exerts deleterious impacts on spermatogenesis in pubertal mice via unknown mechanisms. Here, we showed that intermittent treatment with BTZ resulted in fertility impairment in adult mice, evidenced by testicular atrophy, desquamation of immature germ cells and reduced caudal sperm storage. These deleterious effects may originate from the elevated apoptosis in distinct germ cells during the acute phase and the subsequent disruption of Sertoli–germ cell anchoring junctions (AJs) during the late recovery. Mechanistically, balance between AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and Akt/ERK pathway appeared to be indispensable for AJ integrity during the late testicular recovery. Of particular interest, the upregulated testicular apoptosis and the following disturbance of Sertoli–germ cell interaction may both stem from the excessive oxidative stress elicited by BTZ exposure. We also provided the in vitro evidence that AMPK-dependent mechanisms counteract follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) proliferative effects in BTZ-exposed Sertoli cells. Collectively, BTZ appeared to efficiently prevent germ cells from normal development via multiple mechanisms in adult mice. Employment of antioxidants and/or AMPK inhibitor may represent an attractive strategy of fertility preservation in male MM patients exposed to conventional BTZ therapy and warrants further investigation. - Highlights: • Intermittent treatment with BTZ caused fertility impairment in adult mice. • BTZ treatment elicited apoptosis during early phase of testicular recovery. • Up-regulation of oxidative stress by BTZ treatment

  10. Reversibility of Defective Hematopoiesis Caused by Telomere Shortening in Telomerase Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Aparna; Behbehani, Gregory K.; Nguyen, Le Xuan Truong; Thomas, Daniel; Kusler, Brenda; Garbuzov, Alina; Ramunas, John; Holbrook, Colin; Park, Christopher Y.; Blau, Helen; Nolan, Garry P.; Artandi, Steven E.; Mitchell, Beverly S.

    2015-01-01

    Telomere shortening is common in bone marrow failure syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenita (DC), aplastic anemia (AA) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, improved knowledge of the lineage-specific consequences of telomere erosion and restoration of telomere length in hematopoietic progenitors is required to advance therapeutic approaches. We have employed a reversible murine model of telomerase deficiency to compare the dependence of erythroid and myeloid lineage differentiation on telomerase activity. Fifth generation Tert-/- (G5 Tert-/-) mice with shortened telomeres have significant anemia, decreased erythroblasts and reduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) populations associated with neutrophilia and increased myelopoiesis. Intracellular multiparameter analysis by mass cytometry showed significantly reduced cell proliferation and increased sensitivity to activation of DNA damage checkpoints in erythroid progenitors and in erythroid-biased CD150hi HSC, but not in myeloid progenitors. Strikingly, Cre-inducible reactivation of telomerase activity restored hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, normalized the DNA damage response, and improved red cell production and hemoglobin levels. These data establish a direct link between the loss of TERT activity, telomere shortening and defective erythropoiesis and suggest that novel strategies to restore telomerase function may have an important role in the treatment of the resulting anemia. PMID:26133370

  11. Stimulation of cell proliferation in the subventricular zone by synthetic murine pheromones.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sachiko; Soini, Helena A; Foley, John; Novotny, Milos V; Lai, Cary

    2013-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in female mice is known to be enhanced by exposure to soiled bedding from males, although the identity of the relevant chemosignals has remained unknown. Here we show that the previously recognized male murine pheromones, the farnesenes and 2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole (SBT), strongly increase cell proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult female mice, but not younger female mice. In addition, we found that a unique female murine pheromone, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, facilitates similar changes in males. SBT stimulated cell proliferation in the SVZ of only adult females and not in young adult or pre- and post-puberty females. Our study suggests that pheromonal communication between males and females is enhancing reproductive success by controlling the estrous cycle and by promoting cell proliferation in a reciprocal manner.

  12. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib induces testicular toxicity by upregulation of oxidative stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and deregulation of germ cell development in adult murine testis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Fu, Jianfang; Zhang, Shun; Zhao, Jie; Xie, Nianlin; Cai, Guoqing

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how chemotherapeutic agents mediate testicular toxicity is crucial in light of compelling evidence that male infertility, one of the severe late side effects of intensive cancer treatment, occurs more often than they are expected to. Previous study demonstrated that bortezomib (BTZ), a 26S proteasome inhibitor used to treat refractory multiple myeloma (MM), exerts deleterious impacts on spermatogenesis in pubertal mice via unknown mechanisms. Here, we showed that intermittent treatment with BTZ resulted in fertility impairment in adult mice, evidenced by testicular atrophy, desquamation of immature germ cells and reduced caudal sperm storage. These deleterious effects may originate from the elevated apoptosis in distinct germ cells during the acute phase and the subsequent disruption of Sertoli-germ cell anchoring junctions (AJs) during the late recovery. Mechanistically, balance between AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and Akt/ERK pathway appeared to be indispensable for AJ integrity during the late testicular recovery. Of particular interest, the upregulated testicular apoptosis and the following disturbance of Sertoli-germ cell interaction may both stem from the excessive oxidative stress elicited by BTZ exposure. We also provided the in vitro evidence that AMPK-dependent mechanisms counteract follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) proliferative effects in BTZ-exposed Sertoli cells. Collectively, BTZ appeared to efficiently prevent germ cells from normal development via multiple mechanisms in adult mice. Employment of antioxidants and/or AMPK inhibitor may represent an attractive strategy of fertility preservation in male MM patients exposed to conventional BTZ therapy and warrants further investigation. PMID:25886977

  13. Quantitative trait gene Slit2 positively regulates murine hematopoietic stem cell numbers

    PubMed Central

    Waterstrat, Amanda; Rector, Kyle; Geiger, Hartmut; Liang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) demonstrate natural variation in number and function. The genetic factors responsible for the variations (or quantitative traits) are largely unknown. We previously identified a gene whose differential expression underlies the natural variation of HSC numbers in C57BL/6 (B6) and DBA/2 (D2) mice. We now report the finding of another gene, Slit2, on chromosome 5 that also accounts for variation in HSC number. In reciprocal chromosome 5 congenic mice, introgressed D2 alleles increased HSC numbers, whereas B6 alleles had the opposite effect. Using gene array and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we identified Slit2 as a quantitative trait gene whose expression was positively correlated with the number of HSCs. Ectopic expression of Slit2 not only increased the number of the long-term colony forming HSCs, but also enhanced their repopulation capacity upon transplantation. Therefore, Slit2 is a novel quantitative trait gene and a positive regulator of the number and function of murine HSCs. This finding suggests that Slit2 may be a potential therapeutic target for the effective in vitro and in vivo expansion of HSCs without compromising normal hematopoiesis. PMID:27503415

  14. Quantitative trait gene Slit2 positively regulates murine hematopoietic stem cell numbers.

    PubMed

    Waterstrat, Amanda; Rector, Kyle; Geiger, Hartmut; Liang, Ying

    2016-08-09

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) demonstrate natural variation in number and function. The genetic factors responsible for the variations (or quantitative traits) are largely unknown. We previously identified a gene whose differential expression underlies the natural variation of HSC numbers in C57BL/6 (B6) and DBA/2 (D2) mice. We now report the finding of another gene, Slit2, on chromosome 5 that also accounts for variation in HSC number. In reciprocal chromosome 5 congenic mice, introgressed D2 alleles increased HSC numbers, whereas B6 alleles had the opposite effect. Using gene array and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we identified Slit2 as a quantitative trait gene whose expression was positively correlated with the number of HSCs. Ectopic expression of Slit2 not only increased the number of the long-term colony forming HSCs, but also enhanced their repopulation capacity upon transplantation. Therefore, Slit2 is a novel quantitative trait gene and a positive regulator of the number and function of murine HSCs. This finding suggests that Slit2 may be a potential therapeutic target for the effective in vitro and in vivo expansion of HSCs without compromising normal hematopoiesis.

  15. Quantitative trait gene Slit2 positively regulates murine hematopoietic stem cell numbers.

    PubMed

    Waterstrat, Amanda; Rector, Kyle; Geiger, Hartmut; Liang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) demonstrate natural variation in number and function. The genetic factors responsible for the variations (or quantitative traits) are largely unknown. We previously identified a gene whose differential expression underlies the natural variation of HSC numbers in C57BL/6 (B6) and DBA/2 (D2) mice. We now report the finding of another gene, Slit2, on chromosome 5 that also accounts for variation in HSC number. In reciprocal chromosome 5 congenic mice, introgressed D2 alleles increased HSC numbers, whereas B6 alleles had the opposite effect. Using gene array and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we identified Slit2 as a quantitative trait gene whose expression was positively correlated with the number of HSCs. Ectopic expression of Slit2 not only increased the number of the long-term colony forming HSCs, but also enhanced their repopulation capacity upon transplantation. Therefore, Slit2 is a novel quantitative trait gene and a positive regulator of the number and function of murine HSCs. This finding suggests that Slit2 may be a potential therapeutic target for the effective in vitro and in vivo expansion of HSCs without compromising normal hematopoiesis. PMID:27503415

  16. Murine gamma interferon fails to inhibit Toxoplasma gondii growth in murine fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzman, J D; Gonias, S L; Pfefferkorn, E R

    1990-01-01

    Although treatment of human macrophages or fibroblasts with human gamma interferon results in the inhibition of intracellular Toxoplasma gondii, murine gamma interferon stimulated only murine macrophages, not murine fibroblasts, to inhibit T. gondii. This species difference may be important in understanding the control of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. PMID:2106497

  17. Biologic and immunohistochemical analysis of interleukin-6 expression in vivo. Constitutive and induced expression in murine polymorphonuclear and mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Terebuh, P. D.; Otterness, I. G.; Strieter, R. M.; Lincoln, P. M.; Danforth, J. M.; Kunkel, S. L.; Chensue, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is considered an important multifunctional cytokine involved in the regulation of a variety of cellular responses, including the induction of acute-phase protein synthesis, lymphocyte activation, and hematopoiesis. In vitro studies have identified many cells that can produce IL-6, but the cellular sources under physiologic conditions have yet to be identified. Using immunoaffinity purified goat anti-murine IL-6, the authors performed immunohistochemical studies to localize cells expressing IL-6 in selected organs of normal and endotoxin challenged NIH-Swiss outbred mice. In the blood, findings were correlated with cell-associated bioactivity using the standard B9 cell proliferation assay. In normal mice, constitutive expression was seen in granulocytes, monocytes and their precursors as well as in bone marrow and splenic stromal macrophages. Hepatic macrophages were negative, as were lymphocytes, megakaryocytes, erythroid precursors, and endothelial cells. In the absence of significant serum levels of IL-6, cell-associated IL-6 bioactivity was detected in circulating polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not lymphocytes. After endotoxin challenge, there was a threefold increase in PMN IL-6 content from 1 to 3 hours followed by almost complete depletion at 6 hours. This correlated well with a threefold increase of IL-6 mRNA in the bone marrow followed by a decrease at 6 hours. This pattern also correlated with serum levels of IL-6, which peaked at 3 hours and dropped significantly by 6 hours. By 24 hours, cell-associated IL-6 showed recovery with no increase in serum levels. In vivo findings showing IL-6 expression in bone marrow macrophages support in vitro studies suggesting a role for IL-6 in hematopoiesis. Furthermore, PMNs as well as macrophages are likely important sources of IL-6 during inflammatory and septic states. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:1372159

  18. A Novel Population of Cells Expressing Both Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Markers Is Present in the Normal Adult Bone Marrow and Is Augmented in a Murine Model of Marrow Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ohishi, Masanobu; Ono, Wanida; Ono, Noriaki; Khatri, Richa; Marzia, Marilena; Baker, Emma K.; Root, Sierra H.; Wilson, Tremika Le-Shan; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Aguila, Hector L.; Purton, Louise E.; Schipani, Ernestina

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) fibrosis is a feature of severe hyperparathyroidism. Consistent with this observation, mice expressing constitutively active parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide receptors (PPR) in osteoblasts (PPR*Tg) display BM fibrosis. To obtain insight into the nature of BM fibrosis in such a model, a double-mutant mouse expressing constitutively active PPR and green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the type I collagen promoter (PPR*Tg/GFP) was generated. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry revealed the presence of a cell population expressing GFP (GFP+) that was also positive for the hematopoietic marker CD45 in the BM of both PPR*Tg/GFP and control animals. This cell population was expanded in PPR*Tg/GFP. The existence of cells expressing both type I collagen and CD45 in the adult BM was confirmed by IHC and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. An analysis of total RNA extracted from sorted GFP+CD45+ cells showed that these cells produced type I collagen and PTH/PTH-related peptide receptor and receptor activator for NF-κB mRNAs, further supporting their features of being both mesenchymal and hematopoietic lineages. Similar cells, known as fibrocytes, are also present in pathological fibroses. Our findings, thus, indicate that the BM is a permissive microenvironment for the differentiation of fibrocyte-like cells and raise the possibility that these cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of BM fibrosis. PMID:22155108

  19. Pleiotropic roles of Notch signaling in normal, malignant, and developmental hematopoiesis in the human

    PubMed Central

    Kushwah, Rahul; Guezguez, Borhane; Lee, Jung Bok; Hopkins, Claudia I; Bhatia, Mickie

    2014-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is evolutionarily conserved across species and plays an important role in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. It has been implicated in several different hematopoietic processes including early hematopoietic development as well as adult hematological malignancies in humans. This review focuses on recent developments in understanding the role of Notch signaling in the human hematopoietic system with an emphasis on hematopoietic initiation from human pluripotent stem cells and regulation within the bone marrow. Based on recent insights, we summarize potential strategies for treatment of human hematological malignancies toward the concept of targeting Notch signaling for fate regulation. PMID:25252682

  20. Alteration of classical and hematopoiesis specific p53 pathway in the bone marrow hematopoietic stem/progenitor compartment facilitates leukemia progression in experimental mice.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ritam; Chattopadhyay, Sukalpa; Law, Sujata

    2016-08-01

    Downregulation of p53 is associated with most of the neoplasms, however it claims additional significance for hematopoietic malignancy due to its supplementary role during hematopoiesis. Apart from the classical role as tumor suppressor, p53 during steady state hematopoiesis is associated with the maintenance of quiescent cell population in bone marrow by upregulating necdin (Ndn) and Gfi-1. We felt, it is necessary to delineate its attribution towards malignant conversion of hematopoietic system during leukemogenesis from all the possible angles. The present study deals with the characterization of N-N' Ethylnitrosourea (ENU) induced mouse model of leukemia by peripheral blood hemogram, bone marrow cytology, histology, cytochemical staining (MPO) and scanning electron microscopic study. We further investigated the alteration of conventional and hematopoiesis specific p53 pathways by flowcytometric expressional analysis of ATM, Chk-2, p53, p21, Ndn, Gfi-1 and Tie-2. The disruption of classical p53 pathway was observed in leukemic hematopoietic stem/progenitor population which involved downregulation of ATM, Chk-2, p53 and p21. Moreover, the expressional decline of Ndn and Gfi-1 hinted towards the mechanism of hindrance of hematopoietic quiescency in leukemic bone marrow. Increased expression of Tie-2 due to reverse correlation with p53 was found to be responsible for pathological angiogenesis in bone marrow together with increased blast burden in bone marrow during leukemia. The study presents the mechanistic scenario of the alteration of both classical as well as hematopoiesis specific p53 pathways in HSPC compartment triggering leukemic pathophysiology. PMID:27280487

  1. Insights into monocyte-driven osteoclastogenesis and its link with hematopoiesis: regulatory roles of PECAM-1 (CD31) and SHP-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Madri, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Osteoclasts are derived from hematopoietic cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage. Osteoclastogenesis is orchestrated by the migration of monocytic osteoclast progenitor cells in close proximity to bone surfaces destined for resorption. Although the overall roles of monocyte migratory behavior in osteoclastogenesis remain enigmatic, impaired monocyte migration can lead to either decreased or increased osteoclastogenesis, which appears contingent upon the roles of migration in either fusion events required for osteoclast formation or terminal differentiation of osteoclasts. The cell adhesion molecule PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1), in concert with the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 (Src homology 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1) and tyrosine kinase Syk-1 (spleen tyrosine kinase 1), functions as a negative regulator of osteoclastogenesis. Both PECAM-1 (CD31) and SHP-1 knockout mice exhibit not only increased osteoclastogenesis but also abnormal hematopoiesis, which is suggestive of the intricate interplay between hematopoiesis and osteoclastogenesis. Interestingly, the most pronounced effect of PECAM-1 deficiency on hematopoiesis is reflected by excessive megakaryocytopoiesis. Emerging data have suggested the role of megakaryocytes in bone remodeling. Megakaryocytopoiesis-osteoclastogenesis interactions are discussed herein, reconciling the discrepancies shown by different studies in this area. PECAM-1 and non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase polymorphisms have been revealed in a spectrum of diseases. The complex regulatory roles of PECAM-1 and SHP-1 in vivo suggest the potential utilization of polymorphisms of these genes for diagnostic purposes. PMID:21083524

  2. Quantitative trait mapping reveals a regulatory axis involving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, PRDM16, transforming growth factor-β2 and FLT3 in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Avagyan, Serine; Aguilo, Francesca; Kamezaki, Kenjiro; Snoeck, Hans-Willem

    2011-12-01

    Hematopoiesis is the process whereby BM HSCs renew to maintain their number or to differentiate into committed progenitors to generate all blood cells. One approach to gain mechanistic insight into this complex process is the investigation of quantitative genetic variation in hematopoietic function among inbred mouse strains. We previously showed that TGF-β2 is a genetically determined positive regulator of hematopoiesis. In the presence of unknown nonprotein serum factors TGF-β2, but not TGF-β1 or -β3, enhances progenitor proliferation in vitro, an effect that is subject to mouse strain-dependent variation mapping to a locus on chr.4, Tb2r1. TGF-β2-deficient mice show hematopoietic defects, demonstrating the physiologic role of this cytokine. Here, we show that TGF-β2 specifically and predominantly cell autonomously enhances signaling by FLT3 in vitro and in vivo. A coding polymorphism in Prdm16 (PR-domain-containing 16) underlies Tb2r1 and differentially regulates transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), identifying lipid PPAR ligands as the serum factors required for regulation of FLT3 signaling by TGF-β2. We furthermore show that PPARγ agonists play a FLT3-dependent role in stress responses of progenitor cells. These observations identify a novel regulatory axis that includes PPARs, Prdm16, and TGF-β2 in hematopoiesis.

  3. Murine Typhus, Reunion, France, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Camuset, Guillaume; Socolovschi, Cristina; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Kuli, Barbara; Foucher, Aurélie; Poubeau, Patrice; Borgherini, Gianandrea; Wartel, Guillaume; Audin, Héla; Raoult, Didier; Filleul, Laurent; Parola, Philippe; Pagès, Fréderic

    2015-01-01

    Murine typhus case was initially identified in Reunion, France, in 2012 in a tourist. Our investigation confirmed 8 autochthonous cases that occurred during January 2011–January 2013 in Reunion. Murine typhus should be considered in local patients and in travelers returning from Reunion who have fevers of unknown origin. PMID:25625653

  4. Long-term malignant hematopoiesis in human acute leukemia bone marrow biopsies implanted in severe combined immunodeficiency mice.

    PubMed

    Legrand, F; Khazaal, I; Peuchmaur, M; Fenneteau, O; Cavé, H; Rohrlich, P; Vilmer, E; Péault, B

    1997-09-01

    Bone marrow (BM) trephine biopsies from 15 pediatric patients with acute lymphoid (ALL) or myeloid (AML) leukemia were engrafted subcutaneously into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice conditioned by 200 cGy total-body irradiation. Implants were harvested 5 to 19 weeks later for histologic, cytologic, and/or flow cytometric analysis of the residing marrow. Eighteen of 19 grafts contained viable human leukemic cells to various extents as assessed by one or more of these methods. Thirteen of 14 implants analyzed by flow cytometry included high numbers of tumor cells, accounting for 85% to 100% of the total nucleated cells in seven of them. Histologically, engrafted marrow samples exhibited areas of blastic infiltration, and tumor-specific gene rearrangements were retrieved in long-term engrafted biopsies. Importantly, engrafted mice remained perfectly healthy even 5 months posttransplantation, and no human tumor cell dissemination was detected in the hematolymphoid and nonhematopoietic tissues at the time of autopsy. These results demonstrate that human malignant hematopoiesis can be sustained long-term in its original, intact marrow stromal environment transplanted in appropriately conditioned immunodeficient mice.

  5. Primary Myelofibrosis Presenting as Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in a Transplanted Liver Graft: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Mohyuddin, Ghulam Rehman; Yacoub, Abdulraheem

    2016-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) commonly results in extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) in the spleen and liver as well as a variety of other organs. We present a first report of a unique presentation of PMF in a liver transplant recipient patient as EMH in the transplanted liver graft. A 76-year-old man with history of cryptogenic cirrhosis received cadaveric liver transplantation in 1996. He maintained a normal graft function and stable hematologic parameters until 2013 when he presented with anemia and progressive fatigue. Extensive work-up did not identify the etiology of the recent decline in his hemoglobin; thus a liver biopsy was done which showed findings of EMH within the sinusoids with increased megakaryocytes, some with atypical morphology. A BM biopsy revealed a hypercellular marrow, moderately increased reticulin fibrosis, and features consistent with primary myelofibrosis. Abdominal imaging showed a normal-size spleen and did not identify any sites of EMH outside of the liver. The diagnosis of myelofibrosis was thus made, and this case demonstrated predominant tropism to a transplanted liver graft with absence of EMH elsewhere. We would thus like to emphasize that findings of EMH in subjects with no preexisting hematologic neoplasm should warrant close follow-up and assessment. PMID:26885416

  6. Extramedullary hematopoiesis in a case of benign mixed mammary tumor in a female dog: cytological and histopathological assessment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Backgroud Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) is defined as the presence of hematopoietic stem cells such as erythroid and myeloid lineage plus megakaryocytes in extramedullary sites like liver, spleen and lymph nodes and is usually associated with either bone marrow or hematological disorders. Mammary EMH is a rare condition either in human and veterinary medicine and can be associated with benign mixed mammary tumors, similarly to that described in this case. Case presentation Hematopoietic stem cells were found in a benign mixed mammary tumor of a 7-year-old female mongrel dog that presents a nodule in the left inguinal mammary gland. The patient did not have any hematological abnormalities. Cytological evaluation demonstrated two distinct cell populations, composed of either epithelial or mesenchymal cells, sometimes associated with a fibrillar acidophilic matrix, apart from megakaryocytes, osteoclasts, metarubricytes, prorubricytes, rubricytes, rubriblasts, promyelocytes, myeloblasts. Histological examination confirmed the presence of an active hematopoietic bone marrow within the bone tissue of a benign mammary mixed tumor. Conclusions EMH is a rare condition described in veterinary medicine that can be associated with mammary mixed tumors. It's detection can be associated with several neoplastic and non-neoplastic mammary lesions, i.e. osteosarcomas, mixed tumors and bone metaplasia. PMID:20846427

  7. The IKAROS Interaction with a Complex Including Chromatin Remodeling and Transcription Elongation Activities Is Required for Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Bottardi, Stefania; Mavoungou, Lionel; Pak, Helen; Daou, Salima; Bourgoin, Vincent; Lakehal, Yahia A.; Affar, El Bachir; Milot, Eric

    2014-01-01

    IKAROS is a critical regulator of hematopoietic cell fate and its dynamic expression pattern is required for proper hematopoiesis. In collaboration with the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase (NuRD) complex, it promotes gene repression and activation. It remains to be clarified how IKAROS can support transcription activation while being associated with the HDAC-containing complex NuRD. IKAROS also binds to the Positive-Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb) at gene promoters. Here, we demonstrate that NuRD and P-TEFb are assembled in a complex that can be recruited to specific genes by IKAROS. The expression level of IKAROS influences the recruitment of the NuRD-P-TEFb complex to gene regulatory regions and facilitates transcription elongation by transferring the Protein Phosphatase 1α (PP1α), an IKAROS-binding protein and P-TEFb activator, to CDK9. We show that an IKAROS mutant that is unable to bind PP1α cannot sustain gene expression and impedes normal differentiation of IkNULL hematopoietic progenitors. Finally, the knock-down of the NuRD subunit Mi2 reveals that the occupancy of the NuRD complex at transcribed regions of genes favors the relief of POL II promoter-proximal pausing and thereby, promotes transcription elongation. PMID:25474253

  8. Human adipose-derived stromal cells efficiently support hematopoiesis in vitro and in vivo: a key step for therapeutic studies.

    PubMed

    De Toni, Fabienne; Poglio, Sandrine; Youcef, Aissa Ben; Cousin, Béatrice; Pflumio, Françoise; Bourin, Philippe; Casteilla, Louis; Laharrague, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) are close relatives of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs). The ease of access to subcutaneous fat pad and the abundance of stromal precursors make fat tissue an attractive source of stromal cells for clinicians. However, their ability to support hematopoietic stem cells in vitro and in vivo has not been established definitively. Thus, their usefulness in supporting hematopoietic stem cell engraftment is not as clear as with BM-MSCs. In this article, we show that human ADSCs, cultured with a good manufacturing practice medium, maintain in vitro human early and committed hematopoietic progenitors and support their complete differentiation toward myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Compared with BM-MSCs, ADSCs elicit a more precocious early progenitor formation and faster proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors. Further, in vivo, when co-injected in NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2(rgtm1Wjl)/SzJ (NSG) mice with a low number of human CD34(+) cells, ADSCs enabled the higher production of immature human hematopoietic progenitors and CD45(+) cells when compared with BM-MSCs. As a whole, our results indicate that human ADSCs, isolated and expanded under clinical-grade conditions, support hematopoiesis in vitro and in vivo and thus provide the rationale for their use in supporting hematopoietic reconstitution in clinical settings.

  9. Murine Model of Hindlimb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Niiyama, Hiroshi; Huang, Ngan F.; Rollins, Mark D.; Cooke, John P.

    2009-01-01

    In the United States, peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects about 10 million individuals, and is also prevalent worldwide. Medical therapies for symptomatic relief are limited. Surgical or endovascular interventions are useful for some individuals, but long-term results are often disappointing. As a result, there is a need for developing new therapies to treat PAD. The murine hindlimb ischemia preparation is a model of PAD, and is useful for testing new therapies. When compared to other models of tissue ischemia such as coronary or cerebral artery ligation, femoral artery ligation provides for a simpler model of ischemic tissue. Other advantages of this model are the ease of access to the femoral artery and low mortality rate. In this video, we demonstrate the methodology for the murine model of unilateral hindimb ischemia. The specific materials and procedures for creating and evaluating the model will be described, including the assessment of limb perfusion by laser Doppler imaging. This protocol can also be utilized for the transplantation and non-invasive tracking of cells, which is demonstrated by Huang et al.1. PMID:19229179

  10. Murine model of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Louise; Prosser, Hamish C G; Tan, Joanne T M; Vanags, Laura Z; Ng, Martin K C; Bursill, Christina A

    2013-05-28

    Wound healing and repair are the most complex biological processes that occur in human life. After injury, multiple biological pathways become activated. Impaired wound healing, which occurs in diabetic patients for example, can lead to severe unfavorable outcomes such as amputation. There is, therefore, an increasing impetus to develop novel agents that promote wound repair. The testing of these has been limited to large animal models such as swine, which are often impractical. Mice represent the ideal preclinical model, as they are economical and amenable to genetic manipulation, which allows for mechanistic investigation. However, wound healing in a mouse is fundamentally different to that of humans as it primarily occurs via contraction. Our murine model overcomes this by incorporating a splint around the wound. By splinting the wound, the repair process is then dependent on epithelialization, cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, which closely mirror the biological processes of human wound healing. Whilst requiring consistency and care, this murine model does not involve complicated surgical techniques and allows for the robust testing of promising agents that may, for example, promote angiogenesis or inhibit inflammation. Furthermore, each mouse acts as its own control as two wounds are prepared, enabling the application of both the test compound and the vehicle control on the same animal. In conclusion, we demonstrate a practical, easy-to-learn, and robust model of wound healing, which is comparable to that of humans.

  11. Plaque assay for murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B; Bragazzi Cunha, Juliana; Wobus, Christiane E

    2012-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is the only member of the Norovirus genus that efficiently grows in tissue culture. Cell lysis and cytopathic effect (CPE) are observed during MNV-1 infection of murine dendritic cells or macrophages. This property of MNV-1 can be used to quantify the number of infectious particles in a given sample by performing a plaque assay. The plaque assay relies on the ability of MNV-1 to lyse cells and to form holes in a confluent cell monolayer, which are called plaques. Multiple techniques can be used to detect viral infections in tissue culture, harvested tissue, clinical, and environmental samples, but not all measure the number of infectious particles (e.g. qRT-PCR). One way to quantify infectious viral particles is to perform a plaque assay, which will be described in detail below. A variation on the MNV plaque assay is the fluorescent focus assay, where MNV antigen is immunostained in cell monolayers. This assay can be faster, since viral antigen expression precedes plaque formation. It is also useful for titrating viruses unable to form plaques. However, the fluorescent focus assay requires additional resources beyond those of the plaque assay, such as antibodies and a microscope to count focus-forming units. Infectious MNV can also be quantified by determining the 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose (TCID50). This assay measures the amount of virus required to produce CPE in 50% of inoculated tissue culture cells by endpoint titration. However, its limit of detection is higher compared to a plaque assay. In this article, we describe a plaque assay protocol that can be used to effectively determine the number of infectious MNV particles present in biological or environmental samples. This method is based on the preparation of 10-fold serial dilutions of MNV-containing samples, which are used to inoculate a monolayer of permissive cells (RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells). Virus is allowed to attach to the cell monolayer for a given period of

  12. Knockdown of a Zebrafish Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor (AHRRa) Affects Expression of Genes Related to Photoreceptor Development and Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Jenny, Matthew J.; Hahn, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) is a transcriptional repressor of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and is regulated by an AHR-dependent mechanism. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) possess two AHRR paralogs; AHRRa regulates constitutive AHR signaling during development, whereas AHRRb regulates polyaromatic hydrocarbon-induced gene expression. However, little is known about the endogenous roles and targets of AHRRs. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of AHRRs during zebrafish development using a loss-of-function approach followed by gene expression analysis. Zebrafish embryos were microinjected with morpholino oligonucleotides against AHRRa or AHRRb to knockdown AHRR protein expression. At 72 h postfertilization (hpf), microarray analysis revealed that the expression of 279 and 116 genes was altered by knockdown of AHRRa and AHRRb, respectively. In AHRRa-morphant embryos, 97 genes were up-regulated and 182 genes were down-regulated. Among the down-regulated genes were several related to photoreceptor function, including cone-specific genes such as several opsins (opn1sw1, opn1sw2, opn1mw1, and opn1lw2), phosphodiesterases (pde6H and pde6C), retinol binding protein (rbp4l), phosducin, and arrestins. Down-regulation was confirmed by RT-PCR and with samples from an independent experiment. The four genes tested (opn1sw1, pde6H, pde6C, and arr3b) were not inducible by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. AHRRa knockdown also caused up-regulation of embryonic hemoglobin (hbbe3), suggesting a role for AHRR in regulating hematopoiesis. Knockdown of AHRRb caused up-regulation of 31 genes and down-regulation of 85 genes, without enrichment for any specific biological process. Overall, these results suggest that AHRRs may have important roles in development, in addition to their roles in regulating xenobiotic signaling. PMID:24675095

  13. Polysaccharides from the root of Angelica sinensis promotes hematopoiesis and thrombopoiesis through the PI3K/AKT pathway

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dozens of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formulas have been used for promotion of "blood production" for centuries, and we are interested in developing novel thrombopoietic medicines from these TCMs. Our previous studies have demonstrated the hematopoietic effects of DangGui BuXue Tong (DBT), a formula composed of Radix Angelicae Sinensis and Radix Astragali in animal and cellular models. As a step further to identify and characterize the active chemical components of DBT, we tested the hematopoietic and particularly, thrombopoietic effects of polysaccharide-enriched fractions from the root of Radix Angelicae Sinensis (APS) in this study. Methods A myelosuppression mouse model was treated with APS (10 mg/kg/day). Peripheral blood cells from APS, thrombopoietin and vehicle-treated samples were then counted at different time-points. Using the colony-forming unit (CFU) assays, we determined the effects of APS on the proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and megakaryocytic lineages. Using a megakaryocytic cell line M-07e as model, we analyzed the cellular apoptosis progression with and without APS treatment by Annexin V, Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Caspase 3 assays. Last, the anti-apoptotic effect of APS on cells treated with Ly294002, a Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinse inhibitor (PI3K) was also tested. Results In animal models, APS significantly enhanced not only the recovery of platelets, other blood cells and their progenitor cells, but also the formation of Colony Forming Unit (CFU). In M-07e cells, we observed the anti-apoptotic effect of APS. Treatment by Ly294002 alone increased the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis. However, addition of APS to Ly294002-treated cells significantly reduced the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis. Conclusions APS promotes hematopoiesis and thrombopoiesis in the mouse model. This effect likely resulted from the anti-apoptosis activity of APS and is likely to involve

  14. Normal hematopoiesis and lack of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts of patients and mice harboring Lrp5 gain-of-function mutations☆, ☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Galán-Díez, Marta; Isa, Adiba; Ponzetti, Marco; Nielsen, Morten Frost; Kassem, Moustapha; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts are emerging regulators of myeloid malignancies since genetic alterations in them, such as constitutive activation of β-catenin, instigate their appearance. The LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), initially proposed to be a co-receptor for Wnt proteins, in fact favors bone formation by suppressing gut-serotonin synthesis. This function of Lrp5 occurring in the gut is independent of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts. However, it is unknown whether Lrp5 can act directly in osteoblast to influence other functions that require β-catenin signaling, particularly, the deregulation of hematopoiesis and leukemogenic properties of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts, that lead to development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using mice with gain-of-function (GOF) Lrp5 alleles (Lrp5A214V) that recapitulate the human high bone mass (HBM) phenotype, as well as patients with the T253I HBM Lrp5 mutation, we show here that Lrp5 GOF mutations in both humans and mice do not activate β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. Consistent with a lack of β-catenin activation in their osteoblasts, Lrp5A214V mice have normal trilinear hematopoiesis. In contrast to leukemic mice with constitutive activation of β-catenin in osteoblasts (Ctnnb1CAosb), accumulation of early myeloid progenitors, a characteristic of AML, myeloid-blasts in blood, and segmented neutrophils or dysplastic megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, are not observed in Lrp5A214V mice. Likewise, peripheral blood count analysis in HBM patients showed normal hematopoiesis, normal percentage of myeloid cells, and lack of anemia. We conclude that Lrp5 GOF mutations do not activate β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. As a result, myeloid lineage differentiation is normal in HBM patients and mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza. PMID:26681532

  15. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator is an essential regulator of murine hematopoietic stem cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Krock, Bryan L.; Eisinger-Mathason, Tzipora S.; Giannoukos, Dionysios N.; Shay, Jessica E.; Gohil, Mercy; Lee, David S.; Nakazawa, Michael S.; Sesen, Julie; Skuli, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are master regulators of the transcriptional response to low oxygen and play essential roles in embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and disease. Recent studies have demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) within the bone marrow localize to a hypoxic niche and that HIF-1α promotes HSC adaptation to stress. Because the related factor HIF-2α is also expressed in HSCs, the combined role of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in HSC maintenance is unclear. To this end, we have conditionally deleted the HIF-α dimerization partner, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) in the hematopoietic system to ablate activity of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α and assessed the functional consequence of ARNT deficiency on fetal liver and adult hematopoiesis. We determined that ARNT is essential for adult and fetal HSC viability and homeostasis. Importantly, conditional knockout of both Hif-1α and Hif-2α phenocopied key aspects of these HSC phenotypes, demonstrating that the impact of Arnt deletion is primarily HIF dependent. ARNT-deficient long-term HSCs underwent apoptosis, potentially because of reduced B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) expression. Our results suggest that HIF activity may regulate HSC homeostasis through these prosurvival factors. PMID:25855602

  16. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors.

  17. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  18. Characterization of mice harboring a variant of EPCR with impaired ability to bind protein C: novel role of EPCR in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Pepler, Laura; Yu, Pei; Dwivedi, Dhruva J; Trigatti, Bernardo L; Liaw, Patricia C

    2015-07-30

    The interaction of protein C (PC) with the endothelial PC receptor (EPCR) enhances activated PC (APC) generation. The physiological importance of EPCR has been demonstrated in EPCR knockout mice which show early embryonic lethality due to placental thrombosis. In order to study the role of EPCR independent of PC interaction, we generated an EPCR point mutation knock-in mouse (EPCR(R84A/R84A)) which lacks the ability to bind PC/APC. EPCR(R84A/R84A) mice are viable and reproduce normally. In response to thrombotic challenge with factor Xa/phospholipids, EPCR(R84A/R84A) mice generate more thrombin, less APC, and show increased fibrin deposition in lungs and heart compared with wild-type (WT) mice. EPCR(R84A/R84A) mice challenged with lipopolysaccharide generate less APC, more interleukin-6, and show increased neutrophil infiltration in the lungs compared with WT controls. Interestingly, EPCR(R84A/R84A) mice develop splenomegaly as a result of bone marrow (BM) failure. BM transplant experiments suggest a role for EPCR on hematopoietic stem cells and BM stromal cells in modulating hematopoiesis. Taken together, our studies suggest that impaired EPCR/PC-binding interactions not only result in procoagulant and proinflammatory effects, but also impact hematopoiesis. PMID:26045607

  19. Regulation of Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Desforges, Jane F.

    1984-01-01

    These discussions are selected from the weekly staff conferences in the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. Taken from transcriptions, they are prepared by Drs Homer A. Boushey, Associate Professor of Medicine, and David G. Warnock, Associate Professor of Medicine, under the direction of Dr Lloyd H. Smith, Jr, Professor of Medicine and Chairman of the Department of Medicine. Requests for reprints should be sent to the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA 94143. PMID:6382801

  20. Titration of murine leukemia viruses with rat cell line RFL.

    PubMed

    Koga, M

    1977-08-01

    Normal rat embryo cell (RFL) from syncytia after infection with murine leukemia virus. The assay for counting the number of syncytium foci produced in RFL cells is a sensitive method for a direct infectivity assay of murine leukemia virus.

  1. Murine Norovirus: Propagation, Quantification and Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seungmin; Alhatlani, Bader; Arias, Armando; Caddy, Sarah L; Christodoulou, Constantina; Cunha, Juliana; Emmott, Ed; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta; Kolawole, Abimbola; Lu, Jia; Rippinger, Christine; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Thorne, Lucy; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a positive-sense, plus-stranded RNA virus in the Caliciviridae family. It is the most common pathogen in biomedical research colonies. MNV is also related to the human noroviruses, which cause the majority of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Like the human noroviruses, MNV is an enteric virus that replicates in the intestine and is transmitted by the fecal-oral route. MNV replicates in murine macrophages and dendritic cells in cells in culture and in the murine host. This virus is often used to study mechanisms in norovirus biology, because the human noroviruses are refractory to growth in cell culture. MNV combines the availability of a cell culture and reverse genetics system with the ability to study infection in the native host. Herein, we describe a panel of techniques that are commonly used to study MNV biology. PMID:24789596

  2. Adult Books for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Betty

    1997-01-01

    Considers the differences between young adult and adult books and maintains that teachers must be familiar with young adults' tastes for both. Suggests that traffic between these publishing divisions is a two-way street, with young adults reading adult books and adults reading young adult books. (TB)

  3. Neonatal CD71+ erythroid cells do not modify murine sepsis mortality

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.; Scumpia, Philip O.; Stocks, Blair T.; Romano-Keeler, Joann; Alrifai, Mhd Wael; Liu, Jin-Hua; Kim, Annette S.; Alford, Catherine E.; Matta, Pranathi; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Moore, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. A recent report suggested murine neonatal host defense against infection could be compromised by immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid splenocytes. We examined the impact of CD71+ erythroid splenocytes on murine neonatal mortality to endotoxin challenge or polymicrobial sepsis and characterized circulating CD71+ erythroid (CD235a+) cells in human neonates. Adoptive transfer or antibody-mediated reduction of neonatal CD71+ erythroid splenocytes did not alter murine neonatal survival to endotoxin challenge or polymicrobial sepsis challenge. Ex vivo immunosuppression of stimulated adult CD11b+ cells was not limited to neonatal splenocytes as it also occurred with adult and neonatal bone marrow. Animals treated with anti-CD71 antibody showed reduced splenic bacterial load following bacterial challenge compared to isotype-treated mice. However, adoptive transfer of enriched CD71+ erythroid splenocytes to CD71+-reduced animals did not reduce bacterial clearance. Human CD71+CD235a+ cells were common among cord blood mononuclear cells and were shown to be reticulocytes. In summary, a lack of effect on murine survival to polymicrobial sepsis following adoptive transfer or diminution of CD71+ erythroid splenocytes under these experimental conditions suggests the impact of these cells on neonatal infection risk and progression may be limited. An unanticipated immune priming effect of anti-CD71 antibody treatment was likely responsible for the reported enhanced bacterial clearance, rather than a reduction of immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid splenocytes. In humans, the well-described rapid decrease in circulating reticulocytes after birth suggests they may have a limited role in reducing inflammation secondary to microbial colonization. PMID:26101326

  4. Murine typhus identified as a major cause of febrile illness in a camp for displaced Khmers in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Duffy, P E; Le Guillouzic, H; Gass, R F; Innis, B L

    1990-11-01

    Scrub and murine typhus have been identified as causes of illness among the 238,000 displaced Khmer people residing in temporary settlements on the Thai side of the Thai-Cambodian border. Still, the true extent of the problem and the relative frequency of infection with scrub typhus as compared to murine typhus are unknown. We evaluated consecutive patients with unexplained pyrexia (documented fever, no exclusionary diagnosis, and constitutional symptoms) in 1 temporary settlement over 1 month. Laboratory studies included culture of blood and assay of paired sera for rickettsial IgM and IgG antibody, for dengue IgM and IgG antibody, and for leptospiral IgM and IgG antibody. Among 37 patients (27 adults and 10 children), 28 (75%) had a rickettsiosis (26 cases of murine typhus and 2 cases of scrub typhus). No case of enteric fever, dengue, or leptospirosis was diagnosed. The illnesses of 9 patients were not identified. Signs and symptoms did not distinguish confirmed rickettsial infections from undiagnosed illnesses. The 1 month attack rate of rickettsial infection was 29/100,000 for children and 185/100,000 for adults. Murine typhus was a major cause of febrile illness in this settlement.

  5. Deep Sequencing of the Murine Olfactory Receptor Neuron Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kanageswaran, Ninthujah; Demond, Marilen; Nagel, Maximilian; Schreiner, Benjamin S. P.; Baumgart, Sabrina; Scholz, Paul; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Doerner, Julia F.; Conrad, Heike; Oberland, Sonja; Wetzel, Christian H.; Neuhaus, Eva M.; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The ability of animals to sense and differentiate among thousands of odorants relies on a large set of olfactory receptors (OR) and a multitude of accessory proteins within the olfactory epithelium (OE). ORs and related signaling mechanisms have been the subject of intensive studies over the past years, but our knowledge regarding olfactory processing remains limited. The recent development of next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques encouraged us to assess the transcriptome of the murine OE. We analyzed RNA from OEs of female and male adult mice and from fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-sorted olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) obtained from transgenic OMP-GFP mice. The Illumina RNA-Seq protocol was utilized to generate up to 86 million reads per transcriptome. In OE samples, nearly all OR and trace amine-associated receptor (TAAR) genes involved in the perception of volatile amines were detectably expressed. Other genes known to participate in olfactory signaling pathways were among the 200 genes with the highest expression levels in the OE. To identify OE-specific genes, we compared olfactory neuron expression profiles with RNA-Seq transcriptome data from different murine tissues. By analyzing different transcript classes, we detected the expression of non-olfactory GPCRs in ORNs and established an expression ranking for GPCRs detected in the OE. We also identified other previously undescribed membrane proteins as potential new players in olfaction. The quantitative and comprehensive transcriptome data provide a virtually complete catalogue of genes expressed in the OE and present a useful tool to uncover candidate genes involved in, for example, olfactory signaling, OR trafficking and recycling, and proliferation. PMID:25590618

  6. Differential requirement for irf8 in formation of embryonic and adult macrophages in zebrafish

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shiau, Celia E.; Kaufman, Zoe; Meireles, Ana M.; Talbot, William S.

    2015-01-23

    Interferon regulatory factor 8 (Irf8) is critical for mammalian macrophage development and innate immunity, but its role in teleost myelopoiesis remains incompletely understood. Specifically, genetic tools to analyze the role of irf8 in zebrafish macrophage development at larval and adult stages are lacking. In this study, we generated irf8 null mutants in zebrafish using TALEN-mediated targeting. Our analysis defines different requirements for irf8 at different stages. irf8 is required for formation of all macrophages during primitive and transient definitive hematopoiesis, but not during adult-phase definitive hematopoiesis starting at 5-6 days postfertilization. At early stages, irf8 mutants have excess neutrophils andmore » excess cell death in pu.1-expressing myeloid cells. Macrophage fates were recovered in irf8 mutants after wildtype irf8 expression in neutrophil and macrophage lineages, suggesting that irf8 regulates macrophage specification and survival. In juvenile irf8 mutant fish, mature macrophages are present, but at numbers significantly reduced compared to wildtype, indicating an ongoing requirement for irf8 after embryogenesis. As development progresses, tissue macrophages become apparent in zebrafish irf8 mutants, with the possible exception of microglia. Our study defines distinct requirement for irf8 in myelopoiesis before and after transition to the adult hematopoietic system.« less

  7. Hematopoiesis: Gap Junction Intercellular Communication is Likely to be Involved in Regulation of Stroma-dependent Proliferation of Hemopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ploemacher, ROB E.; Mayen, ANGELIQUE E. M.; De Koning, ALEXANDRA E.; Krenacs, TIBOR; Rosendaal, MARTIN

    2000-01-01

    The 80-100 fold increased immunohistological expression of the Gap Junction (GJ) protein Connexin-43 in murine bone marrow during the neonatal period and directly following cytoreductive treatment of adult mice suggests that the regulation of stem cell proliferation may involve GJ Intercellular Communication (GJIC). Using a series of stromal cell lines from foetal liver and neonatal bone marrow we observed that the percentage of cells with GJIC, as indicated by dye-coupling using microinjection of lucifer yellow, correlated with the stromal support for late appearing clones formed by primitive stem cells (CAFC week 3-5). In order to functionally block all GJIC between mutual stromal cells and stromal cells and hemopoietic cells, in long-term stroma-supported flask (LTC) and CAFC cultures, the lipophilic compounds amphotericin-B (AB), nystatin, alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid, tetraphenylboron, dipicrylamine and arachidonic acid were tested for their effect on GJIC and CAFC support. Only AB and nystatin, which induced complete and prolonged GJIC blockade, were able to dramatically inhibit cobblestone area (CA) formation and CFU-C generation in LTC. This inhibition could be fully abrogated by withdrawing AB within the first 2 weeks of culture. Low AB concentrations stimulated CA formation. The AB-mediated inhibition of hemopoiesis probably involved direct stromal contact with stem cells because a) AB did not inhibit CFU-C generation when stem cells were cultured in trans-well inserts above the stroma; b) conditioned media from AB-containing or normal LTC did not inhibit colony formation by normal cells in semi-solid, non-stromal cultures, and c) AB did not inhibit colony formation by bone marrow cells in semi-solid culture nor did it inhibit growth or maintenance of stromal cells. In addition, The inhibition of hemopoiesis by AB could also not be explained by changes in the amount of cytokine and chemokine transcripts, including TGF-b1, in AB-blocked stromal cells. Our

  8. Murine models of vaginal trichomonad infections.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Eduardo R; Eckmann, Lars; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2011-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus cause common sexually transmitted infections in humans and cattle, respectively. Mouse models of trichomoniasis are important for pathogenic and therapeutic studies. Here, we compared murine genital infections with T. vaginalis and T. foetus. Persistent vaginal infection with T. foetus was established with 100 parasites but T. vaginalis infection required doses of 10(6), perhaps because of greater susceptibility to killing by mouse vaginal polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Infection with T. vaginalis persisted longest after combined treatment of mice with estrogen and dexamethasone, whereas infection was only short-lived when mice were given estrogen or dexamethasone alone, co-infected with Lactobacillus acidophilus, and/or pretreated with antibiotics. Infection rates were similar with metronidazole-resistant (MR) and metronidazole-sensitive (MS) T. vaginalis. High dose but not low dose metronidazole treatment controlled infection with MS better than MR T. vaginalis. These murine models will be valuable for investigating the pathogenesis and treatment of trichomoniasis. PMID:21976570

  9. Immunodetection of Murine Lymphotoxins in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Boitchenko, Veronika E.; Korobko, Vyacheslav G.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Kravchenko, Vladimir V.; Kuimov, Alexander N.; Turetskaya, Regina L.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2000-10-01

    Lymphotoxins alpha and beta (LTalpha and LTbeta) are members of tumor necrosis factor superfamily. LT heterotrimers exist on the surface of lymphocytes and signal through LTbeta receptor while soluble LTalpha homotrimer can signal through TNF receptors p55 and p75. LT-, as well as TNF-mediated signaling are important for the organogenesis and maintenance of microarchitecture of secondary lymphoid organs in mice and has been implicated in the mechanism of certain inflammatory syndromes in humans. In this study we describe the generation of eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding murine LTalpha and LTbeta genes and a prokaryotic expression construct for murine LTalpha. Using recombinant proteins expressed by these vectors as tools for antisera selection, we produced and characterized several polyclonal antibodies capable of detecting LT proteins in eukaryotic cells.

  10. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Primary T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2016-01-01

    Summary In comparison to human T cells, efficient retroviral gene transfer and subsequent expansion of murine primary T cells is more difficult to achieve. Herein, we describe an optimized gene transfer protocol utilizing an ecotropic viral vector to transduce primary murine T cells activated with magnetic beads coated with agonistic anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Activated T cells are subsequently centrifuged (spinoculated) on RetroNectin-coated tissue culture plates in the context of retroviral supernatant. Variables found to be critical to high gene transfer and subsequent efficient T cell expansion included CD3/CD28 magnetic bead to cell ratio, time from T cell activation to initial spinoculation, frequency of T cell spinoculation, interleukin-2 concentration in the medium, and the initial purity of the T cell preparation. PMID:19110621

  11. Enhanced Cultivation Of Stimulated Murine B Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Method of in vitro cultivation of large numbers of stimulated murine B lymphocytes. Cells electrofused with other cells to produce hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies. Offers several advantages: polyclonally stimulated B-cell blasts cultivated for as long as 14 days, hybridomas created throughout culture period, yield of hybridomas increases during cultivation, and possible to expand polyclonally in vitro number of B cells specific for antigenic determinants first recognized in vivo.

  12. Murine models of human wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jerry S; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-01-01

    In vivo wound healing experiments remain the most predictive models for studying human wound healing, allowing an accurate representation of the complete wound healing environment including various cell types, environmental cues, and paracrine interactions. Small animals are economical, easy to maintain, and allow researchers to take advantage of the numerous transgenic strains that have been developed to investigate the specific mechanisms involved in wound healing and regeneration. Here we describe three reproducible murine wound healing models that recapitulate the human wound healing process.

  13. Potent inhibition of Junín virus infection by interferon in murine cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Walker, Aida G; Grant, Ashley M; Kolokoltsova, Olga A; Yun, Nadezhda E; Seregin, Alexey V; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-06-01

    The new world arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV) is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, a lethal human infectious disease. Adult laboratory mice are generally resistant to peripheral infection by JUNV. The mechanism underlying the mouse resistance to JUNV infection is largely unknown. We have reported that interferon receptor knockout mice succumb to JUNV infection, indicating the critical role of interferon in restricting JUNV infection in mice. Here we report that the pathogenic and vaccine strains of JUNV were highly sensitive to interferon in murine primary cells. Treatment with low concentrations of interferon abrogated viral NP protein expression in murine cells. The replication of both JUNVs was enhanced in IRF3/IRF7 deficient cells. In addition, the vaccine strain of JUNV displayed impaired growth in primary murine cells. Our data suggested a direct and potent role of host interferon response in restricting JUNV replication in mice. The defect in viral growth for vaccine JUNV might also partially explain its attenuation in mice.

  14. Potent Inhibition of Junín Virus Infection by Interferon in Murine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng; Walker, Aida G.; Grant, Ashley M.; Kolokoltsova, Olga A.; Yun, Nadezhda E.; Seregin, Alexey V.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    The new world arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV) is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, a lethal human infectious disease. Adult laboratory mice are generally resistant to peripheral infection by JUNV. The mechanism underlying the mouse resistance to JUNV infection is largely unknown. We have reported that interferon receptor knockout mice succumb to JUNV infection, indicating the critical role of interferon in restricting JUNV infection in mice. Here we report that the pathogenic and vaccine strains of JUNV were highly sensitive to interferon in murine primary cells. Treatment with low concentrations of interferon abrogated viral NP protein expression in murine cells. The replication of both JUNVs was enhanced in IRF3/IRF7 deficient cells. In addition, the vaccine strain of JUNV displayed impaired growth in primary murine cells. Our data suggested a direct and potent role of host interferon response in restricting JUNV replication in mice. The defect in viral growth for vaccine JUNV might also partially explain its attenuation in mice. PMID:24901990

  15. Review of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Hicks, John; Bullard, Daniel C

    2006-01-01

    While murine models of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis have been available for sometime, it is only recently that immune and inflammatory mechanisms and molecular genetics have been extensively investigated. Genes involved in murine and human lupus nephritis have been discovered and provide insight into this disease process and provide avenues for molecular-targeted therapy. Immune modulation of murine nephritis has provided insight into novel therapy that may attenuate this disease or halt disease progression. With the advances in understanding the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis using translational research modalities, including electron microscopy, and molecular genetics, many "designer" therapies have become available for clinical use and for clinical investigational trials. This paper reviews autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models, candidate genes involved in lupus nephritis, adhesion molecules implicated in murine lupus-like nephritis, immune modulation of murine lupus-like nephritis, and novel and potential therapy for immune complex glomerulonephritis.

  16. Waddlia chondrophila induces systemic infection, organ pathology, and elicits Th1-associated humoral immunity in a murine model of genital infection

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevsky, Sam; Gyger, Joel; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Pilloux, Ludovic; Greub, Gilbert; Stojanov, Milos; Baud, David

    2015-01-01

    Waddlia chondrophila is a known bovine abortigenic Chlamydia-related bacterium that has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes in human. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding how W. chondrophila infection spreads, its ability to elicit an immune response and induce pathology. A murine model of genital infection was developed to investigate the pathogenicity and immune response associated with a W. chondrophila infection. Genital inoculation of the bacterial agent resulted in a dose-dependent infection that spread to lumbar lymph nodes and successively to spleen and liver. Bacterial-induced pathology peaked on day 14, characterized by leukocyte infiltration (uterine horn, liver, and spleen), necrosis (liver) and extramedullary hematopoiesis (spleen). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the presence of a large number of W. chondrophila in the spleen on day 14. Robust IgG titers were detected by day 14 and remained high until day 52. IgG isotypes consisted of high IgG2a, moderate IgG3 and no detectable IgG1, indicating a Th1-associated immune response. This study provides the first evidence that W. chondrophila genital infection is capable of inducing a systemic infection that spreads to major organs, induces uterus, spleen, and liver pathology and elicits a Th1-skewed humoral response. This new animal model will help our understanding of the mechanisms related to intracellular bacteria-induced miscarriages, the most frequent complication of pregnancy that affects one in four women. PMID:26583077

  17. Loss of c-Kit and bone marrow failure upon conditional removal of the GATA-2 C-terminal zinc finger domain in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan S; Jin, Jin; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Matatall, Katie A; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Huiyuan; Ullrich, Stephen E; King, Katherine Y; Sun, Shao-Cong; Watowich, Stephanie S

    2016-09-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the transcriptional regulator GATA-2 associate with multilineage immunodeficiency, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The majority of these mutations localize in the zinc finger (ZnF) domains, which mediate GATA-2 DNA binding. Deregulated hematopoiesis with GATA-2 mutation frequently develops in adulthood, yet GATA-2 function in the bone marrow remains unresolved. To investigate this, we conditionally deleted the GATA-2 C-terminal ZnF (C-ZnF) coding sequences in adult mice. Upon Gata2 C-ZnF deletion, we observed rapid peripheral cytopenia, bone marrow failure, and decreased c-Kit expression on hematopoietic progenitors. Transplant studies indicated GATA-2 has a cell-autonomous role in bone marrow hematopoiesis. Moreover, myeloid lineage populations were particularly sensitive to Gata2 hemizygosity, while molecular assays indicated GATA-2 regulates c-Kit expression in multilineage progenitor cells. Enforced c-Kit expression in Gata2 C-ZnF-deficient hematopoietic progenitors enhanced myeloid colony activity, suggesting GATA-2 sustains myelopoiesis via a cell intrinsic role involving maintenance of c-Kit expression. Our results provide insight into mechanisms regulating hematopoiesis in bone marrow and may contribute to a better understanding of immunodeficiency and bone marrow failure associated with GATA-2 mutation.

  18. The dynamics of murine mammary stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    DONG, Qiaoxiang; SUN, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The stem/progenitor cells in the murine mammary gland are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for ductal elongation in puberty, homeostasis maintenance in adult, and lobulo-alveolar genesis during pregnancy. In recent years understanding the epithelial cell hierarchy within the mammary gland is becoming particularly important as these different stem/progenitor cells were perceived to be the cells of origin for various subtypes of breast cancer. Although significant advances have been made in enrichment and isolation of stem/progenitor cells by combinations of antibodies against cell surface proteins together with flow cytometry, and in identification of stem/progenitor cells with multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal using mammary fat pad reconstitution assay and in vivo genetic labeling technique, a clear understanding of how these different stem/progenitors are orchestrated in the mammary gland is still lacking. Here we discuss the different in vivo and in vitro methods currently available for stem/progenitor identification, their associated caveats, and a possible new hierarchy model to reconcile various putative stem/progenitor cell populations identified by different research groups. PMID:25580105

  19. Interleukin 6 promotes vasculogenesis of murine brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fee, D; Grzybicki, D; Dobbs, M; Ihyer, S; Clotfelter, J; Macvilay, S; Hart, M N; Sandor, M; Fabry, Z

    2000-06-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a cytokine that acts on a wide range of tissues influencing cell growth and differentiation. Here we show that IL-6 plays a role in the early vascular development (vasculogenesis) in the central nervous system (CNS). We report that IL-6 induces the proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro. Furthermore, IL-6 significantly accelerates the formation of tube-like structures by these cells in Matrigel basement matrix. Moreover, IL-6 mRNA is expressed in vivo in two physiological conditions in which vascularization in the CNS is important: (1) during normal brain development, (2) during the healing process of a traumatic brain injury. Expression of IL-6 mRNA coincides with the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA in the developing brain with decreasing expression following birth. However, IL-6 mRNA can be detected in the healing adult murine brain tissue by in situ hybridization coinciding with the period of intense tissue reorganization. The transient upregulation of IL-6 mRNA during normal brain development and at brain injury site and the effect of IL-6 on in vitro vasculogenesis suggest that IL-6 may play a role in normal physiology of vascularization in the CNS.

  20. Surface Markers for the Murine Oval Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Dorrell, Craig; Erker, Laura; Lanxon-Cookson, Kelsea M.; Abraham, Stephanie L.; Victoroff, Tristan; Ro, Simon; Canaday, Pamela S.; Streeter, Philip R.; Grompe, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The biology of progenitor activation in the liver is of considerable medical and scientific interest. The powerful genetic tools available for the mouse make it an ideal model system to study this complex process involving many different cell types. However, reagents for the isolation and study of distinct hepatic subpopulations have been quite limited compared to those available for hematopoietic cells. To produce cell surface reactive reagents more specific for the oval cell response, we generated a new collection of monoclonal antibodies by immunization of Fischer rats with enzymatically dispersed nonparenchymal cells from the livers of adult mice treated with 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine. Each of the resulting antibodies recognized a surface antigen present on a liver cell subset and permitted the viable isolation of the associated subpopulation by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Differential activity was observed on normal liver cells and at different stages of oval cell activation, indicating potential utility for progenitor cell identification. The subdivision of liver cells using these tools should facilitate the study of the biology of ductal and periductal hepatic cell types, including progenitors. Conclusion A new panel of surface reactive monoclonal antibodies to support investigation of the murine oval cell response has been developed. PMID:18726953

  1. A Detailed Analysis of the Murine TAP Transporter Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Burgevin, Anne; Saveanu, Loredana; Kim, Yohan; Barilleau, Émilie; Kotturi, Maya; Sette, Alessandro; van Endert, Peter; Peters, Bjoern

    2008-01-01

    Background The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) supplies cytosolic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum for binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Its specificity therefore influences the repertoire of peptides presented by MHC molecules. Compared to human TAP, murine TAP's binding specificity has not been characterized as well, even though murine systems are widely used for basic studies of antigen processing and presentation. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a detailed experimental analysis of murine TAP binding specificity by measuring the binding affinities of 323 peptides. Based on this experimental data, a computational model of murine TAP specificity was constructed. The model was compared to previously generated data on human and murine TAP specificities. In addition, the murine TAP specificities for known epitopes and random peptides were predicted and compared to assess the impact of murine TAP selectivity on epitope selection. Conclusions/Significance Comparisons to a previously constructed model of human TAP specificity confirms the well-established differences for peptide substrates with positively charged C-termini. In addition these comparisons show that several residues at the N-terminus of peptides which strongly influence binding to human TAP showed little effect on binding to murine TAP, and that the overall influence of the aminoterminal residues on peptide affinity for murine TAP is much lower than for the human transporter. Murine TAP also partly prefers different hydrophobic amino acids than human TAP in the carboxyterminal position. These species-dependent differences in specificity determined in vitro are shown to correlate with the epitope repertoire recognized in vivo. The quantitative model of binding specificity of murine TAP developed herein should be useful for interpreting epitope mapping and immunogenicity data obtained in humanized mouse models. PMID:18545702

  2. Differential requirement for irf8 in formation of embryonic and adult macrophages in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Shiau, Celia E.; Kaufman, Zoe; Meireles, Ana M.; Talbot, William S.

    2015-01-23

    Interferon regulatory factor 8 (Irf8) is critical for mammalian macrophage development and innate immunity, but its role in teleost myelopoiesis remains incompletely understood. Specifically, genetic tools to analyze the role of irf8 in zebrafish macrophage development at larval and adult stages are lacking. In this study, we generated irf8 null mutants in zebrafish using TALEN-mediated targeting. Our analysis defines different requirements for irf8 at different stages. irf8 is required for formation of all macrophages during primitive and transient definitive hematopoiesis, but not during adult-phase definitive hematopoiesis starting at 5-6 days postfertilization. At early stages, irf8 mutants have excess neutrophils and excess cell death in pu.1-expressing myeloid cells. Macrophage fates were recovered in irf8 mutants after wildtype irf8 expression in neutrophil and macrophage lineages, suggesting that irf8 regulates macrophage specification and survival. In juvenile irf8 mutant fish, mature macrophages are present, but at numbers significantly reduced compared to wildtype, indicating an ongoing requirement for irf8 after embryogenesis. As development progresses, tissue macrophages become apparent in zebrafish irf8 mutants, with the possible exception of microglia. Our study defines distinct requirement for irf8 in myelopoiesis before and after transition to the adult hematopoietic system.

  3. Murine Flexor Tendon Injury and Repair Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Jessica E; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2016-01-01

    Tendon connects skeletal muscle and bone, facilitating movement of nearly the entire body. In the hand, flexor tendons (FTs) enable flexion of the fingers and general hand function. Injuries to the FTs are common, and satisfactory healing is often impaired due to excess scar tissue and adhesions between the tendon and surrounding tissue. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular components of FT repair. To that end, a murine model of FT repair that recapitulates many aspects of healing in humans, including impaired range of motion and decreased mechanical properties, has been developed and previously described. Here an in-depth demonstration of this surgical procedure is provided, involving transection and subsequent repair of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon in the murine hind paw. This technique can be used to conduct lineage analysis of different cell types, assess the effects of gene gain or loss-of-function, and to test the efficacy of pharmacological interventions in the healing process. However, there are two primary limitations to this model: i) the FDL tendon in the mid-portion of the murine hind paw, where the transection and repair occur, is not surrounded by a synovial sheath. Therefore this model does not account for the potential contribution of the sheath to the scar formation process. ii) To protect the integrity of the repair site, the FT is released at the myotendinous junction, decreasing the mechanical forces of the tendon, likely contributing to increased scar formation. Isolation of sufficient cells from the granulation tissue of the FT during the healing process for flow cytometric analysis has proved challenging; cytology centrifugation to concentrate these cells is an alternate method used, and allows for generation of cell preparations on which immunofluorescent labeling can be performed. With this method, quantification of cells or proteins of interest during FT healing becomes possible. PMID:27684281

  4. Definitive Hematopoiesis in the Yolk Sac Emerges from Wnt-Responsive Hemogenic Endothelium Independently of Circulation and Arterial Identity.

    PubMed

    Frame, Jenna M; Fegan, Katherine H; Conway, Simon J; McGrath, Kathleen E; Palis, James

    2016-02-01

    Adult-repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge in low numbers in the midgestation mouse embryo from a subset of arterial endothelium, through an endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition. HSC-producing arterial hemogenic endothelium relies on the establishment of embryonic blood flow and arterial identity, and requires β-catenin signaling. Specified prior to and during the formation of these initial HSCs are thousands of yolk sac-derived erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs). EMPs ensure embryonic survival prior to the establishment of a permanent hematopoietic system, and provide subsets of long-lived tissue macrophages. While an endothelial origin for these HSC-independent definitive progenitors is also accepted, the spatial location and temporal output of yolk sac hemogenic endothelium over developmental time remain undefined. We performed a spatiotemporal analysis of EMP emergence, and document the morphological steps of the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition. Emergence of rounded EMPs from polygonal clusters of Kit(+) cells initiates prior to the establishment of arborized arterial and venous vasculature in the yolk sac. Interestingly, Kit(+) polygonal clusters are detected in both arterial and venous vessels after remodeling. To determine whether there are similar mechanisms regulating the specification of EMPs with other angiogenic signals regulating adult-repopulating HSCs, we investigated the role of embryonic blood flow and Wnt/β-catenin signaling during EMP emergence. In embryos lacking a functional circulation, rounded Kit(+) EMPs still fully emerge from unremodeled yolk sac vasculature. In contrast, canonical Wnt signaling appears to be a common mechanism regulating hematopoietic emergence from hemogenic endothelium. These data illustrate the heterogeneity in hematopoietic output and spatiotemporal regulation of primary embryonic hemogenic endothelium.

  5. Definitive Hematopoiesis in the Yolk Sac Emerges from Wnt-Responsive Hemogenic Endothelium Independently of Circulation and Arterial Identity.

    PubMed

    Frame, Jenna M; Fegan, Katherine H; Conway, Simon J; McGrath, Kathleen E; Palis, James

    2016-02-01

    Adult-repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge in low numbers in the midgestation mouse embryo from a subset of arterial endothelium, through an endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition. HSC-producing arterial hemogenic endothelium relies on the establishment of embryonic blood flow and arterial identity, and requires β-catenin signaling. Specified prior to and during the formation of these initial HSCs are thousands of yolk sac-derived erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs). EMPs ensure embryonic survival prior to the establishment of a permanent hematopoietic system, and provide subsets of long-lived tissue macrophages. While an endothelial origin for these HSC-independent definitive progenitors is also accepted, the spatial location and temporal output of yolk sac hemogenic endothelium over developmental time remain undefined. We performed a spatiotemporal analysis of EMP emergence, and document the morphological steps of the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition. Emergence of rounded EMPs from polygonal clusters of Kit(+) cells initiates prior to the establishment of arborized arterial and venous vasculature in the yolk sac. Interestingly, Kit(+) polygonal clusters are detected in both arterial and venous vessels after remodeling. To determine whether there are similar mechanisms regulating the specification of EMPs with other angiogenic signals regulating adult-repopulating HSCs, we investigated the role of embryonic blood flow and Wnt/β-catenin signaling during EMP emergence. In embryos lacking a functional circulation, rounded Kit(+) EMPs still fully emerge from unremodeled yolk sac vasculature. In contrast, canonical Wnt signaling appears to be a common mechanism regulating hematopoietic emergence from hemogenic endothelium. These data illustrate the heterogeneity in hematopoietic output and spatiotemporal regulation of primary embryonic hemogenic endothelium. PMID:26418893

  6. Hematopoiesis in steady-state versus stress: self-renewal, lineage fate choice, and the conversion of danger signals into cytokine signals in HSCs

    PubMed Central

    Borghesi, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) replenish the innate and adaptive immune compartments throughout life. While significant progress has defined the major transcription factors that regulate lineage specification, the architectural proteins that globally coordinate DNA methylation, histone modification, and changes in gene expression are poorly defined. Provocative new studies establish the chromatin organizer Satb1 as one such global regulator in LT-HSCs. Satb1 is a nuclear organizer that partitions chromatin through the formation of cage-like structures. By integrating epigenetic and transcriptional pathways, Satb1 coordinates LT-HSC division, self-renewal, and lymphoid potential. Unexpected among the assortment of genes under Satb1 control in HSCs are cytokines, a finding that takes on additional importance with the provocative finding that short-term (ST-) HSCs and downstream multipotent progenitors (MPPs) are potent and biologically relevant cytokine secretors during stress-mediated hematopoiesis. Together these studies reveal a new mechanism of fate regulation and an unforeseen functional capability of HSCs. PMID:25128551

  7. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Loci Associated with Blood Cell Traits and Reveals a Role for Alternative GFI1B Splice Variants in Human Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Polfus, Linda M; Khajuria, Rajiv K; Schick, Ursula M; Pankratz, Nathan; Pazoki, Raha; Brody, Jennifer A; Chen, Ming-Huei; Auer, Paul L; Floyd, James S; Huang, Jie; Lange, Leslie; van Rooij, Frank J A; Gibbs, Richard A; Metcalf, Ginger; Muzny, Donna; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Walter, Klaudia; Chen, Lu; Yanek, Lisa; Becker, Lewis C; Peloso, Gina M; Wakabayashi, Aoi; Kals, Mart; Metspalu, Andres; Esko, Tõnu; Fox, Keolu; Wallace, Robert; Franceshini, Nora; Matijevic, Nena; Rice, Kenneth M; Bartz, Traci M; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Lettre, Guillaume; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franco, Oscar H; Rich, Stephen S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Wilson, James G; Psaty, Bruce M; Soranzo, Nicole; Dehghan, Abbas; Boerwinkle, Eric; Zhang, Xiaoling; Johnson, Andrew D; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Johnsen, Jill M; Reiner, Alexander P; Ganesh, Santhi K; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-08-01

    Circulating blood cell counts and indices are important indicators of hematopoietic function and a number of clinical parameters, such as blood oxygen-carrying capacity, inflammation, and hemostasis. By performing whole-exome sequence association analyses of hematologic quantitative traits in 15,459 community-dwelling individuals, followed by in silico replication in up to 52,024 independent samples, we identified two previously undescribed coding variants associated with lower platelet count: a common missense variant in CPS1 (rs1047891, MAF = 0.33, discovery + replication p = 6.38 × 10(-10)) and a rare synonymous variant in GFI1B (rs150813342, MAF = 0.009, discovery + replication p = 1.79 × 10(-27)). By performing CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in hematopoietic cell lines and follow-up targeted knockdown experiments in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, we demonstrate an alternative splicing mechanism by which the GFI1B rs150813342 variant suppresses formation of a GFI1B isoform that preferentially promotes megakaryocyte differentiation and platelet production. These results demonstrate how unbiased studies of natural variation in blood cell traits can provide insight into the regulation of human hematopoiesis. PMID:27486782

  8. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  9. Reemergence of Murine Typhus in Galveston, Texas, USA, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Rahat F.; Bouyer, Donald H.; Walker, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Twelve patients with murine typhus were identified in Galveston, Texas, USA, in 2013. An isolate from 1 patient was confirmed to be Rickettsia typhi. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston emphasizes the importance of vector control and awareness of this disease by physicians and public health officials. PMID:25695758

  10. Methylcellulose media for plaque assay of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Horikawa, Y; Sato, K; Saito, H

    1982-09-01

    When ecotropic murine leukemia virus was assayed by a methylcellulose-XC cell procedure, plaque titers showed less test-to-test variation, more uniform dose-response curves, and larger plaque sizes, as compared with results of the conventional liquid overlay-XC cell test system. This assay therefore seems to be reliable and useful for the titration of ecotropic murine leukemia virus.

  11. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston, Texas, USA, 2013.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lucas S; Vohra, Rahat F; Bouyer, Donald H; Walker, David H

    2015-03-01

    Twelve patients with murine typhus were identified in Galveston, Texas, USA, in 2013. An isolate from 1 patient was confirmed to be Rickettsia typhi. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston emphasizes the importance of vector control and awareness of this disease by physicians and public health officials.

  12. Bone marrow mononuclears from murine tibia after spaceflight on biosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Elena; Roe, Maria; Buravkova, Ludmila; Andrianova, Irina; Goncharova, Elena; Gornostaeva, Alexandra

    Elucidation of the space flight effects on the adult stem and progenitor cells is an important goal in space biology and medicine. A unique opportunity for this is provided by project "BION -M1". The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 30-day flight on biosatellite "BION - M1" and the subsequent 7-day recovery on the quantity, viability, immunophenotype of mononuclears from murine tibia bone marrow. Also the in vitro characterization of functional capacity of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) was scheduled. Under the project, the S57black/6 mice were divided into groups: spaceflight/vivarium control, recovery after spaceflight/ vivarium control to recovery. Bone marrow mononuclears were isolated from the tibia and immunophenotyped using antibodies against CD45, CD34, CD90 on a flow cytometer Epics XL (Beckman Coulter). A part of the each pool was frozen for subsequent estimation of hematopoietic colony-forming units (CFU), the rest was used for the evaluation of fibroblast CFU (CFUf) number, MSC proliferative activity and osteogenic potency. The cell number in the flight group was significantly lower than in the vivarium control group. There were no differences in this parameter between flight and control groups after 7 days of recovery. The mononuclears viability was more than 95 percent in all examined groups. Flow cytometric analysis showed no differences in the bone marrow cell immunophenotype (CD45, CD34, CD90.1 (Thy1)), but the flight animals had more large-sized CD45+mononuclears, than the control groups of mice. There was no difference in the CFUf number between groups. After 7 days in vitro the MSC number in flight group was twice higher than in vivarium group, after 10 days - 4 times higher. These data may indicate a higher proliferative activity of MSCs after spaceflight. MSCs showed the same and high alkaline phosphatase activity, both in flight and in the control groups, suggesting no effect of spaceflight factors on early

  13. Expression of Fas ligand in murine ovary.

    PubMed

    Guo, M W; Xu, J P; Mori, E; Sato, E; Saito, S; Mori, T

    1997-05-01

    Corresponding to the expression of Fas in the ovarian oocytes as previously reported (Guo et al., Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1994; 203:1438-1446; Mori et al., JSIR 1995; 9:49-50), the expression of Fas ligand (FasL) in the ovarian follicle was found to be restricted in the area of granulosa cells by the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) test. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT/PCR) technique coupled with Southern blot hybridization analysis showed that the highest level of FasL mRNA was demonstrated in murine ovaries and granulosa cells 1 day after the administration of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG), while the level of FasL mRNA became very weak on the day 5, respectively. The observed gradual decrease in FasL mRNA could not be attributed to a generalized degradation of cellular RNA during atresia, as evidenced by the presence of constitutive expression of elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) mRNA in murine ovaries and granulosa cells treated with PMSG. Furthermore, in situ hybridization analysis with a FasL-specific probe confirmed that FasL was specifically localized in the granulosa cells of most follicles and its expression was regulated by PMSG administration. FasL localized in granulosa cells might possibly play an important role in the formation of the ovarian atretic follicles, most likely depending on PMSG administration. PMID:9196798

  14. Sexual dimorphism of Murine Masticatory Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, David W.; Tian, Zuozhen; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2008-01-01

    (1) Objective To determine if gender distinctions of force generating capacity existed in murine masticatory muscles. (2) Design In order to investigate the effect of sex on force generating capacity in this muscle group, an isolated muscle preparation was developed utilizing the murine anterior deep masseter. Age-matched male and female mice were utilized to assess function, muscle fiber type and size in this muscle. (3) Results Maximum isometric force production was not different between age-matched male and female mice. However, the rate of force generation and relaxation was slower in female masseter muscles. Assessment of fiber type distribution by immunohistochemistry revealed a threefold decrease in the proportion of myosin heavy chain 2b positive fibers in female masseters, which correlated with the differences in contraction kinetics. (4) Conclusions These results provide evidence that masticatory muscle strength in mice is not affected by sex, but there are significant distinctions in kinetics associated with force production between males and females. PMID:18028868

  15. Immunosuppression by Murine Sarcoma Virus (Moloney)

    PubMed Central

    Chan, S. P.; Hook, W. A.; Turner, W.; Chirigos, M. A.

    1970-01-01

    Infection of mice with the murine sarcoma virus (Moloney) markedly suppressed the humoral antibody response to sheep erythrocyte antigen injected 10 days after infection, when tumor size was maximal, and on day 26, when primary tumors had partially regressed. Humoral antibody response was also inhibited when antigen was injected at the time secondary tumors and metastases were evident. No significant suppression of humoral antibody was seen when mice were injected with sheep erythrocyte antigen 5 days after virus infection. Inhibition of the cellular immune response of murine sarcoma virus (Moloney)-infected mice, as measured by the increased survival time of skin grafts, was also determined. Mice that were infected 5 days prior to grafting demonstrated prolonged survival of grafts, suggesting a suppression of cellular immunity. These mice had a graft survival time 14 days greater than noninfected controls. No significant prolongation of graft survival was seen in mice grafted at the times of maximum primary tumor growth, of primary tumor regression, or when secondary tumors had appeared. PMID:16557730

  16. Benzaldehyde suppresses murine allergic asthma and rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Young; Park, Chang-Shin; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Heo, Min-Jeong; Kim, Young Hyo

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the antiallergic effects of oral benzaldehyde in a murine model of allergic asthma and rhinitis, we divided 20 female BALB/c mice aged 8-10 weeks into nonallergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to normal saline), allergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to ovalbumin), and 200- and 400-mg/kg benzaldehyde (allergic but treated) groups. The number of nose-scratching events in 10 min, levels of total and ovalbumin-specific IgE in serum, differential counts of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, titers of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) in BAL fluid, histopathologic findings of lung and nasal tissues, and expressions of proteins involved in apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3), inflammation (COX-2), antioxidation (extracellular SOD, HO-1), and hypoxia (HIF-1α, VEGF) in lung tissue were evaluated. The treated mice had significantly fewer nose-scratching events, less inflammatory cell infiltration in lung and nasal tissues, and lower HIF-1α and VEGF expressions in lung tissue than the allergic group. The number of eosinophils and neutrophils and Th2 cytokine titers in BAL fluid significantly decreased after the treatment (P<0.05). These results imply that oral benzaldehyde exerts antiallergic effects in murine allergic asthma and rhinitis, possibly through inhibition of HIF-1α and VEGF.

  17. Murine branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase kinase; cDNA cloning, tissue distribution, and temporal expression during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Doering, C B; Coursey, C; Spangler, W; Danner, D J

    1998-06-01

    These studies were designed to demonstrate the structural and functional similarity of murine branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase and its regulation by the complex-specific kinase. Nucleotide sequence and deduced amino acid sequence for the kinase cDNA demonstrate a highly conserved coding sequence between mouse and human. Tissue-specific expression in adult mice parallels that reported in other mammals. Kinase expression in female liver is influenced by circadian rhythm. Of special interest is the fluctuating expression of this kinase during embryonic development against the continuing increase in the catalytic subunits of this mitochondrial complex during development. The need for regulation of the branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex by kinase expression during embryogenesis is not understood. However, the similarity of murine branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase and its kinase to the human enzyme supports the use of this animal as a model for the human system. PMID:9611264

  18. Murine erythropoietin gene: cloning, expression, and human gene homology.

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, C B; Mitsock, L D

    1986-01-01

    The gene for murine erythropoietin (EPO) was isolated from a mouse genomic library with a human EPO cDNA probe. Nucleotide sequence analysis permitted the identification of the murine EPO coding sequence and the prediction of the encoded amino acid sequence based on sequence conservation between the mouse and human EPO genes. Both the coding DNA and the amino acid sequences were 80% conserved between the two species. Transformation of COS-1 cells with a mammalian cell expression vector containing the murine EPO coding region resulted in secretion of murine EPO with biological activity on both murine and human erythroid progenitor cells. The transcription start site for the murine EPO gene in kidneys was determined. This permitted tentative identification of the transcription control region. The region included 140 base pairs upstream of the cap site which was over 90% conserved between the murine and human genes. Surprisingly, the first intron and much of the 5'- and 3'-untranslated sequences were also substantially conserved between the genes of the two species. Images PMID:3773894

  19. Adult immunization

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bharti; Chawla, Sumit; Kumar Dharma, Vijay; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is recommended throughout life to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequel. The primary focus of vaccination programs has historically been directed to childhood immunizations. For adults, chronic diseases have been the primary focus of preventive and medical health care, though there has been increased emphasis on preventing infectious diseases. Adult vaccination coverage, however, remains low for most of the routinely recommended vaccines. Though adults are less susceptible to fall prey to traditional infectious agents, the probability of exposure to infectious agents has increased manifold owing to globalization and increasing travel opportunities both within and across the countries. Thus, there is an urgent need to address the problem of adult immunization. The adult immunization enterprise is more complex, encompassing a wide variety of vaccines and a very diverse target population. There is no coordinated public health infrastructure to support an adult immunization program as there is for children. Moreover, there is little coordination among adult healthcare providers in terms of vaccine provision. Substantial improvement in adult vaccination is needed to reduce the health consequences of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Routine assessment of adult patient vaccination needs, recommendation, and offer of needed vaccines for adults should be incorporated into routine clinical care of adults. PMID:24128707

  20. Hemorrhage Exacerbates Radiation Effects on Survival, Leukocytopenia, Thrombopenia, Erythropenia, Bone Marrow Cell Depletion and Hematopoiesis, and Inflammation-Associated microRNAs Expression in Kidney.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Juliann G; Smith, Joan T; Anderson, Marsha N; Swift, Joshua M; Christensen, Christine L; Gupta, Paridhi; Balakathiresan, Nagaraja; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high-dose radiation results in detrimental effects on survival. The effects of combined trauma, such as radiation in combination with hemorrhage, the typical injury of victims exposed to a radiation blast, on survival and hematopoietic effects have yet to be understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of radiation injury (RI) combined with hemorrhage (i.e., combined injury, CI) on survival and hematopoietic effects, and to investigate whether hemorrhage (Hemo) enhanced RI-induced mortality and hematopoietic syndrome. Male CD2F1 mice (10 weeks old) were given one single exposure of γ- radiation (60Co) at various doses (0.6 Gy/min). Within 2 hr after RI, animals under anesthesia were bled 0% (Sham) or 20% (Hemo) of total blood volume via the submandibular vein. In these mice, Hemo reduced the LD50/30 for 30-day survival from 9.1 Gy (RI) to 8.75 Gy (CI) with a DMF of 1.046. RI resulted in leukocytopenia, thrombopenia, erythropenia, and bone marrow cell depletion, but decreased the caspase-3 activation response. RI increased IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, and TNF-α concentrations in serum, bone marrow, ileum, spleen, and kidney. Some of these adverse alterations were magnified by CI. Erythropoietin production was increased in kidney and blood more after CI than RI. Furthermore, CI altered the global miRNAs expression in kidney and the ingenuity pathway analysis showed that miRNAs viz., let-7e, miR-30e and miR-29b that were associated with hematopoiesis and inflammation. This study provides preliminary evidence that non-lethal Hemo exacerbates RI-induced mortality and cell losses associated with high-dose γ-radiation. We identified some of the initial changes occurring due to CI which may have facilitated in worsening the injury and hampering the recovery of animals ultimately resulting in higher mortality. PMID:26422254

  1. Hemorrhage Exacerbates Radiation Effects on Survival, Leukocytopenia, Thrombopenia, Erythropenia, Bone Marrow Cell Depletion and Hematopoiesis, and Inflammation-Associated microRNAs Expression in Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Kiang, Juliann G.; Smith, Joan T.; Anderson, Marsha N.; Swift, Joshua M.; Christensen, Christine L.; Gupta, Paridhi; Balakathiresan, Nagaraja; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high-dose radiation results in detrimental effects on survival. The effects of combined trauma, such as radiation in combination with hemorrhage, the typical injury of victims exposed to a radiation blast, on survival and hematopoietic effects have yet to be understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of radiation injury (RI) combined with hemorrhage (i.e., combined injury, CI) on survival and hematopoietic effects, and to investigate whether hemorrhage (Hemo) enhanced RI-induced mortality and hematopoietic syndrome. Male CD2F1 mice (10 weeks old) were given one single exposure of γ- radiation (60Co) at various doses (0.6 Gy/min). Within 2 hr after RI, animals under anesthesia were bled 0% (Sham) or 20% (Hemo) of total blood volume via the submandibular vein. In these mice, Hemo reduced the LD50/30 for 30-day survival from 9.1 Gy (RI) to 8.75 Gy (CI) with a DMF of 1.046. RI resulted in leukocytopenia, thrombopenia, erythropenia, and bone marrow cell depletion, but decreased the caspase-3 activation response. RI increased IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, and TNF-α concentrations in serum, bone marrow, ileum, spleen, and kidney. Some of these adverse alterations were magnified by CI. Erythropoietin production was increased in kidney and blood more after CI than RI. Furthermore, CI altered the global miRNAs expression in kidney and the ingenuity pathway analysis showed that miRNAs viz., let-7e, miR-30e and miR-29b that were associated with hematopoiesis and inflammation. This study provides preliminary evidence that non-lethal Hemo exacerbates RI-induced mortality and cell losses associated with high-dose γ-radiation. We identified some of the initial changes occurring due to CI which may have facilitated in worsening the injury and hampering the recovery of animals ultimately resulting in higher mortality. PMID:26422254

  2. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  3. C-Myb(+) erythro-myeloid progenitor-derived fetal monocytes give rise to adult tissue-resident macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hoeffel, Guillaume; Chen, Jinmiao; Lavin, Yonit; Low, Donovan; Almeida, Francisca F; See, Peter; Beaudin, Anna E; Lum, Josephine; Low, Ivy; Forsberg, E Camilla; Poidinger, Michael; Zolezzi, Francesca; Larbi, Anis; Ng, Lai Guan; Chan, Jerry K Y; Greter, Melanie; Becher, Burkhard; Samokhvalov, Igor M; Merad, Miriam; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-04-21

    Although classified as hematopoietic cells, tissue-resident macrophages (MFs) arise from embryonic precursors that seed the tissues prior to birth to generate a self-renewing population, which is maintained independently of adult hematopoiesis. Here we reveal the identity of these embryonic precursors using an in utero MF-depletion strategy and fate-mapping of yolk sac (YS) and fetal liver (FL) hematopoiesis. We show that YS MFs are the main precursors of microglia, while most other MFs derive from fetal monocytes (MOs). Both YS MFs and fetal MOs arise from erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) generated in the YS. In the YS, EMPs gave rise to MFs without monocytic intermediates, while EMP seeding the FL upon the establishment of blood circulation acquired c-Myb expression and gave rise to fetal MOs that then seeded embryonic tissues and differentiated into MFs. Thus, adult tissue-resident MFs established from hematopoietic stem cell-independent embryonic precursors arise from two distinct developmental programs.

  4. Murine fertilized ovum, blastomere and morula cells lacking SP phenotype.

    PubMed

    Xu, YiXin; He, ZhiYing; Zhu, HaiYing; Chen, XueSong; Li, JianXiu; Zhang, HongXia; Pan, XingHua; Hu, YiPing

    2007-12-01

    In the field of stem cell research, SP (side population) phenotype is used to define the property that cells maintain a high efflux capability for some fluorescent dye, such as Hoechst 33342. Recently, many researches proposed that SP phenotype is a phenotype shared by some stem cells and some progenitor cells, and that SP phenotype is regarded as a candidate purification marker for stem cells. In this research, murine fertilized ova (including conjugate and single nucleus fertilized ova), 2-cell stage and 8-cell stage blastomeres, morulas and blastocysts were isolated and directly stained by Hoechst 33342 dye. The results show that fertilized ovum, blastomere and morula cells do not demonstrate any ability to efflux the dye. However, the inner cell mass (ICM) cells of blastocyst exhibit SP phenotype, which is consistent with the result of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro. These results indicate that the SP phenotype of ICM-derived ESCs is an intrinsic property and independent of the culture condition in vitro, and that SP phenotype is one of the characteristics of at least some pluripotent stem cells, but is not shared by totipotent stem cells. In addition, the result that the SP phenotype of ICM cells disappeared when the inhibitor verapamil was added into medium implies that the SP phenotype is directly associated with ABCG2. These results suggest that not all the stem cells demonstrate SP phenotype, and that SP phenotype might act as a purification marker for partial stem cells such as some pluripotent embryonic stem cells and multipotent adult stem cells, but not for all stem cells exampled by the totipotent stem cells in the very early stage of mouse embryos.

  5. Hhex is Required at Multiple Stages of Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Goodings, Charnise; Smith, Elizabeth; Mathias, Elizabeth; Elliott, Natalina; Cleveland, Susan M.; Tripathi, Rati M.; Layer, Justin H.; Chen, Xi; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Hamid, Rizwan; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P.

    2015-01-01

    Hhex encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is widely expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. Its enforced expression induces T-cell leukemia and we have implicated it as an important oncogene in early T-cell precursor leukemias where it is immediately downstream of an LMO2-associated protein complex. Conventional Hhex knockouts cause embryonic lethality precluding analysis of adult hematopoiesis. Thus, we induced highly efficient conditional knockout (cKO) using vav-Cre transgenic mice. Hhex cKO mice were viable and born at normal litter sizes. At steady state, we observed a defect in B-cell development that we localized to the earliest B-cell precursor, the pro-B-cell stage. Most remarkably, bone marrow transplantation using Hhex cKO donor cells revealed a more profound defect in all hematopoietic lineages. In contrast, sublethal irradiation resulted in normal myeloid cell repopulation of the bone marrow but markedly impaired repopulation of T- and B-cell compartments. We noted that Hhex cKO stem and progenitor cell populations were skewed in their distribution and showed enhanced proliferation compared to WT cells. Our results implicate Hhex in the maintenance of LT-HSCs and in lineage allocation from multipotent progenitors especially in stress hematopoiesis. PMID:25968920

  6. Hhex is Required at Multiple Stages of Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Goodings, Charnise; Smith, Elizabeth; Mathias, Elizabeth; Elliott, Natalina; Cleveland, Susan M; Tripathi, Rati M; Layer, Justin H; Chen, Xi; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Hamid, Rizwan; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P

    2015-08-01

    Hhex encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is widely expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. Its enforced expression induces T-cell leukemia and we have implicated it as an important oncogene in early T-cell precursor leukemias where it is immediately downstream of an LMO2-associated protein complex. Conventional Hhex knockouts cause embryonic lethality precluding analysis of adult hematopoiesis. Thus, we induced highly efficient conditional knockout (cKO) using vav-Cre transgenic mice. Hhex cKO mice were viable and born at normal litter sizes. At steady state, we observed a defect in B-cell development that we localized to the earliest B-cell precursor, the pro-B-cell stage. Most remarkably, bone marrow transplantation using Hhex cKO donor cells revealed a more profound defect in all hematopoietic lineages. In contrast, sublethal irradiation resulted in normal myeloid cell repopulation of the bone marrow but markedly impaired repopulation of T- and B-cell compartments. We noted that Hhex cKO stem and progenitor cell populations were skewed in their distribution and showed enhanced proliferation compared to WT cells. Our results implicate Hhex in the maintenance of LT-HSCs and in lineage allocation from multipotent progenitors especially in stress hematopoiesis.

  7. Cardiac-Specific YAP Activation Improves Cardiac Function and Survival in an Experimental Murine MI Model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiqiang; von Gise, Alexander; Zhou, Pingzhu; Gu, Fei; Ma, Qing; Jiang, Jiangming; Yau, Allan L.; Buck, Jessica N.; Gouin, Katryna A.; van Gorp, Pim R. R.; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Jinghai; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Wang, Da-zhi; Pu, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Yes-Associated Protein (YAP), the terminal effector of the Hippo signaling pathway, is crucial for regulating embryonic cardiomyocyte (CM) proliferation. Objective We hypothesized that YAP activation after myocardial infarction would preserve cardiac function and improve survival. Methods and Results We used a cardiac-specific, inducible expression system to activate YAP in adult mouse heart. Activation of YAP in adult heart promoted CM proliferation and did not deleteriously affect heart function. Furthermore, YAP activation after myocardial infarction (MI) preserved heart function and reduced infarct size. Using adeno-associated virus subtype 9 (AAV9) as a delivery vector, we expressed human YAP in the adult murine myocardium immediately after MI. We found that AAV9:hYAP significantly improved cardiac function and mouse survival. AAV9:hYAP did not exert its salutary effects by reducing CM apoptosis. Rather, AAV9:hYAP stimulated adult CM proliferation. Gene expression profiling indicated that AAV9:hYAP stimulated expression of cell cycle genes and promoted a less mature cardiac gene expression signature. Conclusions Cardiac specific YAP activation after MI mitigated myocardial injury, improved cardiac function, and enhanced survival. These findings suggest that therapeutic activation of YAP or its downstream targets, potentially through AAV-mediated gene therapy, may be a strategy to improve outcome after MI. PMID:24833660

  8. Characterization of msim, a murine homologue of the Drosophila sim transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Moffett, P.; Reece, M.; Pelletier, J.

    1996-07-01

    Mutations in the Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene result in loss of precursor cells that give rise to midline cells of the embryonic central nervous system. During the course of an exon-trapping strategy aimed at identifying transcripts that contribute to the etiology and pathophysiology of Down syndrome, we identified a human exon from the Down syndrome, we identified a human exon from the Down syndrome critical region showing significantly homology to the Drosophila sim gene. Using a cross-hybridization approach, we have isolated a murine homolog of Drosophila sim gene, which we designated msim. Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence analyses of msim cDNA clones indicate the this gene encodes a member of the basic-helix-loop-helix class of transcription factors. The murine and Drosophila proteins share 88% residues within the basic-helix-loop helix domain, with an overall homology of 92%. In addition, the N-terminal domain of MSIM contains two PAS dimerization motifs also featured in the Drosophila sim gene product, as well as a small number of other transcription factors. Northern blot analysis of adult murine tissues revealed that the msim gene produces a single mRNA species of {approximately}4 kb expressed in a small number of tissues, with the highest levels in the kidneys and lower levels present in skeletal muscle, lung, testis, brain, and heart. In situ hybridization experiments demonstrate that msim is also expressed in early fetal development in the central nervous system and in cartilage primordia. The characteristics of the msim gene are consistent with its putative function as a transcriptional regulator. 51 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Novel microbial virulence factor triggers murine lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Qin, Jinhong; Promnares, Kamoltip; Kariu, Toru; Anderson, John F; Pal, Utpal

    2013-03-15

    Borrelia burgdorferi bba57 is a conserved gene encoding a potential lipoprotein of unknown function. Here we show that bba57 is up-regulated in vivo and is required for early murine infection and potential spirochete transmission process. Although BBA57 is dispensable for late murine infection, the mutants were unable to induce disease. We show that BBA57, an outer membrane and surface-exposed antigen, is a major trigger of murine Lyme arthritis; even in cases of larger challenge inocula, which allow their persistence in joints at a level similar to wild-type spirochetes, bba57 mutants are unable to induce joint inflammation. We further showed that BBA57 deficiency reduces the expression of selected "neutrophil-recruiting" chemokines and associated receptors, causing significant impairment of neutrophil chemotaxis. New approaches to combat Lyme disease may include strategies to interfere with BBA57, a novel virulence factor and a trigger of murine Lyme arthritis.

  10. Establishment of a New Murine Elastase-Induced Aneurysm Model Combined with Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Merx, Marc W.; Koeppel, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of our study was to develop a reproducible murine model of elastase-induced aneurysm formation combined with aortic transplantation. Methods Adult male mice (n = 6–9 per group) underwent infrarenal, orthotopic transplantation of the aorta treated with elastase or left untreated. Subsequently, both groups of mice were monitored by ultrasound until 7 weeks after grafting. Results Mice receiving an elastase-pretreated aorta developed aneurysms and exhibited a significantly increased diastolic vessel diameter compared to control grafted mice at 7 week after surgery (1.11±0.10 mm vs. 0.75±0.03 mm; p≤0,001). Histopathological examination revealed disruption of medial elastin, an increase in collagen content and smooth muscle cells, and neointima formation in aneurysm grafts. Conclusions We developed a reproducible murine model of elastase-induced aneurysm combined with aortic transplantation. This model may be suitable to investigate aneurysm-specific inflammatory processes and for use in gene-targeted animals. PMID:25068788

  11. Study on the comparative activity of echinocandins on murine gut colonization by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Hamilos, George; Dimopoulou, Dimitra; Andrianaki, Angeliki M; Karageorgiadis, Alexander Steven; Kyvernitakis, Andreas; Lionakis, Stelios; Kofteridis, Diamantis P; Samonis, George

    2015-08-01

    Colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract by Candida species is a principal pathogenetic event for development of invasive candidiasis. Importantly, the effect of echinocandins, the preferred antifungal agents for treatment of invasive candidiasis, on GI tract colonization by Candida spp. is currently unknown. Herein, we used an established model of persistent murine GI tract colonization by Candida albicans to test the ability of different echinocandins to eradicate the yeast from murine gut. Adult male Crl:CD1 (ICR) BR mice were fed with chow containing C. albicans and subsequently treated with different echinocandins or normal saline via daily intraperitoneal injections for 10 days. Quantitative stool cultures were performed immediately before (week one), and weekly for three months after discontinuation of treatment. Notably, treatment with all three echinocandins used (caspofungin, anidulafungin, and micafungin) resulted in eradication of Candida albicans from the stools, as evidenced by the significant reduction of yeast cells from a mean of 4.2 log10 CFU/g of stool before treatment (week one of colonization) to undetectable (<2 log10 CFU/g of stool) levels (week 12, P < 0.0001). In contrast, there was no significant reduction of Candida yeast cells in the stools of control mice. Collectively, the ability of echinocandins to eradicate C. albicans from the stools could have important implications in prophylaxis of high-risk patients for development of invasive candidiasis originating from the GI tract.

  12. Murine and Human Tissue-Engineered Esophagus Form from Sufficient Stem/Progenitor Cells and Do Not Require Microdesigned Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Spurrier, Ryan Gregory; Speer, Allison L.; Hou, Xiaogang; El-Nachef, Wael N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Tissue-engineered esophagus (TEE) may serve as a therapeutic replacement for absent foregut. Most prior esophagus studies have favored microdesigned biomaterials and yielded epithelial growth alone. None have generated human TEE with mesenchymal components. We hypothesized that sufficient progenitor cells might only require basic support for successful generation of murine and human TEE. Materials and Methods: Esophageal organoid units (EOUs) were isolated from murine or human esophagi and implanted on a polyglycolic acid/poly-l-lactic acid collagen-coated scaffold in adult allogeneic or immune-deficient mice. Alternatively, EOU were cultured for 10 days in vitro prior to implantation. Results: TEE recapitulated all key components of native esophagus with an epithelium and subjacent muscularis. Differentiated suprabasal and proliferative basal layers of esophageal epithelium, muscle, and nerve were identified. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple EOU could contribute to the epithelium and mesenchyme of a single TEE. Cultured murine EOU grew as an expanding sphere of proliferative basal cells on a neuromuscular network that demonstrated spontaneous peristalsis in culture. Subsequently, cultured EOU generated TEE. Conclusions: TEE forms after transplantation of mouse and human organ-specific stem/progenitor cells in vivo on a relatively simple biodegradable scaffold. This is a first step toward future human therapies. PMID:25298083

  13. Diphtheria toxin-based recombinant murine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting murine regulatory T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Marino, Jose; Trowell, Aaron; Zhang, Huiping; Stromp Peraino, Jaclyn; Rajasekera, Priyani V; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Benichou, Gilles; Wang, Zhirui

    2014-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells which suppress immune responses of effector cells and are known to play a very important role in protection against autoimmune disease development, induction of transplantation tolerance and suppression of effective immune response against tumor cells. An effective in vivo Treg depletion agent would facilitate Treg-associated studies across many research areas. In this study, we have developed diphtheria toxin-based monovalent and bivalent murine IL-2 fusion toxins for depleting murine IL-2 receptor positive cells including CD25(+) Treg in vivo. Their potencies were assessed by in vitro protein synthesis inhibition and cell proliferation inhibition assays using a murine CD25(+) CTLL-2 cell line. Surprisingly, in contrast to our previously developed recombinant fusion toxins, the monovalent isoform (DT390-mIL-2) was approximately 4-fold more potent than its bivalent counterpart (DT390-bi-mIL-2). Binding analysis by flow cytometry demonstrated that the monovalent isoform bound stronger than the bivalent version. In vivo Treg depletion with the monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin was performed using C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Spleen Treg were significantly depleted with a maximum reduction of ∼70% and detectable as early as 12 h after the last injection. The spleen Treg numbers were reduced until Day 3 and returned to control levels by Day 7. We believe that this monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin will be an effective in vivo murine Treg depleter. PMID:25147093

  14. A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF WHY MURINE MODELS OF TRAUMA DO NOT RECAPITULATE THE HUMAN SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Lori F.; Nacionales, Dina C.; Lopez, M. Cecilia; Vanzant, Erin; Cuenca, Angela; Cuenca, Alex G.; Ungaro, Ricardo; Baslanti, Tezcan Ozrazgat; McKinley, Bruce A.; Bihorac, Azra; Cuschieri, Joseph; Maier, Ronald V.; Moore, Frederick A.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Baker, Henry V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Efron, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Genomic analyses from blood leukocytes have concluded that mouse injury poorly reflects human trauma at the leukocyte transcriptome. Concerns have focused on the modest severity of murine injury models, differences in murine compared to human age, dissimilar circulating leukocyte populations between species, and whether similar signaling pathways are involved. We sought to examine whether the transcriptomic response to severe trauma in mice could be explained by these extrinsic factors, by utilizing an increasing severity of murine trauma and shock in young and aged mice over time, and examining the response in isolated neutrophil populations. Design Pre-clinical controlled in vivo laboratory study and retrospective cohort study Setting Laboratory of Inflammation Biology and Surgical Science and multi-institution level 1 trauma centers Subjects 6–10 week old and 20–24 month old C57BL/6 (B6) mice and two cohorts of 167 and 244 severely traumatized (ISS >15) adult (>18 yo) patients. Interventions Mice underwent one of two severity polytrauma models of injury. Total blood leukocyte and neutrophil samples were collected. Measurements and Main Results Fold expression changes in leukocyte and neutrophil genome-wide expression analyses between healthy and injured mice (p<0.001) were compared to human total and enriched blood leukocyte expression analyses of severe trauma patients at 0.5, 1, 4, 7, 14, and 28 days after injury (Glue Grant TRDB). We found that increasing the severity of the murine trauma model only modestly improved the correlation in the transcriptomic response with humans, whereas the age of the mice did not. In addition, the genome-wide response to blood neutrophils (rather than total WBC) was also not well correlated between humans and mice. However, the expression of many individual gene families was much more strongly correlated after injury in mice and humans. Conclusions Although overall transcriptomic association remained weak even

  15. Polyprotein processing of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, R P; Kong, W P; Semler, B L

    1989-01-01

    To investigate polyprotein processing of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis viruses, we analyzed in vitro translation reactions programmed by in vitro-derived transcripts from an infectious full-length cDNA clone of the DA strain of Theiler's virus. To help identify the proteinases that carried out the processing, we modified the DA cDNA clone transcription template by linearization with different restriction endonucleases that generate templates of different lengths or by constructing linker insertion or deletion mutations or both in putative proteinase-coding regions. Protein 3C carried out most of the cleavages of the polyprotein, as is true for the other picornaviruses that have been studied. A second proteinase also appeared active at the LP12A-2B junction. A protein of slightly faster mobility than the leader protein was seen with translation of transcripts derived from DA cDNA but not GDVII cDNA. This protein may be synthesized from an alternative initiation site in the DA leader-coding region out of phase with the polyprotein reading frame. Our findings are relevant to ongoing investigations of the abnormal virus expression seen in DA virus late demyelinating disease, since polyprotein processing is critical in regulating picornaviral gene expression. Images PMID:2555559

  16. MR for the investigation of murine vasculature.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Flögel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of alterations in vessel morphology of transgenic mouse models generally requires time-consuming and laborious planimetry of histological sections. This postmortem analysis is per se restricted to endpoint studies and, furthermore, may reflect the situation in vivo to a limited degree only. For the repetitive and noninvasive monitoring of dynamic changes in the murine vasculature, several protocols for high-resolution 3D MR angiography (MRA) at a vertical 9.4 T system are described. These protocols are based on flow-compensated 3D gradient echo sequences with application-dependent spatial resolution, resulting in voxel sizes between 1 and 13 nL. To ensure constant physiological conditions, particular attention is paid to minimize the acquisition time. All measurements are carried out without a contrast agent to avoid temporal inconstancy of the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) as well as toxic side effects. Moreover, metabolic alterations as a consequence of disturbed vascularization and blood supply are monitored by (31)P MR spectroscopy. PMID:21874492

  17. Quantitative Trait Loci for Murine Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheverud, J. M.; Routman, E. J.; Duarte, FAM.; van-Swinderen, B.; Cothran, K.; Perel, C.

    1996-01-01

    Body size is an archetypal quantitative trait with variation due to the segregation of many gene loci, each of relatively minor effect, and the environment. We examine the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on age-specific body weights and growth in the F(2) intercross of the LG/J and SM/J strains of inbred mice. Weekly weights (1-10 wk) and 75 microsatellite genotypes were obtained for 535 mice. Interval mapping was used to locate and measure the genotypic effects of QTLs on body weight and growth. QTL effects were detected on 16 of the 19 autosomes with several chromosomes carrying more than one QTL. The number of QTLs for age-specific weights varied from seven at 1 week to 17 at 10 wk. The QTLs were each of relatively minor, subequal effect. QTLs affecting early and late growth were generally distinct, mapping to different chromosomal locations indicating separate genetic and physiological systems for early and later murine growth. PMID:8846907

  18. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  19. Cortactin is implicated in murine zygotic development

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dan; Zhang, Helin; Blanpied, Thomas A.; Smith, Elizabeth; Zhan, Xi

    2009-01-01

    Cortactin is a cortex-enriched protein implicated in Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. However, the physiological role of cortactin remains unknown. We have generated a mouse strain in which the allele of murine cortactin was disrupted by a gene trapping vector. The resulting heterozygous mice developed normally and were fertile, but embryonic fibroblasts derived from heterozygous animals displayed partial impairment in PDGF-induced membrane ruffling. No homozygous offspring or early embryos even at the two-cell stage were detected. Analysis of oocytes revealed a gradual decrease in the detection of homozygous zygotes after fertilization. In normal oocytes arrested at meiotic metaphase II (MII), cortactin immunoreactivity was detected in an apical layer that overlies the maternal chromosome and overlaps with a polarized cortex enriched with actin. The formation of the polarized cortactin layer was diminished upon treatment with latrunculin B, an actin polymerization inhibitor. After resumption of meiosis II, the majority of cortactin protein was accumulated into the second polar body. Microinjection of MII-arrested eggs with either cortactin antibody or RNA encoding a cortactin mutant deficient in Arp2/3 complex binding disrupted the integrity of the actin cap and inhibited emission of the second polar body triggered by parthenogenesis. Our data suggest that cortactin plays an important role in the mechanics of asymmetric division in oocytes. PMID:20004659

  20. Quantitative investigation of murine cytomegalovirus nucleocapsid interaction.

    PubMed

    Buser, Christopher; Fleischer, Frank; Mertens, Thomas; Michel, Detlef; Schmidt, Volker; Walther, Paul

    2007-10-01

    In this study, we quantitatively investigate the role of the M97 protein for viral morphogenesis in murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-infected fibroblast cells. For this purpose, a statistical analysis is performed for the spatial distribution of nuclear B-capsids (devoid of DNA, containing the scaffold) and C-capsids (filled with DNA). Cell nuclei infected with either wild-type or an M97 deletion mutant were compared. Univariate and multivariate point process characteristics (like Ripley's K-function, the L-function and the nearest neighbour distance distribution function) are investigated in order to describe and quantify the effects that the deletion of M97 causes to the process of DNA packaging into nucleocapsids. The estimation of the function L(r) -r reveals that with respect to the wild type there is an increased frequency of point pairs at a very short distance (less than approximately 100 nm) for both the B-capsids as well as for the C-capsids. For the M97 deletion mutant type this is no longer true. Here only the C-capsids show such a clustering behaviour, whereas for B-capsids it is almost nonexistant. Estimations of functionals such as the nearest neighbour distance distribution function confirmed these results. Thereby, a quantification is provided for the effect that the deletion of M97 leads to a loss of typical nucleocapsid clustering in MCMV-infected nuclei. PMID:17910700

  1. The murine excisional wound model: Contraction revisited

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Mirza, Rita; Kwon, Young; DiPietro, Luisa A.; Koh, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Rodent models of healing are considered limited because of the perception that rodent wounds heal by contraction while humans heal by re-epithelialization. The purpose of this report is to present evidence that simple murine excisional wounds provide a valid and reproducible wound model that heals by both contraction and re-epithelialization. Previous studies have shown that, although rodent wounds contract by up to 80%, much of this contraction occurs only after epithelial closure. To confirm these previous findings, we measured re-epithelialization and contraction in three separate mouse strains, (BALB/c, db/+ and db/db); re-epithelialization and contraction each accounted for ~40-60% of the initial closure of full thickness excisional wounds. After closure, the wound continues to contract and this provides the impression of dominant closure by contraction. In conclusion, the simple excisional rodent wound model produces a well-defined and readily identifiable wound bed over which the process of re-epithelialization is clearly measurable. PMID:26136050

  2. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Münk, C; Löhler, J; Prassolov, V; Just, U; Stockschläder, M; Stocking, C

    1997-05-27

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed.

  3. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcelo, Kathrina L.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  4. MR for the investigation of murine vasculature.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Flögel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of alterations in vessel morphology of transgenic mouse models generally requires time-consuming and laborious planimetry of histological sections. This postmortem analysis is per se restricted to endpoint studies and, furthermore, may reflect the situation in vivo to a limited degree only. For the repetitive and noninvasive monitoring of dynamic changes in the murine vasculature, several protocols for high-resolution 3D MR angiography (MRA) at a vertical 9.4 T system are described. These protocols are based on flow-compensated 3D gradient echo sequences with application-dependent spatial resolution, resulting in voxel sizes between 1 and 13 nL. To ensure constant physiological conditions, particular attention is paid to minimize the acquisition time. All measurements are carried out without a contrast agent to avoid temporal inconstancy of the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) as well as toxic side effects. Moreover, metabolic alterations as a consequence of disturbed vascularization and blood supply are monitored by (31)P MR spectroscopy.

  5. The in vitro immunoregulatory properties of cultured murine trophoblast are not unique to this tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Drake, B L; Rodger, J C

    1985-01-01

    Primary cultures of murine trophoblast (ectoplacental cone and mid-term placenta) and their supernatants were found to inhibit in vitro lymphocyte proliferative responses to concanavalin A (77-87%) and allo-antigen (52-84%). However, cultures and cell-conditioned media from non-trophoblastic tissues (embryonic sac, adult lung and liver, and B16 melanoma line) produced similar results. In all cases, the inhibitory effects were not due to reduced cell viability. Addition of anti-progesterone serum to the ectoplacental cone-lymphocyte co-cultures, at a concentration known to bind the available trophoblast-derived progesterone, did not overcome the observed suppression. The results clearly demonstrate that a range of cultured cell types, and their conditioned media, will suppress immune responses in vitro. We conclude that cultured trophoblast is not an appropriate model for studies of placental immunoregulation. PMID:3159651

  6. Measuring ATP Concentration in a Small Number of Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Szade, Krzysztof; Zukowska, Monika; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of quiescent adult stem cells differs from the metabolism of differentiated cells. The metabolic processes are tightly regulated and their alterations disturb function of stem cells. One of the indicators of metabolic status of cells is the ATP level. While the method of measuring the ATP levels has been known for many years, estimating ATP levels in small population of defined stem cells isolated directly from the tissue has remained challenging. Here, we show our method of measuring the ATP levels in hematopoietic stem cells sorted from murine bone marrow. We used magnetic sorting as well as cell sorter and adopted the commonly used bioluminescence-based detection kits in described protocol. Our strategy allows to measure ATP levels in 1000 highly purified HSC.

  7. Measuring ATP Concentration in a Small Number of Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Szade, Krzysztof; Zukowska, Monika; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of quiescent adult stem cells differs from the metabolism of differentiated cells. The metabolic processes are tightly regulated and their alterations disturb function of stem cells. One of the indicators of metabolic status of cells is the ATP level. While the method of measuring the ATP levels has been known for many years, estimating ATP levels in small population of defined stem cells isolated directly from the tissue has remained challenging. Here, we show our method of measuring the ATP levels in hematopoietic stem cells sorted from murine bone marrow. We used magnetic sorting as well as cell sorter and adopted the commonly used bioluminescence-based detection kits in described protocol. Our strategy allows to measure ATP levels in 1000 highly purified HSC. PMID:27138010

  8. Molecular bases of dominant negative and loss of function mutations at the murine c-kit/white spotting locus: W37, Wv, W41 and W.

    PubMed Central

    Nocka, K; Tan, J C; Chiu, E; Chu, T Y; Ray, P; Traktman, P; Besmer, P

    1990-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-kit encodes a transmembrane tyrosine protein kinase receptor for an unknown ligand and is allelic with the murine white-spotting locus (W). Mutations at the W locus affect various aspects of hematopoiesis, the proliferation and migration of primordial germ cells and melanoblasts during development. The original W mutation and W37 are severe lethal mutations when homozygous. In the heterozygous state the W mutation has a weak phenotype while W37 has dominant characteristics. Wv and W41 are weak W mutations with dominant characteristics. We have characterized the molecular basis of these four W mutations and determined their effects on mast cell differentiation by using a fibroblast/mast cell co-culture assay. We show that W37, Wv and W41 are the result of missense mutations in the kinase domain of the c-kit coding sequence (W37 E----K at position 582; Wv T----M position 660 and W41 V----M position 831), which affect the c-kit associated tyrosine kinase to varying degrees. The c-kit protein products in homozygous mutant mast cells are expressed normally, although the 160 kd cell membrane form of the c-kitW37 protein displays accelerated turnover characteristics. The W mutation is the result of a 78 amino acid deletion which includes the transmembrane domain of the c-kit protein. A 125 kd c-kit protein was detected in homozygous W/W mast cells which lacks kinase activity and is not expressed on the cell surface.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:1693331

  9. Urinary tract infection - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder infection - adults; UTI - adults; Cystitis - bacterial - adults; Pyelonephritis - adults; Kidney infection - adults ... to the hospital if you: Are an older adult Have kidney stones or changes in the anatomy ...

  10. Molecular Plasticity of Male and Female Murine Gonadotropes Revealed by mRNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Sen; Nordström, Karl; Muijs, Leon; Gasparoni, Gilles; Tierling, Sascha; Krause, Elmar; Walter, Jörn; Boehm, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Gonadotropes in the anterior pituitary gland are of particular importance within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis because they provide a means of communication and thus a functional link between the brain and the gonads. Recent results indicate that female gonadotropes may be organized in the form of a network that shows plasticity and adapts to the altered endocrine conditions of different physiological states. However, little is known about functional changes on the molecular level within gonadotropes during these different conditions. In this study we capitalize on a binary genetic strategy in order to fluorescently label murine gonadotrope cells. Using this mouse model allows to produce an enriched gonadotrope population using fluorescence activated cell sorting to perform mRNA sequencing. By using this strategy, we analyze and compare the expression profile of murine gonadotropes in different genders and developmental and hormonal stages. We find that gonadotropes taken from juvenile males and females, from cycling females at diestrus and at proestrus, from lactating females, and from adult males each have unique gene expression patterns with approximately 100 to approximately 500 genes expressed only in one particular stage. We also demonstrate extensive gene-expression profile changes with up to approximately 2200 differentially expressed genes when comparing female and male development, juveniles and adults, and cycling females. Differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched in the GnRH signaling, calcium signaling, and MAPK signaling pathways by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis. Our data provide an unprecedented molecular view of the primary gonadotropes and reveal a high degree of molecular plasticity within the gonadotrope population.

  11. Murine norovirus infection does not cause major disruptions in the murine intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Murine norovirus (MNV) is the most common gastrointestinal pathogen of research mice and can alter research outcomes in biomedical mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Despite indications that an altered microbiota is a risk factor for IBD, the response of the murine intestinal microbiota to MNV infection has not been examined. Microbiota disruption caused by MNV infection could introduce the confounding effects observed in research experiments. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of MNV infection on the intestinal microbiota of wild-type mice. Results The composition of the intestinal microbiota was assessed over time in both outbred Swiss Webster and inbred C57BL/6 mice following MNV infection. Mice were infected with both persistent and non-persistent MNV strains and tissue-associated or fecal-associated microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA-encoding gene pyrosequencing. Analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in infected mice at the phylum and family level showed no major differences to uninfected controls, both in tissue-associated samples and feces, and also over time following infection, demonstrating that the intestinal microbiota of wild-type mice is highly resistant to disruption following MNV infection. Conclusions This is the first study to describe the intestinal microbiota following MNV infection and demonstrates that acute or persistent MNV infection is not associated with major disruptions of microbial communities in Swiss Webster and C57BL/6 mice. PMID:24451302

  12. Hematopoiesis in antiorthostatic, hypokinesic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. D. R.; Johnson, P. C.; Lange, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Rats exposed to antiorthostatic, hypokinesia showed the following effects which are comparable to those seen in man during or after space flight: weight loss, reduced food and water consumption, transient increases in peripheral hematocrit and RBC count, decreasing MCV and reduced reticulocyte count. In addition, the hemoglobin P50 was shifted to the right. A significant shortening of RBC t1/2 was only seen after suspension. Changes in leukocyte and platelet numbers in suspended rats were also comparable to those in man during space flight, but leukocyte PHA sensitivity in rats showed no consistent alteration. The results demonstrate that this model reproduces many of the hematological effects of space flight and has potential as a tool in understanding the hematopoietic response to zero gravity.

  13. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factor 13 regulates Na+ channels and conduction velocity in murine heart

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuan; Hennessey, Jessica A.; Kirkton, Robert D.; Wang, Chaojian; Graham, Victoria; Puranam, Ram S.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Bursac, Nenad; Pitt, Geoffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs), a subfamily of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) that are incapable of functioning as growth factors, are intracellular modulators of Na+ channels and have been linked to neurodegenerative diseases. Although certain FHFs have been found in embryonic heart, they have not been reported in adult heart, and they have not been shown to regulate endogenous cardiac Na+ channels nor participate in cardiac pathophysiology. Objective We tested whether FHFs regulate Na+ channels in murine heart. Methods and Results We demonstrated that isoforms of FGF13 are the predominant FHFs in adult mouse ventricular myocytes. FGF13 binds directly to, and co-localizes with the Na 1.5 Na+ V channel in the sarcolemma of adult mouse ventricular myocytes. Knockdown of FGF13 in adult mouse ventricular myocytes revealed a loss-of-function of NaV1.5: reduced Na+ current (INa) density, decreased Na+ channel availability, and slowed INa recovery from inactivation. Cell surface biotinylation experiments showed a ~45% reduction in NaV1.5 protein at the sarcolemma after FGF13 knockdown, whereas no changes in whole-cell NaV1.5 protein nor mRNA level were observed. Optical imaging in neonatal rat ventricular myocyte monolayers demonstrated slowed conduction velocity and a reduced maximum capture rate after FGF13 knockdown. Conclusion These findings show that FHFs are potent regulators of Na+ channels in adult ventricular myocytes and suggest that loss-of-function mutations in FHFs may underlie a similar set of cardiac arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies that result from NaV1.5 loss-of-function mutations. PMID:21817159

  14. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tabata, Hidenori; Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  15. Apoptosis and the thymic microenvironment in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, Y; Taguchi, N; Shultz, L; Boyd, R L; Naiki, M; Ansari, A A; Gershwin, M E

    1999-11-01

    The thymus of New Zealand black (NZB) mice undergoes premature involution. In addition, cultured thymic epithelial cells from NZB mice undergo accelerated preprogrammed degeneration. NZB mice also have distinctive and well-defined abnormalities of thymic architecture involving stromal cells, defined by staining with monoclonal antibodies specific for the thymic microenvironment. We took advantage of these findings, as well as our large panel of monoclonal antibodies which recognize thymic stroma, to study the induction of apoptosis in the thymus of murine lupus and including changes of epithelial architecture. We studied NZB, MRL/lpr, BXSB/Yaa, C3H/gld mice and BALB/c and C57BL/6 as control mice. Apoptosis was studied both at basal levels and following induction with either dexamethasone or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The apoptotic cells were primarily found in the thymic cortex, and the frequency of apoptosis in murine lupus was less than 20% of controls. Moreover, all strains of murine lupus had severe abnormalities of the cortical network. These changes were not accentuated by dexamethasone treatment in cultured thymocytes. However, the thymus in murine lupus was less susceptible to LPS-induced apoptosis than control mice. Finally we note that the number of thymic nurse cells (TNC) was lowest in NZB mice. Our findings demonstrate significant abnormalities in the induction of apoptosis and the formation of TNC-like epithelial cells in SLE mice, and suggest that the abnormalities of the thymic microenvironment have an important role in the pathogenesis of murine lupus.

  16. Adhesion: a confounding bias in murine cervical heterotopic heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinghui; Chen, Qi; Liu, Fang; Fu, Zhiren; Wang, Quanxing

    2015-01-01

    Tissue adhesion is a common postsurgical phenomenon among the human population. This complication also occurs in murine transplant models. In this study, we investigated the impact of adhesion on murine cervical heterotopic heart transplantation by using sodium hyaluronate (SH) as an anti-adhesive agent. Our study revealed that SH administration produced no significant effect on histological change, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP-1, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 expression, CD4+ T, CD8+ T, or neutrophil and macrophage counts. Our findings suggest that SH was biocompatible and non-immunogenic. Later, we observed that adhesion not only affected the survival of the graft without mediating rejection, but was closely related to the severity of rejection as manifested by larger and more severe adhesion formation in total-allomismatched and MHC class II-allomismatched murine cardiac allografts. Therefore, we inferred that using the murine cervical heterotopic heart transplant model may lead to an exaggerated p-value in statistical significance testing which could mislead experimenters in considering that the results are more significant than the fact. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first demonstration that proves that adhesion was a confounding bias in the murine cervical heterotopic heart transplant model and highlights the possibilities for improvement in future use. PMID:26550450

  17. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Wagner, Willi L.; Bennett, Robert D.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D.; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.

    2015-01-01

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends (“E”). Septal retraction, observed in 20–30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  18. Telomere sister chromatid exchange in telomerase deficient murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie

    2005-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that several types of genomic rearrangements (i.e., telomere sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE), genomic-SCE, or end-to-end fusions) were more often detected in long-term cultured murine telomerase deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells than in freshly prepared murine splenocytes, even through they possessed similar frequencies of critically short telomeres. The high rate of genomic rearrangements in telomerase deficient ES cells, when compared to murine splenocytes, may reflect the cultured cells' gained ability to protect chromosome ends with eroded telomeres allowing them to escape 'end crisis'. However, the possibility that ES cells were more permissive to genomic rearrangements than other cell types or that differences in the microenvironment or genetic background of the animals might consequentially determine the rate of T-SCEs or other genomic rearrangements at critically short telomeres could not be ruled out.

  19. The purification and properties of cancer procoagulant from murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Moore, W R

    1992-04-30

    The protease, cancer procoagulant, was isolated from three murine metastatic tumors and was purified to apparent homogeneity (SDS-PAGE) from Lewis lung cells by the sequence of (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DE-53 anion-exchange chromatography, and Sephacryl 200 chromatography. The murine tumor enzyme has a molecular weight of 68,000 and Ca2+ is required for procoagulant and proteolytic activity; thus, the murine enzyme is very similar to that isolated from rabbit tumors. Two peptidyl chromogenic substrates of cancer procoagulant were discovered, facilitating kinetic and inhibition studies with the enzyme. The peptide substrate structures and the results of inhibition studies suggest that cancer procoagulant is thrombin-like in specificity but is a thiol protease.

  20. Characterization of eosinophilic esophagitis murine models using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Noti, Mario; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Artis, David; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies using murine models are critical for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying immune-mediated disorders such as Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of providing three-dimensional images with axial and transverse resolutions of 5 µm and 10 µm, respectively, was utilized to obtain esophageal images from a murine model of EoE-like disease ex vivo. Structural changes in the esophagus of wild-type (Tslpr+/+) and mutant (Tslpr−/−) mice with EoE-like disease were quantitatively evaluated and food impaction sites in the esophagus of diseased mice were monitored using OCT. Here, the capability of OCT as a label-free imaging tool devoid of tissue-processing artifacts to effectively characterize murine EoE-like disease models has been demonstrated. PMID:24575353

  1. Markers of epidermal stem cell subpopulations in adult mammalian skin.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Watt, Fiona M

    2014-10-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of mammalian skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. As in other epithelia, adult stem cells within the epidermis maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to repair of tissue damage. The bulge of hair follicles, where DNA-label-retaining cells reside, was traditionally regarded as the sole epidermal stem cell compartment. However, in recent years multiple stem cell populations have been identified. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell compartments of adult murine and human epidermis, the markers that they express, and the assays that are used to characterize epidermal stem cell properties.

  2. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle Erin; Rosten, Patty; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Lai, Courteney; Humphries, R Keith

    2016-01-01

    Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1's importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1's functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA)26Sor(tm1(Cre/ERT)Nat)/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre)1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1's role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation. PMID:26986211

  3. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michelle Erin; Rosten, Patty; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Lai, Courteney; Humphries, R. Keith

    2016-01-01

    Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1’s importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1’s functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA)26Sortm1(Cre/ERT)Nat/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre)1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1’s role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation. PMID:26986211

  4. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus induces tumour necrosis factor-alpha in murine astrocyte cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, A; Rubio, N

    1993-01-01

    Cytokines have been postulated to exert an important modulatory and recruiting role in demyelination induced by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in SJL/J mice. Using a cytolytic bioassay and ELISA, we have detected and quantified a cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), in supernatants from astrocyte cultures infected in vitro with TMEV. TNF was detected only after TMEV-specific infection of astrocyte cultures (approximately 200-400 U/ml). In vitro TNF synthesis appeared in a dose- and time-dependent manner and was produced by both SJL/J (a strain susceptible to TMEV-induced demyelination) and BALB/c (a resistant strain) astrocytes. The precise nature of TNF activity was further assessed by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) and antibody neutralization. These results indicate an active role for astrocytes as accessory immune cells in our experimental model for multiple sclerosis. PMID:8478023

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the murine cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Akki, Ashwin; Gupta, Ashish; Weiss, Robert G

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful and reliable tool to noninvasively study the cardiovascular system in clinical practice. Because transgenic mouse models have assumed a critical role in cardiovascular research, technological advances in MRI have been extended to mice over the last decade. These have provided critical insights into cardiac and vascular morphology, function, and physiology/pathophysiology in many murine models of heart disease. Furthermore, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has allowed the nondestructive study of myocardial metabolism in both isolated hearts and in intact mice. This article reviews the current techniques and important pathophysiological insights from the application of MRI/MRS technology to murine models of cardiovascular disease.

  6. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  7. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K. H.; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed “L-DC” in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6CloLy6G− cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6Clo and Ly6Chi monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− cells, which are CD43+, Siglec-F− and CD115−. Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types. PMID:26793192

  8. Adult intussusception.

    PubMed Central

    Azar, T; Berger, D L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objectives were to review adult intussusception, its diagnosis, and its treatment. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Adult intussusception represents 1% of all bowel obstructions, 5% of all intussusceptions, and 0.003%-0.02% of all hospital admissions. Intussusception is a different entity in adults than it is in children. METHODS: The records of all patients 18 years and older with the postoperative diagnosis of intussusception at the Massachusetts General Hospital during the years 1964 through 1993 were reviewed retrospectively. The 58 patients were divided into those with benign enteric, malignant enteric, benign colonic, and malignant colonic lesions associated with their intussusception. The diagnosis and treatment of each were reviewed. RESULTS: In 30 years at the Massachusetts General Hospital, there are 58 cases of surgically proven adult intussusception. The patients' mean age was 54.4 years. Most patients presented with symptoms consistent with bowel obstruction. There were 44 enteric and 14 colonic intussusceptions. Ninety-three percent of the intussusceptions were associated with a pathologic lesion. Forty-eight percent of the enteric lesions were malignant and 52% were benign. Forty-three percent of the colonic lesions were malignant and 57% were benign. CONCLUSIONS: Intussusception occurs rarely in adults. It presents with a variety of acute, intermittent, and chronic symptoms, thus making its preoperative diagnosis difficult. Computed tomography scanning proved to be the most useful diagnostic radiologic method. The diagnosis and treatment of adult intussusception are surgical. Surgical resection of the intussusception without reduction is the preferred treatment in adults, as almost half of both colonic and enteric intussusceptions are associated with malignancy. PMID:9296505

  9. Pharmacological Modulation of Hemodynamics in Adult Zebrafish In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brönnimann, Daniel; Dellenbach, Christian; Saveljic, Igor; Rieger, Michael; Rohr, Stephan; Filipovic, Nenad; Djonov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemodynamic parameters in zebrafish receive increasing attention because of their important role in cardiovascular processes such as atherosclerosis, hematopoiesis, sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis. To study underlying mechanisms, the precise modulation of parameters like blood flow velocity or shear stress is centrally important. Questions related to blood flow have been addressed in the past in either embryonic or ex vivo-zebrafish models but little information is available for adult animals. Here we describe a pharmacological approach to modulate cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish in vivo. Materials and Methods Adult zebrafish were paralyzed and orally perfused with salt water. The drugs isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside were directly applied with the perfusate, thus closely resembling the preferred method for drug delivery in zebrafish, namely within the water. Drug effects on the heart and on blood flow in the submental vein were studied using electrocardiograms, in vivo-microscopy and mathematical flow simulations. Results Under control conditions, heart rate, blood flow velocity and shear stress varied less than ± 5%. Maximal chronotropic effects of isoprenaline were achieved at a concentration of 50 μmol/L, where it increased the heart rate by 22.6 ± 1.3% (n = 4; p < 0.0001). Blood flow velocity and shear stress in the submental vein were not significantly increased. Sodium nitroprusside at 1 mmol/L did not alter the heart rate but increased blood flow velocity by 110.46 ± 19.64% (p = 0.01) and shear stress by 117.96 ± 23.65% (n = 9; p = 0.03). Discussion In this study, we demonstrate that cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish can be efficiently modulated by isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside. Together with the suitability of the zebrafish for in vivo-microscopy and genetic modifications, the methodology described permits studying biological processes that are dependent on hemodynamic

  10. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 regulates primitive hematopoiesis by suppressing apoptosis and by promoting G(0)/G(1) transition in CD34(+) cells: evidence for an autocrine/paracrine mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Clay, Denis; Bourin, Philippe; Hérodin, Françis; Dupuy, Catherine; Jasmin, Claude; Le Bousse-Kerdilès, Marie-Caroline

    2002-02-15

    The stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) chemokine has various effects on hematopoietic cell functions. Its role in migration and homing of hematopoietic progenitors is currently well established. Previously it was shown that SDF-1 stimulates myeloid progenitor proliferation in synergy with cytokines. Results of this study indicate that SDF-1 alone promotes survival of purified CD34(+) cells from human unmobilized peripheral blood (PB) by counteracting apoptosis as demonstrated by its capacity to reduce DNA fragmentation, annexin-V(+) cell number, and APO2.7 detection and to modulate bcl-2 homolog protein expression. The study demonstrates that SDF-1, produced by sorted CD34(+)CD38(+) cells and over-released in response to cell damage, exerts an antiapoptotic effect on CD34(+) cells through an autocrine/paracrine regulatory loop. SDF-1 participates in the autonomous survival of circulating CD34(+) cells and its effect required activation of the phosphotidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3-K)/Akt axis. Cell sorting based on Hoechst/pyroninY fluorescences shows that SDF-1 production is restricted to cycling CD34(+) cells. SDF-1 triggers G(0) quiescent cells in G(1) phase and, in synergy with thrombopoietin or Steel factor, makes CD34(+) cells progress through S+G(2)/M phases of cell cycle. By assessing sorted CD34(+)CD38(-) and CD34(+)CD38(+) in semisolid culture, the study demonstrates that SDF-1 promotes survival of clonogenic progenitors. In conclusion, the results are the first to indicate a role for endogenous SDF-1 in primitive hematopoiesis regulation as a survival and cell cycle priming factor for circulating CD34(+) cells. The proposal is made that SDF-1 may contribute to hematopoiesis homeostasis by participating in the autonomous survival and cycling of progenitors under physiologic conditions and by protecting them from cell aggression in stress situations.

  11. Murine myocardium OCT imaging with a blood substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeehyun; Villard, Joseph W.; Lee, Ho; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2002-06-01

    Imaging of the in vivo murine myocardium using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. Application of conventional techniques (e.g. MRI, Ultrasound imaging) for imaging the murine myocardium is problematic because the wall thickness is less than 1.5mm (20g mouse), and the heart rate can be as high as six-hundred beats per minute. To acquire a real-time image of the murine myocardium, OCT can provide sufficient spatial resolution (10 micrometers ) and imaging speed (1000 A-Scans/s). Strong light scattering by blood in the heart causes significant light attenuation making delineation of the endocardium-chamber boundary problematic. By replacing whole blood in the mouse with an artificial blood substitute we demonstrate significant reduction of light scattering in the murine myocardium. The results indicate a significant reduction in light scattering as whole blood hematocrit is diminished below 5%. To measure thickness change of the myocardium during one cycle, a myocardium edge detection algorithm is developed and demonstrated.

  12. Distinct mechanisms define murine B cell lineage immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Chunlin; Yang, Qunying; Kantor, Aaron B; Chu, Hiutung; Ghosn, Eliver EB; Qin, Guang; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Han, Jian; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2015-01-01

    Processes that define immunoglobulin repertoires are commonly presumed to be the same for all murine B cells. However, studies here that couple high-dimensional FACS sorting with large-scale quantitative IgH deep-sequencing demonstrate that B-1a IgH repertoire differs dramatically from the follicular and marginal zone B cells repertoires and is defined by distinct mechanisms. We track B-1a cells from their early appearance in neonatal spleen to their long-term residence in adult peritoneum and spleen. We show that de novo B-1a IgH rearrangement mainly occurs during the first few weeks of life, after which their repertoire continues to evolve profoundly, including convergent selection of certain V(D)J rearrangements encoding specific CDR3 peptides in all adults and progressive introduction of hypermutation and class-switching as animals age. This V(D)J selection and AID-mediated diversification operate comparably in germ-free and conventional mice, indicating these unique B-1a repertoire-defining mechanisms are driven by antigens that are not derived from microbiota. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09083.001 PMID:26422511

  13. Dysregulation of Npas2 leads to altered metabolic pathways in a murine knockout model.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Derek; Mendez-Figueroa, Hector; Mistretta, Toni-Ann; Su, Chunliu; Lane, Robert H; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2013-11-01

    In our primate model of maternal high fat diet exposure, we have described that fetal epigenomic modifications to the peripheral circadian Npas2 are associated with persistent alterations in fetal hepatic metabolism and non-alcoholic fatty liver. As the interaction of circadian response with metabolism is not well understood, we employed a murine knockout model to characterize the molecular mechanisms with which Npas2 reprograms the fetal hepatic metabolic response. cDNA was generated from Npas2-/- and +/+ (wild type) livers at day 2 (newborn) and at 25 weeks (adult) of life. Newborn samples were analyzed by exon array (n = 3/cohort). Independent pathway analysis software determined that the primary dysregulated pathway(s) in the Npas2-/- animals uniformly converged on lipid metabolism. Of particular interest, Ppargc1a, which integrates circadian and metabolism pathways, was significantly (p < .01) over expressed in newborn (1.7 fold) and adult (1.8 fold) Npas2-/- animals. These findings are consistent with an essential role for Npas2 in programming the peripheral circadian response and hepatic metabolism, which has not been previously described.

  14. Heterogeneity of Matrin 3 in the developing and aging murine central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rayaprolu, Sruti; D'Alton, Simon; Crosby, Keith; Moloney, Christina; Howard, John; Duffy, Colin; Cabrera, Mariela; Siemienski, Zoe; Hernandez, Abigail R; Gallego-Iradi, Carolina; Borchelt, David R; Lewis, Jada

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in the MATR3 gene encoding the nucleotide binding protein Matrin 3 have recently been identified as causing a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS) and more rarely causing distal myopathy. Translating the identification of MATR3 mutations into an understanding of disease pathogenesis and the creation of mouse models requires a complete understanding of normal Matrin 3 levels and distribution in vivo. Consequently, we examined the levels of murine Matrin 3 in body tissues and regions of the central nervous system (CNS). We observed a significant degree of variability in Matrin 3 protein levels among different tissues of adult animals, with the highest levels found in reproductive organs and the lowest in muscle. Within the adult CNS, Matrin 3 levels were lowest in spinal cord. Further, we found that Matrin 3 declines significantly in CNS through early development and young adulthood before stabilizing. As previously reported, antibodies to Matrin 3 primarily stain nuclei, but the intensity of staining was not uniform in all nuclei. The low levels of Matrin 3 in spinal cord and muscle could mean that that these tissues are particularly vulnerable to alterations in Matrin 3 function. Our study is the first to characterize endogenous Matrin 3 in rodents across the lifespan, providing the groundwork for deciphering disease mechanisms and developing mouse models of MATR3-linked ALS. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2740-2752, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26878116

  15. Distinct mechanisms define murine B cell lineage immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) repertoires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Chunlin; Yang, Qunying; Kantor, Aaron B; Chu, Hiutung; Ghosn, Eliver Eb; Qin, Guang; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Han, Jian; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2015-09-30

    Processes that define immunoglobulin repertoires are commonly presumed to be the same for all murine B cells. However, studies here that couple high-dimensional FACS sorting with large-scale quantitative IgH deep-sequencing demonstrate that B-1a IgH repertoire differs dramatically from the follicular and marginal zone B cells repertoires and is defined by distinct mechanisms. We track B-1a cells from their early appearance in neonatal spleen to their long-term residence in adult peritoneum and spleen. We show that de novo B-1a IgH rearrangement mainly occurs during the first few weeks of life, after which their repertoire continues to evolve profoundly, including convergent selection of certain V(D)J rearrangements encoding specific CDR3 peptides in all adults and progressive introduction of hypermutation and class-switching as animals age. This V(D)J selection and AID-mediated diversification operate comparably in germ-free and conventional mice, indicating these unique B-1a repertoire-defining mechanisms are driven by antigens that are not derived from microbiota.

  16. Engineering Skeletal Muscle Tissues from Murine Myoblast Progenitor Cells and Application of Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    van der Schaft, Daisy W. J.; van Spreeuwel, Ariane C. C.; Boonen, Kristel J. M.; Langelaan, Marloes L. P.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.; Baaijens, Frank P. T.

    2013-01-01

    Engineered muscle tissues can be used for several different purposes, which include the production of tissues for use as a disease model in vitro, e.g. to study pressure ulcers, for regenerative medicine and as a meat alternative 1. The first reported 3D muscle constructs have been made many years ago and pioneers in the field are Vandenburgh and colleagues 2,3. Advances made in muscle tissue engineering are not only the result from the vast gain in knowledge of biochemical factors, stem cells and progenitor cells, but are in particular based on insights gained by researchers that physical factors play essential roles in the control of cell behavior and tissue development. State-of-the-art engineered muscle constructs currently consist of cell-populated hydrogel constructs. In our lab these generally consist of murine myoblast progenitor cells, isolated from murine hind limb muscles or a murine myoblast cell line C2C12, mixed with a mixture of collagen/Matrigel and plated between two anchoring points, mimicking the muscle ligaments. Other cells may be considered as well, e.g. alternative cell lines such as L6 rat myoblasts 4, neonatal muscle derived progenitor cells 5, cells derived from adult muscle tissues from other species such as human 6 or even induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) 7. Cell contractility causes alignment of the cells along the long axis of the construct 8,9 and differentiation of the muscle progenitor cells after approximately one week of culture. Moreover, the application of electrical stimulation can enhance the process of differentiation to some extent 8. Because of its limited size (8 x 2 x 0.5 mm) the complete tissue can be analyzed using confocal microscopy to monitor e.g. viability, differentiation and cell alignment. Depending on the specific application the requirements for the engineered muscle tissue will vary; e.g. use for regenerative medicine requires the up scaling of tissue size and vascularization, while to serve as a

  17. Engineering skeletal muscle tissues from murine myoblast progenitor cells and application of electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    van der Schaft, Daisy W J; van Spreeuwel, Ariane C C; Boonen, Kristel J M; Langelaan, Marloes L P; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2013-03-19

    Engineered muscle tissues can be used for several different purposes, which include the production of tissues for use as a disease model in vitro, e.g. to study pressure ulcers, for regenerative medicine and as a meat alternative (1). The first reported 3D muscle constructs have been made many years ago and pioneers in the field are Vandenburgh and colleagues (2,3). Advances made in muscle tissue engineering are not only the result from the vast gain in knowledge of biochemical factors, stem cells and progenitor cells, but are in particular based on insights gained by researchers that physical factors play essential roles in the control of cell behavior and tissue development. State-of-the-art engineered muscle constructs currently consist of cell-populated hydrogel constructs. In our lab these generally consist of murine myoblast progenitor cells, isolated from murine hind limb muscles or a murine myoblast cell line C2C12, mixed with a mixture of collagen/Matrigel and plated between two anchoring points, mimicking the muscle ligaments. Other cells may be considered as well, e.g. alternative cell lines such as L6 rat myoblasts (4), neonatal muscle derived progenitor cells (5), cells derived from adult muscle tissues from other species such as human (6) or even induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) (7). Cell contractility causes alignment of the cells along the long axis of the construct (8,9) and differentiation of the muscle progenitor cells after approximately one week of culture. Moreover, the application of electrical stimulation can enhance the process of differentiation to some extent (8). Because of its limited size (8 x 2 x 0.5 mm) the complete tissue can be analyzed using confocal microscopy to monitor e.g. viability, differentiation and cell alignment. Depending on the specific application the requirements for the engineered muscle tissue will vary; e.g. use for regenerative medicine requires the up scaling of tissue size and vascularization, while

  18. Adult Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on adult children. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include aging parents, dementia and Alzheimer's disease in the…

  19. Adult Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bischof, Ledford J.

    This volume comprehensively reviews the research on the psychology of the middle aged (ages 40-65). Topics include the concept of maturity and maturation models, the measurement and influences of adult self image; marriage and sexual patterns; intergenerational relationships between and children; vocations and avocations (work, retirement, play,…

  20. 3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine prevents induction of murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in C57BL/10 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukemia viruses, a possible animal model for antiretroviral drug screening.

    PubMed Central

    Ohnota, H; Okada, Y; Ushijima, H; Kitamura, T; Komuro, K; Mizuochi, T

    1990-01-01

    Adult C57BL/10 mice (H-2b Fv-1b) inoculated with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus develop a disease which has many features in common with human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), in particular abnormal lymphoproliferation and severe immunodeficiency. In the present study, we examined the possibility that this murine AIDS (MAIDS) model would be useful for evaluating antiretrovirus drugs in vivo through the use of a well-defined antiretrovirus drug, the reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (H. Mitsuya, K.J. Weinhold, P.A. Furman, M.H. St. Claire, S. Nusinoff-Lehrman, R.C. Gallo, D. Bolognesi, D.W. Barry, and S. Broder, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:7096-7100, 1985) 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). We evaluated the effect of AZT treatment on de novo virus infection as well as on the induction of immunodeficiency by various parameters, including RT activity in serum, splenomegaly, proliferative responses against alloantigens and mitogens, soluble-antigen-presenting cell activity, and immunoglobulin G levels in serum. Our results demonstrated that AZT treatment of C57BL/10 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus efficiently prevented the induction of immunodeficiency if started at the time of virus inoculation. Starting AZT treatment 1 week later provided only a partial protective effect. Starting AZT treatment 2 weeks later was associated with suppression of RT activity in serum but no prevention of immunosuppression. This MAIDS model may allow rapid and cost-effective screening for antiretrovirus drugs targeted against retroviral functions shared between human AIDS and MAIDS, such as those encoded by gag, pol, or env. PMID:1693056

  1. Hematopoietic effect of deer antler extract fermented by Bacillus subtilis on murine marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yooheon; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Lee, Hyun-Sun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES We examined the chemical composition and the effect of fermented deer antler on hematopoietic factors in bone marrow cells. MATERIALS/METHODS For the preparation of fermented deer antler extract (FAB), fermentation was carried out using Bacillus subtilis at 30℃ for 7 days. The hematopoietic effect of FAB was investigated hematopoietic factors in marrow cells. RESULTS The contents of total sugar, sulfated glycosaminoglycans, and uronic acid and the dry weight gradually increased with fermentation time. The sialic acid content (from 0.14 mg/mL to 0.54 mg/mL) was the highest on the 4th day of fermentation after which it decreased. The proliferating activity of bone marrow cells increased with fermentation times. The levels of various hematopoietic growth factors were determined to verify the beneficial effect of deer antler extract fermented by B. subtilis on hematopoiesis. FAB increased the number of stem cell factors and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in bone marrow cells. In addition, FAB augmented the burst-forming unit erythroid and total colonies in splenocyte-conditioned medium compared with non-fermented antler extract (NFA). However, FAB did not affect the mRNA levels of erythropoietin, an important factor for erythropoiesis. CONCLUSIONS FAB, like NFA, did not directly affect hematopoiesis, but contributed to hematopoiesis by stimulating the production of hematopoietic factors. PMID:26425273

  2. The effects of simulated hypogravity on murine bone marrow cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Desales

    1989-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow cells grown in complete medium at unit gravity were compared with a similar population cultured in conditions that mimic some aspects of microgravity. After the cells adjusted to the conditions that simulated microgravity, they proliferated as fetal or oncogenic populations; their numbers doubled in twelve hour periods. Differentiated subpopulations were depleted from the heterogeneous mixture with time and the undifferentiated hematopoietic stem cells increased in numbers. The cells in the control groups in unit gravity and those in the bioreactors in conditions of microgravity were monitored under a number of parameters. Each were phenotyped as to cell surface antigens using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry. Other parameters compared included: pH, glucose uptake, oxygen consumption and carbon-dioxide production. Nuclear DNA was monitored by flow cytometry. Functional responses were studied by mitogenic stimulation by various lectins. The importance of these findings should have relevance to the space program. Cells should behave predictably in zero gravity; specific populations can be eliminated from diverse populations and other populations isolated. The availability of stem cell populations will enhance both bone marrow and gene transplant programs. Stem cells will permit developmental biologists study the paths of hematopoiesis.

  3. ADULT EDUCATION OF MIGRANT ADULTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEAL, CATHERINE; AND OTHERS

    UNITS ON MIGRANT ADULT EDUCATION, AND A UNIT ON ORGANIZING INFORMAL GROUPS OF MIGRANT WOMEN TO DISCUSS MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING THEIR TEMPORARY HOMES, ARE PRESENTED. THE GOALS OF THE UNIT ON EDUCATION FOR MIGRANT MEN ARE ECONOMIC INDEPENDENCE, BETTER HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, AND BETTER HANDLING OF RESPONSIBILITIES. THE MAIN DIVISIONS OF THE…

  4. Quantification of age-related changes of α-tocopherol in lysosomal membranes in murine tissues and human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    König, Jeannette; Besoke, Fabian; Stuetz, Wolfgang; Malarski, Angelika; Jahreis, Gerhard; Grune, Tilman; Höhn, Annika

    2016-05-01

    Considering the biological function of α-tocopherol (α-Toc) as a potent protective factor against oxidative stress, this antioxidant is in the focus of aging research. To understand the role of α-Toc during aging we investigated α-Toc concentrations in young and aged primary human fibroblasts after supplementation with RRR-α-Toc. Additionally, α-Toc contents were determined in brain, kidney, and liver tissue of 10 week-, 18 month-, and 24 month-old mice, which were fed a standard diet containing 100 mg/kg dl-α-tocopheryl acetate. α-Toc concentrations in isolated lysosomes and the expression of the α-Toc transport proteins Niemann Pick C1 (NPC1), Niemann Pick C2 (NPC2), and lipoprotein lipase were also analyzed. Obtained data show a significant age-related increase of α-Toc in murine liver, kidney, and brain tissue as well as in human dermal fibroblasts. Also liver and kidney lysosomes are marked by elevated α-Toc contents with aging. NPC1 and NPC2 protein amounts are significantly decreased in adult and aged murine kidney tissue. Also aged human dermal fibroblasts show decreased NPC1 amounts. Supplementation of young and aged fibroblasts led also to decreased NPC1 amounts, suggesting a direct role of this protein in α-Toc distribution. Our results indicate an age-dependent increase of α-Toc in different murine tissues as well as in human fibroblasts. Furthermore saturation and intracellular distribution of α-Toc seem to be strongly dependent on the availability of this vitamin as well as on the presence of the lysosomal protein NPC1. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(3):307-315, 2016.

  5. Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 Alpha Is Expressed in Germ Cells throughout the Murine Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Lauren H.; Mathews, Juanita; Yamazaki, Yuki; Allsopp, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells of the early embryo, and germ line cells, are essential to ensure uncompromised development to adulthood as well as species propagation, respectively. Recently, the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (Hif1α) has been shown to have important roles in embryonic stem cells; in particular, regulation of conversion to glycolytic metabolism and, as we have shown, maintenance of functional levels of telomerase. In the present study, we sought to assess whether Hif1α was also expressed in the primitive cells of the murine embryo. We observed expression of Hif1α in pre-implantation embryos, specifically the 2-cell stage, morula, and blastocyst. Robust Hif1α expression was also observed in male and female primordial germ cells. We subsequently assessed whether Hif1α was expressed in adult male and female germ cells. In the testis, Hif1α was robustly expressed in spermatogonial cells, in both juvenile (6-week old) and adult (3-month old) males. In the ovaries, Hif1α was expressed in mature oocytes from adult females, as assessed both in situ and in individual oocytes flushed from super-ovulated females. Analysis of Hif1α transcript levels indicates a mechanism of regulation during early development that involves stockpiling of Hif1α protein in mature oocytes, presumably to provide protection from hypoxic stress until the gene is re-activated at the blastocyst stage. Together, these observations show that Hif1α is expressed throughout the life-cycle, including both the male and female germ line, and point to an important role for Hif1α in early progenitor cells. PMID:27148974

  6. [Adult twins].

    PubMed

    Charlemaine, Christiane

    2006-12-31

    This paper explores the deep roots of closeness that twins share in their youngest age and their effect on their destiny at the adult age. Psychologists believe the bond between twins begins in utero and develops throughout the twins' lives. The four patterns of twinship described show that the twin bond is determined by the quality of parenting that twins receive in their infancy and early childhood. Common problems of adult twins bring about difficulties to adapt in a non-twin world. The nature versus nurture controversy has taken on new life focusing on inter-twin differences and the importance of parent-child interaction as fundamental to the growth and development of personality. PMID:17352324

  7. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  8. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  9. Proteomic analysis of murine testes lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiyi; Wei, Suning; Li, Linghai; Su, Xueying; Du, Congkuo; Li, Fengjuan; Geng, Bin; Liu, Pingsheng; Xu, Guoheng

    2015-01-01

    Testicular Leydig cells contain abundant cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) as a cholesteryl-ester store for releasing cholesterols as the precursor substrate for testosterone biosynthesis. Here, we identified the protein composition of testicular LDs purified from adult mice by using mass spectrometry and immunodetection. Among 337 proteins identified, 144 were previously detected in LD proteomes; 44 were confirmed by microscopy. Testicular LDs contained multiple Rab GTPases, chaperones, and proteins involved in glucuronidation, ubiquination and transport, many known to modulate LD formation and LD-related cellular functions. In particular, testicular LDs contained many members of both the perilipin family and classical lipase/esterase superfamily assembled predominately in adipocyte LDs. Thus, testicular LDs might be regulated similar to adipocyte LDs. Remarkably, testicular LDs contained a large number of classical enzymes for biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol and hormonal steroids, so steroidogenic reactions might occur on testicular LDs or the steroidogenic enzymes and products could be transferred through testicular LDs. These characteristics differ from the LDs in most other types of cells, so testicular LDs could be an active organelle functionally involved in steroidogenesis. PMID:26159641

  10. Soluble factor(s) produced by adult bone marrow stroma inhibit in vitro proliferation and differentiation of fetal liver BFU-E by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Roy, V; Verfaillie, C M

    1997-01-01

    Hematopoiesis occurs in different organs during fetal development. Several studies suggest that the growth of hematopoietic progenitors at one stage of ontogenic maturation may not be supported by a microenvironment from a different ontogenic stage. To determine if human fetal liver (FL) clonogenic progenitors can develop in an adult bone marrow (ABM) microenvironment, we compared growth of BFU-E and CFU-GM from 7-14-wk-old FL, 11-20-wk-old fetal bone marrow (FBM), umbilical cord blood (UCB), or ABM in clonogenic medium with or without ABM stroma. In contrast to BFU-E from FBM, UCB, or ABM, soluble factor(s) produced by ABM stroma severely suppressed growth of 98% of FL BFU-E by inducing apoptosis of cells beyond early erythroblast stage. The nature of the soluble factor remains unknown, although we have evidence that it is heat labile with molecular mass < 10 kD. Antibody neutralization studies indicate that TGF-beta1, IL-1, TNF-alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, or IFN-gamma are not responsible. The observation that FL progenitors may not be capable of differentiating when transferred to an ABM microenvironment may have important implications for FL transplantation into postnatal recipients. Further, this demonstrates that ontogenic stage-specific interactions between hematopoietic progenitors and their microenvironment are important for the normal development of hematopoiesis. PMID:9259591

  11. AML1 deletion in adult mice causes splenomegaly and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Putz, G; Rosner, A; Nuesslein, I; Schmitz, N; Buchholz, F

    2006-02-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) encodes a DNA-binding subunit of the CBF transcription factor family and is required for the establishment of definitive hematopoiesis. AML1 is one of the most frequently mutated genes associated with human acute leukemia, suggesting that genetic alterations of the gene contribute to leukemogenesis. Here, we report the analysis of mice carrying conditional AML1 knockout alleles that were inactivated using the Cre/loxP system. AML1 was deleted in adult mice by inducing Cre activity to replicate AML1 deletions found in human MDS, familial platelet disorder and rare de novo human AML. At a latency of 2 months after induction, the thymus was reduced in size and frequently populated by immature double negative thymocytes, indicating defective T-lymphocyte maturation, resulting in lymphatic diseases with 50% penetrance, including atypical hyperplasia and thymic lymphoma. Metastatic lymphomas to the liver and the meninges were observed. Mice also developed splenomegaly with an expansion of the myeloid compartment. Increased Howell-Jolly body counts indicated splenic hypofunction. Thrombocytopenia occurred due to immaturity of mini-megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. Together with mild lymphocytopenia in the peripheral blood and increased fractions of immature cells in the bone marrow, AML1 deficient mice display features of a myelodysplastic syndrome, suggesting a preleukemic state.

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  13. Genomic organization of the murine CTL lipase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.H.; Boyer, S.N.; Grusby, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    Murine cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) lipase was originally identified as an IL-4-inducible gene in CD8-positive T cells. To further our understanding of both the function and the regulation of CTL lipase in T cells, we have cloned and characterized the murine gene. Two overlapping phage clones spanning 29 kb contain the entire CTL lipase gene. The exon structure in similar to those characterized for the human and canine pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 genes, with notable differences in the 5{prime} end. Transcripts initiate from a site that matches a consensus for an initiator sequence. Potential cis-regulatory elements in the CTL lipase 5{prime} regulatory region that would confer dual tissue specificity in exocrine pancreas and cytotoxic T lymphocytes are identified. The implications of this promoter organization are discussed. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the murine cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Akki, Ashwin; Gupta, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful and reliable tool to noninvasively study the cardiovascular system in clinical practice. Because transgenic mouse models have assumed a critical role in cardiovascular research, technological advances in MRI have been extended to mice over the last decade. These have provided critical insights into cardiac and vascular morphology, function, and physiology/pathophysiology in many murine models of heart disease. Furthermore, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has allowed the nondestructive study of myocardial metabolism in both isolated hearts and in intact mice. This article reviews the current techniques and important pathophysiological insights from the application of MRI/MRS technology to murine models of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23292717

  15. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells Within Murine Aorta.

    PubMed

    Gjurich, Breanne N; Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the modulation of atherogenesis at all stages of the disease. However, there are many technical difficulties when studying the immune system within murine aortas. Common techniques such as PCR and immunohistochemistry have answered many questions about the presence of immune cells and mediators of inflammation within the aorta yet many questions remain unanswered due to the limitations of these techniques. On the other hand, cumulatively the flow cytometry approach has propelled the immunology field forward but it has been challenging to apply this technique to aortic tissues. Here, we describe the methodology to isolate and characterize the immune cells within the murine aorta and provide examples of functional assays for aortic leukocytes using flow cytometry. The method involves the harvesting and enzymatic digestion of the aorta, extracellular and intracellular protein staining, and a subsequent flow cytometric analysis. PMID:26445788

  16. Increased photosensitivity to near-ultraviolet light in murine SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, D.T.; Borel, Y.

    1984-02-01

    The authors investigated whether there is increased susceptibility to near-UVL in murine SLE. Cultured spleen cells from either strain of mice with lupus disease or conventional strains of mice were exposed to different UVL fractions in vitro. The effect of DNA synthesis, release, and repair was examined. DNA synthesis and release was measured as percent of (/sup 3/H)thymidine (dT) uptake into either total acid-precipitable radioactive material of cell sediment plus supernatant, or that of the medium alone, whereas hydroxyurea-resistant dT incorporation represented DNA repair. The data indicate that all SLE strains, in contrast to all non-SLE strains, show increased DNA synthesis and release after UV-A exposure. In addition, all murine SLE strains demonstrate increased susceptibility to induction of DNA damage by UV-A. The significance of these observations in relation to the clinical activity of SLE after sunlight exposure is discussed.

  17. A generalized transducing phage for the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Nicola K.; Toribio, Ana L.; Goulding, David; Foulds, Ian; Thomson, Nicholas; Dougan, Gordon; Salmond, George P. C.

    2008-01-01

    A virulent phage (φCR1) capable of generalized transduction in Citrobacter rodentium was isolated from the environment and characterized. C. rodentium is a natural pathogen of mice, causing transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia. Sequencing of its genome has recently been completed and will soon be fully annotated and published. C. rodentium is an important model organism for infections caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC). φCR1 uses a lipopolysaccharide receptor, has a genome size of approximately 300 kb, and is able to transduce a variety of markers. φCR1 is the first reported transducing phage for C. rodentium and will be a useful tool for functional genomic analysis of this important natural murine pathogen. PMID:17768241

  18. Murine B-1 B Cell Progenitors Initiate B-Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With Features of High Risk Disease1

    PubMed Central

    Montecino-Rodriguez, Encarnacion; Li, Katy; Fice, Michael; Dorshkind, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    B-1 and B-2 B cells derive from distinct progenitors that emerge in overlapping waves of development. The number of murine B-1 progenitors peaks during fetal development while B-2 B cell production predominates in adult bone marrow. Many genetic mutations that underlie B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) occur in the fetus, at which time B-1 progenitor numbers are high. However, whether B-ALL can initiate in B-1 progenitors is unknown. We now report that BCR-ABL transformed murine B-1 progenitors can be B-ALL cells of origin and demonstrate that they initiate disease more rapidly than oncogene expressing B-2 progenitors. We further demonstrate that B-1 progenitors exhibit relative resistance to apoptosis and undergo significant growth following oncogene expression and propose that these properties underlie the accelerated kinetics with which they initiate leukemia. These results provide a developmental perspective on the origin of B-ALL and indicate B cell lineage as a factor influencing disease progression. PMID:24752443

  19. Morphology and growth of murine cell lines on model biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Godek, Marisha L; Duchsherer, Nichole L; McElwee, Quinn; Grainger, David W

    2004-01-01

    All biomaterial implants are assaulted by the host "foreign body" immune response. Understanding the complex, dynamic relationship between cells, biomaterials and milieu is an important first step towards controlling this reaction. Material surface chemistry dictates protein adsorption, and thus subsequent cell interactions. The cell-implant is a microenvironment involving 1) proteins that coat the surface and 2) cells that interact with these proteins. Macrophages and fibroblasts are two cell types that interact with proteins on biomaterials surfaces and play different related, but equally important, roles in biomaterials rejection and implant failure. Growth characteristics of four murine cell lines on model biomaterials surfaces were examined. Murine monocyte-macrophages (RAW 264.7 and J774A.1), murine macrophage (IC-21) and murine fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines were tested to determine whether differences exist in adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, spreading, and fusion (macrophage lineages only) on these surfaces. Differences were observed in the ability of cells to adhere to and subsequently proliferate on polymer surfaces. (Monocyte-) macrophages grew well on all surfaces tested and growth rates were measured on three representative polymer biomaterials surfaces: tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), polystyrene, and Teflon-AF. J774A.1 cultures grown on TCPS and treated with exogenous cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF were observed to contain multinucleate cells with unusual morphologies. Thus, (monocyte-) macrophage cell lines were found to effectively attach to and interrogate each surface presented, with evidence of extensive spreading on Teflon-AF surfaces, particularly in the IC-21 cultures. The J774A.1 line was able to proliferate and/or differentiate to more specialized cell types (multinucleate/dendritic-like cells) in the presence of soluble chemokine cues. PMID:15133927

  20. Osteopontin Is Upregulated in Human and Murine Acute Schistosomiasis Mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Thiago Almeida; Syn, Wing-Kin; Amâncio, Frederico Figueiredo; Cunha, Pedro Henrique Diniz; Caporali, Julia Fonseca Morais; Trindade, Guilherme Vaz de Melo; Santos, Elisângela Trindade; Souza, Márcia Maria; Andrade, Zilton Araújo; Witek, Rafal P; Secor, William Evan; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Background Symptomatic acute schistosomiasis mansoni is a systemic hypersensitivity reaction against the migrating schistosomula and mature eggs after a primary infection. The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of acute schistosomiasis are not fully elucidated. Osteopontin has been implicated in granulomatous reactions and in acute hepatic injury. Our aims were to evaluate if osteopontin plays a role in acute Schistosoma mansoni infection in both human and experimentally infected mice and if circulating OPN levels could be a novel biomarker of this infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Serum/plasma osteopontin levels were measured by ELISA in patients with acute (n = 28), hepatointestinal (n = 26), hepatosplenic (n = 39) schistosomiasis and in uninfected controls (n = 21). Liver osteopontin was assessed by immunohistochemistry in needle biopsies of 5 patients. Sera and hepatic osteopontin were quantified in the murine model of schistosomiasis mansoni during acute (7 and 8 weeks post infection, n = 10) and chronic (30 weeks post infection, n = 8) phase. Circulating osteopontin levels are increased in patients with acute schistosomiasis (p = 0.0001). The highest levels of OPN were observed during the peak of clinical symptoms (7–11 weeks post infection), returning to baseline level once the granulomas were modulated (>12 weeks post infection). The plasma levels in acute schistosomiasis were even higher than in hepatosplenic patients. The murine model mirrored the human disease. Macrophages were the major source of OPN in human and murine acute schistosomiasis, while the ductular reaction maintains OPN production in hepatosplenic disease. Soluble egg antigens from S. mansoni induced OPN expression in primary human kupffer cells. Conclusions/Significance S. mansoni egg antigens induce the production of OPN by macrophages in the necrotic-exudative granulomas characteristic of acute schistosomiasis mansoni. Circulating OPN levels are upregulated in human and

  1. Antitumor and antimetastatic activity of interleukin 12 against murine tumors

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that in vivo administration of murine interleukin 12 (IL-12) to mice results in augmentation of cytotoxic natural killer (NK)/lymphocyte-activated killer cell activity, enhancement of cytolytic T cell generation, and induction of interferon gamma secretion. In this study, the in vivo activity of murine IL-12 against a number of murine tumors has been evaluated. Experimental pulmonary metastases or subcutaneous growth of the B16F10 melanoma were markedly reduced in mice treated intraperitoneally with IL-12, resulting in an increase in survival time. The therapeutic effectiveness of IL-12 was dose dependent and treatment of subcutaneous tumors could be initiated up to 14 d after injection of tumor cells. Likewise, established experimental hepatic metastases and established subcutaneous M5076 reticulum cell sarcoma and Renca renal cell adenocarcinoma tumors were effectively treated by IL-12 at doses which resulted in no gross toxicity. Local peritumoral injection of IL-12 into established subcutaneous Renca tumors resulted in regression and complete disappearance of these tumors. IL-12 was as effective in NK cell-deficient beige mice or in mice depleted of NK cell activity by treatment with antiasialo GM1, suggesting that NK cells are not the primary cell type mediating the antitumor effects of this cytokine. However, the efficacy of IL-12 was greatly reduced in nude mice suggesting the involvement of T cells. Furthermore, depletion of CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells significantly reduced the efficacy of IL-12. These results demonstrate that IL-12 has potent in vivo antitumor and antimetastatic effects against murine tumors and demonstrate as well the critical role of CD8+ T cells in mediating the antitumor effects against subcutaneous tumors. PMID:8104230

  2. Murine immunization by cesium-137 irradiation attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M. Jr.; Minard, P.; Cruess, D.F.

    1984-06-01

    Cesium-137, becoming a more readily available ionizing gamma radiation source for laboratory use, was shown to effectively attenuate Schistosoma mansoni cercariae for vaccine production. In parallel comparison studies with the murine model, cesium-137 attenuated cercariae consistently afforded better protection than did the cobalt-60 prepared vaccine. Dose-response data indicated that the optimal total irradiation with cesium-137 was between 45 and 50 Krad.

  3. Comprehensive Echocardiographic Assessment of the Right Ventricle in Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nishi; Singh, Harpreet

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-invasive high-resolution echocardiography to evaluate cardiovascular function of small animals is increasingly being used due to availability of genetically engineered murine models. Even though guidelines and standard values for humans were revised by the American Society of Echocardiography, evaluations on murine models are not performed according to any standard protocols. These limitations are preventing translation of preclinical evaluations to clinical meaningful conclusions. We have assessed the right heart of two commonly used murine models according to standard clinical guidelines, and provided the practical guide and sample values for cardiac assessments. Methods Right heart echocardiography evaluations of CD1 and C57BL/6 mice were performed under 1–3% isoflurane anesthesia using Vevo® 2100 Imaging System with a high-frequency (18–38 MHz) probe (VisualSonics MS400). We have provided a practical guide on how to image and assess the right heart of a mouse which is frequently used to evaluate development of right heart failure due to pulmonary hypertension. Results Our results show significant differences between CD1 and C57BL/6 mice. Right ventricle structural assessment showed significantly larger (p < 0.05) size, and pulmonary artery diameter in CD1 mice (n = 11) compared to C57BL/6 mice (n = 15). Right heart systolic and diastolic functions were similar for both strains. Conclusion Our practical guide on how to image and assess the right heart of murine models provides the first comprehensive values which can be used for preclinical research studies using echocardiography. Additionally, our results indicate that there is a high variability between mouse species and experimental models should be carefully selected for cardiac evaluations. PMID:27721954

  4. Teaching Adults. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Alan

    The question of how adult educators can make their teaching of adults more effective is explored in the context of recent work on adult lifelong learning. The following are among the topics discussed: (1) modes of adult education and the shift in focus from adult education to lifelong learning; (2) the contract between adult student and adult…

  5. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD. PMID:26811642

  6. Structure and regulation of the murine gamma-casein gene.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Andreas F

    2002-12-12

    The murine casein locus consists of five genes, which are coordinately regulated during mammary development. The levels of casein-specific mRNAs in mammary epithelial cells increase during the second half of pregnancy and remain high during lactation. The murine gamma-casein gene, which corresponds to the alphaS2-casein gene in ruminants, was isolated from a mouse bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library (strain 129SV). The gene contains 14 exons, which are distributed over 14 kb of DNA sequence. The expression pattern of the murine gamma-casein gene mimics that of the neighbouring beta-casein gene in terms of developmental induction in vivo. In cell culture, both the beta- and gamma-casein promoter are synergistically induced by prolactin and glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoid induction is critically dependent on prolactin-mediated activation of STAT5 in both promoters. Several consensus STAT5 binding sites were identified in the gamma-casein promoter, some of which may have an additive effect on prolactin induction. mRNA levels of gamma- and beta-casein are similar in lactating mammary tissue. However, promoter segments derived from the gamma-casein gene are significantly less active in cell culture than comparable fragments of the beta-casein promoter. Promoter hybrids between the gamma- and beta-casein promoters revealed that the critical sequences which are responsible for the different in vitro activity are located in a short promoter proximal region.

  7. Activation of murine macrophages and lymphocytes by Ureaplasma diversum.

    PubMed Central

    Chelmonska-Soyta, A; Miller, R B; Ruhnke, L; Rosendal, S

    1994-01-01

    Ureaplasma diversum is a pathogen in the bovine reproductive tract. The objective of the research was to study interactions with macrophages and lymphocytes which might elucidate aspects of pathogenetic mechanisms of this organism. We studied the activation of murine macrophages of C3H/HeN (LPS-responder) and C3H/HeJ (LPS-low-responder) genotype for TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1 and nitric oxide production and blastogenic response of C3H/HeJ splenocytes after Ureaplasma diversum stimulation. Live and heat-killed U. diversum induced TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 in peritoneal macrophage cultures of both C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice in a dose dependent manner. Interferon-gamma modulated the cytokine production, by increasing the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and nitric oxide, but IL-1 secretion was only enhanced in C3H/HeJ macrophages stimulated by live ureaplasmas. Supernatant of U. diversum sonicate was mitogenic for murine spleen lymphocytes. The blastogenic response was dose dependent, and stimulation with both U. diversum and Concanavalin A seemed to have an additive effect. These results suggest that U. diversum, similar to other mycoplasmas, activates murine macrophages and lymphoid cells. The studies should be repeated with bovine cells in order to elucidate pathogenetic aspects of inflammation in cattle caused by U. diversum. PMID:7889459

  8. Cloning and characterization of a murine SIL gene

    SciTech Connect

    Collazo-Garcia, N.; Scherer, P.; Aplan, P.D.

    1995-12-10

    The human SIL gene is disrupted by a site-specific interstitial deletion in 25% of children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since transcriptionally active genes are prone to recombination events, the recurrent nature of this lesion suggests that the SIL gene product is transcriptionally active in the cell type that undergoes this interstitial deletion and that the SIL gene product may play a role in normal lymphoid development. To facilitate studies of SIL gene function, we have cloned and characterized a murine SIL gene. The predicted murine SIL protein is 75% identical to the human gene, with good homology throughout the open reading frame. An in vitro translated SIL cDNA generated a protein slightly larger than the predicted 139-kDa protein. Although a prior report detected SIL mRNA expression exclusively in hematopoietic tissues, a sensitive RT-PCR assay demonstrated SIL expression to be ubiquitous, detectable in all tissues examined. Since the RT-PCR assay suggested that SIL mRNA expression was higher in rapidly proliferating tissues, we assayed SIL mRNA expression using a murine erythroleukemia model of terminal differentiation and found it to be dramatically decreased in conjunction with terminal differentiation. These studies demonstrate that the human SIL gene product is quite well conserved in rodents and suggest that the SIL gene product may play a role in cell proliferation. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Characterisation of Cultured Mesothelial Cells Derived from the Murine Adult Omentum

    PubMed Central

    Dauleh, Sumaya; Santeramo, Ilaria; Fielding, Claire; Ward, Kelly; Herrmann, Anne; Murray, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The human omentum has been long regarded as a healing patch, used by surgeons for its ability to immunomodulate, repair and vascularise injured tissues. A major component of the omentum are mesothelial cells, which display some of the characteristics of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells. For instance, lineage tracing studies have shown that mesothelial cells give rise to adipocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, and human and rat mesothelial cells have been shown to differentiate into osteoblast- and adipocyte-like cells in vitro, indicating that they have considerable plasticity. However, so far, long-term cultures of mesothelial cells have not been successfully established due to early senescence. Here, we demonstrate that mesothelial cells isolated from the mouse omentum could be cultured for more than 30 passages. While epithelial markers were downregulated over passages in the mesothelial cells, their mesenchymal profile remained unchanged. Early passage mesothelial cells displayed clonogenicitiy, expressed several stem cell markers, and up to passage 5 and 13, respectively, could differentiate along the adipogenic and osteogenic lineages, demonstrating stem/progenitor characteristics and differentiation potential. PMID:27403660

  10. Critical Role of Jak2 in the Maintenance and Function of Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    AKADA, HAJIME; AKADA, SAEKO; HUTCHISON, ROBERT E.; SAKAMOTO, KAZUHITO; WAGNER, KAY-UWE; MOHI, GOLAM

    2014-01-01

    Jak2, a member of the Janus kinase family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases, is activated in response to a variety of cytokines, and functions in survival and proliferation of cells. An activating JAK2V617F mutation has been found in most patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, and patients treated with Jak2 inhibitors show significant hematopoietic toxicities. However, the role of Jak2 in adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has not been clearly elucidated. Using a conditional Jak2 knockout allele, we have found that Jak2 deletion results in rapid loss of HSCs/progenitors leading to bone marrow failure and early lethality in adult mice. Jak2 deficiency causes marked impairment in HSC function, and the mutant HSCs are severely defective in reconstituting hematopoiesis in recipient animals. Jak2 deficiency also causes significant apoptosis and loss of quiescence in HSC-enriched LSK (Lin−Sca-1+c-kit+) cells. Jak2-deficient LSK cells exhibit elevated reactive oxygen species levels and enhanced p38 MAPK activation. Mutant LSK cells also show defective Stat5, Erk and Akt activation in response to thrombopoietin and stem cell factor. Gene expression analysis reveals significant downregulation of genes related to HSC quiescence and self-renewal in Jak2-deficient LSK cells. These data suggest that Jak2 plays a critical role in the maintenance and function of adult HSCs. PMID:24677703

  11. The transcriptional coactivator Cbp regulates self-renewal and differentiation in adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wai-In; Hannah, Rebecca L; Dawson, Mark A; Pridans, Clare; Foster, Donna; Joshi, Anagha; Göttgens, Berthold; Van Deursen, Jan M; Huntly, Brian J P

    2011-12-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Cbp plays an important role in a wide range of cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although studies have shown its requirement for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development, its role in adult HSC maintenance, as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying Cbp function, is not clear. Here, we demonstrate a gradual loss of phenotypic HSCs and differentiation defects following conditional ablation of Cbp during adult homeostasis. In addition, Cbp-deficient HSCs reconstituted hematopoiesis with lower efficiency than their wild-type counterparts, and this response was readily exhausted under replicative stress. This phenotype relates to an alteration in cellular fate decisions for HSCs, with Cbp loss leading to an increase in differentiation, quiescence, and apoptosis. Genome-wide analyses of Cbp occupancy and differential gene expression upon Cbp deletion identified HSC-specific genes regulated by Cbp, providing a molecular basis for the phenotype. Finally, Cbp binding significantly overlapped at genes combinatorially bound by 7 major hematopoietic transcriptional regulators, linking Cbp to a critical HSC transcriptional regulatory network. Our data demonstrate that Cbp plays a role in adult HSC homeostasis by maintaining the balance between different HSC fate decisions, and our findings identify a putative HSC-specific transcriptional network coordinated by Cbp.

  12. Expression and modulation of IL-1 alpha in murine keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ansel, J.C.; Luger, T.A.; Lowry, D.; Perry, P.; Roop, D.R.; Mountz, J.D.

    1988-04-01

    Murine and human keratinocytes produce an IL-1-like factor that appears to be similar if not identical to monocyte-derived IL-1. IL-1 may be an important mediator in cutaneous inflammatory responses, however, little is currently known concerning factors that may modulate IL-1 expression in keratinocytes. To address this issue we examined the effect of LPS, UV, and the cell differentiation state on murine keratinocyte IL-1 mRNA expression. Our results indicated that as with the murine P388D1 monocyte cell line, PAM 212 keratinocytes constitutively express abundant amounts of IL-1 alpha mRNA. On exposure to LPS (100 micrograms/ml) for 8 h there was more than 10 times the increase in PAM 212 IL-1 alpha mRNA which was accompanied by a sixfold increase in supernatant IL-1 activity. Similarly UV irradiation had a significant effect on keratinocyte IL-1 alpha expression. High dose UV (300 mJ/cm2) inhibited PAM 212 IL-1 alpha expression at 4, 8, 24, 48 h post-UV whereas a lower dose of UV (100 mJ/cm2) inhibited UV at 4 and 8 h post-UV, but induced IL-1 expression at 24 and 48 h post-UV. The expression of IL-1 alpha varied with the differentiation state of the keratinocytes. Freshly removed newborn murine keratinocytes were found to constitutively express IL-1 alpha mRNA. Keratinocytes grown in low (Ca2+) tissue culture media (0.05 mM) for 6 days, functionally and phenotypically become undifferentiated and express increased quantities of IL-1 alpha mRNA, whereas cells grown in high (Ca2+) media (1.2 mM) for 6 days become terminally differentiated and IL-1 expression ceased. Keratinocytes cultured for 3 days in low (Ca2+) conditions expressed an intermediate level of IL-1 alpha. In contrast, little or no IL-1 beta mRNA was detected in either the PAM 212 cells or newborn murine keratinocytes.

  13. Murine Norovirus Transcytosis across an In Vitro Polarized Murine Intestinal Epithelial Monolayer Is Mediated by M-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B.; Liu, Thomas; Blanco, Luz P.; Auble, Heather; Payne, Hilary C.

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the causative agent of the vast majority of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to the inability to culture human NoVs and the inability to orally infect a small animal model, little is known about the initial steps of viral entry. One particular step that is not understood is how NoVs breach the intestinal epithelial barrier. Murine NoV (MNV) is the only NoV that can be propagated in vitro by infecting murine macrophages and dendritic cells, making this virus an attractive model for studies of different aspects of NoV biology. Polarized murine intestinal epithelial mICcl2 cells were used to investigate how MNV interacts with and crosses the intestinal epithelium. In this in vitro model of the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), MNV is transported across the polarized cell monolayer in the absence of viral replication or disruption of tight junctions by a distinct epithelial cell with microfold (M) cell properties. In addition to transporting MNV, these M-like cells also transcytose microbeads and express an IgA receptor. Interestingly, B myeloma cells cultured in the basolateral compartment underlying the epithelial monolayer did not alter the number of M-like cells but increased their transcytotic activity. Our data demonstrate that MNV can cross an intact intestinal epithelial monolayer in vitro by hijacking the M-like cells' intrinsic transcytotic pathway and suggest a potential mechanism for MNV entry into the host. PMID:24049163

  14. Denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody to RANKL, inhibits bone resorption and increases BMD in knock-in mice that express chimeric (murine/human) RANKL.

    PubMed

    Kostenuik, Paul J; Nguyen, Hung Q; McCabe, James; Warmington, Kelly S; Kurahara, Carol; Sun, Ning; Chen, Ching; Li, Luke; Cattley, Russ C; Van, Gwyneth; Scully, Shelia; Elliott, Robin; Grisanti, Mario; Morony, Sean; Tan, Hong Lin; Asuncion, Frank; Li, Xiaodong; Ominsky, Michael S; Stolina, Marina; Dwyer, Denise; Dougall, William C; Hawkins, Nessa; Boyle, William J; Simonet, William S; Sullivan, John K

    2009-02-01

    RANKL is a TNF family member that mediates osteoclast formation, activation, and survival by activating RANK. The proresorptive effects of RANKL are prevented by binding to its soluble inhibitor osteoprotegerin (OPG). Recombinant human OPG-Fc recognizes RANKL from multiple species and reduced bone resorption and increased bone volume, density, and strength in a number of rodent models of bone disease. The clinical development of OPG-Fc was discontinued in favor of denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that specifically inhibits primate RANKL. Direct binding assays showed that denosumab bound to human RANKL but not to murine RANKL, human TRAIL, or other human TNF family members. Denosumab did not suppress bone resorption in normal mice or rats but did prevent the resorptive response in mice challenged with a human RANKL fragment encoded primarily by the fifth exon of the RANKL gene. To create mice that were responsive to denosumab, knock-in technology was used to replace exon 5 from murine RANKL with its human ortholog. The resulting "huRANKL" mice exclusively express chimeric (human/murine) RANKL that was measurable with a human RANKL assay and that maintained bone resorption at slightly reduced levels versus wildtype controls. In young huRANKL mice, denosumab and OPG-Fc each reduced trabecular osteoclast surfaces by 95% and increased bone density and volume. In adult huRANKL mice, denosumab reduced bone resorption, increased cortical and cancellous bone mass, and improved trabecular microarchitecture. These huRANKL mice have potential utility for characterizing the activity of denosumab in a variety of murine bone disease models.

  15. Retrovirus-induced murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: natural history of infection and differing susceptibility of inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Hartley, J W; Fredrickson, T N; Yetter, R A; Makino, M; Morse, H C

    1989-03-01

    C57BL mice (Fv-1b) develop a severe immunodeficiency disease following inoculation as adults with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV), a derivative of Duplan-Laterjet virus which contains B-tropic ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing MuLVs and a putative defective genome which may be the proximal cause of disease. The stages of development of this disease were defined for C57BL mice on the basis of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly; histopathological changes consistent with B-cell activation; and alterations in expression of cell surface antigens affected by proliferation of T cells, B cells, and macrophages. By using this disease profile as a standard, the response of adult mice of various inbred strains and selected F1 hybrids was compared. We show that although the strains which are highly sensitive are of the Fv-1b genotype (i.e., permissive for B-tropic MuLVs), certain Fv-1b strains, e.g., BALB/c and A/J, are resistant to murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, whereas certain Fv-1n strains (permissive for N-tropic MuLVs but restrictive for B-tropic MuLVs), notably P/N, BDP, and AKR, show moderate sensitivity and (C57BL/6 x CBA/N)F1 mice (Fv-1n/b and thus dually restrictive) are of relatively high susceptibility. The results of virus recovery tests suggest that apparently anomalous sensitivity, based on predicted Fv-1 restriction, may reflect MuLV induction and/or mutation to provide a helper virus for which the host is permissive.

  16. Retrovirus-induced murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: natural history of infection and differing susceptibility of inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, J W; Fredrickson, T N; Yetter, R A; Makino, M; Morse, H C

    1989-01-01

    C57BL mice (Fv-1b) develop a severe immunodeficiency disease following inoculation as adults with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV), a derivative of Duplan-Laterjet virus which contains B-tropic ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing MuLVs and a putative defective genome which may be the proximal cause of disease. The stages of development of this disease were defined for C57BL mice on the basis of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly; histopathological changes consistent with B-cell activation; and alterations in expression of cell surface antigens affected by proliferation of T cells, B cells, and macrophages. By using this disease profile as a standard, the response of adult mice of various inbred strains and selected F1 hybrids was compared. We show that although the strains which are highly sensitive are of the Fv-1b genotype (i.e., permissive for B-tropic MuLVs), certain Fv-1b strains, e.g., BALB/c and A/J, are resistant to murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, whereas certain Fv-1n strains (permissive for N-tropic MuLVs but restrictive for B-tropic MuLVs), notably P/N, BDP, and AKR, show moderate sensitivity and (C57BL/6 x CBA/N)F1 mice (Fv-1n/b and thus dually restrictive) are of relatively high susceptibility. The results of virus recovery tests suggest that apparently anomalous sensitivity, based on predicted Fv-1 restriction, may reflect MuLV induction and/or mutation to provide a helper virus for which the host is permissive. Images PMID:2536830

  17. Significance of murine retroviral mutagenesis for identification of disease genes in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Erkeland, Stefan J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Löwenberg, Bob; Touw, Ivo P

    2006-01-15

    Retroviral insertion mutagenesis is considered a powerful tool to identify cancer genes in mice, but its significance for human cancer has remained elusive. Moreover, it has recently been debated whether common virus integrations are always a hallmark of tumor cells and contribute to the oncogenic process. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with a variable response to treatment. Recurrent cytogenetic defects and acquired mutations in regulatory genes are associated with AML subtypes and prognosis. Recently, gene expression profiling (GEP) has been applied to further risk stratify AML. Here, we show that mouse leukemia genes identified by retroviral insertion mutagenesis are more frequently differentially expressed in distinct subclasses of adult and pediatric AML than randomly selected genes or genes located more distantly from a virus integration site. The candidate proto-oncogenes showing discriminative expression in primary AML could be placed in regulatory networks mainly involved in signal transduction and transcriptional control. Our data support the validity of retroviral insertion mutagenesis in mice for human disease and indicate that combining these murine screens for potential proto-oncogenes with GEP in human AML may help to identify critical disease genes and novel pathogenetic networks in leukemia.

  18. Pleural cavity type 2 innate lymphoid cells precede Th2 expansion in murine Litomosoides sigmodontis infection.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Alexis; Killoran, Kristin; Mitre, Edward; Nutman, Thomas B

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a family of innate cells has been identified that respond to IL-25 and IL-33 in murine intestinal helminths. Termed Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) they facilitate the development of Th2 responses responsible for helminth clearance. We evaluated these cells in a tissue-invasive helminth model. Using Litomosides sigmodontis (a strong Th2 polarizing filarial infection) we observed a robust Th2 response in the pleural cavity, where adult worms reside, marked by increased levels of IL-5 and IL-13 in infected mice. In parallel, ILC2s were expanded in the pleural cavity early in the infection, peaking during the pre-patent period. L. sigmodontis also elicits a strong systemic Th2 response, which includes significantly increased levels of IgG1, IgE and IL-5 in the plasma of infected mice. Although ILC2s were expanded locally, they were not expanded in the spleen, blood, or mediastinal lymph nodes in response to L. sigmodontis infection, suggesting that ILC2s function primarily at the site of infection. The increase in ILC2s in the pleural cavity and the expansion in Th2 responses indicates a probable role for these cells in initiating and maintaining the Th2 response and highlights the importance of these cells in helminth infections and their role in Th2 immunity.

  19. Inhibition of KDM6 activity during murine ESC differentiation induces DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Christine; Kampka, Justyna M; Huppertz, Sascha; Weber, Heike; Schlosser, Andreas; Müller, Albrecht M; Becker, Matthias

    2016-02-15

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterised by their capacity to self-renew indefinitely while maintaining the potential to differentiate into all cell types of an adult organism. Both the undifferentiated and differentiated states are defined by specific gene expression programs that are regulated at the chromatin level. Here, we have analysed the contribution of the H3K27me2- and H3K27me23-specific demethylases KDM6A and KDM6B to murine ESC differentiation by employing the GSK-J4 inhibitor, which is specific for KDM6 proteins, and by targeted gene knockout (KO) and knockdown. We observe that inhibition of the H3K27 demethylase activity induces DNA damage along with activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and cell death in differentiating but not in undifferentiated ESCs. Laser microirradiation experiments revealed that the H3K27me3 mark, but not the KDM6B protein, colocalise with γH2AX-positive sites of DNA damage in differentiating ESCs. Lack of H3K27me3 attenuates the GSK-J4-induced DDR in differentiating Eed-KO ESCs. Collectively, our findings indicate that differentiating ESCs depend on KDM6 and that the H3K27me3 demethylase activity is crucially involved in DDR and survival of differentiating ESCs. PMID:26759175

  20. Inhibition of KDM6 activity during murine ESC differentiation induces DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Christine; Kampka, Justyna M; Huppertz, Sascha; Weber, Heike; Schlosser, Andreas; Müller, Albrecht M; Becker, Matthias

    2016-02-15

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterised by their capacity to self-renew indefinitely while maintaining the potential to differentiate into all cell types of an adult organism. Both the undifferentiated and differentiated states are defined by specific gene expression programs that are regulated at the chromatin level. Here, we have analysed the contribution of the H3K27me2- and H3K27me23-specific demethylases KDM6A and KDM6B to murine ESC differentiation by employing the GSK-J4 inhibitor, which is specific for KDM6 proteins, and by targeted gene knockout (KO) and knockdown. We observe that inhibition of the H3K27 demethylase activity induces DNA damage along with activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and cell death in differentiating but not in undifferentiated ESCs. Laser microirradiation experiments revealed that the H3K27me3 mark, but not the KDM6B protein, colocalise with γH2AX-positive sites of DNA damage in differentiating ESCs. Lack of H3K27me3 attenuates the GSK-J4-induced DDR in differentiating Eed-KO ESCs. Collectively, our findings indicate that differentiating ESCs depend on KDM6 and that the H3K27me3 demethylase activity is crucially involved in DDR and survival of differentiating ESCs.

  1. The Murine Lung Microbiome Changes During Lung Inflammation and Intranasal Vancomycin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Barfod, Kenneth Klingenberg; Vrankx, Katleen; Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Hansen, Jitka Stilund; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Larsen, Søren Thor; Ouwenhand, Arthur C; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    Most microbiome research related to airway diseases has focused on the gut microbiome. This is despite advances in culture independent microbial identification techniques revealing that even healthy lungs possess a unique dynamic microbiome. This conceptual change raises the question; if lung diseases could be causally linked to local dysbiosis of the local lung microbiota. Here, we manipulate the murine lung and gut microbiome, in order to show that the lung microbiota can be changed experimentally. We have used four different approaches: lung inflammation by exposure to carbon nano-tube particles, oral probiotics and oral or intranasal exposure to the antibiotic vancomycin. Bacterial DNA was extracted from broncho-alveolar and nasal lavage fluids, caecum samples and compared by DGGE. Our results show that: the lung microbiota is sex dependent and not just a reflection of the gut microbiota, and that induced inflammation can change lung microbiota. This change is not transferred to offspring. Oral probiotics in adult mice do not change lung microbiome detectible by DGGE. Nasal vancomycin can change the lung microbiome preferentially, while oral exposure does not. These observations should be considered in future studies of the causal relationship between lung microbiota and lung diseases. PMID:26668669

  2. The Murine Lung Microbiome Changes During Lung Inflammation and Intranasal Vancomycin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Barfod, Kenneth Klingenberg; Vrankx, Katleen; Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Hansen, Jitka Stilund; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Larsen, Søren Thor; Ouwenhand, Arthur C.; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    Most microbiome research related to airway diseases has focused on the gut microbiome. This is despite advances in culture independent microbial identification techniques revealing that even healthy lungs possess a unique dynamic microbiome. This conceptual change raises the question; if lung diseases could be causally linked to local dysbiosis of the local lung microbiota. Here, we manipulate the murine lung and gut microbiome, in order to show that the lung microbiota can be changed experimentally. We have used four different approaches: lung inflammation by exposure to carbon nano-tube particles, oral probiotics and oral or intranasal exposure to the antibiotic vancomycin. Bacterial DNA was extracted from broncho-alveolar and nasal lavage fluids, caecum samples and compared by DGGE. Our results show that: the lung microbiota is sex dependent and not just a reflection of the gut microbiota, and that induced inflammation can change lung microbiota. This change is not transferred to offspring. Oral probiotics in adult mice do not change lung microbiome detectible by DGGE. Nasal vancomycin can change the lung microbiome preferentially, while oral exposure does not. These observations should be considered in future studies of the causal relationship between lung microbiota and lung diseases. PMID:26668669

  3. Pleural cavity type 2 innate lymphoid cells precede Th2 expansion in murine Litomosoides sigmodontis infection.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Alexis; Killoran, Kristin; Mitre, Edward; Nutman, Thomas B

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a family of innate cells has been identified that respond to IL-25 and IL-33 in murine intestinal helminths. Termed Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) they facilitate the development of Th2 responses responsible for helminth clearance. We evaluated these cells in a tissue-invasive helminth model. Using Litomosides sigmodontis (a strong Th2 polarizing filarial infection) we observed a robust Th2 response in the pleural cavity, where adult worms reside, marked by increased levels of IL-5 and IL-13 in infected mice. In parallel, ILC2s were expanded in the pleural cavity early in the infection, peaking during the pre-patent period. L. sigmodontis also elicits a strong systemic Th2 response, which includes significantly increased levels of IgG1, IgE and IL-5 in the plasma of infected mice. Although ILC2s were expanded locally, they were not expanded in the spleen, blood, or mediastinal lymph nodes in response to L. sigmodontis infection, suggesting that ILC2s function primarily at the site of infection. The increase in ILC2s in the pleural cavity and the expansion in Th2 responses indicates a probable role for these cells in initiating and maintaining the Th2 response and highlights the importance of these cells in helminth infections and their role in Th2 immunity. PMID:26394284

  4. Leptin enhances endothelial cell differentiation and angiogenesis in murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kurtovic, Silvia; Ng, Tina T; Gupta, Ankur; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja; Chaiboonma, Kira L; Aminzadeh, Mohammad Amin; Makkar, Raj; Dafoe, Donald C; Talavera-Adame, Dodanim

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic regulation of leptin and its angiogenic effects have been well characterized in adult mammals. However, the role of leptin in the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to endothelial cells (ECs) has not been characterized. We hypothesized that leptin enhances the generation of ECs derived from ESCs and, in this way, promotes angiogenesis in embryonic vessels. To address this hypothesis, we utilized an in vitro model consisting of murine ESCs-derived embryoid bodies (EBs). Vascular density, EC and angiogenesis markers as well as phosphorylation levels of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (pSTAT3) were investigated in leptin-treated EBs and in untreated EBs as controls. ESC-derived ECs were isolated by magnetic sorting based on the expression of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1/CD31). Significant upregulation of EC and angiogenic markers as well as higher vessel density were found in leptin-treated EBs compared to controls. CD31 positive enriched cells derived from leptin-treated EBs had improved proliferation and survival rate and showed higher levels of pSTAT3. These results suggested that leptin promotes EC differentiation and angiogenesis in mouse EBs and that janus tyrosine kinase (JAK)/STAT pathway can play a role in this biological process. Leptin-mediated EC differentiation and angiogenesis in ESCs can be a useful application towards regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. PMID:25250519

  5. Development of a murine ocular posterior segment explant culture for the study of intravitreous vector delivery

    PubMed Central

    Denk, Nora; Misra, Vikram; Sandmeyer, Lynne S.; Bauer, Bianca B.; Singh, Jaswant; Forsyth, George W.; Grahn, Bruce H.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a murine retinal/choroidal/scleral explant culture system to facilitate the intravitreous delivery of vectors. Posterior segment explants from adult mice of 2 different age groups (4 wk and 15 wk) were cultured in serum-free medium for variable time periods. Tissue viability was assessed by gross morphology, cell survival quantification, activated caspase-3 expression, and immunohistochemistry. To model ocular gene therapy, explants were exposed to varying transducing units of a lentiviral vector expressing the gene for green fluorescent protein for 48 h. Explant retinal cells remained viable for approximately 1 wk, although the ganglion cell layer developed apoptosis between 4 and 7 d. Following vector infusion into the posterior segment cups, viral transduction was noted in multiple retinal layers in both age groups. An age of donor mouse influence was noted and older mice did not transduce as well as younger mice. This explant offers an easily managed posterior segment ocular culture with minimum disturbance of the tissue, and may be useful for investigating methods of enhancing retinal gene therapy under controlled conditions. PMID:25673906

  6. Nitric oxide mediates murine cytomegalovirus-associated pneumonitis in lungs that are free of the virus.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, K; Nakazawa, H; Okada, K; Umezawa, K; Fukuyama, N; Koga, Y

    1997-01-01

    4 wk after intraperitoneal inoculation of 0.2 LD50 (50% lethal dose) of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) in adult BALB/c mice, MCMV remained detectable in the salivary glands, but not in the lungs or other organs. When the T cells of these mice were activated in vivo by a single injection of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, interstitial pneumonitis was induced in the lungs that were free of the virus with an excessive production of the cytokines. In the lungs of such mice persistently infected with MCMV, the mRNA of the cytokines such as IL-2, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma were abundantly expressed 3 h after the anti-CD3 injection, and the elevated levels continued thereafter. A marked expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) was then noted in the lungs, suggesting that such cytokines as TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma may have induced iNOS. Although the increase in NO formation was demonstrated by the significant elevation of the serum levels of nitrite and nitrate, the interstitial pneumonitis was not associated with either increased superoxide formation or peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine nitration. Nevertheless, the administration of an NO antagonist also alleviated the interstitial pneumonitis provoked by anti-CD3 mAb. Based on these findings, it was concluded that MCMV-associated pneumonitis is mediated by a molecule of cytokine-induced NO other than peroxynitrite. PMID:9312183

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive airways disease - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive lung disease - adults - discharge; Chronic bronchitis - adults - discharge; Emphysema - adults - ...

  8. The Murine Bladder Supports a Population of Stromal Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Meredith A.; Kulkulka, Natalie A.; Firmiss, Paula R.; Ross, Michael J.; Flum, Andrew S.; Santos, Grace B. Delos; Bowen, Diana K.; Dettman, Robert W.; Gong, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder fibrosis is an undesired end point of injury of obstruction and often renders the smooth muscle layer noncompliant. In many cases, the long-term effect of bladder fibrosis is renal failure. Despite our understanding of the progression of this disease, little is known about the cellular mechanisms that lead to a remodeled bladder wall. Resident stem (progenitor) cells have been identified in various organs such as the brain, heart and lung. These cells function normally during organ homeostasis, but become dysregulated after organ injury. Here, we aimed to characterize a mesenchymal progenitor cell population as a first step in understanding its role in bladder fibrosis. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), we identified a Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- (PECAM-: CD45-: Ter119-) population in the adult murine bladder. These cells were localized to the stromal layer of the adult bladder and appeared by postnatal day 1. Cultured Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- bladder cells self-renewed, formed colonies and spontaneously differentiated into cells expressing smooth muscle genes. These cells differentiated into other mesenchymal lineages (chondrocytes, adipocytes and osteocytes) upon culture in induction medium. Both acute and partial obstruction of the bladder reduced expression of CD34 and changed localization of Sca-1 to the urothelium. Partial obstruction resulted in upregulation of fibrosis genes within the Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- population. Our data indicate a resident, mesenchymal stem cell population in the bladder that is altered by bladder obstruction. These findings provide new information about the cellular changes in the bladder that may be associated with bladder fibrosis. PMID:26540309

  9. The Murine Bladder Supports a Population of Stromal Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Meredith A; Kulkulka, Natalie A; Firmiss, Paula R; Ross, Michael J; Flum, Andrew S; Santos, Grace B Delos; Bowen, Diana K; Dettman, Robert W; Gong, Edward M

    2015-01-01

    Bladder fibrosis is an undesired end point of injury of obstruction and often renders the smooth muscle layer noncompliant. In many cases, the long-term effect of bladder fibrosis is renal failure. Despite our understanding of the progression of this disease, little is known about the cellular mechanisms that lead to a remodeled bladder wall. Resident stem (progenitor) cells have been identified in various organs such as the brain, heart and lung. These cells function normally during organ homeostasis, but become dysregulated after organ injury. Here, we aimed to characterize a mesenchymal progenitor cell population as a first step in understanding its role in bladder fibrosis. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), we identified a Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- (PECAM-: CD45-: Ter119-) population in the adult murine bladder. These cells were localized to the stromal layer of the adult bladder and appeared by postnatal day 1. Cultured Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- bladder cells self-renewed, formed colonies and spontaneously differentiated into cells expressing smooth muscle genes. These cells differentiated into other mesenchymal lineages (chondrocytes, adipocytes and osteocytes) upon culture in induction medium. Both acute and partial obstruction of the bladder reduced expression of CD34 and changed localization of Sca-1 to the urothelium. Partial obstruction resulted in upregulation of fibrosis genes within the Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- population. Our data indicate a resident, mesenchymal stem cell population in the bladder that is altered by bladder obstruction. These findings provide new information about the cellular changes in the bladder that may be associated with bladder fibrosis. PMID:26540309

  10. Adult flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Toullec, E

    2015-02-01

    Adult flatfoot is defined as a flattening of the medial arch of the foot in weight-bearing and lack of a propulsive gait. The 3 lesion levels are the talonavicular, tibiotarsal and midfoot joints. The subtalar joint is damaged by the consequent rotational defects. Clinical examination determines deformity and reducibility, and assesses any posterior tibialis muscle deficit, the posterior tibialis tendon and spring ligament being frequently subject to degenerative lesions. Radiographic examination in 3 incidences in weight-bearing is essential, to determine the principal level of deformity. Tendon (posterior tibialis tendon) and ligamentous lesions (spring ligament and interosseous ligament) are analyzed on MRI or ultrasound. In fixed deformities, CT explores for arthritic evolution or specific etiologies. 3D CT reconstruction can analyze bone and joint morphology and contribute to the planning of any osteotomy. Medical management associates insoles and physiotherapy. Acute painful flatfoot requires strict cast immobilization. Surgical treatment associates numerous combinations of procedures, currently under assessment for supple flatfoot: for the hindfoot: medial slide calcaneal osteotomy, calcaneal lengthening osteotomy, or arthroereisis; for the midfoot: arthrodesis on one or several rays, or first cuneiform or first metatarsal osteotomy; for the ankle: medial collateral ligament repair with tendon transfer. Fixed deformities require arthrodesis of one or several joint-lines in the hindfoot; for the ankle, total replacement after realignment of the foot, or tibiotalocalcaneal fusion or ankle and hindfoot fusion; and, for the midfoot, cuneonavicular or cuneometatarsal fusion. Tendinous procedures are often associated. Specific etiologies may need individualized procedures. In conclusion, adult flatfoot tends to be diagnosed and managed too late, with consequent impact on the ankle, the management of which is complex and poorly codified.

  11. Adult flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Toullec, E

    2015-02-01

    Adult flatfoot is defined as a flattening of the medial arch of the foot in weight-bearing and lack of a propulsive gait. The 3 lesion levels are the talonavicular, tibiotarsal and midfoot joints. The subtalar joint is damaged by the consequent rotational defects. Clinical examination determines deformity and reducibility, and assesses any posterior tibialis muscle deficit, the posterior tibialis tendon and spring ligament being frequently subject to degenerative lesions. Radiographic examination in 3 incidences in weight-bearing is essential, to determine the principal level of deformity. Tendon (posterior tibialis tendon) and ligamentous lesions (spring ligament and interosseous ligament) are analyzed on MRI or ultrasound. In fixed deformities, CT explores for arthritic evolution or specific etiologies. 3D CT reconstruction can analyze bone and joint morphology and contribute to the planning of any osteotomy. Medical management associates insoles and physiotherapy. Acute painful flatfoot requires strict cast immobilization. Surgical treatment associates numerous combinations of procedures, currently under assessment for supple flatfoot: for the hindfoot: medial slide calcaneal osteotomy, calcaneal lengthening osteotomy, or arthroereisis; for the midfoot: arthrodesis on one or several rays, or first cuneiform or first metatarsal osteotomy; for the ankle: medial collateral ligament repair with tendon transfer. Fixed deformities require arthrodesis of one or several joint-lines in the hindfoot; for the ankle, total replacement after realignment of the foot, or tibiotalocalcaneal fusion or ankle and hindfoot fusion; and, for the midfoot, cuneonavicular or cuneometatarsal fusion. Tendinous procedures are often associated. Specific etiologies may need individualized procedures. In conclusion, adult flatfoot tends to be diagnosed and managed too late, with consequent impact on the ankle, the management of which is complex and poorly codified. PMID:25595429

  12. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  13. Role of SDF-1 (CXCL12) in regulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells traffic into the liver during extramedullary hematopoiesis induced by G-CSF, AMD3100 and PHZ.

    PubMed

    Mendt, Mayela; Cardier, Jose E

    2015-12-01

    The stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) plays an essential role in the homing of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) to bone marrow (BM). It is not known whether SDF-1 may also regulate the homing of HSPCs to the liver during extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). Here, we investigated the possible role of SDF-1 in attracting HSPCs to the liver during experimental EMH induced by the hematopoietic mobilizers G-CSF, AMD3100 and phenylhydrazine (PHZ). Mice treated with G-CSF, AMD3100 and PHZ showed a significant increase in the expression of SDF-1 in the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) microenvironments. Liver from mice treated with the hematopoietic mobilizers showed HSPCs located adjacent to the LSEC microenvironments, expressing high levels of SDF-1. An inverse relationship was found between the hepatic SDF-1 levels and those in the BM. In vitro, LSEC monolayers induced the migration of HSPCs, and this effect was significantly reduced by AMD3100. In conclusion, our results provide the first evidence showing that SDF-1 expressed by LSEC can be a major player in the recruitment of HSPCs to the liver during EMH induced by hematopoietic mobilizers.

  14. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Shannan L; Tesh, Robert B; Azar, Sasha R; Muruato, Antonio E; Hanley, Kathryn A; Auguste, Albert J; Langsjoen, Rose M; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2016-06-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼10(7) plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines.

  15. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Tesh, Robert B.; Azar, Sasha R.; Muruato, Antonio E.; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Auguste, Albert J.; Langsjoen, Rose M.; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain–Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼107 plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  16. Methylated MicroRNA Genes of the Developing Murine Palate

    PubMed Central

    Seelan, Ratnam S.; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Warner, Dennis R.; Appana, Savitri N.; Brock, Guy N.; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the etiology of cleft palate (CP). Environmental factors can also affect gene expression via alterations in DNA methylation suggesting a possible mechanism for the induction of CP. Identification of genes methylated during development of the secondary palate provides the basis for examination of the means by which environmental factors may adversely influence palatal ontogeny. We previously characterized the methylome of the developing murine secondary palate focusing primarily on protein-encoding genes. We now extend this study to include methylated microRNA (miRNA) genes. A total of 42 miRNA genes were found to be stably methylated in developing murine palatal tissue. Twenty eight of these were localized within host genes. Gene methylation was confirmed by pyrosequencing of selected miRNA genes. Integration of methylated miRNA gene and expression datasets identified 62 miRNAs, 69% of which were non-expressed. For a majority of genes (83%), upstream CpG islands (CGIs) were highly methylated suggesting down-regulation of CGI-associated promoters. DAVID and IPA analyses indicated that both expressed and non-expressed miRNAs target identical signaling pathways and biological processes associated with palatogenesis. Furthermore, these analyses also identified novel signaling pathways whose roles in palatogenesis remain to be elucidated. In summary, we identify methylated miRNA genes in the developing murine secondary palate, correlate miRNA gene methylation with expression of their cognate miRNA transcripts, and identify pathways and biological processes potentially mediated by these miRNAs. PMID:25642850

  17. Production of antibodies which recognize opiate receptors on murine leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.J.J.; Bost, K.L.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    An antibody has been developed which recognizes opiate receptors on cells of the immune system. This antibody blocks specific binding of the radiolabeled opiate receptor ligand, /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine, to receptors on murine splenocytes. Additionally, the anti-receptor antibody competes with ..beta..-endorphin, meta-enkephalin, and naloxone for the same binding site on the leukocytes. Moreover, the anti-receptor antibody possesses agonist activity similar to ..beta..-endorphin in suppressing cAMP production by lymphocytes. These results suggest the development of an antibody which recognizes classical opiate receptors on cells of the immune system.

  18. Gene Regulation and Quality Control in Murine Polyomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Gordon G.

    2016-01-01

    Murine polyomavirus (MPyV) infects mouse cells and is highly oncogenic in immunocompromised hosts and in other rodents. Its genome is a small, circular DNA molecule of just over 5000 base pairs and it encodes only seven polypeptides. While seemingly simply organized, this virus has adopted an unusual genome structure and some unusual uses of cellular quality control pathways that, together, allow an amazingly complex and varied pattern of gene regulation. In this review we discuss how MPyV leverages these various pathways to control its life cycle. PMID:27763514

  19. Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

    1987-01-01

    Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.

  20. Sexual transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in murine model.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marcelle; Nitz, Nadjar; Santana, Camilla; Moraes, Aline; Hagström, Luciana; Andrade, Rafael; Rios, Adriano; Sousa, Alessandro; Dallago, Bruno; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Hecht, Mariana

    2016-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is mainly transmitted by blood-sucking triatomines, but other routes also have epidemiological importance, such as blood transfusion and congenital transmission. Although the possibility of sexual transmission of T. cruzi has been suggested since its discovery, few studies have been published on this subject. We investigated acquisition of T. cruzi by sexual intercourse in an experimental murine model. Male and female mice in the chronic phase of Chagas disease were mated with naive partners. Parasitological, serological and molecular tests demonstrated the parasites in tissues and blood of partners. These results confirm the sexual transmission of T. cruzi in mice.

  1. In Vivo Targeting of Adult Neural Stem Cells in the Dentate Gyrus by a Split-Cre Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beckervordersandforth, Ruth; Deshpande, Aditi; Schäffner, Iris; Huttner, Hagen B.; Lepier, Alexandra; Lie, Dieter Chichung; Götz, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe the labeling of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in the mouse and human dentate gyrus (DG) by the combinatorial expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Prominin1, as revealed by immunohistochemistry. Split-Cre-based genetic fate mapping of these double-positive cells in the adult murine DG reveals their NSC identity, as they are self-renewing and contribute to neurogenesis over several months. Their progeny reacts to stimuli such as voluntary exercise with increased neurogenesis. Prominin1+/GFAP+ cells also exist in the adult human DG, the only region in the human brain for which adult neurogenesis has been consistently reported. Our data, together with previous evidence of such double-positive NSCs in the developing murine brain and in neurogenic regions of vertebrates with widespread neurogenesis, suggest that Prominin1- and GFAP-expressing cells are NSCs in a wide range of species in development and adulthood. PMID:24527389

  2. Calcium-activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 promote murine uterine smooth muscle contractility

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kyra; Vink, Joy Y; Fu, Xiao Wen; Wakita, Hiromi; Danielsson, Jennifer; Wapner, Ronald; Gallos, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the presence of calcium activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 in human and murine uterine smooth muscle and evaluate the physiologic role for these ion channels in murine myometrial contractility. Study Design We performed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine if anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine uterine tissue to validate the study of this protein in mouse models. Immunohistochemical staining of anoctamin 1 and 2 was then performed to determine protein expression in murine myometrial tissue. The function of anoctamin 1 and 2 in murine uterine tissue was evaluated using electrophysiological studies, organ bath, and calcium flux experiments. Results Anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine USM cells. Functional studies show that selective antagonism of these channels promotes relaxation of spontaneous murine uterine smooth muscle contractions. Blockade of anoctamin 1 and 2 inhibits both agonist-induced and spontaneous transient inward currents and abolishes G-protein coupled receptor (oxytocin) mediated elevations in intracellular calcium. Conclusion The calcium activated chloride channels ANO 1 and 2 are present in human and murine myometrial tissue and may provide novel potential therapeutic targets to achieve effective tocolysis. PMID:24928056

  3. Retinal Inhibition of CCR3 Induces Retinal Cell Death in a Murine Model of Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Gambhir, Deeksha; Becker, Silke; Kunz, Eric; Liu, Angelina Jingtong; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of chemokine C-C motif receptor 3 (CCR3) signaling has been considered as treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, CCR3 is expressed in neural retina from aged human donor eyes. Therefore, broad CCR3 inhibition may be harmful to the retina. We assessed the effects of CCR3 inhibition on retina and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) that develop into choroidal neovascularization (CNV). In adult murine eyes, CCR3 colocalized with glutamine-synthetase labeled Műller cells. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, CCR3 immunolocalized not only to lectin-stained cells in CNV lesions but also to the retina. Compared to non-lasered controls, CCR3 mRNA was significantly increased in laser-treated retina. An intravitreal injection of a CCR3 inhibitor (CCR3i) significantly reduced CNV compared to DMSO or PBS controls. Both CCR3i and a neutralizing antibody to CCR3 increased TUNEL+ retinal cells overlying CNV, compared to controls. There was no difference in cleaved caspase-3 in laser-induced CNV lesions or in overlying retina between CCR3i- or control-treated eyes. Following CCR3i, apoptotic inducible factor (AIF) was significantly increased and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2 decreased in the retina; there were no differences in retinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In cultured human Műller cells exposed to eotaxin (CCL11) and VEGF, CCR3i significantly increased TUNEL+ cells and AIF but decreased BCL2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor, without affecting caspase-3 activity or VEGF. CCR3i significantly decreased AIF in RPE/choroids and immunostaining of phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (p-VEGFR2) in CNV with a trend toward reduced VEGF. In cultured CECs treated with CCL11 and/or VEGF, CCR3i decreased p-VEGFR2 and increased BCL2 without increasing TUNEL+ cells and AIF. These findings suggest that inhibition of retinal CCR3 causes retinal cell death and that targeted inhibition of CCR3 in CECs may be a safer if CCR3 inhibition

  4. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePlus

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  5. Overexpression of the influenza virus polymerase can titrate out inhibition by the murine Mx1 protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, T; Pavlovic, J; Staeheli, P; Krystal, M

    1992-07-01

    The murine Mx1 protein is an interferon-inducible protein which confers selective resistance to influenza virus infection both in vitro and in vivo. The precise mechanism by which the murine Mx1 specifically inhibits replication of influenza virus is not known. Previously, sensitive replication systems for influenza virus ribonucleoprotein, in which a synthetic influenza virus-like ribonucleoprotein is replicated and transcribed by influenza virus proteins provided in trans, have been developed. With these systems, the antiviral activity of the murine Mx1 protein was examined. It was found that continued expression of influenza polymerase polypeptides via vaccinia virus vectors can titrate out the inhibitory action of the murine Mx1 protein. This titration of inhibitory activity also occurs when the viral PB2 protein alone is overexpressed, suggesting that an antiviral target for the murine Mx1 polypeptide is the viral PB2 protein.

  6. Assessment of murine lung mechanics outcome measures: alignment with those made in asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Julia K. L.; Kraft, Monica; Fisher, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Although asthma is characterized as an inflammatory disease, recent reports highlight the importance of pulmonary physiology outcome measures to the clinical assessment of asthma control and risk of asthma exacerbation. Murine models of allergic inflammatory airway disease have been widely used to gain mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of asthma; however, several aspects of murine models could benefit from improvement. This review focuses on aligning lung mechanics measures made in mice with those made in humans, with an eye toward improving the translational utility of these measures. A brief description of techniques available to measure murine lung mechanics is provided along with a methodological consideration of their utilization. How murine lung mechanics outcome measures relate to pulmonary physiology measures conducted in humans is discussed and we recommend that, like human studies, outcome measures be standardized for murine models of asthma. PMID:23408785

  7. Panic Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  8. Bipolar Disorder Among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  9. Major Depression Among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  10. Measles virus persistence in an immortalized murine macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M B; Buckthal, D J; Picciotto, S; O'Bryan, T A; Goldman, J N

    1995-02-20

    Persistent infection with the Edmonston strain of measles virus (MV) has been established in IC-21 cells, an immortalized murine macrophage cell line. Persistence was established immediately without syncytia formation or cytopathic effects. MV was expressed in the majority of the cells as evidenced by immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, infectious centers assays, and limiting dilution analysis. Hemagglutinin (H) and phosphoprotein expressed in persistently infected IC-21 cells had retarded migration in SDS-PAGE gels when compared to these proteins expressed in Vero cells. H protein differences were also found between freshly infected IC-21 cells and persistently infected IC-21 cells passaged for over 2 years. Six sublines of IC-21 cells, infected at different times, have maintained these characteristics for 2 years of passage. During this time period the intensity of immunofluorescence and the number of infectious virus particles recoverable fluctuated in five of the six cell lines. In one cell line virus expression remained at a consistent high level. The ability to establish a persistent MV infection in murine macrophages allows studies using a cell important in disseminating the infection. It facilitates experiments on immunological aspects of viral immunity by enabling cell mixing experiments with histocompatible cell populations and by making available the wide array of cellular and humoral reagents in the mouse. PMID:7871720

  11. Surgical Modification of the Murine Calvaria Osteolysis Model.

    PubMed

    Al-Quhali, Ali Mohammed; Sun, Yu; Bai, Xizhuang; Jin, Zhe; Yu, Guibo

    2015-01-01

    The murine calvaria model has been adopted for evaluation of osteolysis and inflammation induced by polyethylene (PE) or metal wear debris. However, this model suffers from several complications. The purpose of our study is to introduce a surgical modification with lower complication rates, thus providing more accurate results. Forty C57/BL6 mice were divided into two groups, both receiving polyethylene particles. Surgical modifications were performed in group 1, and group 2 underwent traditional surgeries. The incidence of fluid leakage was recorded on the operative day. Curst formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were recorded on day 7. Histological osteolysis was demonstrated by HE staining of tissue slices. Micro-CT was used for quantifying evaluation of osteolysis in two groups. Intraoperative fluid leakage was significantly reduced in group 1. Postoperative crust formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were also significantly decreased in group 1. HE staining results revealed obvious osteolysis in group 1 and more obvious osteolysis in group 2. Bone volume fraction (BVF) was (0.32 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (0.24 ± 0.05). Bone mineral density (BMD) was (1.11 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (1.01 ± 0.02). Surgical modifications provide a reliable way for establishment of the murine calvaria osteolysis model. PMID:26769571

  12. Expression and regulation of CCN genes in murine osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Muriel S; Gazzerro, Elizabetta; Rydziel, Sheila; Canalis, Ernesto

    2006-05-01

    Members of the CCN family of genes include cysteine-rich 61 (CYR61), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), nephroblastoma overexpressed (NOV), and Wnt-induced secreted proteins (WISP) 1, 2 and 3. CCN proteins play a role in cell differentiation and function, but their expression and function in skeletal tissue is partially understood. We examined the expression and regulation of CCN genes in primary cultures of murine osteoblasts treated with transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, or cortisol. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of CYR61, CTGF, NOV, and WISP 1 and 2 transcripts in murine osteoblasts, but not WISP 3 transcripts. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that TGF beta, BMP-2, and cortisol increased CYR61 and CTGF mRNA and protein levels. TGF beta decreased NOV and increased WISP 2 mRNA and protein levels, and TGF beta and BMP-2 increased, whereas cortisol decreased WISP 1 mRNA and protein levels. Nuclear run-on assays revealed that TGF beta, BMP-2 and cortisol enhanced CYR61 and CTGF transcription, TGF beta and BMP-2 induced and cortisol suppressed WISP 1, and TGF beta induced WISP 2 transcription. Suppression of NOV transcription could not be detected due to low control levels. In conclusion, five of the six known CCN genes are expressed by osteoblasts and their transcription is regulated by TGF beta, BMP-2 and cortisol.

  13. Toxocara canis: anthelmintic activity of quinone derivatives in murine toxocarosis.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, T; Mata-Santos, H A; Carneiro, P F; De Moura, K C G; Fenalti, J M; Klafke, G B; Cruz, L A X; Martins, L H R; Pinto, N F; Pinto, M C F R; Berne, M E A; Da Silva, P E A; Scaini, C J

    2016-04-01

    Human toxocarosis is a chronic tissue parasitosis most often caused by Toxocara canis. The seroprevalence can reach up to 50%, especially among children and adolescents. The anthelmintics used in the treatment have moderate efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of quinones and their derivatives against T. canis larvae and the cytotoxicity of the larvicidal compounds. The compounds were evaluated at 1 mg mL(-1) concentration in microculture plates containing third stage larvae in an Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 environment, incubated at 37 °C in 5% CO2 tension for 48 h. Five naphthoxiranes were selected for the cytotoxicity analysis. The cell viability evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays using murine peritoneal macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice revealed that the naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) were less cytotoxic at a concentration of 0.05 mg mL(-1). The efficacy of naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) was examined in murine toxocarosis also. The anthelmintic activity was examined by evaluating the number of larvae in the brain, carcass, liver, lungs, heart, kidneys and eyes. Compound (3) demonstrated anthelmintic activity similar to that of albendazole by decreasing the number of larvae in the organs of mice and thus could form the basis of the development of a new anthelmintic drug. PMID:26887285

  14. Viruses in Rodent Colonies: Lessons Learned from Murine Noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Karst, Stephanie M; Wobus, Christiane E

    2015-11-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are highly prevalent, positive-sense RNA viruses that infect a range of mammals, including humans and mice. Murine noroviruses (MuNoVs) are the most prevalent pathogens in biomedical research colonies, and they have been used extensively as a model system for human noroviruses (HuNoVs). Despite recent successes in culturing HuNoVs in the laboratory and a small animal host, studies of human viruses have inherent limitations. Thus, owing to its versatility, the MuNoV system-with its native host, reverse genetics, and cell culture systems-will continue to provide important insights into NoV and enteric virus biology. In the current review, we summarize recent findings from MuNoVs that increase our understanding of enteric virus pathogenesis and highlight similarities between human and murine NoVs that underscore the value of MuNoVs to inform studies of HuNoV biology. We also discuss the potential of endemic MuNoV infections to impact other disease models. PMID:26958927

  15. Toxocara canis: anthelmintic activity of quinone derivatives in murine toxocarosis.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, T; Mata-Santos, H A; Carneiro, P F; De Moura, K C G; Fenalti, J M; Klafke, G B; Cruz, L A X; Martins, L H R; Pinto, N F; Pinto, M C F R; Berne, M E A; Da Silva, P E A; Scaini, C J

    2016-04-01

    Human toxocarosis is a chronic tissue parasitosis most often caused by Toxocara canis. The seroprevalence can reach up to 50%, especially among children and adolescents. The anthelmintics used in the treatment have moderate efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of quinones and their derivatives against T. canis larvae and the cytotoxicity of the larvicidal compounds. The compounds were evaluated at 1 mg mL(-1) concentration in microculture plates containing third stage larvae in an Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 environment, incubated at 37 °C in 5% CO2 tension for 48 h. Five naphthoxiranes were selected for the cytotoxicity analysis. The cell viability evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays using murine peritoneal macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice revealed that the naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) were less cytotoxic at a concentration of 0.05 mg mL(-1). The efficacy of naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) was examined in murine toxocarosis also. The anthelmintic activity was examined by evaluating the number of larvae in the brain, carcass, liver, lungs, heart, kidneys and eyes. Compound (3) demonstrated anthelmintic activity similar to that of albendazole by decreasing the number of larvae in the organs of mice and thus could form the basis of the development of a new anthelmintic drug.

  16. Fluorescence tomography in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Kumar, Anand T. N.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Boas, David A.; Bacskai, Brian J.

    2007-02-01

    Noninvasive molecular imaging of amyloid plaques in murine Alzheimer's disease models would accelerate drug development and basic Alzheimer's research. Amyloid plaques differ from traditional fluorescent targets in size and spatial distribution and therefore present a unique challenge for biomarker development and tomography. To study imaging feasibility and establish biomarker criteria, we developed a digital mouse head model from a 100 μm-resolution, digital, segmented mouse atlas1. The cortical region of the brain was filled with a spatially uniform distribution of plaques that had different fluorescent properties from the surrounding brain tissue, similar to current transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence was simulated with a Monte Carlo algorithm using different plaque densities, detection geometries, and background fluorescence. Our preliminary results demonstrated that shielding effects might require nonlinear reconstruction algorithms and that background fluorescence would seriously hinder quantitative burden estimation. The Monte Carlo based approach presented here offers a powerful way to study the feasibility of non-invasive imaging in murine Alzheimer's models and to optimize experimental conditions.

  17. Murine Models of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Elshafa Hassan; Baiocchi, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a B-lymphotropic gamma herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies. Most EBV-related cancers present complex medical management challenges; thus it has been essential to develop preclinical in vivo models allowing for the study of pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of these diseases. Early in vivo models used nonhuman primates; however, such models were limited by the inability of EBV to achieve viral latency, availability, and cost. Immunodeficient mouse strains emerged as efficient models that allow for engraftment of human mononuclear cells and controlled evaluation of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). By using highly immunodeficient strains of mice such as severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) and NOD/LtSz-scid ILrg(-/-)(NOG) mice, investigators have developed efficient platforms for evaluating pathogenesis of benign (HLH) and malignant (EBV-LPD) diseases associated with EBV. Humanized murine chimeric models have been essential tools for evaluating preventive strategies with vaccine and adoptive cellular approaches, as well as development of experimental therapeutic strategies. Manipulation of the human immune cells before engraftment or mutation of viral lytic and latent genes has enhanced our understanding of the oncogenic nature of EBV and the complexity of human immune responses to EBV. In this review, we discuss how the EBV murine models have evolved to become essential tools for studying the virology of EBV as it relates to human EBV-LPD pathogenesis, the immunobiology of innate and adaptive responses, and limitations of these models. PMID:27034395

  18. Global Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Taher, Leila; Collette, Nicole M.; Murugesh, Deepa; Maxwell, Evan; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed information about stage-specific changes in gene expression is crucial for understanding the gene regulatory networks underlying development and the various signal transduction pathways contributing to morphogenesis. Here we describe the global gene expression dynamics during early murine limb development, when cartilage, tendons, muscle, joints, vasculature and nerves are specified and the musculoskeletal system of limbs is established. We used whole-genome microarrays to identify genes with differential expression at 5 stages of limb development (E9.5 to 13.5), during fore- and hind-limb patterning. We found that the onset of limb formation is characterized by an up-regulation of transcription factors, which is followed by a massive activation of genes during E10.5 and E11.5 which levels off at later time points. Among the 3520 genes identified as significantly up-regulated in the limb, we find ∼30% to be novel, dramatically expanding the repertoire of candidate genes likely to function in the limb. Hierarchical and stage-specific clustering identified expression profiles that are likely to correlate with functional programs during limb development and further characterization of these transcripts will provide new insights into specific tissue patterning processes. Here, we provide for the first time a comprehensive analysis of developmentally regulated genes during murine limb development, and provide some novel insights into the expression dynamics governing limb morphogenesis. PMID:22174793

  19. Global gene expression analysis of murine limb development.

    PubMed

    Taher, Leila; Collette, Nicole M; Murugesh, Deepa; Maxwell, Evan; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Loots, Gabriela G

    2011-01-01

    Detailed information about stage-specific changes in gene expression is crucial for understanding the gene regulatory networks underlying development and the various signal transduction pathways contributing to morphogenesis. Here we describe the global gene expression dynamics during early murine limb development, when cartilage, tendons, muscle, joints, vasculature and nerves are specified and the musculoskeletal system of limbs is established. We used whole-genome microarrays to identify genes with differential expression at 5 stages of limb development (E9.5 to 13.5), during fore- and hind-limb patterning. We found that the onset of limb formation is characterized by an up-regulation of transcription factors, which is followed by a massive activation of genes during E10.5 and E11.5 which levels off at later time points. Among the 3520 genes identified as significantly up-regulated in the limb, we find ~30% to be novel, dramatically expanding the repertoire of candidate genes likely to function in the limb. Hierarchical and stage-specific clustering identified expression profiles that are likely to correlate with functional programs during limb development and further characterization of these transcripts will provide new insights into specific tissue patterning processes. Here, we provide for the first time a comprehensive analysis of developmentally regulated genes during murine limb development, and provide some novel insights into the expression dynamics governing limb morphogenesis.

  20. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tabata, Hidenori; Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-09-01

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle.

  1. Adaptive Immunity Restricts Replication of Novel Murine Astroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Christine C.; Loh, Joy; Zhao, Guoyan; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Wang, David; Huang, Henry V.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of astrovirus pathogenesis are largely unknown, in part due to a lack of a small-animal model of disease. Using shotgun sequencing and a custom analysis pipeline, we identified two novel astroviruses capable of infecting research mice, murine astrovirus (MuAstV) STL1 and STL2. Subsequent analysis revealed the presence of at least two additional viruses (MuAstV STL3 and STL4), suggestive of a diverse population of murine astroviruses in research mice. Complete genomic characterization and subsequent phylogenetic analysis showed that MuAstV STL1 to STL4 are members of the mamastrovirus genus and are likely members of a new mamastrovirus genogroup. Using Rag1−/− mice deficient in B and T cells, we demonstrate that adaptive immunity is required to control MuAstV infection. Furthermore, using Stat1−/− mice deficient in innate signaling, we demonstrate a role for the innate immune response in the control of MuAstV replication. Our results demonstrate that MuAstV STL permits the study of the mechanisms of astrovirus infection and host-pathogen interactions in a genetically manipulable small-animal model. Finally, we detected MuAstV in commercially available mice, suggesting that these viruses may be present in academic and commercial research mouse facilities, with possible implications for interpretation of data generated in current mouse models of disease. PMID:22951832

  2. Correlation between experimental human and murine skin sensitization induction thresholds.

    PubMed

    Api, Anne Marie; Basketter, David; Lalko, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative risk assessment for skin sensitization is directed towards the determination of levels of exposure to known sensitizing substances that will avoid the induction of contact allergy in humans. A key component of this work is the predictive identification of relative skin sensitizing potency, achieved normally by the measurement of the threshold (the "EC3" value) in the local lymph node assay (LLNA). In an extended series of studies, the accuracy of this murine induction threshold as the predictor of the absence of a sensitizing effect has been verified by conduct of a human repeated insult patch test (HRIPT). Murine and human thresholds for a diverse set of 57 fragrance chemicals spanning approximately four orders of magnitude variation in potency have been compared. The results confirm that there is a useful correlation, with the LLNA EC3 value helping particularly to identify stronger sensitizers. Good correlation (with half an order of magnitude) was seen with three-quarters of the dataset. The analysis also helps to identify potential outlier types of (fragrance) chemistry, exemplified by hexyl and benzyl salicylates (an over-prediction) and trans-2-hexenal (an under-prediction).

  3. Tensile Properties of the Murine Ventral Vertical Midline Incision

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Mark A.; Chakkalakal, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Background In clinical surgery, the vertical midline abdominal incision is popular but associated with healing failures. A murine model of the ventral vertical midline incision was developed in order to study the healing of this incision type. Methodology/Principal Findings The strength of the wild type murine ventral abdominal wall in the midline was contained within the dermis; the linea alba made a negligible contribution. Unwounded abdominal wall had a downward trend (nonsignificant) in maximal tension between 12 and 29 weeks of age. The incision attained 50% of its final strength by postoperative day 40. The maximal tension of the ventral vertical midline incision was nearly that of unwounded abdominal wall by postwounding day 60; there was no difference in unwounded vs. wounded maximal tension at postwounding day 120. Conclusions/Significance After 120 days of healing, the ventral vertical midline incision in the wild type mouse was not significantly different from age-matched nonwounded controls. About half of the final incisional strength was attained after 6 weeks of healing. The significance of this work was to establish the kinetics of wild type incisional healing in a model for which numerous genotypes and genetic tools would be available for subsequent study. PMID:21915298

  4. Surgical Modification of the Murine Calvaria Osteolysis Model

    PubMed Central

    Al-quhali, Ali Mohammed; Sun, Yu; Bai, Xizhuang; Jin, Zhe; Yu, Guibo

    2015-01-01

    The murine calvaria model has been adopted for evaluation of osteolysis and inflammation induced by polyethylene (PE) or metal wear debris. However, this model suffers from several complications. The purpose of our study is to introduce a surgical modification with lower complication rates, thus providing more accurate results. Forty C57/BL6 mice were divided into two groups, both receiving polyethylene particles. Surgical modifications were performed in group 1, and group 2 underwent traditional surgeries. The incidence of fluid leakage was recorded on the operative day. Curst formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were recorded on day 7. Histological osteolysis was demonstrated by HE staining of tissue slices. Micro-CT was used for quantifying evaluation of osteolysis in two groups. Intraoperative fluid leakage was significantly reduced in group 1. Postoperative crust formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were also significantly decreased in group 1. HE staining results revealed obvious osteolysis in group 1 and more obvious osteolysis in group 2. Bone volume fraction (BVF) was (0.32 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (0.24 ± 0.05). Bone mineral density (BMD) was (1.11 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (1.01 ± 0.02). Surgical modifications provide a reliable way for establishment of the murine calvaria osteolysis model. PMID:26769571

  5. Surface Contaminants Inhibit Osseointegration in a Novel Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Colbrunn, Robb W.; Tatro, Joscelyn M.; Messerschmitt, Patrick J.; Hernandez, Christopher J.; Goldberg, Victor M.; Stewart, Matthew C.; Greenfield, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Surface contaminants, such as bacterial debris and manufacturing residues, may remain on orthopaedic implants after sterilization procedures and affect osseointegration. The goals of this study were to develop a murine model of osseointegration in order to determine whether removing surface contaminants enhances osseointegration. To develop the murine model, titanium alloy implants were implanted into a unicortical pilot hole in the mid-diaphysis of the femur and osseointegration was measured over a five week time course. Histology, backscatter scanning electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy showed areas of bone in intimate physical contact with the implant, confirming osseointegration. Histomorphometric quantification of bone-to-implant contact and peri-implant bone and biomechanical pullout quantification of ultimate force, stiffness and work to failure increased significantly over time, also demonstrating successful osseointegration. We also found that a rigorous cleaning procedure significantly enhances bone-to-implant contact and biomechanical pullout measures by two-fold compared with implants that were autoclaved, as recommended by the manufacturer. The most likely interpretation of these results is that surface contaminants inhibit osseointegration. The results of this study justify the need for the development of better detection and removal techniques for contaminants on orthopaedic implants and other medical devices. PMID:21801863

  6. Investigation of the impact of the common animal facility contaminant murine norovirus on experimental murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Doom, Carmen M; Turula, Holly M; Hill, Ann B

    2009-09-30

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered pathogen that has become a common contaminant of specific pathogen-free mouse colonies. MNV-1 induces a robust interferon-beta response and causes histopathology in some mouse strains, suggesting that it may impact other mouse models of infection. Despite many concerns about MNV-1 contamination, there is little information about its impact on immune responses to other infections. This study addresses whether MNV-1 infection has an effect on a model of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Exposure to MNV-1 resulted in a decreased CD8 T cell response to immunodominant MCMV epitopes in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. However, MNV-1 did not impact MCMV titers in either mouse strain, nor did it stimulate reactivation of latent MCMV. These data suggest that while MNV-1 has a mild impact on the immune response to MCMV, it is not likely to affect most experimental outcomes in immunocompetent mice in the MCMV model.

  7. Assignment of CSF-1 to 5q33.1: evidence for clustering of genes regulating hematopoiesis and for their involvement in the deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5 in myeloid disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Pettenati, M J; Le Beau, M M; Lemons, R S; Shima, E A; Kawasaki, E S; Larson, R A; Sherr, C J; Diaz, M O; Rowley, J D

    1987-01-01

    The CSF-1 gene encodes a hematopoietic colony-stimulating factor (CSF) that promotes growth, differentiation, and survival of mononuclear phagocytes. By using somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization, we localized this gene to human chromosome 5 at bands q31 to q35, a chromosomal region that is frequently deleted [del(5q)] in patients with myeloid disorders. By in situ hybridization, the CSF-1 gene was found to be deleted in the 5q- chromosome of a patient with refractory anemia who had a del(5)(q15q33.3) and in that of a second patient with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia de novo who had a similar distal breakpoint [del(5)(q13q33.3)]. The gene was present in the deleted chromosome of a third patient, with therapy-related acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, who had a more proximal breakpoint in band q33 [del(5)(q22q33.1)]. Hybridization of the CSF-1 probe to metaphase cells of a fourth patient, with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia de novo, who had a rearrangement of chromosomes 5 and 21 [ins(21;5)(q22;q31.3q33.1)] resulted in labeling of the breakpoint junctions of both rearranged chromosomes; this suggested that CSF-1 is located at 5q33.1. Thus, a small segment of chromosome 5 contains GM-CSF (the gene encoding the granulocyte-macrophage CSF), CSF-1, and FMS, which encodes the CSF-1 receptor, in that order from the centromere; this cluster of genes may be involved in the altered hematopoiesis associated with a deletion of 5q. Images PMID:3495006

  8. The murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 from persistently infected murine cells exhibits an extended host range.

    PubMed Central

    Schickli, J H; Zelus, B D; Wentworth, D E; Sawicki, S G; Holmes, K V

    1997-01-01

    In murine 17 Cl 1 cells persistently infected with murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 (MHV-A59), expression of the virus receptor glycoprotein MHVR was markedly reduced (S. G. Sawicki, J. H. Lu, and K. V. Holmes, J. Virol. 69:5535-5543, 1995). Virus isolated from passage 600 of the persistently infected cells made smaller plaques on 17 Cl 1 cells than did MHV-A59. Unlike the parental MHV-A59, this variant virus also infected the BHK-21 (BHK) line of hamster cells. Virus plaque purified on BHK cells (MHV/BHK) grew more slowly in murine cells than did MHV-A59, and the rate of viral RNA synthesis was lower and the development of the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein was slower than those of MHV-A59. MHV/BHK was 100-fold more resistant to neutralization with the purified soluble recombinant MHV receptor glycoprotein (sMHVR) than was MHV-A59. Pretreatment of 17 Cl 1 cells with anti-MHVR monoclonal antibody CC1 protected the cells from infection with MHV-A59 but only partially protected them from infection with MHV/BHK. Thus, although MHV/BHK could still utilize MHVR as a receptor, its interactions with the receptor were significantly different from those of MHV-A59. To determine whether a hemagglutinin esterase (HE) glycoprotein that could bind the virions to 9-O-acetylated neuraminic acid moieties on the cell surface was expressed by MHV/BHK, an in situ esterase assay was used. No expression of HE activity was detected in 17 Cl 1 cells infected with MHV/BHK, suggesting that this virus, like MHV-A59, bound to cell membranes via its S glycoprotein. MHV/BHK was able to infect cell lines from many mammalian species, including murine (17 Cl 1), hamster (BHK), feline (Fcwf), bovine (MDBK), rat (RIE), monkey (Vero), and human (L132 and HeLa) cell lines. MHV/BHK could not infect dog kidney (MDCK I) or swine testis (ST) cell lines. Thus, in persistently infected murine cell lines that express very low levels of virus receptor MHVR and which also have and may

  9. Adult Recruitment Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Juliet, Ed.; And Others

    Findings of an American College Testing Program 1981 survey on college recruitment of adult students are summarized, and 12 articles on adult recruitment are presented. Titles and authors are as follows: "Adult Recruitment Practices: A Report of a National Survey" (Patricia Spratt, Juliet Kaufmann, Lee Noel); "Three Programs for Adults in Shopping…

  10. Markers of Epidermal Stem Cell Subpopulations in Adult Mammalian Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of mammalian skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. As in other epithelia, adult stem cells within the epidermis maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to repair of tissue damage. The bulge of hair follicles, where DNA-label-retaining cells reside, was traditionally regarded as the sole epidermal stem cell compartment. However, in recent years multiple stem cell populations have been identified. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell compartments of adult murine and human epidermis, the markers that they express, and the assays that are used to characterize epidermal stem cell properties. PMID:24993676

  11. High frequency of transmission of murine AIDS virus in C57BL/10 mice via mother's milk.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Y; Suzuki, K; Komuro, K; Mizuochi, T

    1992-01-01

    Maternal transmission of a murine leukemia virus (MuLV) mixture named LP-BM5 MuLV, which is knwon to induce murine AIDS (MAIDS), was investigated. Adult female C57BL/10 mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with LP-BM5 MuLV. When the virus-inoculated female mice developed splenomegaly or lymphadenopathy, they were mated with normal C57BL/10 male mice. Of 56 offspring born to MAIDS mothers, 14 appeared to develop MAIDS, as assessed by the occurrence of splenomegaly or lymphadenopathy as well as the mitogen response of spleen cells. The occurrence of MAIDS in offspring was found to be accompanied by the maternal transmission and expansion of a defective virus genome from which almost the entire pol and env regions are deleted. On the other hand, the ecotropic helper virus genome was detected in all offspring regardless of the occurrence of MAIDS. To examine the mode of maternal transmission of LP-BM5 MuLV, foster-nursing experiments were conducted. The ecotropic helper viruses were found in all normal offspring nursed by a MAIDS mother, and some of them developed MAIDS. In contrast, none of offspring born to a MAIDS mother that were nursed by an uninfected foster mother either carried the LP-BM5 MuLV or developed MAIDS. Finally, both the defective and the ecotropic helper viruses were detected in LP-BM5 MuLV-infected mother's milk. These results indicated that maternal transmission of LP-BM5 MuLV occurs with a high frequency and is mediated by mother's milk. Images PMID:1323688

  12. Perinatal bisphenol A exposure promotes hyperactivity, lean body composition, and hormonal responses across the murine life course

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Olivia S.; Peterson, Karen E.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Mancuso, Peter; Dolinoy, Dana C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of adult-onset diseases is influenced by perinatal exposure to altered environmental conditions. One such exposure, bisphenol A (BPA), has been associated with obesity and diabetes, and consequently labeled an obesogen. Using an isogenic murine model, we examined the effects of perinatal exposure through maternal diet to 50 ng (n=20), 50 μg (n=21), or 50 mg (n=18) BPA/kg diet, as well as controls (n=20) on offspring energy expenditure, spontaneous activity, and body composition at 3, 6, and 9 mo of age, and hormone levels at 9 and 10 mo of age. Overall, exposed females and males exhibited increased energy expenditure (P<0.001 and 0.001, respectively) throughout the life course. In females, horizontal and vertical activity increased (P=0.07 and 0.06, respectively) throughout the life course. Generally, body composition measures were not different throughout the life course in exposed females or males (all P>0.44), although body fat and weight decreased in exposed females at particular ages (all P<0.08). Milligram-exposed females had improved glucose, insulin, adiponectin, and leptin profiles (all P<0.10). Thus, life-course analysis illustrates that BPA is associated with hyperactive and lean phenotypes. Variability across studies may be attributable to differential exposure duration and timing, dietary fat and phytoestrogen content, or lack of sophisticated phenotyping across the life course.—Anderson, O.S., Peterson, K.E., Sanchez, B.N., Zhang, Z., Mancuso, P., Dolinoy, D.C. Perinatal bisphenol A exposure promotes hyperactivity, lean body composition, and hormonal responses across the murine life course. PMID:23345456

  13. In vitro construction of 2D and 3D simulations of the murine hematopoietic niche.

    PubMed

    Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Bethel, Monique; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Kacena, Melissa A; Srour, Edward F

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) undergo multilineage differentiation or self-renewal to maintain normal hematopoiesis and to sustain the size of the HSC pool throughout life. These processes are determined by a complex interplay of molecular signals between HSC and other cellular components such as osteoblasts (OB), stromal cells, endothelial cells, and a number of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Through changes in its physical properties within the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, collagen, which is one of the most critical ECM proteins, can modulate HSC function and maintenance of the competence of the hematopoietic niche (HN). At present, there is no consensus as to how different cellular elements of the niche collaborate and interact to promote HSC self-renewal or differentiation to maintain hematopoiesis. Deciphering these interactions and the impact of mechanical properties of the collagen microstructures within the HN has critical clinical implications in the areas of stem cell homing, engraftment, and maintenance of HSC function. In this chapter, we describe several of the in vitro methodologies for establishing and maintaining HSC in vitro including the isolation of OB, stromal cells, and hematopoietic progenitor cells, as well as the establishment of both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) coculture systems.

  14. Adult Cancers in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Laurence, Valérie; Marples, Maria; Stark, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of cancer seen in young people changes with increasing age, transitioning from childhood- to adult-type cancer in adolescence and the third decade. The risk factors, presentation and biology of cancer in young adults differ from those in the older adult population. Factors of particular significance in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) include genetic predisposition to adult-type cancer, diagnostic uncertainty, long-term morbidity and considerations of fertility. New systemic therapies are being introduced that can prolong life and even increase the chance of cure, but the impact on AYAs is uncertain, as these patients are often under-represented in clinical trials. Here, we discuss the management of AYAs with 3 of the most common cancers affecting adults, when they emerge in the AYA populations, and therefore are currently met by medical oncologists - breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma. PMID:27595357

  15. Heterogeneity across the murine small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Bowcutt, Rowann; Forman, Ruth; Glymenaki, Maria; Carding, Simon Richard; Else, Kathryn Jane; Cruickshank, Sheena Margaret

    2014-11-01

    The small and large intestine of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) have evolved to have discrete functions with distinct anatomies and immune cell composition. The importance of these differences is underlined when considering that different pathogens have uniquely adapted to live in each region of the gut. Furthermore, different regions of the GIT are also associated with differences in susceptibility to diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammation. The large and small intestine, given their anatomical and functional differences, should be seen as two separate immunological sites. However, this distinction is often ignored with findings from one area of the GIT being inappropriately extrapolated to the other. Focussing largely on the murine small and large intestine, this review addresses the literature relating to the immunology and biology of the two sites, drawing comparisons between them and clarifying similarities and differences. We also highlight the gaps in our understanding and where further research is needed.

  16. Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa Extract Attenuates DSS-Induced Murine Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jong-Chan; Lee, Kang Min

    2016-01-01

    We examined the protective effects of Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa (AAK) extract on a murine model of acute experimental colitis. Colitis was induced by 4% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water of male C57BL/6 mice, for 7 consecutive days. Oral administration of AAK extract (500 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated DSS-induced symptoms such as anorexia, weight loss, events of diarrhea or bloody stools, and colon shortening. Histological damage was also ameliorated, as evidenced by the architectural preservation and suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration in colonic samples. Treatment improved the colonic mRNA expression of different inflammatory markers: cytokines, inducible enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases, and tight junction-related proteins. In the isolated serum, IgE levels were downregulated. Collectively, these findings indicate the therapeutic potentials of AAK as an effective complementary or alternative modality for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. PMID:27293323

  17. Zika Virus Infection and Development of a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankit; Kumar, Anil

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV), there is an urgent need to investigate the pathogenesis of the symptoms associated with ZIKV infection. Since the first identification of the virus in 1947, the pathologies associated with ZIKV infection were thought to be limited with mild illness that presented fever, rashes, muscle aches, and weakness. However, ZIKV infection has been shown to cause Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and numerous cases of congenital microcephaly in children have been reported when pregnant females were exposed to the virus. The severity and the rate of spread of ZIKV in the last year has drawn alarming interest among researchers to investigate murine models to study viral pathogenesis and develop candidate vaccines. A recent study by Lazear and colleagues, in the May 2016 issue of cell host and microbe, is an effort to study the pathogenesis of contemporary and historical virus strains in various mouse models. PMID:27260223

  18. Monitoring Murine Skeletal Muscle Function for Muscle Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H.; Li, Dejia; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    The primary function of skeletal muscle is to generate force. Muscle force production is compromised in various forms of acquired and/or inherited muscle diseases. An important goal of muscle gene therapy is to recover muscle strength. Genetically engineered mice and spontaneous mouse mutants are readily available for preclinical muscle gene therapy studies. In this chapter, we outlined the methods commonly used for measuring murine skeletal muscle function. These include ex vivo and in situ analysis of the contractile profile of a single intact limb muscle (the extensor digitorium longus for ex vivo assay and the tibialis anterior muscle for in situ assay), grip force analysis, and downhill treadmill exercise. Force measurement in a single muscle is extremely useful for pilot testing of new gene therapy protocols by local gene transfer. Grip force and treadmill assessments offer body-wide evaluation following systemic muscle gene therapy. PMID:21194022

  19. Dye-mediated photosensitization of murine neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sieber, F.; Sieber-Blum, M.

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if photosensitization mediated by the fluorescent dye, merocyanine 540, could be used to preferentially kill murine neuroblastoma cells in simulated autologous remission marrow grafts. Simultaneous exposure of Neuro 2a or NB41A3 neuroblastoma cells to merocyanine 540 and white light reduced the concentration of in vitro-clonogenic tumor cells 50,000-fold. By contrast, the same treatment had little effect on the graft's ability to rescue lethally irradiated syngeneic hosts. Lethally irradiated C57BL/6J X A/J F1 mice transplanted with photosensitized mixtures of neuroblastoma cells and normal marrow cells (1:100 or 1:10) survived without developing neuroblastomas. It is conceivable that merocyanine 540-mediated photosensitization will prove useful for the extracorporeal purging of residual neuroblastoma cells from human autologous remission marrow grafts.

  20. Effects of trichostatins on differentiation of murine erythroleukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, M.; Nomura, S.; Beppu, T.

    1987-07-15

    The fungistatic antibiotics trichostatins (TS) A and C were isolated from culture broth of Streptomyces platensis No. 145 and were found to be potent inducers of differentiation in murine erythroleukemia (Friend and RV133) cells at concentrations of 1.5 X 10(-8) M for TSA and 5 X 10(-7) M for TSC. Differentiation induced by TS was cooperatively enhanced by UV irradiation but not by treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide. This enhanced activity was completely inhibited by adding cycloheximide to the culture medium 2 h after exposure to TS, suggesting that TS are dimethyl sulfoxide-type inducers of erythroid differentiation. No inhibitory effect of TS was observed on macromolecular synthesis in cultured cells.

  1. Murine Tumor Models for Oncolytic Rhabdo-Virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Falls, Theresa; Roy, Dominic Guy; Bell, John Cameron; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    The preclinical optimization and validation of novel treatments for cancer therapy requires the use of laboratory animals. Although in vitro experiments using tumor cell lines and ex vivo treatment of patient tumor samples provide a remarkable first-line tool for the initial study of tumoricidal potential, tumor-bearing animals remain the primary option to study delivery, efficacy, and safety of therapies in the context of a complete tumor microenvironment and functional immune system. In this review, we will describe the use of murine tumor models for oncolytic virotherapy using vesicular stomatitis virus. We will discuss studies using immunocompetent and immunodeficient models with respect to toxicity and therapeutic treatments, as well as the various techniques and tools available to study cancer therapy with Rhabdoviruses. PMID:27034397

  2. Modulation of cell-surface antigens of a murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Akeson, R; Herschman, H R

    1974-01-01

    Antisera were produced in rabbits to morphologically differentiated cells from the C1300 murine neuroblastoma (i.e., cells in which process formation was induced by maintenance on serum-free medium for 5 days). These antisera reacted more strongly in the complement fixation reaction with such "differentiated" cells than with "undifferentiated" (nonprocess-bearing) neuroblastoma cells. Adsorption of the antisera with undifferentiated cells removed the reactivity to cells without processes, while the reactivity with serum-free cells which possess processes was retained. Indirect immunofluorescence studies confirmed the results obtained by complement fixation and demonstrated that antibodies to the surface antigens of process-bearing cells could be adsorbed by particulate preparations from brain but not liver, spleen, or kidney. This is the first description of neural-associated cell-surface changes that correlate with the morphological differentiation in culture of neuroblastoma cells.

  3. Efficacy of echinocandins against murine infections by Diutina (Candida) rugosa.

    PubMed

    Sanchis, Marta; Sutton, Deanna A; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Guarro, Josep; Capilla, Javier

    2016-09-01

    Echinocandins are recommended as a first-line therapy for invasive candidiasis. Candida rugosa was recently transferred to the new genus Diutina. We have determined the in vitro killing kinetics of two echinocandins, anidulafungin, and caspofungin and their in vivo efficacy, administering doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg, and 1 or 5 mg/kg, respectively against 2 clinical strains of D. rugosa. Both drugs showed a fungicidal concentration-dependent activity and, in a neutropenic murine model of disseminated infection, were able to reduce tissue burden and to prolong survival of mice. These results suggest that both echinocandins could be useful to treat infections by this fungus when isolates show minimal inhibitory concentrations within the range of susceptibility for both drugs. PMID:27342787

  4. Visualisation of nitric oxide generated by activated murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Leone, A M; Furst, V W; Foxwell, N A; Cellek, S; Moncada, S

    1996-04-01

    We have visualised the release and approximate diffusion profile of nitric oxide (NO) from activated murine macrophages using a high transmission microscope coupled to a high sensitivity photon counting camera. The images generated by NO were cell-associated and spread over an area of approximately 175 micrometers from the activated macrophage. The signals obtained were dependent on the presence of exogenous L-arginine in the medium and followed a time course similar to that previously described for the generation of NO by the inducible form of NO synthase. The light signal was attenuated by the inhibitor of NO synthase, N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Studies using superoxide-deficient macrophages further confirmed that the signals detected were generated by NO rather than reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:8660339

  5. Effects of fludarabine treatment on murine lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Jones, O Y; Alexander, P J; Lacson, A; Gok, F; Feliz, A; Marikar, Y; Madivi, C; Jones, J M; Good, R A

    2004-01-01

    BXSB mice, a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), were treated with two different doses of fludarabine for a four-week period and examined two weeks after the final dose. Control mice were treated with saline or cyclophosphamide. Mice treated with fludarabine had a significant reduction in renal pathology compared to control mice. Fludarabine-treated mice also had an almost 10-fold increase in percentile of CD8+CD25+ T cells in the spleen and a smaller but significant increase in CD4+CD25+ cells. Mice treated with cyclophosphamide had a greater leucopenia compared to the other groups and a significant reduction in percentile of B220+ cells in peripheral blood and spleen. Serum autoantibody levels to dsDNA did not differ significantly among the groups, but were higher in 4/10 mice treated with fludarabine. Although few trials of fludarabine for human SLE have been conducted, additional studies may be warranted.

  6. Expression of Wnts in the developing murine secondary palate

    PubMed Central

    WARNER, DENNIS R.; SMITH, HENRY S.; WEBB, CYNTHIA L.; GREENE, ROBERT M.; PISANO, M. MICHELE

    2009-01-01

    Morphogenesis of the mammalian secondary palate requires coordination of cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and synthesis of extracellular matrix molecules by numerous signal transduction pathways. Recent evidence suggests a role for members of the Wnt family of secreted cytokines in orofacial development. However, no study has systematically or comprehensively examined the expression of Wnts in embryonic orofacial tissue. We thus conducted a survey of the expression of all known Wnt genes in the developing murine secondary palate. Using an RT-PCR strategy to assay gene expression, 12 of the 19 known members of the Wnt family were found to be expressed in embryonic palatal tissue during key phases of its development. The expression of 5 Wnt family members was found to be temporally regulated. Moreover, these Wnts had unique spatio-temporal patterns of expression which suggested possible roles in palatal ontogeny. PMID:19598129

  7. Chemoprophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of thymol in murine cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Maggiore, M; Pensel, P E; Denegri, G; Elissondo, M C

    2015-10-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the larval stage of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. The drugs commonly used against cystic echinococcosis are benzimidazoles. Unfortunately, 20%-40% of cases do not respond favorably to such chemotherapy. Consequently, the search of new therapeutic alternatives such as the use of traditional medicinal plants has been increased. The aim of the current experimental work was to investigate the chemoprophylactic and clinical efficacy of thymol on mice infected with E. granulosus metacestodes. Thymol (40 mg/kg) was administered under two different therapeutic schemes: dosing every 24h over 20 days and treatment every 12h for 10 days. Thymol demonstrated efficacy against experimental murine cystic echinococcosis. The chemoprophylactic and therapeutic effects of thymol were comparable to that of albendazole. Due to the lack of toxicity observed in mice at the tested doses; we consider that thymol is a potential alternative to be applied for the treatment of human hydatid disease. PMID:26096310

  8. Antifungal activity of ajoene on experimental murine paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Maluf, Marcia L F; Takahachi, Gisele; Svidzinski, Terezinha I E; Xander, Patricia; Apitz-Castro, Raphael; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A; Cuman, Roberto K N

    2008-09-30

    The natural compound ajoene (4,5,9- trithiadodeca-1,6,11-triene 9-oxide) is capable of controlling infection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in experimental models. Swiss mice were inoculated with 5.0 x 10e6 cells of the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Pb18 by intraperitoneal route and treated with ajoene. In weeks 2, 6, 10 and 13 of treatment, levels of anti-Pb antibodies were measured by the ELISA test and the animals were put down and their lungs, livers and spleens removed for histopathological analysis and determination of the number of viable fungus. The results show that experimental murine paracoccidioidomycosis was well established and that ajoene was capable of controlling the evolution of the disease, as it significantly reduced the levels of antibodies from the 10th week of treatment.

  9. Histopathology of spontaneous regression in virus-induced murine leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, I.; Russo, J.; Baldwin, J.; Rich, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The histopathology of the spontaneous regression of murine leukemia induced by a particular strain of Friend leukemia virus was studied in Swiss ICR/Ha mice. Animals inoculated with the regressing strain of Friend virus exhibited an initial pathologic response identical to that induced by conventional strains of Friend virus. Unlike the fatal leukemia produced by conventional Friend virus, the pathology of the disease induced by the regressing strain of Friend virus appeared to be self-limiting. The histopathology of the two diseases is compared in this report. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:970443

  10. Inactivation of feline calicivirus and murine norovirus during Dongchimi fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Hwa; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Ha, Sang-Do; Choi, Changsun

    2012-09-01

    Among the traditional fermented vegetables in Korea, Dongchimi is a type of kimchi with a large water base. We aimed to investigate the survival of norovirus surrogates during Dongchimi fermentation. Dongchimi spiked with feline calicivirus (FCV) or murine norovirus (MNV) was prepared following a traditional recipe. Dongchimi was initially fermented at room temperature overnight and then kept at 4 °C. The number of lactic acid bacteria, pH, acidity, and virus titer were measured 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20 days after fermentation. During the fermentation process, lactic acid bacteria and acidity increased. At the end of the fermentation, population of FCV and MNV decreased about 4.12 and 1.47 log units, respectively. Based on the significant reduction of norovirus surrogate during Dongchimi fermentation, we conclude that the risk of norovirus in Dongchimi may be low.

  11. Zika Virus Infection and Development of a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankit; Kumar, Anil

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV), there is an urgent need to investigate the pathogenesis of the symptoms associated with ZIKV infection. Since the first identification of the virus in 1947, the pathologies associated with ZIKV infection were thought to be limited with mild illness that presented fever, rashes, muscle aches, and weakness. However, ZIKV infection has been shown to cause Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and numerous cases of congenital microcephaly in children have been reported when pregnant females were exposed to the virus. The severity and the rate of spread of ZIKV in the last year has drawn alarming interest among researchers to investigate murine models to study viral pathogenesis and develop candidate vaccines. A recent study by Lazear and colleagues, in the May 2016 issue of cell host and microbe, is an effort to study the pathogenesis of contemporary and historical virus strains in various mouse models.

  12. Flow cytometric quantification of radiation responses of murine peritoneal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tokita, N.; Raju, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Methods have been developed to distinguish subpopulations of murine peritoneal cells, and these were applied to the measurement of early changes in peritoneal cells after irradiation. The ratio of the two major subpopulations in the peritoneal fluid, lymphocytes and macrophages, was measured rapidly by means of cell volume distribution analysis as well as by hypotonic propidium iodide (PI) staining. After irradiation, dose and time dependent changes were noted in the cell volume distributions: a rapid loss of peritoneal lymphocytes, and an increase in the mean cell volume of macrophages. The hypotonic PI staining characteristics of the peritoneal cells showed two or three distinctive G/sub 1/ peaks. The ratio of the areas of these peaks was also found to be dependent of the radiation dose and the time after irradiation. These results demonstrate that these two parameters may be used to monitor changes induced by irradiation (biological dosimetry), and to sort different peritoneal subpopulations.

  13. Metronidazole-induced alterations in murine spermatozoa morphology.

    PubMed

    Mudry, Marta D; Palermo, Ana M; Merani, María S; Carballo, Marta A

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the effect of metronidazole (MTZ) on the stages of the seminiferous epithelial cycle and spermatozoa morphology when the drug is administered in human therapeutic doses to 60-day-old CFW male mice. The frequency of the stages was established by counting spermatocytes in pachytene and spermatids. Abnormalities in the flagellum or the head, lack of maturity and multiple malformations, were considered in the morphological analysis. Murine control strain was compared with MTZ treated group (v.ip 130 mg/kg/bw) both kept in standard captivity conditions. Cellular composition or number of stages in the seminiferous tubules were not altered in MTZ exposed animals, though the number of cells in stages I, V and XII was increased. The sperm cell morphology was severely affected by the treatment with potentially serious consequences on the normal fertilization process. Thus, the MTZ has to be considered as a conceivable thread regarding male fertility. PMID:17184970

  14. Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa Extract Attenuates DSS-Induced Murine Colitis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jong-Chan; Lee, Kang Min; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    We examined the protective effects of Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa (AAK) extract on a murine model of acute experimental colitis. Colitis was induced by 4% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water of male C57BL/6 mice, for 7 consecutive days. Oral administration of AAK extract (500 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated DSS-induced symptoms such as anorexia, weight loss, events of diarrhea or bloody stools, and colon shortening. Histological damage was also ameliorated, as evidenced by the architectural preservation and suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration in colonic samples. Treatment improved the colonic mRNA expression of different inflammatory markers: cytokines, inducible enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases, and tight junction-related proteins. In the isolated serum, IgE levels were downregulated. Collectively, these findings indicate the therapeutic potentials of AAK as an effective complementary or alternative modality for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

  15. Functional expression of murine multidrug resistance in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, G.; Vera, J.C.; Rosen, O.M. ); Yang, Chiaping Huang; Horwitz, S.B. )

    1990-06-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) is associated with the overproduction of a plasma membrane glycoprotein, P glycoprotein. Here the authors report the functional expression of a member of the murine MDR family of proteins and show that Xenopus oocytes injected with RNA encoding the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein develop a MDR-like phenotype. Immunological analysis indicated that oocytes injected with the mdr1b RNA synthesized a protein with the size and immunological characteristics of the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein. These oocytes exhibited a decreased accumulation of ({sup 3}H)vinblastine and showed an increased capacity to extrude the drug compared to control oocytes not expressing the P glycoprotein. In addition, competition experiments indicated that verapamil, vincristine, daunomycin, and quinidine, but not colchicine, can overcome the rapid drug efflux conferred by the expression of the mouse P glycoprotein.

  16. Adult neurogenesis in the olfactory system and neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Gallarda, B W; Lledo, P-M

    2012-12-01

    The olfactory system is unique in many respects-two of which include the process of adult neurogenesis which continually supplies it with newborn neurons, and the fact that neurodegenerative diseases are often accompanied by a loss of smell. A link between these two phenomena has been hypothesized, but recent evidence for the lack of robust adult neurogenesis in the human olfactory system calls into question this hypothesis. Nevertheless, model organisms continue to play a critical role in the exploration of neurodegenerative disease. In part one of this review we discuss the most promising recent technological advancements for studying adult neurogenesis in the murine olfactory system. Part two continues by looking at emerging evidence related to adult neurogenesis in neurodegenerative disease studied in model organisms and the differences between animal and human olfactory system adult neurogenesis. Hopefully, the careful application of advanced research methods to the study of neurodegenerative disease in model organisms, while taking into account the recently reported differences between the human and model organism olfactory system, will lead to a better understanding of the reasons for the susceptibility of olfaction to disease.

  17. Treatment with gentamicin on a murine model of protothecal mastitis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ruilong; Yang, Qiaoling; Liu, Gang; Liu, Yongxia; Zheng, Bowen; Su, Jingliang; Han, Bo

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a murine protothecal mastitis model and to evaluate the treatment efficiency of gentamicin. Challenge routes were determined with a pathogenic Prototheca zopfii genotype 2 (P. zopfii) strain. 25 BALB/c mice were inoculated in mammary glands with graded dosages (10(3), 10(4), 10(5), 10(6), 10(7) CFU of P. zopfii) and killed on the 7th day. Another 25 animals were also killed at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 days after inoculation of 1 × 10(6) CFU of P. zopfii, the milk somatic cell counts, pathological section of mammary glands, and P. zopfii burden were observed. The antimicrobial activity was tested using disc diffusion test and minimum inhibitory concentrations. Gentamicin was given intramuscularly to analyze the therapeutic effect. The results showed that the best infection route was intra-mammary gland, and the mastitis model was established with 1 × 10(6) CFU of P. zopfii. After infection, the somatic cell counts increased significantly. The pathological reaction mainly consisted of infiltration of inflammatory cells, destruction of acini, accumulation of lymphocyte cells and the severity of the changes was dosage and time-dependent. The P. zopfii burden revealed that P. zopfii continuously replicated. In vitro susceptibility tests indicated that the Prototheca strains were antimicrobial susceptible to gentamicin at concentrations between 0.03 and 4 μg/ml. In vivo therapeutic assay demonstrated that high concentrations of gentamicin (≥20 mg/kg) could inhibit the growth of P. zopfii. We conclude that the murine model of protothecal mastitis was established successfully and gentamicin may be an effective choice for treatment of P. zopfii. PMID:23463523

  18. Hyperlipidemia affects multiscale structure and strength of murine femur.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Lutz, Andre; Du, Xia; Klimecky, Laureen; Kawas, Neal; Hourany, Talia; Jahng, Joelle; Chin, Jesse; Tintut, Yin; Nackenhors, Udo; Keyak, Joyce

    2014-07-18

    To improve bone strength prediction beyond limitations of assessment founded solely on the bone mineral component, we investigated the effect of hyperlipidemia, present in more than 40% of osteoporotic patients, on multiscale structure of murine bone. Our overarching purpose is to estimate bone strength accurately, to facilitate mitigating fracture morbidity and mortality in patients. Because (i) orientation of collagen type I affects, independently of degree of mineralization, cortical bone׳s micro-structural strength; and, (ii) hyperlipidemia affects collagen orientation and μCT volumetric tissue mineral density (vTMD) in murine cortical bone, we have constructed the first multiscale finite element (mFE), mouse-specific femoral model to study the effect of collagen orientation and vTMD on strength in Ldlr(-/-), a mouse model of hyperlipidemia, and its control wild type, on either high fat diet or normal diet. Each µCT scan-based mFE model included either element-specific elastic orthotropic properties calculated from collagen orientation and vTMD (collagen-density model) by experimentally validated formulation, or usual element-specific elastic isotropic material properties dependent on vTMD-only (density-only model). We found that collagen orientation, assessed by circularly polarized light and confocal microscopies, and vTMD, differed among groups and that microindentation results strongly correlate with elastic modulus of collagen-density models (r(2)=0.85, p=10(-5)). Collagen-density models yielded (1) larger strains, and therefore lower strength, in simulations of 3-point bending and physiological loading; and (2) higher correlation between mFE-predicted strength and 3-point bending experimental strength, than density-only models. This novel method supports ongoing translational research to achieve the as yet elusive goal of accurate bone strength prediction.

  19. Expression of fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) in murine tooth development.

    PubMed

    Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Otsuka-Tanaka, Yoko; Basson, M Albert; Moon, Anne M; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2011-05-01

    Fgf signalling is known to play critical roles in tooth development. Twenty-two Fgf ligands have been identified in mammals, but expression of only 10 in molars and three in the incisor loop stem cell region have been documented in murine tooth development. Our understanding of Fgf signalling in tooth development thus remains incomplete and we therefore carried out comparative in situ hybridisation analysis of unexamined Fgf ligands (eight in molars and 15 in cervical loops of incisors; Fgf11-Fgf14 were excluded from this analysis because they are not secreted and do not activate Fgf receptors) during tooth development. To identify where Fgf signalling is activated, we also examined the expression of Etv4 and Etv5, considered to be transcriptional targets of the Fgf signalling pathway. In molar tooth development, the expression of Fgf15 and Fgf20 was restricted to the primary enamel knots, whereas Etv4 and Etv5 were expressed in cells surrounding the primary enamel knots. Fgf20 expression was observed in the secondary enamel knots, whereas Fgf15 showed localised expression in the adjacent mesenchyme. Fgf16, Etv4 and Etv5 were strongly expressed in the ameloblasts of molars. In the incisor cervical loop stem cell region, Fgf17, Fgf18, Etv4 and Etv5 showed a restricted expression pattern. These molecules thus show dynamic temporo-spatial expression in murine tooth development. We also analysed teeth in Fgf15(-/-) and Fgf15(-/-) ;Fgf8(+/-) mutant mice. Neither mutant showed significant abnormalities in tooth development, indicating likely functional redundancy.

  20. Force-Induced Craniosynostosis in the Murine Sagittal Suture

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Rhee, Samuel T.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The etiology of non-syndromic craniosynostosis remains elusive. While compressive forces have been implicated in premature suture fusion, conclusive evidence of force-induced craniosynostosis is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine if cyclical loading of the murine calvarium could induce suture fusion. METHODS Calvarial coupons from post-natal day 21, B6CBA wild-type mice (n = 18) were harvested and cultured. A custom appliance capable of delivering controlled, cyclical, compressive loads was applied perpendicular to the sagittal suture within the coupon in vitro. Nine coupons were subjected to 0.3g of force for 30 minutes each day for a total of 14 days. A control group of nine coupons was clamped in the appliance without loading. Analysis of suture phenotype was performed using alkaline phosphatase and H&E staining techniques, as well as in situ hybridization analysis using Bone Sialoprotein (BSP). RESULTS Control group sagittal sutures—which normally remain patent in mice—showed their customary histological appearance. In contradistinction, sagittal sutures subjected to cyclic loading showed histological evidence of premature fusion (craniosynostosis). In addition, alkaline phosphatase activity and BSP expression was observed to be increased in the experimental group when compared to matched controls. CONCLUSIONS An in vitro model of forced-induced craniosynostosis has been devised. Premature fusion of the murine sagittal suture was induced with the application of controlled, cyclical, compressive loads. These results implicate abnormal forces in the development of non-syndromic craniosynostosis, which supports our global hypothesis that epigenetic phenomena have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of craniosynostosis. PMID:19952640

  1. Cloning of the genes encoding two murine and human cochlear unconventional type I myosins

    SciTech Connect

    Crozet, F.; El Amraoui, Z.; Blanchard, S.

    1997-03-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate a crucial role for unconventional myosins in the function of the sensory hair cells of the inner ear. We report here the characterization of the cDNAs encoding two unconventional type I myosins from a mouse cochlear cDNA library. The first cDNA encodes a putative protein named Myo1c, which is likely to be the murine orthologue of the bullfrog myosin I{beta} and which may be involved in the gating of the mechanotransduction channel of the sensory hair cells. This myosin belongs to the group of short-tailed myosins I, with its tail ending shortly after a polybasic, TH-1-like domain. The second cDNA encodes a novel type I myosin Myo1f which displays three regions: a head domain with the conserved ATP- and actin-binding sites, a neck domain with a single IQ motif, and a tail domain with the tripartite structure initially described in protozoan myosins I. The tail of Myo1f includes (1) a TH-1 region rich in basic residues, which may interact with anionic membrane phospholipids; (2) a TH-2 proline-rich region, expected to contain an ATP-insensitive actin-binding site; and (3) an SH-3 domain found in a variety of cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. Northern blot analysis indicated that the genes encoding Myo1c and Myo1f display a widespread tissue expression in the adult mouse. Myo1c and Myo1f were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomal regions 11D-11E and 17B-17C, respectively. The human orthologuous genes MYO1C and MYO1F were also characterized, and mapped to the human chromosomal regions 17p13 and 19p13.2- 19p1.3.3, respectively. 45 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. The murine biglycan: Complete cDNA cloning, genomic organization, promoter function, and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wegrowski, Y.; Pillarisetti, J.; Danielson, K.G.; Iozzo, R.V.; Suzuki, S.

    1995-11-01

    Biglycan is a ubiquitous chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that belongs to a growing family of proteins harboring leucine-rich repeats. We have cloned and sequenced the cDNA containing the complete murine biglycan, elucidated its genomic organization, and demonstrated functional promoter activity of its 5{prime} flanking region. The deduced biglycan protein core was highly conserved across species. However, the mouse biglycan (Bgn) gene was significantly larger than the human counterpart, primarily because of a large > 4.5-kb intron between exons 1 and 2. The mouse Bgn gene spanned over 9.5 kb of continuous DNA and comprised 8 exons, with a perfectly conserved intron/exon organization vis-a-vis the human counterpart. The promoter region was enriched in GC dinucleotide and contained numerous cis-acting elements including binding sites for SP-1, AP-1, and AP-2 factors. It lacked TATA and CAAT boxes typical of housekeeping genes. In support of this, primer extension analysis showed the existence of multiple transcription start sites. Transient cell transfection assays with a construct comprising the 548 hp upstream of the major transcription start site fused to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene showed functional promoter activity. Internal and 5{prime} deletion constructs showed that the distal promoter of the Bgn gene was required for full transcriptional activity. In contrast to the homologous proteoglycan decorin, the highest expression of biglycan mRNA was observed in lung, liver, and spleen of adult mouse and the lowest in skin, heart, and kidney. These results will be useful for the study of biglycan gene regulation and for the generation of mice with targeted null mutation of the Bgn gene. 56 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The effect of kynurenic acid on the synthesis of selected cytokines by murine splenocytes – in vitro and ex vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Siwicki, Andrzej K.; Wójcik, Roman M.; Turski, Waldemar A.; Kaczorek, Edyta

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA), a secondary product of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation, known mainly as an endogenous neuroprotectant, shows also immunotropic properties. Some quantities of KYNA are present in food and are effectively absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Since the spleen is an important target of dietary immunomodulators, the aim of the study was to determine the effect of exogenous KYNA on murine splenocytes. Splenocytes isolated from adult BALB/c mice were used in the study. Firstly, the effect of increasing KYNA concentrations (0-5 mM) on the viability, and proliferative and cytokine response (interleukin 1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α]) of murine splenocytes under in vitro conditions was determined. Then, proliferative and cytokine responses were determined in cells derived from animals receiving kynurenic acid in drinking water at concentrations of 2.5, 25, or 250 mg/l for 7-14 days. Cytokine levels were measured using commercial immunoassay (ELISA) kits, and cell viability and proliferation was determined with MTT reduction assay. Exogenous KYNA was characterised by a low level of cytotoxicity towards murine splenocytes, and was well tolerated by the animals receiving it in drinking water. As expected, it exhibited anti-inflammatory action towards the activated splenocytes, under both in vitro and ex vivo conditions. Surprisingly, however, KYNA itself influenced the activity of resting, non-stimulated cells, exerting an immunostimulant effect in vitro, and an immunosuppressive effect under ex vivo conditions. The obtained results indicate not only anti-inflammatory, but also more complex, immunomodulating properties of KYNA, which require more detailed investigation. PMID:27095921

  4. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S; Basco, Maria D S; Mullis, Lisa; Foley, Steven L; Hart, Mark E; Sung, Kidon; Azevedo, Marli P

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV). We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together.

  5. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S.; Basco, Maria D. S.; Mullis, Lisa; Foley, Steven L.; Hart, Mark E.; Sung, Kidon; Azevedo, Marli P.

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV). We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together. PMID:26658916

  6. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S; Basco, Maria D S; Mullis, Lisa; Foley, Steven L; Hart, Mark E; Sung, Kidon; Azevedo, Marli P

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV). We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together. PMID:26658916

  7. A murine-ES like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Buecker, Christa; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Polo, Jose; Daheron, Laurence; Bu, Lei; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Okwieka, Patricia; Porter, Andrew; Gribnau, Joost; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Geijsen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem cells have been shown to exist in two functionally distinct pluripotent states, embryonic stem cells (ES cell)- and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs), which are defined by the culture growth factor conditions. Human ES cells appear to exist in an epiblast-like state, which in comparison to their murine counterparts, is relatively difficult to propagate and manipulate. As a result, gene targeting is difficult and to-date only a handful of human knock-in or knock-out cell lines exist. We explored whether an alternative stem cell state exists for human stem cells as well, and demonstrate that manipulation of the growth factor milieu allows the derivation of a novel human stem cell type that displays morphological, molecular and functional properties of murine ES cells and facilitates gene targeting. As such, the murine ES-like state provides a powerful tool for the generation of recombinant human pluripotent stem cell lines. PMID:20569691

  8. Differential effects of processing time and duration of collagenase digestion on human and murine fat grafts

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, SA; Tannan, ST; Cao, Y; Peirce, SM; Lin, KY

    2015-01-01

    Background Autologous fat graft retention is unpredictable and mechanisms of optimization are poorly understood. Attempts at improving retention utilize collagenase experimentally and clinically to isolate the stromal vascular fraction to “enhance” fat grafts. However, no standardized duration for collagenase digestion or time following fat graft harvest has been established. This study investigates the effect of 1.) time after fat graft harvest and 2.) collagenase digestion time on interstitial cell and adipocyte viability in murine fat and human lipoaspirate. Methods Murine fat and human lipoaspirate were incubated ex vivo after harvest at room temperature for 120 minutes. Additional groups were incubated with collagenase for increasing five minute intervals from 30-60 minutes. Samples from each group were stained with BODIPY to quantify intact adipocytes and LIVE/DEAD kit to quantify interstitial cell viability. Results With increased time post-harvest, the number of intact adipocytes in murine fat and human lipoaspirate remained unchanged. Human interstitial cells were resistant to the effect of increased time ex vivo, while murine interstitial cells decreased in viability. In both populations, increased collagenase digestion time significantly decreased the number of viable adipocytes (murine: p-value ≤ 0.001, human: p-value ≤ 0.001) and interstitial cells (murine: p-value ≤ 0.001, human: p-value ≤ 0.001). Conclusions Human and murine adipocytes and human interstitial cells appear resistant to deleterious effects of increasing time following harvest. However, murine interstitial cells including are sensitive to increased time and prolonged collagenase digestion. These studies highlight the complex cellular components of fat grafts and how they respond differentially to time and collagenase digestion. PMID:26218393

  9. Dependence on exogenous methionine of rat sarcoma and murine leukemia cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Koziorowska, J; Pieńkowska, K; Tautt, J

    1980-01-01

    A comparative study was performed on methionine auxotrophy of rat sarcoma and murine leukemia cells taken directly from the organism and grown in culture in media lacking methionine or in which methionine was substituted by homocysteine. Methionine auxotrophy was observed in both kinds of cells. At low levels of methionine in the media containing homocysteine rat sarcoma cells showed an increase in growth. Addition of homocysteine to the media with low levels of methionine did not influence the survival of murine leukemia cells.

  10. HAC stability in murine cells is influenced by nuclear localization and chromatin organization

    PubMed Central

    Moralli, Daniela; Chan, David YL; Jefferson, Andrew; Volpi, Emanuela V; Monaco, Zoia L

    2009-01-01

    Background Human artificial chromosomes (HAC) are small functional extrachromosomal elements, which segregate correctly during each cell division. In human cells, they are mitotically stable, however when the HAC are transferred to murine cells they show an increased and variable rate of loss. In some cell lines the HAC are lost over a short period of time, while in others the HAC become stable without acquiring murine DNA. Results In this study, we linked the loss rate to the position of the HAC in the murine cell nucleus with respect to the chromocenters. HAC that associated preferentially with the chromocenter displayed a lower loss rate compared to the HAC that are less frequently associated. The chromocenter acts as a hub for the deposition of heterochromatic markers, controlling centromeric and pericentromeric DNA replication timing and chromosome segregation. The HAC which localized more frequently outside the chromocenters bound variable amounts of histone H3 tri-methylated at lysine 9, and the high level of intraclonal variability was associated with an increase in HAC segregation errors and delayed DNA replication timing. Conclusion This is a novel result indicating that HAC segregation is closely linked to the position in the murine nucleus and gives important insight for HAC gene expression studies in murine cells and establishing murine models of human genetic disease. PMID:19267891

  11. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  12. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  13. Specific lysis of murine cells expressing HLA molecules by allospecific human and murine H-2-restricted anti-HLA T killer lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Achour, A; Begue, B; Gomard, E; Paul, P; Sayagh, B; Van Pel, A; Levy, J P

    1986-06-01

    The lysis by human and murine anti-HLA cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) of murine cells expressing class I HLA molecule after gene transfection has been studied using two different murine cells: LMTK- and P815-HTR-TK-. Weak but significant HLA-A11-specific lysis was found occasionally with human CTL on the HLA-A11+ L cells. On the contrary, P815-A11 or P815-A2 cells were lysed strongly and specifically by HLA-A11 or HLA-A2-specific human CTL. The T8+T4- phenotype of the effector cells was confirmed and the reaction was inhibited by anti-HLA class I monoclonal antibodies. Despite their higher sensitivity to human CTL, the P815-HLA+ cells did not express higher levels of HLA antigens than L cells, and the presence or the absence of human beta 2 microglobulin was irrelevant. Anti-human LFA-1 antibodies abrogated the lysis of P815-A11+ cells showing that the LFA-1 receptor which is apparently lacking on the L cell surface was on the contrary expressed on P815 cells. On the other hand, murine anti-HLA CTL have been prepared by immunizing mice against syngeneic HLA-A11+ L cells. They lysed very efficiently and specifically these cells, but appeared completely devoid of activity against human HLA-A11 target cells. This barrier was apparently due to the H-2 restriction of these H-2k anti-HLA murine CTL, as shown by their inability to lyse allogeneic H-2d cells expressing HLA-A11, and by the blocking of their activity by anti H-2k antibodies. By contrast, xenogeneic anti-HLA CTL obtained by immunizing murine lymphocytes against human cells lysed both human and murine HLA+ cells but they reacted with a monomorphic epitope of the HLA molecule in a nonrestricted way. These results show that human cells lyse very efficiently P815 murine cells expressing HLA class I antigens; the higher sensitivity of P815 cells compared to L cells is probably due to the presence of a LFA-1 receptor on these cells; a class I molecule of human origin can be seen as an H-2-restricted minor

  14. Angiopoietin 2 stimulates migration and tube-like structure formation of murine brain capillary endothelial cells through c-Fes and c-Fyn.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yasushi; Nakamura, Takao; Kanetake, Hiroshi; Kanda, Shigeru

    2002-01-01

    The angiopoietin (Ang)/Tie2 system is exclusively involved in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Ang2 is known to inhibit Ang1-mediated phosphorylation of Tie2 as well as cellular responses during embryonic development. Recent studies have demonstrated that Ang2 has angiogenic activities in adult tissues and cultured endothelial cells. In the present study, we examined the downstream signaling pathways involved in Ang2-mediated cellular responses by murine brain capillary cell line, IBE cells. Tie2 was tyrosine phoshorylated by Ang2. Ang2 showed no effect on proliferation, but stimulated chemotaxis and tube-like structure formation. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) was activated by Ang2 through c-Fes and was involved in chemotaxis toward Ang2. Ang2 also activated c-Fyn in IBE cells. Cells expressing kinase-inactive c-Fyn attenuated Ang2-induced tube formation, suggesting that c-Fyn was responsible for Ang-2-mediated tube formation. Collecting these data, Ang2 activates c-Fes and c-Fyn, leading to migration and tube formation by murine capillary endothelial cells.

  15. Liberal Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toiviainen, Timo

    1988-01-01

    Discusses providers of and the concept of liberal adult education in Finland. Providers include (1) folk high schools, (2) adult education centers, (3) voluntary popular organizations, (4) public libraries, (5) evening schools, (6) cooperative groups formed of universities and other adult education providers, (7) summer universities, and (8)…

  16. Comparing Adult Education Worldwide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, Alexander N.; And Others

    Comparative international adult education, defined as that field in which adult educators from various countries compare their own institutions and practices with those of their counterparts in other nations, is examined. Provided is an account of adult education in nine European socialist countries (including the Soviet Union), as well as…

  17. Adult Numeracy Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steeds, Andrew, Ed.

    Designed primarily for adult literacy teachers and tutors, this curriculum describes the content of what should be taught in numeracy programs in order to meet the individual needs of adults through the selection and teaching of skills appropriate to those adults' needs. An introduction describes national standards and qualifications, learners,…

  18. Adult Educators' Core Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned…

  19. Adults Learning. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jenny

    Aimed at anyone who wants to know how to teach adults, this guide aims to build confidence, offer practical advice, and give the real-life flavor of helping fellow adults develop. Chapter 1 addresses adult learners: mindsets, motivation, and learning (learning cycle, learning styles, relevance, reinforcement and practice, experience, learning to…

  20. Adult Education in Hungary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csoma, Gyula; And Others

    Beginning with a brief survey of the national system, this work covers provisions since 1945 for adult education in Hungary. Educational objectives and other theoretical aspects of adult education in Hungarian society are described, together with the eight year elementary program, technical and vocational adult schools, general and professional…

  1. An Adult ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Literacy Resource Center, Columbia.

    This curriculum framework for adult literacy was written by 21 South Carolina adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instructors, as submitted to the South Carolina Literacy Resource Center. It is based on current theories in the fields of adult education and second language acquisition and is designed to be flexible so that it may be adapted to…

  2. Dimensions of Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Griff, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This broad introduction to adult and postcompulsory education offers an overview of the field for students, adult educators and workplace trainers. The book establishes an analytical framework to emphasize the nature of learning and agency of learners; examines the core knowledge and skills that adult educators need; discusses policy, research and…

  3. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional materials,…

  4. Adult Learning Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine Knowles' theory of andragogy and his six assumptions of how adults learn while providing evidence to support two of his assumptions based on the theory of andragogy. As no single theory explains how adults learn, it can best be assumed that adults learn through the accumulation of formal and informal…

  5. Adult Education in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkos, Alexios

    2008-01-01

    The central aim of this article is to analyse the current situation of adult education in Greece. The article focuses on the following points: (a) the degree of participation in programmes of continuing professional training and general adult education courses, (b) the quality and the outcomes of the adult education provision in Greece, and (c)…

  6. Adults Role in Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Charles E.; Padgett, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Do adults play a role in bullying? Do parents, teachers, school staff, and community adult leaders influence bullying behavior in children and teenagers? This article will focus on research regarding all adults who have almost daily contact with children and teens and their part in how bullying is identified, addressed, and prevented. This article…

  7. Adult Survival Skills Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsko, Gregory M.

    The purpose of this instrument is to supplement data from the Adult Basic Learning Examination in assessing the functional level of adults in daily situations. It may also be used as a teaching tool for adults requesting tutoring in specific concepts and skills presented in the instrument. This instrument is an informal assessment instrument and…

  8. Adult Learning: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Peter, Ed.

    This book on adult learning is divided into six sections. Section 1, Cognitive Processes, includes the following chapters: "Cognitive Processes: Contemporary Paradigms of Learning" (Jack Mezirow); "Information Processing, Memory, Age and Adult Learning" (Gillian Boulton-Lewis); "Adult Learners' Metacognitive Behaviour in Higher Education" (Barry…

  9. Kids Who Outwit Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.; Brendtro, Larry K.

    Kids who distrust adults are highly skilled at hiding their real nature and resisting change. Most adults shun such youths or get mired in conflict with them. Punitive get tough practices as well as traditional flaw-fixing treatment are reactive strategies that often drive these youths further from adult bonds and reinforce oppositional and…

  10. Adults Learning for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Alan

    This book, drawing on 30 years of adult education experience in England, Ireland, India, and other countries, contrasts the individualistic approach to adult education in the West with the social responsibility view of adult education in the developing world. The book's thesis is that the gulf between the approach of the West and that of…

  11. Young Adult Services Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boegen, Anne, Ed.

    Designed to offer guidelines, ideas and help to those who provide library service to young adults, this manual includes information about the provision of young adult (YA) services in six sections. The first section, which addresses planning and administration, includes a definition of a young adult and a checklist for determining community needs…

  12. The Adult Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Janet

    The 14 chapters of this textbook chronicle adult development from youth through old age, emphasizing both research and interviews with adults at various stages in their lives. Topics covered include the following: (1) the academic field of adult development; (2) theories and research methods; (3) aging and disease prevention; (4) sexuality and…

  13. Adult Education in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miser, Rifat; Ural, Ozana; Ünlühisarýklý, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the situation and practices of adult education in Turkey in terms of (a) participants, (b) providers, and (c) program areas. The data were derived from published statistical data and one-to-one interaction with adult education providers when such data are unavailable. Turkey has a long tradition of adult education with…

  14. A role for smoothened during murine lens and cornea development.

    PubMed

    Choi, Janet J Y; Ting, Chao-Tung; Trogrlic, Lidia; Milevski, Stefan V; Familari, Mary; Martinez, Gemma; de Iongh, Robb U

    2014-01-01

    Various studies suggest that Hedgehog (Hh) signalling plays roles in human and zebrafish ocular development. Recent studies (Kerr et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012; 53, 3316-30) showed that conditionally activating Hh signals promotes murine lens epithelial cell proliferation and disrupts fibre differentiation. In this study we examined the expression of the Hh pathway and the requirement for the Smoothened gene in murine lens development. Expression of Hh pathway components in developing lens was examined by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. The requirement of Smo in lens development was determined by conditional loss-of-function mutations, using LeCre and MLR10 Cre transgenic mice. The phenotype of mutant mice was examined by immunofluorescence for various markers of cell cycle, lens and cornea differentiation. Hh pathway components (Ptch1, Smo, Gli2, Gli3) were detected in lens epithelium from E12.5. Gli2 was particularly localised to mitotic nuclei and, at E13.5, Gli3 exhibited a shift from cytosol to nucleus, suggesting distinct roles for these transcription factors. Conditional deletion of Smo, from ∼E12.5 (MLR10 Cre) did not affect ocular development, whereas deletion from ∼E9.5 (LeCre) resulted in lens and corneal defects from E14.5. Mutant lenses were smaller and showed normal expression of p57Kip2, c-Maf, E-cadherin and Pax6, reduced expression of FoxE3 and Ptch1 and decreased nuclear Hes1. There was normal G1-S phase but decreased G2-M phase transition at E16.5 and epithelial cell death from E14.5-E16.5. Mutant corneas were thicker due to aberrant migration of Nrp2+ cells from the extraocular mesenchyme, resulting in delayed corneal endothelial but normal epithelial differentiation. These results indicate the Hh pathway is required during a discrete period (E9.5-E12.5) in lens development to regulate lens epithelial cell proliferation, survival and FoxE3 expression. Defective corneal development occurs secondary to defects

  15. Tumor vascularity and hematogenous metastasis in experimental murine intraocular melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, H E

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that primary tumor vascularity in a murine model of intraocular melanoma positively correlates with the development and hematogenous spread of metastasis. METHODS: Forty 12-week-old C57BL6 mice were inoculated in either the anterior chamber (AC) or posterior compartment (PC) of 1 eye with 5 x 10(5) cells/microL of Queens tissue culture melanoma cells. The inoculated eye was enucleated at 2 weeks; the mice were sacrificed at 4 weeks postinoculation, and necropsies were performed. The enucleated eyes were examined for histologic and ultrastructural features, including relationship of tumor cells to tumor vascular channels, vascular pattern, and mean vascular density. RESULTS: Melanoma grew and was confined to the eye in 12 of 20 AC eyes and 10 of 20 PC eyes. Histologic and electron microscopic examination showed tumor invasion into vascular channels. Five of 12 AC tumors (42%) and 8 of 10 PC tumors (80%) metastasized. All of the AC tumors, but none of the PC tumors, that distantly metastasized also metastasized to ipsilateral cervical lymph nodes (P = .00535). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern between the melanomas that did and did not metastasize to lungs in the PC group (P = .24), although there was a significant difference in the AC group (P = .02). Tumors with high-grade vascular patterns were more likely to metastasize than tumors with low-grade vascular patterns in the AC group. The mean vascular density positively correlated with the presence and number of metastases in both groups (P = .0000 and P < .001, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern and mean vascular density for AC versus PC melanoma (P = .97). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of metastasis in this murine intraocular melanoma model positively correlates with primary tumor vascularity. The melanoma metastasizes via invasion of tumor vascular channels. AC melanoma also

  16. [Kinetic study of splenocytes after allogeneic murine bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Hua; Zhou, Fan; Dou, Li-Ping; Wang, Li-Li; Wang, Xin-Rong; Li, Li; Yu, Li

    2010-08-01

    The study was purposed to understand immunological reconstitution of peripheral immune organs after transplantation, through establishing allogeneic murine bone marrow transplantation model and detecting the kinetic change of splenocytes after transplantation. C57BL/6 mice were donors, BALB/c mice were recipients. Recipient mice were divided into irradiation group (R), irradiation plus inoculating bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNC) group (B), and irradiation plus inoculating bone marrow mononuclear cells and spleno-MNC group (S). After transplantation, the mice were examined daily for the symptoms such as weight, hunched posture, activity, ruffled fur, diarrhea, and survival. Blood routine test was done once a week, splenocyte was counted and CD3, CD4, CD8, B220, CD11c positive cell relative count was detected by FACS on day 2, 7, 14, 27, 60 after transplantation, Liver, skin and intestine were biopsied for histopathological examination before dying. The results indicated that 89% mice in S group died of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) during day 6 to 78. The spleno-mononuclear cell count quickly decreased and reached to lowest level on day 2, then gradually recovered to level of pretransplantation on day 14; CD8 and B220 positive cells decreased to lowest level on day 12, in which CD8(+) cells quickly recovered and reached to level of pretransplantation, but the B220(+) recovered most slowly and sustained to be with low level, then gradually recovered to level of pretransplantation on day 60; CD3 and CD4 positive cells decreased relatively slowly, and reached to lowest level on day 14, then both gradually recovered to level of pretransplantation on day 60; CD11c positive cell count changed unstrikingly except day 14. It is concluded that when C57BL/6 mice are donors, and BALB/c mice are recipients treated with irradiation of 7.5 Gy and inoculated with 1 x 10⁷ bone marrow MNC and 1 x 10⁷ spleno-MNC, allogeneic murine bone marrow transplantation model

  17. A Role for Smoothened during Murine Lens and Cornea Development

    PubMed Central

    Trogrlic, Lidia; Milevski, Stefan V.; Familari, Mary; Martinez, Gemma; de Iongh, Robb U

    2014-01-01

    Various studies suggest that Hedgehog (Hh) signalling plays roles in human and zebrafish ocular development. Recent studies (Kerr et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012; 53, 3316–30) showed that conditionally activating Hh signals promotes murine lens epithelial cell proliferation and disrupts fibre differentiation. In this study we examined the expression of the Hh pathway and the requirement for the Smoothened gene in murine lens development. Expression of Hh pathway components in developing lens was examined by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. The requirement of Smo in lens development was determined by conditional loss-of-function mutations, using LeCre and MLR10 Cre transgenic mice. The phenotype of mutant mice was examined by immunofluorescence for various markers of cell cycle, lens and cornea differentiation. Hh pathway components (Ptch1, Smo, Gli2, Gli3) were detected in lens epithelium from E12.5. Gli2 was particularly localised to mitotic nuclei and, at E13.5, Gli3 exhibited a shift from cytosol to nucleus, suggesting distinct roles for these transcription factors. Conditional deletion of Smo, from ∼E12.5 (MLR10 Cre) did not affect ocular development, whereas deletion from ∼E9.5 (LeCre) resulted in lens and corneal defects from E14.5. Mutant lenses were smaller and showed normal expression of p57Kip2, c-Maf, E-cadherin and Pax6, reduced expression of FoxE3 and Ptch1 and decreased nuclear Hes1. There was normal G1-S phase but decreased G2-M phase transition at E16.5 and epithelial cell death from E14.5-E16.5. Mutant corneas were thicker due to aberrant migration of Nrp2+ cells from the extraocular mesenchyme, resulting in delayed corneal endothelial but normal epithelial differentiation. These results indicate the Hh pathway is required during a discrete period (E9.5–E12.5) in lens development to regulate lens epithelial cell proliferation, survival and FoxE3 expression. Defective corneal development occurs secondary to

  18. Assessment of carbon nanoparticle exposure on murine macrophage function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suro-Maldonado, Raquel M.

    There is growing concern about the potential cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. Exposure to respirable ultrafine particles (2.5uM) can adversely affect human health and have been implicated with episodes of increased respiratory diseases such as asthma and allergies. Nanoparticles are of particular interest because of their ability to penetrate into the lung and potentially elicit health effects triggering immune responses. Nanoparticles are structures and devises with length scales in the 1 to 100-nanometer range. Black carbon (BC) nanoparticles have been observed to be products of combustion, especially flame combustion and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been shown to be found in both indoor and outdoor air. Furthermore, asbestos, which have been known to cause mesothelioma as well as lung cancer, have been shown to be structurally identical to MWCNTs. The aims of these studies were to examine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on murine macrophage function and clearance mechanisms. Macrophages are immune cells that function as the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are likely to be amongst the first cells affected by nanoparticles. Our research focused on two manufactured nanoparticles, MWCNT and BC. The two were tested against murine-derived macrophages in a chronic contact model. We hypothesized that long-term chronic exposure to carbon nanoparticles would decrease macrophages ability to effectively respond to immunological challenge. Production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), cell surface macrophage; activation markers, reactive oxygen species formation (ROS), and antigen processing and presentation were examined in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following a 144hr exposure to the particulates. Data demonstrated an increase in TNF-alpha, and NO production; a decrease in phagocytosis and antigen processing and presentation; and a decrease in the expression levels of cell surface macrophage

  19. The CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase complex controls adult and embryonic stem cell differentiation and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Buckley, Shannon M; Cimmino, Luisa; Guillamot, Maria; Strikoudis, Alexandros; Cang, Yong; Goff, Stephen P; Aifantis, Iannis

    2015-01-01

    Little is known on post-transcriptional regulation of adult and embryonic stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Here we characterize the role of Ddb1, a component of the CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase complex. Ddb1 is highly expressed in multipotent hematopoietic progenitors and its deletion leads to abrogation of both adult and fetal hematopoiesis, targeting specifically transiently amplifying progenitor subsets. However, Ddb1 deletion in non-dividing lymphocytes has no discernible phenotypes. Ddb1 silencing activates Trp53 pathway and leads to significant effects on cell cycle progression and rapid apoptosis. The abrogation of hematopoietic progenitor cells can be partially rescued by simultaneous deletion of Trp53. Conversely, depletion of DDB1 in embryonic stem cell (ESC) leads to differentiation albeit negative effects on cell cycle and apoptosis. Mass spectrometry reveals differing protein interactions between DDB1 and distinct DCAFs, the substrate recognizing components of the E3 complex, between cell types. Our studies identify CUL4-DDB1 complex as a novel post-translational regulator of stem and progenitor maintenance and differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07539.001 PMID:26613412

  20. Evaluation of Initial Telomere Length and Changes after Transplantation in Adult Double-Unit Cord Blood Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Ashbridge, Beth; Zehir, Ahmet; Lubin, Marissa; Barker, Juliet N; Moore, Malcolm A S

    2015-07-01

    Cord blood (CB) leukocytes have inherent telomere length (TL) variation, and CB hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) can maintain high telomerase levels preventing telomere attrition in vitro. We evaluated TL changes in 13 adult double-unit CB transplant (CBT) recipients. In the 26 units, we observed a marked variation in CB TL at thaw (median, 9.99 kilobases [kb]; range, 6.85 to 13.5). All 13 patients engrafted. Of 11 engrafting with 1 unit, there was no correlation between unit dominance and TL (mean dominant unit TL, 8.84 kb ± 1.76; mean nonengrafting unit TL, 10.3 kb ± 1.81; P = .77). Serial measurements of TL up to 1 year after CBT demonstrated an overall mean 3.04 kb ± .16 TL decrease with only 1 patient exhibiting telomere maintenance. In summary, initial TL does not predict CB unit dominance. Moreover, our analysis suggests neonatal hematopoiesis makes a transition to an HSC characterized by changes in average TL and potentially low telomerase asymmetric cell division in adult CBT recipients. Further investigation of alterations in telomere length and its clinical implications after transplantation of this observation are indicated.

  1. The CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase complex controls adult and embryonic stem cell differentiation and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Buckley, Shannon M; Cimmino, Luisa; Guillamot, Maria; Strikoudis, Alexandros; Cang, Yong; Goff, Stephen P; Aifantis, Iannis

    2015-11-27

    Little is known on post-transcriptional regulation of adult and embryonic stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Here we characterize the role of Ddb1, a component of the CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase complex. Ddb1 is highly expressed in multipotent hematopoietic progenitors and its deletion leads to abrogation of both adult and fetal hematopoiesis, targeting specifically transiently amplifying progenitor subsets. However, Ddb1 deletion in non-dividing lymphocytes has no discernible phenotypes. Ddb1 silencing activates Trp53 pathway and leads to significant effects on cell cycle progression and rapid apoptosis. The abrogation of hematopoietic progenitor cells can be partially rescued by simultaneous deletion of Trp53. Conversely, depletion of DDB1 in embryonic stem cell (ESC) leads to differentiation albeit negative effects on cell cycle and apoptosis. Mass spectrometry reveals differing protein interactions between DDB1 and distinct DCAFs, the substrate recognizing components of the E3 complex, between cell types. Our studies identify CUL4-DDB1 complex as a novel post-translational regulator of stem and progenitor maintenance and differentiation.

  2. The Effects of Obesity on Murine Cortical Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Sophi

    This dissertation details the effects of obesity on the mechanical properties and structure of cortical bone. Obesity is associated with greater bone mineral content that might be expected to protect against fracture, which has been observed in adults. Paradoxically however, the incidence of bone fractures has been found to increase in overweight and obese children and adolescents. Femora from adolescent and adult mice fed a high-fat diet are investigated for changes in shape, tissue structure, as well as tissue-level and whole-bone mechanical properties. Results indicate increased bone size, reduced size-independent mechanical properties, but maintained size-dependent mechanical properties. Other changes in cortical bone response to obesity are observed with advancing age. This study indicates that bone quantity and bone quality play important compensatory roles in determining fracture risk, and that fracture risk may not be lessened for adults as previously thought.

  3. Histologic Lesions Induced by Murine Norovirus Infection in Laboratory Mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C C; Piotrowski, S L; Meeker, S M; Smith, K D; Maggio-Price, L; Treuting, P M

    2016-07-01

    Murine noroviruses (MNVs) are highly prevalent in laboratory mice, can cause persistent infections, and have been shown to infect macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells. To address the potential impact of MNV infection on research outcomes, numerous studies have been conducted with various mouse models of human disease and have generated mixed results, ranging from no impact to significant disease. Many of these studies included histologic evaluations after MNV infection, and these results have similarly been variable in terms of whether MNV induces lesions, despite the fact that localization of MNV by viral culture and molecular techniques have demonstrated systemic distribution regardless of mouse immune status. The aim of this review is to summarize the histologic findings that have been reported with MNV infection in several mouse models. The studies demonstrate that experimental infection of MNV in wild-type mice results in minimal to no histologic changes. In contrast, immunodeficient mice consistently have detectable MNV-induced lesions that are typically inflammatory and, in the most severe cases, accompanied by necrosis. In these, the liver is commonly affected, with more variable lesions reported in the lung, gastrointestinal tract, mesenteric lymph nodes, brain, and spleen. In specific disease models including atherosclerosis, MNV infection had a variable impact that was dependent on the mouse model, viral strain, timing of infection, or other experimental variables. It is important to recognize the reported MNV lesions to help discern the possible influence of MNV infection on data generated in mouse models. PMID:26792844

  4. Lack of XBP-1 Impedes Murine Cytomegalovirus Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Drori, Adi; Messerle, Martin; Brune, Wolfram; Tirosh, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-nucleus signaling cascade induced in response to ER stress. The UPR aims at restoring homeostasis, but can also induce apoptosis if stress persists. Infection by human and murine cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) provokes ER stress and induces the UPR. However, both CMVs manipulate the UPR to promote its prosurvival activity and delay apoptosis. The underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Recently, we demonstrated that MCMV and HCMV encode a late protein to target IRE1 for degradation. However, the importance of its downstream effector, X Box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), has not been directly studied. Here we show that deletion of XBP-1 prior to or early after infection confers a transient delay in viral propagation in fibroblasts that can be overcome by increasing the viral dose. A similar phenotype was demonstrated in peritoneal macrophages. In vivo, acute infection by MCMV is reduced in the absence of XBP-1. Our data indicate that removal of XBP-1 confers a kinetic delay in early stages of MCMV infection and suggest that the late targeting of IRE1 is aimed at inhibiting activities other than the splicing of XBP-1 mRNA. PMID:25333725

  5. Murine and epidemic typhus rickettsiae: how close is their relationship?

    PubMed

    Woodward, T E

    1982-01-01

    Typhus fever has occurred globally as epidemic and endemic disorders. In 1910, Brill reported a typhus-like illness which Zinsser and others determined to be recurrent epidemic typhus fever. Maxcy, in 1926, proposed rodents and fleas as reservoir and vector, respectively, of endemic typhus, which Dyer confirmed in 1930. Animals experimentally infected with epidemic typhus (Rickettsia prowazeki) are immune to murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi) and vice versa. Similar solid cross-immunity exists for humans. The two diseases are clinically similar in pathologic and serologic reactions. Human epidemic typhus presumably involved a man-louse-man cycle without an animal reservoir. This concept is now questioned. Antibodies to R. prowazeki have been reported in livestock in Africa, rats in Manila, and from flying squirrels and humans in the United States. R. prowazeki was recovered from blood specimens of goats, sheep, from ixodid ticks, louse, and flea-ectoparasites of flying squirrels, and tissues of flying squirrels. More than 20 cases of squirrel-related acute epidemic typhus have been reported in the United States. R. prowazeki has not been recovered from human cases. Chemical studies of R. prowazeki and R. typhi show genetic similarities but differences in genome size and degree of hybridization suggest that interconversions between the two agents do not occur rapidly in nature. It is proposed that, with time, their relatedness will become even closer. PMID:6817526

  6. TRPC6 regulates CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis of murine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Otto; Umlauf, Daniel; Frank, Svetlana; Schimmelpfennig, Sandra; Bertrand, Jessica; Pap, Thomas; Hanley, Peter J; Fabian, Anke; Dietrich, Alexander; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-06-01

    Unraveling the mechanisms involved in chemotactic navigation of immune cells is of particular interest for the development of new immunoregulatory therapies. It is generally agreed upon that members of the classical transient receptor potential channel family (TRPC) are involved in chemotaxis. However, the regulatory role of TRPC channels in chemoattractant receptor-mediated signaling has not yet been clarified in detail. In this study, we demonstrate that the TRPC6 channels play a pronounced role in CXCR2-mediated intermediary chemotaxis, whereas N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine receptor-mediated end-target chemotaxis is TRPC6 independent. The knockout of TRPC6 channels in murine neutrophils led to a strongly impaired intermediary chemotaxis after CXCR2 activation which is not further reinforced by CXCR2, PI3K, or p38 MAPK inhibition. Furthermore, CXCR2-mediated Ca(2+) influx but not Ca(2+) store release was attenuated in TRPC6(-/-) neutrophils. We demonstrate that the TRPC6 deficiency affected phosphorylation of AKT and MAPK downstream of CXCR2 receptor activation and led to altered remodeling of actin. The relevance of this TRPC6-depending defect in neutrophil chemotaxis is underscored by our in vivo findings. A nonseptic peritoneal inflammation revealed an attenuated recruitment of neutrophils in the peritoneal cavity of TRPC6(-/-) mice. In summary, this paper defines a specific role of TRPC6 channels in CXCR2-induced intermediary chemotaxis. In particular, TRPC6-mediated supply of calcium appears to be critical for activation of downstream signaling components.

  7. Inactivation of murine norovirus and feline calicivirus during oyster fermentation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Joo; Lee, Min Hwa; Seo, Jina; Ha, Sang-Do; Choi, Changsun

    2014-12-01

    Fermented seafood is popular in Asian countries. This study examined the survival of feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV) during oyster fermentation. Oysters spiked with FCV and MNV were fermented with 5% or 10% salt at 18 °C for 15 days, and MNV and FCV titers, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) populations, pH, and enzymatic activity were measured at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 15 days post-fermentation (DPF). Reductions in MNV and FCV were greater in 5% NaCl-supplemented oysters than in 10% NaCl-supplemented oysters. In 5% NaCl oysters, MNV and FCV titers significantly decreased by 1.60 log and 3.01 log, respectively, at 15 DPF. Populations of LAB increased from 3.62 log10 colony-forming units/g at 0 DPF to 8.77 log10 colony-forming units/g at 15 DPF during oyster fermentation supplemented with 5% NaCl supplementation, and the pH decreased gradually from 5.38 at 0 DPF to 4.17 at 15 DPF. During oyster fermentation, α-amylase, proteinase, and lipase were produced at higher levels in 5% salted oysters than in 10% salted oysters (P < 0.01). We concluded that many of the antimicrobial factors produced in fermented oysters could contribute to a reduction in foodborne viruses.

  8. Curcumin modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion in murine sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Vachharajani, Vidula; Wang, Si-Wei; Mishra, Nilamadhab; El-Gazzar, Mohammad; Yoza, Barbara; McCall, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective Circulating cell-endothelial cell interaction in sepsis is a rate-determining factor in organ dysfunction, and interventions targeting this process have a potential therapeutic value. In this project, we examined whether curcumin, an active ingredient of turmeric and an anti-inflammatory agent, could disrupt interactions between circulating blood cells and endothelium and improve survival in a murine model of sepsis. Methods Mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce sepsis vs. sham surgery. We studied leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation using intravital fluorescent video microscopy technique, blood brain barrier dysfunction using Evans Blue leakage method, P-selectin expression using dual radiolabeling technique and survival in mice subjected to Sham, CLP and CLP with curcumin pre-treatment (CLP+Curcumin). Results Curcumin significantly attenuated leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation, Evans Blue leakage in the brain tissue and improved survival in mice with CLP. P-selectin expression in mice with CLP+Curcumin was significantly attenuated compared to CLP in various microcirculatory beds including brain. Reduction in platelet adhesion was predominantly via modulation of endothelium by curcumin. Conclusion Curcumin pre-treatment modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion and blood brain barrier dysfunction in mice with CLP via P-selectin expression and improves survival in mice with CLP. PMID:20690979

  9. Neuronal and glial properties of a murine transgenic retinoblastoma model.

    PubMed Central

    Kivelä, T.; Virtanen, I.; Marcus, D. M.; O'Brien, J. M.; Carpenter, J. L.; Brauner, E.; Tarkkanen, A.; Albert, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Antigenic properties of a murine transgenic model for hereditary retinoblastoma, induced by a chimeric gene coding for Simian virus 40 large T antigen, an oncogene that inactivates the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product, were studied by immunohistochemistry. All transgenic mice develop bilateral intraocular retinal tumors in the inner nuclear layer with Homer Wright-like rosettes, and one quarter develop midbrain tumors resembling trilateral retinoblastoma. Cell lines TE-1 and TM-1 were established from intraocular and metastatic tumors, respectively. Intraocular tumors reacted with antibodies to neuron-specific enolase and synaptophysin, while vimentin, glial fibrillary acidic, and S-100 proteins were detected only in reactive glia derived from adjacent retina. The midbrain tumors showed weak reactivity to synaptophysin, and they blended with reactive astrocytes positive for glial markers. The tumors were negative for cytokeratins. Finally both derived cell lines expressed synaptophysin and individual neurofilament triplet proteins in immunofluorescence and Western blotting, supporting their essentially neuronal nature. The antigenic profile resembles human retinoblastoma, but differences in morphology and antigen distribution suggest a more close relationship to neurons of the inner nuclear layer than to photoreceptor cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1708946

  10. Can microbiota transplantation abrogate murine colonization resistance against Campylobacter jejuni?

    PubMed Central

    Plickert, R.; Fischer, A.; Göbel, U. B.; Bereswill, S.

    2013-01-01

    Enterocolitis caused by Campylobacter jejuni represents an important socioeconomic burden worldwide. The host-specific intestinal microbiota is essential for maintaining colonization resistance (CR) against C. jejuni in conventional mice. Notably, CR is abrogated by shifts of the intestinal microbiota towards overgrowth with commensal E. coli during acute ileitis. Thus, we investigated whether oral transplantation (TX) of ileal microbiota derived from C. jejuni susceptible mice with acute ileitis overcomes CR of healthy conventional animals. Four days following ileitis microbiota TX or ileitis induction and right before C. jejuni infection, mice displayed comparable loads of main intestinal bacterial groups as shown by culture. Eight days following ileitis induction, but not ileal microbiota TX, however, C. jejuni could readily colonize the gastrointestinal tract of conventional mice and also translocate to extra-intestinal tissue sites such as mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and blood within 4 days following oral infection. Of note, C. jejuni did not further deteriorate histopathology following ileitis induction. Lack of C. jejuni colonization in TX mice was accompanied by a decrease of commensal E. coli loads in the feces 4 days following C. jejuni infection. In summary, oral ileal microbiota TX from susceptible donors is not sufficient to abrogate murine CR against C. jejuni. PMID:24265916

  11. Cinnarizine and flunarizine as radiation sensitisers in two murine tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, P. J.; Hirst, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the calcium antagonists, cinnarizine and flunarizine on the radiation sensitivity of two murine tumours, RIF-1 and SCCVII/St was investigated. Initial experiments giving the compounds at 50 mg kg-1 i.p. indicated that cinnarizine had no effect on cell survival after 20 Gy of X-rays in the RIF-1 sarcoma and only a small effect in the SCCVII/St carcinoma. However, flunarizine produced a small radiosensitisation in the RIF-1 tumour and a substantial sensitisation in the SCCVII/St tumour. Subsequent experiments in the SCCVII/St tumour indicated that the optimal radiosensitising dose of flunarizine was approximately 5 mg kg-1, although some sensitisation was apparent throughout the range of 0.05-500 mg kg-1. Flunarizine produced a parallel shift in the X-ray dose response curve, equivalent to a 5-fold reduction in hypoxic fraction. In a normal tissue study, 5 mg kg-1 flunarizine did not enhance the reduction in white cell counts produced by X-ray doses of 2-8 Gy. These data suggest that flunarizine may have some potential use as a radiosensitiser. PMID:3224079

  12. Dynamic imaging of preimplantation embryos in the murine oviduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Jason C.; Wang, Shang; Larina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    Studying the dynamic events involved in early preimplantation embryo development during their transport from the ovary to the uterus is of great significance to improve the understanding of infertility, and eventually to help reduce the infertility rate. The mouse is a widely used mammalian model in reproductive biology, however, dynamic imaging studies of mouse preimplantation embryos have been very limited due to the lack of proper imaging tools for such analysis. Here, we introduce an innovative approach, which can potentially be used for three-dimensional imaging and tracking of murine oocytes with optical coherence tomography (OCT) as they exit the ovary and migrate through the oviduct to the uterus. The imaging is performed with spectral-domain OCT system operating at 70 kHz A-scan rate. The preimplantation embryos and surrounding cumulus cells can be clearly visualized. Results from our experiments indicate that OCT has great potential for dynamic imaging of the oviduct and oocyte tracking, which provides the foundation for future investigations aimed at understanding dynamic events during preimplantation stages in normal development as well as in mouse models of infertility.

  13. Organization, structure and expression of murine interferon alpha genes.

    PubMed

    Zwarthoff, E C; Mooren, A T; Trapman, J

    1985-02-11

    Using a human interferon-alpha probe we have isolated recombinant phages containing murine interferon-alpha (Mu IFN-alpha) genes from a genomic library. One of these phages contained two complete Mu IFN-alpha genes and part of a third gene. The insert of a second phage held two IFN genes. This indicates that the Mu IFN-alpha genes are clustered in the genome as is the case for the analogous human genes. The nucleotide sequences of these 5 genes were determined. They show that the genes are all different, albeit highly homologous. The deduced amino acid sequences show that four of the five genes contain a putative glycosylation site. Three genes were transiently expressed in COS cells and they gave rise to protein products showing antiviral properties. The expression of the five Mu IFN-alpha genes and the Mu IFN-beta gene was studied in virus-induced mouse L cells. The individual mRNAs were visualized in a nuclease S1 experiment, using a specific probe for each gene. In RNA preparations from induced cells mRNAs for each of the five alpha genes and the beta gene were present. However, substantial differences in the amounts of the individual mRNAs were observed.

  14. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease.

  15. Gene expression of lactobacilli in murine forestomach biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Clarissa; Tveit, Alexander Tøsdal; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacilli populate the gastro-intestinal tract of vertebrates, and are used in food fermentations and as probiotics. Lactobacilli are also major constituents of stable biofilms in the forestomach of rodents. In order to investigate the lifestyle of these biofilm lactobacilli in C57BL/6 mice, we applied metatranscriptomics to analyse gene expression (assessed by mRNA) and community composition (assessed by rRNA). Lactobacillales were the major biofilm inhabitants (62–82% of rRNA reads), followed by Clostridiales (8–31% of rRNA reads). To identify mRNA transcripts specific for the forestomach, we compared forestomach and hindgut metatranscriptomes. Gene expression of the biofilm microbiota was characterized by high abundance of transcripts related to glucose and maltose utilization, peptide degradation, and amino acid transport, indicating their major catabolic and anabolic pathways. The microbiota transcribed genes encoding pathways enhancing oxidative stress (glutathione synthesis) and acid tolerance. Various pathways, including metabolite formation (urea degradation, arginine pathway, γ-aminobutyrate) and cell wall modification (DltA, cyclopropane-fatty-acyl-phospholipid synthase), contributed to acid tolerance, as judged from the transcript profile. In addition, the biofilm microbiota expressed numerous genes encoding extracellular proteins involved in adhesion and/or biofilm formation (e.g. MucBP, glycosyl hydrolase families 68 and 70). This study shed light on the lifestyle and specific adaptations of lactobacilli in the murine forestomach that might also be relevant for lactobacilli biofilms in other vertebrates, including humans. PMID:24702817

  16. Murine Cytomegalovirus Exploits Olfaction To Enter New Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Lawler, Clara; Tan, Cindy S. E.; MacDonald, Kate; Bruce, Kimberley; Mach, Michael; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Viruses transmit via the environmental and social interactions of their hosts. Herpesviruses have colonized mammals since their earliest origins, suggesting that they exploit ancient, common pathways. Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) are assumed to enter new hosts orally, but no site has been identified. We show by live imaging that murine CMV (MCMV) infects nasally rather than orally, both after experimental virus uptake and during natural transmission. Replication-deficient virions revealed the primary target as olfactory neurons. Local, nasal replication by wild-type MCMV was not extensive, but there was rapid systemic spread, associated with macrophage infection. A long-term, transmissible infection was then maintained in the salivary glands. The viral m131/m129 chemokine homolog, which influences tropism, promoted salivary gland colonization after nasal entry but was not required for entry per se. The capacity of MCMV to transmit via olfaction, together with previous demonstrations of experimental olfactory infection by murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), suggest that this is a common, conserved route of mammalian herpesvirus entry. PMID:27118588

  17. Infectious Agents Are Not Necessary for Murine Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Samuel D.; Burton, Charlotte; Hernandez, Melba; Hassing, Heide; Montenegro, Judy; Mundt, Steve; Patel, Sushma; Card, Deborah J.; Hermanowski-Vosatka, Anne; Bergstrom, James D.; Sparrow, Carl P.; Detmers, Patricia A.; Chao, Yu-Sheng

    2000-01-01

    Recent work has revealed correlations between bacterial or viral infections and atherosclerotic disease. One particular bacterium, Chlamydia pneumoniae, has been observed at high frequency in human atherosclerotic lesions, prompting the hypothesis that infectious agents may be necessary for the initiation or progression of atherosclerosis. To determine if responses to gram-negative bacteria are necessary for atherogenesis, we first bred atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein (apo) E−/− (deficient) mice with animals incapable of responding to bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Atherogenesis was unaffected in doubly deficient animals. We further tested the role of infectious agents by creating a colony of germ-free apo E−/− mice. These animals are free of all microbial agents (bacterial, viral, and fungal). Atherosclerosis in germ-free animals was not measurably different from that in animals raised with ambient levels of microbial challenge. These studies show that infection is not necessary for murine atherosclerosis and that, unlike peptic ulcer, Koch's postulates cannot be fulfilled for any infectious agent in atherosclerosis. PMID:10770809

  18. Infectious agents are not necessary for murine atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wright, S D; Burton, C; Hernandez, M; Hassing, H; Montenegro, J; Mundt, S; Patel, S; Card, D J; Hermanowski-Vosatka, A; Bergstrom, J D; Sparrow, C P; Detmers, P A; Chao, Y S

    2000-04-17

    Recent work has revealed correlations between bacterial or viral infections and atherosclerotic disease. One particular bacterium, Chlamydia pneumoniae, has been observed at high frequency in human atherosclerotic lesions, prompting the hypothesis that infectious agents may be necessary for the initiation or progression of atherosclerosis. To determine if responses to gram-negative bacteria are necessary for atherogenesis, we first bred atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein (apo) E(-/)- (deficient) mice with animals incapable of responding to bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Atherogenesis was unaffected in doubly deficient animals. We further tested the role of infectious agents by creating a colony of germ-free apo E(-/)- mice. These animals are free of all microbial agents (bacterial, viral, and fungal). Atherosclerosis in germ-free animals was not measurably different from that in animals raised with ambient levels of microbial challenge. These studies show that infection is not necessary for murine atherosclerosis and that, unlike peptic ulcer, Koch's postulates cannot be fulfilled for any infectious agent in atherosclerosis. PMID:10770809

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed. PMID:25758653