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Sample records for adult murine model

  1. Partial Characterization of the Sox2+ Cell Population in an Adult Murine Model of Digit Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vineet; Siu, Bernard F.; Chao, Hsu; Hirschi, Karen K.; Raborn, Eric; Johnson, Scott A.; Tottey, Stephen; Hurley, Katherine B.; Medberry, Chris J.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue regeneration in response to injury in adult mammals is generally limited to select tissues. Nonmammalian species such as newts and axolotls undergo regeneration of complex tissues such as limbs and digits via recruitment and accumulation of local and circulating multipotent progenitors preprogrammed to recapitulate the missing tissue. Directed recruitment and activation of progenitor cells at a site of injury in adult mammals may alter the default wound-healing response from scar tissue toward regeneration. Bioactive molecules derived from proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been shown to recruit a variety of progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo to the site of injury. The present study further characterized the population of cells accumulating at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products in a well-established model of murine digit amputation. After a mid-second phalanx digit amputation in 6–8-week-old adult mice, treatment with ECM degradation products resulted in the accumulation of a heterogeneous population of cells, a subset of which expressed the transcription factor Sox2, a marker of pluripotent and adult progenitor cells. Sox2+ cells were localized lateral to the amputated P2 bone and coexpressed progenitor cell markers CD90 and Sca1. Transgenic Sox2 eGFP/+ and bone marrow chimeric mice showed that the bone marrow and blood circulation did not contribute to the Sox2+ cell population. The present study showed that, in addition to circulating progenitor cells, resident tissue-derived cells also populate at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products. Although future work is necessary to determine the contribution of Sox2+ cells to functional tissue at the site of injury, recruitment and/or activation of local tissue-derived cells may be a viable approach to tissue engineering of more complex tissues in adult mammals. PMID:22530556

  2. A model utilizing adult murine stem cells for creation of personalized islets for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Song, L J; Gerber, D A; Fair, J H; Rice, L; LaPaglia, M; Andreoni, K A

    2004-05-01

    Clinical islet cell transplantation has demonstrated great promise for diabetes treatment. Two major obstacles are the organ donor shortage and the immunoresponse. The purpose of this study was to create a model using the patient's own adult stem cell sources, possibly in combination with non-self cells, such as pancreatic, hepatic, or embryonic stem cells, to create "personalized" islets. We hypothesize that the reconstructed islets have the normal capability to produce insulin and glucagon with reduced immunoresponses after transplantation. Stem cells are a proliferating population of master cells that have the ability for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. The recently developed photolithograph-based, biologic, microelectromechanic system (BioMEMS) technique supplies a useful tool for biomedical applications. Our lab has developed a novel method that integrates the adult stem cell and BioMEMS to reconstruct personalized islets. We selected islet-derived progenitor cells (IPC) for repairing and reconstructing STZ-diabetic islets. A6(+)/PYY(+) or A6(+)/ngn3(+) cells were selected to manipulate the neoislets. After 3 to 4 weeks in culture, the reconstructed cells formed islet-like clusters containing insulin or glucagon producing cells. The pilot results showed the ability of these reconstructed islets to correct hyperglycemia when transplanted into a STZ-diabetic isograft mouse model. Although several technical problems remain with the mouse model, namely, the difficulty to collect enough islets from a single mouse because of animal size, the mouse isograft model is suitable for personalized islet development.

  3. Organotypical tissue cultures from adult murine colon as an in vitro model of intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bareiss, Petra M.; Metzger, Marco; Sohn, Kai; Rupp, Steffen; Frick, Julia S.; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Lang, Florian; Schwarz, Heinz; Skutella, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Together with animal experiments, organotypical cell cultures are important models for analyzing cellular interactions of the mucosal epithelium and pathogenic mechanisms in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional culture model from the adult mouse colon for cell biological investigations in an in vivo-like environment. These explant cultures were cultured for up to 2 weeks and maintained typical characteristics of the intestinal mucosa, including a high-prismatic epithelium with specific epithelial cell-to-cell connections, a basal lamina and various connective tissue cell types, as analyzed with immunohistological and electron microscopic methods. The function of the epithelium was tested by treating the cultures with dexamethasone, which resulted in a strong upregulation of the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 similar to that found in vivo. The culture system was investigated in infection experiments with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Wildtype but not Δcph1/Δefg1-knockout Candida adhered to, penetrated and infiltrated the epithelial barrier. The results demonstrate the potential usefulness of this intestinal in vitro model for studying epithelial cell-cell interactions, cellular signaling and microbiological infections in a three-dimensional cell arrangement. PMID:18320204

  4. Hypocellularity in the Murine Model for Down Syndrome Ts65Dn Is Not Affected by Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    López-Hidalgo, Rosa; Ballestín, Raul; Vega, Jessica; Blasco-Ibáñez, José M.; Crespo, Carlos; Gilabert-Juan, Javier; Nácher, Juan; Varea, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused by the presence of an extra copy of the chromosome 21 and it is the most common aneuploidy producing intellectual disability. Neural mechanisms underlying this alteration may include defects in the formation of neuronal networks, information processing and brain plasticity. The murine model for DS, Ts65Dn, presents reduced adult neurogenesis. This reduction has been suggested to underlie the hypocellularity of the hippocampus as well as the deficit in olfactory learning in the Ts65Dn mice. Similar alterations have also been observed in individuals with DS. To determine whether the impairment in adult neurogenesis is, in fact, responsible for the hypocellularity in the hippocampus and physiology of the olfactory bulb, we have analyzed cell proliferation and neuronal maturation in the two major adult neurogenic niches in the Ts656Dn mice: the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Additionally, we carried out a study to determine the survival rate and phenotypic fate of newly generated cells in both regions, injecting 5′BrdU and sacrificing the mice 21 days later, and analyzing the number and phenotype of the remaining 5′BrdU-positive cells. We observed a reduction in the number of proliferating (Ki67 positive) cells and immature (doublecortin positive) neurons in the subgranular and SVZ of Ts65Dn mice, but we did not observe changes in the number of surviving cells or in their phenotype. These data correlated with a lower number of apoptotic cells (cleaved caspase 3 positive) in Ts65Dn. We conclude that although adult Ts65Dn mice have a lower number of proliferating cells, it is compensated by a lower level of cell death. This higher survival rate in Ts65Dn produces a final number of mature cells similar to controls. Therefore, the reduction of adult neurogenesis cannot be held responsible for the neuronal hypocellularity in the hippocampus or for the olfactory learning deficit of Ts65Dn mice

  5. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    PubMed

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  6. Murine Model of Hindlimb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Niiyama, Hiroshi; Huang, Ngan F.; Rollins, Mark D.; Cooke, John P.

    2009-01-01

    In the United States, peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects about 10 million individuals, and is also prevalent worldwide. Medical therapies for symptomatic relief are limited. Surgical or endovascular interventions are useful for some individuals, but long-term results are often disappointing. As a result, there is a need for developing new therapies to treat PAD. The murine hindlimb ischemia preparation is a model of PAD, and is useful for testing new therapies. When compared to other models of tissue ischemia such as coronary or cerebral artery ligation, femoral artery ligation provides for a simpler model of ischemic tissue. Other advantages of this model are the ease of access to the femoral artery and low mortality rate. In this video, we demonstrate the methodology for the murine model of unilateral hindimb ischemia. The specific materials and procedures for creating and evaluating the model will be described, including the assessment of limb perfusion by laser Doppler imaging. This protocol can also be utilized for the transplantation and non-invasive tracking of cells, which is demonstrated by Huang et al.1. PMID:19229179

  7. Murine model of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Louise; Prosser, Hamish C G; Tan, Joanne T M; Vanags, Laura Z; Ng, Martin K C; Bursill, Christina A

    2013-05-28

    Wound healing and repair are the most complex biological processes that occur in human life. After injury, multiple biological pathways become activated. Impaired wound healing, which occurs in diabetic patients for example, can lead to severe unfavorable outcomes such as amputation. There is, therefore, an increasing impetus to develop novel agents that promote wound repair. The testing of these has been limited to large animal models such as swine, which are often impractical. Mice represent the ideal preclinical model, as they are economical and amenable to genetic manipulation, which allows for mechanistic investigation. However, wound healing in a mouse is fundamentally different to that of humans as it primarily occurs via contraction. Our murine model overcomes this by incorporating a splint around the wound. By splinting the wound, the repair process is then dependent on epithelialization, cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, which closely mirror the biological processes of human wound healing. Whilst requiring consistency and care, this murine model does not involve complicated surgical techniques and allows for the robust testing of promising agents that may, for example, promote angiogenesis or inhibit inflammation. Furthermore, each mouse acts as its own control as two wounds are prepared, enabling the application of both the test compound and the vehicle control on the same animal. In conclusion, we demonstrate a practical, easy-to-learn, and robust model of wound healing, which is comparable to that of humans.

  8. Augmented efficacy with the combination of blockade of the Notch-1 pathway, bortezomib and romidepsin in a murine MT-1 adult T-cell leukemia model.

    PubMed

    Yu, P; Petrus, M N; Ju, W; Zhang, M; Conlon, K C; Nakagawa, M; Maeda, M; Bamford, R N; Waldmann, T A

    2015-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive malignancy caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1. There is no accepted curative therapy for ATL. We have reported that certain ATL patients have increased Notch-1 signaling along with constitutive activation of the nuclear factor-κB pathway. Physical and functional interaction between these two pathways provides the rationale to combine the γ-secretase inhibitor compound E with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Moreover, romidepsin, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, has demonstrated major antitumor action in leukemia/lymphoma. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the single agents and the combination of these agents in a murine model of human ATL, the MT-1 model. Single and double agents inhibited tumor growth as monitored by tumor size (P<0.05), and prolonged survival of leukemia-bearing mice (P<0.05) compared with the control group. The combination of three agents significantly enhanced the antitumor efficacy as assessed by tumor size, tumor markers in the serum (human soluble interleukin-2 receptor-α and β2-microglobulin) and survival of the MT-1 tumor-bearing mice, compared with all other treatment groups (P<0.05). Improved therapeutic efficacy obtained by combining compound E, bortezomib and romidepsin supports a clinical trial of this combination in the treatment of ATL.

  9. Enhanced habit-based learning and decreased neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus in a murine model of chronic social stress.

    PubMed

    Ferragud, A; Haro, A; Sylvain, A; Velázquez-Sánchez, C; Hernández-Rabaza, V; Canales, J J

    2010-06-26

    Stress can induce preferential engagement of habit learning mediated by the basal ganglia, relative to learning that involves complex spatial associations contributed by the hippocampal formation. We explored in mice the influence that chronic episodes of social stress exert on the selection of cognitive/spatial vs. habit-based learning strategies. Male mice were exposed to repeated episodes of social confrontation and were categorized as dominant, subordinate or undetermined according to quantitative ethologically relevant parameters of aggression. Mice were then trained in a conditional discrimination task in the T-maze in the presence of allocentric cues until five correct choices were made. The T-maze was then turned 180 degrees and mice were categorized as "cue-learners" or "place-learners" on the basis of their first response in the probe test. Mice showed a graded preference for place vs. cue learning strategies depending on their social categorization (control>undetermined>dominant>subordinate), which ranged from 55% in controls to only 10% in subordinate mice. The response of subordinate mice differed significantly from controls. Hippocampal neurogenesis was studied in the different groups of mice. In keeping with the tendency to engage habit learning, 2,5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation in the DG was reduced in mice that experienced agonistic encounters, and so was the expression of doublecortin, a marker for immature neurons. These observations suggest that chronic social stress impairs neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, weakens spatial learning and strengthens habit-like responses.

  10. Murine models of human wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jerry S; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-01-01

    In vivo wound healing experiments remain the most predictive models for studying human wound healing, allowing an accurate representation of the complete wound healing environment including various cell types, environmental cues, and paracrine interactions. Small animals are economical, easy to maintain, and allow researchers to take advantage of the numerous transgenic strains that have been developed to investigate the specific mechanisms involved in wound healing and regeneration. Here we describe three reproducible murine wound healing models that recapitulate the human wound healing process.

  11. Murine models of vaginal trichomonad infections.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Eduardo R; Eckmann, Lars; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2011-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus cause common sexually transmitted infections in humans and cattle, respectively. Mouse models of trichomoniasis are important for pathogenic and therapeutic studies. Here, we compared murine genital infections with T. vaginalis and T. foetus. Persistent vaginal infection with T. foetus was established with 100 parasites but T. vaginalis infection required doses of 10(6), perhaps because of greater susceptibility to killing by mouse vaginal polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Infection with T. vaginalis persisted longest after combined treatment of mice with estrogen and dexamethasone, whereas infection was only short-lived when mice were given estrogen or dexamethasone alone, co-infected with Lactobacillus acidophilus, and/or pretreated with antibiotics. Infection rates were similar with metronidazole-resistant (MR) and metronidazole-sensitive (MS) T. vaginalis. High dose but not low dose metronidazole treatment controlled infection with MS better than MR T. vaginalis. These murine models will be valuable for investigating the pathogenesis and treatment of trichomoniasis. PMID:21976570

  12. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  13. Review of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Hicks, John; Bullard, Daniel C

    2006-01-01

    While murine models of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis have been available for sometime, it is only recently that immune and inflammatory mechanisms and molecular genetics have been extensively investigated. Genes involved in murine and human lupus nephritis have been discovered and provide insight into this disease process and provide avenues for molecular-targeted therapy. Immune modulation of murine nephritis has provided insight into novel therapy that may attenuate this disease or halt disease progression. With the advances in understanding the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis using translational research modalities, including electron microscopy, and molecular genetics, many "designer" therapies have become available for clinical use and for clinical investigational trials. This paper reviews autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models, candidate genes involved in lupus nephritis, adhesion molecules implicated in murine lupus-like nephritis, immune modulation of murine lupus-like nephritis, and novel and potential therapy for immune complex glomerulonephritis.

  14. The murine excisional wound model: Contraction revisited

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Mirza, Rita; Kwon, Young; DiPietro, Luisa A.; Koh, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Rodent models of healing are considered limited because of the perception that rodent wounds heal by contraction while humans heal by re-epithelialization. The purpose of this report is to present evidence that simple murine excisional wounds provide a valid and reproducible wound model that heals by both contraction and re-epithelialization. Previous studies have shown that, although rodent wounds contract by up to 80%, much of this contraction occurs only after epithelial closure. To confirm these previous findings, we measured re-epithelialization and contraction in three separate mouse strains, (BALB/c, db/+ and db/db); re-epithelialization and contraction each accounted for ~40-60% of the initial closure of full thickness excisional wounds. After closure, the wound continues to contract and this provides the impression of dominant closure by contraction. In conclusion, the simple excisional rodent wound model produces a well-defined and readily identifiable wound bed over which the process of re-epithelialization is clearly measurable. PMID:26136050

  15. Assessment of DNA synthesis in Islet-1{sup +} cells in the adult murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Florian Mehrkens, Dennis Starbatty, Jutta Nicol, Philipp Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Islet-1 was expressed in the adult heart. • Islet-1-positive cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. • Sinoatrial node cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. - Abstract: Rationale: Islet-1 positive (Islet-1{sup +}) cardiac progenitor cells give rise to the right ventricle, atria and outflow tract during murine cardiac development. In the adult heart Islet-1 expression is limited to parasympathetic neurons, few cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, within the proximal aorta and pulmonary artery and sinoatrial node cells. Its role in these cells is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that Islet-1{sup +} cells retain proliferative activity and may therefore play a role in regenerating specialized regions in the heart. Methods and results: DNA synthesis was analyzed by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine ({sup 3}H-thymidine) in Isl-1-nLacZ mice, a transgenic model with an insertion of a nuclear beta-galactosidase in the Islet-1 locus. Mice received daily injections of {sup 3}H-thymidine for 5 days. DNA synthesis was visualized throughout the heart by dipping autoradiography of cryosections. Colocalization of an nLacZ-signal and silver grains would indicate DNA synthesis in Islet-1{sup +} cells. Whereas Islet{sup −} non-myocyte nuclei were regularly marked by accumulation of silver grains, colocalization with nLacZ-signals was not detected in >25,000 cells analyzed. Conclusions: Islet-1{sup +} cells are quiescent in the adult heart, suggesting that, under normal conditions, even pacemaking cells do not proliferate at higher rates than normal cardiac myocytes.

  16. Characterization of eosinophilic esophagitis murine models using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Noti, Mario; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Artis, David; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies using murine models are critical for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying immune-mediated disorders such as Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of providing three-dimensional images with axial and transverse resolutions of 5 µm and 10 µm, respectively, was utilized to obtain esophageal images from a murine model of EoE-like disease ex vivo. Structural changes in the esophagus of wild-type (Tslpr+/+) and mutant (Tslpr−/−) mice with EoE-like disease were quantitatively evaluated and food impaction sites in the esophagus of diseased mice were monitored using OCT. Here, the capability of OCT as a label-free imaging tool devoid of tissue-processing artifacts to effectively characterize murine EoE-like disease models has been demonstrated. PMID:24575353

  17. Differential expression of murine adult hemoglobins in early ontogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzyniak, C.J.; Lewis, S.E.; Popp, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A hemoglobin mutation is described that permits study of the expression of the two adult ..beta..-globin genes throughout fetal and postnatal development. Mice with a mutation at the Hbb/sup s/, ..beta..-globin locus, were used to study the relative levels of ..beta..-s2major and ..beta..-sminor globins specified by the mutant Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype during development. At 11.5 days of gestation ..beta..-sminor comprised over 80% and ..beta..-s2major under 20% of the adult beta-globin. The relative level of ..beta..-sminor decreased through fetal development; at birth ..beta..-sminor represented 33.7% of the ..beta..-globin. The adult values of 71.0% ..beta..-s2major and 29.0% ..beta..-sminor globin are expressed in mice six days after birth. Because the two ..beta..-globin genes are expressed in mice of the Hbb/sup 2s/ haplotype, both the ..beta..-smajor and ..beta..-sminor genes must be expressed in mice of the Hbb/sup s/ haplotype. Expression of the ..beta..-sminor gene is elevated to 35.6% in Hbb/sup s2/ mice that have been bled repeatedly. Thus, the 5' ..beta..-s2major and 3' ..beta..-sminor genes of the Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype and, presumably the 5' ..beta..-smajor and 3' ..beta..-sminor genes of the Hbb/sup s/ haplotype, are regulated independently and are homologous to the 5' ..beta..-dmajor and 3' ..beta..-dminor genes of the Hbb/sup d/ haplotype. Mice of the Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype are better than mice of the Hbb/sup d/ haplotytpe for studying the mechanisms of hemoglobin switching because the Hbb/sup s2/ each of the three embryonic and two adult hemoglobins can be separated by electrophoresis. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Label-Retaining Cells in the Adult Murine Salivary Glands Possess Characteristics of Adult Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chibly, Alejandro M.; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction. PMID:25238060

  19. Label-retaining cells in the adult murine salivary glands possess characteristics of adult progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chibly, Alejandro M; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction.

  20. Comprehensive Echocardiographic Assessment of the Right Ventricle in Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nishi; Singh, Harpreet

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-invasive high-resolution echocardiography to evaluate cardiovascular function of small animals is increasingly being used due to availability of genetically engineered murine models. Even though guidelines and standard values for humans were revised by the American Society of Echocardiography, evaluations on murine models are not performed according to any standard protocols. These limitations are preventing translation of preclinical evaluations to clinical meaningful conclusions. We have assessed the right heart of two commonly used murine models according to standard clinical guidelines, and provided the practical guide and sample values for cardiac assessments. Methods Right heart echocardiography evaluations of CD1 and C57BL/6 mice were performed under 1–3% isoflurane anesthesia using Vevo® 2100 Imaging System with a high-frequency (18–38 MHz) probe (VisualSonics MS400). We have provided a practical guide on how to image and assess the right heart of a mouse which is frequently used to evaluate development of right heart failure due to pulmonary hypertension. Results Our results show significant differences between CD1 and C57BL/6 mice. Right ventricle structural assessment showed significantly larger (p < 0.05) size, and pulmonary artery diameter in CD1 mice (n = 11) compared to C57BL/6 mice (n = 15). Right heart systolic and diastolic functions were similar for both strains. Conclusion Our practical guide on how to image and assess the right heart of murine models provides the first comprehensive values which can be used for preclinical research studies using echocardiography. Additionally, our results indicate that there is a high variability between mouse species and experimental models should be carefully selected for cardiac evaluations. PMID:27721954

  1. Effective treatment of a murine model of adult T-cell leukemia using 211At-7G7/B6 and its combination with unmodified anti-Tac (daclizumab) directed toward CD25.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Zhang, Meili; Garmestani, Kayhan; Talanov, Vladimir S; Plascjak, Paul S; Beck, Barbara; Goldman, Carolyn; Brechbiel, Martin W; Waldmann, Thomas A

    2006-08-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) consists of an overabundance of T cells, which express CD25. Therapeutic efficacy of astatine-211 ((211)At)-labeled murine monoclonal antibody 7G7/B6 alone and in combination with daclizumab was evaluated in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice given injections of MET-1 human T-cell leukemia cells. Daclizumab and 7G7/B6 are directed toward different epitopes of CD25. Either a single dose of 12 microCi (0.444 MBq) (211)At-7G7/B6 per mouse given intravenously or receptor-saturating doses of daclizumab given at 100 microg weekly for 4 weeks intravenously inhibited tumor growth as monitored by serum levels of human beta-2 microglobulin (beta(2)mu) and by prolonged survival of leukemia-bearing mice compared with the control groups (P < .001). The combination of 2 agents enhanced the antitumor effect when compared with groups treated with 12 microCi (0.444 MBq) of (211)At-7G7/B6 (P < .05) or daclizumab alone (P < .05). The median survival duration of the PBS group was 62.6 days and 61.5 days in the radiolabeled nonspecific antibody (211)At-11F11-treated group. In contrast, 91% of mice in the combination group survived through day 94. These results that demonstrate a significantly improved therapeutic efficacy by combining (211)At-7G7/B6 with daclizumab support a clinical trial of this regimen in patients with ATL. PMID:16569769

  2. Infections of neonatal and adult mice with murine CMV HaNa1 strain upon oronasal inoculation: New insights in the pathogenesis of natural primary CMV infections.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun; Zhang, Shunchuan; Nauwynck, Hans

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, naturally acquired infections of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are generally asymptomatic. Animal models mimicking the natural primary HCMV infections in infants and adults are scarce. Here, neonatal and adult BALB/c mice were inoculated oronasally with a Belgian isolate HaNa1 of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). None of the mice showed clinical symptoms. In neonatal mice, a typical systemic infection occurred. In adult mice, viral replication was restricted to the nasal mucosa and submandibular glands. Infectious virus was not detected in trachea, oral mucosa, pharynx, esophagus, small intestines of both neonatal and adult mice at all time points. Nose was demonstrated to be the entry site. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that in nose infected cells were olfactory neurons and sustentacular cells in olfactory epithelium and were macrophages and dendritic cells in nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT). Neonatal and adult mice developed similar antibody response pattern, though former magnitude was lower. In summary, we have established intranasal (without anesthesia) infections of neonatal and adult mice with murine CMV HaNa1 strain, which mimic the range and extent of virus replication during natural primary HCMV infections in healthy infants and adults. These findings might bring new insights in the pathogenesis of natural primary CMV infections. PMID:26474525

  3. Ferric Chloride-induced Murine Thrombosis Models.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Nieman, Marvin; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis (blood clot) is a common complication of many systemic diseases associated with chronic inflammation, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, obesity, cancer and chronic autoimmune rheumatologic disorders. Thrombi are the cause of most heart attacks, strokes and extremity loss, making thrombosis an extremely important public health problem. Since these thrombi stem from inappropriate platelet activation and subsequent coagulation, targeting these systems therapeutically has important clinical significance for developing safer treatments. Due to the complexities of the hemostatic system, in vitro experiments cannot replicate the blood-to-vessel wall interactions; therefore, in vivo studies are critical to understand pathological mechanisms of thrombus formation. To this end, various thrombosis models have been developed in mice. Among them, ferric chloride (FeCl3) induced vascular injury is a widely used model of occlusive thrombosis that reports platelet activation and aggregation in the context of an aseptic closed vascular system. This model is based on redox-induced endothelial cell injury, which is simple and sensitive to both anticoagulant and anti-platelets drugs. The time required for the development of a thrombus that occludes blood flow gives a quantitative measure of vascular injury, platelet activation and aggregation that is relevant to thrombotic diseases. We have significantly refined this FeCl3-induced vascular thrombosis model, which makes the data highly reproducible with minimal variation. Here we describe the model and present representative data from several experimental set-ups that demonstrate the utility of this model in thrombosis research. PMID:27684194

  4. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD. PMID:26811642

  5. Morphology and growth of murine cell lines on model biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Godek, Marisha L; Duchsherer, Nichole L; McElwee, Quinn; Grainger, David W

    2004-01-01

    All biomaterial implants are assaulted by the host "foreign body" immune response. Understanding the complex, dynamic relationship between cells, biomaterials and milieu is an important first step towards controlling this reaction. Material surface chemistry dictates protein adsorption, and thus subsequent cell interactions. The cell-implant is a microenvironment involving 1) proteins that coat the surface and 2) cells that interact with these proteins. Macrophages and fibroblasts are two cell types that interact with proteins on biomaterials surfaces and play different related, but equally important, roles in biomaterials rejection and implant failure. Growth characteristics of four murine cell lines on model biomaterials surfaces were examined. Murine monocyte-macrophages (RAW 264.7 and J774A.1), murine macrophage (IC-21) and murine fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines were tested to determine whether differences exist in adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, spreading, and fusion (macrophage lineages only) on these surfaces. Differences were observed in the ability of cells to adhere to and subsequently proliferate on polymer surfaces. (Monocyte-) macrophages grew well on all surfaces tested and growth rates were measured on three representative polymer biomaterials surfaces: tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), polystyrene, and Teflon-AF. J774A.1 cultures grown on TCPS and treated with exogenous cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF were observed to contain multinucleate cells with unusual morphologies. Thus, (monocyte-) macrophage cell lines were found to effectively attach to and interrogate each surface presented, with evidence of extensive spreading on Teflon-AF surfaces, particularly in the IC-21 cultures. The J774A.1 line was able to proliferate and/or differentiate to more specialized cell types (multinucleate/dendritic-like cells) in the presence of soluble chemokine cues. PMID:15133927

  6. Murine Models of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Elshafa Hassan; Baiocchi, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a B-lymphotropic gamma herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies. Most EBV-related cancers present complex medical management challenges; thus it has been essential to develop preclinical in vivo models allowing for the study of pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of these diseases. Early in vivo models used nonhuman primates; however, such models were limited by the inability of EBV to achieve viral latency, availability, and cost. Immunodeficient mouse strains emerged as efficient models that allow for engraftment of human mononuclear cells and controlled evaluation of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). By using highly immunodeficient strains of mice such as severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) and NOD/LtSz-scid ILrg(-/-)(NOG) mice, investigators have developed efficient platforms for evaluating pathogenesis of benign (HLH) and malignant (EBV-LPD) diseases associated with EBV. Humanized murine chimeric models have been essential tools for evaluating preventive strategies with vaccine and adoptive cellular approaches, as well as development of experimental therapeutic strategies. Manipulation of the human immune cells before engraftment or mutation of viral lytic and latent genes has enhanced our understanding of the oncogenic nature of EBV and the complexity of human immune responses to EBV. In this review, we discuss how the EBV murine models have evolved to become essential tools for studying the virology of EBV as it relates to human EBV-LPD pathogenesis, the immunobiology of innate and adaptive responses, and limitations of these models. PMID:27034395

  7. Optimization of murine model for Besnoitia caprae.

    PubMed

    Oryan, A; Sadoughifar, R; Namavari, M

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown that mice, particularly the BALB/c ones, are susceptible to infection by some of the apicomplexan parasites. To compare the susceptibility of the inbred BALB/c, outbred BALB/c and C57 BL/6 to Besnoitia caprae inoculation and to determine LD50, 30 male inbred BALB/c, 30 outbred BALB/c and 30 C57 BL/6 mice were assigned into 18 groups of 5 mice. Each group was inoculated intraperitoneally with 12.5 × 10(3), 25 × 10(3), 5 × 10(4), 1 × 10(5), 2 × 10(5) tachyzoites and a control inoculum of DMEM, respectively. The inbred BALB/c was found the most susceptible strain among the experienced mice strains so the LD50 per inbred BALB/c mouse was calculated as 12.5 × 10(3.6) tachyzoites while the LD50 for the outbred BALB/c and C57 BL/6 was 25 × 10(3.4) and 5 × 10(4) tachyzoites per mouse, respectively. To investigate the impact of different routes of inoculation in the most susceptible mice strain, another seventy five male inbred BALB/c mice were inoculated with 2 × 10(5) tachyzoites of B. caprae via various inoculation routes including: subcutaneous, intramuscular, intraperitoneal, infraorbital and oral. All the mice in the oral and infraorbital groups survived for 60 days, whereas the IM group showed quicker death and more severe pathologic lesions, which was then followed by SC and IP groups. Therefore, BALB/c mouse is a proper laboratory model and IM inoculation is an ideal method in besnoitiosis induction and a candidate in treatment, prevention and testing the efficacy of vaccines for besnoitiosis. PMID:27605770

  8. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Shannan L; Tesh, Robert B; Azar, Sasha R; Muruato, Antonio E; Hanley, Kathryn A; Auguste, Albert J; Langsjoen, Rose M; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2016-06-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼10(7) plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines.

  9. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Tesh, Robert B.; Azar, Sasha R.; Muruato, Antonio E.; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Auguste, Albert J.; Langsjoen, Rose M.; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain–Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼107 plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  10. Sexual transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in murine model.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marcelle; Nitz, Nadjar; Santana, Camilla; Moraes, Aline; Hagström, Luciana; Andrade, Rafael; Rios, Adriano; Sousa, Alessandro; Dallago, Bruno; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Hecht, Mariana

    2016-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is mainly transmitted by blood-sucking triatomines, but other routes also have epidemiological importance, such as blood transfusion and congenital transmission. Although the possibility of sexual transmission of T. cruzi has been suggested since its discovery, few studies have been published on this subject. We investigated acquisition of T. cruzi by sexual intercourse in an experimental murine model. Male and female mice in the chronic phase of Chagas disease were mated with naive partners. Parasitological, serological and molecular tests demonstrated the parasites in tissues and blood of partners. These results confirm the sexual transmission of T. cruzi in mice.

  11. Fluorescence tomography in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Kumar, Anand T. N.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Boas, David A.; Bacskai, Brian J.

    2007-02-01

    Noninvasive molecular imaging of amyloid plaques in murine Alzheimer's disease models would accelerate drug development and basic Alzheimer's research. Amyloid plaques differ from traditional fluorescent targets in size and spatial distribution and therefore present a unique challenge for biomarker development and tomography. To study imaging feasibility and establish biomarker criteria, we developed a digital mouse head model from a 100 μm-resolution, digital, segmented mouse atlas1. The cortical region of the brain was filled with a spatially uniform distribution of plaques that had different fluorescent properties from the surrounding brain tissue, similar to current transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence was simulated with a Monte Carlo algorithm using different plaque densities, detection geometries, and background fluorescence. Our preliminary results demonstrated that shielding effects might require nonlinear reconstruction algorithms and that background fluorescence would seriously hinder quantitative burden estimation. The Monte Carlo based approach presented here offers a powerful way to study the feasibility of non-invasive imaging in murine Alzheimer's models and to optimize experimental conditions.

  12. Surgical Modification of the Murine Calvaria Osteolysis Model.

    PubMed

    Al-Quhali, Ali Mohammed; Sun, Yu; Bai, Xizhuang; Jin, Zhe; Yu, Guibo

    2015-01-01

    The murine calvaria model has been adopted for evaluation of osteolysis and inflammation induced by polyethylene (PE) or metal wear debris. However, this model suffers from several complications. The purpose of our study is to introduce a surgical modification with lower complication rates, thus providing more accurate results. Forty C57/BL6 mice were divided into two groups, both receiving polyethylene particles. Surgical modifications were performed in group 1, and group 2 underwent traditional surgeries. The incidence of fluid leakage was recorded on the operative day. Curst formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were recorded on day 7. Histological osteolysis was demonstrated by HE staining of tissue slices. Micro-CT was used for quantifying evaluation of osteolysis in two groups. Intraoperative fluid leakage was significantly reduced in group 1. Postoperative crust formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were also significantly decreased in group 1. HE staining results revealed obvious osteolysis in group 1 and more obvious osteolysis in group 2. Bone volume fraction (BVF) was (0.32 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (0.24 ± 0.05). Bone mineral density (BMD) was (1.11 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (1.01 ± 0.02). Surgical modifications provide a reliable way for establishment of the murine calvaria osteolysis model. PMID:26769571

  13. Surgical Modification of the Murine Calvaria Osteolysis Model

    PubMed Central

    Al-quhali, Ali Mohammed; Sun, Yu; Bai, Xizhuang; Jin, Zhe; Yu, Guibo

    2015-01-01

    The murine calvaria model has been adopted for evaluation of osteolysis and inflammation induced by polyethylene (PE) or metal wear debris. However, this model suffers from several complications. The purpose of our study is to introduce a surgical modification with lower complication rates, thus providing more accurate results. Forty C57/BL6 mice were divided into two groups, both receiving polyethylene particles. Surgical modifications were performed in group 1, and group 2 underwent traditional surgeries. The incidence of fluid leakage was recorded on the operative day. Curst formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were recorded on day 7. Histological osteolysis was demonstrated by HE staining of tissue slices. Micro-CT was used for quantifying evaluation of osteolysis in two groups. Intraoperative fluid leakage was significantly reduced in group 1. Postoperative crust formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were also significantly decreased in group 1. HE staining results revealed obvious osteolysis in group 1 and more obvious osteolysis in group 2. Bone volume fraction (BVF) was (0.32 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (0.24 ± 0.05). Bone mineral density (BMD) was (1.11 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (1.01 ± 0.02). Surgical modifications provide a reliable way for establishment of the murine calvaria osteolysis model. PMID:26769571

  14. Surface Contaminants Inhibit Osseointegration in a Novel Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Colbrunn, Robb W.; Tatro, Joscelyn M.; Messerschmitt, Patrick J.; Hernandez, Christopher J.; Goldberg, Victor M.; Stewart, Matthew C.; Greenfield, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Surface contaminants, such as bacterial debris and manufacturing residues, may remain on orthopaedic implants after sterilization procedures and affect osseointegration. The goals of this study were to develop a murine model of osseointegration in order to determine whether removing surface contaminants enhances osseointegration. To develop the murine model, titanium alloy implants were implanted into a unicortical pilot hole in the mid-diaphysis of the femur and osseointegration was measured over a five week time course. Histology, backscatter scanning electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy showed areas of bone in intimate physical contact with the implant, confirming osseointegration. Histomorphometric quantification of bone-to-implant contact and peri-implant bone and biomechanical pullout quantification of ultimate force, stiffness and work to failure increased significantly over time, also demonstrating successful osseointegration. We also found that a rigorous cleaning procedure significantly enhances bone-to-implant contact and biomechanical pullout measures by two-fold compared with implants that were autoclaved, as recommended by the manufacturer. The most likely interpretation of these results is that surface contaminants inhibit osseointegration. The results of this study justify the need for the development of better detection and removal techniques for contaminants on orthopaedic implants and other medical devices. PMID:21801863

  15. Establishment of a New Murine Elastase-Induced Aneurysm Model Combined with Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Merx, Marc W.; Koeppel, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of our study was to develop a reproducible murine model of elastase-induced aneurysm formation combined with aortic transplantation. Methods Adult male mice (n = 6–9 per group) underwent infrarenal, orthotopic transplantation of the aorta treated with elastase or left untreated. Subsequently, both groups of mice were monitored by ultrasound until 7 weeks after grafting. Results Mice receiving an elastase-pretreated aorta developed aneurysms and exhibited a significantly increased diastolic vessel diameter compared to control grafted mice at 7 week after surgery (1.11±0.10 mm vs. 0.75±0.03 mm; p≤0,001). Histopathological examination revealed disruption of medial elastin, an increase in collagen content and smooth muscle cells, and neointima formation in aneurysm grafts. Conclusions We developed a reproducible murine model of elastase-induced aneurysm combined with aortic transplantation. This model may be suitable to investigate aneurysm-specific inflammatory processes and for use in gene-targeted animals. PMID:25068788

  16. Zika Virus Infection and Development of a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankit; Kumar, Anil

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV), there is an urgent need to investigate the pathogenesis of the symptoms associated with ZIKV infection. Since the first identification of the virus in 1947, the pathologies associated with ZIKV infection were thought to be limited with mild illness that presented fever, rashes, muscle aches, and weakness. However, ZIKV infection has been shown to cause Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and numerous cases of congenital microcephaly in children have been reported when pregnant females were exposed to the virus. The severity and the rate of spread of ZIKV in the last year has drawn alarming interest among researchers to investigate murine models to study viral pathogenesis and develop candidate vaccines. A recent study by Lazear and colleagues, in the May 2016 issue of cell host and microbe, is an effort to study the pathogenesis of contemporary and historical virus strains in various mouse models. PMID:27260223

  17. Murine Tumor Models for Oncolytic Rhabdo-Virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Falls, Theresa; Roy, Dominic Guy; Bell, John Cameron; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    The preclinical optimization and validation of novel treatments for cancer therapy requires the use of laboratory animals. Although in vitro experiments using tumor cell lines and ex vivo treatment of patient tumor samples provide a remarkable first-line tool for the initial study of tumoricidal potential, tumor-bearing animals remain the primary option to study delivery, efficacy, and safety of therapies in the context of a complete tumor microenvironment and functional immune system. In this review, we will describe the use of murine tumor models for oncolytic virotherapy using vesicular stomatitis virus. We will discuss studies using immunocompetent and immunodeficient models with respect to toxicity and therapeutic treatments, as well as the various techniques and tools available to study cancer therapy with Rhabdoviruses. PMID:27034397

  18. Zika Virus Infection and Development of a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankit; Kumar, Anil

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV), there is an urgent need to investigate the pathogenesis of the symptoms associated with ZIKV infection. Since the first identification of the virus in 1947, the pathologies associated with ZIKV infection were thought to be limited with mild illness that presented fever, rashes, muscle aches, and weakness. However, ZIKV infection has been shown to cause Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and numerous cases of congenital microcephaly in children have been reported when pregnant females were exposed to the virus. The severity and the rate of spread of ZIKV in the last year has drawn alarming interest among researchers to investigate murine models to study viral pathogenesis and develop candidate vaccines. A recent study by Lazear and colleagues, in the May 2016 issue of cell host and microbe, is an effort to study the pathogenesis of contemporary and historical virus strains in various mouse models.

  19. Identification and enrichment of colony-forming cells from the adult murine pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Lepore, D.A.; Roeszler, K.; Wagner, J.; Ross, S.A.; Bauer, K.; Thomas, P.Q. , E-Mail: paul.thomas@mcri.edu.au

    2005-08-01

    Stem and progenitor cells have been identified in many adult tissues including bone marrow, the central nervous system, and skin. While there is direct evidence to indicate the activity of a progenitor cell population in the pituitary gland, this putative subpopulation has not yet been identified. Herein we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel clonogenic cell type in the adult murine pituitary, which we have termed Pituitary Colony-Forming Cells (PCFCs). PCFCs constitute 0.2% of pituitary cells, and generate heterogeneous colonies from single cells. PCFCs exhibit variable proliferative potential, and may exceed 11 population doublings in 14 days. Enrichment of PCFCs to 61.5-fold with 100% recovery can be obtained through the active uptake of the fluorescent dipeptide, {beta}-Ala-Lys-N{epsilon}-AMCA. PCFCs are mostly contained within the large, agranular subpopulation of AMCA{sup +} cells, and constitute 28% of this fraction, corresponding to 140.5-fold enrichment. Interestingly, the AMCA{sup +} population contains rare cells that are GH{sup +} or PRL{sup +}. GH{sup +} cells were also identified in PCFC single cell colonies, suggesting that PCFCs have the potential to differentiate into GH{sup +} cells. Together, these data show that the pituitary contains a rare clonogenic population which may correspond to the somatotrope/lactotrope progenitors suggested by previous experiments.

  20. Alternatively activated macrophages determine repair of the infarcted adult murine heart

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Manabu; Shintani, Yasunori; Shintani, Yusuke; Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo; Yashiro, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Alternatively activated (also known as M2) macrophages are involved in the repair of various types of organs. However, the contribution of M2 macrophages to cardiac repair after myocardial infarction (MI) remains to be fully characterized. Here, we identified CD206+F4/80+CD11b+ M2-like macrophages in the murine heart and demonstrated that this cell population predominantly increases in the infarct area and exhibits strengthened reparative abilities after MI. We evaluated mice lacking the kinase TRIB1 (Trib1–/–), which exhibit a selective depletion of M2 macrophages after MI. Compared with control animals, Trib1–/– mice had a catastrophic prognosis, with frequent cardiac rupture, as the result of markedly reduced collagen fibril formation in the infarct area due to impaired fibroblast activation. The decreased tissue repair observed in Trib1–/– mice was entirely rescued by an external supply of M2-like macrophages. Furthermore, IL-1α and osteopontin were suggested to be mediators of M2-like macrophage–induced fibroblast activation. In addition, IL-4 administration achieved a targeted increase in the number of M2-like macrophages and enhanced the post-MI prognosis of WT mice, corresponding with amplified fibroblast activation and formation of more supportive fibrous tissues in the infarcts. Together, these data demonstrate that M2-like macrophages critically determine the repair of infarcted adult murine heart by regulating fibroblast activation and suggest that IL-4 is a potential biological drug for treating MI. PMID:27140396

  1. Treatment with gentamicin on a murine model of protothecal mastitis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ruilong; Yang, Qiaoling; Liu, Gang; Liu, Yongxia; Zheng, Bowen; Su, Jingliang; Han, Bo

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a murine protothecal mastitis model and to evaluate the treatment efficiency of gentamicin. Challenge routes were determined with a pathogenic Prototheca zopfii genotype 2 (P. zopfii) strain. 25 BALB/c mice were inoculated in mammary glands with graded dosages (10(3), 10(4), 10(5), 10(6), 10(7) CFU of P. zopfii) and killed on the 7th day. Another 25 animals were also killed at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 days after inoculation of 1 × 10(6) CFU of P. zopfii, the milk somatic cell counts, pathological section of mammary glands, and P. zopfii burden were observed. The antimicrobial activity was tested using disc diffusion test and minimum inhibitory concentrations. Gentamicin was given intramuscularly to analyze the therapeutic effect. The results showed that the best infection route was intra-mammary gland, and the mastitis model was established with 1 × 10(6) CFU of P. zopfii. After infection, the somatic cell counts increased significantly. The pathological reaction mainly consisted of infiltration of inflammatory cells, destruction of acini, accumulation of lymphocyte cells and the severity of the changes was dosage and time-dependent. The P. zopfii burden revealed that P. zopfii continuously replicated. In vitro susceptibility tests indicated that the Prototheca strains were antimicrobial susceptible to gentamicin at concentrations between 0.03 and 4 μg/ml. In vivo therapeutic assay demonstrated that high concentrations of gentamicin (≥20 mg/kg) could inhibit the growth of P. zopfii. We conclude that the murine model of protothecal mastitis was established successfully and gentamicin may be an effective choice for treatment of P. zopfii. PMID:23463523

  2. Three Models of Adult Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, Michael R.; Crumpler, Cheryl A.

    1996-01-01

    Compares ontogenetic models, which stress development through a series of stages; sociogenic models, which stress the influence of social context on adult behavior; and liberative models. Liberative models do not treat adult development as entirely dependent on biological or social determinism, and do stress individuals' conscious efforts at…

  3. A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF WHY MURINE MODELS OF TRAUMA DO NOT RECAPITULATE THE HUMAN SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Lori F.; Nacionales, Dina C.; Lopez, M. Cecilia; Vanzant, Erin; Cuenca, Angela; Cuenca, Alex G.; Ungaro, Ricardo; Baslanti, Tezcan Ozrazgat; McKinley, Bruce A.; Bihorac, Azra; Cuschieri, Joseph; Maier, Ronald V.; Moore, Frederick A.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Baker, Henry V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Efron, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Genomic analyses from blood leukocytes have concluded that mouse injury poorly reflects human trauma at the leukocyte transcriptome. Concerns have focused on the modest severity of murine injury models, differences in murine compared to human age, dissimilar circulating leukocyte populations between species, and whether similar signaling pathways are involved. We sought to examine whether the transcriptomic response to severe trauma in mice could be explained by these extrinsic factors, by utilizing an increasing severity of murine trauma and shock in young and aged mice over time, and examining the response in isolated neutrophil populations. Design Pre-clinical controlled in vivo laboratory study and retrospective cohort study Setting Laboratory of Inflammation Biology and Surgical Science and multi-institution level 1 trauma centers Subjects 6–10 week old and 20–24 month old C57BL/6 (B6) mice and two cohorts of 167 and 244 severely traumatized (ISS >15) adult (>18 yo) patients. Interventions Mice underwent one of two severity polytrauma models of injury. Total blood leukocyte and neutrophil samples were collected. Measurements and Main Results Fold expression changes in leukocyte and neutrophil genome-wide expression analyses between healthy and injured mice (p<0.001) were compared to human total and enriched blood leukocyte expression analyses of severe trauma patients at 0.5, 1, 4, 7, 14, and 28 days after injury (Glue Grant TRDB). We found that increasing the severity of the murine trauma model only modestly improved the correlation in the transcriptomic response with humans, whereas the age of the mice did not. In addition, the genome-wide response to blood neutrophils (rather than total WBC) was also not well correlated between humans and mice. However, the expression of many individual gene families was much more strongly correlated after injury in mice and humans. Conclusions Although overall transcriptomic association remained weak even

  4. Current advances of murine models for food allergy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiange; Navarro, Severine; Lopata, Andreas L

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy affects an increasing population in Western world but also developing countries. Researchers have been taking great efforts in identifying and characterising food allergens using molecular tools. However, there are still many mechanistic hypotheses that need to be tested using an appropriate in vivo experimental platform. To date, a number of mouse models for food allergy have been established and provided valuable insights into food allergenicity, development of therapies and allergic inflammation mechanisms. Nevertheless, a large diversity of protocols have been developed for the establishment of relevant mouse models. As a result, comparisons of outcomes between different models are very difficult to be conducted. The phenotypes of mouse models are greatly influenced by genetic background, gender, route of allergen exposure, the nature and concentration of food allergens, as well as the usage of adjuvants. This review focuses on IgE-mediated food allergy, compares the differential approaches in developing appropriate murine models for food allergy and details specific findings for three major food allergens, peanut, milk and shellfish. PMID:26759987

  5. Current advances of murine models for food allergy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiange; Navarro, Severine; Lopata, Andreas L

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy affects an increasing population in Western world but also developing countries. Researchers have been taking great efforts in identifying and characterising food allergens using molecular tools. However, there are still many mechanistic hypotheses that need to be tested using an appropriate in vivo experimental platform. To date, a number of mouse models for food allergy have been established and provided valuable insights into food allergenicity, development of therapies and allergic inflammation mechanisms. Nevertheless, a large diversity of protocols have been developed for the establishment of relevant mouse models. As a result, comparisons of outcomes between different models are very difficult to be conducted. The phenotypes of mouse models are greatly influenced by genetic background, gender, route of allergen exposure, the nature and concentration of food allergens, as well as the usage of adjuvants. This review focuses on IgE-mediated food allergy, compares the differential approaches in developing appropriate murine models for food allergy and details specific findings for three major food allergens, peanut, milk and shellfish.

  6. A Novel Population of Cells Expressing Both Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Markers Is Present in the Normal Adult Bone Marrow and Is Augmented in a Murine Model of Marrow Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ohishi, Masanobu; Ono, Wanida; Ono, Noriaki; Khatri, Richa; Marzia, Marilena; Baker, Emma K.; Root, Sierra H.; Wilson, Tremika Le-Shan; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Aguila, Hector L.; Purton, Louise E.; Schipani, Ernestina

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) fibrosis is a feature of severe hyperparathyroidism. Consistent with this observation, mice expressing constitutively active parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide receptors (PPR) in osteoblasts (PPR*Tg) display BM fibrosis. To obtain insight into the nature of BM fibrosis in such a model, a double-mutant mouse expressing constitutively active PPR and green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the type I collagen promoter (PPR*Tg/GFP) was generated. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry revealed the presence of a cell population expressing GFP (GFP+) that was also positive for the hematopoietic marker CD45 in the BM of both PPR*Tg/GFP and control animals. This cell population was expanded in PPR*Tg/GFP. The existence of cells expressing both type I collagen and CD45 in the adult BM was confirmed by IHC and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. An analysis of total RNA extracted from sorted GFP+CD45+ cells showed that these cells produced type I collagen and PTH/PTH-related peptide receptor and receptor activator for NF-κB mRNAs, further supporting their features of being both mesenchymal and hematopoietic lineages. Similar cells, known as fibrocytes, are also present in pathological fibroses. Our findings, thus, indicate that the BM is a permissive microenvironment for the differentiation of fibrocyte-like cells and raise the possibility that these cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of BM fibrosis. PMID:22155108

  7. Immunocompetent murine models for the study of glioblastoma immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma remains a lethal diagnosis with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. (NEJM 352:987-96, 2005) Although immunotherapy-based approaches are capable of inducing detectable immune responses against tumor-specific antigens, improvements in clinical outcomes are modest, in no small part due to tumor-induced immunosuppressive mechanisms that promote immune escape and immuno-resistance. Immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at bolstering the immune response while neutralizing immunosuppression will play a critical role in improving treatment outcomes for glioblastoma patients. In vivo murine models of glioma provide an invaluable resource to achieving that end, and their use is an essential part of the preclinical workup for novel therapeutics that need to be tested in animal models prior to testing experimental therapies in patients. In this article, we review five contemporary immunocompetent mouse models, GL261 (C57BL/6), GL26 (C57BL/6) CT-2A (C57BL/6), SMA-560 (VM/Dk), and 4C8 (B6D2F1), each of which offer a suitable platform for testing novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:24779345

  8. Hamster and murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T; Du Chateau, Brian K; Callister, Steven M; Schell, Ronald F

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology.

  9. Murine models of atrophy, cachexia, and sarcopenia in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Romanick, Mark; Brown-Borg, Holly M.

    2013-01-01

    With the extension of life span over the past several decades, the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength that characterizes sarcopenia is becoming more evident and thus, has a more significant impact on society. To determine ways to intervene and delay, or even arrest the physical frailty and dependence that accompany sarcopenia, it is necessary to identify those biochemical pathways that define this process. Animal models that mimic one or more of the physiological pathways involved with this phenomenon are very beneficial in providing an understanding of the cellular processes at work in sarcopenia. The ability to influence pathways through genetic manipulation gives insight into cellular responses and their impact on the physical expression of sarcopenia. This review evaluates several murine models that have the potential to elucidate biochemical processes integral to sarcopenia. Identifying animal models that reflect sarcopenia or its component pathways will enable researchers to better understand those pathways that contribute to age-related skeletal muscle mass loss, and in turn, develop interventions that will prevent, retard, arrest, or reverse this phenomenon. PMID:23523469

  10. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models.

    PubMed

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Jaques, Jenny; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date. PMID:27642303

  11. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Vellenga, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date.

  12. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Vellenga, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date. PMID:27642303

  13. Virulence characteristics of oral treponemes in a murine model.

    PubMed Central

    Kesavalu, L; Walker, S G; Holt, S C; Crawley, R R; Ebersole, J L

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the virulence characteristics of Treponema denticola, T. socranskii, T. pectinovorum, and T. vincentii following challenge infection of mice. These microorganisms induced well-demarcated, dose-dependent, raised subcutaneous (s.c.) abscesses which were similar in time of onset, lesion progression, and duration of healing. Only viable cells were capable of inducing these characteristic s.c. abscesses. Histological examination of the skin lesion 3 and 5 days postinfection revealed abscess formation in the s.c. tissues, and abundant spiral organisms were demonstrated to be present in the abscess. Host resistance modulation by dexamethasone (neutrophil alteration) and cyclophosphamide (neutrophil depletion) pretreatment had a minimal effect on the virulence expression by any of these treponemes. The T. denticola isolates demonstrated significant trypsin-like protease (TLPase) activity, while both T. socranskii and T. vincentii were devoid of this activity. Interestingly, T. pectinovorum strains were heterogeneous with respect to TLPase as high producers, low producers, and nonproducers. However, no differences in lesion formation were noted regardless of whether the species expressed this proteolytic activity or whether treatment with N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) and dithiothreitol was performed. These results showed that (i) a murine model may be used to evaluate virulence expression by oral treponemes; (ii) while TLPase activity varies among the oral treponemes, this protease does not appear to participate in abscess induction in the mouse model; and (iii) T. pectinovorum strains show variation in TLPase activity. PMID:9393801

  14. TALEN mediated somatic mutagenesis in murine models of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyuan; Li, Lin; Kendrick, Sara L.; Gerard, Robert D.; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has identified numerous somatic mutations whose biological relevance is uncertain. In this study, we used genome-editing tools to create and analyze targeted somatic mutations in murine models of liver cancer. TALEN were designed against β-catenin (Ctnnb1) and Apc, two commonly mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), to generate isogenic HCC cell lines. Both mutant cell lines exhibited evidence of Wnt pathway dysregulation. We asked if these TALENs could create targeted somatic mutations after hydrodynamic transfection (HDT) into mouse liver. TALENs targeting β-catenin promoted endogenous HCC carrying the intended gain-of-function mutations. However, TALENs targeting Apc were not as efficient in inducing in vivo homozygous loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesized that hepatocyte polyploidy might be protective against TALEN-induced loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and indeed Apc gene editing was less efficient in tetraploid than in diploid hepatocytes. To increase efficiency, we administered adenoviral Apc TALENs and found that we could achieve a higher mutagenesis rate in vivo. Our results demonstrate that genome-editing tools can enable the in vivo study of cancer genes and faithfully recapitulate the mosaic nature of mutagenesis in mouse cancer models. PMID:25070752

  15. Murine Cervical Heart Transplantation Model Using a Modified Cuff Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Markus; Ritschl, Paul; Oellinger, Robert; Aigner, Felix; Sucher, Robert; Schneeberger, Stefan; Pratschke, Johann; Brandacher, Gerald; Maglione, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models are of special interest in research since a wide variety of monoclonal antibodies and commercially defined inbred and knockout strains are available to perform mechanistic in vivo studies. While heart transplantation models using a suture technique were first successfully developed in rats, the translation into an equally widespread used murine equivalent was never achieved due the technical complexity of the microsurgical procedure. In contrast, non-suture cuff techniques, also developed initially in rats, were successfully adapted for use in mice1-3. This technique for revascularization involves two major steps I) everting the recipient vessel over a polyethylene cuff; II) pulling the donor vessel over the formerly everted recipient vessel and holding it in place with a circumferential tie. This ensures a continuity of the endothelial layer, short operating time and very high patency rates4. Using this technique for vascular anastomosis we performed more than 1,000 cervical heart transplants with an overall success rate of 95%. For arterial inflow the common carotid artery and the proximal aortic arch were anastomosed resulting in a retrograde perfusion of the transplanted heart. For venous drainage the pulmonary artery of the graft was anastomosed with the external jugular vein of the recipient5. Herein, we provide additional details of this technique to supplement the video. PMID:25350682

  16. Neuronal and glial properties of a murine transgenic retinoblastoma model.

    PubMed Central

    Kivelä, T.; Virtanen, I.; Marcus, D. M.; O'Brien, J. M.; Carpenter, J. L.; Brauner, E.; Tarkkanen, A.; Albert, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Antigenic properties of a murine transgenic model for hereditary retinoblastoma, induced by a chimeric gene coding for Simian virus 40 large T antigen, an oncogene that inactivates the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product, were studied by immunohistochemistry. All transgenic mice develop bilateral intraocular retinal tumors in the inner nuclear layer with Homer Wright-like rosettes, and one quarter develop midbrain tumors resembling trilateral retinoblastoma. Cell lines TE-1 and TM-1 were established from intraocular and metastatic tumors, respectively. Intraocular tumors reacted with antibodies to neuron-specific enolase and synaptophysin, while vimentin, glial fibrillary acidic, and S-100 proteins were detected only in reactive glia derived from adjacent retina. The midbrain tumors showed weak reactivity to synaptophysin, and they blended with reactive astrocytes positive for glial markers. The tumors were negative for cytokeratins. Finally both derived cell lines expressed synaptophysin and individual neurofilament triplet proteins in immunofluorescence and Western blotting, supporting their essentially neuronal nature. The antigenic profile resembles human retinoblastoma, but differences in morphology and antigen distribution suggest a more close relationship to neurons of the inner nuclear layer than to photoreceptor cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1708946

  17. Experimental murine amyloidosis: a model system for studying amyloid formation.

    PubMed Central

    Baumal, R.; Wilson, B.; Pass, E.

    1975-01-01

    Myeloma-associated and casein-induced murine amyloidosis were used as models to study the role of lymphocytes and macrophages in amyloid formation. Amyloidosis occurred rarely and in small amounts in Balb/C mice with immunoglobulin (Ig)-producing myeloma tumours but large amounts could be induced by injections of casein. Fluorescent staining of both forms of amyloid deposits by means of anti-casein- and anti-myeloma-amyloid antibodies indicated that they either crossreacted or coexisted. Nor abnormality of Ig biosynthesis was detected in amyloidosis, suggesting that abnormal degradation was responsible for production of the Ig form of amyloid. Although spleen lymphocytes of casein-injected mice with amyloidosis demonstrated diminished cellular immunologic responses, this did not indicate generalized immunologic incompetence. The non-Ig form of amyloid in casein-injected mice was shown to be produced by macrophages, and a technique was developed for increasing the yield of amyloid-containing cells. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 PMID:1080430

  18. Dysregulation of Npas2 leads to altered metabolic pathways in a murine knockout model.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Derek; Mendez-Figueroa, Hector; Mistretta, Toni-Ann; Su, Chunliu; Lane, Robert H; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2013-11-01

    In our primate model of maternal high fat diet exposure, we have described that fetal epigenomic modifications to the peripheral circadian Npas2 are associated with persistent alterations in fetal hepatic metabolism and non-alcoholic fatty liver. As the interaction of circadian response with metabolism is not well understood, we employed a murine knockout model to characterize the molecular mechanisms with which Npas2 reprograms the fetal hepatic metabolic response. cDNA was generated from Npas2-/- and +/+ (wild type) livers at day 2 (newborn) and at 25 weeks (adult) of life. Newborn samples were analyzed by exon array (n = 3/cohort). Independent pathway analysis software determined that the primary dysregulated pathway(s) in the Npas2-/- animals uniformly converged on lipid metabolism. Of particular interest, Ppargc1a, which integrates circadian and metabolism pathways, was significantly (p < .01) over expressed in newborn (1.7 fold) and adult (1.8 fold) Npas2-/- animals. These findings are consistent with an essential role for Npas2 in programming the peripheral circadian response and hepatic metabolism, which has not been previously described.

  19. A Murine Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Model: The DBA/2J Strain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Chen, Yuanjian; Zhao, Fengbo; Gu, Qingqing; Williams, Robert W; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Lu, Lu; Sun, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is attributed to mutations in genes that encode for the sarcomere proteins, especially Mybpc3 and Myh7. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies show significant variability in HCM phenotypes among affected individuals with identical causal mutations. Morphological changes and clinical expression of HCM are the result of interactions with modifier genes. With the exceptions of angiotensin converting enzyme, these modifiers have not been identified. Although mouse models have been used to investigate the genetics of many complex diseases, natural murine models for HCM are still lacking. In this study we show that the DBA/2J (D2) strain of mouse has sequence variants in Mybpc3 and Myh7, relative to widely used C57BL/6J (B6) reference strain and the key features of human HCM. Four-month-old of male D2 mice exhibit hallmarks of HCM including increased heart weight and cardiomyocyte size relative to B6 mice, as well as elevated markers for cardiac hypertrophy including β-myosin heavy chain (MHC), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and skeletal muscle alpha actin (α1-actin). Furthermore, cardiac interstitial fibrosis, another feature of HCM, is also evident in the D2 strain, and is accompanied by up-regulation of type I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-markers of fibrosis. Of great interest, blood pressure and cardiac function are within the normal range in the D2 strain, demonstrating that cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis are not secondary to hypertension, myocardial infarction, or heart failure. Because D2 and B6 strains have been used to generate a large family of recombinant inbred strains, the BXD cohort, the D2 model can be effectively exploited for in-depth genetic analysis of HCM susceptibility and modifier screens.

  20. Predictive Modeling in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    The current economic crisis, a growing workforce, the increasing lifespan of workers, and demanding, complex jobs have made organizations highly selective in employee recruitment and retention. It is therefore important, to the adult educator, to develop models of learning that better prepare adult learners for the workplace. The purpose of…

  1. The Proteome of Native Adult Müller Glial Cells From Murine Retina.

    PubMed

    Grosche, Antje; Hauser, Alexandra; Lepper, Marlen Franziska; Mayo, Rebecca; von Toerne, Christine; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Hauck, Stefanie M

    2016-02-01

    To date, the proteomic profiling of Müller cells, the dominant macroglia of the retina, has been hampered because of the absence of suitable enrichment methods. We established a novel protocol to isolate native, intact Müller cells from adult murine retinae at excellent purity which retain in situ morphology and are well suited for proteomic analyses. Two different strategies of sample preparation - an in StageTips (iST) and a subcellular fractionation approach including cell surface protein profiling were used for quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS) comparing Müller cell-enriched to depleted neuronal fractions. Pathway enrichment analyses on both data sets enabled us to identify Müller cell-specific functions which included focal adhesion kinase signaling, signal transduction mediated by calcium as second messenger, transmembrane neurotransmitter transport and antioxidant activity. Pathways associated with RNA processing, cellular respiration and phototransduction were enriched in the neuronal subpopulation. Proteomic results were validated for selected Müller cell genes by quantitative real time PCR, confirming the high expression levels of numerous members of the angiogenic and anti-inflammatory annexins and antioxidant enzymes (e.g. paraoxonase 2, peroxiredoxin 1, 4 and 6). Finally, the significant enrichment of antioxidant proteins in Müller cells was confirmed by measurements on vital retinal cells using the oxidative stress indicator CM-H2DCFDA. In contrast to photoreceptors or bipolar cells, Müller cells were most efficiently protected against H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species formation, which is in line with the protein repertoire identified in the proteomic profiling. Our novel approach to isolate intact glial cells from adult retina in combination with proteomic profiling enabled the identification of novel Müller glia specific proteins, which were validated as markers and for their functional impact in glial

  2. Osteoporosis in murine systemic lupus erythematosus--a laboratory model.

    PubMed

    Schapira, D; Kabala, A; Raz, B; Israeli, E

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the skeletal metabolism in a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). MRL/n and MRL/l mice (respectively representing a benign and a malignant form of the disease) were observed from 1.5 to 6.5 months of life. The monthly follow-up included: biochemical and histomorphometrical studies of the femoral bone, serum biochemistry, immunoglobulins and osteocalcin, and histological evaluation of the kidney tissue. The results showed a higher femoral weight (+11.5%), calcium (+4.4%) and protein bone content (+11.4%) and a significantly higher (+77%) phosphorus bone content in the MRL/n group; significantly lower (-48.9%) bone alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity, lower bone alkaline/acid phosphatase enzymatic activities ratio (-40.8%) and lower (-38.4%) serum osteocalcin values in the MRL/l group (which might suggest reduced bone formation in these animals); markedly smaller trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) in the femoral head (-36.2%) and femoral neck (-39.8%), and smaller cortical and femoral areas in the mid-femoral shaft (-38.8% and -38.1% respectively) in the MRL/l group; higher serum immunoglobulins, increased serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine and a higher index of activity in the kidney histology in the MRL/l group, indicating increased activity of the disease in this substrain. The MRL mice, through their two substrains, may serve as a valuable laboratory animal model for study of the skeletal changes in SLE and of the influence of the disease activity on the skeletal metabolism.

  3. Environmental Modulation of Oral Treponeme Virulence in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Holt, Stanley C.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of environmental alteration on the virulence of the oral treponemes Treponema denticola and Treponema pectinovorum. The environmental effects were assessed by using a model of localized inflammatory abscesses in mice. In vitro growth of T. denticola and T. pectinovorum as a function of modification of the cysteine concentration significantly enhanced abscess formation and size. In contrast, growth of T. denticola or T. pectinovorum under iron-limiting conditions (e.g., dipyridyl chelation) had no effect on abscess induction in comparison to that when the strains were grown under normal iron conditions. In vivo modulation of the microenvironment at the focus of infection with Cytodex beads demonstrated that increasing the local inflammation had no effect on lesion induction or size. In vivo studies involved the determination of the effects of increased systemic iron availability (e.g., iron dextran or phenylhydrazine) on the induction, kinetics, and size of lesions. T. denticola induced significantly larger lesions in mice with iron pretreatment and demonstrated systemic manifestations of the infectious challenge and an accompanying spreading lesion with phenylhydrazine pretreatment (e.g., increases in circulating free hemoglobin). In contrast, T. pectinovorum virulence was minimally affected by this in vivo treatment to increase iron availability. T. denticola virulence, as evaluated by lesion size, was increased additively by in vivo iron availability, and cysteine modified growth of the microorganism. Additionally, galactosamine sensitized mice to a lethal outcome following infection with both T. denticola and T. pectinovorum, suggesting an endotoxin-like activity in these treponemes. These findings demonstrated the ability to modify the virulence capacity of T. denticola and T. pectinovorum by environmental conditions which can be evaluated by using in vivo murine models. PMID:10338481

  4. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial uncoupling in a murine cancer cachexia model.

    PubMed

    Tzika, A Aria; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely Cristine; Shestov, Alexander A; Constantinou, Caterina; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Righi, Valeria; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Busquets, Silvia; Lopez-Soriano, Francisco J; Milot, Sylvain; Lepine, Francois; Mindrinos, Michael N; Rahme, Laurence G; Argiles, Josep M

    2013-09-01

    Approximately half of all cancer patients present with cachexia, a condition in which disease-associated metabolic changes lead to a severe loss of skeletal muscle mass. Working toward an integrated and mechanistic view of cancer cachexia, we investigated the hypothesis that cancer promotes mitochondrial uncoupling in skeletal muscle. We subjected mice to in vivo phosphorous-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy and subjected murine skeletal muscle samples to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The mice used in both experiments were Lewis lung carcinoma models of cancer cachexia. A novel 'fragmented mass isotopomer' approach was used in our dynamic analysis of 13C mass isotopomer data. Our 31P NMR and GC/MS results indicated that the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis rate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux were reduced by 49% and 22%, respectively, in the cancer-bearing mice (p<0.008; t-test vs. controls). The ratio of ATP synthesis rate to the TCA cycle flux (an index of mitochondrial coupling) was reduced by 32% in the cancer-bearing mice (p=0.036; t-test vs. controls). Genomic analysis revealed aberrant expression levels for key regulatory genes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the muscle fiber, consistent with the presence of abnormal, giant mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggest that mitochondrial uncoupling occurs in cancer cachexia and thus point to the mitochondria as a potential pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cachexia. These findings may prove relevant to elucidating the mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle wasting observed in other chronic diseases, as well as in aging.

  5. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  6. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S.; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Ullrich, Robert L.; Petrache, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to 137Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u 56Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u 28Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy 56Fe or 28Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  7. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions.

  8. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Block, Darci R.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Cunningham, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155–330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99–340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225–945 μmol/L and 276–687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  9. Activity of levofloxacin in a murine model of tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Klemens, S P; Sharpe, C A; Rogge, M C; Cynamon, M H

    1994-01-01

    The activity of levofloxacin (LEV) was evaluated in a murine model of tuberculosis. Approximately 10(7) viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis ATCC 35801 were given intravenously to 4-week-old female outbred mice. In a dose-response study, treatment with LEV at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg of body weight was started 1 day after infection and was given daily for 28 days. Viable cell counts were determined from homogenates of spleens and lungs. A dose-related reduction in organism cell counts in organs was noted for LEV. The activities of LEV at 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg were compared with those of first-line antituberculosis agents. Both isoniazid and rifampin were more active than LEV. There was no difference in activity between LEV and either ethambutol or pyrazinamide against splenic organisms. The activities of ethambutol and LEV at the two higher doses were comparable against lung organisms. LEV at 300 mg/kg was more active than pyrazinamide against lung organisms. The activity of LEV was compared with those of two other quinolones, ofloxacin and sparfloxacin. LEV at 200 mg/kg had more than twofold greater activity than ofloxacin at the same dose. Sparfloxacin at 100 mg/kg was more active than LEV at 200 mg/kg; however, the activities of sparfloxacin at 50 mg/kg and LEV at 200 mg/kg were comparable. The promising activity of LEV in M. tuberculosis-infected mice suggests that it is a good candidate for clinical development as a new antituberculosis agent. PMID:7979275

  10. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Block, Darci R; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Cunningham, Scott A; Patel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155-330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99-340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225-945 μmol/L and 276-687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  11. Computational models of adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2005-10-01

    Experimental results in recent years have shown that adult neurogenesis is a significant phenomenon in the mammalian brain. Little is known, however, about the functional role played by the generation and destruction of neurons in the context of an adult brain. Here, we propose two models where new projection neurons are incorporated. We show that in both models, using incorporation and removal of neurons as a computational tool, it is possible to achieve a higher computational efficiency that in purely static, synapse-learning-driven networks. We also discuss the implication for understanding the role of adult neurogenesis in specific brain areas like the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus.

  12. Protective effects of astaxanthin from Paracoccus carotinifaciens on murine gastric ulcer models.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kenta; Oyagi, Atsushi; Takahira, Dai; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ishibashi, Takashi; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of astaxanthin extracted from Paracoccus carotinifaciens on gastric mucosal damage in murine gastric ulcer models. Mice were pretreated with astaxanthin for 1 h before ulcer induction. Gastric ulcers were induced in mice by oral administration of hydrochloride (HCl)/ethanol or acidified aspirin. The effect of astaxanthin on lipid peroxidation in murine stomach homogenates was also evaluated by measuring the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS). The free radical scavenging activities of astaxanthin were also measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Astaxanthin significantly decreased the extent of HCl/ethanol- and acidified aspirin-induced gastric ulcers. Astaxanthin also decreased the level of TBARS. The ESR measurement showed that astaxanthin had radical scavenging activities against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and the superoxide anion radical. These results suggest that astaxanthin has antioxidant properties and exerts a protective effect against ulcer formation in murine models.

  13. Fetal wound healing using a genetically modified murine model: the contribution of P-selectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During early gestation, fetal wounds heal with paucity of inflammation and absent scar formation. P-selectin is an adhesion molecule that is important for leukocyte recruitment to injury sites. We used a murine fetal wound healing model to study the specific contribution of P-selectin to scarless wo...

  14. TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE-INDUCED EOSINOPHILIA IN A MURINE MODEL OF OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE-INDUCED EOSINOPHILIA IN A MURINE MODEL OF OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA. J F Regal, ME Mohrman, E Boykin and D Sailstad. Dept. of Pharmacology, University of Minnesota, Duluth, MN, USA and NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Trimellitic anhydride (TMA) is a small m...

  15. Retinal Inhibition of CCR3 Induces Retinal Cell Death in a Murine Model of Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Gambhir, Deeksha; Becker, Silke; Kunz, Eric; Liu, Angelina Jingtong; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of chemokine C-C motif receptor 3 (CCR3) signaling has been considered as treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, CCR3 is expressed in neural retina from aged human donor eyes. Therefore, broad CCR3 inhibition may be harmful to the retina. We assessed the effects of CCR3 inhibition on retina and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) that develop into choroidal neovascularization (CNV). In adult murine eyes, CCR3 colocalized with glutamine-synthetase labeled Műller cells. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, CCR3 immunolocalized not only to lectin-stained cells in CNV lesions but also to the retina. Compared to non-lasered controls, CCR3 mRNA was significantly increased in laser-treated retina. An intravitreal injection of a CCR3 inhibitor (CCR3i) significantly reduced CNV compared to DMSO or PBS controls. Both CCR3i and a neutralizing antibody to CCR3 increased TUNEL+ retinal cells overlying CNV, compared to controls. There was no difference in cleaved caspase-3 in laser-induced CNV lesions or in overlying retina between CCR3i- or control-treated eyes. Following CCR3i, apoptotic inducible factor (AIF) was significantly increased and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2 decreased in the retina; there were no differences in retinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In cultured human Műller cells exposed to eotaxin (CCL11) and VEGF, CCR3i significantly increased TUNEL+ cells and AIF but decreased BCL2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor, without affecting caspase-3 activity or VEGF. CCR3i significantly decreased AIF in RPE/choroids and immunostaining of phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (p-VEGFR2) in CNV with a trend toward reduced VEGF. In cultured CECs treated with CCL11 and/or VEGF, CCR3i decreased p-VEGFR2 and increased BCL2 without increasing TUNEL+ cells and AIF. These findings suggest that inhibition of retinal CCR3 causes retinal cell death and that targeted inhibition of CCR3 in CECs may be a safer if CCR3 inhibition

  16. Membrane-dependent Activities of Human 15-LOX-2 and Its Murine Counterpart: IMPLICATIONS FOR MURINE MODELS OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS.

    PubMed

    Bender, Gunes; Schexnaydre, Erin E; Murphy, Robert C; Uhlson, Charis; Newcomer, Marcia E

    2016-09-01

    The enzyme encoded by the ALOX15B gene has been linked to the development of atherosclerotic plaques in humans and in a mouse model of hypercholesterolemia. In vitro, these enzymes, which share 78% sequence identity, generate distinct products from their substrate arachidonic acid: the human enzyme, a 15-S-hydroperoxy product; and the murine enzyme, an 8-S-product. We probed the activities of these enzymes with nanodiscs as membrane mimics to determine whether they can access substrate esterified in a bilayer and characterized their activities at the membrane interface. We observed that both enzymes transform phospholipid-esterified arachidonic acid to a 15-S-product. Moreover, when expressed in transfected HEK cells, both enzymes result in significant increases in the amounts of 15-hydroxyderivatives of eicosanoids detected. In addition, we show that 15-LOX-2 is distributed at the plasma membrane when the HEK293 cells are stimulated by the addition Ca(2+) ionophore and that cellular localization is dependent upon the presence of a putative membrane insertion loop. We also report that sequence differences between the human and mouse enzymes in this loop appear to confer distinct mechanisms of enzyme-membrane interaction for the homologues.

  17. In Vitro Colony Assays for Characterizing Tri-potent Progenitor Cells Isolated from the Adult Murine Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Jacob R; LeBon, Jeanne M; Luo, Angela; Quijano, Janine C; Wedeken, Lena; Jou, Kevin; Riggs, Arthur D; Tirrell, David A; Ku, H Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells from the adult pancreas could be a potential source of therapeutic beta-like cells for treating patients with type 1 diabetes. However, it is still unknown whether stem and progenitor cells exist in the adult pancreas. Research strategies using cre-lox lineage-tracing in adult mice have yielded results that either support or refute the idea that beta cells can be generated from the ducts, the presumed location where adult pancreatic progenitors may reside. These in vivo cre-lox lineage-tracing methods, however, cannot answer the questions of self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation-two criteria necessary to define a stem cell. To begin addressing this technical gap, we devised 3-dimensional colony assays for pancreatic progenitors. Soon after our initial publication, other laboratories independently developed a similar, but not identical, method called the organoid assay. Compared to the organoid assay, our method employs methylcellulose, which forms viscous solutions that allow the inclusion of extracellular matrix proteins at low concentrations. The methylcellulose-containing assays permit easier detection and analyses of progenitor cells at the single-cell level, which are critical when progenitors constitute a small sub-population, as is the case for many adult organ stem cells. Together, results from several laboratories demonstrate in vitro self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells from mice. The current protocols describe two methylcellulose-based colony assays to characterize mouse pancreatic progenitors; one contains a commercial preparation of murine extracellular matrix proteins and the other an artificial extracellular matrix protein known as a laminin hydrogel. The techniques shown here are 1) dissociation of the pancreas and sorting of CD133(+)Sox9/EGFP(+) ductal cells from adult mice, 2) single cell manipulation of the sorted cells, 3) single colony analyses using microfluidic q

  18. Diet and specific microbial exposure trigger features of environmental enteropathy in a novel murine model

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric M.; Wlodarska, Marta; Willing, Benjamin P.; Vonaesch, Pascale; Han, Jun; Reynolds, Lisa A.; Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Uhrig, Marco; Scholz, Roland; Partida, Oswaldo; Borchers, Christoph H.; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2015-01-01

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a subclinical chronic inflammatory disease of the small intestine and has a profound impact on the persistence of childhood malnutrition worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease remains unknown and no animal model exists to date, the creation of which would aid in understanding this complex disease. Here we demonstrate that early-life consumption of a moderately malnourished diet, in combination with iterative oral exposure to commensal Bacteroidales species and Escherichia coli, remodels the murine small intestine to resemble features of EE observed in humans. We further report the profound changes that malnutrition imparts on the small intestinal microbiota, metabolite and intraepithelial lymphocyte composition, along with the susceptibility to enteric infection. Our findings provide evidence indicating that both diet and microbes combine to contribute to the aetiology of EE, and describe a novel murine model that can be used to elucidate the mechanisms behind this understudied disease. PMID:26241678

  19. Conditional Knockout of Myocyte Focal Adhesion Kinase Abrogates Ischemic Preconditioning in Adult Murine Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Perricone, Adam J.; Bivona, Benjamin J.; Jackson, Fannie R.; Vander Heide, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Our laboratory has previously demonstrated the importance of a cytoskeletal‐based survival signaling pathway using in vitro models of ischemia/reperfusion (IR). However, the importance of this pathway in mediating stress‐elicited survival signaling in vivo is unknown. Methods and Results The essential cytoskeletal signaling pathway member focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was selectively deleted in adult cardiac myocytes using a tamoxifen‐inducible Cre‐Lox system (α‐MHC‐MerCreMer). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot were performed to confirm FAK knockout (KO). All mice were subjected to a 40‐minute coronary occlusion followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Ischemic preconditioning (IP) was performed using a standard protocol. Control groups included wild‐type (WT) and tamoxifen‐treated α‐MHC‐MerCreMer+/−/FAKWT/WT (experimental control) mice. Infarct size was expressed as a percentage of the risk region. In WT mice IP significantly enhanced the expression of activated/phosphorylated FAK by 36.3% compared to WT mice subjected to a sham experimental protocol (P≤0.05; n=6 hearts [sham], n=4 hearts [IP]). IP significantly reduced infarct size in both WT and experimental control mice (43.7% versus 19.8%; P≤0.001; 44.7% versus 17.5%; P≤0.001, respectively). No difference in infarct size was observed between preconditioned FAK KO and nonpreconditioned controls (37.1% versus 43.7% versus 44.7%; FAK KO versus WT versus experimental control; P=NS). IP elicited a 67.2%/88.8% increase in activated phosphatidylinositol‐3‐kinase (PI3K) p85/activated Akt expression in WT mice, but failed to enhance the expression of either in preconditioned FAK KO mice. Conclusions Our results indicate that FAK is an essential mediator of IP‐elicited cardioprotection and provide further support for the hypothesis that cytoskeletal‐based signaling is an important component of stress‐elicited survival signaling. PMID:24080910

  20. Sex differences in the MB49 syngeneic, murine model of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    White-Gilbertson, Shai; Davis, Megan; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina; Kasman, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The MB49 syngeneic, murine model of bladder cancer has been widely used for more than 35 years. In humans, bladder cancer is one third as prevalent in women as in men, with a trend toward lower prevalence in parous compared to nulliparous women. Our objective was to determine if the MB49 bladder cancer model reproduces the sex differences observed in humans, and to determine its sensitivity to testosterone and the pregnancy hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). METHODS Male and female C57BL/6 mice were implanted with MB49 murine bladder cancer cells, and observed for tumor growth. MB49 dose responses to hCG and dihydrotestosterone were determined in vitro. RESULTS MB49 tumor growth was significantly greater in male mice than female mice. Pregnancy did not affect MB49 tumor growth in female mice. MB49 cells did not proliferate in response to hCG in vitro and the functional receptor for gonadotropins was absent. Dihydrotestosterone strongly stimulated growth of MB49 cells in vitro. CONCLUSIONS The MB49 murine model of bladder cancer reproduced some aspects of the sex differences observed in humans. Our results suggest that testosterone may stimulate MB49 cell proliferation, which may explain the more rapid MB49 tumor growth observed in male mice. PMID:26998503

  1. 3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine prevents induction of murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in C57BL/10 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukemia viruses, a possible animal model for antiretroviral drug screening.

    PubMed Central

    Ohnota, H; Okada, Y; Ushijima, H; Kitamura, T; Komuro, K; Mizuochi, T

    1990-01-01

    Adult C57BL/10 mice (H-2b Fv-1b) inoculated with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus develop a disease which has many features in common with human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), in particular abnormal lymphoproliferation and severe immunodeficiency. In the present study, we examined the possibility that this murine AIDS (MAIDS) model would be useful for evaluating antiretrovirus drugs in vivo through the use of a well-defined antiretrovirus drug, the reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (H. Mitsuya, K.J. Weinhold, P.A. Furman, M.H. St. Claire, S. Nusinoff-Lehrman, R.C. Gallo, D. Bolognesi, D.W. Barry, and S. Broder, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:7096-7100, 1985) 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). We evaluated the effect of AZT treatment on de novo virus infection as well as on the induction of immunodeficiency by various parameters, including RT activity in serum, splenomegaly, proliferative responses against alloantigens and mitogens, soluble-antigen-presenting cell activity, and immunoglobulin G levels in serum. Our results demonstrated that AZT treatment of C57BL/10 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus efficiently prevented the induction of immunodeficiency if started at the time of virus inoculation. Starting AZT treatment 1 week later provided only a partial protective effect. Starting AZT treatment 2 weeks later was associated with suppression of RT activity in serum but no prevention of immunosuppression. This MAIDS model may allow rapid and cost-effective screening for antiretrovirus drugs targeted against retroviral functions shared between human AIDS and MAIDS, such as those encoded by gag, pol, or env. PMID:1693056

  2. Mechano-rheological properties of the murine thrombus determined via nanoindentation and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Slaboch, Constance L; Alber, Mark S; Rosen, Elliot D; Ovaert, Timothy C

    2012-06-01

    Deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and abdominal aortic aneurysms are blood-related diseases that represent a major public health problem. These diseases are characterized by the formation of a thrombus (i.e., blood clot) that either blocks a major artery or causes an aortic rupture. Identifying the mechanical properties of thrombi can help determine when these incidents will occur. In this investigation, a murine thrombus, formed from platelet-rich plasma, calcium, and thrombin, was nanoindented and the elastic modulus was estimated via elastic contact theory. This information was used as input to an inverse finite element simulation, which determined optimal values for the elastic modulus and viscosity of the thrombus using a viscoelastic material model. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to determine which material parameters have the greatest affect on the simulation. Results from this investigation demonstrate the feasibility of the mechanical characterization of a murine thrombus using nanoindentation. PMID:22520420

  3. Persistence of intestinal antibody response to heterologous rotavirus infection in a murine model beyond 1 year.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, R D; Merchant, A A; Groene, W S; Cheng, E H

    1993-01-01

    We used an ELISPOT (enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot) assay to quantitate the long-term rotavirus-specific intestinal antibody response in a murine model. The frequency of murine intestinal antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) was followed for a period of 1 year after a single dose of rhesus rotavirus (10(6) PFU) was administered at 10 days of age. Some animals were boosted at that time with a second dose. One year after infection, virus-specific ASCs declined from acute-phase levels, but they were still present at significant levels (1.32 x 10(4) virus-specific ASCs per 10(6) intestinal mononuclear cells; approximately 17% of the previously reported response at 1 month after infection). A booster dose 1 year after the primary infection produced a 100% increase in virus-specific ASCs but did not restore the response to that of the primary infection. PMID:8381806

  4. Ablating hedgehog signaling in tenocytes during development impairs biomechanics and matrix organization of the adult murine patellar tendon enthesis.

    PubMed

    Breidenbach, Andrew P; Aschbacher-Smith, Lindsey; Lu, Yinhui; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Liu, Chia-Feng; Liu, Han; Wylie, Chris; Rao, Marepalli; Shearn, Jason T; Rowe, David W; Kadler, Karl E; Jiang, Rulang; Butler, David L

    2015-08-01

    Restoring the native structure of the tendon enthesis, where collagen fibers of the midsubstance are integrated within a fibrocartilaginous structure, is problematic following injury. As current surgical methods fail to restore this region adequately, engineers, biologists, and clinicians are working to understand how this structure forms as a prerequisite to improving repair outcomes. We recently reported on the role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a novel enthesis marker, in regulating early postnatal enthesis formation. Here, we investigate how inactivating the Hh pathway in tendon cells affects adult (12-week) murine patellar tendon (PT) enthesis mechanics, fibrocartilage morphology, and collagen fiber organization. We show that ablating Hh signaling resulted in greater than 100% increased failure insertion strain (0.10 v. 0.05 mm/mm, p<0.01) as well as sub-failure biomechanical deficiencies. Although collagen fiber orientation appears overtly normal in the midsubstance, ablating Hh signaling reduces mineralized fibrocartilage by 32%, leading to less collagen embedded within mineralized tissue. Ablating Hh signaling also caused collagen fibers to coalesce at the insertion, which may explain in part the increased strains. These results indicate that Ihh signaling plays a critical role in the mineralization process of fibrocartilaginous entheses and may be a novel therapeutic to promote tendon-to-bone healing.

  5. Beneficial lactobacilli: effects on the vaginal tract in a murine experimental model.

    PubMed

    De Gregorio, Priscilla Romina; Juárez Tomás, María Silvina; Santos, Viviana; Nader-Macías, María Elena Fatima

    2012-11-01

    Vaginal probiotics containing lactic acid bacteria with activity towards pathogenic microorganisms that cause urogenital tract infections have been proposed as a valid strategy for their prophylaxis and therapy. A murine experimental model was set up to evaluate the colonization capability of beneficial human lactobacilli and their effects on the mouse vaginal mucosa and innate immune cells. Five Lactobacillus strains were intravaginally inoculated into previously estrogenized BALB/c mice. The significance of the effects observed in the vaginal tract was determined by analysis of variance using the general linear model. The numbers of viable vaginal lactobacilli were significantly higher at proestrous-estrous than those at the metaestrous-diestrous phase and decreased markedly on the days after inoculation. Lactobacilli inoculation did not cause cytological or histological modifications of the murine vaginal tract. Moreover, the intravaginal administration of Lactobacillus salivarius CRL (Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos culture collection) 1328 and Lactobacillus gasseri CRL 1263 did not affect the amounts of granulocytes and macrophages present in vaginal washings. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that vaginal lactobacilli did not produce adverse effects on the murine vaginal tract. Therefore, they could be proposed as safe probiotic candidates to promote a balanced microbiota in the urogenital tract.

  6. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Laura B.; Janke, Laura J.; Payton, Monique A.; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W.; Karol, Seth E.; Kamdem, Landry Kamdem; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26252865

  7. Differential Toll-Like Receptor-Signalling of Burkholderia pseudomallei Lipopolysaccharide in Murine and Human Models

    PubMed Central

    Weehuizen, Tassili A. F.; Prior, Joann L.; van der Vaart, Thomas W.; Ngugi, Sarah A.; Nepogodiev, Sergey A.; Field, Robert A.; Kager, Liesbeth M.; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F.; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis and is a CDC category B bioterrorism agent. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 impairs host defense during pulmonary B.pseudomallei infection while TLR4 only has limited impact. We investigated the role of TLRs in B.pseudomallei-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammation. Purified B.pseudomallei-LPS activated only TLR2-transfected-HEK-cells during short stimulation but both HEK-TLR2 and HEK-TLR4-cells after 24 h. In human blood, an additive effect of TLR2 on TLR4-mediated signalling induced by B.pseudomallei-LPS was observed. In contrast, murine peritoneal macrophages recognized B.pseudomallei-LPS solely through TLR4. Intranasal inoculation of B.pseudomallei-LPS showed that both TLR4-knockout(-/-) and TLR2x4-/-, but not TLR2-/- mice, displayed diminished cytokine responses and neutrophil influx compared to wild-type controls. These data suggest that B.pseudomallei-LPS signalling occurs solely through murine TLR4, while in human models TLR2 plays an additional role, highlighting important differences between specificity of human and murine models that may have important consequences for B.pseudomallei-LPS sensing by TLRs and subsequent susceptibility to melioidosis. PMID:26689559

  8. Adapting Human Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study Methods to Detect and Characterize Dysphagia in Murine Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Teresa E.; Braun, Sabrina M.; Brooks, Ryan T.; Harris, Rebecca A.; Littrell, Loren L.; Neff, Ryan M.; Hinkel, Cameron J.; Allen, Mitchell J.; Ulsas, Mollie A.

    2015-01-01

    This study adapted human videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) methods for use with murine disease models for the purpose of facilitating translational dysphagia research. Successful outcomes are dependent upon three critical components: test chambers that permit self-feeding while standing unrestrained in a confined space, recipes that mask the aversive taste/odor of commercially-available oral contrast agents, and a step-by-step test protocol that permits quantification of swallow physiology. Elimination of one or more of these components will have a detrimental impact on the study results. Moreover, the energy level capability of the fluoroscopy system will determine which swallow parameters can be investigated. Most research centers have high energy fluoroscopes designed for use with people and larger animals, which results in exceptionally poor image quality when testing mice and other small rodents. Despite this limitation, we have identified seven VFSS parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice when using a high energy fluoroscope in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol. We recently obtained a low energy fluoroscopy system with exceptionally high imaging resolution and magnification capabilities that was designed for use with mice and other small rodents. Preliminary work using this new system, in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol, has identified 13 swallow parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice, which is nearly double the number obtained using conventional (i.e., high energy) fluoroscopes. Identification of additional swallow parameters is expected as we optimize the capabilities of this new system. Results thus far demonstrate the utility of using a low energy fluoroscopy system to detect and quantify subtle changes in swallow physiology that may otherwise be overlooked when using high energy fluoroscopes to investigate murine disease models. PMID:25866882

  9. Adapting human videofluoroscopic swallow study methods to detect and characterize dysphagia in murine disease models.

    PubMed

    Lever, Teresa E; Braun, Sabrina M; Brooks, Ryan T; Harris, Rebecca A; Littrell, Loren L; Neff, Ryan M; Hinkel, Cameron J; Allen, Mitchell J; Ulsas, Mollie A

    2015-01-01

    This study adapted human videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) methods for use with murine disease models for the purpose of facilitating translational dysphagia research. Successful outcomes are dependent upon three critical components: test chambers that permit self-feeding while standing unrestrained in a confined space, recipes that mask the aversive taste/odor of commercially-available oral contrast agents, and a step-by-step test protocol that permits quantification of swallow physiology. Elimination of one or more of these components will have a detrimental impact on the study results. Moreover, the energy level capability of the fluoroscopy system will determine which swallow parameters can be investigated. Most research centers have high energy fluoroscopes designed for use with people and larger animals, which results in exceptionally poor image quality when testing mice and other small rodents. Despite this limitation, we have identified seven VFSS parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice when using a high energy fluoroscope in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol. We recently obtained a low energy fluoroscopy system with exceptionally high imaging resolution and magnification capabilities that was designed for use with mice and other small rodents. Preliminary work using this new system, in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol, has identified 13 swallow parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice, which is nearly double the number obtained using conventional (i.e., high energy) fluoroscopes. Identification of additional swallow parameters is expected as we optimize the capabilities of this new system. Results thus far demonstrate the utility of using a low energy fluoroscopy system to detect and quantify subtle changes in swallow physiology that may otherwise be overlooked when using high energy fluoroscopes to investigate murine disease models.

  10. An isogenic model of murine mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Sagar S; Weiss, Daniela M; Donneys, Alexis; Gallagher, Katherine K; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Sarhaddi, Deniz; Buchman, Steven R

    2013-03-01

    The advent of stem cell-based therapies makes current models of mandibular distraction osteogenesis unwieldy. We thereby designed an isogenic model of distraction osteogenesis whose purpose was to allow for the free transfer of cells and components between rats. As immune response plays a significant role in healing and prevention of infection, an immune-competent mode is desirable rather than an athymic rat/xenograft model. The purposes of this study were as follows: (1) to replicate established models of distraction osteogenesis in a rodent model using an isogenic rat strain, and (2) to characterize the differences between inbred, isogenic rats and outbred rats in mandibular distraction osteogenesis via radiomorphometry and biomechanical response analysis. We demonstrated successful distraction osteogenesis to 5.1 mm in all Lewis (isogenic) rat mandibles as well as all Sprague-Dawley (outbred) rat mandibles, with no significant difference in volume-normalized radiomorphometrics, trending difference in non-volume-normalized radiomorphometrics and significant differences in biomechanical response parameters. We attribute the differences demonstrated to the decreased size of the Lewis rat mandible in comparison to Sprague-Dawley mandibles. We also provide information with caring with the additional needs of the Lewis rat. Given these differences, we find that Lewis rats function as an excellent model for isogenic mandibular distraction osteogenesis, but data procured may not be comparable between isogenic and nonisogenic models.

  11. Cardiac-Specific YAP Activation Improves Cardiac Function and Survival in an Experimental Murine MI Model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiqiang; von Gise, Alexander; Zhou, Pingzhu; Gu, Fei; Ma, Qing; Jiang, Jiangming; Yau, Allan L.; Buck, Jessica N.; Gouin, Katryna A.; van Gorp, Pim R. R.; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Jinghai; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Wang, Da-zhi; Pu, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Yes-Associated Protein (YAP), the terminal effector of the Hippo signaling pathway, is crucial for regulating embryonic cardiomyocyte (CM) proliferation. Objective We hypothesized that YAP activation after myocardial infarction would preserve cardiac function and improve survival. Methods and Results We used a cardiac-specific, inducible expression system to activate YAP in adult mouse heart. Activation of YAP in adult heart promoted CM proliferation and did not deleteriously affect heart function. Furthermore, YAP activation after myocardial infarction (MI) preserved heart function and reduced infarct size. Using adeno-associated virus subtype 9 (AAV9) as a delivery vector, we expressed human YAP in the adult murine myocardium immediately after MI. We found that AAV9:hYAP significantly improved cardiac function and mouse survival. AAV9:hYAP did not exert its salutary effects by reducing CM apoptosis. Rather, AAV9:hYAP stimulated adult CM proliferation. Gene expression profiling indicated that AAV9:hYAP stimulated expression of cell cycle genes and promoted a less mature cardiac gene expression signature. Conclusions Cardiac specific YAP activation after MI mitigated myocardial injury, improved cardiac function, and enhanced survival. These findings suggest that therapeutic activation of YAP or its downstream targets, potentially through AAV-mediated gene therapy, may be a strategy to improve outcome after MI. PMID:24833660

  12. Murine Models of Candida Gastrointestinal Colonization and Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ninety-five percent of infectious agents enter through exposed mucosal surfaces, such as the respiratory and gastrointestinal (GI) tracts. The human GI tract is colonized with trillions of commensal microbes, including numerous Candida spp. Some commensal microbes in the GI tract can cause serious human infections under specific circumstances, typically involving changes in the gut environment and/or host immune conditions. Therefore, utilizing animal models of fungal GI colonization and dissemination can lead to significant insights into the complex pathophysiology of transformation from a commensal organism to a pathogen and host-pathogen interactions. This paper will review the methodologic approaches used for modeling GI colonization versus dissemination, the insights learned from these models, and finally, possible future directions using these animal modeling systems. PMID:24036344

  13. An Orthotopic Murine Model of Human Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pavese, Janet; Ogden, Irene M.; Bergan, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Our laboratory has developed a novel orthotopic implantation model of human prostate cancer (PCa). As PCa death is not due to the primary tumor, but rather the formation of distinct metastasis, the ability to effectively model this progression pre-clinically is of high value. In this model, cells are directly implanted into the ventral lobe of the prostate in Balb/c athymic mice, and allowed to progress for 4-6 weeks. At experiment termination, several distinct endpoints can be measured, such as size and molecular characterization of the primary tumor, the presence and quantification of circulating tumor cells in the blood and bone marrow, and formation of metastasis to the lung. In addition to a variety of endpoints, this model provides a picture of a cells ability to invade and escape the primary organ, enter and survive in the circulatory system, and implant and grow in a secondary site. This model has been used effectively to measure metastatic response to both changes in protein expression as well as to response to small molecule therapeutics, in a short turnaround time. PMID:24084571

  14. A murine model for genetic manipulation of the T cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Gu, J; Kuo, M L; Rivera, A; Sutkowski, N; Ron, Y; Dougherty, J P

    1996-10-01

    The expression of exogenous genes in long-lived primary T cells is potentially beneficial for the treatment of various diseases including cancer, AIDS, genetic defects of the lymphoid compartment, and systemic enzyme deficiencies such as hemophilia. One approach for genetic modification of T cells is to introduce therapeutic genes into hematopoietic stem cells that would give rise to cells of the lymphoid lineage. Efficient gene transfer and expression in stem cells is often problematic, however. A more direct approach is to introduce the genes into mature primary T lymphocytes since the transferred genes can be maintained and expressed for long periods by long-lived peripheral T cells. In this report, we describe the adoptive transfer into SCID mice of both murine and human primary T cells that have been efficiently transduced with exogenous genes. Primary murine T cells transduced with a retroviral vector containing the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene persisted for at least 5 months in lymphoid organs of SCID mice, continuously expressing the exogenous gene. Primary human T cells were also used as target cells for transfer of the beta-galactosidase (lacZ) gene. Expression of the lacZ gene could be detected in over 20% of the transduced primary T cells before adoptive transfer into SCID mice. Transduced human T cells were injected into SCID mice intraperitoneally (ip), and the beta-galactosidase activity could be detected in cells collected from peritoneal exudate washes of recipient mice 6 weeks post-injection. These results demonstrate the availability of a murine model in which the long-term effects of expression of exogenous genes in both murine and human T cells can be tested. PMID:8913290

  15. Murine Models of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ninomiya, Masashi; Kondo, Yasuteru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    In 1980, Ludwig et al. first reported patients of steatohepatitis who lacked a history of excessive alcohol consumption but showed liver histology resembling alcoholic hepatitis and progression to cirrhosis of the liver accompanied by inflammation and fibrosis. The development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is associated with obesity, diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. However, the pathogenesis of NASH remains incomplete. A “multiple-hit” hypothesis for the pathogenesis of NASH based on an animal model has been proposed and remains a foundation for research in this field. We review the important dietary and genetic animal models and discuss the pathogenesis of NASH. PMID:27335818

  16. Murine Models of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Masashi; Kondo, Yasuteru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    In 1980, Ludwig et al. first reported patients of steatohepatitis who lacked a history of excessive alcohol consumption but showed liver histology resembling alcoholic hepatitis and progression to cirrhosis of the liver accompanied by inflammation and fibrosis. The development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is associated with obesity, diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. However, the pathogenesis of NASH remains incomplete. A "multiple-hit" hypothesis for the pathogenesis of NASH based on an animal model has been proposed and remains a foundation for research in this field. We review the important dietary and genetic animal models and discuss the pathogenesis of NASH. PMID:27335818

  17. PDGFRα demarcates the cardiogenic clonogenic Sca1+ stem/progenitor cell in adult murine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Noseda, Michela; Harada, Mutsuo; McSweeney, Sara; Leja, Thomas; Belian, Elisa; Stuckey, Daniel J; Abreu Paiva, Marta S; Habib, Josef; Macaulay, Iain; de Smith, Adam J; al-Beidh, Farah; Sampson, Robert; Lumbers, R Thomas; Rao, Pulivarthi; Harding, Sian E; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; Barahona, Mauricio; Schneider, Michael D

    2015-05-18

    Cardiac progenitor/stem cells in adult hearts represent an attractive therapeutic target for heart regeneration, though (inter)-relationships among reported cells remain obscure. Using single-cell qRT-PCR and clonal analyses, here we define four subpopulations of cardiac progenitor/stem cells in adult mouse myocardium all sharing stem cell antigen-1 (Sca1), based on side population (SP) phenotype, PECAM-1 (CD31) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα) expression. SP status predicts clonogenicity and cardiogenic gene expression (Gata4/6, Hand2 and Tbx5/20), properties segregating more specifically to PDGFRα(+) cells. Clonal progeny of single Sca1(+) SP cells show cardiomyocyte, endothelial and smooth muscle lineage potential after cardiac grafting, augmenting cardiac function although durable engraftment is rare. PDGFRα(-) cells are characterized by Kdr/Flk1, Cdh5, CD31 and lack of clonogenicity. PDGFRα(+)/CD31(-) cells derive from cells formerly expressing Mesp1, Nkx2-5, Isl1, Gata5 and Wt1, distinct from PDGFRα(-)/CD31(+) cells (Gata5 low; Flk1 and Tie2 high). Thus, PDGFRα demarcates the clonogenic cardiogenic Sca1(+) stem/progenitor cell.

  18. PDGFRα demarcates the cardiogenic clonogenic Sca1+ stem/progenitor cell in adult murine myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Noseda, Michela; Harada, Mutsuo; McSweeney, Sara; Leja, Thomas; Belian, Elisa; Stuckey, Daniel J.; Abreu Paiva, Marta S.; Habib, Josef; Macaulay, Iain; de Smith, Adam J.; al-Beidh, Farah; Sampson, Robert; Lumbers, R. Thomas; Rao, Pulivarthi; Harding, Sian E.; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Eirik Jacobsen, Sten; Barahona, Mauricio; Schneider, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor/stem cells in adult hearts represent an attractive therapeutic target for heart regeneration, though (inter)-relationships among reported cells remain obscure. Using single-cell qRT–PCR and clonal analyses, here we define four subpopulations of cardiac progenitor/stem cells in adult mouse myocardium all sharing stem cell antigen-1 (Sca1), based on side population (SP) phenotype, PECAM-1 (CD31) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα) expression. SP status predicts clonogenicity and cardiogenic gene expression (Gata4/6, Hand2 and Tbx5/20), properties segregating more specifically to PDGFRα+ cells. Clonal progeny of single Sca1+ SP cells show cardiomyocyte, endothelial and smooth muscle lineage potential after cardiac grafting, augmenting cardiac function although durable engraftment is rare. PDGFRα− cells are characterized by Kdr/Flk1, Cdh5, CD31 and lack of clonogenicity. PDGFRα+/CD31− cells derive from cells formerly expressing Mesp1, Nkx2-5, Isl1, Gata5 and Wt1, distinct from PDGFRα−/CD31+ cells (Gata5 low; Flk1 and Tie2 high). Thus, PDGFRα demarcates the clonogenic cardiogenic Sca1+ stem/progenitor cell. PMID:25980517

  19. AN IN VITRO MODEL FOR MURINE URETERIC EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a model developed to study growth and differentiation of primary cultures of ureteric epithelial cells from embryonic C57BL/6N mouse urinary tracts. Single cells were resuspended in medium and plated onto transwells coated with collagen IV and laminin. Basa...

  20. Astragalin Attenuates Allergic Inflammation in a Murine Asthma Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiping; Cheng, Yue; Zhang, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Xue; Chen, Shuxian; Hu, Zongmiao; Zhou, Chunmei; Zhang, Enhu; Ma, Shiping

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to determine the protective effects and the underlying mechanisms of astragalin (AG) on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic inflammation in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Our study demonstrated that AG inhibited OVA-induced increases in eosinophil count; IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IgE were recovered in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and increased IFN-γ level in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Histological studies demonstrated that AG substantially inhibited OVA-induced eosinophilia in lung tissue. Western blot analysis demonstrated that AG treatments markedly inhibited OVA-induced SOCS-3 expression and enhancement of SOCS-5 expression in an asthma model. Our findings support the possible use of AG as a therapeutic drug for patients with allergic asthma.

  1. Role of Nox4 in murine models of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Babelova, Andrea; Avaniadi, Despina; Jung, Oliver; Fork, Christian; Beckmann, Janet; Kosowski, Judith; Weissmann, Norbert; Anilkumar, Narayana; Shah, Ajay M; Schaefer, Liliana; Schröder, Katrin; Brandes, Ralf P

    2012-08-15

    Nox4 is a hydrogen peroxide-producing NADPH oxidase highly expressed in the kidney which has been linked to epithelial cell injury and diabetic-induced cellular dysfunction in cultured cells. The role of the enzyme for renal pathology in vivo, however, is unclear. To address this, three experimental animal models of renal injury (streptozotocin diabetes I, unilateral ureteral ligation (UUO), and 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx)) were studied in either Nox4-inducible (Nox4(*/*)) or constitutive knockout (Nox4(-/-)) mice. Nox4 contributed more than 80% of diphenylene iodonium-sensitive H(2)O(2) formation of freshly isolated tubules determined by Amplex Red assay. In streptozotocin diabetes, acute deletion of Nox4 by tamoxifen-activated cre-recombinase increased albuminuria, whereas matrix deposition was similar between WT and Nox4(*/*) mice. Interestingly, renal Nox4 expression, mainly localized to tubular cells, decreased in the course of diabetes and this was not associated with a compensatory upregulation of Nox1 or Nox2. In the UUO model, renal expression of ICAM1, connective tissue growth factor, and fibronectin were higher in kidneys of Nox4(*/*) than control mice. Also in this model, levels of Nox4 decreased in the course of the disease. In the 5/6Nx model, which was performed in SV129 and SV129-Nox4(-/-) mice, no difference in the development of hypertension and albuminuria was found between the strains. Collectively, the first in vivo data of the kidney do not support the view that Nox4 is a main driver of renal disease. It rather appears that under specific conditions Nox4 may even slightly limit injury and disease progression.

  2. Preclinical murine models of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Vlahos, Ross; Bozinovski, Steven

    2015-07-15

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major incurable global health burden and is the 4th leading cause of death worldwide. It is believed that an exaggerated inflammatory response to cigarette smoke causes progressive airflow limitation. This inflammation, where macrophages, neutrophils and T lymphocytes are prominent, leads to oxidative stress, emphysema, small airway fibrosis and mucus hypersecretion. Much of the disease burden and health care utilisation in COPD is associated with the management of its comorbidities and infectious (viral and bacterial) exacerbations (AECOPD). Comorbidities, defined as other chronic medical conditions, in particular skeletal muscle wasting and cardiovascular disease markedly impact on disease morbidity, progression and mortality. The mechanisms and mediators underlying COPD and its comorbidities are poorly understood and current COPD therapy is relatively ineffective. Thus, there is an obvious need for new therapies that can prevent the induction and progression of COPD and effectively treat AECOPD and comorbidities of COPD. Given that access to COPD patients can be difficult and that clinical samples often represent a "snapshot" at a particular time in the disease process, many researchers have used animal modelling systems to explore the mechanisms underlying COPD, AECOPD and comorbidities of COPD with the goal of identifying novel therapeutic targets. This review highlights the mouse models used to define the cellular, molecular and pathological consequences of cigarette smoke exposure and the recent advances in modelling infectious exacerbations and comorbidities of COPD.

  3. Pharmacological analysis of epithelial chloride secretion mechanisms in adult murine airways.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Ambra; Ferrera, Loretta; Philp, Amber R; Caci, Emanuela; Zegarra-Moran, Olga; Galietta, Luis J V; Flores, Carlos A

    2016-06-15

    Defective epithelial chloride secretion occurs in humans with cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic defect due to loss of function of CFTR, a cAMP-activated chloride channel. In the airways, absence of an active CFTR causes a severe lung disease. In mice, genetic ablation of CFTR function does not result in similar lung pathology. This may be due to the expression of an alternative chloride channel which is activated by calcium. The most probable protein performing this function is TMEM16A, a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC). Our aim was to assess the relative contribution of CFTR and TMEM16A to chloride secretion in adult mouse trachea. For this purpose we tested pharmacological inhibitors of chloride channels in normal and CF mice. The amplitude of the cAMP-activated current was similar in both types of animals and was not affected by a selective CFTR inhibitor. In contrast, a CaCC inhibitor (CaCCinh-A01) strongly blocked the cAMP-activated current as well as the calcium-activated chloride secretion triggered by apical UTP. Although control experiments revealed that CaCCinh-A01 also shows inhibitory activity on CFTR, our results indicate that transepithelial chloride secretion in adult mouse trachea is independent of CFTR and that another channel, possibly TMEM16A, performs both cAMP- and calcium-activated chloride transport. The prevalent function of a non-CFTR channel may explain the absence of a defect in chloride transport in CF mice. PMID:27063443

  4. Mycobacterium abscessus Morphotype Comparison in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Caverly, Lindsay J.; Caceres, Silvia M.; Fratelli, Cori; Happoldt, Carrie; Kidwell, Kelley M.; Malcolm, Kenneth C.; Nick, Jerry A.; Nichols, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infections with Mycobacterium abscessus (M. abscessus) are increasingly prevalent in patients with lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. M. abscessus exists in two morphotypes, smooth and rough, but the impact of morphotype on virulence is unclear. We developed an immune competent mouse model of pulmonary M. abscessus infection and tested the differences in host inflammatory response between the morphotypes of M. abscessus. Smooth and rough morphotypes of M. abscessus were isolated from the same American Type Culture Collection strain. Wild type and cystic fibrosis mice were intratracheally inoculated with known quantities of M. abscessus suspended in fibrin plugs. At the time of sacrifice lung and splenic tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected and cultured. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for leukocyte count, differential and cytokine expression. Pulmonary infection with M. abscessus was present at both 3 days and 14 days post-inoculation in all groups at greater levels than systemic infection. Inoculation with M. abscessus rough morphotype resulted in more bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophils compared to smooth morphotype at 14 days post-inoculation in both wild type (p = 0.01) and cystic fibrosis (p<0.01) mice. Spontaneous in vivo conversion from smooth to rough morphotype occurred in 12/57 (21%) of mice. These mice trended towards greater weight loss than mice in which morphotype conversion did not occur. In the described fibrin plug model of M. abscessus infection, pulmonary infection with minimal systemic dissemination is achieved with both smooth and rough morphotypes. In this model M. abscessus rough morphotype causes a greater host inflammatory response than the smooth based on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophil levels. PMID:25675351

  5. Mycobacterium abscessus morphotype comparison in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Caverly, Lindsay J; Caceres, Silvia M; Fratelli, Cori; Happoldt, Carrie; Kidwell, Kelley M; Malcolm, Kenneth C; Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infections with Mycobacterium abscessus (M. abscessus) are increasingly prevalent in patients with lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. M. abscessus exists in two morphotypes, smooth and rough, but the impact of morphotype on virulence is unclear. We developed an immune competent mouse model of pulmonary M. abscessus infection and tested the differences in host inflammatory response between the morphotypes of M. abscessus. Smooth and rough morphotypes of M. abscessus were isolated from the same American Type Culture Collection strain. Wild type and cystic fibrosis mice were intratracheally inoculated with known quantities of M. abscessus suspended in fibrin plugs. At the time of sacrifice lung and splenic tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected and cultured. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for leukocyte count, differential and cytokine expression. Pulmonary infection with M. abscessus was present at both 3 days and 14 days post-inoculation in all groups at greater levels than systemic infection. Inoculation with M. abscessus rough morphotype resulted in more bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophils compared to smooth morphotype at 14 days post-inoculation in both wild type (p = 0.01) and cystic fibrosis (p<0.01) mice. Spontaneous in vivo conversion from smooth to rough morphotype occurred in 12/57 (21%) of mice. These mice trended towards greater weight loss than mice in which morphotype conversion did not occur. In the described fibrin plug model of M. abscessus infection, pulmonary infection with minimal systemic dissemination is achieved with both smooth and rough morphotypes. In this model M. abscessus rough morphotype causes a greater host inflammatory response than the smooth based on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophil levels. PMID:25675351

  6. Multiscale analysis of the murine intestine for modeling human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Jesse; Herring, Charles A.; Banerjee, Amrita; Simmons, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    When functioning properly, the intestine is one of the key interfaces between the human body and its environment. It is responsible for extracting nutrients from our food and excreting our waste products. It provides an environment for a host of healthful microbes and serves as a first defense against pathogenic ones. These processes require tight homeostatic controls, which are provided by the interactions of a complex mix of epithelial, stromal, neural and immune cells, as well as the resident microflora. This homeostasis can be disrupted by invasive microbes, genetic lesions, and carcinogens, resulting in diseases such Clostridium difficile infection, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and cancer. Enormous strides have been made in understanding how this important organ functions in health and disease using everything from cell culture systems to animal models to human tissue samples. This has resulted in better therapies for all of these diseases, but there is still significant room for improvement. In the United States alone, 14000 people per year die of C. difficile, up to 1.6 million people suffer from IBD, and more than 50000 people die every year from colon cancer. Because these and other intestinal diseases arise from complex interactions between the different components of the gut ecosystem, we propose that systems approaches that address this complexity in an integrative manner may eventually lead to improved therapeutics that deliver lasting cures. This review will discuss the use of systems biology for studying intestinal diseases in vivo with particular emphasis on mouse models. Additionally, it will focus on established experimental techniques that have been used to drive this systems-level analysis, and emerging techniques that will push this field forward in the future. PMID:26040649

  7. microRNA-222 modulates liver fibrosis in a murine model of biliary atresia

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wen-jun; Dong, Rui; Chen, Gong Zheng, Shan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • The RRV infected group showed cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. • miR-222 was highly expressed, and PPP2R2A was inhibited in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 might represent a potential target for improving biliary atresia prognosis. - Abstract: microRNA-222 (miR-222) has been shown to initiate the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of miR-22 in a mouse model of biliary atresia (BA) induced by Rhesus Rotavirus (RRV) infection. New-born Balb/c mice were randomized into control and RRV infected groups. The extrahepatic bile ducts were evaluated. The experimental group was divided into BA group and negative group based on histology. The expression of miR-222, protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B alpha (PPP2R2A), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phospho-Akt were detected. We found that the experimental group showed signs of cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. No abnormalities were found in the control group. In the BA group, miR-222, PCNA and Akt were highly expressed, and PPP2R2A expression was significantly inhibited. Our findings suggest that miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine BA model, which might represent a potential target for improving BA prognosis.

  8. Further biodosimetry investigations using murine partial-body irradiation model.

    PubMed

    Blakely, W F; Sandgren, D J; Nagy, V; Kim, S-Y; Sigal, G B; Ossetrova, N I

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluates both the effects of physical restraint and use of candidate biomarkers in a CD2F1 male mouse partial-body irradiation model for biological dosimetry diagnostic assays. Mice were irradiated (6-Gy, 250-kVp X ray) to 3/3rd (total body), 2/3rd (gut and torso), 1/3rd (gut only) and 0/3rd (sham) of total body. Blood was sampled for haematology and blood plasma proteomic biomarkers at 1 and 2 d after exposure. Increases in the body fraction exposed showed progressive decreases in lymphocyte counts and increases in the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios with no significant differences in the neutrophil and platelet counts. The radioresponse for plasma biomarker Flt3L showed proportional increases; however, G-CSF and SAA levels exhibited dramatic and non-proportional increases in levels. Physical restraint at 1 d post-exposure increased lymphocyte counts and SAA, decreased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and Flt3L and showed no effects on neutrophil and platelet counts or G-CSF.

  9. Persistent G. lamblia impairs growth in a murine malnutrition model.

    PubMed

    Bartelt, Luther A; Roche, James; Kolling, Glynis; Bolick, David; Noronha, Francisco; Naylor, Caitlin; Hoffman, Paul; Warren, Cirle; Singer, Steven; Guerrant, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Giardia lamblia infections are nearly universal among children in low-income countries and are syndemic with the triumvirate of malnutrition, diarrhea, and developmental growth delays. Amidst the morass of early childhood enteropathogen exposures in these populations, G. lamblia–specific associations with persistent diarrhea, cognitive deficits, stunting, and nutrient deficiencies have demonstrated conflicting results, placing endemic pediatric giardiasis in a state of equipoise. Many infections in endemic settings appear to be asymptomatic/ subclinical, further contributing to uncertainty regarding a causal link between G. lamblia infection and developmental delay. We used G. lamblia H3 cyst infection in a weaned mouse model of malnutrition to demonstrate that persistent giardiasis leads to epithelial cell apoptosis and crypt hyperplasia. Infection was associated with a Th2-biased inflammatory response and impaired growth. Malnutrition accentuated the severity of these growth decrements. Faltering malnourished mice exhibited impaired compensatory responses following infection and demonstrated an absence of crypt hyperplasia and subsequently blunted villus architecture. Concomitantly, severe malnutrition prevented increases in B220+ cells in the lamina propria as well as mucosal Il4 and Il5 mRNA in response to infection. These findings add insight into the potential role of G. lamblia as a "stunting" pathogen and suggest that, similarly, malnourished children may be at increased risk of G. lamblia– potentiated growth decrements.

  10. Glomerular parietal epithelial cells of adult murine kidney undergo EMT to generate cells with traits of renal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    G, Swetha; Chandra, Vikash; Phadnis, Smruti; Bhonde, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glomerular parietal epithelial cells (GPECs) are known to revert to embryonic phenotype in response to renal injury. However, the mechanism of de-differentiation in GPECs and the underlying cellular processes are not fully understood. In the present study, we show that cultured GPECs of adult murine kidney undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to generate cells, which express CD24, CD44 and CD29 surface antigens. Characterization by qRT-PCR and immunostaining of these clonogenic cells demonstrate that they exhibit metastable phenotype with co-expression of both epithelial (cytokeratin-18) and mesenchymal (vimentin) markers. Transcript analysis by qRT-PCR revealed high expression of metanephric mesenchymal (Pax-2, WT-1, Six-1, Eya-1, GDNF) and uteric bud (Hoxb-7, C-Ret) genes in these cells, indicating their bipotent progenitor status. Incubation of GPECs with EMT blocker Prostaglandin E2, resulted in low expression of renal progenitor markers reflecting the correlation between EMT and acquired stemness in these cells. Additional in vitro renal commitment assays confirmed their functional staminality. When injected into E13.5 kidney rudiments, the cells incorporated into the developing kidney primordia and co-culture with E13.5 spinal cord resulted in branching and tubulogenesis in these cells. When implanted under renal capsule of unilaterally nephrectomized mice, these cells differentiated into immature glomeruli and vascular ducts. Our study demonstrates that EMT plays a major role in imparting plasticity to terminally differentiated GPECs by producing metastable cells with traits of kidney progenitors. The present study would improve our understanding on epithelial cell plasticity, furthering our knowledge of its role in renal repair and regeneration. PMID:19840197

  11. Videofluoroscopic Validation of a Translational Murine Model of Presbyphagia.

    PubMed

    Lever, Teresa E; Brooks, Ryan T; Thombs, Lori A; Littrell, Loren L; Harris, Rebecca A; Allen, Mitchell J; Kadosh, Matan D; Robbins, Kate L

    2015-06-01

    Presbyphagia affects approximately 40% of otherwise healthy people over 60 years of age. Hence, it is a condition of primary aging rather than a consequence of primary disease. This distinction warrants systematic investigations to understand the causal mechanisms of aging versus disease specifically on the structure and function of the swallowing mechanism. Toward this goal, we have been studying healthy aging C57BL/6 mice (also called B6), the most popular laboratory rodent for biomedical research. The goal of this study was to validate this strain as a model of presbyphagia for translational research purposes. We tested two age groups of B6 mice: young (4-7 months; n = 16) and old (18-21 months; n = 11). Mice underwent a freely behaving videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) protocol developed in our lab. VFSS videos (recorded at 30 frames per second) were analyzed frame-by-frame to quantify 15 swallow metrics. Six of the 15 swallow metrics were significantly different between young and old mice. Compared to young mice, old mice had significantly longer pharyngeal and esophageal transit times (p = 0.038 and p = 0.022, respectively), swallowed larger boluses (p = 0.032), and had a significantly higher percentage of ineffective primary esophageal swallows (p = 0.0405). In addition, lick rate was significantly slower for old mice, measured using tongue cycle rate (p = 0.0034) and jaw cycle rate (p = 0.0020). This study provides novel evidence that otherwise healthy aging B6 mice indeed develop age-related changes in swallow function resembling presbyphagia in humans. Specifically, aging B6 mice have a generally slow swallow that spans all stages of swallowing: oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal. The next step is to build upon this foundational work by exploring the responsible mechanisms of presbyphagia in B6 mice.

  12. Fluorescence and reflectance spectral imaging system for a murine mammary window chamber model

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hui Min; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2015-01-01

    A spectral imaging system was developed to study the development of breast cancer xenografts in a murine mammary window chamber model. The instrument is configured to work with either a laser to excite fluorescence or a broadband light source for diffuse reflectance imaging. Two applications were demonstrated. First, spectral imaging of fluorescence signals was demonstrated with a GFP-breast cancer tumor and fluorescein injection. Second, based on the principles of broadband reflectance spectroscopy, the instrument was used to monitor dynamic changes of tissue absorbance to yield tissue oxygenation maps at different time points during tumor progression. PMID:26309753

  13. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    de Munck, Estefanía; Palomo, Valle; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Perez, Daniel I.; Gómez-Miguel, Begoña; Solas, M. Teresa; Gil, Carmen; Martínez, Ana; Arahuetes, Rosa M.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS. PMID:27631495

  14. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Estefanía; Palomo, Valle; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Perez, Daniel I; Gómez-Miguel, Begoña; Solas, M Teresa; Gil, Carmen; Martínez, Ana; Arahuetes, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS. PMID:27631495

  15. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Estefanía; Palomo, Valle; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Perez, Daniel I; Gómez-Miguel, Begoña; Solas, M Teresa; Gil, Carmen; Martínez, Ana; Arahuetes, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS.

  16. Murine Model Imitating Chronic Wound Infections for Evaluation of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Fila, Grzegorz; Kasimova, Kamola; Arenas, Yaxal; Nakonieczna, Joanna; Grinholc, Mariusz; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Lilge, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the age of antibiotics could come to an end, due to their widespread, and inappropriate use. Particularly for chronic wounds alternatives are being thought. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (APDT) is a potential candidate, and while approved for some indications, such as periodontitis, chronic sinusitis and other niche indications, its use in chronic wounds is not established. To further facilitate the development of APDT in chronic wounds we present an easy to use animal model exhibiting the key hallmarks of chronic wounds, based on full-thickness skin wounds paired with an optically transparent cover. The moisture-retaining wound exhibited rapid expansion of pathogen colonies up to 8 days while not jeopardizing the host survival. Use of two bioluminescent pathogens; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa permits real time monitoring of the pathogens. The murine model was employed to evaluate the performance of four different photosensitizers as mediators in Photodynamic Therapy. While all four photosensitizers, Rose Bengal, porphyrin TMPyP, New Methylene Blue, and TLD1411 demonstrated good to excellent antimicrobial efficacy in planktonic solutions at 1 to 50 μM concentrations, whereas in in vivo the growth delay was limited with 24–48 h delay in pathogen expansion for MRSA, and we noticed longer growth suppression of P. aeruginosa with TLD1411 mediated Photodynamic Therapy. The murine model will enable developing new strategies for enhancement of APDT for chronic wound infections. PMID:27555843

  17. Murine Model Imitating Chronic Wound Infections for Evaluation of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Fila, Grzegorz; Kasimova, Kamola; Arenas, Yaxal; Nakonieczna, Joanna; Grinholc, Mariusz; Bielawski, Krzysztof P; Lilge, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the age of antibiotics could come to an end, due to their widespread, and inappropriate use. Particularly for chronic wounds alternatives are being thought. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (APDT) is a potential candidate, and while approved for some indications, such as periodontitis, chronic sinusitis and other niche indications, its use in chronic wounds is not established. To further facilitate the development of APDT in chronic wounds we present an easy to use animal model exhibiting the key hallmarks of chronic wounds, based on full-thickness skin wounds paired with an optically transparent cover. The moisture-retaining wound exhibited rapid expansion of pathogen colonies up to 8 days while not jeopardizing the host survival. Use of two bioluminescent pathogens; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa permits real time monitoring of the pathogens. The murine model was employed to evaluate the performance of four different photosensitizers as mediators in Photodynamic Therapy. While all four photosensitizers, Rose Bengal, porphyrin TMPyP, New Methylene Blue, and TLD1411 demonstrated good to excellent antimicrobial efficacy in planktonic solutions at 1 to 50 μM concentrations, whereas in in vivo the growth delay was limited with 24-48 h delay in pathogen expansion for MRSA, and we noticed longer growth suppression of P. aeruginosa with TLD1411 mediated Photodynamic Therapy. The murine model will enable developing new strategies for enhancement of APDT for chronic wound infections. PMID:27555843

  18. Endogenous biosynthesis of thromboxane and prostacyclin in 2 distinct murine models of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Praticò, D; Cyrus, T; Li, H; FitzGerald, G A

    2000-12-01

    Thromboxane A(2) is a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet agonist; prostacyclin is a potent platelet inhibitor and vasodilator. Altered biosynthesis of these eicosanoids is a feature of human hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. This study examined whether in 2 murine models of atherosclerosis their levels are increased and correlated with the evolution of the disease. Urinary 2,3-dinor thromboxane B(2) and 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F(1 alpha), metabolites of thromboxane and prostacyclin, respectively, were assayed in apoliprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice on chow and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice on chow and a Western-type diet. Atherosclerosis lesion area was measured by en face method. Both eicosanoids increased in apoE-deficient mice on chow and in LDLR-deficient mice on a high-fat diet, but not in LDLR-deficient mice on chow by the end of the study. Aspirin suppressed ex vivo platelet aggregation, serum thromboxane B(2), and 2,3-dinor thromboxane B(2), and significantly reduced the excretion of 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F(1 alpha) in these animals. This study demonstrates that thromboxane as well as prostacyclin biosynthesis is increased in 2 murine models of atherogenesis and is secondary to increased in vivo platelet activation. Assessment of their generation in these models may afford the basis for future studies on the functional role of these eicosanoids in the evolution and progression of atherosclerosis. (Blood. 2000;96:3823-3826)

  19. Ube3a reinstatement identifies distinct developmental windows in a murine Angelman syndrome model

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Santos, Sara; van Woerden, Geeske M.; Bruinsma, Caroline F.; Mientjes, Edwin; Jolfaei, Mehrnoush Aghadavoud; Distel, Ben; Kushner, Steven A.; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that results from loss of function of the maternal ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) allele. Due to neuron-specific imprinting, the paternal UBE3A copy is silenced. Previous studies in murine models have demonstrated that strategies to activate the paternal Ube3a allele are feasible; however, a recent study showed that pharmacological Ube3a gene reactivation in adulthood failed to rescue the majority of neurocognitive phenotypes in a murine AS model. Here, we performed a systematic study to investigate the possibility that neurocognitive rescue can be achieved by reinstating Ube3a during earlier neurodevelopmental windows. We developed an AS model that allows for temporally controlled Cre-dependent induction of the maternal Ube3a allele and determined that there are distinct neurodevelopmental windows during which Ube3a restoration can rescue AS-relevant phenotypes. Motor deficits were rescued by Ube3a reinstatement in adolescent mice, whereas anxiety, repetitive behavior, and epilepsy were only rescued when Ube3a was reinstated during early development. In contrast, hippocampal synaptic plasticity could be restored at any age. Together, these findings suggest that Ube3a reinstatement early in development may be necessary to prevent or rescue most AS-associated phenotypes and should be considered in future clinical trial design. PMID:25866966

  20. Ube3a reinstatement identifies distinct developmental windows in a murine Angelman syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Silva-Santos, Sara; van Woerden, Geeske M; Bruinsma, Caroline F; Mientjes, Edwin; Jolfaei, Mehrnoush Aghadavoud; Distel, Ben; Kushner, Steven A; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-05-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that results from loss of function of the maternal ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) allele. Due to neuron-specific imprinting, the paternal UBE3A copy is silenced. Previous studies in murine models have demonstrated that strategies to activate the paternal Ube3a allele are feasible; however, a recent study showed that pharmacological Ube3a gene reactivation in adulthood failed to rescue the majority of neurocognitive phenotypes in a murine AS model. Here, we performed a systematic study to investigate the possibility that neurocognitive rescue can be achieved by reinstating Ube3a during earlier neurodevelopmental windows. We developed an AS model that allows for temporally controlled Cre-dependent induction of the maternal Ube3a allele and determined that there are distinct neurodevelopmental windows during which Ube3a restoration can rescue AS-relevant phenotypes. Motor deficits were rescued by Ube3a reinstatement in adolescent mice, whereas anxiety, repetitive behavior, and epilepsy were only rescued when Ube3a was reinstated during early development. In contrast, hippocampal synaptic plasticity could be restored at any age. Together, these findings suggest that Ube3a reinstatement early in development may be necessary to prevent or rescue most AS-associated phenotypes and should be considered in future clinical trial design. PMID:25866966

  1. Safety and antidiarrheal activity of Priva adhaerens aqueous leaf extract in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Nansunga, Miriam; Barasa, Ambrose; Abimana, Justus; Alele, Paul E.; Kasolo, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Priva adhaerens (Forssk.) Chiov., a wildly growing plant, is reported in central Uganda to be an effective traditional remedy for diarrhea. The objective of this study was to provide a scientific basis for the ethnopharmacological utility of this plant whose aqueous leaf and shoot extract was evaluated for acute toxicity and antidiarrheal activity using a murine model. Materials and methods Acute toxicity of the aqueous leaf and shoot extract was assessed after determining the major phytochemicals present in the extract. The aqueous leaf and shoot extract was assayed against castor oil-induced diarrhea, transit time, and enteropooling, in comparison to loperamide, a standard drug. Results The oral LD50 value obtained for Priva adhaerens aqueous extract was greater than 5000 mg/kg in rats; the aqueous leaf and shoot extract possessed several important phytochemicals. Furthermore, the aqueous extract significantly, and dose-dependently, reduced frequency of stooling in castor oil-induced diarrhea, intestinal motility, and castor oil-induced enteropooling in rats. Conclusion This murine model shows that it is relatively safe to orally use the aqueous leaf and shoot extract of Priva adhaerens . The aqueous extract contains phytochemicals that are active for the treatment of diarrhea in a rat model. PMID:25304198

  2. Membrane configuration optimization for a murine in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Wuest, Diane M; Wing, Allison M; Lee, Kelvin H

    2013-01-30

    A powerful experimental tool used to study the dynamic functions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an in vitro cellular based system utilizing cell culture inserts in multi-well plates. Currently, usage of divergent model configurations without explanation of selected variable set points renders data comparisons difficult and limits widespread understanding. This work presents for the first time in literature a comprehensive screening study to optimize membrane configuration, with aims to unveil influential membrane effects on the ability of cerebral endothelial cells to form a tight monolayer. First, primary murine brain endothelial cells and astrocytes were co-cultured in contact and non-contact orientations on membranes of pore diameter sizes ranging from 0.4 μm to 8.0 μm, and the non-contact orientation and smallest pore diameter size were shown to support a significantly tighter monolayer formation. Then, membranes made from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) purchased from three different commercial sources were compared, and PET membranes purchased from two manufacturers facilitated a significantly tighter monolayer formation. Models were characterized by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER), sodium fluorescein permeability, and immunocytochemical labeling of tight junction proteins. Finally, a murine brain endothelial cell line, bEnd.3, was grown on the different membranes, and similar results were obtained with respect to optimal membrane configuration selection. The results and methodology presented here on high throughput 24-well plate inserts can be translated to other BBB systems to advance model understanding.

  3. Multivariate modelling with 1H NMR of pleural effusion in murine cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cerebral malaria is a clinical manifestation of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Although brain damage is the predominant pathophysiological complication of cerebral malaria (CM), respiratory distress, acute lung injury, hydrothorax/pleural effusion are also observed in several cases. Immunological parameters have been assessed in pleural fluid in murine models; however there are no reports of characterization of metabolites present in pleural effusion. Methods 1H NMR of the sera and the pleural effusion of cerebral malaria infected mice were analyzed using principal component analysis, orthogonal partial least square analysis, multiway principal component analysis, and multivariate curve resolution. Results It has been observed that there was 100% occurrence of pleural effusion (PE) in the mice affected with CM, as opposed to those are non-cerebral and succumbing to hyperparasitaemia (NCM/HP). An analysis of 1H NMR and SDS-PAGE profile of PE and serum samples of each of the CM mice exhibited a similar profile in terms of constituents. Multivariate analysis on these two classes of biofluids was performed and significant differences were detected in concentrations of metabolites. Glucose, creatine and glutamine contents were high in the PE and lipids being high in the sera. Multivariate curve resolution between sera and pleural effusion showed that changes in PE co-varied with that of serum in CM mice. The increase of glucose in PE is negatively correlated to the glucose in serum in CM as obtained from the result of multiway principal component analysis. Conclusions This study reports for the first time, the characterization of metabolites in pleural effusion formed during murine cerebral malaria. The study indicates that the origin of PE metabolites in murine CM may be the serum. The loss of the components like glucose, glutamine and creatine into the PE may worsen the situation of patients, in conjunction with the enhanced glycolysis, glutaminolysis and

  4. Immunotoxicity and allergic potential induced by topical application of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey E; Franko, Jennifer; Anderson, Katie L; Munson, Albert E; Lukomska, Ewa; Meade, B Jean

    2013-01-01

    Dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is an industrial chemical, used as a paint and adhesive solvent, with the potential for significant increases in production. Using select immune function assays, the purpose of these studies was to evaluate the immunotoxicity of DMC following dermal exposure using a murine model. Following a 28-day exposure, DMC produced a significant decrease in thymus weight at concentrations of 75% and greater. No effects on body weight, hematological parameters (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and their differentials), or immune cell phenotyping (B-cells, T-cells, and T-cell sub-sets) were identified. The IgM antibody response to sheep red blood cell (SRBC) was significantly reduced in the spleen but not the serum. DMC was not identified to be an irritant and evaluation of the sensitization potential, conducted using the local lymph node assay (LLNA) at concentrations ranging from 50-100%, did not identify increases in lymphocyte proliferation. These results demonstrate that dermal exposure to DMC induces immune suppression in a murine model and raise concern about potential human exposure and the need for occupational exposure regulations. PMID:22953780

  5. Tumor control by human cytomegalovirus in a murine model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Russo, Laetitia; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Borg, Christophe; Pothier, Pierre; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses can cause cancer, other studies reported the regression of human tumors upon viral infections. We investigated the cytoreductive potential of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in a murine model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe-immunodeficient mice. Infection of HepG2 cells with HCMV resulted in the absence of tumor or in a limited tumor growth following injection of cells subcutaneously. By contrast all mice injected with uninfected HepG2 cells and with HepG2 cells infected with UV-treated HCMV did develop tumors without any significant restriction. Analysis of tumors indicated that in mice injected with HCMV-infected-HepG2 cells, but not in controls, a restricted cellular proliferation was observed parallel to a limited activation of the STAT3-cyclin D1 axis, decreased formation of colonies in soft agar, and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. We conclude that HCMV can provide antitumoral effects in a murine model of HCC which requires replicative virus at some stages that results in limitation of tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis mediated through the intrinsic caspase pathway. PMID:27626063

  6. Immunomodulatory Effects of Deokgu Thermomineral Water Balneotherapy on Oxazolone-Induced Atopic Dermatitis Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sae Mi; Lee, Kyung Ho; Han, Hyung Jin; Yu, Dong Soo; Woo, So Youn; Yun, Seong Taek; Hamm, Se-Yeong; Kim, Hong Jig

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the therapeutic mechanism of balneotherapy for atopic dermatitis has not been clarified, many atopic patients who visit thermomineral springs have shown clinical improvements. Objective This study was aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of thermomineral water balneotherapy on the atopic dermatitis murine model. Methods The oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis murine model was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of balneotherapy with Deokgu thermomineral water compared with distilled water. Histologic evaluation and confocal microscopic imaging were performed to analyze the lesional expression of cluster-of-differentiation (CD)4 and forkhead box p3 (Foxp3). Lesional mRNA expression of interleukin (IL) 33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and Foxp3 was evaluated by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Compared with the distilled water bath group, confocal microscopic evaluation of CD4 and Foxp3 merged images showed increased expression of regulatory T cells in the thermomineral balneotherapy group. The lesional mRNA level of IL-33 showed a reduced trend in the thermomineral balneotherapy group, whereas the level of mRNA of Foxp3 was increased. TSLP showed a decreased trend in both distilled water and thermomineral water bath groups. There was a trend of reduced expression in lesional IL-33 mRNA but increased cell count of CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in thermomineral balneotherapy compared with distilled water bath. Conclusion Therefore, thermomineral balneotherapy can be an effective and safe adjuvant therapeutic option for atopic dermatitis. PMID:27081266

  7. A Novel Murine Model for Localized Radiation Necrosis and its Characterization Using Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jost, Sarah C.; Hope, Andrew; Kiehl, Erich; Perry, Arie; Travers, Sarah; Garbow, Joel R.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To develop a murine model of radiation necrosis using fractionated, subtotal cranial irradiation; and to investigate the imaging signature of radiation-induced tissue damage using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four mice each received 60 Gy of hemispheric (left) irradiation in 10 equal fractions. Magnetic resonance images at 4.7 T were subsequently collected using T1-, T2-, and diffusion sequences at selected time points after irradiation. After imaging, animals were killed and their brains fixed for correlative histologic analysis. Results: Contrast-enhanced T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images at months 2, 3, and 4 showed changes consistent with progressive radiation necrosis. Quantitatively, mean diffusivity was significantly higher (mean = 0.86, 1.13, and 1.24 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms at 2, 3, and 4 months, respectively) in radiated brain, compared with contralateral untreated brain tissue (mean = 0.78, 0.82, and 0.83 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms) (p < 0.0001). Histology reflected changes typically seen in radiation necrosis. Conclusions: This murine model of radiation necrosis will facilitate investigation of imaging biomarkers that distinguish between radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence. In addition, this preclinical study supports clinical data suggesting that diffusion-weighted imaging may be helpful in answering this diagnostic question in clinical settings.

  8. In vivo measurement of epidermal thickness changes associated with tumor promotion in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Samatham, Ravikant; Choudhury, Niloy; Gladish, James C.; Thuillier, Philippe; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of tissue morphology in murine models of pathogenesis has traditionally been carried out by excision of affected tissues with subsequent immunohistological examination. Excision-based histology provides a limited two-dimensional presentation of tissue morphology at the cost of halting disease progression at a single time point and sacrifice of the animal. We investigate the use of noninvasive reflectance mode confocal scanning laser microscopy (rCSLM) as an alternative tool to biopsy in documenting epidermal hyperplasia in murine models exposed to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). An automated technique utilizing average axial rCSLM reflectance profiles is used to extract epidermal thickness values from rCSLM data cubes. In comparisons to epidermal thicknesses determined from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections, we find no significant correlation to rCSLM-derived thickness values. This results from method-specific artifacts: physical alterations of tissue during H&E preparation in standard histology and specimen-induced abberations in rCSLM imaging. Despite their disagreement, both histology and rCSLM methods reliably measure statistically significant thickness changes in response to TPA exposure. Our results demonstrate that in vivo rCSLM imaging provides epithelial biologists an accurate noninvasive means to monitor cutaneous pathogenesis. PMID:20799792

  9. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhou, Meiling; Jia, Dongwei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  10. Oral treatment with Bifidobacterium longum 51A reduced inflammation in a murine experimental model of gout.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A T; Galvão, I; Amaral, F A; Teixeira, M M; Nicoli, J R; Martins, F S

    2015-01-01

    Gout is an acute inflammatory disease characterised by the presence of uric acid crystals in the joint. This event promotes neutrophil infiltration and activation that leads to tissue damage. We investigated here whether the oral administration of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum 5(1A) (BL) could ameliorate monosodium urate crystal (MSU)-induced inflammation in a murine model of gout. Mice received oral administration of BL or saline daily for 7 days and then were injected with MSU in the knee cavity. Treatment with BL significantly alleviated the inflammatory parameters, as seen by reduced hypernociception, reduced neutrophil accumulation in the joint and myeloperoxidase activity in periarticular tissue. There was inhibition of the production of CXCL1 and interleukin(IL)-1β in joints. Levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were significantly higher in the knee tissue of mice treated with than control mice injected with MSU. In conclusion, oral BL treatment reduced the inflammatory response in an experimental murine model of gout, suggesting it may be useful as an adjuvant treatment in patients with gout.

  11. Tumor control by human cytomegalovirus in a murine model of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Russo, Laetitia; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Borg, Christophe; Pothier, Pierre; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses can cause cancer, other studies reported the regression of human tumors upon viral infections. We investigated the cytoreductive potential of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in a murine model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe-immunodeficient mice. Infection of HepG2 cells with HCMV resulted in the absence of tumor or in a limited tumor growth following injection of cells subcutaneously. By contrast all mice injected with uninfected HepG2 cells and with HepG2 cells infected with UV-treated HCMV did develop tumors without any significant restriction. Analysis of tumors indicated that in mice injected with HCMV-infected-HepG2 cells, but not in controls, a restricted cellular proliferation was observed parallel to a limited activation of the STAT3-cyclin D1 axis, decreased formation of colonies in soft agar, and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. We conclude that HCMV can provide antitumoral effects in a murine model of HCC which requires replicative virus at some stages that results in limitation of tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis mediated through the intrinsic caspase pathway. PMID:27626063

  12. Intranasal curcumin attenuates airway remodeling in murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Subhashini; Dash, D; Singh, Rashmi

    2014-07-01

    Curcumin, phytochemical present in turmeric, rhizome of Curcuma longa, a known anti-inflammatory molecule with variety of pharmacological activities is found effective in murine model of chronic asthma characterized by structural alterations and airway remodeling. Here, we have investigated the effects of intranasal curcumin in chronic asthma where animals were exposed to allergen for longer time. In the present study Balb/c mice were sensitized by an intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA) and subsequently challenged with 2% OVA in aerosol twice a week for five consecutive weeks. Intranasal curcumin (5mg/kg) was administered from days 21 to 55, an hour before every nebulization and inflammatory cells recruitment, levels of IgE, EPO, IL-4 and IL-5 were found suppressed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Intranasal curcumin administration prevented accumulation of inflammatory cells to the airways, structural alterations and remodeling associated with chronic asthma like peribronchial and airway smooth muscle thickening, sloughing off of the epithelial lining and mucus secretion in ovalbumin induced murine model of chronic asthma.

  13. Effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid on a murine model of diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Koganei, Megumi; Saitou, Yuri; Tsuchiya, Kyoko; Abe, Fuminori; Tanaka, Toru; Horinouchi, Izumi; Izumi, Yoshiya; Yamaji, Taketo; Takahashi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) on obesity were investigated using a murine model (diet-induced obese mice). Diet-induced obese mice were divided into 4 groups: a control group (C group), which was fed a high-fat diet; a low-5-ALA dose (10 mg/kg/day) group (10A group); a moderate-5-ALA dose (30 mg/kg/day) group (30A group); and a high-5-ALA dose (100 mg/kg/day) group (100A group). 5-ALA was administered by mixing the high fat diet for 8 weeks. Body weight increases in the 30A and 100A groups were significantly smaller compared with those of the C group. Body fat measurements by X-ray computed tomography indicated that the 100A group showed a tendency toward low visceral fat quantities during the final week of the study. Visceral fat weights in the 30A and 100A groups were slightly low. The levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and total cholesterol (TC) in the 10A group was slightly low, whereas the 30A and 100A groups showed significantly lower ALT and TC values. Liver lipid concentration showed a dose-dependent decrease with ALA. Thus, in this diet-induced obese murine model, administration of 5-ALA had a significantly beneficial impact on the visceral fat, serum ALT and TC, and liver lipid concentration. PMID:26388673

  14. In vivo measurement of epidermal thickness changes associated with tumor promotion in murine models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Samatham, Ravikant; Choudhury, Niloy; Gladish, James C.; Thuillier, Philippe; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-07-01

    The characterization of tissue morphology in murine models of pathogenesis has traditionally been carried out by excision of affected tissues with subsequent immunohistological examination. Excision-based histology provides a limited two-dimensional presentation of tissue morphology at the cost of halting disease progression at a single time point and sacrifice of the animal. We investigate the use of noninvasive reflectance mode confocal scanning laser microscopy (rCSLM) as an alternative tool to biopsy in documenting epidermal hyperplasia in murine models exposed to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). An automated technique utilizing average axial rCSLM reflectance profiles is used to extract epidermal thickness values from rCSLM data cubes. In comparisons to epidermal thicknesses determined from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections, we find no significant correlation to rCSLM-derived thickness values. This results from method-specific artifacts: physical alterations of tissue during H&E preparation in standard histology and specimen-induced abberations in rCSLM imaging. Despite their disagreement, both histology and rCSLM methods reliably measure statistically significant thickness changes in response to TPA exposure. Our results demonstrate that in vivo rCSLM imaging provides epithelial biologists an accurate noninvasive means to monitor cutaneous pathogenesis.

  15. The Effects of Simulated Weightlessness on Susceptibility to Viral and Bacterial Infections Using a Murine Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    Certain immunological responses may be compromised as a result of changes in environmental conditions, such as the physiological adaptation to and from the weightlessness which occurs during space flight and recovery. A murine antiorthostatic model was developed to simulate weightlessness. Using this model, the proposed study will determine if differences in susceptibility to viral and bacterial infections exist among mice suspended in an antiorthostatic orientation to simulate weightlessness, mice suspended in an orthostatic orientation to provide a stressful situation without the condition of weightlessness simulation, and non-suspended control mice. Inbred mouse strains which are resistant to the diabetogenic effects of the D variant of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC-D) and the lethal effects of Salmonella typhimurium will be evaluated. Glucose tolerance tests will be performed on all EMC-D-infected and non-infected control groups. The incidence of EMC-D-induced diabetes and the percentage survival of S. typhimurium-infected animals will be determined in each group. An additional study will determine the effects of simulated weightlessness on murine responses to exogenous interferon.

  16. Ex vivo micro-CT imaging of murine brain models using non-ionic iodinated contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Bautista, N.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Murrieta-Rodríguez, T.; Manjarrez-Marmolejo, J.; Franco-Pérez, J.; Calvillo-Velasco, M. E.

    2014-11-01

    Preclinical investigation of brain tumors is frequently carried out by means of intracranial implantation of brain tumor xenografts or allografts, with subsequent analysis of tumor growth using conventional histopathology. However, very little has been reported on the use contrast-enhanced techniques in micro-CT imaging for the study of malignant brain tumors in small animal models. The aim of this study has been to test a protocol for ex vivo imaging of murine brain models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) after treatment with non-ionic iodinated solution, using an in-house developed laboratory micro-CT. We have found that the best compromise between acquisition time and image quality is obtained using a 50 kVp, 0.5 mAs, 1° angular step on a 360 degree orbit acquisition protocol, with 70 μm reconstructed voxel size using the Feldkamp algorithm. With this parameters up to 4 murine brains can be scanned in tandem in less than 15 minutes. Image segmentation and analysis of three sample brains allowed identifying tumor volumes as small as 0.4 mm3.

  17. Immunotoxicity and allergic potential induced by topical application of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey E.; Franko, Jennifer; Anderson, Katie L.; Munson, Albert E.; Lukomska, Ewa; Meade, B. Jean

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is an industrial chemical, used as a paint and adhesive solvent, with the potential for significant increases in production. Using select immune function assays, the purpose of these studies was to evaluate the immunotoxicity of DMC following dermal exposure using a murine model. Following a 28-day exposure, DMC produced a significant decrease in thymus weight at concentrations of 75% and greater. No effects on body weight, hematological parameters (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and their differentials), or immune cell phenotyping (B-cells, T-cells, and T-cell sub-sets) were identified. The IgM antibody response to sheep red blood cell (SRBC) was significantly reduced in the spleen but not the serum. DMC was not identified to be an irritant and evaluation of the sensitization potential, conducted using the local lymph node assay (LLNA) at concentrations ranging from 50–100%, did not identify increases in lymphocyte proliferation. These results demonstrate that dermal exposure to DMC induces immune suppression in a murine model and raise concern about potential human exposure and the need for occupational exposure regulations. PMID:22953780

  18. Development of a non-invasive murine infection model for acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Stol, K; van Selm, S; van den Berg, S; Bootsma, H J; Blokx, W A M; Graamans, K; Tonnaer, E L G M; Hermans, P W M

    2009-12-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most frequent diseases in childhood, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is among the main causative bacterial agents. Since current experimental models used to study the bacterial pathogenesis of OM have several limitations, such as the invasiveness of the experimental procedures, we developed a non-invasive murine OM model. In our model, adapted from a previously developed rat OM model, a pressure cabin is used in which a 40 kPa pressure increase is applied to translocate pneumococci from the nasopharyngeal cavity into both mouse middle ears. Wild-type pneumococci were found to persist in the middle ear cavity for 144 h after infection, with a maximum bacterial load at 96 h. Inflammation was confirmed at 96 and 144 h post-infection by IL-1beta and TNF-alpha cytokine analysis and histopathology. Subsequently, we investigated the contribution of two surface-associated pneumococcal proteins, the streptococcal lipoprotein rotamase A (SlrA) and the putative proteinase maturation protein A (PpmA), to experimental OM in our model. Pneumococci lacking the slrA gene, but not those lacking the ppmA gene, were significantly reduced in virulence in the OM model. Importantly, pneumococci lacking both genes were significantly more attenuated than the DeltaslrA single mutant. This additive effect suggests that SlrA and PpmA exert complementary functions during experimental OM. In conclusion, we have developed a highly reproducible and non-invasive murine infection model for pneumococcal OM using a pressure cabin, which is very suitable to study pneumococcal pathogenesis and virulence in vivo.

  19. Histological and In Vivo Microscopic Analysis of the Bone Marrow Microenvironment in a Murine Model of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Weissenberger, Eva S; Krause, Daniela S

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the leukemic bone marrow microenvironment, also called the leukemic bone marrow niche, is an essential method to determine and to evaluate the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and other leukemias in murine models. In this chapter we introduce the murine model of CML primarily used in our laboratory by describing blood and bone marrow analysis as well as the method of histological sectioning and immunohistochemistry in combination with various stainings that can help to understand the complex interaction between leukemic cells, their normal hematopoietic counterparts, and the bone marrow microenvironment. We conclude with describing how to image the bone marrow niche using in vivo microscopy. PMID:27581139

  20. Mini-review: Retarding aging in murine genetic models of neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Albin, Roger L; Miller, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Retardation of aging processes is a plausible approach to delaying the onset or slowing the progression of common neurodegenerative disorders. We review the results of experiments using murine genetic models of Alzheimer disease and Huntington disease to evaluate the effects of retarding aging. While positive results are reported in several of these experiments, there are several discrepancies in behavioral and pathologic outcomes both within and between different experiments. Similarly, different experiments yield varying assessments of potential proximate mechanisms of action of retarding aging. The anti-aging interventions used for some experiments include some that show only modest effects on lifespan, and others that have proven hard to reproduce. Several experiments used aggressive transgenic neurodegenerative disease models that may be less relevant in the context of age-related diseases. The experience with these models and interventions may be useful in designing future experiments assessing anti-aging interventions for disease-modifying treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Characterization of the murine model of schistosomal hepatic periportal fibrosis ('pipestem' fibrosis).

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Z. A.; Cheever, A. W.

    1993-01-01

    During mild (one to two pairs of worms) and prolonged (23 weeks or more) mouse infections with Schistosoma mansoni, but not with S. japonicum, periovular granulomas and fibrosis were seen to be preferentially located along periportal tissues. This caused fibrotic expansion of the portal spaces on a background of normal-looking hepatic parenchyma, a picture mimicking 'clay pipestem fibrosis' seen in human patients with advanced schistosomiasis. The model was reproduced in outbred and in several strains of inbred mice, and their main characteristics were studied and compared to the human counterpart. A balanced consideration of the similarities and differences between the murine model and human pipestem fibrosis is needed for the adequate utilization of this simple, reproducible and inexpensive experimental model. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8499320

  2. Detection of Talaromyces marneffei from Fresh Tissue of an Inhalational Murine Pulmonary Model Using Nested PCR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yinghui; Huang, Xiaowen; Yi, Xiuwen; He, Ya; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Xi, Liyan

    2016-01-01

    Penicilliosis marneffei, often consecutive to the aspiration of Talaromyces marneffei (Penicillium marneffei), continues to be one of the significant causes of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients in endemic regions such as Southeast Asia. Improving the accuracy of diagnosing this disease would aid in reducing the mortality of associated infections. In this study, we developed a stable and reproducible murine pulmonary model that mimics human penicilliosis marneffei using a nebulizer to deliver Talaromyces marneffei (SUMS0152) conidia to the lungs of BALB/c nude mice housed in exposure chamber. Using this model, we further revealed that nested PCR was sensitive and specific for detecting Talaromyces marneffei in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and fresh tissues. This inhalation model may provide a more representative analysis tool for studying the development of penicilliosis marneffei, in addition to revealing that nested PCR has a predictive value in reflecting pulmonary infection. PMID:26886887

  3. An In Vitro Murine Model of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kelynack, Kristen J; Holt, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is seen ubiquitously in aging blood vessels and prematurely in disease states like renal failure. It is thought to be driven by a number of systemic and local factors that lead to extra-osseous deposition of mineral in the vascular wall and valves as a common endpoint. The response of resident vascular smooth muscle cell to these dystrophic signals appears to be important in this process. Whilst in vivo models allow the observation of global changes in a pro-calcific environment, identifying the specific cells and mechanisms involved has been largely garnered from in vitro experiments, which provide added benefits in terms of reproducibility, cost, and convenience. Here we describe a 7-21 day cell culture model of calcification developed using immortalized murine vascular smooth muscle cells (MOVAS-1). This model provides a method by which vascular smooth muscle cell involvement and manipulation within a mineralizing domain can be studied.

  4. The Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) model for multiple sclerosis shows a strong influence of the murine equivalents of HLA-A, B, and C.

    PubMed

    Clatch, R J; Melvold, R W; Dal Canto, M C; Miller, S D; Lipton, H L

    1987-06-01

    Following intracerebral inoculation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV), susceptible mouse strains develop a chronic demyelinating disease characterized histologically by mononuclear cell-rich infiltrates in the central nervous system (CNS). An immune-mediated basis for this disease is strongly supported by previous studies demonstrating a correlation between clinical disease susceptibility, the presence of particular H-2 region genotypes, and the development of chronically elevated levels of TMEV-specific, MHC class II-restricted delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). The present study compared disease susceptibility in (B10.S X SJL)F1 and (B10.S(26R) X SJL)F1 mice which differ only at the D region of the H-2 complex. The data conclusively demonstrates a major influence for homozygosity of H-2s alleles at the H-2D region (the murine equivalent of the human class I HLA-A, B, and C genes) in determining disease susceptibility, as measured by either clinical or histopathological endpoints. In addition, disease susceptibility strongly correlated with the development of high levels of TMEV-specific DTH in the susceptible (B10.S X SJL)F1 strain. However, disease susceptibility did not appear to correlate with TMEV titers in the CNS, TMEV-specific humoral (ELISA and neutralizing) immune responses, or virus-specific splenic T cell proliferative responses. These findings lend additional support to our hypothesis that CNS myelin damage is mediated by a TMEV-specific DTH response. The possible role of class I-restricted responses in the demyelinating process is discussed and murine TMEV-induced demyelinating disease is compared with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis as relevant animal models for human multiple sclerosis.

  5. Skin repair properties of d-Limonene and perillyl alcohol in murine models.

    PubMed

    d'Alessio, Patrizia A; Mirshahi, Massoud; Bisson, Jean-Francois; Bene, Marie C

    2014-03-01

    The orange-peel derived terpene d-Limonene, probably through its metabolite, perillyl alcohol (POH), has been reported to have tissue-repair properties. Two murine models of respectively 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate (TPA)-induced dermatitis and mechanical skin lesion were used here to assess the efficacy of d-Limonene or POH applied topically. Macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of skin lesions was performed as well as that of P-selectin expression, together with measurements of serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in the first model. Healing and angiogenesis around the scar were examined in the second model. Because differences in angiogenesis were noted, the effect of both d-Limonene and POH was further tested on an in vitro model of endothelial microtubules formation. Both d-Limonene and POH reduced the severity and extension of TPA-induced skin lesions with significantly lowered macroscopic and microscopic scores (p<0.04 in both cases). Moreover, the expression of P-selectin induced by TPA was abrogated by POH and significantly lower serum concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α were observed in d-Limonene- and POH-treated mice (p<0.04 and 0.03). In the second model, tissue regeneration was improved, especially by POH, and was clearly associated with reduced neovascularization. This surprising anti-angiogenic effect was confirmed in the matrigel model of endothelial microtubules formation. These studies show that d-Limonene and POH demonstrate significant anti-inflammatory effects in murine dermal inflammation and wound-healing. The decreased systemic cytokine production as well as a consistent inhibition of endothelial P-selectin expression and neo-vascularization induced by these terpenic compounds contribute to their healing effects on the epidermal barrier.

  6. Femur Window Chamber Model for In Vivo Cell Tracking in the Murine Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonghong; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; DaCosta, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow is a complex organ that contains various hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. These cells are involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, immune regulation and tumor regulation. Commonly used methods for understanding cellular actions in the bone marrow, such as histology and blood counts, provide static information rather than capturing the dynamic action of multiple cellular components in vivo. To complement the standard methods, a window chamber (WC)-based model was developed to enable serial in vivo imaging of cells and structures in the murine bone marrow. This protocol describes a surgical procedure for installing the WC in the femur, in order to facilitate long-term optical access to the femoral bone marrow. In particular, to demonstrate its experimental utility, this WC approach was used to image and track neutrophils within the vascular network of the femur, thereby providing a novel method to visualize and quantify immune cell trafficking and regulation in the bone marrow. This method can be applied to study various biological processes in the murine bone marrow, such as hematopoiesis, stem cell transplantation, and immune responses in pathological conditions, including cancer. PMID:27500928

  7. Comparison of histochemical methods for murine eosinophil detection in a RSV vaccine-enhanced inflammation model

    PubMed Central

    Meyerholz, David K.; Griffin, Michelle A.; Castilow, Elaine M.; Varga, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    A comparative study of histochemical detection of eosinophils in fixed murine tissue is lacking. Five histochemical methods previously reported for eosinophil detection were quantitatively and qualitatively compared in an established murine RSV vaccine-enhanced inflammation model. Nonspecific neutrophil staining was evaluated in tissue sections of neutrophilic soft tissue lesions and bone marrow from respective animals. Eosinophils had granular red to orange-red cytoplasmic staining, depending on the method, whereas neutrophils had, when stained, a more homogenous cytoplasmic pattern. Nonspecific background staining of similar coloration was variably seen in arterial walls and erythrocytes. Astra Blue/Vital New Red, Congo Red, Luna, Modified Hematoxylin & Eosin, and Sirius Red techniques were all effective in detecting increased eosinophil recruitment compared to controls; however, differences in eosinophil quantification significantly varied between techniques. Astra Blue/Vital New Red had the best specificity for differentiating eosinophils and neutrophils, but had a reduced ability to enumerate eosinophils and was the most time intensive. The Luna stain had excessive non specific staining of tissues and a reduced enumeration of infiltrating eosinophils making it suboptimal. For multiple parameters such as eosinophil detection, specificity, and contrast with background tissues, the Sirius Red followed by Congo Red and Modified Hematoxylin & Eosin methods were useful, each with their own staining qualities. PMID:19181630

  8. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis: a model of demyelination and persistence of virus.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Oleszak, E; Leibowitz, J

    1987-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) causes immune-mediated demyelination in susceptible mice which is similar to human demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. In addition, the picornavirus persists within the central nervous system throughout the course of the chronic demyelinating disease. This article reviews the neuropathology, virology, immunology, and molecular biology of the model system. We analyze the possible mechanisms by which this virus induces demyelination and persists in the nervous system. Finally, we provide a hypothesis that the specificity of primary white matter destruction in the TMEV model depends on immune-sensitized cells which interact with viral antigen plus major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens on the surfaces of oligodendrocytes or myelin sheaths.

  9. Complex and Multidimensional Lipid Raft Alterations in a Murine Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Wayne; Brenneman, Randall; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Various animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been created to assist our appreciation of AD pathophysiology, as well as aid development of novel therapeutic strategies. Despite the discovery of mutated proteins that predict the development of AD, there are likely to be many other proteins also involved in this disorder. Complex physiological processes are mediated by coherent interactions of clusters of functionally related proteins. Synaptic dysfunction is one of the hallmarks of AD. Synaptic proteins are organized into multiprotein complexes in high-density membrane structures, known as lipid rafts. These microdomains enable coherent clustering of synergistic signaling proteins. We have used mass analytical techniques and multiple bioinformatic approaches to better appreciate the intricate interactions of these multifunctional proteins in the 3xTgAD murine model of AD. Our results show that there are significant alterations in numerous receptor/cell signaling proteins in cortical lipid rafts isolated from 3xTgAD mice. PMID:21151659

  10. The development of an improved murine iontophoresis reactivation model for the study of HSV-1 latency.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Y J; Araullo-Cruz, T P; Romanowski, E; Ruziczka, L; Balouris, C; Oren, J; Cheng, K P; Kim, S

    1986-08-01

    The present study reviews the development of an effective murine iontophoresis reactivation model for the study of HSV-1 latency. In a series of experiments, Balb C mice latently infected with HSV-1 McKrae strain were iontophoresed with epinephrine X 3 days (EPI X 3/ION) or 6-hydroxydopamine X 1 day followed by topical epinephrine (6-HD ION/EPI). Reactivation and recovery of latent HSV-1 was determined by daily ocular swabs, titration, and neutralization. Additional studies determined the effect of topical ocular steroids on viral recovery rate. The results demonstrated no recovery of McKrae strain in Balb C (0%) with EPI X 3/ION, and no enhancement with topical steroids. 6-HD ION/EPI demonstrated a low recovery rate in mice (8%). However, the recovery rate was significantly increased to 50% by the addition of topical steroids to form the 6-HD ION/EPI/STEROID model, a useful experimental tool. The substitution of a clinical isolate, W strain, for McKrae strain further improved the model. The results demonstrated that, following the acute infection in mice, W strain was associated with a significantly higher (P = .001) survival rate than McKrae strain (81% vs. 52%). There was no statistically significant difference between the two strains, W vs McKrae, in Balb C mice comparing keratitis, establishment of latency (by co-cultivation), spontaneous shedding rate, or induced ocular shedding following iontophoresis. The development of an effective murine iontophoresis model offers an economical method which is uniquely suited for immunological and genetic studies of HSV-1 latency.

  11. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using 211At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Back, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Balkin, Ethan R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frayo, Shani; Hylarides, Mark; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2013-05-15

    Anti-CD45 Radioimmunotherapy using an Alpha-Emitting Radionuclide 211At Combined with Bone Marrow Transplantation Prolongs Survival in a Disseminated Murine Leukemia Model ABSTRACT Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using antibodies (Ab) labeled primarily with beta-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse.

  12. Retroperitoneal inoculation of murine neuroblastoma results in a reliable model for evaluation of the antitumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Katsanis, E; Blazar, B R; Bausero, M A; Gunther, R; Anderson, P M

    1994-04-01

    To more closely mimic the natural site of human neuroblastoma and the original spontaneous arising paraspinal murine tumor, the authors developed a new model system in which murine neuroblastoma cells (neuro-2a) are implanted directly into the retroperitoneal space. This method of administration resulted in an aggressive and reproducible neuroblastoma model, with death occurring at a median of 20.3 days after tumor implantation using 1 x 10(6) neuro-2a cells, compared with the intraperitoneal (median, 31 days) and subcutaneous routes (median, 35.1 days) (P < .001). Adoptive transfer of single cell suspensions from livers, spleens, and bone marrows of mice with retroperitoneal tumors into healthy hosts resulted in tumor growth, confirming the presence of metastatic foci in these organs. The retroperitoneal murine neuroblastoma model was used to assess the importance of natural killer (NK) and T cells in regulating the growth of neuro-2a in vivo. T cells played an equally protective role as NK cells; depletion of either T or NK populations significantly decreased survival as compared with undepleted mice. Elimination of both NK and T cells further accelerated mortality of neuro-2a-bearing mice as compared to those depleted of either T or NK populations. The retroperitoneal murine model is a highly relevant in vivo system for preclinical studies of new therapeutic approaches for neuroblastoma.

  13. A MURINE MODEL FOR LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT CHEMICALS: DIFFERENTIATION OF RESPIRATORY SENSITIZERS (TMA) FROM CONTACT SENSITIZERS (DNFB)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to low molecular weight (LMW) chemicals contributes to both dermal and respiratory sensitization and is an important occupational health problem. Our goal was to establish an in vivo murine model for hazard identification of LMW chemicals that have the potential to indu...

  14. Murine models of diastolic dysfunction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Horgan, S; Watson, C; Glezeva, N; Baugh, J

    2014-12-01

    Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction leads to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, an increasingly prevalent condition largely driven by modern day lifestyle risk factors. As heart failure with preserved ejection fraction accounts for almost one-half of all patients with heart failure, appropriate nonhuman animal models are required to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome and to provide a platform for preclinical investigation of potential therapies. Hypertension, obesity, and diabetes are major risk factors for diastolic dysfunction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. This review focuses on murine models reflecting this disease continuum driven by the aforementioned common risk factors. We describe various models of diastolic dysfunction and highlight models of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction reported in the literature. Strengths and weaknesses of the different models are discussed to provide an aid to translational scientists when selecting an appropriate model. We also bring attention to the fact that heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is difficult to diagnose in animal models and that, therefore, there is a paucity of well described animal models of this increasingly important condition.

  15. Foxp3+ cells control Th2 responses in a murine model of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fyhrquist, Nanna; Lehtimäki, Sari; Lahl, Katharina; Savinko, Terhi; Lappeteläinen, Anna-Mari; Sparwasser, Tim; Wolff, Henrik; Lauerma, Antti; Alenius, Harri

    2012-06-01

    The role of Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells in atopic dermatitis (AD) is still unclear. In a murine AD model, the number of Foxp3+ cells increased in the allergen-exposed skin area and in the secondary lymphoid organs. Both Foxp3+ and Foxp3- IL-10+ T cells accumulated at the site of allergen exposure, and CD103+ effector/memory Foxp3+ Treg cells expanded gradually in the lymph nodes throughout the sensitization protocol. The depletion of Foxp3+ Treg cells led to significantly exacerbated skin inflammation, including increased recruitment of inflammatory cells and expression of T helper type 2 cytokines, as well as elevated serum IgE levels. The effect of depleting Treg cells during epicutaneous sensitization was mirrored off by a stronger inflammatory response also in the lungs following airway challenge. Thus, Treg cells have an important role in controlling AD-like inflammation and the transfer of allergic skin inflammation to the lungs. PMID:22402436

  16. Liposomal prednisolone inhibits vascular inflammation and enhances venous outward remodeling in a murine arteriovenous fistula model

    PubMed Central

    Wong, ChunYu; Bezhaeva, Taisiya; Rothuizen, Tonia C.; Metselaar, Josbert M.; de Vries, Margreet R.; Verbeek, Floris P. R.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Wezel, Anouk; van Zonneveld, Anton-Jan; Rabelink, Ton J.; Quax, Paul H. A.; Rotmans, Joris I.

    2016-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) for hemodialysis access have a 1-year primary patency rate of only 60%, mainly as a result of maturation failure that is caused by insufficient outward remodeling and intimal hyperplasia. The exact pathophysiology remains unknown, but the inflammatory vascular response is thought to play an important role. In the present study we demonstrate that targeted liposomal delivery of prednisolone increases outward remodeling of the AVF in a murine model. Liposomes accumulate in the post-anastomotic area of the venous outflow tract in which the vascular pathology is most prominent in failed AVFs. On a histological level, we observed a reduction of lymphocytes and granulocytes in the vascular wall. In addition, a strong anti-inflammatory effect of liposomal prednisolone on macrophages was demonstrated in vitro. Therefore, treatment with liposomal prednisolone might be a valuable strategy to improve AVF maturation. PMID:27460883

  17. Efficacy of Posaconazole in a Murine Model of Systemic Infection by Saprochaete capitata

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Pamela; Guarro, Josep; Mayayo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Saprochaete capitata causes opportunistic human infections, mainly in immunocompromised patients with hematological malignancies. The best therapy for this severe infection is still unknown. We evaluated the in vitro killing activity and the in vivo efficacy of posaconazole at 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg twice a day (BID) in a murine neutropenic model of systemic infection with S. capitata by testing a set of six clinical isolates. Posaconazole showed fungistatic activity against all of the isolates tested. The different doses of the drug, especially the highest one, showed good efficacy, measured by prolonged survival, reduction of (1-3)-β-d-glucan levels in serum, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology. PMID:26392490

  18. Local Origin of Mesenchymal Cells in a Murine Orthotopic Lung Transplantation Model of Bronchiolitis Obliterans

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Takeshi; Walker, Natalie; Aoki, Yoshiro; Manning, Casey M.; Murdock, Benjamin J.; Myers, Jeffery L.; Lagstein, Amir; Osterholzer, John J.; Lama, Vibha N.

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans is the leading cause of chronic graft failure and long-term mortality in lung transplant recipients. Here, we used a novel murine model to characterize allograft fibrogenesis within a whole-lung microenvironment. Unilateral left lung transplantation was performed in mice across varying degrees of major histocompatibility complex mismatch combinations. B6D2F1/J (a cross between C57BL/6J and DBA/2J) (Haplotype H2b/d) lungs transplanted into DBA/2J (H2d) recipients were identified to show histopathology for bronchiolitis obliterans in all allogeneic grafts. Time course analysis showed an evolution from immune cell infiltration of the bronchioles and vessels at day 14, consistent with acute rejection and lymphocytic bronchitis, to subepithelial and intraluminal fibrotic lesions of bronchiolitis obliterans by day 28. Allografts at day 28 showed a significantly higher hydroxyproline content than the isografts (33.21 ± 1.89 versus 22.36 ± 2.33 μg/mL). At day 40 the hydroxyproline content had increased further (48.91 ± 7.09 μg/mL). Flow cytometric analysis was used to investigate the origin of mesenchymal cells in fibrotic allografts. Collagen I–positive cells (89.43% ± 6.53%) in day 28 allografts were H2Db positive, showing their donor origin. This novel murine model shows consistent and reproducible allograft fibrogenesis in the context of single-lung transplantation and represents a major step forward in investigating mechanisms of chronic graft failure. PMID:25848843

  19. In Vivo MRI Assessment of Hepatic and Splenic Disease in a Murine Model of Schistosmiasis

    PubMed Central

    Laprie, Caroline; Dessein, Helia; Bernard, Monique; Dessein, Alain; Viola, Angèle

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis (or bilharzia), a major parasitic disease, affects more than 260 million people worldwide. In chronic cases of intestinal schistosomiasis caused by trematodes of the Schistosoma genus, hepatic fibrosis develops as a host immune response to the helminth eggs, followed by potentially lethal portal hypertension. In this study, we characterized hepatic and splenic features of a murine model of intestinal schistosomiasis using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evaluated the transverse relaxation time T2 as a non-invasive imaging biomarker for monitoring hepatic fibrogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings CBA/J mice were imaged at 11.75T two, six and ten weeks after percutaneous infection with Schistosoma mansoni. In vivo imaging studies were completed with histology at the last two time points. Anatomical MRI allowed detection of typical manifestations of the intestinal disease such as significant hepato- and splenomegaly, and dilation of the portal vein as early as six weeks, with further aggravation at 10 weeks after infection. Liver multifocal lesions observed by MRI in infected animals at 10 weeks post infection corresponded to granulomatous inflammation and intergranulomatous fibrosis with METAVIR scores up to A2F2. While most healthy hepatic tissue showed T2 values below 14 ms, these lesions were characterized by a T2 greater than 16 ms. The area fraction of increased T2 correlated (rS = 0.83) with the area fraction of Sirius Red stained collagen in histological sections. A continuous liver T2* decrease was also measured while brown pigments in macrophages were detected at histology. These findings suggest accumulation of hematin in infected livers. Conclusions/Significance Our multiparametric MRI approach confirms that this murine model replicates hepatic and splenic manifestations of human intestinal schistosomiasis. Quantitative T2 mapping proved sensitive to assess liver fibrogenesis non-invasively and may therefore

  20. Chemically linked phage idiotype vaccination in the murine B cell lymphoma 1 model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background B cell malignancies are characterized by clonal expansion of B cells expressing tumor-specific idiotypes on their surface. These idiotypes are ideal target antigens for an individualized immunotherapy. However, previous idiotype vaccines mostly lacked efficiency due to a low immunogenicity of the idiotype. The objective of the present study was the determination of the feasibility, safety and immunogenicity of a novel chemically linked phage idiotype vaccine. Methods In the murine B cell lymphoma 1 model, tumor idiotypes were chemically linked to phage particles used as immunological carriers. For comparison, the idiotype was genetically expressed on the major phage coat protein g8 or linked to keyhole limpet hemocynanin. After intradermal immunizations with idiotype vaccines, tolerability and humoral immune responses were assessed. Results Feasibility and tolerability of the chemically linked phage idiotype vaccine was demonstrated. Vaccination with B cell lymphoma 1 idiotype expressing phage resulted in a significant survival benefit in the murine B cell lymphoma 1 protection model (60.2 ± 23.8 days vs. 41.8 ± 1.6 days and 39.8 ± 3.8 days after vaccination with wild type phage or phosphate buffered saline, respectively). Superior immunogenicity of the chemically linked phage idiotype vaccine compared to the genetically engineered phage idiotype and keyhole limpet hemocynanin-coupled idiotype vaccine was demonstrated by significantly higher B cell lymphoma 1 idiotype-specific IgG levels after vaccination with chemically linked phage idiotype. Conclusion We present a novel, simple, time- and cost-efficient phage idiotype vaccination strategy, which represents a safe and feasible therapy and may produce a superior immune response compared to previously employed idiotype vaccination strategies. PMID:24152874

  1. Role of GADD45a in murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Biji; Takekoshi, Daisuke; Sammani, Saad; Epshtein, Yulia; Sharma, Rajesh; Smith, Brett D; Mitra, Sumegha; Desai, Ankit A; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Garcia, Joe G N; Jacobson, Jeffrey R

    2015-12-15

    We previously reported protective effects of GADD45a (growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 45 alpha) in murine ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) via effects on Akt-mediated endothelial cell signaling. In the present study we investigated the role of GADD45a in separate murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury. Initial studies of wild-type mice subjected to single-dose thoracic radiation (10 Gy) confirmed a significant increase in lung GADD45a expression within 24 h and persistent at 6 wk. Mice deficient in GADD45a (GADD45a(-/-)) demonstrated increased susceptibility to radiation-induced lung injury (RILI, 10 Gy) evidenced by increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid total cell counts, protein and albumin levels, and levels of inflammatory cytokines compared with RILI-challenged wild-type animals at 2 and 4 wk. Furthermore, GADD45a(-/-) mice had decreased total and phosphorylated lung Akt levels both at baseline and 6 wk after RILI challenge relative to wild-type mice while increased RILI susceptibility was observed in both Akt(+/-) mice and mice treated with an Akt inhibitor beginning 1 wk prior to irradiation. Additionally, overexpression of a constitutively active Akt1 transgene reversed RILI-susceptibility in GADD45a(-/-) mice. In separate studies, lung fibrotic changes 2 wk after treatment with bleomycin (0.25 U/kg IT) was significantly increased in GADD45a(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice assessed by lung collagen content and histology. These data implicate GADD45a as an important modulator of lung inflammatory responses across different injury models and highlight GADD45a-mediated signaling as a novel target in inflammatory lung injury clinically.

  2. Murine Models of Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis and Their Relevance to Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Richard J W; Lalor, Patricia F; Parker, Richard; Newsome, Philip N

    2016-04-01

    Alcohol-induced liver damage is a major burden for most societies, and murine studies can provide a means to better understand its pathogenesis and test new therapies. However, there are many models reported with widely differing phenotypes, not all of which fully regenerate the spectrum of human disease. Thus, it is important to understand the implications of these variations to efficiently model human disease. This review critically appraises key articles in the field, detailing the spectrum of liver damage seen in different models, and how they relate to the phenotype of disease seen in patients. A range of different methods of alcohol administration have been studied, ranging from ad libitum consumption of alcohol and water to modified diets (eg, Lieber deCarli liquid diet). Other feeding regimens have taken more invasive routes using intragastric feeding tubes to infuse alcohol directly into the stomach. Notably, models using wild-type mice generally produce a milder phenotype of liver damage than those using genetically modified mice, with the exception of the chronic binge-feeding model. We recommend panels of tests for consideration to standardize end points for the evaluation of the severity of liver damage-key for comparison of models of injury, testing of new therapies, and subsequent translation of findings into clinical practice. PMID:26835538

  3. A model for evaluating topical antimicrobial efficacy against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in superficial murine wounds.

    PubMed

    Roche, Eric D; Renick, Paul J; Tetens, Shannon P; Carson, Dennis L

    2012-08-01

    A wound biofilm model was created by adapting a superficial infection model. Partial-thickness murine wounds were inoculated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Dense biofilm communities developed at the wound surface after 24 h as demonstrated by microscopy and quantitative microbiology. Common topical antimicrobial agents had reduced efficacy when treatment was initiated 24 h after inoculation compared to 4 h after inoculation. This model provides a rapid in vivo test for new agents to treat wound biofilm infections.

  4. Superoxide dismutase 3 dysregulation in a murine model of neonatal lung injury.

    PubMed

    Poonyagariyagorn, Hataya K; Metzger, Shana; Dikeman, Dustin; Mercado, Armando Lopez; Malinina, Alla; Calvi, Carla; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon; Neptune, Enid R

    2014-09-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a common chronic respiratory disease that occurs after premature birth, is believed to be secondary to oxidative damage from hyperoxia and inflammation, which leads to impaired alveolar formation and chronic lung dysfunction. We hypothesized that extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD)3, an antioxidant uniquely targeted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and alveolar fluid, might have a different response (down-regulation) to hyperoxic injury and recovery in room air (RA), thereby contributing to the persistent airspace injury and inflammation. We used a murine BPD model using postnatal hyperoxia (O2) (4 or 5 d) followed by short-term recovery (14 d) in RA, which mimics the durable effects after injury during alveolar development. This was associated with significantly increased mRNA expression for antioxidant genes mediated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) in the O2 (n = 4) versus RA group (n = 5). SOD3, an Nrf2-independent antioxidant, was significantly reduced in the O2-exposed mice compared with RA. Immunohistochemistry revealed decreased and disrupted SOD3 deposition in the alveolar ECM of O2-exposed mice. Furthermore, this distinct hyperoxic antioxidant and injury profile was reproducible in murine lung epithelial 12 cells exposed to O2. Overexpression of SOD3 rescued the injury measures in the O2-exposed cells. We establish that reduced SOD3 expression correlates with alveolar injury measures in the recovered neonatal hyperoxic lung, and SOD3 overexpression attenuates hyperoxic injury in an alveolar epithelial cell line. Such findings suggest a candidate mechanism for the pathogenesis of BPD that may lead to targeted interventions.

  5. Quantifying lung morphology with respiratory-gated micro-CT in a murine model of emphysema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, N. L.; Martin, E. L.; Lewis, J. F.; Veldhuizen, R. A. W.; Holdsworth, D. W.; Drangova, M.

    2009-04-01

    Non-invasive micro-CT imaging techniques have been developed to investigate lung structure in free-breathing rodents. In this study, we investigate the utility of retrospectively respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging in an emphysema model to determine if anatomical changes could be observed in the image-derived quantitative analysis at two respiratory phases. The emphysema model chosen was a well-characterized, genetically altered model (TIMP-3 knockout mice) that exhibits a homogeneous phenotype. Micro-CT scans of the free-breathing, anaesthetized mice were obtained in 50 s and retrospectively respiratory sorted and reconstructed, providing 3D images representing peak inspiration and end expiration with 0.15 mm isotropic voxel spacing. Anatomical measurements included the volume and CT density of the lungs and the volume of the major airways, along with the diameters of the trachea, left bronchus and right bronchus. From these measurements, functional parameters such as functional residual capacity and tidal volume were calculated. Significant differences between the wild-type and TIMP-3 knockout groups were observed for measurements of CT density over the entire lung, indicating increased air content in the lungs of TIMP-3 knockout mice. These results demonstrate retrospective respiratory-gated micro-CT, providing images at multiple respiratory phases that can be analyzed quantitatively to investigate anatomical changes in murine models of emphysema.

  6. Herpes Murine Model as a Biological Assay to Test Dialyzable Leukocyte Extracts Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-Jazmín, Nohemí; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Becerril-García, Miguel Angel; Limón-Flores, Alberto Yairh; Vázquez-Leyva, Said; Pavón, Lenin; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra

    2015-01-01

    Human dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLEs) are heterogeneous mixtures of low-molecular-weight peptides that are released on disruption of peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy donors. DLEs improve clinical responses in infections, allergies, cancer, and immunodeficiencies. Transferon is a human DLE that has been registered as a hemoderivate by Mexican health authorities and commercialized nationally. To develop an animal model that could be used routinely as a quality control assay for Transferon, we standardized and validated a murine model of cutaneous HSV-1 infection. Using this model, we evaluated the activity of 27 Transferon batches. All batches improved the survival of HSV-1-infected mice, wherein average survival rose from 20.9% in control mice to 59.6% in Transferon-treated mice. The activity of Transferon correlated with increased serum levels of IFN-γ and reduced IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations. Our results demonstrate that (i) this mouse model of cutaneous herpes can be used to examine the activity of DLEs, such as Transferon; (ii) the assay can be used as a routine test for batch release; (iii) Transferon is produced with high homogeneity between batches; (iv) Transferon does not have direct virucidal, cytoprotective, or antireplicative effects; and (v) the protective effect of Transferon in vivo correlates with changes in serum cytokines. PMID:25984538

  7. An improved syngeneic orthotopic murine model of human breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Omar M; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramachandran, Suburamaniam; Dumur, Catherine; Schaum, Julia; Yamada, Akimitsu; Terracina, Krista P; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer drug development costs nearly $610 million and 37 months in preclinical mouse model trials with minimal success rates. Despite these inefficiencies, there are still no consensus breast cancer preclinical models. Murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1-luc2 cells were implanted subcutaneous (SQ) or orthotopically percutaneous (OP) injection in the area of the nipple, or surgically into the chest 2nd mammary fat pad under direct vision (ODV) in Balb/c immunocompetent mice. Tumor progression was followed by in vivo bioluminescence and direct measurements, pathology and survival determined, and tumor gene expression analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. ODV produced less variable-sized tumors and was a reliable method of implantation. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad rather than into the abdominal 4th mammary pad, the most common implantation site, better mimicked human breast cancer progression pattern, which correlated with bioluminescent tumor burden and survival. Compared to SQ, ODV produced tumors that differentially expressed genes whose interaction networks are of importance in cancer research. qPCR validation of 10 specific target genes of interest in ongoing clinical trials demonstrated significant differences in expression. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad provides the most reliable model that mimics human breast cancer compared from subcutaneous implantation that produces tumors with different genome expression profiles of clinical significance. Increased understanding of the limitations of the different preclinical models in use will help guide new investigations and may improve the efficiency of breast cancer drug development . PMID:25200444

  8. Herpes murine model as a biological assay to test dialyzable leukocyte extracts activity.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Jazmín, Nohemí; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Becerril-García, Miguel Angel; Limón-Flores, Alberto Yairh; Vázquez-Leyva, Said; Medina-Rivero, Emilio; Pavón, Lenin; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra

    2015-01-01

    Human dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLEs) are heterogeneous mixtures of low-molecular-weight peptides that are released on disruption of peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy donors. DLEs improve clinical responses in infections, allergies, cancer, and immunodeficiencies. Transferon is a human DLE that has been registered as a hemoderivate by Mexican health authorities and commercialized nationally. To develop an animal model that could be used routinely as a quality control assay for Transferon, we standardized and validated a murine model of cutaneous HSV-1 infection. Using this model, we evaluated the activity of 27 Transferon batches. All batches improved the survival of HSV-1-infected mice, wherein average survival rose from 20.9% in control mice to 59.6% in Transferon-treated mice. The activity of Transferon correlated with increased serum levels of IFN-γ and reduced IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations. Our results demonstrate that (i) this mouse model of cutaneous herpes can be used to examine the activity of DLEs, such as Transferon; (ii) the assay can be used as a routine test for batch release; (iii) Transferon is produced with high homogeneity between batches; (iv) Transferon does not have direct virucidal, cytoprotective, or antireplicative effects; and (v) the protective effect of Transferon in vivo correlates with changes in serum cytokines.

  9. Control of graft-versus-host disease with maintenance of the graft-versus-leukemia effect in a murine allogeneic transplant model using retrovirally transduced murine suicidal lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kornblau, Steven M.; Aycox, Preston G.; Stephens, L. Clifton; McCue, David; Champlin, Richard E.; Marini, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Limited clinical trials have validated the hypothesis of controlling graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) arising from stem cell transplant utilizing suicidal T-lymphocytes that have been transduced to express the HSV-TK gene. However, clinical utility has been limited by diminished T-cell function arising from the production process. To evaluate strategies for harnessing the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect while improving the safety and function of suicidal lymphocytes, we have developed techniques to produce fully functional, retrovirally transduced, HSV-TK–positive murine T cells (TK+TC). Methods Utilizing a murine major histocompatibility complex–matched transplant model, we evaluated the ability of TK+TC to generate a GVL effect and the ability to control GVHD in experiments where we varied the dose of TK+TC, ganciclovir (GCV) dose, the start of GCV administration (day 4, 7, 10, 13, 15, or 19) posttransplantation, and the GCV administration route (osmotic pump versus intraperitoneal). Results At TK+TC doses in excess of the standard lethal dose (SLD) of unmanipulated T-cells, GCV administration completely (2 × SLD) and partially (4 × SLD) controlled GVHD. Additionally, GVHD remained reversible despite delaying administration of GCV for a week after GVHD developed. Importantly, GVHD was controlled with a 1-log but not 2-log reduction in GCV dose, and this “partial suicide” preserved more circulating TK+TC compared with standard-dose GCV. Survival of leukemia-positive mice receiving TK+TC and GCV was significantly increased compared with control cohorts not receiving GCV or transplanted with unmanipulated T cells, thereby demonstrating a GVL effect. Conclusion Retrovirally transduced suicidal lymphocytes generate a potent GVL effect while simultaneously enabling control of GVHD, which results in improved leukemia and GVHD-free survival. PMID:17577932

  10. A Murine Closed-chest Model of Myocardial Ischemia and Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-Chan; Boehm, Olaf; Meyer, Rainer; Hoeft, Andreas; Knüfermann, Pascal; Baumgarten, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Surgical trauma by thoracotomy in open-chest models of coronary ligation induces an immune response which modifies different mechanisms involved in ischemia and reperfusion. Immune response includes cytokine expression and release or secretion of endogenous ligands of innate immune receptors. Activation of innate immunity can potentially modulate infarct size. We have modified an existing murine closed-chest model using hanging weights which could be useful for studying myocardial pre- and postconditioning and the role of innate immunity in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. This model allows animals to recover from surgical trauma before onset of myocardial ischemia. Volatile anesthetics have been intensely studied and their preconditioning effect for the ischemic heart is well known. However, this protective effect precludes its use in open chest models of coronary artery ligation. Thus, another advantage could be the use of the well controllable volatile anesthetics for instrumentation in a chronic closed-chest model, since their preconditioning effect lasts up to 72 hours. Chronic heart diseases with intermittent ischemia and multiple hit models are other possible applications of this model. For the chronic closed-chest model, intubated and ventilated mice undergo a lateral blunt thoracotomy via the 4th intercostal space. Following identification of the left anterior descending a ligature is passed underneath the vessel and both suture ends are threaded through an occluder. Then, both suture ends are passed through the chest wall, knotted to form a loop and left in the subcutaneous tissue. After chest closure and recovery for 5 days, mice are anesthetized again, chest skin is reopened and hanging weights are hooked up to the loop under ECG control. At the end of the ischemia/reperfusion protocol, hearts can be stained with TTC for infarct size assessment or undergo perfusion fixation to allow morphometric studies in addition to histology and

  11. Dysfunctional cardiac mitochondrial bioenergetic, lipidomic, and signaling in a murine model of Barth syndrome[S

    PubMed Central

    Kiebish, Michael A.; Yang, Kui; Liu, Xinping; Mancuso, David J.; Guan, Shaoping; Zhao, Zhongdan; Sims, Harold F.; Cerqua, Rebekah; Cade, W. Todd; Han, Xianlin; Gross, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Barth syndrome is a complex metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the mitochondrial transacylase tafazzin. Recently, an inducible tafazzin shRNA knockdown mouse model was generated to deconvolute the complex bioenergetic phenotype of this disease. To investigate the underlying cause of hemodynamic dysfunction in Barth syndrome, we interrogated the cardiac structural and signaling lipidome of this mouse model as well as its myocardial bioenergetic phenotype. A decrease in the distribution of cardiolipin molecular species and robust increases in monolysocardiolipin and dilysocardiolipin were demonstrated. Additionally, the contents of choline and ethanolamine glycerophospholipid molecular species containing precursors for lipid signaling at the sn-2 position were altered. Lipidomic analyses revealed specific dysregulation of HETEs and prostanoids, as well as oxidized linoleic and docosahexaenoic metabolites. Bioenergetic interrogation uncovered differential substrate utilization as well as decreases in Complex III and V activities. Transgenic expression of cardiolipin synthase or iPLA2γ ablation in tafazzin-deficient mice did not rescue the observed phenotype. These results underscore the complex nature of alterations in cardiolipin metabolism mediated by tafazzin loss of function. Collectively, we identified specific lipidomic, bioenergetic, and signaling alterations in a murine model that parallel those of Barth syndrome thereby providing novel insights into the pathophysiology of this debilitating disease. PMID:23410936

  12. Murine Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Green, Sabrina I.; Ajami, Nadim J.; Ma, Li; Poole, Nina M.; Price, Roger E.; Petrosino, Joseph F.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major cause of life-threatening infections in patients with neutropenia, particularly those receiving chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer. In most cases, these infections originate from opportunistic strains living within the patient's gastrointestinal tract which then translocate to major organ systems. There are no animal models that faithfully recapitulate these infections, and, as such, the host or bacterial factors that govern this process remain unidentified. We present here a novel model of chemotherapy-induced bacterial translocation of E. coli. Oral gavage of BALB/c mice with a clinical isolate of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) leads to stable and long-term colonization of the murine intestine. Following the induction of neutropenia with the chemotherapeutic drug cyclophosphamide, ExPEC translocates from the intestine to the lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys with concomitant morbidity in infected animals. Translocation can also occur in mice bearing mammary tumors, even in the absence of chemotherapy. Translocation of ExPEC is also associated with an increase of the diversity of bacterial DNA detected in the blood. This is the first report of a chemotherapy-based animal model of ExPEC translocation in cancerous mice, a system that can be readily used to identify important virulence factors for this process. PMID:26034214

  13. Assessing the accuracy and reproducibility of modality independent elastography in a murine model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Jared A.; Flint, Katelyn M.; Sanchez, Violeta; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Cancer progression has been linked to mechanics. Therefore, there has been recent interest in developing noninvasive imaging tools for cancer assessment that are sensitive to changes in tissue mechanical properties. We have developed one such method, modality independent elastography (MIE), that estimates the relative elastic properties of tissue by fitting anatomical image volumes acquired before and after the application of compression to biomechanical models. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of the method using phantoms and a murine breast cancer model. Magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired, and the MIE method was used to estimate relative volumetric stiffness. Accuracy was assessed using phantom data by comparing to gold-standard mechanical testing of elasticity ratios. Validation error was <12%. Reproducibility analysis was performed on animal data, and within-subject coefficients of variation ranged from 2 to 13% at the bulk level and 32% at the voxel level. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the reproducibility of an elasticity imaging metric in a preclinical cancer model. Our results suggest that the MIE method can reproducibly generate accurate estimates of the relative mechanical stiffness and provide guidance on the degree of change needed in order to declare biological changes rather than experimental error in future therapeutic studies. PMID:26158120

  14. A Murine Model of Candida glabrata Vaginitis Shows No Evidence of an Inflammatory Immunopathogenic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Evelyn E.; Peters, Brian M.; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is the second most common organism isolated from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), particularly in women with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. However, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of C. glabrata-associated VVC are unknown and have not been studied at any depth in animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate host responses to infection following efforts to optimize a murine model of C. glabrata VVC. For this, various designs were evaluated for consistent experimental vaginal colonization (i.e., type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice, exogenous estrogen, varying inocula, and co-infection with C. albicans). Upon model optimization, vaginal fungal burden and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) recruitment were assessed longitudinally over 21 days post-inoculation, together with vaginal concentrations of IL-1β, S100A8 alarmin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and in vivo biofilm formation. Consistent and sustained vaginal colonization with C. glabrata was achieved in estrogenized streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Vaginal PMN infiltration was consistently low, with IL-1β, S100A8, and LDH concentrations similar to uninoculated mice. Biofilm formation was not detected in vivo, and co-infection with C. albicans did not induce synergistic immunopathogenic effects. This data suggests that experimental vaginal colonization of C. glabrata is not associated with an inflammatory immunopathogenic response or biofilm formation. PMID:26807975

  15. A statistical analysis of murine incisional and excisional acute wound models

    PubMed Central

    Ansell, David M; Campbell, Laura; Thomason, Helen A; Brass, Andrew; Hardman, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Mice represent the most commonly used species for preclinical in vivo research. While incisional and excisional acute murine wound models are both frequently employed, there is little agreement on which model is optimum. Moreover, current lack of standardization of wounding procedure, analysis time point(s), method of assessment, and the use of individual wounds vs. individual animals as replicates makes it difficult to compare across studies. Here we have profiled secondary intention healing of incisional and excisional wounds within the same animal, assessing multiple parameters to determine the optimal methodology for future studies. We report that histology provides the least variable assessment of healing. Furthermore, histology alone (not planimetry) is able to detect accelerated healing in a castrated mouse model. Perhaps most importantly, we find virtually no correlation between wounds within the same animal, suggesting that use of wound (not animal) biological replicates is perfectly acceptable. Overall, these findings should guide and refine future studies, increasing the likelihood of detecting novel phenotypes while reducing the numbers of animals required for experimentation. PMID:24635179

  16. Murine Model of Buckwheat Allergy by Intragastric Sensitization with Fresh Buckwheat Flour Extract

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sejo; Lee, Kisun; Jang, Young-Ju; Sohn, Myung-Hyun; Lee, Kyoung-En; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2005-01-01

    Food allergies affect about 4% of the Korean population, and buckwheat allergy is one of the most severe food allergies in Korea. The purpose of the present study was to develop a murine model of IgE-mediated buckwheat hypersensitivity induced by intragastric sensitization. Young female C3H/HeJ mice were sensitized and challenged intragastricly with fresh buckwheat flour (1, 5, 25 mg/dose of proteins) mixed in cholera toxin, followed by intragastric challenge. Anaphylactic reactions, antigen-specific antibodies, splenocytes proliferation assays and cytokine productions were evaluated. Oral buckwheat challenges of sensitized mice provoked anaphylactic reactions such as severe scratch, perioral/periorbital swellings, or decreased activity. Reactions were associated with elevated levels of buckwheat-specific IgE antibodies. Splenocytes from buckwheat allergic mice exhibited significantly greater proliferative responses to buckwheat than non-allergic mice. Buckwheat-stimulated IL-4, IL-5, and INF-γ productions were associated with elevated levels of buckwheat-specific IgE in sensitized mice. In this model, 1 mg and 5 mg dose of sensitization produced almost the same degree of Th2-directed immune response, however, a 25 mg dose showed blunted antibody responses. In conclusion, we developed IgE-mediated buckwheat allergy by intragastric sensitization and challenge, and this model could provide a good tool for future studies. PMID:16100445

  17. A murine model for bone loss from therapeutic and space-relevant sources of radiation.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, S A; Pecaut, M J; Gridley, D S; Travis, N D; Bandstra, E R; Willey, J S; Nelson, G A; Bateman, T A

    2006-09-01

    Cancer patients receiving radiation therapy are exposed to photon (gamma/X-ray), electron, and less commonly proton radiation. Similarly, astronauts on exploratory missions will be exposed to extended periods of lower-dose radiation from multiple sources and of multiple types, including heavy ions. Therapeutic doses of radiation have been shown to have deleterious consequences on bone health, occasionally causing osteoradionecrosis and spontaneous fractures. However, no animal model exists to study the cause of radiation-induced osteoporosis. Additionally, the effect of lower doses of ionizing radiation, including heavy ions, on general bone quality has not been investigated. This study presents data developing a murine model for radiation-induced bone loss. Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to gamma, proton, carbon, or iron radiation at 2-Gray doses, representing both a clinical treatment fraction and spaceflight exposure for an exploratory mission. Mice were euthanized 110 days after irradiation. The proximal tibiae and femur diaphyses were analyzed using microcomputed tomography. Results demonstrate profound changes in trabecular architecture. Significant losses in trabecular bone volume fraction were observed for all radiation species: gamma, (-29%), proton (-35%), carbon (-39%), and iron (-34%). Trabecular connectivity density, thickness, spacing, and number were also affected. These data have clear implications for clinical radiotherapy in that bone loss in an animal model has been demonstrated at low doses. Additionally, these data suggest that space radiation has the potential to exacerbate the bone loss caused by microgravity, although lower doses and dose rates need to be studied. PMID:16741258

  18. Acute and chronic exposure to Tyrophagus putrescentiae induces allergic pulmonary response in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, Nailê Karine; dos Santos Dutra, Moisés; Barbosa, Gustavo Leivas; Morassutti, Alessandra Loureiro; de Souza, Rodrigo Godinho; Vargas, Mauro Henrique Moraes; Antunes, Géssica Luana; Silveira, Josiane Silva; da Silva, Guilherme Liberato; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio

    2016-01-01

    Background Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Tp) is a source of aeroallergen that causes allergic diseases. Objective To describe an acute and chronic murine model of allergic asthma with Tp extract with no systemic sensitization and no use of adjuvant. Methods Mites from dust sample were cultured and a raw extract was produced. Female BALB/c mice (6-8 weeks) were challenged intranasally with Tp extract or Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline, for 10 consecutive days (acute protocol) or for 6 weeks (chronic protocol). Twenty-four hours after the last intranasal challenge, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was performed for total and differential cells count, cytokine analysis, and eosinophil peroxidase activity. Lung tissue was also removed for histopathologic analysis. Results Tp extract has shown a significant increase in total cells count from BALF as well as an increase in absolute eosinophils count, eosinophil peroxidase activity, interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 levels, in both acute and chronic protocols. Peribronchovascular infiltrate, goblet cells hyperplasia and collagen deposition were shown in the airways of acute and chronic Tp-exposed mice. Conclusion Our data suggest that the intranasal exposure to Tp extract, with no systemic sensitization and no use of adjuvants, induces a robust allergic inflammation in the lungs of mice, in both acute and chronic models. Our Tp extract seems to be a potent allergen extract which may be used in asthma model studies. PMID:26844220

  19. Changes of the hepatic proteome in murine models for toxically induced fibrogenesis and sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Corinna; Roderfeld, Martin; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Berres, Marie-Luise; Hillebrandt, Sonja; Lammert, Frank; Meyer, Helmut E; Stühler, Kai; Graf, Jürgen; Roeb, Elke

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the changes in the hepatic proteome in murine models for toxic-induced fibrogenesis and sclerosing cholangitis. A comprehensive comparison of protein changes observed is made and the mechanistical basis of the expression changes is discussed. Hepatic fibrosis was induced by repetitive intraperitoneal CCl4 treatment of BALB/c mice or developed spontaneously in BALB/c-ATP-binding cassette, subfamily B, member 4 (Abcb4) knock out mice. Fibrosis was verified by a morphometric score and assessment of hydroxyproline content of liver tissue, respectively. The innovative difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technique was used to analyse protein expression levels of the mouse proteome. Results were confirmed by Western blotting and real-time RT-PCR. In CCl4-induced fibrosis 20 out of 40 and in BALB/c-Abcb4(-/-) mice 8 out of 28 differentially expressed proteins were identified utilizing DIGE. Only two proteins, selenium-binding protein (Sbp2) and carbonic anhydrase 3, have been unidirectionally expressed (i.e. down-regulated) in both models. Relevant differences in the pathogenesis of toxically induced liver fibrosis and sclerosing cholangitis exist. The only novel protein with regard to liver fibrosis depicting a unidirectional expression pattern in both animal models was Sbp2. An explicit protein function could not be clarified yet.

  20. Excisional Wound Healing Is Delayed in a Murine Model of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Akhil K.; De la Garza, Mauricio; Fang, Robert C.; Hong, Seok J.; Galiano, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Approximately 15% of the United States population suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD), often demonstrating an associated impairment in wound healing. This study outlines the development of a surgical murine model of CKD in order to investigate the mechanisms underlying this impairment. Methods CKD was induced in mice by partial cauterization of one kidney cortex and contralateral nephrectomy, modifying a previously published technique. After a minimum of 6-weeks, splinted, dorsal excisional wounds were created to permit assessment of wound healing parameters. Wounds were harvested on postoperative days (POD) 0, 3, 7, and 14 for histological, immunofluorescent, and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Results CKD mice exhibited deranged blood chemistry and hematology profiles, including profound uremia and anemia. Significant decreases in re-epithelialization and granulation tissue deposition rates were found in uremic mice wounds relative to controls. On immunofluorescent analysis, uremic mice demonstrated significant reductions in cellular proliferation (BrdU) and angiogenesis (CD31), with a concurrent increase in inflammation (CD45) as compared to controls. CKD mice also displayed differential expression of wound healing-related genes (VEGF, IL-1β, eNOS, iNOS) on qPCR. Conclusions These findings represent the first reported investigation of cutaneous healing in a CKD animal model. Ongoing studies of this significantly delayed wound healing phenotype include the establishment of renal failure model in diabetic strains to study the combined effects of CKD and diabetes. PMID:23536900

  1. 4D optical coherence tomography of aortic valve dynamics in a murine mouse model ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Christian; Jannasch, Anett; Faak, Saskia; Waldow, Thomas; Koch, Edmund

    2015-07-01

    The heart and its mechanical components, especially the heart valves and leaflets, are under enormous strain during lifetime. Like all highly stressed materials, also these biological components undergo fatigue and signs of wear, which impinge upon cardiac output and in the end on health and living comfort of affected patients. Thereby pathophysiological changes of the aortic valve leading to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS) as most frequent heart valve disease in humans are of particular interest. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behavior during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug-based options of prevention or therapy. ApoE-/- mice as established model of AVS versus wildtype mice were introduced in an ex vivo artificially stimulated heart model. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behavior of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. OCT and high-speed video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution represent promising tools for the investigation of dynamic behavior and their changes in calcific aortic stenosis disease models in mice.

  2. Treatment with probiotics in experimental oral colonization by Candida albicans in murine model (DBA/2).

    PubMed

    Matsubara, V H; Silva, E G; Paula, C R; Ishikawa, K H; Nakamae, A E M

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the oral colonization by Candida albicans in experimental murine immunosuppressed DBA/2 and treatment with probiotic bacteria. To achieve these objectives, 152 DBA/2-immunosuppressed mice were orally inoculated with a suspension of C. albicans containing 10(8) viable yeast cells, the animals were treated with nystatin or with the probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus). Evaluations were performed by Candida count from oral mucosa swabbing. The oral mucosa colonization by C. albicans started at day 1 after inoculation, remained maximal from day 3 until day 7, and then decreased significantly. Probiotics reduced the C. albicans colonization significantly on the oral mucosa in comparison with the untreated animal group. In the group treated with L. rhamnosus, the reduction in yeast colonization was significantly higher compared with that of the group receiving nystatin. Immunosuppressed animal model DBA/2 is a relevant model for experimental Candida oral colonization, and the treatment with probiotics in this model may be an effective alternative to prevent it.

  3. Characterization of the Invasive, Multidrug Resistant Non-typhoidal Salmonella Strain D23580 in a Murine Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Kenneth L.; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Ott, C. Mark; Forsyth, Rebecca J.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    A distinct pathovar of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, ST313, has emerged in sub-Saharan Africa as a major cause of fatal bacteremia in young children and HIV-infected adults. D23580, a multidrug resistant clinical isolate of ST313, was previously shown to have undergone genome reduction in a manner that resembles that of the more human-restricted pathogen, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. It has since been shown through tissue distribution studies that D23580 is able to establish an invasive infection in chickens. However, it remains unclear whether ST313 can cause lethal disease in a non-human host following a natural course of infection. Herein we report that D23580 causes lethal and invasive disease in a murine model of infection following peroral challenge. The LD50 of D23580 in female BALB/c mice was 4.7 x 105 CFU. Tissue distribution studies performed 3 and 5 days post-infection confirmed that D23580 was able to more rapidly colonize the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes and gall bladder in mice when compared to the well-characterized S. Typhimurium strain SL1344. D23580 exhibited enhanced resistance to acid stress relative to SL1344, which may lend towards increased capability to survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract as well as during its intracellular lifecycle. Interestingly, D23580 also displayed higher swimming motility relative to SL1344, S. Typhi strain Ty2, and the ST313 strain A130. Biochemical tests revealed that D23580 shares many similar metabolic features with SL1344, with several notable differences in the Voges-Proskauer and catalase tests, as well alterations in melibiose, and inositol utilization. These results represent the first full duration infection study using an ST313 strain following the entire natural course of disease progression, and serve as a benchmark for ongoing and future studies into the pathogenesis of D23580. PMID:26091096

  4. Adult Children of Alcoholics: A Counseling Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Robert L.; Phyfer, Ann Quinn

    1988-01-01

    Notes that adult children of alcoholics attending college present unique problems and opportunities to the college counselor. Presents a treatment model for serving such students which identifies four survivor roles and their manifestations, and suggests counseling techniques for each role. (Author/NB)

  5. Model of Adult Career Education in Corrections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, T. A.; And Others

    The model was designed to provide a guide for systematic planning, implementation, and evaluation of adult career education in correctional settings, utilizing a systems approach. It consists of seven chapters and a flowchart presenting seven major functions which must be carried out: (1) establishing a conceptual framework, (2) setting up an…

  6. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic assessment of faropenem in a lethal murine Bacillus anthracis inhalation postexposure prophylaxis model.

    PubMed

    Gill, Stanley C; Rubino, Christopher M; Bassett, Jennifer; Miller, Lynda; Ambrose, Paul G; Bhavnani, Sujata M; Beaudry, Amber; Li, Jinfang; Stone, Kimberly Clawson; Critchley, Ian; Janjic, Nebojsa; Heine, Henry S

    2010-05-01

    There are few options for prophylaxis after exposure to Bacillus anthracis, especially in children and women of childbearing potential. Faropenem is a beta-lactam in the penem subclass that is being developed as an oral prodrug, faropenem medoxomil, for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Faropenem was shown to have in vitro activity against B. anthracis strains that variably express the bla1 beta-lactamase (MIC range, murine postexposure prophylaxis inhalation model. The plasma PKs and PKs-PDs of faropenem were evaluated in BALB/c mice following the intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of doses ranging from 2.5 to 160 mg/kg of body weight. For the evaluation of efficacy, mice received by inhalation aerosol doses of B. anthracis (Ames strain; faropenem MIC, 0.06 microg/ml) at 100 times the 50% lethal dose. The faropenem dosing regimens (10, 20, 40, and 80 mg/kg/day) were administered i.p. at 24 h postchallenge at 4-, 6-, and 12-h intervals for 14 days. The sigmoid maximum-threshold-of-efficacy (E(max)) model fit the survival data, in which the free-drug area under the concentration-time curve (fAUC)/MIC ratio, the maximum concentration of free drug in plasma (fC(max))/MIC ratio, and the cumulative percentage of a 24-h period that the free-drug concentration exceeds the MIC under steady-state pharmacokinetic conditions (f %T(MIC)) were each evaluated. Assessment of f %T(MIC) demonstrated the strongest correlation with survival (R(2) = 0.967) compared to the correlations achieved by assessment of fAUC/MIC or fC(max)/MIC, for which minimal correlations were observed. The 50% effective dose (ED(50)), ED(90), and ED(99) corresponded to f %T(MIC) values of 10.6, 13.4, and 16.4%, respectively, and E(max) was 89.3%. Overall, faropenem demonstrated a high

  7. In vivo murine and in vitro M-like cell models of gastrointestinal anthrax.

    PubMed

    Tonry, Jessica H; Popov, Serguei G; Narayanan, Aarthi; Kashanchi, Fatah; Hakami, Ramin M; Carpenter, Calvin; Bailey, Charles; Chung, Myung-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax and is acquired by three routes of infection: inhalational, gastrointestinal and cutaneous. Gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax is rare, but can rapidly result in severe, systemic disease that is fatal in 25%-60% of cases. Disease mechanisms of GI anthrax remain unclear due to limited numbers of clinical cases and the lack of experimental animal models. Here, we developed an in vivo murine model of GI anthrax where spore survival was maximized through the neutralization of stomach acid followed by an intragastric administration of a thiabendazole paste spore formulation. Infected mice showed a dose-dependent mortality rate and pathological features closely mimicking human GI anthrax. Since Peyer's patches in the murine intestine are the primary sites of B. anthracis growth, we developed a human M (microfold)-like-cell model using a Caco-2/Raji B-cell co-culturing system to study invasive mechanisms of GI anthrax across the intestinal epithelium. Translocation of B. anthracis spores was higher in M-like cells than Caco-2 monolayers, suggesting that M-like cells may serve as an initial entry site for spores. Here, we developed an in vivo murine model of GI anthrax and an in vitro M-like cell model that could be used to further our knowledge of GI anthrax pathogenesis.

  8. Physiologic and molecular characterization of a murine model of right ventricular volume overload

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingming; Hu, Dong-Qing; Fajardo, Giovanni; Katznelson, Ethan; Punn, Rajesh; Spin, Joshua M.; Chan, Frandics P.; Bernstein, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary insufficiency (PI) is a common long-term sequel after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, causing progressive right ventricular (RV) dilation and failure. We describe the physiologic and molecular characteristics of the first murine model of RV volume overload. PI was created by entrapping the pulmonary valve leaflets with sutures. Imaging, catheterization, and exercise testing were performed at 1, 3, and 6 mo and compared with sham controls. RNA from the RV free wall was hybridized to Agilent whole genome oligonucleotide microarrays. Volume overload resulted in RV enlargement, decreased RV outflow tract shortening fraction at 1 mo followed by normalization at 3 and 6 mo (39 ± 2, 44 ± 2, and 41 ± 2 vs. 46 ± 3% in sham), early reversal of early and late diastolic filling velocities (E/A ratio) followed by pseudonormalization (0.87 ± 0.08, 0.82 ± 0.08, and 0.96 ± 0.08 vs. 1.04 ± 0.03; P < 0.05), elevated end-diastolic pressure (7.6 ± 0.7, 6.9 ± 0.8, and 7 ± 0.5 vs. 2.7 ± 0.2 mmHg; P < 0.05), and decreased exercise duration (26 ± 0.4, 26 ± 1, and 22 ± 1.3 vs. 30 ± 1.1 min; P < 0.05). Subendocardial RV fibrosis was evident by 1 mo. At 1 mo, 372 genes were significantly downregulated. Mitochondrial pathways and G protein-coupled receptor signaling were the most represented categories. At 3 mo, 434 genes were upregulated and 307 downregulated. While many of the same pathways continued to be downregulated, TNF-α, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), p53-signaling, and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling transitioned from down- to upregulated. We describe a novel murine model of chronic RV volume overload recapitulating aspects of the clinical disease with gene expression changes suggesting early mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction, enhanced TGF-β signaling, ECM remodeling, and apoptosis. PMID:23504182

  9. Murine Models of Helicobacter (pylori or felis)-associated Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Carrie A; Burkitt, Michael D; Williams, Jonathan M; Parsons, Bryony N; Tang, Joseph M F; Pritchard, D Mark

    2015-06-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is the fifth most common cancer and third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. The majority of these cancers develop in genetically susceptible individuals who are chronically infected with the Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori. Often these individuals have also been exposed to certain environmental factors that increase susceptibility, such as dietary components. Murine models of Helicobacter-induced gastric cancer are valuable tools for investigating the mechanisms responsible for the stepwise pathological changes of chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and gastric adenocarcinoma. Helicobacter felis colonization greatly accelerates the development of gastric neoplasia in mice, and causes pathologies similar to those observed with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis in humans. These mouse models are therefore useful for investigating genetic and environmental factors that may be involved in the pathogenesis and treatment of gastric cancer. Detailed in these protocols are procedures for inducing Helicobacter-associated carcinogenesis in mice as well as the histological analysis and interpretation of gastric pathology in these animals.

  10. A Paclitaxel-Loaded Recombinant Polypeptide Nanoparticle Outperforms Abraxane in Multiple Murine Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Bellucci, Joseph J.; Weitzhandler, Isaac; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Li, Xinghai; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Chi, Jen-Tsan Ashley; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Packaging clinically relevant hydrophobic drugs into a self-assembled nanoparticle can improve their aqueous solubility, plasma half-life, tumor specific uptake and therapeutic potential. To this end, here we conjugated paclitaxel (PTX) to recombinant chimeric polypeptides (CPs) that spontaneously self-assemble into ~60-nm diameter near-monodisperse nanoparticles that increased the systemic exposure of PTX by 7-fold compared to free drug and 2-fold compared to the FDA approved taxane nanoformulation (Abraxane®). The tumor uptake of the CP-PTX nanoparticle was 5-fold greater than free drug and 2-fold greater than Abraxane. In a murine cancer model of human triple negative breast cancer and prostate cancer, CP-PTX induced near complete tumor regression after a single dose in both tumor models, whereas at the same dose, no mice treated with Abraxane survived for more than 80 days (breast) and 60 days (prostate) respectively. These results show that a molecularly engineered nanoparticle with precisely engineered design features outperforms Abraxane, the current gold standard for paclitaxel delivery. PMID:26239362

  11. Rapamycin improves TIE2-mutated venous malformation in murine model and human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo, Elisa; Limaye, Nisha; Huang, Lan; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Soblet, Julie; Uebelhoer, Melanie; Mendola, Antonella; Natynki, Marjut; Seront, Emmanuel; Dupont, Sophie; Hammer, Jennifer; Legrand, Catherine; Brugnara, Carlo; Eklund, Lauri; Vikkula, Miikka; Bischoff, Joyce; Boon, Laurence M.

    2015-01-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are composed of ectatic veins with scarce smooth muscle cell coverage. Activating mutations in the endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2 are a common cause of these lesions. VMs cause deformity, pain, and local intravascular coagulopathy, and they expand with time. Targeted pharmacological therapies are not available for this condition. Here, we generated a model of VMs by injecting HUVECs expressing the most frequent VM-causing TIE2 mutation, TIE2-L914F, into immune-deficient mice. TIE2-L914F–expressing HUVECs formed VMs with ectatic blood-filled channels that enlarged over time. We tested both rapamycin and a TIE2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TIE2-TKI) for their effects on murine VM expansion and for their ability to inhibit mutant TIE2 signaling. Rapamycin prevented VM growth, while TIE2-TKI had no effect. In cultured TIE2-L914F–expressing HUVECs, rapamycin effectively reduced mutant TIE2-induced AKT signaling and, though TIE2-TKI did target the WT receptor, it only weakly suppressed mutant-induced AKT signaling. In a prospective clinical pilot study, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin in 6 patients with difficult–to-treat venous anomalies. Rapamycin reduced pain, bleeding, lesion size, functional and esthetic impairment, and intravascular coagulopathy. This study provides a VM model that allows evaluation of potential therapeutic strategies and demonstrates that rapamycin provides clinical improvement in patients with venous malformation. PMID:26258417

  12. Interactome analysis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in murine models of colon and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aliper, Alexander M; Frieden-Korovkina, Victoria P; Buzdin, Anton; Roumiantsev, Sergey A; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2014-11-30

    In solid cancers, myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) infiltrate (peri)tumoral tissues to induce immune tolerance and hence to establish a microenvironment permissive to tumor growth. Importantly, the mechanisms that facilitate such infiltration or a subsequent immune suppression are not fully understood. Hence, in this study, we aimed to delineate disparate molecular pathways which MDSC utilize in murine models of colon or breast cancer. Using pathways enrichment analysis, we completed interactome maps of multiple signaling pathways in CD11b+/Gr1(high/low) MDSC from spleens and tumor infiltrates of mice with c26GM colon cancer and tumor infiltrates of MDSC in 4T1 breast cancer. In both cancer models, infiltrating MDSC, but not CD11b+ splenic cells, have been found to be enriched in multiple signaling molecules suggestive of their enhanced proliferative and invasive phenotypes. The interactome data has been subsequently used to reconstruct a previously unexplored regulation of MDSC cell cycle by the c-myc transcription factor which was predicted by the analysis. Thus, this study represents a first interactome mapping of distinct multiple molecular pathways whereby MDSC sustain cancer progression. PMID:25294811

  13. Rapamycin improves TIE2-mutated venous malformation in murine model and human subjects.

    PubMed

    Boscolo, Elisa; Limaye, Nisha; Huang, Lan; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Soblet, Julie; Uebelhoer, Melanie; Mendola, Antonella; Natynki, Marjut; Seront, Emmanuel; Dupont, Sophie; Hammer, Jennifer; Legrand, Catherine; Brugnara, Carlo; Eklund, Lauri; Vikkula, Miikka; Bischoff, Joyce; Boon, Laurence M

    2015-09-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are composed of ectatic veins with scarce smooth muscle cell coverage. Activating mutations in the endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2 are a common cause of these lesions. VMs cause deformity, pain, and local intravascular coagulopathy, and they expand with time. Targeted pharmacological therapies are not available for this condition. Here, we generated a model of VMs by injecting HUVECs expressing the most frequent VM-causing TIE2 mutation, TIE2-L914F, into immune-deficient mice. TIE2-L914F-expressing HUVECs formed VMs with ectatic blood-filled channels that enlarged over time. We tested both rapamycin and a TIE2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TIE2-TKI) for their effects on murine VM expansion and for their ability to inhibit mutant TIE2 signaling. Rapamycin prevented VM growth, while TIE2-TKI had no effect. In cultured TIE2-L914F-expressing HUVECs, rapamycin effectively reduced mutant TIE2-induced AKT signaling and, though TIE2-TKI did target the WT receptor, it only weakly suppressed mutant-induced AKT signaling. In a prospective clinical pilot study, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin in 6 patients with difficult-to-treat venous anomalies. Rapamycin reduced pain, bleeding, lesion size, functional and esthetic impairment, and intravascular coagulopathy. This study provides a VM model that allows evaluation of potential therapeutic strategies and demonstrates that rapamycin provides clinical improvement in patients with venous malformation.

  14. Evaluation of VT-1161 for Treatment of Coccidioidomycosis in Murine Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Hien T.; Galgiani, John N.; Lewis, Maria L.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Lewis, Eric R. G.; Doyle, Adina L.; Hoekstra, William J.; Schotzinger, Robert J.; Garvey, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis, or valley fever, is a growing health concern endemic to the southwestern United States. Safer, more effective, and more easily administered drugs are needed especially for severe, chronic, or unresponsive infections. The novel fungal CYP51 inhibitor VT-1161 demonstrated in vitro antifungal activity, with MIC50 and MIC90 values of 1 and 2 μg/ml, respectively, against 52 Coccidioides clinical isolates. In the initial animal study, oral doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg VT-1161 significantly reduced fungal burdens and increased survival time in a lethal respiratory model in comparison with treatment with a placebo (P < 0.001). Oral doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg VT-1161 were similarly efficacious in the murine central nervous system (CNS) model compared to placebo treatment (P < 0.001). All comparisons with the positive-control drug, fluconazole at 50 mg/kg per day, demonstrated either statistical equivalence or superiority of VT-1161. VT-1161 treatment also prevented dissemination of infection from the original inoculation site to a greater extent than fluconazole. Many of these in vivo results can be explained by the long half-life of VT-1161 leading to sustained high plasma levels. Thus, the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of VT-1161 are attractive characteristics for long-term treatment of this serious fungal infection. PMID:26369964

  15. Rapamycin improves TIE2-mutated venous malformation in murine model and human subjects.

    PubMed

    Boscolo, Elisa; Limaye, Nisha; Huang, Lan; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Soblet, Julie; Uebelhoer, Melanie; Mendola, Antonella; Natynki, Marjut; Seront, Emmanuel; Dupont, Sophie; Hammer, Jennifer; Legrand, Catherine; Brugnara, Carlo; Eklund, Lauri; Vikkula, Miikka; Bischoff, Joyce; Boon, Laurence M

    2015-09-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are composed of ectatic veins with scarce smooth muscle cell coverage. Activating mutations in the endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2 are a common cause of these lesions. VMs cause deformity, pain, and local intravascular coagulopathy, and they expand with time. Targeted pharmacological therapies are not available for this condition. Here, we generated a model of VMs by injecting HUVECs expressing the most frequent VM-causing TIE2 mutation, TIE2-L914F, into immune-deficient mice. TIE2-L914F-expressing HUVECs formed VMs with ectatic blood-filled channels that enlarged over time. We tested both rapamycin and a TIE2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TIE2-TKI) for their effects on murine VM expansion and for their ability to inhibit mutant TIE2 signaling. Rapamycin prevented VM growth, while TIE2-TKI had no effect. In cultured TIE2-L914F-expressing HUVECs, rapamycin effectively reduced mutant TIE2-induced AKT signaling and, though TIE2-TKI did target the WT receptor, it only weakly suppressed mutant-induced AKT signaling. In a prospective clinical pilot study, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin in 6 patients with difficult-to-treat venous anomalies. Rapamycin reduced pain, bleeding, lesion size, functional and esthetic impairment, and intravascular coagulopathy. This study provides a VM model that allows evaluation of potential therapeutic strategies and demonstrates that rapamycin provides clinical improvement in patients with venous malformation. PMID:26258417

  16. Inflammatory and remodeling events in asthma with chronic exposure to house dust mites: a murine model.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Hyun; Kim, Chi Hong; Kim, Yong Hyun; Kim, Seung Joon; Lee, Sook Young; Kim, Young Kyoon; Kim, Kwan Hyoung; Moon, Hwa Sik; Song, Jeong Sup; Park, Sung Hak; Kwon, Soon Seog

    2007-12-01

    Although animal models with ovalbumin have been used to study chronic asthma, there are difficulties in inducing recurrence as well as in maintaining chronic inflammation in this system. Using a murine model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced bronchial asthma, we examined the airway remodeling process in response to the chronic exposure to HDM. During the seventh and twelfth weeks of study, HDM were inhaled through the nose for three consecutive days and airway responsiveness was measured. Twenty-four hours later, bronchoalveolar lavage and histological examination were performed. The degree of overproduction of mucus, subepithelial fibrosis, and the thickness of the peribronchial smooth muscle in the experimental group was clearly increased compared to the control group. In addition, HDM-exposed mice demonstrated severe airway hyperreactivity to methacholine. In the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the number of total cells and eosinophils was increased; during the twelfth week, the number of neutrophils increased in the experimental group. With regard to changes in cytokines, the concentrations of IL-4, IL- 13, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) were increased in the experimental group. The data suggest that eosinophils, IL-4, IL-13, and TGF-beta might play an important role in the airway remodeling process and that neutrophils may be involved with increased exposure time.

  17. Surgical Debridement Is Superior to Sole Antibiotic Therapy in a Novel Murine Posttraumatic Osteomyelitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Christoph; Ismer, Britta; Schira, Jessica; Abraham, Stephanie; Harati, Kamran; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Behr, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bone infections after trauma, i.e. posttraumatic osteomyelitis, pose one of the biggest problems of orthopedic surgery. Even after sufficient clinical therapy including vast debridement of infected bone and antibiotic treatment, regeneration of postinfectious bone seems to be restricted. One explanation includes the large sized defects resulting from sufficient debridement. Furthermore, it remains unclear if inflammatory processes after bone infection do affect bone regeneration. For continuing studies in this field, an animal model is needed where bone regeneration after sufficient treatment can be studied in detail. Methods For this purpose we created a stable infection in murine tibiae by Staphylococcus aureus inoculation. Thereafter, osteomyelitic bones were debrided thoroughly and animals were subsequently treated with antibiotics. Controls included debrided, non-infected, as well as infected animals exclusively treated with antibiotics. To verify sufficient treatment of infected bone, different assessments detecting S. aureus were utilized: agar plates, histology and RT-qPCR. Results All three detection methods revealed massive reduction or eradication of S. aureus within debrided bones 1 and 2 weeks postoperatively, whereas sole antibiotic therapy could not provide sufficient treatment of osteomyelitic bones. Debrided, previously infected bones showed significantly decreased bone formation, compared to debrided, non-infected controls. Discussion Thus, the animal model presented herein provides a reliable and fascinating tool to study posttraumatic osteomyelitis for clinical therapies. PMID:26872128

  18. MicroRNA-184-Mediated Inhibition of Tumour Growth in an Orthotopic Murine Model of Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    TIVNAN, AMANDA; FOLEY, NIAMH H.; TRACEY, LORRAINE; DAVIDOFF, ANDREW M.; STALLINGS, RAYMOND L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroblastoma is a paediatric cancer which originates from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system. Previous studies have shown that miR-184 expression has anti-proliferative effects in neuroblastoma cells grown in culture. Therefore, it was of interest to evaluate this effect in vivo. Materials and Methods Neuroblastoma cells overexpressing miR-184 were injected retroperitoneally into CB17-SCID mice and tumour burden was assessed by measuring bioluminescence. Overall survival was also evaluated. Results Ectopic overexpression of miR-184 in neuroblastoma cell lines is anti-proliferative. In addition, overexpression of miR-184 led to a significant reduction in tumour growth relative to negative control-treated cohorts in a xenograft model of neuroblastoma. Conclusion This study demonstrated for the first time that miR-184 significantly reduces tumour growth and increases overall survival in an orthotopic murine model of neuroblastoma through assessment of tumour growth and moribundity relative to control miRNA-treated cohorts. PMID:21115884

  19. Protective effects of sirtuin 3 in a murine model of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Yu; Zhang, Lei; Sui, Ming-Xing; Zhu, You-Hua; Zeng, Li

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rapid loss of kidney function characterized by damage to renal tubular cells driven by mitochondrial dysregulation and oxidative stress. Here, we used a murine caecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis-induced AKI to study the role of sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), a NAD(+) dependent deacetylase critical for the maintenance of mitochondrial viability, in AKI-related renal tubular cell damage and explored the underlying mechanisms. CLP induced alterations in kidney function and morphology were associated with SIRT3 downregulation, and SIRT3 deletion exacerbated CLP-induced kidney dysfunction, renal tubular cell injury and apoptosis, mitochondrial alterations, and ROS production in a knockout mouse model. SIRT3 deletion increased the CLP-induced upregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, resulting in the activation of oxidative stress, increased production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18, and the enhancement of apoptosis, and these effects were reversed by antioxidant NAC. Our results suggest that SIRT3 plays a protective role against mitochondrial damage in the kidney by attenuating ROS production, inhibiting the NRLP3 inflammasome, attenuating oxidative stress, and downregulating IL-1β and IL-18. PMID:27620507

  20. Cryptococcus neoformans Hyperfilamentous Strain Is Hypervirulent in a Murine Model of Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Feretzaki, Marianna; Hardison, Sarah E.; Wormley, Floyd L.; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a human fungal pathogen that causes lethal infections of the lung and central nervous system in immunocompromised individuals. C. neoformans has a defined bipolar sexual life cycle with a and α mating types. During the sexual cycle, which can occur between cells of opposite mating types (bisexual reproduction) or cells of one mating type (unisexual reproduction), a dimorphic transition from yeast to hyphal growth occurs. Hyphal development and meiosis generate abundant spores that, following inhalation, penetrate deep into the lung to enter the alveoli, germinate, and establish a pulmonary infection growing as budding yeast cells. Unisexual reproduction has been directly observed only in the Cryptococcus var. neoformans (serotype D) lineage under laboratory conditions. However, hyphal development has been previously associated with reduced virulence and the serotype D lineage exhibits limited pathogenicity in the murine model. In this study we show that the serotype D hyperfilamentous strain XL280α is hypervirulent in an animal model. It can grow inside the lung of the host, establish a pulmonary infection, and then disseminate to the brain to cause cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. Surprisingly, this hyperfilamentous strain triggers an immune response polarized towards Th2-type immunity, which is usually observed in the highly virulent sibling species C. gattii, responsible for the Pacific Northwest outbreak. These studies provide a technological advance that will facilitate analysis of virulence genes and attributes in C. neoformans var. neoformans, and reveal the virulence potential of serotype D as broader and more dynamic than previously appreciated. PMID:25093333

  1. A paclitaxel-loaded recombinant polypeptide nanoparticle outperforms Abraxane in multiple murine cancer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Bellucci, Joseph J.; Weitzhandler, Isaac; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Li, Xinghai; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Chi, Jen-Tsan Ashley; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-08-01

    Packaging clinically relevant hydrophobic drugs into a self-assembled nanoparticle can improve their aqueous solubility, plasma half-life, tumour-specific uptake and therapeutic potential. To this end, here we conjugated paclitaxel (PTX) to recombinant chimeric polypeptides (CPs) that spontaneously self-assemble into ~60 nm near-monodisperse nanoparticles that increased the systemic exposure of PTX by sevenfold compared with free drug and twofold compared with the Food and Drug Administration-approved taxane nanoformulation (Abraxane). The tumour uptake of the CP-PTX nanoparticle was fivefold greater than free drug and twofold greater than Abraxane. In a murine cancer model of human triple-negative breast cancer and prostate cancer, CP-PTX induced near-complete tumour regression after a single dose in both tumour models, whereas at the same dose, no mice treated with Abraxane survived for >80 days (breast) and 60 days (prostate), respectively. These results show that a molecularly engineered nanoparticle with precisely engineered design features outperforms Abraxane, the current gold standard for PTX delivery.

  2. Transcutaneous photodynamic therapy delays the onset of paralysis in a murine multiple sclerosis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, David W. C.; Leong, Simon; Levy, Julia G.; Chan, Agnes H.

    1995-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD, Verteporfin) and whole body irradiation, can affect the course of adoptively transferred experimental allergic (autoimmune) encephalomyelitis (EAE) in PL mice. Murine EAE is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease which serves as a model for human multiple sclerosis. Using a novel disease induction protocol, we found that mice characteristically developed EAE within 3 weeks of receipt of myelin basic protein (MBP)-sensitized, in vitro-cultured spleen or lymph node cells. However, if animals were treated with PDT (1 mg BPD/kg bodyweight and exposed to whole body 15 Joules cm2 of LED light) 24 hours after receiving these cells, disease onset time was significantly delayed. PDT-treated mice developed disease symptoms 45 +/- 3 days following cell administration whereas untreated controls were affected within 23 +/- 2 days. In contrast, application of PDT 48 or 120 hours following injection of the pathogenic cells had no significant effect upon the development of EAE. Experiments are in progress to account for the protective effect of PDT in this animal model. These studies should provide evidence on the feasibility of PDT as a treatment for human autoimmune disease.

  3. Evaluation of VT-1161 for Treatment of Coccidioidomycosis in Murine Infection Models.

    PubMed

    Shubitz, Lisa F; Trinh, Hien T; Galgiani, John N; Lewis, Maria L; Fothergill, Annette W; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Barker, Bridget M; Lewis, Eric R G; Doyle, Adina L; Hoekstra, William J; Schotzinger, Robert J; Garvey, Edward P

    2015-12-01

    Coccidioidomycosis, or valley fever, is a growing health concern endemic to the southwestern United States. Safer, more effective, and more easily administered drugs are needed especially for severe, chronic, or unresponsive infections. The novel fungal CYP51 inhibitor VT-1161 demonstrated in vitro antifungal activity, with MIC50 and MIC90 values of 1 and 2 μg/ml, respectively, against 52 Coccidioides clinical isolates. In the initial animal study, oral doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg VT-1161 significantly reduced fungal burdens and increased survival time in a lethal respiratory model in comparison with treatment with a placebo (P < 0.001). Oral doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg VT-1161 were similarly efficacious in the murine central nervous system (CNS) model compared to placebo treatment (P < 0.001). All comparisons with the positive-control drug, fluconazole at 50 mg/kg per day, demonstrated either statistical equivalence or superiority of VT-1161. VT-1161 treatment also prevented dissemination of infection from the original inoculation site to a greater extent than fluconazole. Many of these in vivo results can be explained by the long half-life of VT-1161 leading to sustained high plasma levels. Thus, the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of VT-1161 are attractive characteristics for long-term treatment of this serious fungal infection. PMID:26369964

  4. Low-dose cyclophosphamide improves survival in a murine treatment model of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian; Bellevue, Oliver; Shawo, Alexandra; Woldesemayat, Hiwot; Lyo, Victoria; Rayikanti, Benjamin; Lee, Michelle; Uzosike, Ezechinyerem D; Kasravi, Shiva; Harris, Hobart W

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a complex medical condition characterized by a systemic inflammatory response in the setting of infection. We hypothesized that combining antibiotics plus an immunosuppressant would protect against the morbidity and mortality of polymicrobial sepsis in mice better than would antibiotics alone. We used a murine cecal-ligation-and-puncture model in which mice were treated either with imipenem plus cyclophosphamide or imipenem alone. Titration to a low cyclophosphamide dose revealed that combination therapy increased survival by 20% compared with imipenem alone (56% vs. 36%, P < 0.001). To investigate the mechanism by which combination therapy did this, we reviewed quantitative and qualitative markers of the systemic immune response, end-organ damage, and the local immune response at the site of injury. Cyclophosphamide treatment was not associated with depletion of peripheral leukocytes or differences in pulmonary damage. However, mice that received combination therapy had higher plasma granulocyte colony-stimulating factor levels than did those treated with antibiotics alone. In addition, mice treated with cyclophosphamide had higher levels of bacterial colonization in intestinal Peyer's patch lymph nodes at 72 h after the septic insult. Intraperitoneal macrophage phenotypes and phagocytosis activity did not differ between groups. We conclude that the inflammatory response plays a significant role in the mortality of polymicrobial sepsis and that the regulation of this element is both feasible and beneficial in this disease model.

  5. Redox Signaling in an In Vivo Murine Model of Low Magnitude Oscillatory Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Nick J.; Kundu, Kousik; Knight, Sarah F.; Dikalov, Sergey; Murthy, Niren

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Wall Shear Stress (WSS) has been identified as an important factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We utilized a novel murine aortic coarctation model to acutely create a region of low magnitude oscillatory WSS in vivo. We employed this model to test the hypothesis that acute changes in WSS in vivo induce upregulation of inflammatory proteins, mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Superoxide generation and VCAM-1 expression both increased in regions of low magnitude oscillatory WSS. WSS-dependent superoxide formation was attenuated by tempol treatment, but was unchanged in p47 phox knockout (ko) mice. However, in both the p47 phox ko mice and the tempol-treated mice, low magnitude oscillatory WSS produced an increase in VCAM-1 expression comparable to control mice. Additionally, this same VCAM-1 expression was observed in ebselen-treated mice and catalase overexpressing mice. These results suggest that although the redox state is important to the overall pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the initial WSS-dependent inflammatory response leading to lesion localization is not dependent on ROS. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1369–1378. PMID:20712414

  6. A mammary adenocarcinoma murine model suitable for the study of cancer immunoediting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer immunoediting is a dynamic process composed of three phases: elimination (EL), equilibrium (EQ) and escape (ES) that encompasses the potential host-protective and tumor-sculpting functions of the immune system throughout tumor development. Animal models are useful tools for studying diseases such as cancer. The present study was designed to characterize the interaction between mammary adenocarcinoma M-406 and CBi, CBi− and CBi/L inbred mice lines. Results The mammary adenocarcinoma M-406 developed spontaneously in a CBi mouse. CBi/L and CBi− mice were artificially selected for body conformation from CBi. When CBi mice are s.c. challenged with M-406, tumor growths exponentially in 100% of animals, while in CBi− the tumor growths briefly and then begins a rejection process in 100% of the animals. In CBi/L the growth of the tumor shows the three phases: 51.6% in ES, 18.5% in EQ and 29.8% in EL. Conclusions The results obtained support the conclusion that the system M-406 plus the inbred mouse lines CBi, CBi− and CBi/L, is a good murine model to study the process of tumor immunoediting. PMID:24885995

  7. Neuroprotective pentapeptide CN-105 improves functional and histological outcomes in a murine model of intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Beilei; James, Michael L.; Liu, Ji; Zhou, Guanen; Venkatraman, Talaignair N.; Lascola, Christopher D.; Acheson, Shawn K.; Dubois, Laura G.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Wang, Haichen

    2016-01-01

    Presently, no pharmacological treatments have been demonstrated to improve long-term functional outcomes following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Clinical evidence associates apolipoprotein E (apoE) genotype with ICH incidence and outcome. While apoE modifies neuroinflammatory responses through its adaptive role in glial downregulation, intact apoE holoprotein is too large to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Therefore, we developed a 5-amino acid peptide – CN-105 – that mimics the polar face of the apoE helical domain involved in receptor interactions. In the current study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of CN-105 in a mouse model of ICH. Three doses of CN-105 (0.05 mg/kg) was administered by tail vein injection within 24 hours after ICH induction. Functional assessment showed durable improvement in vestibulomotor performance after CN-105 treatment, as quantified by increased Rotarod latencies on Days 1–5 post-ICH, and long-term improvement in neurocognitive performance, as quantified by reduced Morris water maze latencies on Days 29–32 post-ICH. Further, brain water content was significantly reduced, neuroinflammation was decreased and hippocampal CA3 neuronal survival was increased, although hemorrhage volume was not affected by CN-105. We concluded, therefore, that pentapeptide CN-105 improved short- and long-term neurobehavioral outcomes in a murine model of ICH, suggesting therapeutic potential for patients with acute ICH. PMID:27713572

  8. Protective effects of sirtuin 3 in a murine model of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wen-Yu; Zhang, Lei; Sui, Ming-Xing; Zhu, You-Hua; Zeng, Li

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rapid loss of kidney function characterized by damage to renal tubular cells driven by mitochondrial dysregulation and oxidative stress. Here, we used a murine caecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis-induced AKI to study the role of sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), a NAD+ dependent deacetylase critical for the maintenance of mitochondrial viability, in AKI-related renal tubular cell damage and explored the underlying mechanisms. CLP induced alterations in kidney function and morphology were associated with SIRT3 downregulation, and SIRT3 deletion exacerbated CLP-induced kidney dysfunction, renal tubular cell injury and apoptosis, mitochondrial alterations, and ROS production in a knockout mouse model. SIRT3 deletion increased the CLP-induced upregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, resulting in the activation of oxidative stress, increased production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18, and the enhancement of apoptosis, and these effects were reversed by antioxidant NAC. Our results suggest that SIRT3 plays a protective role against mitochondrial damage in the kidney by attenuating ROS production, inhibiting the NRLP3 inflammasome, attenuating oxidative stress, and downregulating IL-1β and IL-18. PMID:27620507

  9. Retinal expression of small non-coding RNAs in a murine model of proliferative retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Wang, Zhongxiao; Sun, Ye; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Ocular neovascularization is a leading cause of blindness in proliferative retinopathy. Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) play critical roles in both vascular and neuronal development of the retina through post-transcriptional regulation of target gene expression. To identify the function and therapeutic potential of sncRNAs in retinopathy, we assessed the expression profile of retinal sncRNAs in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) with pathologic proliferation of neovessels. Approximately 2% of all analyzed sncRNAs were significantly altered in OIR retinas compared with normoxic controls. Twenty three microRNAs with substantial up- or down-regulation were identified, including miR-351, -762, -210, 145, -155, -129-5p, -150, -203, and -375, which were further analyzed for their potential target genes in angiogenic, hypoxic, and immune response-related pathways. In addition, nineteen small nucleolar RNAs also revealed differential expression in OIR retinas compared with control retinas. A decrease of overall microRNA expression in OIR retinas was consistent with reduced microRNA processing enzyme Dicer, and increased expression of Alu element in OIR. Together, our findings elucidated a group of differentially expressed sncRNAs in a murine model of proliferative retinopathy. These sncRNAs may exert critical post-transcriptional regulatory roles in regulating pathological neovascularization in eye diseases. PMID:27653551

  10. Berberine inhibits human tongue squamous carcinoma cancer tumor growth in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yung-Tsuan; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Li, Tsai-Chung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2009-09-01

    Our primary studies showed that berberine induced apoptosis in human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells in vitro. But there is no report to show berberine inhibited SCC-4 cancer cells in vivo on a murine xenograft animal model. SCC-4 tumor cells were implanted into mice and groups of mice were treated with vehicle, berberine (10mg/kg of body weight) and doxorubicin (4mg/kg of body weight). The tested agents were injected once per four days intraperitoneally (i.p.), with treatment starting 4 weeks prior to cells inoculation. Treatment with 4mg/kg of doxorubicin or with 10mg/kg of berberine resulted in a reduction in tumor incidence. Tumor size in xenograft mice treated with 10mg/kg berberine was significantly smaller than that in the control group. Our findings indicated that berbeirne inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft animal model. Therefore, berberine may represent a tongue cancer preventive agent and can be used in clinic. PMID:19303753

  11. Characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei Strains Using a Murine Intraperitoneal Infection Model and In Vitro Macrophage Assays

    PubMed Central

    Welkos, Susan L.; Klimko, Christopher P.; Kern, Steven J.; Bearss, Jeremy J.; Bozue, Joel A.; Bernhards, Robert C.; Trevino, Sylvia R.; Waag, David M.; Amemiya, Kei; Worsham, Patricia L.; Cote, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is a gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium. This bacterium is endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia and can infect humans and animals by several routes. It has also been estimated to present a considerable risk as a potential biothreat agent. There are currently no effective vaccines for B. pseudomallei, and antibiotic treatment can be hampered by nonspecific symptomology, the high incidence of naturally occurring antibiotic resistant strains, and disease chronicity. Accordingly, there is a concerted effort to better characterize B. pseudomallei and its associated disease. Before novel vaccines and therapeutics can be tested in vivo, a well characterized animal model is essential. Previous work has indicated that mice may be a useful animal model. In order to develop standardized animal models of melioidosis, different strains of bacteria must be isolated, propagated, and characterized. Using a murine intraperitoneal (IP) infection model, we tested the virulence of 11 B. pseudomallei strains. The IP route offers a reproducible way to rank virulence that can be readily reproduced by other laboratories. This infection route is also useful in distinguishing significant differences in strain virulence that may be masked by the exquisite susceptibility associated with other routes of infection (e.g., inhalational). Additionally, there were several pathologic lesions observed in mice following IP infection. These included varisized abscesses in the spleen, liver, and haired skin. This model indicated that commonly used laboratory strains of B. pseudomallei (i.e., K96243 and 1026b) were significantly less virulent as compared to more recently acquired clinical isolates. Additionally, we characterized in vitro strain-associated differences in virulence for macrophages and described a potential inverse relationship between virulence in the IP mouse model of some strains and in the

  12. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase contributes to the anti-inflammatory effect of antimicrobial triclocarban in a murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Junyan; Qiu Hong; Morisseau, Christophe; Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Ulu, Arzu; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2011-09-01

    The increasing use of the antimicrobial triclocarban (TCC) in personal care products (PCPs) has resulted in concern regarding environmental pollution. TCC is a potent inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Inhibitors of sEH (sEHIs) are anti-inflammatory, anti-hypertensive and cardio-protective in multiple animal models. However, the in vivo effects anticipated from a sEHI have not been reported for TCC. Here we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects in vivo of TCC in a murine model. TCC was employed in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine model. Systolic blood pressure, plasma levels of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokine, and metabolomic profile of plasma oxylipins were determined. TCC significantly reversed LPS-induced morbid hypotension in a time-dependent manner. TCC significantly repressed the increased release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokine caused by LPS. Furthermore, TCC significantly shifted the oxylipin profile in vivo in a time-dependent manner towards resolution of inflammation as expected from a sEHI. These results demonstrated that at the doses used TCC is anti-inflammatory in the murine model. This study suggests that TCC may provide some benefits in humans in addition to its antimicrobial activities due to its potent inhibition of sEH. It may be a promising starting point for developing new low volume high value applications of TCC. However these biological effects also caution against the general over use of TCC in PCPs. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: > Anti-microbial triclocarban (TCC) is anti-inflammatory in a murine model. > TCC significantly shifted the oxylipin profile in vivo as expected from a sEHI. > TCC significantly reversed LPS-induced morbid hypotension in a time-dependent manner. > TCC significantly repressed LPS-induced increased release of inflammatory cytokines.

  13. Effects of exogenous, nonleukemogenic, ecotropic murine leukemia virus infections on the immune systems of adult C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J S; Giese, N A; Elkins, K L; Yetter, R A; Holmes, K L; Hartley, J W; Morse, H C

    1995-01-01

    Mouse AIDS (MAIDS) develops in mice infected with a mixture of replication-competent ecotropic and mink lung cell focus-inducing murine leukemia viruses and an etiologic replication-defective virus. Helper viruses are not required for induction of MAIDS, but the time course of disease is accelerated in their presence. To understand the possible contributions of ectropic murine leukemia viruses to MAIDS pathogenesis, we biologically cloned a series of viruses from the MAIDS-inducing LP-BM5 virus mixture. These viruses were examined for replication in tissues of infected mice and for effects on the immune system. All virus stocks replicated efficiently in mice. Infected animals showed slight lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly due primarily to B-cell proliferation associated with differentiation to immunoglobulin secretion resulting in twofold increases in serum immunoglobulin M levels; however, B-cell responses to helper T-cell-independent antigens were increased rather than decreased as in MAIDS. Analyses of CD8+ T-cell function showed that cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses to alloantigens were comparable in control and infected mice. Finally, we showed that infection resulted in enhanced expression of transcripts for interleukin-10, interleukin-4, and gamma interferon. These cytokines can all contribute to B-cell activation and may promote the expansion of a target cell population for the MAIDS defective virus. PMID:7769677

  14. Murine Vaginal Colonization Model for Investigating Asymptomatic Mucosal Carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael E.; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    While many virulence factors promoting Streptococcus pyogenes invasive disease have been described, specific streptococcal factors and host properties influencing asymptomatic mucosal carriage remain uncertain. To address the need for a refined model of prolonged S. pyogenes asymptomatic mucosal colonization, we have adapted a preestrogenized murine vaginal colonization model for S. pyogenes. In this model, derivatives of strains HSC5, SF370, JRS4, NZ131, and MEW123 established a reproducible, asymptomatic colonization of the vaginal mucosa over a period of typically 3 to 4 weeks' duration at a relatively high colonization efficiency. Prior treatment with estradiol prolonged streptococcal colonization and was associated with reduced inflammation in the colonized vaginal epithelium as well as a decreased leukocyte presence in vaginal fluid compared to the levels of inflammation and leukocyte presence in non-estradiol-treated control mice. The utility of our model for investigating S. pyogenes factors contributing to mucosal carriage was verified, as a mutant with a mutation in the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A (CcpA) demonstrated significant impairment in vaginal colonization. An assessment of in vivo transcriptional activity in the CcpA− strain for several known CcpA-regulated genes identified significantly elevated transcription of lactate oxidase (lctO) correlating with excessive generation of hydrogen peroxide to self-lethal levels. Deletion of lctO did not impair colonization, but deletion of lctO in a CcpA− strain prolonged carriage, exceeding even that of the wild-type strain. Thus, while LctO is not essential for vaginal colonization, its dysregulation is deleterious, highlighting the critical role of CcpA in promoting mucosal colonization. The vaginal colonization model should prove effective for future analyses of S. pyogenes mucosal colonization. PMID:23460515

  15. A New Murine Model of Osteoblastic/Osteolytic Lesions from Human Androgen-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Serre, Claire Marie; Farlay, Delphine; Turtoi, Andrei; Bellahcene, Akeila; Follet, Hélène; Castronovo, Vincent; Clézardin, Philippe; Bonnelye, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Background Up to 80% of patients dying from prostate carcinoma have developed bone metastases that are incurable. Castration is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. Although the disease initially responds to androgen blockade strategies, it often becomes castration-resistant (CRPC for Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer). Most of the murine models of mixed lesions derived from prostate cancer cells are androgen sensitive. Thus, we established a new model of CRPC (androgen receptor (AR) negative) that causes mixed lesions in bone. Methods PC3 and its derived new cell clone PC3c cells were directly injected into the tibiae of SCID male mice. Tumor growth was analyzed by radiography and histology. Direct effects of conditioned medium of both cell lines were tested on osteoclasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes. Results We found that PC3c cells induced mixed lesions 10 weeks after intratibial injection. In vitro, PC3c conditioned medium was able to stimulate tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) and endothelin-1 (ET1) were highly expressed by PC3c while dikkopf-1 (DKK1) expression was decreased. Finally, PC3c highly expressed bone associated markers osteopontin (OPN), Runx2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and produced mineralized matrix in vitro in osteogenic conditions. Conclusions We have established a new CRPC cell line as a useful system for modeling human metastatic prostate cancer which presents the mixed phenotype of bone metastases that is commonly observed in prostate cancer patients with advanced disease. This model will help to understand androgen-independent mechanisms involved in the progression of prostate cancer in bone and provides a preclinical model for testing the effects of new treatments for bone metastases. PMID:24069383

  16. Validation of a novel murine wound model of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mitchell G; Black, Chad C; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Honnold, Cary L; Wise, Matthew C; Alamneh, Yonas A; Moon, Jay K; Kessler, Jennifer L; Si, Yuanzheng; Williams, Robert; Yildirim, Suleyman; Kirkup, Benjamin C; Green, Romanza K; Hall, Eric R; Palys, Thomas J; Zurawski, Daniel V

    2014-01-01

    Patients recovering from traumatic injuries or surgery often require weeks to months of hospitalization, increasing the risk for wound and surgical site infections caused by ESKAPE pathogens, which include A. baumannii (the ESKAPE pathogens are Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species). As new therapies are being developed to counter A. baumannii infections, animal models are also needed to evaluate potential treatments. Here, we present an excisional, murine wound model in which a diminutive inoculum of a clinically relevant, multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolate can proliferate, form biofilms, and be effectively treated with antibiotics. The model requires a temporary, cyclophosphamide-induced neutropenia to establish an infection that can persist. A 6-mm-diameter, full-thickness wound was created in the skin overlying the thoracic spine, and after the wound bed was inoculated, it was covered with a dressing for 7 days. Uninoculated control wounds healed within 13 days, whereas infected, placebo-treated wounds remained unclosed beyond 21 days. Treated and untreated wounds were assessed with multiple quantitative and qualitative techniques that included gross pathology, weight loss and recovery, wound closure, bacterial burden, 16S rRNA community profiling, histopathology, peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization, and scanning electron microscopy assessment of biofilms. The range of differences that we are able to identify with these measures in antibiotic- versus placebo-treated animals provides a clear window within which novel antimicrobial therapies can be assessed. The model can be used to evaluate antimicrobials for their ability to reduce specific pathogen loads in wounded tissues and clear biofilms. Ultimately, the mouse model approach allows for highly powered studies and serves as an initial multifaceted in vivo assessment prior to

  17. Adult zebrafish model for pneumococcal pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Saralahti, Anni; Piippo, Hannaleena; Parikka, Mataleena; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Rämet, Mika; Rounioja, Samuli

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a leading cause of community acquired pneumonia, septicemia, and meningitis. Due to incomplete understanding of the host and bacterial factors contributing to these diseases optimal treatment and prevention methods are lacking. In the present study we examined whether the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) can be used to investigate the pathophysiology of pneumococcal diseases. Here we show that both intraperitoneal and intramuscular injections of the pneumococcal strain TIGR4 cause a fulminant, dose-dependent infection in adult zebrafish, while isogenic mutant bacteria lacking the polysaccharide capsule, autolysin, or pneumolysin are attenuated in the model. Infection through the intraperitoneal route is characterized by rapid expansion of pneumococci in the bloodstream, followed by penetration of the blood-brain barrier and progression to meningitis. Using Rag1 mutant zebrafish, which are devoid of somatic recombination and thus lack adaptive immune responses, we show that clearance of pneumococci in adult zebrafish depends mainly on innate immune responses. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that the adult zebrafish can be used as a model for a pneumococcal infection, and that it can be used to study both host and bacterial factors involved in the pathogenesis. However, our results do not support the use of the zebrafish in studies on the role of adaptive immunity in pneumococcal disease or in the development of new pneumococcal vaccines.

  18. Single-Limb Irradiation Induces Local and Systemic Bone Loss in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Wright, Laura E; Buijs, Jeroen T; Kim, Hun-Soo; Coats, Laura E; Scheidler, Anne M; John, Sutha K; She, Yun; Murthy, Sreemala; Ma, Ning; Chin-Sinex, Helen J; Bellido, Teresita M; Bateman, Ted A; Mendonca, Marc S; Mohammad, Khalid S; Guise, Theresa A

    2015-07-01

    Increased fracture risk is commonly reported in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy, particularly at sites within the field of treatment. The direct and systemic effects of ionizing radiation on bone at a therapeutic dose are not well-characterized in clinically relevant animal models. Using 20-week-old male C57Bl/6 mice, effects of irradiation (right hindlimb; 2 Gy) on bone volume and microarchitecture were evaluated prospectively by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry and compared to contralateral-shielded bone (left hindlimb) and non-irradiated control bone. One week postirradiation, trabecular bone volume declined in irradiated tibias (-22%; p < 0.0001) and femurs (-14%; p = 0.0586) and microarchitectural parameters were compromised. Trabecular bone volume declined in contralateral tibias (-17%; p = 0.003), and no loss was detected at the femur. Osteoclast number, apoptotic osteocyte number, and marrow adiposity were increased in irradiated bone relative to contralateral and non-irradiated bone, whereas osteoblast number was unchanged. Despite no change in osteoblast number 1 week postirradiation, dynamic bone formation indices revealed a reduction in mineralized bone surface and a concomitant increase in unmineralized osteoid surface area in irradiated bone relative to contralateral and non-irradiated control bone. Further, dose-dependent and time-dependent calvarial culture and in vitro assays confirmed that calvarial osteoblasts and osteoblast-like MC3T3 cells were relatively radioresistant, whereas calvarial osteocyte and osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cell apoptosis was induced as early as 48 hours postirradiation (4 Gy). In osteoclastogenesis assays, radiation exposure (8 Gy) stimulated murine macrophage RAW264.7 cell differentiation, and coculture of irradiated RAW264.7 cells with MLO-Y4 or murine bone marrow cells enhanced this effect. These studies highlight the multifaceted nature of radiation-induced bone loss by demonstrating direct

  19. A plasmin-activatable thrombin inhibitor reduces experimental thrombosis and assists experimental thrombolysis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, W P; Eltringham-Smith, L J; Gataiance, S; Bhakta, V

    2015-05-01

    The leech protein hirudin is a potent natural thrombin inhibitor. Its potential as an antithrombotic agent is limited by its promotion of bleeding. We attempted to modify this profile by positioning albumin and a plasmin cleavage site on its N-terminus, in recombinant protein HSACHV3 [comprising hirudin variant 3 (HV3) fused to the C-terminus of human serum albumin (HSA) via a plasmin cleavage site (C)], Previously we showed that HSACHV3 inhibited thrombin in a plasmin-dependent manner, and that, unlike HV3, it did not increase bleeding in vivo when administered to mice. Here we tested HSACHV3 for the ability to reduce thrombosis and assist enzymatic thrombolysis in animal models. Intravenous administration of HSACHV3, but not a control protein lacking the plasmin cleavage site (HSAHV3), reduced thrombus weight by 2.1-fold in the ferric chloride-injured mouse vena cava. Similarly, thrombi formed in a rabbit jugular vein stasis model were 1.7-fold lighter in animals treated with HSACHV3 compared to those receiving HSAHV3. Administration of 60 mg/kg body weight HSACHV3 prolonged the time to occlusion in the ferric chloride-injured mouse carotid artery by threefold compared to vehicle controls, while equimolar HSAHV3 had no effect. HSACHV3 had no ability to restore flow to the murine carotid arteries occluded by ferric chloride treatment, but combining HSACHV3 (60 mg/kg) with recombinant mutant tissue plasminogen activator (TNKase) significantly reduced the time to restore patency to the artery compared to TNKase alone. Unlike unfused HV3, HSACHV3 did not increase bleeding in a mouse liver laceration model. Our results show that HSACHV3 acts as an antithrombotic agent that does not promote bleeding and which speeds the time to flow restoration when used as an adjunct to pharmacological thrombolysis in animal models. PMID:25481811

  20. Productively Infected Murine Kaposi's Sarcoma-Like Tumors Define New Animal Models for Studying and Targeting KSHV Oncogenesis and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Ashlock, Brittany M.; Ma, Qi; Issac, Biju; Mesri, Enrique A.

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an AIDS-defining cancer caused by the KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). KS tumors are composed of KSHV-infected spindle cells of vascular origin with aberrant neovascularization and erythrocyte extravasation. KSHV genes expressed during both latent and lytic replicative cycles play important roles in viral oncogenesis. Animal models able to recapitulate both viral and host biological characteristics of KS are needed to elucidate oncogenic mechanisms, for developing targeted therapies, and to trace cellular components of KS ontogeny. Herein, we describe two new murine models of Kaposi's sarcoma. We found that murine bone marrow-derived cells, whether established in culture or isolated from fresh murine bone marrow, were infectable with rKSHV.219, formed KS-like tumors in immunocompromised mice and produced mature herpesvirus-like virions in vivo. Further, we show in vivo that the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA/Vorinostat) enhanced viral lytic reactivation. We propose that these novel models are ideal for studying both viral and host contributions to KSHV-induced oncogenesis as well as for testing virally-targeted antitumor strategies for the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma. Furthermore, our isolation of bone marrow-derived cell populations containing a cell type that, when infected with KSHV, renders a tumorigenic KS-like spindle cell, should facilitate systematic identification of KS progenitor cells. PMID:24489895

  1. Metallothionein-1 and nitric oxide expression are inversely correlated in a murine model of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Mejia, Martha Elba; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Porchia, Leonardo M; Salgado, Hilda Rosas; Totolhua, José-Luis; Ortega, Arturo; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa Clara Regina; Ruiz-Vivanco, Guadalupe; Báez-Duarte, Blanca G; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, represents an endemic among Latin America countries. The participation of free radicals, especially nitric oxide (NO), has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of seropositive individuals with T. cruzi. In Chagas disease, increased NO contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and megacolon. Metallothioneins (MTs) are efficient free radicals scavengers of NO in vitro and in vivo. Here, we developed a murine model of the chronic phase of Chagas disease using endemic T. cruzi RyCH1 in BALB/c mice, which were divided into four groups: infected non-treated (Inf), infected N-monomethyl-L-arginine treated (Inf L-NAME), non-infected L-NAME treated and non-infected vehicle-treated. We determined blood parasitaemia and NO levels, the extent of parasite nests in tissues and liver MT-I expression levels. It was observed that NO levels were increasing in Inf mice in a time-dependent manner. Inf L-NAME mice had fewer T. cruzi nests in cardiac and skeletal muscle with decreased blood NO levels at day 135 post infection. This affect was negatively correlated with an increase of MT-I expression (r = -0.8462, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, we determined that in Chagas disease, an unknown inhibitory mechanism reduces MT-I expression, allowing augmented NO levels. PMID:24676665

  2. High-Dose Menaquinone-7 Supplementation Reduces Cardiovascular Calcification in a Murine Model of Extraosseous Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Scheiber, Daniel; Veulemans, Verena; Horn, Patrick; Chatrou, Martijn L.; Potthoff, Sebastian A.; Kelm, Malte; Schurgers, Leon J.; Westenfeld, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular calcification is prevalent in the aging population and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus, giving rise to substantial morbidity and mortality. Vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla-protein (MGP) is an important inhibitor of calcification. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of high-dose menaquinone-7 (MK-7) supplementation (100 µg/g diet) on the development of extraosseous calcification in a murine model. Calcification was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy combined with high phosphate diet in rats. Sham operated animals served as controls. Animals received high or low MK-7 diets for 12 weeks. We assessed vital parameters, serum chemistry, creatinine clearance, and cardiac function. CKD provoked increased aortic (1.3 fold; p < 0.05) and myocardial (2.4 fold; p < 0.05) calcification in line with increased alkaline phosphatase levels (2.2 fold; p < 0.01). MK-7 supplementation inhibited cardiovascular calcification and decreased aortic alkaline phosphatase tissue concentrations. Furthermore, MK-7 supplementation increased aortic MGP messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression (10-fold; p < 0.05). CKD-induced arterial hypertension with secondary myocardial hypertrophy and increased elastic fiber breaking points in the arterial tunica media did not change with MK-7 supplementation. Our results show that high-dose MK-7 supplementation inhibits the development of cardiovascular calcification. The protective effect of MK-7 may be related to the inhibition of secondary mineralization of damaged vascular structures. PMID:26295257

  3. Biological reaction to polyethylene particles in a murine calvarial model is highly influenced by age.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Jean; Zaoui, Amine; Bichara, David A; Nich, Christophe; Bensidhoum, Morad; Petite, Hervé; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Hamadouche, Moussa

    2016-04-01

    Particle-induced osteolysis is driven by multiple factors including bone metabolism, inflammation, and age. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of age on polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis in a murine calvarial model comparing 2-month-old (young) versus 24-month-old (old) mice. After PE particle implantation, calvaria were assessed at days (D) 3, D7, D14, and D21 via chemoluminescent imaging for inflammation (L-012 probe). In addition micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histomorphometry end points addressed the bone reaction. Inflammation peaked at D7 in young mice and D14 in old mice. Using micro-CT, a nadir of mature bone was recorded at D7 for young mice, versus D21 for old mice. Besides, regenerating bone peaked at distinct timepoints: D7 for young mice versus D21 for old mice. In the young mice group, the histomorphometric findings correlated with micro-CT regenerating bone findings at D7, associated with ample osteoïd deposition. No osteoïd could be histologically quantified in the old mice group at D7. This study demonstrated that the biological reaction to polyethylene particles is highly influenced by age. PMID:26375608

  4. A pain-mediated neural signal induces relapse in murine autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a multiple sclerosis model

    PubMed Central

    Arima, Yasunobu; Kamimura, Daisuke; Atsumi, Toru; Harada, Masaya; Kawamoto, Tadafumi; Nishikawa, Naoki; Stofkova, Andrea; Ohki, Takuto; Higuchi, Kotaro; Morimoto, Yuji; Wieghofer, Peter; Okada, Yuka; Mori, Yuki; Sakoda, Saburo; Saika, Shizuya; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Komuro, Issei; Yamashita, Toshihide; Hirano, Toshio; Prinz, Marco; Murakami, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Although pain is a common symptom of various diseases and disorders, its contribution to disease pathogenesis is not well understood. Here we show using murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for multiple sclerosis (MS), that pain induces EAE relapse. Mechanistic analysis showed that pain induction activates a sensory-sympathetic signal followed by a chemokine-mediated accumulation of MHC class II+CD11b+ cells that showed antigen-presentation activity at specific ventral vessels in the fifth lumbar cord of EAE-recovered mice. Following this accumulation, various immune cells including pathogenic CD4+ T cells recruited in the spinal cord in a manner dependent on a local chemokine inducer in endothelial cells, resulting in EAE relapse. Our results demonstrate that a pain-mediated neural signal can be transformed into an inflammation reaction at specific vessels to induce disease relapse, thus making this signal a potential therapeutic target. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08733.001 PMID:26193120

  5. Pathobiology of human RH strain induced experimental toxoplasmosis in murine model.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Vikrant; Tewari, A K; Singh, Harkirat; Singh, R

    2016-09-01

    Of late, toxoplasmosis has gained immense importance as an opportunist parasite in immunocompromised patients. In immunocompromised subjects, the disease is supposed to occur in acute form and causes acute toxoplasmic encephalitis. However, the exact pathogenesis of other vital organs, particularly in acute form of infection, is still a matter of debate. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the pathogenesis of acute form of toxoplasmosis using cryopreserved human RH strain of the parasite in murine models. For this, 100 tachyzoites were given to individual mice and upon the setup of acute form of infection, the mice were euthanized and the organs were processed for histopathology. Histopathology revealed tachyzoites in liver only while severe necrosis due to multiplication of tachyzoites were visible in liver, spleen, lungs and brain. Kidneys and heart appeared more or less normal. Finally, the pathology of disease in these organs is described in detail. The present research has generated some vital information regarding necrotic changes in tissues due to acute toxoplasmosis and will defiantly help the researchers in the better understanding of disease particularly in humans and putting up of suitable treatment regime for human subjects infected with acute toxoplasmosis. PMID:27605794

  6. High-Dose Menaquinone-7 Supplementation Reduces Cardiovascular Calcification in a Murine Model of Extraosseous Calcification.

    PubMed

    Scheiber, Daniel; Veulemans, Verena; Horn, Patrick; Chatrou, Martijn L; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Kelm, Malte; Schurgers, Leon J; Westenfeld, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular calcification is prevalent in the aging population and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus, giving rise to substantial morbidity and mortality. Vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla-protein (MGP) is an important inhibitor of calcification. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of high-dose menaquinone-7 (MK-7) supplementation (100 µg/g diet) on the development of extraosseous calcification in a murine model. Calcification was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy combined with high phosphate diet in rats. Sham operated animals served as controls. Animals received high or low MK-7 diets for 12 weeks. We assessed vital parameters, serum chemistry, creatinine clearance, and cardiac function. CKD provoked increased aortic (1.3 fold; p < 0.05) and myocardial (2.4 fold; p < 0.05) calcification in line with increased alkaline phosphatase levels (2.2 fold; p < 0.01). MK-7 supplementation inhibited cardiovascular calcification and decreased aortic alkaline phosphatase tissue concentrations. Furthermore, MK-7 supplementation increased aortic MGP messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression (10-fold; p < 0.05). CKD-induced arterial hypertension with secondary myocardial hypertrophy and increased elastic fiber breaking points in the arterial tunica media did not change with MK-7 supplementation. Our results show that high-dose MK-7 supplementation inhibits the development of cardiovascular calcification. The protective effect of MK-7 may be related to the inhibition of secondary mineralization of damaged vascular structures. PMID:26295257

  7. Experimental infection of Phlebotomus perniciosus by bioluminescent Leishmania infantum using murine model and artificial feeder

    PubMed Central

    Cannet, Arnaud; Akhoundi, Mohammad; Michel, Gregory; Marty, Pierre; Delaunay, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease that is transmitted by sandflies and caused by obligate intracellular protozoa of the genus Leishmania. In the present study, we carried out a screening on the experimental infection of Phlebotomus pernioucus by bioluminescent Leishmania infantum using murine model and artificial feeder. We developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based method to determine individually the number of Leishmania promastigotes fed by infected flies. Among 1840 new emerged female sand flies, 428 were fed on the infected mice. After their death, they were analysed individually by RT-PCR. Our results demonstrated just a single Leishmania positive female at sixth day post meal. A total of 1070 female sand flies were exposed in contact with artificial feeder containing the human blood with two different quantities of Leishmania parasites: 2.106/mL and 1.107/mL. A blood meal including 1.107/mL LUC-promastigotes was proposed to 270 females and 75 (28%) flies were engorged. Among them, 44 (59%) were positive by RT-PCR analysis, with a relative average of 50551 Leishmania parasites. In case of blood feeding of females with 2.106/mL promastigotes, 57 out of 800 (7%) females succeed to feed from artificial feeder which 22 (39%) were positive with a relative average of 6487 parasites. PMID:27439032

  8. Perforin gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells improves immune dysregulation in murine models of perforin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-04-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8(+) lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-γ secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL.

  9. In vivo characterization of neutrophil extracellular traps in various organs of a murine sepsis model.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Koike, Yuhki; Shimura, Tadanobu; Okigami, Masato; Ide, Shozo; Toiyama, Yuji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Araki, Toshimitsu; Uchida, Keiichi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Mizoguchi, Akira; Kusunoki, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent extracellular microbial trapping and killing. Recently, it has been implicated in thrombogenesis, autoimmune disease, and cancer progression. The aim of this study was to characterize NETs in various organs of a murine sepsis model in vivo and to investigate their associations with platelets, leukocytes, or vascular endothelium. NETs were classified as two distinct forms; cell-free NETs that were released away from neutrophils and anchored NETs that were anchored to neutrophils. Circulating cell-free NETs were characterized as fragmented or cotton-like structures, while anchored NETs were characterized as linear, reticular, membranous, or spot-like structures. In septic mice, both anchored and cell-free NETs were significantly increased in postcapillary venules of the cecum and hepatic sinusoids with increased leukocyte-endothelial interactions. NETs were also observed in both alveolar space and pulmonary capillaries of the lung. The interactions of NETs with platelet aggregates, leukocyte-platelet aggregates or vascular endothelium of arterioles and venules were observed in the microcirculation of septic mice. Microvessel occlusions which may be caused by platelet aggregates or leukocyte-platelet aggregates and heterogeneously decreased blood flow were also observed in septic mice. NETs appeared to be associated with the formation of platelet aggregates or leukocyte-platelet aggregates. These observational findings may suggest the adverse effect of intravascular NETs on the host during a sepsis.

  10. Imidazolium salts as small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Wagers, Patrick O; Tiemann, Kristin M; Shelton, Kerri L; Kofron, William G; Panzner, Matthew J; Wooley, Karen L; Youngs, Wiley J; Hunstad, David A

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel family of small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants that are expected to be of great value in preclinical studies of urologic conditions and have improved potential for translation compared with prior agents. There is broad urologic interest in the therapeutic potential of such exfoliating agents. The primary agent used in preclinical models, the cationic peptide protamine sulfate (PS), has limited translational potential due to concerns including systemic adverse reactions and bladder tissue injury. Intravesical application of a safe, systemically nontoxic exfoliant would have potential utility in the eradication of Escherichia coli and other uropathogens that reside in the bladder epithelium following cystitis, as well as in chronic bladder pain and bladder cancer. Here, we introduce a family of imidazolium salts with potent and focused exfoliating activity on the bladder epithelium. Synthesis and purification were straightforward and scalable, and the compounds exhibited prolonged stability in lyophilized form. Most members of the compound family were cytotoxic to cultured uroepithelial cells, with >10-fold differences in potency across the series. Upon topical (intravesical) administration of selected compounds to the murine bladder, complete epithelial exfoliation was achieved with physiologically relevant imidazolium concentrations and brief contact times. The exfoliative activity of these compounds was markedly improved in comparison to PS, as assessed by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting for uroplakins. Bladder uroepithelium regenerated within days to yield a histologically normal appearance, and no toxicity was observed. Finally, the chemical scaffold offers an opportunity for inclusion of antimicrobials or conjugation with chemotherapeutic or other moieties.

  11. Local Administration of Gold Nanoparticles Prevents Pivotal Pathological Changes in Murine Models of Atopic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Emiliano; Serra, Magda Fraguas; Dos Santos, Rafael Vital; Dos Santos, Cássio Eráclito Alves; Hickmann, Jandir; Cotias, Amanda Costa; Pão, Camila Ribeiro Rodrigues; Trindade, Suelen Gauna; Schimidt, Vanessa; Giacomelli, Cristian; Carvalho, Vinicius Frias; Rodrigues E Silva, Patricia Machado; Cordeiro, Renato Sérgio Balão; Martins, Marco Aurélio

    2015-06-01

    Although gold nanoparticles have been shown to exhibit a range of beneficial biological properties, including antiinflammatory and anti-oxidant effects, their putative impact on allergic asthma has not been addressed. In this study, we evaluated the potential of nasal-instilled gold nanoparticles to prevent allergen-induced asthma in distinct murine models of this disease. Swiss-Webster (outbred) and A/J (inbred) mice were sensitized with ovalbumin and then treated with intranasal injections of gold nanoparticles (6 and 60 μg/kg), 1 h before ovalbumin challenges. Lung function, leukocyte infiltration, mucus exacerbation, extracellular matrix deposition, cytokine generation and oxidative stress were evaluated 24 h after the last challenge. In both mice strains, gold nanoparticles clearly inhibited (70-100%) allergen-induced accumulation of inflammatory cells as well as the production of both pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species. In A/J mice, recognized as genetic asthma prone animals, instilled gold nanoparticles clearly prevented mucus production, peribronchiolar fibrosis and airway hyper-reactivity triggered by allergen provocation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that gold nanoparticles prevented pivotal features of asthma, including airway hyper-reactivity, inflammation and lung remodelling. Such protective effects are accounted for by reduction in lung tissue generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, in a mechanism probably related to down-regulation in the levels of oxidative stress.

  12. Pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamic correlations of fluconazole in murine model of cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Julliana Ribeiro Alves; César, Isabela Costa; Costa, Marliete Carvalho; Ribeiro, Noelly Queiroz; Holanda, Rodrigo Assunção; Ramos, Lais Hott; Freitas, Gustavo José Cota; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Pianetti, Gerson Antônio; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2016-09-20

    The emergence of fluconazole-resistant Cryptococcus gattii is a global concern, since this azole is the main antifungal used worldwide to treat patients with cryptococcosis. Although pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) indices are useful predictive factors for therapeutic outcomes, there is a scarcity of data regarding PK/PD analysis of antifungals in cryptococcosis caused by resistant strains. In this study, PK/PD parameters were determined in a murine model of cryptococcosis caused by resistant C. gattii. We developed and validated a suitable liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for PK studies of fluconazole in the serum, lungs, and brain of uninfected mice. Mice were infected with susceptible or resistant C. gattii, and the effects of different doses of fluconazole on the pulmonary and central nervous system fungal burden were determined. The peak levels in the serum, lungs, and brain were achieved within 0.5h. The AUC/MIC index (area under the curve/minimum inhibitory concentration) was associated with the outcome of anti-cryptococcal therapy. Interestingly, the maximum concentration of fluconazole in the brain was lower than the MIC for both strains. In addition, the treatment of mice infected with the resistant strain was ineffective even when high doses of fluconazole were used or when amphotericin B was tested, confirming the cross-resistance between these drugs. Altogether, our novel data provide the correlation of PK/PD parameters with antifungal therapy during cryptococcosis caused by resistant C. gattii.

  13. Treatment with tetrahydrobiopterin overcomes brain death-associated injury in a murine model of pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oberhuber, R; Ritschl, P; Fabritius, C; Nguyen, A-V; Hermann, M; Obrist, P; Werner, E R; Maglione, M; Flörchinger, B; Ebner, S; Resch, T; Pratschke, J; Kotsch, K

    2015-11-01

    Brain death (BD) has been associated with an immunological priming of donor organs and is thought to exacerbate ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Recently, we showed that the essential nitric oxide synthase co-factor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) abrogates IRI following experimental pancreas transplantation. We therefore studied the effects of BD in a murine model of syngeneic pancreas transplantation and tested the therapeutic potential of BH4 treatment. Compared with sham-operated controls, donor BD resulted in intragraft inflammation reflected by induced IL-1ß, IL-6, VCAM-1, and P-selectin mRNA expression levels and impaired microcirculation after reperfusion (p < 0.05), whereas pretreatment of the BD donor with BH4 significantly improved microcirculation after reperfusion (p < 0.05). Moreover, BD had a devastating impact on cell viability, whereas BH4-treated grafts showed a significantly higher percentage of viable cells (p < 0.001). Early parenchymal damage in pancreatic grafts was significantly more pronounced in organs from BD donors than from sham or non-BD donors (p < 0.05), but BH4 pretreatment significantly ameliorated necrotic lesions in BD organs (p < 0.05). Pretreatment of the BD donor with BH4 resulted in significant recipient survival (p < 0.05). Our data provide novel insights into the impact of BD on pancreatic isografts, further demonstrating the potential of donor pretreatment strategies including BH4 for preventing BD-associated injury after transplantation.

  14. Peptidorhamnomannan negatively modulates the immune response in a scedosporiosis murine model.

    PubMed

    Xisto, Mariana I D S; Liporagi-Lopes, Livia Cristina; Muñoz, Julián Esteban; Bittencourt, Vera C B; Santos, Giulia M P; Dias, Lucas S; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T; Pinto, Márcia R; Taborda, Carlos P; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed the impact of immunization with the peptidorhamnomannan (PRM) from the cell wall of the fungus Scedosporium (Lomentospora) prolificans in a murine model of invasive scedosporiosis. Immunization with PRM decreased the survival of mice infected with S. prolificans. Immunization of mice with PRM led to decreased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines but did not affect the secretion of IL-10. Mice immunized with PRM showed an increase in IgG1 secretion, which is an immunoglobulin linked to a nonprotective response. Splenocytes isolated from mice infected with S. prolificans and immunized with PRM showed no differences in the percentages of Th17 cells and no increase in the frequency of the CD4(+)CD62L(Low) T cell population. PRM-immunized mice showed a significant increase in the percentage of Treg cells. In summary, our results indicated that immunization with PRM did not assist or improve the immunological response against S. prolificans infection. PRM exacerbated the infection process by reducing the inflammatory response, thereby facilitating colonization, virulence and dissemination by the fungus.

  15. Stimulation of Mesothelial Cell Proliferation by Exudate Macrophages Enhances Serosal Wound Healing in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Mutsaers, Steven E.; Whitaker, Darrel; Papadimitriou, John M.

    2002-01-01

    Examination of thermally induced serosal lesions in mice displayed collections of inflammatory cells, predominantly macrophages, on and surrounding the wound within 48 hours of injury. Furthermore, by 2 days a large number of uninjured mesothelial cells adjacent to the wound were synthesizing DNA. From these findings, it was hypothesized that macrophages play a major role in serosal repair by stimulating mesothelial cell proliferation. Again, using a murine model of mesothelial regeneration, depletion of circulating monocytes significantly delayed serosal healing whereas addition of peritoneal exudate cells to the wound site 36 hours before injury increased the healing rate. In vivo assessment of mesothelial cell proliferation using tritiated thymidine incorporation and autoradiography demonstrated that peritoneal exudate cells stimulated mesothelial cell proliferation (12.44 ± 1.63% labeling index, compared with controls in which medium only was used 4.48 ± 0.71%). The mesothelial proliferation was predominantly because of macrophage-secreted products with molecular weights of 36 to 53 kd or 67 to 100 kd. These data support the hypothesis that macrophages play an important role in serosal healing by stimulating mesothelial cell proliferation. PMID:11839589

  16. Cellular and molecular etiology of hepatocyte injury in a murine model of environmentally induced liver abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Al-Griw, M.A.; Alghazeer, R.O.; Al-Azreg, S.A.; Bennour, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Exposures to a wide variety of environmental substances are negatively associated with many biological cell systems both in humans and rodents. Trichloroethane (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, is used in large quantities as a dissolvent, metal degreaser, chemical intermediate, and component of consumer products. This increases the likelihood of human exposure to these compounds through dermal, inhalation and oral routes. The present in vivo study was aimed to investigate the possible cellular and molecular etiology of liver abnormality induced by early exposure to TCE using a murine model. The results showed a significant increase in liver weight. Histopathological examination revealed a TCE-induced hepatotoxicity which appeared as heavily congested central vein and blood sinusoids as well as leukocytic infiltration. Mitotic figures and apoptotic changes such as chromatin condensation and nuclear fragments were also identified. Cell death analysis demonstrates hepatocellular apoptosis was evident in the treated mice compared to control. TCE was also found to induce oxidative stress as indicated by an increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation, an oxidative stress marker. There was also a significant decrease in the DNA content of the hepatocytes of the treated groups compared to control. Agarose gel electrophoresis also provided further biochemical evidence of apoptosis by showing internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the liver cells, indicating oxidative stress as the cause of DNA damage. These results suggest the need for a complete risk assessment of any new chemical prior to its arrival into the consumer market. PMID:27800299

  17. Effects of Resveratrol in Pregnancy Using Murine Models with Reduced Blood Supply to the Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Rajan; Stanley, Joanna L.; Rueda-Clausen, Christian F.; Andersson, Irene J.; Sibley, Colin P.; Davidge, Sandra T.; Baker, Philip N.

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) and fetal growth restriction (FGR) contribute significantly to fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Although the causes of PE and FGR are not fully understood, both conditions are known to be associated with impaired uterine artery blood flow. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in a number of plants, has been shown to induce relaxation of uterine arteries in vitro as well as improve many pathological conditions associated with PE and FGR. We hypothesized that treatment of endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice (eNOS−/−) and catechol-O-methyltransferase knockout mice (COMT−/−) with resveratrol during pregnancy would improve uterine artery blood flow and therefore ameliorate the PE-like phenotype and FGR in these murine models. Pregnant C57BL/6J, eNOS−/− and COMT−/− mice received either resveratrol supplemented diet (4 g/kg diet) or control diet between gestational day (GD) 0.5 and GD 18.5. Resveratrol supplementation significantly increased uterine artery blood flow velocity and fetal weight in COMT−/− but not in eNOS−/− mice. There were no effects of resveratrol on litter size and placental weight among the groups. In conclusion, resveratrol increased uterine artery blood flow velocity and fetal weight in COMT−/− mice, suggesting potential as a therapeutic strategy for PE and FGR. PMID:23667712

  18. Aryl-alkyl-lysines: Membrane-Active Small Molecules Active against Murine Model of Burn Infection.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Chandradhish; Manjunath, Goutham B; Konai, Mohini M; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R; Ravikumar, Raju; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-02-12

    Infections caused by drug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens continue to be significant contributors to human morbidity. The recent advent of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (blaNDM-1) producing pathogens, against which few drugs remain active, has aggravated the problem even further. This paper shows that aryl-alkyl-lysines, membrane-active small molecules, are effective in treating infections caused by Gram-negative pathogens. One of the compounds of the study was effective in killing planktonic cells as well as dispersing biofilms of Gram-negative pathogens. The compound was extremely effective in disrupting preformed biofilms and did not select resistant bacteria in multiple passages. The compound retained activity in different physiological conditions and did not induce any toxic effect in female Balb/c mice until concentrations of 17.5 mg/kg. In a murine model of Acinetobacter baumannii burn infection, the compound was able to bring the bacterial burden down significantly upon topical application for 7 days. PMID:27624962

  19. Murine Norovirus: An Intercurrent Variable in a Mouse Model of Bacteria-Induced Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lencioni, Karen Chase; Seamons, Audrey; Treuting, Piper M; Maggio-Price, Lillian; Brabb, Thea

    2008-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) has recently been recognized as a widely prevalent viral pathogen in mouse colonies and causes disease and mortality in mice with impaired innate immunity. We tested the hypothesis that MNV infection would alter disease course and immune responses in mice with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). FVB.129P2-Abcb1atm1Bor N7 (Mdr1a−/−) mice develop spontaneous IBD that is accelerated by infection with Helicobacter bilis. As compared with controls, Mdr1a−/− mice coinfected with MNV4 and H. bilis showed greater weight loss and IBD scores indicative of severe colitis, demonstrating that MNV4 can modulate the progression of IBD. Compared with controls, mice inoculated with MNV4 alone had altered levels of serum biomarkers, and flow cytometric analysis of immune cells from MNV4-infected mice showed changes in both dendritic cell (CD11c+) and other nonT cell (CD4− CD8−) populations. Dendritic cells isolated from MNV4-infected mice induced higher IFNγ production by polyclonal T cells in vitro at 2 d after infection but not at later time points, indicating that MNV4 infection enhances antigen presentation by dendritic cells early after acute infection. These findings indicate that acute infection with MNV4 is immunomodulatory and alters disease progression in a mouse model of IBD. PMID:19149409

  20. Optoacoustic characterization of prostate cancer in an in vivo transgenic murine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Michelle P.; Riley, Christopher B.; Kolios, Michael C.; Whelan, William M.

    2014-05-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) imaging was employed to distinguish normal from neoplastic tissues in a transgenic murine model of prostate cancer. OA images of five tumor-bearing mice and five age-matched controls across a 14 mm×14 mm region of interest (ROI) on the lower abdomen were acquired using a reverse-mode OA imaging system (Seno Medical Instruments Inc., San Antonio, Texas). Neoplastic prostate tissue was identified based on the OA signal amplitude in combination with spectral analysis of the OA radio frequency (RF) data. Integration of the signal amplitude images was performed to construct two-dimensional images of the ROI. The prostate tumors generated higher amplitude signals than those of the surrounding tissues, with contrast ratios ranging from 31 to 36 dB. The RF spectrum analysis showed significant differences between the tumor and the control mice. The midband fit was higher by 5 dB (62%), the intercept higher by 4 dB (57%) and the spectral slope higher by 0.4 dB/MHz (50%) for neoplastic prostate tissue compared to normal tissues in the control mice. The results demonstrate that OA offers high contrast imaging of prostate cancer in vivo.

  1. Generation and Characterization of a Murine Model of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Catherine M.; Nakano, Mariko; Rettie, Allan E.; Kelly, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is a rare, autosomal recessive, progressive, degenerative eye disease caused by mutations in the CYP4V2 gene, for which no treatments are currently available. Cyp4v3 is the murine ortholog to CYP4V2, and to better understand the molecular pathogenesis of this disease we have established a Cyp4v3-null mouse line. Methods. Cyp4v3−/− mice were generated by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Ocular morphologic characteristics were evaluated via fundus imaging, plasma lipid profiling, and histologic analysis via Oil Red O reactivity, hematoxylin and eosin staining, and transmission electron microscopy. Results. The Cyp4v3−/− mouse recapitulates the characteristic features of corneoretinal crystal accumulation and systemic dyslipidemia seen in BCD. The Cyp4v3−/− mice behave normally and are viable and fertile when maintained under specific pathogen-free (SPF) housing conditions. Conclusions. Cyp4v3−/− mice represent a promising preclinical model that may be used to better understand the disease etiology and to evaluate pharmacotherapies for this devastating condition. PMID:25118264

  2. Metallothionein-1 and nitric oxide expression are inversely correlated in a murine model of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Mejia, Martha Elba; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Porchia, Leonardo M; Salgado, Hilda Rosas; Totolhua, José-Luis; Ortega, Arturo; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa Clara Regina; Ruiz-Vivanco, Guadalupe; Báez-Duarte, Blanca G; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2014-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, represents an endemic among Latin America countries. The participation of free radicals, especially nitric oxide (NO), has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of seropositive individuals with T. cruzi. In Chagas disease, increased NO contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and megacolon. Metallothioneins (MTs) are efficient free radicals scavengers of NO in vitro and in vivo. Here, we developed a murine model of the chronic phase of Chagas disease using endemic T. cruzi RyCH1 in BALB/c mice, which were divided into four groups: infected non-treated (Inf), infected N-monomethyl-L-arginine treated (Inf L-NAME), non-infected L-NAME treated and non-infected vehicle-treated. We determined blood parasitaemia and NO levels, the extent of parasite nests in tissues and liver MT-I expression levels. It was observed that NO levels were increasing in Inf mice in a time-dependent manner. Inf L-NAME mice had fewer T. cruzi nests in cardiac and skeletal muscle with decreased blood NO levels at day 135 post infection. This affect was negatively correlated with an increase of MT-I expression (r = -0.8462, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, we determined that in Chagas disease, an unknown inhibitory mechanism reduces MT-I expression, allowing augmented NO levels.

  3. Imidazolium Salts as Small-Molecule Urinary Bladder Exfoliants in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wagers, Patrick O.; Tiemann, Kristin M.; Shelton, Kerri L.; Kofron, William G.; Panzner, Matthew J.; Wooley, Karen L.; Youngs, Wiley J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel family of small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants that are expected to be of great value in preclinical studies of urologic conditions and have improved potential for translation compared with prior agents. There is broad urologic interest in the therapeutic potential of such exfoliating agents. The primary agent used in preclinical models, the cationic peptide protamine sulfate (PS), has limited translational potential due to concerns including systemic adverse reactions and bladder tissue injury. Intravesical application of a safe, systemically nontoxic exfoliant would have potential utility in the eradication of Escherichia coli and other uropathogens that reside in the bladder epithelium following cystitis, as well as in chronic bladder pain and bladder cancer. Here, we introduce a family of imidazolium salts with potent and focused exfoliating activity on the bladder epithelium. Synthesis and purification were straightforward and scalable, and the compounds exhibited prolonged stability in lyophilized form. Most members of the compound family were cytotoxic to cultured uroepithelial cells, with >10-fold differences in potency across the series. Upon topical (intravesical) administration of selected compounds to the murine bladder, complete epithelial exfoliation was achieved with physiologically relevant imidazolium concentrations and brief contact times. The exfoliative activity of these compounds was markedly improved in comparison to PS, as assessed by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting for uroplakins. Bladder uroepithelium regenerated within days to yield a histologically normal appearance, and no toxicity was observed. Finally, the chemical scaffold offers an opportunity for inclusion of antimicrobials or conjugation with chemotherapeutic or other moieties. PMID:26124168

  4. Pharmacokinetics-Pharmacodynamics Analysis of Bicyclic 4-Nitroimidazole Analogs in a Murine Model of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Cherian, Joseph; Ravindran, Sindhu; Goh, Anne; Jiricek, Jan; Nanjundappa, Mahesh; Nayyar, Amit; Gurumurthy, Meera; Singh, Ramandeep; Dick, Thomas; Blasco, Francesca; Barry, Clifton E.; Ho, Paul C.; Manjunatha, Ujjini H.

    2014-01-01

    PA-824 is a bicyclic 4-nitroimidazole, currently in phase II clinical trials for the treatment of tuberculosis. Dose fractionation pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies in mice indicated that the driver of PA-824 in vivo efficacy is the time during which the free drug concentrations in plasma are above the MIC (fT>MIC). In this study, a panel of closely related potent bicyclic 4-nitroimidazoles was profiled in both in vivo PK and efficacy studies. In an established murine TB model, the efficacy of diverse nitroimidazole analogs ranged between 0.5 and 2.3 log CFU reduction compared to untreated controls. Further, a retrospective analysis was performed for a set of seven nitroimidazole analogs to identify the PK parameters that correlate with in vivo efficacy. Our findings show that the in vivo efficacy of bicyclic 4-nitroimidazoles correlated better with lung PK than with plasma PK. Further, nitroimidazole analogs with moderate-to-high volume of distribution and Lung to plasma ratios of >2 showed good efficacy. Among all the PK-PD indices, total lung T>MIC correlated the best with in vivo efficacy (rs = 0.88) followed by lung Cmax/MIC and AUC/MIC. Thus, lung drug distribution studies could potentially be exploited to guide the selection of compounds for efficacy studies, thereby accelerating the drug discovery efforts in finding new nitroimidazole analogs. PMID:25141257

  5. Stimulation of Respiratory Motor Output and Ventilation in a Murine Model of Pompe Disease by Ampakines

    PubMed Central

    ElMallah, Mai K.; Pagliardini, Silvia; Turner, Sara M.; Cerreta, Anthony J.; Falk, Darin J.; Byrne, Barry J.; Greer, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Pompe disease results from a mutation in the acid α-glucosidase gene leading to lysosomal glycogen accumulation. Respiratory insufficiency is common, and the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved treatment, enzyme replacement, has limited effectiveness. Ampakines are drugs that enhance α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor responses and can increase respiratory motor drive. Recent work indicates that respiratory motor drive can be blunted in Pompe disease, and thus pharmacologic stimulation of breathing may be beneficial. Using a murine Pompe model with the most severe clinical genotype (the Gaa−/− mouse), our primary objective was to test the hypothesis that ampakines can stimulate respiratory motor output and increase ventilation. Our second objective was to confirm that neuropathology was present in Pompe mouse medullary respiratory control neurons. The impact of ampakine CX717 on breathing was determined via phrenic and hypoglossal nerve recordings in anesthetized mice and whole-body plethysmography in unanesthetized mice. The medulla was examined using standard histological methods coupled with immunochemical markers of respiratory control neurons. Ampakine CX717 robustly increased phrenic and hypoglossal inspiratory bursting and reduced respiratory cycle variability in anesthetized Pompe mice, and it increased inspiratory tidal volume in unanesthetized Pompe mice. CX717 did not significantly alter these variables in wild-type mice. Medullary respiratory neurons showed extensive histopathology in Pompe mice. Ampakines stimulate respiratory neuromotor output and ventilation in Pompe mice, and therefore they have potential as an adjunctive therapy in Pompe disease. PMID:25569118

  6. Antitumor effect of pharmacologic ascorbate in the B16 murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Oscar K; Parrow, Nermi L; Violet, Pierre-Christian; Yang, Jacqueline; Zornjak, Jennifer; Basseville, Agnes; Levine, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Because 5-year survival rates for patients with metastatic melanoma remain below 25%, there is continued need for new therapeutic approaches. For some tumors, pharmacologic ascorbate treatment may have a beneficial antitumor effect and may work synergistically with standard chemotherapeutics. To investigate this possibility in melanoma, we examined the effect of pharmacologic ascorbate on B16-F10 cells. Murine models were employed to compare tumor size following treatment with ascorbate, and the chemotherapeutic agents dacarbazine or valproic acid, alone or in combination with ascorbate. Results indicated that nearly all melanoma cell lines were susceptible to ascorbate-mediated cytotoxicity. Compared to saline controls, pharmacologic ascorbate decreased tumor size in both C57BL/6 (P < 0.0001) and NOD-scid tumor bearing mice (P < 0.0001). Pharmacologic ascorbate was superior or equivalent to dacarbazine as an antitumor agent. Synergy was not apparent when ascorbate was combined with either dacarbazine or valproic acid; the latter combination may have additional toxicities. Pharmacologic ascorbate induced DNA damage in melanoma cells, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of the histone variant, H2A.X. Differences were not evident in tumor samples from C57BL/6 mice treated with pharmacologic ascorbate compared to tumors from saline-treated controls. Together, these results suggest that pharmacologic ascorbate has a cytotoxic effect against melanoma that is largely independent of lymphocytic immune functions and that continued investigation of pharmacologic ascorbate in cancer treatment is warranted. PMID:26119785

  7. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Eliminates Clostridium difficile in a Murine Model of Relapsing Disease.

    PubMed

    Seekatz, Anna M; Theriot, Casey M; Molloy, Caitlyn T; Wozniak, Katherine L; Bergin, Ingrid L; Young, Vincent B

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is of particular concern among health care-associated infections. The role of the microbiota in disease recovery is apparent given the success of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for recurrent CDI. Here, we present a murine model of CDI relapse to further define the microbiota recovery following FMT. Cefoperazone-treated mice were infected with C. difficile 630 spores and treated with vancomycin after development of clinical disease. Vancomycin treatment suppressed both C. difficile colonization and cytotoxin titers. However, C. difficile counts increased within 7 days of completing treatment, accompanied by relapse of clinical signs. The administration of FMT immediately after vancomycin cleared C. difficile and decreased cytotoxicity within 1 week. The effects of FMT on the gut microbiota community were detectable in recipients 1-day posttransplant. Conversely, mice not treated with FMT remained persistently colonized with high levels of C. difficile, and the gut microbiota in these mice persisted at low diversity. These results suggest that full recovery of colonization resistance against C. difficile requires the restoration of a specific community structure.

  8. Fecal Microbiota Transplant Restores Mucosal Integrity in a Murine Model of Burn Injury.

    PubMed

    Kuethe, Joshua W; Armocida, Stephanie M; Midura, Emily F; Rice, Teresa C; Hildeman, David A; Healy, Daniel P; Caldwell, Charles C

    2016-06-01

    The gut microbiome is a community of commensal organisms that are known to play a role in nutrient production as well as gut homeostasis. The composition of the gut flora can be affected by many factors; however, the impact of burn injury on the microbiome is not fully known. Here, we hypothesized that burn-induced changes to the microbiome would impact overall colon health. After scald-burn injury, cecal samples were analyzed for aerobic and anaerobic colony forming units, bacterial community, and butyrate levels. In addition, colon and total intestinal permeabilities were determined. These parameters were further determined in a germ-reduced murine model. Following both burn injury and germ reduction, we observed decreases in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, increased colon permeability and no change to small intestinal permeability. After burn injury, we further observed a significant decrease in the butyrate producing bacteria R. Gnavus, C. Eutactus, and Roseburia species as well as decreases in colonic butyrate. Finally, in mice that underwent burn followed by fecal microbiota transplant, bacteria levels and mucosal integrity were restored. Altogether our data demonstrate that burn injury can alter the microbiome leading to decreased butyrate levels and increased colon permeability. Of interest, fecal microbiota transplant treatment was able to ameliorate the burn-induced changes in colon permeability. Thus, fecal transplantation may represent a novel therapy in restoring colon health after burn injury.

  9. Heat shock response associated with hepatocarcinogenesis in a murine model of hereditary tyrosinemia type I.

    PubMed

    Angileri, Francesca; Morrow, Geneviève; Roy, Vincent; Orejuela, Diana; Tanguay, Robert M

    2014-04-23

    Hereditary Tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a metabolic liver disease caused by genetic defects of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), an enzyme necessary to complete the breakdown of tyrosine. The severe hepatic dysfunction caused by the lack of this enzyme is prevented by the therapeutic use of NTBC (2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl] cyclohexane-1,3-dione). However despite the treatment, chronic hepatopathy and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still observed in some HT1 patients. Growing evidence show the important role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in many cellular processes and their involvement in pathological diseases including cancer. Their survival-promoting effect by modulation of the apoptotic machinery is often correlated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy in a number of cancers. Here, we sought to gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with liver dysfunction and tumor development in a murine model of HT1. Differential gene expression patterns in livers of mice under HT1 stress, induced by drug retrieval, have shown deregulation of stress and cell death resistance genes. Among them, genes coding for HSPB and HSPA members, and for anti-apoptotic BCL-2 related mitochondrial proteins were associated with the hepatocarcinogenetic process. Our data highlight the variation of stress pathways related to HT1 hepatocarcinogenesis suggesting the role of HSPs in rendering tyrosinemia-affected liver susceptible to the development of HCC.

  10. N-acetylglucosamine increases symptoms and fungal burden in a murine model of oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Sanae A; Hayama, Kazumi; Takahashi, Miki; Holmes, Ann R; Cannon, Richard D; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    The amino sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) is an in vitro inducer of the hyphal mode of growth of the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans. The development of hyphae by C. albicans is considered to contribute to the pathogenesis of mucosal oral candidiasis. GlcNAc is also a commonly used nutritional supplement for the self-treatment of conditions such as arthritis. To date, no study has investigated whether ingestion of GlcNAc has an effect on the in vivo growth of C. albicans or the pathogenesis of a C. albicans infection. Using a murine model of oral candidiasis, we have found that administration of GlcNAc, but not glucose, increased oral symptoms of candidiasis and fungal burden. Groups of mice were given GlcNAc in either water or in a viscous carrier, i.e., 1% methylcellulose. There was a dose-dependent relationship between GlcNAc concentration and the severity of oral symptoms. Mice given the highest dose of GlcNAc, 45.2 mM, also showed a significant increase in fungal burden, and increased histological evidence of infection compared to controls given water alone. We propose that ingestion of GlcNAc, as a nutritional supplement, may have an impact on oral health in people susceptible to oral candidiasis.

  11. VP4-specific intestinal antibody response to rotavirus in a murine model of heterotypic infection.

    PubMed

    Shaw, R D; Groene, W S; Mackow, E R; Merchant, A A; Cheng, E H

    1991-06-01

    We have adapted a murine model of heterotypic rotavirus infection for the purpose of evaluating the intestinal antibody response to an infection that mimics human vaccination. Neonatal mice were infected with the rhesus rotavirus (RRV). The enzyme-linked immunospot assay was used in order to avoid common artifacts in the quantitation of intestinal immune responses inherent in measurements of luminal or serum immunoglobulins and to obtain easily quantifiable data in a flexible and convenient format. Functionally active lymphocytes were harvested from the spleen, small intestinal lamina propria, Peyer's patches, and mesenteric lymph nodes and processed into single-cell suspensions. Antibody-secreting cells (ASC) were quantitated from 5 to 50 days after infection for total, RRV-specific, baculovirus-expressed VP4-specific, and single-shell RRV-specific ASC secreting either immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, or IgA. The response to VP4 constituted less than 1.5% of the total virus-specific response, which was located almost exclusively in the gut and was 90% IgA. Intestinal ASC were directed overwhelmingly toward proteins incorporated in the single-shell particle, predominantly VP2 and VP6. We conclude that the antibody response to VP4, thought to be the site of the important neutralization sites conserved among several rotavirus serotypes, is an extremely small portion of the overall antibody response in the intestinal tract.

  12. Therapeutic effect of Broussonetia papyrifera and Lonicera japonica in ovalbumin-induced murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Kwon, Jung-Taek; Shin, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji-Eun; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Lee, Somin; Park, Sung-Jin; Chang, Seung-Hee; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Vibin, M; Han, Kiwon; Son, Kun-Ho; Kwak, Wie-Jong; Chae, Chanhee; Bang, Sung-Hye; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2013-11-01

    Broussonetia papyrifera (L.) Vent. and Lonicera japonica Thunb. have been used in recent medicinal research for their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigated the therapeutic efficacy of B. papyrifera and L. japonica ethanolic extracts in a murine model of ovalbumin-induced asthma, in which intra-peritoneal (IP) injections and aerosol ovalbumin delivery were used to induce allergic asthma. Bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), serum samples, lungs and livers were collected from the experimental groups. In the groups treated with B. papyrifera and L. japonica extracts, CD3, CD4, serum IgE and IL-4 levels; activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9; and eotaxin levels in the BALF significantly decreased to near normal levels. Results of a histopathological analysis showed that the level of inflammation and mucous secretions reduced in the treated groups compared to the corresponding levels in the other groups. Moreover, results of a serum enzymatic analysis showed the non-toxic nature of the extracts in the B. papyrifera and L. japonica treated groups. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that the B. papyrifera and L. japonica extracts may be very effective against asthma and inflammation related diseases. PMID:24427953

  13. Neutropenia exacerbates infection by Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates in a murine wound model

    PubMed Central

    Grguric-Smith, Laryssa M.; Lee, Hiu H.; Gandhi, Jay A.; Brennan, Melissa B.; DeLeon-Rodriguez, Carlos M.; Coelho, Carolina; Han, George; Martinez, Luis R.

    2015-01-01

    The Gram negative coccobacillus Acinetobacter baumannii has become an increasingly prevalent cause of hospital-acquired infections in recent years. The majority of clinical A. baumannii isolates display high-level resistance to antimicrobials, which severely compromises our capacity to care for patients with A. baumannii disease. Neutrophils are of major importance in the host defense against microbial infections. However, the contribution of these cells of innate immunity in host resistance to cutaneous A. baumannii infection has not been directly investigated. Hence, we hypothesized that depletion of neutrophils increases severity of bacterial disease in an experimental A. baumannii murine wound model. In this study, the Ly-6G-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), 1A8, was used to generate neutropenic mice and the pathogenesis of several A. baumannii clinical isolates on wounded cutaneous tissue was investigated. We demonstrated that neutrophil depletion enhances bacterial burden using colony forming unit determinations. Also, mAb 1A8 reduces global measurements of wound healing in A. baumannii-infected animals. Interestingly, histological analysis of cutaneous tissue excised from A. baumannii-infected animals treated with mAb 1A8 displays enhanced collagen deposition. Furthermore, neutropenia and A. baumannii infection alter pro-inflammatory cytokine release leading to severe microbial disease. Our findings provide a better understanding of the impact of these innate immune cells in controlling A. baumannii skin infections. PMID:26528277

  14. Behavioral Phenotyping of Murine Disease Models with the Integrated Behavioral Station (INBEST)

    PubMed Central

    Sakic, Boris; Cooper, Marcella P. A.; Taylor, Sarah E.; Stojanovic, Milica; Zagorac, Bosa; Kapadia, Minesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to rapid advances in genetic engineering, small rodents have become the preferred subjects in many disciplines of biomedical research. In studies of chronic CNS disorders, there is an increasing demand for murine models with high validity at the behavioral level. However, multiple pathogenic mechanisms and complex functional deficits often impose challenges to reliably measure and interpret behavior of chronically sick mice. Therefore, the assessment of peripheral pathology and a behavioral profile at several time points using a battery of tests are required. Video-tracking, behavioral spectroscopy, and remote acquisition of physiological measures are emerging technologies that allow for comprehensive, accurate, and unbiased behavioral analysis in a home-base-like setting. This report describes a refined phenotyping protocol, which includes a custom-made monitoring apparatus (Integrated Behavioral Station, INBEST) that focuses on prolonged measurements of basic functional outputs, such as spontaneous activity, food/water intake and motivated behavior in a relatively stress-free environment. Technical and conceptual improvements in INBEST design may further promote reproducibility and standardization of behavioral studies. PMID:25938737

  15. Imatinib treatment reduces brain injury in a murine model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Enming J.; Fredriksson, Linda; Kanzawa, Mia; Moore, Shannon; Folestad, Erika; Stevenson, Tamara K.; Nilsson, Ingrid; Sashindranath, Maithili; Schielke, Gerald P.; Warnock, Mark; Ragsdale, Margaret; Mann, Kris; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa E.; Medcalf, Robert L.; Eriksson, Ulf; Murphy, Geoffrey G.; Lawrence, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for Traumatic brain injury (TBI) focus on stabilizing individuals and on preventing further damage from the secondary consequences of TBI. A major complication of TBI is cerebral edema, which can be caused by the loss of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity. Recent studies in several CNS pathologies have shown that activation of latent platelet derived growth factor-CC (PDGF-CC) within the brain can promote BBB permeability through PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα) signaling, and that blocking this pathway improves outcomes. In this study we examine the efficacy for the treatment of TBI of an FDA approved antagonist of the PDGFRα, Imatinib. Using a murine model we show that Imatinib treatment, begun 45 min after TBI and given twice daily for 5 days, significantly reduces BBB dysfunction. This is associated with significantly reduced lesion size 24 h, 7 days, and 21 days after TBI, reduced cerebral edema, determined from apparent diffusion co-efficient (ADC) measurements, and with the preservation of cognitive function. Finally, analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from human TBI patients suggests a possible correlation between high PDGF-CC levels and increased injury severity. Thus, our data suggests a novel strategy for the treatment of TBI with an existing FDA approved antagonist of the PDGFRα. PMID:26500491

  16. Antimicrobial and immunologic activities of clarithromycin in a murine model of Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Robert D; Rios, Ana Maria; Chavez-Bueno, Susana; Jafri, Hasan S; Hatfield, Jeanine; Rogers, Beverly B; McCracken, George H; Ramilo, Octavio

    2003-05-01

    Because macrolide antibiotics are hypothesized to possess immunomodulatory activity independent of their antimicrobial activity, we evaluated the immunomodulatory effect of clarithromycin in a murine model of lung inflammation induced by either live or UV-killed Mycoplasma pneumoniae. BALB/c mice were intranasally inoculated once with live or UV-killed M. pneumoniae. Clarithromycin (25 mg/kg of body weight) or placebo was subcutaneously administered once daily in both groups of mice. In mice infected with live M. pneumoniae, clarithromycin treatment significantly reduced quantitative M. pneumoniae bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) culture, pulmonary histopathologic scores (HPS), and airway resistance-obstruction (as measured by plethysmography) compared with placebo. Concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, gamma interferon, interleukin-6 (IL-6), mouse KC (functional IL-8), JE/MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha in BAL fluid were also significantly decreased in mice infected with live M. pneumoniae given clarithromycin. In contrast, mice inoculated with UV-killed M. pneumoniae had no significant reduction in HPS, airway resistance-obstruction, or BAL cytokine or chemokine concentrations in response to clarithromycin administration. Clarithromycin therapy demonstrated beneficial effects (microbiologic, histologic, respiratory, and immunologic) on pneumonia in the mice infected with live M. pneumoniae; this was not observed in the mice inoculated with UV-killed M. pneumoniae.

  17. Staphylococcal biofilms impair wound healing by delaying reepithelialization in a murine cutaneous wound model.

    PubMed

    Schierle, Clark F; De la Garza, Mauricio; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms have gained increasing visibility in recent years as a ubiquitous form of survival for microorganisms in myriad environments. A number of in vivo models exist for the study of biofilms in the setting of medically relevant implanted foreign bodies. Growing evidence has demonstrated the presence of bacterial biofilms in the setting of a number of chronic wound states including pressure sores, diabetic foot ulcers, and venous stasis ulcers. Here we present a novel murine cutaneous wound system that directly demonstrates delayed reepithelialization caused by the presence of a bacterial biofilm. We established biofilms using either Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis in splinted cutaneous punch wounds created on the backs of normal C57Bl6/J mice. Wound reepithelialization was significantly delayed by bacterial biofilms. This effect was specifically dependent on the ability of the bacteria to form biofilms as demonstrated by exogenous administration of biofilm inhibiting peptides and the use of mutant Staphylococcus spp. deficient in biofilm formation. This represents the first direct evidence for the effect of bacterial biofilms on cutaneous wound healing.

  18. Lithium treatment decreases activities of tau kinases in a murine model of senescence.

    PubMed

    Tajes, Marta; Gutierrez-Cuesta, Javier; Folch, Jaume; Ferrer, Isidre; Caballero, Beatriz; Smith, Mark A; Casadesus, Gemma; Camins, Antoni; Pallás, Mercé

    2008-06-01

    Lithium modulates glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta), a kinase involved in Alzheimer disease-related tau pathology. To investigate mechanisms of aging and the potential therapy of lithium in neurodegenerative disease, we treated senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM)P8 mice, a murine model of senescence, and mice of the control SAMR1 strain with lithium. The treatment reduced hippocampal caspase 3 and calpain activation, indicating that it provides neuroprotection. Lithium also reduced both the levels and activity of GSK-3beta and the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 and reduced hyperphosphorylation of 3 different phosphoepitopes of tau: Ser199, Ser212, and Ser396. In lithium-treated primary cultures of SAMP8 and SAMR1 cerebellar neurons, there was a marked reduction in protease activity mediated by calpain and caspase 3. Both lithium and SB415286, a specific inhibitor of GSK-3beta, reduced apoptosis in vitro. Taken together, these in vivo and in vitro findings of lithium-mediated reductions in GSK-3beta and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activities, tau phosphorylation, apoptotic activity, and cell death provide a strong rationale for the use of lithium as a potential treatment in neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Nonessential Role for the NLRP1 Inflammasome Complex in a Murine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brickler, Thomas; Gresham, Kisha; Meza, Armand; Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl; Williams, Tere M.; Rothschild, Daniel E.; Allen, Irving C.; Theus, Michelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits the immediate production of proinflammatory cytokines which participate in regulating the immune response. While the mechanisms of adaptive immunity in secondary injury are well characterized, the role of the innate response is unclear. Recently, the NLR inflammasome has been shown to become activated following TBI, causing processing and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex consisting of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing proteins (NLR), caspase-1, and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC). ASC is upregulated after TBI and is critical in coupling the proteins during complex formation resulting in IL-1β cleavage. To directly test whether inflammasome activation contributes to acute TBI-induced damage, we assessed IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 expression, contusion volume, hippocampal cell death, and motor behavior recovery in Nlrp1−/−, Asc−/−, and wild type mice after moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. Although IL-1β expression is significantly attenuated in the cortex of Nlrp1−/− and Asc−/− mice following CCI injury, no difference in motor recovery, cell death, or contusion volume is observed compared to wild type. These findings indicate that inflammasome activation does not significantly contribute to acute neural injury in the murine model of moderate CCI injury. PMID:27199506

  20. Ovarian Aging-Like Phenotype in the Hyperandrogenism-Induced Murine Model of Polycystic Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Shojaei Saadi, Habib A.; Gooshe, Maziar; Abdolghaffari, Amir Hosein; Baeeri, Maryam; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    There are prominently similar symptoms, effectors, and commonalities in the majority of characteristics between ovarian aging and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Despite the approved role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of PCOS and aging, to our knowledge, the link between the PCO(S) and aging has not been investigated yet. In this study we investigated the possible exhibition of ovarian aging phenotype in murine model of PCO induced by daily oral administration of letrozole (1 mg/kg body weight) for 21 consecutive days in the female Wistar rats. Hyperandrogenization showed irregular cycles and histopathological characteristics of PCO which was associated with a significant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in serum and ovary. Moreover, serum testosterone, insulin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, and ovarian matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) were increased in PCO rats compared with healthy controls, while estradiol and progesterone diminished. Almost all of these findings are interestingly found to be common with the characteristics identified with (ovarian) aging showing that hyperandrogenism-induced PCO in rat is associated with ovarian aging-like phenotypes. To our knowledge, this is the first report that provides evidence regarding the phenomenon of aging in PCO. PMID:24693338

  1. C-kit signaling promotes proliferation and invasion of colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jun; Yang, Shu; Shen, Ping; Sun, Haimei; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Yaxi; Wu, Bo; Ji, Fengqing; Yan, Jihong; Xue, Hong; Zhou, Deshan

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family often highly expressed in several mucinous carcinomas. In the present study, we established a murine model of colorectal mucinous adenocardinoma (CRMAC) by treating C57 mice [both wild type (WT) and loss-of-function c-kit mutant type (Wads−/−)] with AOM+DSS for 37 weeks and found that c-kit, a member of RTK family, clearly enhanced the tumor cell proliferation by decreasing p53 and increasing cyclin D1 through AKT pathway. Significantly, c-kit strongly promoted tumor cell invasiveness by increasing ETV4, which induced MMP7 expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via ERK pathway. In vitro up- or down-regulating c-kit activation in human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells further consolidated these results. In conclusion, our data suggested that the c-kit signaling obviously promoted proliferation and invasion of CRMAC. Therefore, targeting the c-kit signaling and its downstream molecules might provide the potential strategies for treatment of patients suffering from CRMAC in the future. PMID:26356816

  2. Intraventricular injections of mesenchymal stem cells activate endogenous functional remyelination in a chronic demyelinating murine model

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Martinez, P; González-Granero, S; Molina-Navarro, M M; Pacheco-Torres, J; García-Verdugo, J M; Geijo-Barrientos, E; Jones, J; Martinez, S

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for demyelinating diseases are generally only capable of ameliorating the symptoms, with little to no effect in decreasing myelin loss nor promoting functional recovery. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown by many researchers to be a potential therapeutic tool in treating various neurodegenerative diseases, including demyelinating disorders. However, in the majority of the cases, the effect was only observed locally, in the area surrounding the graft. Thus, in order to achieve general remyelination in various brain structures simultaneously, bone marrow-derived MSCs were transplanted into the lateral ventricles (LVs) of the cuprizone murine model. In this manner, the cells may secrete soluble factors into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and boost the endogenous oligodendrogenic potential of the subventricular zone (SVZ). As a result, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) were recruited within the corpus callosum (CC) over time, correlating with an increased myelin content. Electrophysiological studies, together with electron microscopy (EM) analysis, indicated that the newly formed myelin correctly enveloped the demyelinated axons and increased signal transduction through the CC. Moreover, increased neural stem progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation was observed in the SVZ, possibly due to the tropic factors released by the MSCs. In conclusion, the findings of this study revealed that intraventricular injections of MSCs is a feasible method to elicit a paracrine effect in the oligodendrogenic niche of the SVZ, which is prone to respond to the factors secreted into the CSF and therefore promoting oligodendrogenesis and functional remyelination. PMID:27171265

  3. Protection of vascular endothelium by aspirin in a murine model of chronic Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Molina-Berríos, Alfredo; Campos-Estrada, Carolina; Lapier, Michel; Duaso, Juan; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Jorge; Morello, Antonio; López-Muñoz, Rodrigo; Maya, Juan Diego

    2013-07-01

    Chronic Chagas' disease affects 10-30 % of patients infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, and it mainly manifests as cardiomyopathy. Important pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the cardiac lesions include activation of the endothelium and induced microvascular alterations. These processes involve the production of endothelial adhesion molecules and thromboxane A2, which are involved in inflammatory cell recruitment and platelet aggregation, respectively. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as aspirin decrease thromboxane production and alter the course of Chagas' disease, both in the acute and chronic phases. We studied the effects of the administration of low and high doses of aspirin during the early phase of T. cruzi infection, following microvascular damage in the context of a chronic murine model of Chagas' disease. The effects of both schedules were assessed at 24 and 90 days postinfection by evaluating parasitemia, mortality, and cardiac histopathological changes as well as the expression of ICAM, VCAM, and E-selectin in cardiac tissue. Thromboxane A2, soluble ICAM, and E-selectin blood levels were also measured. While aspirin did not affect parasitemia or mortality in the infected mice, it decreased both cardiac inflammatory infiltrates and thromboxane levels. Additionally, at 90 days postinfection, aspirin normalized sICAM and sE-selectin levels. Considering the improved endothelial function induced by aspirin, we propose the possibility of including this drug in clinical therapy to treat chronic Chagas' disease.

  4. Atovaquone Nanosuspensions Show Excellent Therapeutic Effect in a New Murine Model of Reactivated Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Schöler, Nadja; Krause, Karsten; Kayser, Oliver; Müller, Rainer H.; Borner, Klaus; Hahn, Helmut; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2001-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients are at risk of developing toxoplasma encephalitis (TE). Standard therapy regimens (including sulfadiazine plus pyrimethamine) are hampered by severe side effects. While atovaquone has potent in vitro activity against Toxoplasma gondii, it is poorly absorbed after oral administration and shows poor therapeutic efficacy against TE. To overcome the low absorption of atovaquone, we prepared atovaquone nanosuspensions (ANSs) for intravenous (i.v.) administration. At concentrations higher than 1.0 μg/ml, ANS did not exert cytotoxicity and was as effective as free atovaquone (i.e., atovaquone suspended in medium) against T. gondii in freshly isolated peritoneal macrophages. In a new murine model of TE that closely mimics reactivated toxoplasmosis in immunocompromised hosts, using mice with a targeted mutation in the gene encoding the interferon consensus sequence binding protein, i.v.-administered ANS doses of 10.0 mg/kg of body weight protected the animals against development of TE and death. Atovaquone was detectable in the sera, brains, livers, and lungs of mice by high-performance liquid chromatography. Development of TE and mortality in mice treated with 1.0- or 0.1-mg/kg i.v. doses of ANS did not differ from that in mice treated orally with 100 mg of atovaquone/kg. In conclusion, i.v. ANSs may prove to be an effective treatment alternative for patients with TE. PMID:11353624

  5. Cutaneous and systemic pathogenicity of a clinical isolate of Cladosporium sphaerospermum in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Huyan, X-H; Yang, Y-P; Fan, Y-M; Huang, W-M; Li, W; Zhou, Y

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenicity of a clinical isolate of Cladosporium sphaerospermum was determined in a murine model. BALB/c mice were given two intraperitoneal injections of 150 mg/kg cyclophosphamide or normal saline on days 4 and 1 preinoculation, and were then challenged with 0.2 ml of C. sphaerospermum inoculum (2 × 10(7) CFU/ml) by topical application on an abrasive wound or by subcutaneous or intravenous injection. Histopathology and inverse fungal culture were performed on the skin lesions and viscera, and pulmonary fungal burden was also determined. Inoculated skin developed localized infections after dermabrasive or subcutaneous challenge in all mice, but the maximum area and number of positive cultures from skin lesions were higher for immunocompromised mice. In the intravenously inoculated mice, all immunocompetent animals survived for the 4-week period of the experiment, while 60% of immunocompromised animals died by 5 days postinoculation. The incidence of disseminated infection and the pulmonary fungal burden of immunosuppressed mice were higher than those of immunocompetent animals. Cutaneous and systemic infections can be established by subcutaneous and intravenous challenge with C. sphaerospermum in BALB/c mice, with the lungs being the most susceptible tissue in systemic infection.

  6. Perforin gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells improves immune dysregulation in murine models of perforin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-04-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8(+) lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-γ secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL. PMID:25523759

  7. Preliminary study on the immunogenicity of a newly developed GCC Tdap vaccine and its protection efficacy against Bordetella pertussis in a murine intranasal challenge model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Active reduced dose tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccination for adolescents and adults is necessary because waning immunity after primary diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccination is related to the recent emergence of pertussis. This study was conducted to compare the immunogenicity and protection efficacy against Bordetella pertussis between a new GCC Tdap vaccine and a commercially available Tdap vaccine in a murine model. Materials and Methods BALB/c mice were immunized with two doses of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine for priming and a subsequent Tdap booster vaccination. According to the type of booster vaccine, mice were divided into four groups: commercially available Tdap vaccine in group 1 and GCC Tdap vaccines of different combinations of pertussis antigens in groups 2 to 4. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses and protection efficacy using a murine intranasal challenge model after booster vaccination were compared among the four groups. Results Every group showed significant increases in antibody titers against pertussis antigens such as pertussis toxin, filamentous hemagglutinin, and pertactin after booster vaccination. Spleen cells showed both Th1 and Th2 cell-mediated immune responses stimulated by pertussis antigens in all groups without any significant difference. In the intranasal B. pertussis infection model, bacteria were eradicated in all groups five days after challenge infection. Conclusion This preliminary study did not show significantly different immunogenicity or protection efficacy of the new GCC Tdap vaccines compared to the commercially available Tdap vaccine, although a more extensive study is necessary to assess the differing efficacies of the new GCC Tdap vaccines. PMID:25649262

  8. Janus kinase inhibition lessens inflammation and ameliorates disease in murine models of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Das, Rupali; Guan, Peng; Sprague, Leslee; Verbist, Katherine; Tedrick, Paige; An, Qi Angel; Cheng, Cheng; Kurachi, Makoto; Levine, Ross; Wherry, E John; Canna, Scott W; Behrens, Edward M; Nichols, Kim E

    2016-03-31

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) comprises an emerging spectrum of inherited and noninherited disorders of the immune system characterized by the excessive production of cytokines, including interferon-γ and interleukins 2, 6, and 10 (IL-2, IL-6, and IL-10). The Janus kinases (JAKs) transduce signals initiated following engagement of specific receptors that bind a broad array of cytokines, including those overproduced in HLH. Based on the central role for cytokines in the pathogenesis of HLH, we sought to examine whether the inhibition of JAK function might lessen inflammation in murine models of the disease. Toward this end, we examined the effects of JAK inhibition using a model of primary (inherited) HLH in which perforin-deficient (Prf1(-∕-)) mice are infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and secondary (noninherited) HLH in which C57BL/6 mice receive repeated injections of CpG DNA. In both models, treatment with the JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib significantly lessened the clinical and laboratory manifestations of HLH, including weight loss, organomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypercytokinemia, and tissue inflammation. Importantly, ruxolitinib treatment also significantly improved the survival of LCMV-infectedPrf1(-∕-)mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that in vivo exposure to ruxolitinib inhibited signal transducer and activation of transcription 1-dependent gene expression, limited CD8(+)T-cell expansion, and greatly reduced proinflammatory cytokine production, without effecting degranulation and cytotoxic function. Collectively, these findings highlight the JAKs as novel, druggable targets for mitigating the cytokine-driven hyperinflammation that occurs in HLH. These observations also support the incorporation of JAK inhibitors such as ruxolitinib into future clinical trials for patients with these life-threatening disorders. PMID:26825707

  9. Creation of a murine orthotopic hepatoma model with intra-abdominal metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jamie; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Chiu, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To create an orthotopic hepatoma model with local metastasis monitored with ultrasound could be created as a platform for testing new treatments. Background: Hepatoma accounts for 25% of liver tumors in children with poor overall survival. Intraabdominal metastasis are present in 35% of patients at time of diagnosis. We hypothesized that an orthotopic tumor model with local metastasis could be created as a platform for testing treatment modalities and could be monitored with ultrasound. Patients and methods: One million human hepatoma cells (Hep3B) were injected into the left lobe of the liver of immunocompromised mice. Tumor volume was monitored with high frequency-ultrasound until it reached 1,000mm3. At that time animals were sacrificed and examined for gross metastatic disease. Tumor sections were analyzed with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Results: Tumor formed in 8/15 mice. The tumor was detected as small as 19.59mm3 on ultrasound. Of the forming tumors, tumor size was 145±177.93mm3 at 60 days post-injection, 665±650.39mm3 at 67 days, and reached >1000mm3 by 76.6±9.9 days. At necropsy, four mice (50%) had tumor only within the liver, four (50%) had additional tumors in omentum, pelvis and peritoneum. H&E showed tumor within the normal liver parenchyma, with multiple mitotic figures, small areas of necrosis, and hemorrhage within the tumor. Conclusion: We have successfully established an orthotopic hepatoma murine model, with a local metastatic rate of 50%. Non-invasive tumor monitoring is feasible via ultrasound. PMID:27458509

  10. Development of a sarcoidosis murine lung granuloma model using Mycobacterium superoxide dismutase A peptide.

    PubMed

    Swaisgood, Carmen M; Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Moeller, Stephen D; Klemenc, Jennifer M; Ruple, Lisa M; Farver, Carol F; Drake, John M; Culver, Daniel A; Drake, Wonder P

    2011-02-01

    Sarcoidosis is characterized by noncaseating granulomas containing CD4(+) T cells with a Th1 immunophenotype. Although the causative antigens remain unknown, independent studies noted molecular and immunologic evidence of mycobacterial virulence factors in sarcoidosis specimens. A major limiting factor in discovering new insights into the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis is the lack of an animal model. Using a distinct superoxide dismutase A peptide (sodA) associated with sarcoidosis granulomas, we developed a pulmonary model of sarcoidosis granulomatous inflammation. Mice were sensitized by a subcutaneous injection of sodA, incorporated in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). Control subjects consisted of mice with no sensitization (ConNS), sensitized with IFA only (ConIFA), or with Schistosoma mansoni eggs. Fourteen days later, sensitized mice were challenged by tail-vein injection of naked beads, covalently coupled to sodA peptides or to schistosome egg antigens (SEA). Histologic analysis revealed hilar lymphadenopathy and noncaseating granulomas in the lungs of sodA-treated or SEA-treated mice. Flow cytometry of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) demonstrated CD4(+) T-cell responses against sodA peptide in the sodA-sensitized mice only. Cytometric bead analysis revealed significant differences in IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion in the BAL fluid of sodA-treated mice, compared with mice that received SEA or naked beads (P = 0.008, Wilcoxon rank sum test). ConNS and ConIFA mice demonstrated no significant formation of granuloma, and no Th1 immunophenotype. The use of microbial peptides distinct for sarcoidosis reveals a histologic and immunologic profile in the murine model that correlates well with those profiles noted in human sarcoidosis, providing the framework to investigate the molecular basis for the progression or resolution of sarcoidosis. PMID:20348207

  11. Clinical Features of Bacterial Vaginosis in a Murine Model of Vaginal Infection with Gardnerella vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Nicole M.; Lewis, Warren G.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a dysbiosis of the vaginal flora characterized by a shift from a Lactobacillus-dominant environment to a polymicrobial mixture including Actinobacteria and Gram-negative bacilli. BV is a common vaginal condition in women and is associated with increased risk of sexually transmitted infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm birth. Gardnerella vaginalis is one of the most frequently isolated bacterial species in BV. However, there has been much debate in the literature concerning the contribution of G. vaginalis to the etiology of BV, since it is also present in a significant proportion of healthy women. Here we present a new murine vaginal infection model with a clinical isolate of G. vaginalis. Our data demonstrate that this model displays key features used clinically to diagnose BV, including the presence of sialidase activity and exfoliated epithelial cells with adherent bacteria (reminiscent of clue cells). G. vaginalis was capable of ascending uterine infection, which correlated with the degree of vaginal infection and level of vaginal sialidase activity. The host response to G. vaginalis infection was characterized by robust vaginal epithelial cell exfoliation in the absence of histological inflammation. Our analyses of clinical specimens from women with BV revealed a measureable epithelial exfoliation response compared to women with normal flora, a phenotype that, to our knowledge, is measured here for the first time. The results of this study demonstrate that G. vaginalis is sufficient to cause BV phenotypes and suggest that this organism may contribute to BV etiology and associated complications. This is the first time vaginal infection by a BV associated bacterium in an animal has been shown to parallel the human disease with regard to clinical diagnostic features. Future studies with this model should facilitate investigation of important questions regarding BV etiology, pathogenesis and associated complications

  12. Oxidative brain damage in Mecp2-mutant murine models of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Claudio; Della Ragione, Floriana; Signorini, Cinzia; Leoncini, Silvia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Ciccoli, Lucia; Scalabrì, Francesco; Marracino, Federico; Madonna, Michele; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Ricceri, Laura; De Filippis, Bianca; Laviola, Giovanni; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Durand, Thierry; Galano, Jean-Marie; Oger, Camille; Guy, Alexandre; Bultel-Poncé, Valérie; Guy, Jacky; Filosa, Stefania; Hayek, Joussef; D'Esposito, Maurizio

    2014-08-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder affecting almost exclusively females, caused in the overwhelming majority of the cases by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2). High circulating levels of oxidative stress (OS) markers in patients suggest the involvement of OS in the RTT pathogenesis. To investigate the occurrence of oxidative brain damage in Mecp2 mutant mouse models, several OS markers were evaluated in whole brains of Mecp2-null (pre-symptomatic, symptomatic, and rescued) and Mecp2-308 mutated (pre-symptomatic and symptomatic) mice, and compared to those of wild type littermates. Selected OS markers included non-protein-bound iron, isoprostanes (F2-isoprostanes, F4-neuroprostanes, F2-dihomo-isoprostanes) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal protein adducts. Our findings indicate that oxidative brain damage 1) occurs in both Mecp2-null (both -/y and stop/y) and Mecp2-308 (both 308/y males and 308/+ females) mouse models of RTT; 2) precedes the onset of symptoms in both Mecp2-null and Mecp2-308 models; and 3) is rescued by Mecp2 brain specific gene reactivation. Our data provide direct evidence of the link between Mecp2 deficiency, oxidative stress and RTT pathology, as demonstrated by the rescue of the brain oxidative homeostasis following brain-specifically Mecp2-reactivated mice. The present study indicates that oxidative brain damage is a previously unrecognized hallmark feature of murine RTT, and suggests that Mecp2 is involved in the protection of the brain from oxidative stress.

  13. Targeting of the bone marrow microenvironment improves outcome in a murine model of myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Balderman, Sophia R.; Li, Allison J.; Hoffman, Corey M.; Frisch, Benjamin J.; Goodman, Alexandra N.; LaMere, Mark W.; Georger, Mary A.; Evans, Andrew G.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Becker, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro evidence suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment (BMME) is altered in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs). Here, we study the BMME in MDS in vivo using a transgenic murine model of MDS with hematopoietic expression of the translocation product NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13). This model exhibits a prolonged period of cytopenias prior to transformation to leukemia and is therefore ideal to interrogate the role of the BMME in MDS. In this model, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) were decreased in NHD13 mice by flow cytometric analysis. The reduction in the total phenotypic HSPC pool in NHD13 mice was confirmed functionally with transplantation assays. Marrow microenvironmental cellular components of the NHD13 BMME were found to be abnormal, including increases in endothelial cells and in dysfunctional mesenchymal and osteoblastic populations, whereas megakaryocytes were decreased. Both CC chemokine ligand 3 and vascular endothelial growth factor, previously shown to be increased in human MDS, were increased in NHD13 mice. To assess whether the BMME contributes to disease progression in NHD13 mice, we performed transplantation of NHD13 marrow into NHD13 mice or their wild-type (WT) littermates. WT recipients as compared with NHD13 recipients of NHD13 marrow had a lower rate of the combined outcome of progression to leukemia and death. Moreover, hematopoietic function was superior in a WT BMME as compared with an NHD13 BMME. Our data therefore demonstrate a contributory role of the BMME to disease progression in MDS and support a therapeutic strategy whereby manipulation of the MDS microenvironment may improve hematopoietic function and overall survival. PMID:26637787

  14. A murine model of coxsackievirus A16 infection for anti-viral evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingwei; Shi, Jinping; Huang, Xulin; Liu, Fei; Cai, Yicun; Lan, Ke; Huang, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) is one of the main causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), which is a common infectious disease in children. CA16 infection may lead to severe nervous system damage and even death in humans. However, study of the pathogenesis of CA16 infection and development of vaccines and anti-viral agents are hindered partly by the lack of an appropriate small animal model. In the present study, we developed and characterized a murine model of CA16 infection. We show that neonatal mice are susceptible to CA16 infection via intraperitoneal inoculation. One-day-old mice infected with 2×10(6)TCID50 of CA16/SZ05 strain consistently exhibited clinical signs, including reduced mobility, and limb weakness and paralysis. About 57% of the mice died within 14days after infection. Significant damage in the brainstem, limb muscles and intestines of the infected mice in the moribund state was observed by histological examination, and the presence of CA16 in neurons of the brainstem was demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining with a CA16-specific polyclonal antibody, strongly suggesting the involvement of the central nervous system in CA16 infection. Analysis of virus titers in various organs/tissues collected at 3, 6 and 9days post-infection, showed that skeletal muscle was the major site of virus replication at the early stage of infection, while the virus mainly accumulated in the brain at the late stage. In addition, susceptibility of mice to CA16 infection was found to be age dependent. Moreover, different CA16 strains could exhibit varied virulence in vivo. Importantly, we demonstrated that post-exposure treatment with an anti-CA16 monoclonal antibody fully protected mice against lethal CA16 infection. Collectively, these results indicate the successful development of a CA16 infection mouse model for anti-viral evaluation. PMID:24583030

  15. JZL184 is anti-hyperalgesic in a murine model of cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Khasabova Iryna, A; Yao, Xu; Paz, Justin; Lewandowski Cutler, T; Lindberg Amy, E; Coicou, Lia; Burlakova, Natasha; Simone Don, A; Seybold Virginia, S

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin has been used effectively to treat a variety of cancers but its use is limited by the development of painful peripheral neuropathy. Because the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG) is anti-hyperalgesic in several preclinical models of chronic pain, the anti-hyperalgesic effect of JZL184, an inhibitor of 2-AG hydrolysis, was tested in a murine model of cisplatin-induced hyperalgesia. Systemic injection of cisplatin (1 mg/kg) produced mechanical hyperalgesia when administered daily for 7 days. Daily peripheral administration of a low dose of JZL184 in conjunction with cisplatin blocked the expression of mechanical hyperalgesia. Acute injection of a cannabinoid (CB)-1 but not a CB2 receptor antagonist reversed the anti-hyperalgesic effect of JZL184 indicating that downstream activation of CB1 receptors suppressed the expression of mechanical hyperalgesia. Components of endocannabinoid signaling in plantar hind paw skin and lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) were altered by treatments with cisplatin and JZL184. Treatment with cisplatin alone reduced levels of 2-AG and AEA in skin and DRGs as well as CB2 receptor protein in skin. Combining treatment of JZL184 with cisplatin increased 2-AG in DRGs compared to cisplatin alone but had no effect on the amount of 2-AG in skin. Evidence that JZL184 decreased the uptake of [3H]AEA into primary cultures of DRGs at a concentration that also inhibited the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase, in conjunction with data that 2-AG mimicked the effect of JZL184 on [3H]AEA uptake support the conclusion that AEA most likely mediates the anti-hyperalgesic effect of JZL184 in this model. PMID:25304184

  16. Patient-derived xenograft models for pancreatic adenocarcinoma demonstrate retention of tumor morphology through incorporation of murine stromal elements.

    PubMed

    Delitto, Daniel; Pham, Kien; Vlada, Adrian C; Sarosi, George A; Thomas, Ryan M; Behrns, Kevin E; Liu, Chen; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M; Trevino, Jose G

    2015-05-01

    Direct implantation of viable surgical specimens provides a representative preclinical platform in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patient-derived xenografts consistently demonstrate retained tumor morphology and genetic stability. However, the evolution of the tumor microenvironment over time remains poorly characterized in these models. This work specifically addresses the recruitment and incorporation of murine stromal elements into expanding patient-derived pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografts, establishing the integration of murine cells into networks of invading cancer cells. In addition, we provide methods and observations in the establishment and maintenance of a patient-derived pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenograft model. A total of 25 histologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens were implanted subcutaneously into nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Patient demographics, staging, pathological analysis, and outcomes were analyzed. After successful engraftment of tumors, histological and immunofluorescence analyses were performed on explanted tumors. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens were successfully engrafted in 15 (60%) of 25 attempts. Successful engraftment does not appear to correlate with clinicopathologic factors or patient survival. Tumor morphology is conserved through multiple passages, and tumors retain metastatic potential. Interestingly, despite morphological similarity between passages, human stromal elements do not appear to expand with invading cancer cells. Rather, desmoplastic murine stroma dominates the xenograft microenvironment after the initial implantation. Recruitment of stromal elements in this manner to support and maintain tumor growth represents a novel avenue for investigation into tumor-stromal interactions.

  17. Establishing a murine model of the Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Plett, P. Artur; Sampson, Carol H.; Chua, Hui Lin; Joshi, Mandar; Booth, Catherine; Gough, Alec; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Katz, Barry P.; Farese, Ann M.; Parker, Jeffrey; MacVittie, Thomas J.; Orschell, Christie M.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a murine model of the Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome (H-ARS) for efficacy testing of medical countermeasures (MCM) against radiation according to the FDA Animal Rule. Ten to 12 week old male and female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to the LD50/30-LD70/30 dose of total body irradiation (TBI, 137Cs, 0.62-0.67 Gy min-1) in the morning hours when mice were determined to be most radiosensitive, and assessed for 30 day survival and mean survival time (MST). Antibiotics were delivered in the drinking water on days 4-30 post-TBI at a concentration based on the amount of water that lethally-irradiated mice were found to consume. The fluoroquinolones, ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, and the tetracycline doxycycline and aminoglycoside neomycin, all significantly increased MST of decedent mice, while ciprofloxacin (p=0.061) and doxycycline + neomycin (p=0.005) showed at least some efficacy to increase 30 day survival. Blood sampling (30uL/mouse every 5th day) was found to negatively impact 30 day survival. Histopathology of tissues harvested from non-moribund mice showed expected effects of lethal irradiation, while moribund mice were largely septicemic with a preponderance of enteric organisms. Kinetics of loss and recovery of peripheral blood cells in untreated mice and those treated with two MCM, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and Amifostine, further characterized and validated our model for use in screening studies and pivotal efficacy studies of candidate MCM for licensure to treat irradiated individuals suffering from H-ARS. PMID:22929467

  18. Efficacy of Astaxanthin for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihisa, Yoko; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Matsunaga, Kenji; Rehman, Mati Ur; Maoka, Takashi; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease associated with various factors, including immunological abnormalities and exposure to allergens. Astaxanthin (AST) is a xanthophyll carotenoid that has recently been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects and to regulate the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Thus, we investigated whether AST could improve the dermatitis and pruritus in a murine model of AD using NC/Nga mice. In addition to a behavioral evaluation, the effects of AST on the AD were determined by the clinical skin severity score, serum IgE level, histological analyses of skin, and by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting analyses for the expression of inflammation-related factors. AST (100 mg/kg) or vehicle (olive oil) was orally administered once day and three times a week for 26 days. When compared with vehicle-treated group, the administration of AST significantly reduced the clinical skin severity score. In addition, the spontaneous scratching in AD model mice was reduced by AST administration. Moreover, the serum IgE level was markedly decreased by the oral administration of AST compared to that in vehicle-treated mice. The number of eosinophils, total and degranulated mast cells all significantly decreased in the skin of AST-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated mice. The mRNA and protein levels of eotaxin, MIF, IL-4, IL-5 and L-histidine decarboxylase were significantly decreased in the skin of AST-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated mice. These results suggest that AST improves the dermatitis and pruritus in AD via the regulation of the inflammatory effects and the expression of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27023003

  19. Mucociliary Clearance Defects in a Murine In Vitro Model of Pneumococcal Airway Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fliegauf, Manfred; Sonnen, Andreas F.-P.; Kremer, Bernhard; Henneke, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Mucociliary airway clearance is an innate defense mechanism that protects the lung from harmful effects of inhaled pathogens. In order to escape mechanical clearance, airway pathogens including Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are thought to inactivate mucociliary clearance by mechanisms such as slowing of ciliary beating and lytic damage of epithelial cells. Pore-forming toxins like pneumolysin, may be instrumental in these processes. In a murine in vitro airway infection model using tracheal epithelial cells grown in air-liquid interface cultures, we investigated the functional consequences on the ciliated respiratory epithelium when the first contact with pneumococci is established. High-speed video microscopy and live-cell imaging showed that the apical infection with both wildtype and pneumolysin-deficient pneumococci caused insufficient fluid flow along the epithelial surface and loss of efficient clearance, whereas ciliary beat frequency remained within the normal range. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy demonstrated that pneumococci caused specific morphologic aberrations of two key elements in the F-actin cytoskeleton: the junctional F-actin at the apical cortex of the lateral cell borders and the apical F-actin, localized within the planes of the apical cell sides at the ciliary bases. The lesions affected the columnar shape of the polarized respiratory epithelial cells. In addition, the planar architecture of the entire ciliated respiratory epithelium was irregularly distorted. Our observations indicate that the mechanical supports essential for both effective cilia strokes and stability of the epithelial barrier were weakened. We provide a new model, where - in pneumococcal infection - persistent ciliary beating generates turbulent fluid flow at non-planar distorted epithelial surface areas, which enables pneumococci to resist mechanical cilia-mediated clearance. PMID:23527286

  20. Cannabidiol increases survival and promotes rescue of cognitive function in a murine model of cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Campos, A C; Brant, F; Miranda, A S; Machado, F S; Teixeira, A L

    2015-03-19

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe complication resulting from Plasmodium falciparum infection that might cause permanent neurological deficits. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotomimetic compound of Cannabis sativa with neuroprotective properties. In the present work, we evaluated the effects of CBD in a murine model of CM. Female mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) and treated with CBD (30mg/kg/day - 3 or 7days i.p.) or vehicle. On 5th day-post-infection (dpi), at the peak of the disease), animals were treated with single or repeated doses of Artesunate, an antimalarial drug. All groups were tested for memory impairment (Novel Object Recognition or Morris Water Maze) and anxiety-like behaviors (Open field or elevated plus maze test) in different stages of the disease (at the peak or after the complete clearance of the disease). Th1/Th2 cytokines and neurotrophins (brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF)) were measured in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of experimental groups. PbA-infected mice displayed memory deficits and exhibited increase in anxiety-like behaviors on the 5dpi or after the clearance of the parasitemia, effects prevented by CBD treatment. On 5dpi, TNF-α and IL-6 increased in the hippocampus, while only IL-6 increased in the prefrontal cortex. CBD treatment resulted in an increase in BDNF expression in the hippocampus and decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus (TNF-α) and prefrontal cortex (IL-6). Our results indicate that CBD exhibits neuroprotective effects in CM model and might be useful as an adjunctive therapy to prevent neurological symptoms following this disease.

  1. Fine specificities of anti-nuclear antibodies in murine models of graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, A P; Meilof, J F; van den Brink, H G; Smeenk, R J

    1990-01-01

    Two models of murine graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were studied with respect to autoantibody production and development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) like disease. One model was induced by injection of (B10.A(4R) x B10.A(2R]F1 mice with parental (B10.A(4R] spleen and lymph node cells (groups I GVHD), the other by injection of (DBA/2 x C57/B16)F1 mice with DBA/2 cells (group II GVHD). Group I GVHD mice remained in a seemingly healthy condition and did not show any proteinuria, in spite of high titres of anti-nuclear antibodies including antibodies to dsDNA, anti-Sm and anti-ribosomal P protein antibodies. Measured levels of these autoantibodies as well as their isotypes were comparable with those found in MRL/lpr and NZB/W mice. Group II GVHD mice developed SLE-like disease signs, including severe proteinuria. At 4 months after induction of the GVHD, almost 50% of these mice had died. At the time nephritis was present, group II mice also produced anti-dsDNA and anti-nuclear antibodies of other (unknown) specificities, but no anti-Sm or anti-P. Furthermore, the incidence of these antibodies was lower than observed in group I GVHD, MRL/lpr or NZB/W mice. It is concluded that (high avidity) anti-dsDNA as well as anti-Sm and anti-P may be present in the circulation without giving rise to the development of nephritis. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2379320

  2. Abnormal morphology of myelin and axon pathology in murine models of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bando, Yoshio; Nomura, Taichi; Bochimoto, Hiroki; Murakami, Koichi; Tanaka, Tatsuhide; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Shigetaka

    2015-02-01

    Demyelination and axonal damage are responsible for neurological deficits in multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. However, the pathology of axonal damage in MS is not fully understood. In this study, histological analysis of morphological changes of axonal organelles during demyelination in murine models was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using an osmium-maceration method. In cuprizone-induced demyelination, SEM showed typical morphology of demyelination in the corpus callosum of mouse brain. In contrast, SEM displayed variations in ultrastructural abnormalities of myelin structures and axonal organelles in spinal cord white matter of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice, an animal model of MS. Myelin detachment and excessive myelin formation were observed as typical morphological myelin abnormalities in EAE. In addition, well-developed axoplasmic reticulum-like structures and accumulated mitochondria were observed in tortuous degenerating/degenerated axons and the length of mitochondria in axons of EAE spinal cord was shorter compared with naïve spinal cord. Immunohistochemistry also revealed dysfunction of mitochondrial fusion/fission machinery in EAE spinal cord axons. Moreover, the number of Y-shaped mitochondria was significantly increased in axons of the EAE spinal cord. Axonal morphologies in myelin basic protein-deficient shiverer mice were similar to those in EAE. However, shiverer mice had "tortuous" (S-curve shaped mitochondria) and larger mitochondria compared with wild-type and EAE mice. Lastly, analysis of human MS patient autopsied brains also demonstrated abnormal myelin structures in demyelinating lesions. These results indicate that morphological abnormalities of myelin and axonal organelles play important role on the pathogenesis of axonal injury in demyelinating diseases.

  3. A murine inhalation model to characterize pulmonary exposure to dry Aspergillus fumigatus conidia.

    PubMed

    Buskirk, Amanda D; Green, Brett J; Lemons, Angela R; Nayak, Ajay P; Goldsmith, W Travis; Kashon, Michael L; Anderson, Stacey E; Hettick, Justin M; Templeton, Steven P; Germolec, Dori R; Beezhold, Donald H

    2014-01-01

    Most murine models of fungal exposure are based on the delivery of uncharacterized extracts or liquid conidia suspensions using aspiration or intranasal approaches. Studies that model exposure to dry fungal aerosols using whole body inhalation have only recently been described. In this study, we aimed to characterize pulmonary immune responses following repeated inhalation of conidia utilizing an acoustical generator to deliver dry fungal aerosols to mice housed in a nose only exposure chamber. Immunocompetent female BALB/cJ mice were exposed to conidia derived from Aspergillus fumigatus wild-type (WT) or a melanin-deficient (Δalb1) strain. Conidia were aerosolized and delivered to mice at an estimated deposition dose of 1×105 twice a week for 4 weeks (8 total). Histopathological and immunological endpoints were assessed 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the final exposure. Histopathological analysis showed that conidia derived from both strains induced lung inflammation, especially at 24 and 48 hour time points. Immunological endpoints evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the mediastinal lymph nodes showed that exposure to WT conidia led to elevated numbers of macrophages, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. Importantly, CD8+ IL17+ (Tc17) cells were significantly higher in BALF and positively correlated with germination of A. fumigatus WT spores. Germination was associated with specific IgG to intracellular proteins while Δalb1 spores elicited antibodies to cell wall hydrophobin. These data suggest that inhalation exposures may provide a more representative analysis of immune responses following exposures to environmentally and occupationally prevalent fungal contaminants. PMID:25340353

  4. Mucociliary clearance defects in a murine in vitro model of pneumococcal airway infection.

    PubMed

    Fliegauf, Manfred; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Kremer, Bernhard; Henneke, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Mucociliary airway clearance is an innate defense mechanism that protects the lung from harmful effects of inhaled pathogens. In order to escape mechanical clearance, airway pathogens including Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are thought to inactivate mucociliary clearance by mechanisms such as slowing of ciliary beating and lytic damage of epithelial cells. Pore-forming toxins like pneumolysin, may be instrumental in these processes. In a murine in vitro airway infection model using tracheal epithelial cells grown in air-liquid interface cultures, we investigated the functional consequences on the ciliated respiratory epithelium when the first contact with pneumococci is established. High-speed video microscopy and live-cell imaging showed that the apical infection with both wildtype and pneumolysin-deficient pneumococci caused insufficient fluid flow along the epithelial surface and loss of efficient clearance, whereas ciliary beat frequency remained within the normal range. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy demonstrated that pneumococci caused specific morphologic aberrations of two key elements in the F-actin cytoskeleton: the junctional F-actin at the apical cortex of the lateral cell borders and the apical F-actin, localized within the planes of the apical cell sides at the ciliary bases. The lesions affected the columnar shape of the polarized respiratory epithelial cells. In addition, the planar architecture of the entire ciliated respiratory epithelium was irregularly distorted. Our observations indicate that the mechanical supports essential for both effective cilia strokes and stability of the epithelial barrier were weakened. We provide a new model, where--in pneumococcal infection--persistent ciliary beating generates turbulent fluid flow at non-planar distorted epithelial surface areas, which enables pneumococci to resist mechanical cilia-mediated clearance. PMID:23527286

  5. Immunization with hepatitis B vaccine accelerates SLE-like disease in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Arango, María-Teresa; Kivity, Shaye; Katzav, Aviva; Gilburd, Boris; Blank, Miri; Tomer, Nir; Volkov, Alex; Barshack, Iris; Chapman, Joab; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis-B vaccine (HBVv) can prevent HBV-infection and associated liver diseases. However, concerns regarding its safety, particularly among patients with autoimmune diseases (i.e. SLE) were raised. Moreover, the aluminum adjuvant in HBVv was related to immune mediated adverse events. Therefore, we examined the effects of immunization with HBVv or alum on SLE-like disease in a murine model. NZBWF1 mice were immunized with HBVv (Engerix), or aluminum hydroxide (alum) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 8 and 12 weeks of age. Mice were followed for weight, autoantibodies titers, blood counts, proteinuria, kidney histology, neurocognitive functions (novel object recognition, staircase, Y-maze and the forced swimming tests) and brain histology. Immunization with HBVv induced acceleration of kidney disease manifested by high anti-dsDNA antibodies (p < 0.01), early onset of proteinuria (p < 0.05), histological damage and deposition of HBs antigen in the kidney. Mice immunized with HBVv and/or alum had decreased cells counts mainly of the red cell lineage (p < 0.001), memory deficits (p < 0.01), and increased activated microglia in different areas of the brain compare with mice immunized with PBS. Anxiety-like behavior was more pronounced among mice immunized with alum. In conclusion, herein we report that immunization with the HBVv aggravated kidney disease in an animal model of SLE. Immunization with either HBVv or alum affected blood counts, neurocognitive functions and brain gliosis. Our data support the concept that different component of vaccines may be linked with immune and autoimmune mediated adverse events.

  6. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Analysis of Spiroindolone Analogs and KAE609 in a Murine Malaria Model

    PubMed Central

    Freymond, Céline; Fischli, Christoph; Yu, Jing; Weber, Sebastian; Goh, Anne; Yeung, Bryan K. S.; Ho, Paul C.; Dartois, Véronique; Diagana, Thierry T.; Rottmann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available on the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters driving the efficacy of antimalarial drugs. Our objective in this study was to determine dose-response relationships of a panel of related spiroindolone analogs and identify the PK-PD index that correlates best with the efficacy of KAE609, a selected class representative. The dose-response efficacy studies were conducted in the Plasmodium berghei murine malaria model, and the relationship between dose and efficacy (i.e., reduction in parasitemia) was examined. All spiroindolone analogs studied displayed a maximum reduction in parasitemia, with 90% effective dose (ED90) values ranging between 6 and 38 mg/kg of body weight. Further, dose fractionation studies were conducted for KAE609, and the relationship between PK-PD indices and efficacy was analyzed. The PK-PD indices were calculated using the in vitro potency against P. berghei (2× the 99% inhibitory concentration [IC99]) as a threshold (TRE). The percentage of the time in which KAE609 plasma concentrations remained at >2× the IC99 within 48 h (%T>TRE) and the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 48 h (AUC0–48)/TRE ratio correlated well with parasite reduction (R2 = 0.97 and 0.95, respectively) but less so for the maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax)/TRE ratio (R2 = 0.88). The present results suggest that for KAE609 and, supposedly, for its analogs, the dosing regimens covering a T>TRE of 100%, AUC0–48/TRE ratio of 587, and a Cmax/TRE ratio of 30 are likely to result in the maximum reduction in parasitemia in the P. berghei malaria mouse model. This information could be used to prioritize analogs within the same class of compounds and contribute to the design of efficacy studies, thereby facilitating early drug discovery and lead optimization programs. PMID:25487807

  7. Multivariate Models of Adult Pacific Salmon Returns

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Brian J.; Peterson, William T.; Beckman, Brian R.; Morgan, Cheryl; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Litz, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Most modeling and statistical approaches encourage simplicity, yet ecological processes are often complex, as they are influenced by numerous dynamic environmental and biological factors. Pacific salmon abundance has been highly variable over the last few decades and most forecasting models have proven inadequate, primarily because of a lack of understanding of the processes affecting variability in survival. Better methods and data for predicting the abundance of returning adults are therefore required to effectively manage the species. We combined 31 distinct indicators of the marine environment collected over an 11-year period into a multivariate analysis to summarize and predict adult spring Chinook salmon returns to the Columbia River in 2012. In addition to forecasts, this tool quantifies the strength of the relationship between various ecological indicators and salmon returns, allowing interpretation of ecosystem processes. The relative importance of indicators varied, but a few trends emerged. Adult returns of spring Chinook salmon were best described using indicators of bottom-up ecological processes such as composition and abundance of zooplankton and fish prey as well as measures of individual fish, such as growth and condition. Local indicators of temperature or coastal upwelling did not contribute as much as large-scale indicators of temperature variability, matching the spatial scale over which salmon spend the majority of their ocean residence. Results suggest that effective management of Pacific salmon requires multiple types of data and that no single indicator can represent the complex early-ocean ecology of salmon. PMID:23326586

  8. The influence of Flightless I on Toll-like-receptor-mediated inflammation in a murine model of diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ruzehaji, Nadira; Mills, Stuart J; Melville, Elizabeth; Arkell, Ruth; Fitridge, Robert; Cowin, Allison J

    2013-01-01

    Impaired wound healing and ulceration represent a serious complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Cytoskeletal protein Flightless I (Flii) is an important inhibitor of wound repair, and reduced Flii gene expression in fibroblasts increased migration, proliferation, and adhesion. As such it has the ability to influence all phases of wound healing including inflammation, remodelling and angiogenesis. Flii has the potential to modulate inflammation through its interaction with MyD88 which it an adaptor protein for TLR4. To assess the effect of Flii on the inflammatory response of diabetic wounds, we used a murine model of streptozocin-induced diabetes and Flii genetic mice. Increased levels of Flii were detected in Flii transgenic murine wounds resulting in impaired healing which was exacerbated when diabetes was induced. When Flii levels were reduced in diabetic wounds of Flii-deficient mice, healing was improved and decreased levels of TLR4 were observed. In contrast, increasing the level of Flii in diabetic mouse wounds led to increased TLR4 and NF- κ B production. Treatment of murine diabetic wounds with neutralising antibodies to Flii led to an improvement in healing with decreased expression of TLR4. Decreasing the level of Flii in diabetic wounds may therefore reduce the inflammatory response and improve healing.

  9. Hyperoxygenation attenuated a murine model of atopic dermatitis through raising skin level of ROS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Ran; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Lee, Yeo Kyong; Kie, Jeong-Hae; Jang, Myoung Ho; Seoh, Ju-Young

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease resulting from excessive stimulation of immune cells. Traditionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the progression of inflammatory diseases, but several opposing observations suggest the protective role of ROS in inflammatory disease. Recently, we demonstrated ROS prevented imiquimod-induced psoriatic dermatitis through enhancing regulatory T cell function. Thus, we hypothesized AD might also be attenuated in elevated levels of ROS through tissue hyperoxygenation, such as by hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) or applying an oxygen-carrying chemical, perfluorodecalin (PFD). Elevated levels of ROS in the skin have been demonstrated directly by staining with dihydroethidum as well as indirectly by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). A murine model of AD was developed by repeated application of a chemical irritant (1% 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene) and house dust mite (Dermatophagoide farinae) extract on one ear of BALB/c mice. The results showed treatment with HBOT or PFD significantly attenuated AD, comparably with 0.1% prednicarbate without any signs of side effects, such as telangiectasia. The expressions of interleukin-17A and interferon-γ were also decreased in the AD lesions by treatment with HBOT or PFD. Enhanced expression of IDO and reduced level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, in association with increased frequency of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the AD lesions, might be involved in the underlying mechanism of oxygen therapy. Taken together, it was suggested that tissue hyperoxygenation, by HBOT or treatment with PFD, might attenuate AD through enhancing skin ROS level.

  10. Amifostine Reduces Radiation-Induced Complications in a Murine Model of Expander-Based Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Felice, Peter A.; Nelson, Noah S.; Page, Erin E.; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Donneys, Alexis; Rodriguez, José; Buchman, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immediate expander-based breast reconstruction after mastectomy is a prevalent option for many women with breast cancer. When coupled with adjuvant radiation, however, radiation-induced skin and soft tissue injury diminish the success of this reconstructive technique. We hypothesize that prophylactic administration of the cytoprotectant Amifostine will reduce soft tissue complications from irradiation, aiding expander-based reconstruction for women battling this disease. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were divided into two experimental groups, Operative Expander Placement (Expander) and Operative Sham (Sham). Expander specimens received a sub-latissimus tissue expander with a 15cc fill volume; Shams underwent identical procedures without expander placement. Experimental groups were further divided into Control specimens receiving no further intervention, XRT specimens receiving human-equivalent radiation, and AMF-XRT specimens receiving both Amifostine and human-equivalent radiation. Animals underwent a 45-day recovery period and were evaluated grossly and via ImageJ analysis for skin and soft tissue complications. Results None of the Control, XRT, or AMF-XRT Sham specimens showed skin and soft tissue complications. For Expander animals, significantly fewer AMF-XRT specimens (4 of 13, 30%) demonstrated skin and soft tissue complications compared to XRT specimens (9 of 13, 69%; p = 0.041). ImageJ evaluation of Expander specimens demonstrated a significant increase in skin and soft tissue necrosis for XRT specimens (12.94%), compared with AMF-XRT animals (6.96%, p = 0.019). Conclusions Amifostine pre-treatment significantly reduced skin and soft-tissue complications in both gross inspection and ImageJ analysis. These findings demonstrate that Amifostine prophylaxis provides protection against radiation-induced skin and soft tissue injury in a murine model of expander-based breast reconstruction. Level of Evidence Animal study, not gradable for level of

  11. Repeated Microneedle Stimulation Induces Enhanced Hair Growth in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon Seob; Jeong, Kwan Ho; Kim, Jung Eun; Woo, Young Jun; Kim, Beom Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background Microneedle is a method that creates transdermal microchannels across the stratum corneum barrier layer of skin. No previous study showed a therapeutic effect of microneedle itself on hair growth by wounding. Objective The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of repeated microwound formed by microneedle on hair growth and hair growth-related genes in a murine model. Methods A disk microneedle roller was applied to each group of mice five times a week for three weeks. First, to identify the optimal length and cycle, microneedles of lengths of 0.15 mm, 0.25 mm, 0.5 mm, and 1 mm and cycles of 3, 6, 10, and 13 cycles were applied. Second, the effect of hair growth and hair-growth-related genes such as Wnt3a, β-catenin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Wnt10b was observed using optimized microneedle. Outcomes were observed using visual inspection, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. Results We found that the optimal length and cycle of microneedle treatment on hair growth was 0.25 mm/10 cycles and 0.5 mm/10 cycles. Repeated microneedle stimulation promoted hair growth, and it also induced the enhanced expression of Wnt3a, β-catenin, VEGF, and Wnt10b. Conclusion Our study provides evidence that microneedle stimulation can induce hair growth via activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and VEGF. Combined with the drug delivery effect, we believe that microneedle stimulation could lead to new approaches for alopecia. PMID:27746638

  12. Exposure to inhomogeneous static magnetic field beneficially affects allergic inflammation in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Csillag, Anikó; Kumar, Brahma V.; Szabó, Krisztina; Szilasi, Mária; Papp, Zsuzsa; Szilasi, Magdolna E.; Pázmándi, Kitti; Boldogh, István; Rajnavölgyi, Éva; Bácsi, Attila; László, János F.

    2014-01-01

    Previous observations suggest that static magnetic field (SMF)-exposure acts on living organisms partly through reactive oxygen species (ROS) reactions. In this study, we aimed to define the impact of SMF-exposure on ragweed pollen extract (RWPE)-induced allergic inflammation closely associated with oxidative stress. Inhomogeneous SMF was generated with an apparatus validated previously providing a peak-to-peak magnetic induction of the dominant SMF component 389 mT by 39 T m−1 lateral gradient in the in vivo and in vitro experiments, and 192 mT by 19 T m−1 in the human study at the 3 mm target distance. Effects of SMF-exposure were studied in a murine model of allergic inflammation and also in human provoked skin allergy. We found that even a single 30-min exposure of mice to SMF immediately following intranasal RWPE challenge significantly lowered the increase in the total antioxidant capacity of the airways and decreased allergic inflammation. Repeated (on 3 consecutive days) or prolonged (60 min) exposure to SMF after RWPE challenge decreased the severity of allergic responses more efficiently than a single 30-min treatment. SMF-exposure did not alter ROS production by RWPE under cell-free conditions, while diminished RWPE-induced increase in the ROS levels in A549 epithelial cells. Results of the human skin prick tests indicated that SMF-exposure had no significant direct effect on provoked mast cell degranulation. The observed beneficial effects of SMF are likely owing to the mobilization of cellular ROS-eliminating mechanisms rather than direct modulation of ROS production by pollen NAD(P)H oxidases. PMID:24647908

  13. Transfusion-induced immunosuppression results in diminished host survival in a murine neuroblastoma model.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, M D; Shou, J; Sigal, R K; Yu, J; Goldfine, J; Daly, J M

    1990-05-01

    Perioperative blood transfusion has been associated with decreased survival in cancer patients. The immunologic consequences of H-2 incompatible blood transfusion as related to neoplasia are unclear. This report examined the effect of multiple allogeneic blood transfusions, compared to syngeneic transfusions and saline infusion, on cellular immunity, tumor growth, and host survival in a murine C1300 neuroblastoma model. A/J mice were randomized to receive two weekly transfusions of washed whole blood cells from C57 Bl/6 or A/J donors or saline. Animals transfused with allogeneic blood, compared to syngeneic transfusions or saline infusions, had a significantly diminished lymphocyte response to mitogen (P less than 0.001), reduced donor-specific (P less than 0.001) and third party alloantigen (P less than 0.01) MLR, and reduced cytotoxicity against a natural killer (NK) cell-sensitive target (P less than 0.001). These in vitro deficits in cellular immunity correlated with a significantly greater Day 21 tumor weight to total body weight ratio in the allogeneic group (0.33) compared with the syngeneic (0.25) and saline (0.28) groups P less than 0.05). Median host survival was reduced in the allogeneic group (24 days) compared with the syngeneic (30 days) and saline (31 days) groups. There were no significant differences in cellular immunity, tumor growth, or survival between syngeneic and saline control groups. Allogeneic blood transfusion had an adverse affect on NK and T-lymphocyte function which was associated with enhanced tumor growth and reduced survival in tumor-bearing mice.

  14. Dynamics of the spleen and its significance in a murine H22 orthotopic hepatoma model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baohua; Zhang, Shu; Huang, Na; Chen, Haiyan; Wang, Peijun; Li, Jun; Pu, Yansong; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of the spleen during tumor progression remains incompletely understood. In this study, we established a murine H22 orthotopic hepatoma model and dynamically detected alterations in the percentages of immunocytes in the spleen. We observed a prominent myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) accumulation during the early response which persisted through all the stages of tumor growth. In addition, the percentage of regulatory T cells (Tregs) increased by week 2. Although the percentage of CD3+CD49b+ natural killer T (NKT) cells increased by day 3, and that of CD3+CD4+ T cells slightly increased by week 1, they decreased to either normal or lower levels compared with those of normal mice. The percentages of total CD3+, CD3+CD4+, and CD3+CD8+ T cells decreased by week 2, and that of NK cells decreased by week 3. The activation of non-Treg CD4+ T cells was scarce. Moreover, splenic MDSCs of tumor-bearing mice suppressed the activation of splenocytes. Therefore, a negative immune response gradually prevailed over a positive immune response during tumor growth. In addition, splenectomy was performed at the time of tumor inoculation, and we found that splenectomy could prolong the survival time, reduce the tumor weights, decrease the ascites volumes, and ameliorate the immune status of the tumor-bearing mice. Splenectomy also decreased the percentage of MDSCs and increased the percentages of CD8+ T cells, NK, and NKT cells in tumor tissues. Additionally, splenectomy decreased the percentage of MDSCs and increased that of CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood. Overall, our findings suggest that immune-negative cells are dominant in the spleen during tumor progression. Splenectomy could be helpful to improve the immune responses of tumor-bearing hosts. PMID:26989085

  15. In vivo pharmacodynamic characterization of anidulafungin in a neutropenic murine candidiasis model.

    PubMed

    Andes, D; Diekema, D J; Pfaller, M A; Prince, R A; Marchillo, K; Ashbeck, J; Hou, J

    2008-02-01

    Multiple in vivo studies have characterized the pharmacodynamics of drugs from the triazole and polyene antifungal drug classes. Fewer studies have investigated these pharmacodynamic relationships for the echinocandin drug class. We used a neutropenic murine model of disseminated Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, and Candida glabrata infection to characterize the time course of activity of the new echinocandin anidulafungin. The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) indices (the percentage of time that the drug concentration was above the MIC, the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h [AUC(0-24)] to the MIC, and the ratio of the maximum serum drug concentration [C(max)] to the MIC) were correlated with in vivo efficacy, as measured by organism numbers in kidney cultures after 96 h of therapy. The kinetics following intraperitoneal anidulafungin dosing in neutropenic infected mice were monitored. Peak levels and AUCs were linear over the 16-fold dose range studied. The drug elimination half-life in serum ranged from 14 to 24 h. Single-dose postantifungal-effect studies demonstrated prolonged suppression of organism regrowth after serum anidulafungin levels had fallen below the MIC. Of the four dosing intervals studied, treatment with the more widely spaced dosing regimens was most efficacious, suggesting the C(max)/MIC ratio as the PK-PD index most predictive of efficacy. Nonlinear regression analysis suggested that both the C(max)/MIC and AUC/MIC ratios were strongly predictive of treatment success. Studies were then conducted with 13 additional C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata isolates with various anidulafungin susceptibilities (MICs of anidulafungin for these strains, 0.015 to 2.0 microg/ml) to determine if similar C(max)/MIC and AUC(0-24)/MIC ratios for these isolates were associated with efficacy. The anidulafungin exposures associated with efficacy were similar among Candida species.

  16. Interleukin-6 receptor alpha blockade improves skin lesions in a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Birner, Peter; Heider, Susanne; Petzelbauer, Peter; Wolf, Peter; Kornauth, Christoph; Kuroll, Madeleine; Merkel, Olaf; Steiner, Günter; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu; Rose-John, Stefan; Soleiman, Afschin; Moriggl, Richard; Kenner, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease, characterized by antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) and immunocomplexes, commonly affecting kidneys, skin, heart, lung or even the brain. We have shown that JunB(Δep) mice develop a SLE phenotype linked to increased epidermal Interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. Blocking of IL-6 receptor alpha (IL-6Rα) is considered as therapeutic strategy for the treatment of SLE. JunB(Δep) and wild-type mice were treated for short (5 weeks) or long term (21 weeks) with the IL-6Rα-blocking antibody MR16-1. Skin and kidney of mice were investigated by histology and immunofluorescence, and in addition, kidneys were analysed by electron microscopy. Furthermore, soluble IL-6R (sIL-6R), antihistone and antinucleosome antibodies levels were measured and associated with disease parameters. Treatment with MR16-1 resulted in significant improvement of SLE-like skin lesions in JunB(Δep) mice, compared to untreated mice. The sIL-6R amount upon long-term treatment with MR16-1 was significantly higher in JunB(Δep) versus untreated JunB(Δep) (P = 0.034) or wild-type mice (P = 0.034). MR16-1 treatment over these time spans did not significantly improve kidney pathology of immunoglobulin deposits causing impaired function. Significantly higher antihistone (P = 0.028) and antinucleosome antibody levels (P = 0.028) were measured in MR16-1-treated JunB(Δep) mice after treatment compared to levels before therapy. In conclusion, blockade of IL-6Rα improves skin lesions in a murine SLE model, but does not have a beneficial effect on autoimmune-mediated kidney pathology. Inhibition of IL-6R signalling might be helpful in lupus cases with predominant skin involvement, but combinatorial treatment might be required to restrain autoantibodies. PMID:26739431

  17. Superior protection elicited by live-attenuated vaccines in the murine model of paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pallab; Shippy, Daniel C; Talaat, Adel M

    2015-12-16

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) causes Johne's disease, a chronic enteric infection in ruminants with severe economic impact on the dairy industry in the USA and worldwide. Currently, available vaccines have limited protective efficacy against disease progression and does not prevent spread of the infection among animals. Because of their ability to elicit wide-spectrum immune responses, we adopted a live-attenuated vaccine approach based on a sigH knock-out strain of M. paratuberculosis (ΔsigH). Earlier analysis of the ΔsigH mutant in mice indicated their inadequate ability to colonize host tissues, unlike the isogenic wild-type strain, validating the role of this sigma factor in M. paratuberculosis virulence. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of the ΔsigH mutant compared to inactivated vaccine constructs in a vaccine/challenge model of murine paratuberculosis. The presented analysis indicated that ΔsigH mutant with or without QuilA adjuvant is capable of eliciting strong immune responses (such as interferon gamma-γ, IFN-γ) suggesting their immunogenicity and ability to potentially initiate effective vaccine-induced immunity. Following a challenge with virulent strains of M. paratuberculosis, ΔsigH conferred protective immunity as indicated by the reduced bacterial burden accompanied with reduced lesions in main body organs (liver, spleen and intestine) usually infected with M. paratuberculosis. More importantly, our data indicated better ability of the ΔsigH vaccine to confer protection compared to the inactivated vaccine constructs even with the presence of oil-adjuvant. Overall, our approach provides a rational basis for using live-attenuated mutant strains to develop improved vaccines that elicit robust immunity against this chronic infection.

  18. Exposure to inhomogeneous static magnetic field beneficially affects allergic inflammation in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Csillag, Anikó; Kumar, Brahma V; Szabó, Krisztina; Szilasi, Mária; Papp, Zsuzsa; Szilasi, Magdolna E; Pázmándi, Kitti; Boldogh, István; Rajnavölgyi, Éva; Bácsi, Attila; László, János F

    2014-06-01

    Previous observations suggest that static magnetic field (SMF)-exposure acts on living organisms partly through reactive oxygen species (ROS) reactions. In this study, we aimed to define the impact of SMF-exposure on ragweed pollen extract (RWPE)-induced allergic inflammation closely associated with oxidative stress. Inhomogeneous SMF was generated with an apparatus validated previously providing a peak-to-peak magnetic induction of the dominant SMF component 389 mT by 39 T m(-1) lateral gradient in the in vivo and in vitro experiments, and 192 mT by 19 T m(-1) in the human study at the 3 mm target distance. Effects of SMF-exposure were studied in a murine model of allergic inflammation and also in human provoked skin allergy. We found that even a single 30-min exposure of mice to SMF immediately following intranasal RWPE challenge significantly lowered the increase in the total antioxidant capacity of the airways and decreased allergic inflammation. Repeated (on 3 consecutive days) or prolonged (60 min) exposure to SMF after RWPE challenge decreased the severity of allergic responses more efficiently than a single 30-min treatment. SMF-exposure did not alter ROS production by RWPE under cell-free conditions, while diminished RWPE-induced increase in the ROS levels in A549 epithelial cells. Results of the human skin prick tests indicated that SMF-exposure had no significant direct effect on provoked mast cell degranulation. The observed beneficial effects of SMF are likely owing to the mobilization of cellular ROS-eliminating mechanisms rather than direct modulation of ROS production by pollen NAD(P)H oxidases.

  19. Central nervous system endoplasmic reticulum stress in a murine model of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sims-Robinson, C.; Zhao, S.; Hur, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Type 2 diabetes is associated with complications in the central nervous system (CNS), including learning and memory, and an increased risk for neurodegenerative diseases. The mechanism underlying this association is not understood. The aim of this study was to gain greater insight into the possible mechanisms of diabetes-induced cognitive decline. Methods We used microarray technology to identify and examine changes in gene expression in the hippocampus of a murine model of type 2 diabetes, the db/db mouse. Bioinformatics approaches were then used to investigate the biological significance of these genes. To validate the biological significance we evaluated mRNA and protein levels. Results At 8 and 24 weeks, 256 and 822 genes, respectively, were differentially expressed in the db/db mice. The most significantly enriched biological functions were related to mitochondria, heat shock proteins, or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the majority of which were downregulated. The ER-enriched cluster was one of the clusters that contained the highest number of differentially expressed genes. Several of the downregulated genes that were differentially expressed at 24 but not at 8 weeks are directly involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and include two heat shock proteins (encoded by Hspa5 and Hsp90b1), a transcriptional factor (x-box binding protein 1, encoded by Xbp1), and an apoptotic mediator (DNA-damage inducible transcript 3, encoded by Ddit3). Conclusions/interpretation The changes that we observed in the UPR pathway due to ER stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of CNS complications in diabetes. The results of this study are a foundation for the development of pharmacological targets to reduce ER stress in diabetic hippocampi. PMID:22581041

  20. Chlamydial infection increases gonococcal colonization in a novel murine coinfection model.

    PubMed

    Vonck, Rachel A; Darville, T; O'Connell, C M; Jerse, Ann E

    2011-04-01

    Genital tract infections caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis serovars D to K occur at high incidence in many areas of the world. Despite high rates of coinfection with these pathogens, investigations of host-parasite interactions have focused on each pathogen individually. We describe here a coinfection model in which female BALB/c mice were first infected with the mouse Chlamydia species C. muridarum and then inoculated with N. gonorrhoeae following treatment with water-soluble 17β-estradiol to promote long-term gonococcal infection. Viable gonococci and chlamydiae were recovered for an average of 8 to 10 days, and diplococci and chlamydial inclusions were observed in lower genital tract tissue by immunohistochemical staining. Estradiol treatment reduced proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in chlamydia-infected mice; however, coinfected mice had a higher percentage of vaginal neutrophils compared to mice infected with either pathogen alone. We detected no difference in pathogen-specific antibody levels due to coinfection. Interestingly, significantly more gonococci were recovered from coinfected mice compared to mice infected with N. gonorrhoeae alone. We found no evidence that C. muridarum increases gonococcal adherence to, or invasion of, immortalized murine epithelial cells. However, increased vaginal concentrations of inflammatory mediators macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha were detected in C. muridarum-infected mice prior to inoculation with N. gonorrhoeae concurrently with the downregulation of cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide and secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor genes. We conclude that female mice can be successfully infected with both C. muridarum and N. gonorrhoeae and that chlamydia-induced alterations in host innate responses may enhance gonococcal infection. PMID:21245268

  1. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Migration After Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in a Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Jonathan; Krueger, Sarah A.; Dilworth, Joshua T.; Torma, John T.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian; Madlambayan, Gerard J.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize the recruitment of bone marrow (BM)-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within tumor microenvironment after radiation therapy (RT) in a murine, heterotopic tumor model. Methods and Materials: Lewis lung carcinoma tumors were established in C57BL/6 mice and irradiated with 30 Gy given as 2 fractions over 2 days. Tumors were imaged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and measured daily with digital calipers. The HSPC and myelomonocytic cell content was assessed via immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry. Functionality of tumor-associated HSPCs was verified in vitro using colony-forming cell assays and in vivo by rescuing lethally irradiated C57BL/6 recipients. Results: Irradiation significantly reduced tumor volumes and tumor regrowth rates compared with nonirradiated controls. The number of CD133{sup +} HSPCs present in irradiated tumors was higher than in nonirradiated tumors during all stages of regrowth. CD11b{sup +} counts were similar. PET/CT imaging and growth rate analysis based on standardized uptake value indicated that HSPC recruitment directly correlated to the extent of regrowth and intratumor cell activity after irradiation. The BM-derived tumor-associated HSPCs successfully formed hematopoietic colonies and engrafted irradiated mice. Finally, targeted treatment with a small animal radiation research platform demonstrated localized HSPC recruitment to defined tumor subsites exposed to radiation. Conclusions: Hypofractionated irradiation resulted in a pronounced and targeted recruitment of BM-derived HSPCs, possibly as a mechanism to promote tumor regrowth. These data indicate for the first time that radiation therapy regulates HSPC content within regrowing tumors.

  2. Prophylactic uses of integrin CD18-βA peptide in a murine polymicrobial peritonitis model

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kwong-Fai; Wo, Jana; Ho, David; Poon, Ronnie T; Casasnovas, José M; Luk, John M

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prophylactic properties of integrin CD18-βA peptide in a murine model of abdominal polymicrobial peritonitis and sepsis. METHODS: Bacterial sepsis was induced in Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery. Inflicted mice were then injected with either sterile saline or CD18-βA peptide intraperitoneally at 2 h after surgery, and were sacrificed at 12 and 24 h after surgery. Blood samples were immediately collected, and analyzed for endotoxin activity and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6. Lungs and liver were studied for CD45+ leukocyte and CD3 mRNA content. Pulmonary expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) and E-selectin was also determined. RESULTS: Intraperitoneal injection of CD18-βA peptide significantly suppressed circulating endotoxin activity (P < 0.01) at 24 h, as well as serum levels of TNF-α (P < 0.05 at 12 and 24 h) and IL-6 (P < 0.01 at 12 h, P < 0.05 at 24 h) in CLP-inflicted mice. CD18-βA peptide also abrogated leukocyte infiltration into liver and lungs as unveiled by reduced CD45+ leukocyte and CD3 mRNA contents. Furthermore, the peptide significantly reduced pulmonary expression of VCAM (P < 0.01 at 12 h, P < 0.001 at 24 h), E-selectin (P < 0.01 at 12 and 24 h), and ICAM-1 (P < 0.01 at 12 h, P < 0.001 at 24 h). These actions of CD18-βA peptide collectively protected septic mice against lethality (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: CD18-βA peptide is a potent endotoxin antagonist that can protect surgical patients against sepsis-associated lethality. PMID:20518087

  3. Rapamycin Blocks Fibrocyte Migration and Attenuates Bronchiolitis Obliterans in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Jacob R.; Zhao, Yunge; Harris, David A.; LaPar, Damien J.; Stone, Matthew L.; Fernandez, Lucas G.; Kron, Irving L.; Lau, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fibrocytes are integral in the development of fibroproliferative disease. The CXCL12/CXCR4 chemokine axis has been shown to play a central role in fibrocyte migration and the development of bronchiolitis obliterans post lung transplantation. Inhibition of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway with rapamycin has been shown to decrease expression of both CXCR4 and its receptor agonist, CXCL12. Thus, we hypothesize that rapamycin treatment would decrease fibrocyte trafficking into tracheal allografts and prevent bronchiolitis obliterans. Methods A total alloantigenic mismatch, murine heterotopic tracheal transplant model of bronchiolitis obliterans was used. Animals were either treated with rapamycin or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for 14 days post tracheal transplant. Fibrocyte levels were assessed via flow cytometry, and allograft neutrophil, CD3+ T-cell, macrophage, and smooth muscle actin levels were assessed via immunohistochemistry. Tracheal luminal obliteration was assessed on hematoxylin and eosin stains. Results Compared to DMSO controls, rapamycin-treated mice showed a significant decrease in fibrocyte levels in tracheal allografts. Fibrocytes levels in recipient’s blood showed a similar pattern, although not statistically significant. Furthermore, animals treated with rapamycin showed a significant decrease in tracheal allograft luminal obliteration compared to controls. Based on immunohistochemistry analyses, populations of α-SMA positive cells, neutrophils, CD3+ T-cells, and macrophages were all decreased in rapamycin-treated allograft versus DMSO controls. Conclusions Rapamycin effectively reduces recruitment of fibrocytes into tracheal allografts and mitigates development of tracheal luminal fibrosis. Further studies are needed to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate the protective effect of rapamycin against bronchiolitis obliterans. PMID:23561805

  4. Quantitative Histologic Evidence of Amifostine Induced Cytoprotection in an Irradiated Murine Model of Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N.; Donneys, Alexis; Razdolsky, Elizabeth R.; Monson, Laura; Farberg, Aaron S.; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Sarhaddi, Deniz; Poushanchi, Behdod; Goldstein, Steven A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Head and neck cancer (HNC) management requires adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). The authors have previously demonstrated the damaging effect of a human equivalent dose of radiation (HEDR) on a murine mandibular model of distraction osteogenesis (DO). Utilizing quantitative histomorphometry (QHM), our specific aim is to objectively measure the radio-protective effects of Amifostine (AMF) on the cellular integrity and tissue quality of an irradiated and distracted regenerate. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned into 2 groups: XRT/DO and AMF/XRT/DO, which received AMF prior to XRT. Both groups were given HEDR in 5 fractionated doses and underwent a left mandibular osteotomy with bilateral fixator placement. Distraction to 5.1mm was followed by a 28-day consolidation period. Left hemimandibles were harvested. QHM was performed for osteocyte count (Oc), empty lacunae (EL), Bone Volume/Tissue Volume (BV/TV) and Osteoid Volume/Tissue Volume (OV/TV) ratios. Results AMF/XRT/DO exhibited bony bridging as opposed to XRT/DO fibrous unions. QHM analysis revealed statistically significant higher Oc and BV/TV ratio in AMF-treated mandibles compared with irradiated mandibles. There was a corresponding decrease in EL and the ratio of OV/TV between AMF/XRT/DO and XRT/DO. Conclusion We have successfully established the significant osseous cytoprotective and histoprotective capacity of AMF on DO in the face of XRT. AMF-sparing effect on bone cellularity correlated with an increase in bony union and elimination of fibrous union. We posit that the demonstration of similar efficacy of AMF in the clinic may allow the successful implementation of DO as a viable reconstructive option for HNC in the future. PMID:22878481

  5. Size dependent skin penetration of nanoparticles in murine and porcine dermatitis models.

    PubMed

    Try, Céline; Moulari, Brice; Béduneau, Arnaud; Fantini, Oscar; Pin, Didier; Pellequer, Yann; Lamprecht, Alf

    2016-03-01

    A major limitation in the current topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases is the inability to selectively deliver the drug to the inflammation site. Recently, smart drug delivery systems such as nanocarriers are being investigated to enhance the selective deposition of anti-inflammatory drugs in inflamed areas of the skin to achieve higher therapeutic efficacy with minimal side effects. Of such systems, polymeric nanoparticles are considered very efficient carriers for the topical drug delivery. In the current work, poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles of nominal sizes of 70nm (NP70) and 300nm (NP300) were studied for their intra-epidermal distribution in murine and pig atopic dermatitis models over time against the respective healthy controls. Confocal laser scanning microscopical examination of skin biopsies was utilized for the qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of nanoparticles skin deposition and penetration depth. While no skin penetration was found for any of the particles in healthy skin, the accumulation of NP70 was significantly higher than NP300 in inflamed skin (15-fold in mice, 5-fold in pigs). Penetration depth of NP70 decreased over time in mice from 55±3μm to 20±2μm and similar tendencies were observed for the other formulations. In inflamed pig skin, a similar trend was found for the penetration depth (NP70: 46±12μm versus NP300: 23±3μm); however, the NP amount remained constant for the whole analyzed period. Their ability to penetrate specifically into inflamed skin combined with minimal effects on healthy skin underlines small polymeric nanoparticles' potential as selective drug carriers in future treatment of chronic inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis.

  6. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone ameliorates disease activity in an induced murine lupus-like model.

    PubMed

    Botte, D A C; Noronha, I L; Malheiros, D M A C; Peixoto, T V; de Mello, S B V

    2014-08-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a neuropeptide exhibiting anti-inflammatory activity in experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, no studies thus far have examined the effects of α-MSH on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aimed to determine the effects of an α-MSH agonist in induced murine lupus. Here we employed female Balb/cAn mice in which lupus was induced by pristane. Groups of lupus animals were treated daily with the α-MSH analogue [Nle4, DPhe7]-α-MSH (NDP-MSH) (1·25 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally or saline for 180 days. Normal animals comprised the control group. Arthritis incidence, plasma immunoglobulin (Ig)G isotypes, anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and plasma cytokines were evaluated. Renal function was assessed by proteinuria and histopathological lesion. Glomerular levels of IgG, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), C3, CD3, melanocortin receptors (MCR)1, corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and α-MSH was estimated by immunohistochemistry. When compared with normal controls, lupus animals exhibited increased arthritis, IgG levels, ANA, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, proteinuria and mesangial cell proliferation together with glomerular expression of α-SMA and iNOS. Glomerular expression of MCR1 was reduced in lupus animals. NDP-MSH treatment reduced arthritis scores by 70% and also diminished IgG1 and IgG2a levels and ANA incidence. In the glomerulus, NDP-MSH treatment reduced cellularity by 50% together with reducing IgG deposits, and expression levels of α-SMA, iNOS and CRF were also all decreased. Taken together, our results suggest for the first time that α-MSH treatment improves several parameters of SLE disease activity in mice, and indicate that this hormone is an interesting potential future treatment option.

  7. Osteoblast function and bone histomorphometry in a murine model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blue, Mary E; Boskey, Adele L; Doty, Stephen B; Fedarko, Neal S; Hossain, Mir Ahamed; Shapiro, Jay R

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder due to mutations affecting the neural transcription factor MeCP2. Approximately 50% of affected females have decreased bone mass. We studied osteoblast function using a murine model of RTT. Female heterozygote (HET) and male Mecp2-null mice were compared to wild type (WT) mice. Micro-CT of tibia from 5 week-old Mecp2-null mice showed significant alterations in trabecular bone including reductions in bone volume fraction (-29%), number (-19%), thickness (-9%) and connectivity density (-32%), and increases in trabecular separation (+28%) compared to WT. We also found significant reductions in cortical bone thickness (-18%) and in polar moment of inertia (-45%). In contrast, cortical and trabecular bone from 8 week-old WT and HET female mice were not significantly different. However, mineral apposition rate, mineralizing surface and bone formation rate/bone surface were each decreased in HET and Mecp2-null mice compared to WT mice. Histomorphometric analysis of femurs showed decreased numbers of osteoblasts but similar numbers of osteoclasts compared to WT, altered osteoblast morphology and decreased tissue synthesis of alkaline phosphatase in Mecp2-null and HET mice. Osteoblasts cultured from Mecp2-null mice, which unlike WT osteoblasts did not express MeCP2, had increased growth rates, but reductions in mRNA expression of type I collagen, Runx2 and Osterix compared to WT osteoblasts. These results indicate that MeCP2 deficiency leads to altered bone growth. Osteoblast dysfunction was more marked in Mecp2-null male than in HET female mice, suggesting that expression of MeCP2 plays a critical role in bone development.

  8. Sphingosine Kinase 1 Deficiency Confers Protection against Hyperoxia-Induced Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Harijith, Anantha; Pendyala, Srikanth; Reddy, Narsa M.; Bai, Tao; Usatyuk, Peter V.; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Gorshkova, Irina; Huang, Long Shuang; Mohan, Vijay; Garzon, Steve; Kanteti, Prasad; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Raj, J. Usha; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2014-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia of the premature newborn is characterized by lung injury, resulting in alveolar simplification and reduced pulmonary function. Exposure of neonatal mice to hyperoxia enhanced sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) levels in lung tissues; however, the role of increased S1P in the pathobiological characteristics of bronchopulmonary dysplasia has not been investigated. We hypothesized that an altered S1P signaling axis, in part, is responsible for neonatal lung injury leading to bronchopulmonary dysplasia. To validate this hypothesis, newborn wild-type, sphingosine kinase1−/− (Sphk1−/−), sphingosine kinase 2−/− (Sphk2−/−), and S1P lyase+/− (Sgpl1+/−) mice were exposed to hyperoxia (75%) from postnatal day 1 to 7. Sphk1−/−, but not Sphk2−/− or Sgpl1+/−, mice offered protection against hyperoxia-induced lung injury, with improved alveolarization and alveolar integrity compared with wild type. Furthermore, SphK1 deficiency attenuated hyperoxia-induced accumulation of IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and NADPH oxidase (NOX) 2 and NOX4 protein expression in lung tissue. In vitro experiments using human lung microvascular endothelial cells showed that exogenous S1P stimulated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, whereas SphK1 siRNA, or inhibitor against SphK1, attenuated hyperoxia-induced S1P generation. Knockdown of NOX2 and NOX4, using specific siRNA, reduced both basal and S1P-induced ROS formation. These results suggest an important role for SphK1-mediated S1P signaling–regulated ROS in the development of hyperoxia-induced lung injury in a murine neonatal model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. PMID:23933064

  9. Particle-size dependent effects in the Balb/c murine model of inhalational melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Richard J.; Davies, C.; Nunez, A.; Hibbs, S.; Eastaugh, L.; Harding, S.; Jordan, J.; Barnes, K.; Oyston, P.; Eley, S.

    2012-01-01

    Deposition of Burkholderia pseudomallei within either the lungs or nasal passages of the Balb/c murine model resulted in different infection kinetics. The infection resulting from the inhalation of B. pseudomallei within a 12 μm particle aerosol was prolonged compared to a 1 μm particle aerosol with a mean time-to-death (MTD) of 174.7 ± 14.9 h and 73.8 ± 11.3 h, respectively. Inhalation of B. pseudomallei within 1 μm or 12 μm particle aerosols resulted in a median lethal dose (MLD) of 4 and 12 cfu, respectively. The 12 μm particle inhalational infection was characterized by a marked involvement of the nasal mucosa and extension of bacterial colonization and inflammatory lesions from the olfactory epithelium through the olfactory nerves (or tracts) to the olfactory bulb (100%), culminating in abscessation of the brain (33%). Initial involvement of the upper respiratory tract lymphoid tissues (nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) and cervical lymph nodes) was observed in both the 1 and 12 μm particle inhalational infections (80–85%). Necrotising alveolitis and bronchiolitis were evident in both inhalational infections, however, lung pathology was greater after inhalation of the 1 μm particle aerosol with pronounced involvement of the mediastinal lymph node (50%). Terminal disease was characterized by bacteraemia in both inhalational infections with dissemination to the spleen, liver, kidneys, and thymus. Treatment with co-trimoxazole was more effective than treatment with doxycycline irrespective of the size of the particles inhaled. Doxycycline was more effective against the 12 μm particle inhalational infection as evidenced by increased time to death. However, both treatment regimes exhibited significant relapse when therapy was discontinued with massive enlargement and abscessation of the lungs, spleen, and cervical lymph nodes observed. PMID:22919690

  10. Immune response to controlled release of immunomodulating peptides in a murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Kiptoo, Paul; Williams, Todd D.; Siahaan, Teruna J.; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of controlled release on immune response to an immunomodulating peptide were evaluated in a murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of multiple sclerosis (MS). The peptide, Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 (Ac-HSLGKWLGHPDKF-(AcpGAcpGAcp)2-ITDGEATDSG-NH2; Ac = acetyl, Acp = aminocaproic acid) was designed to suppress T-cell activation in response to PLP139–151, an antigenic peptide in MS. Poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) microparticles containing Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 (8±4 μm, 1.4±0.2% (w/w)) were prepared by a powder-in oil-in water emulsion-solvent evaporation method, sterilized and administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to SJL/J (H-2s) mice in which EAE had been induced by immunization with PLP139–151. Treatment groups received Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2: (i) in solution by repeated i.v. or s.c. injection, (ii) in solution co-administered with blank PLGA microparticles, (iii) in solution co-administered with Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 loaded microparticles, and (iv) as Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 loaded microparticles. Administration of Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 as an s.c. solution produced clinical scores and maintenance of body weight comparable to i.v. solution, but with reduced overall survival, presumably due to anaphylaxis. Administration as s.c. microparticles provided a somewhat less effective reduction in symptoms but with no toxicity during treatment. Thus, the results suggest that s.c. administration of Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 microparticles can provide pharmacological efficacy and reduction in dosing frequency without increased toxicity. PMID:19748537

  11. Reproduction and Growth in a Murine Model of Early Life-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Eniko; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Wetsel, William C.; MacIver, Nancie J.; Hale, Laura P.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in transgenic murine models have provided insight into the complexity underlying inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a disease hypothesized to result from an injurious immune response against intestinal microbiota. We recently developed a mouse model of IBD that phenotypically and histologically resembles human childhood-onset ulcerative colitis (UC), using mice that are genetically modified to be deficient in the cytokines TNF and IL-10 (“T/I” mice). Here we report the effects of early life onset of colon inflammation on growth and reproductive performance of T/I mice. T/I dams with colitis often failed to get pregnant or had small litters with pups that failed to thrive. Production was optimized by breeding double homozygous mutant T/I males to females homozygous mutant for TNF deficiency and heterozygous for deficiency of IL-10 (“T/I-het” dams) that were not susceptible to spontaneous colon inflammation. When born to healthy (T/I-het) dams, T/I pups initially gained weight similarly to wild type (WT) pups and to their non-colitis-susceptible T/I-het littermates. However, their growth curves diverged between 8 and 13 weeks, when most T/I mice had developed moderate to severe colitis. The observed growth failure in T/I mice occurred despite a significant increase in their food consumption and in the absence of protein loss in the stool. This was not due to TNF-induced anorexia or altered food consumption due to elevated leptin levels. Metabolic studies demonstrated increased consumption of oxygen and water and increased production of heat and CO2 in T/I mice compared to their T/I-het littermates, without differences in motor activity. Based on the clinical similarities of this early life onset model of IBD in T/I mice to human IBD, these results suggest that mechanisms previously hypothesized to explain growth failure in children with IBD require re-evaluation. The T/I mouse model may be useful for further investigation of such mechanisms and for

  12. Reproduction and Growth in a Murine Model of Early Life-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Eniko; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Wetsel, William C; MacIver, Nancie J; Hale, Laura P

    2016-01-01

    Studies in transgenic murine models have provided insight into the complexity underlying inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a disease hypothesized to result from an injurious immune response against intestinal microbiota. We recently developed a mouse model of IBD that phenotypically and histologically resembles human childhood-onset ulcerative colitis (UC), using mice that are genetically modified to be deficient in the cytokines TNF and IL-10 ("T/I" mice). Here we report the effects of early life onset of colon inflammation on growth and reproductive performance of T/I mice. T/I dams with colitis often failed to get pregnant or had small litters with pups that failed to thrive. Production was optimized by breeding double homozygous mutant T/I males to females homozygous mutant for TNF deficiency and heterozygous for deficiency of IL-10 ("T/I-het" dams) that were not susceptible to spontaneous colon inflammation. When born to healthy (T/I-het) dams, T/I pups initially gained weight similarly to wild type (WT) pups and to their non-colitis-susceptible T/I-het littermates. However, their growth curves diverged between 8 and 13 weeks, when most T/I mice had developed moderate to severe colitis. The observed growth failure in T/I mice occurred despite a significant increase in their food consumption and in the absence of protein loss in the stool. This was not due to TNF-induced anorexia or altered food consumption due to elevated leptin levels. Metabolic studies demonstrated increased consumption of oxygen and water and increased production of heat and CO2 in T/I mice compared to their T/I-het littermates, without differences in motor activity. Based on the clinical similarities of this early life onset model of IBD in T/I mice to human IBD, these results suggest that mechanisms previously hypothesized to explain growth failure in children with IBD require re-evaluation. The T/I mouse model may be useful for further investigation of such mechanisms and for development

  13. A simple quantitative model of macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding: Application to the murine prion protein(121-231)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2013-06-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. Macromolecular crowding is found to promote a decrease of the entropic cost of folding of proteins that produces an increase of both the stability and the folding rate. The acceleration of the folding rate due to macromolecular crowding is shown to be a topology-dependent effect. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). The differential effect of macromolecular crowding as a function of protein topology suffices to make non-native configurations relatively more accessible.

  14. Anti-Lipid IgG Antibodies Are Produced via Germinal Centers in a Murine Model Resembling Human Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Reséndiz-Mora, Albany; Donis-Maturano, Luis; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Zárate-Neira, Luz; Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Calderón-Amador, Juana; Medina, Yolanda; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are produced in some mycobacterial infections and in certain autoimmune diseases [such as anti-phospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)]. However, few studies have addressed the B cell responses underlying the production of these immunoglobulins. Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are consistently found in a murine model resembling human lupus induced by chlorpromazine-stabilized non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements (NPA). NPA are transitory lipid associations found in the membranes of most cells; when NPA are stabilized they can become immunogenic and induce specific IgG antibodies, which appear to be involved in the development of the mouse model of lupus. Of note, anti-NPA antibodies are also detected in patients with SLE and leprosy. We used this model of lupus to investigate in vivo the cellular mechanisms that lead to the production of anti-lipid, class-switched IgG antibodies. In this murine lupus model, we found plasma cells (Gr1−, CD19−, CD138+) producing NPA-specific IgGs in the draining lymph nodes, the spleen, and the bone marrow. We also found a significant number of germinal center B cells (IgD−, CD19+, PNA+) specific for NPA in the draining lymph nodes and the spleen, and we identified in situ the presence of NPA in these germinal centers. By contrast, very few NPA-specific, extrafollicular reaction B cells (B220+, Blimp1+) were found. Moreover, when assessing the anti-NPA IgG antibodies produced during the experimental protocol, we found that the affinity of these antibodies progressively increased over time. Altogether, our data indicate that, in this murine model resembling human lupus, B cells produce anti-NPA IgG antibodies mainly via germinal centers. PMID:27746783

  15. Enterococcal biofilm formation and virulence in an optimized murine model of foreign body-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Guiton, Pascale S; Hung, Chia S; Hancock, Lynn E; Caparon, Michael G; Hultgren, Scott J

    2010-10-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) constitute the majority of nosocomial UTIs and pose significant clinical challenges. Enterococcal species are among the predominant causative agents of CAUTIs. However, very little is known about the pathophysiology of Enterococcus-mediated UTIs. We optimized a murine model of foreign body-associated UTI in order to mimic conditions of indwelling catheters in patients. In this model, the presence of a foreign body elicits major histological changes and induces the expression of several proinflammatory cytokines in the bladder. In addition, in contrast to naïve mice, infection of catheter-implanted mice with Enterococcus faecalis induced the specific expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α) in the bladder. These responses resulted in a favorable niche for the development of persistent E. faecalis infections in the murine bladders and kidneys. Furthermore, biofilm formation on the catheter implant in vivo correlated with persistent infections. However, the enterococcal autolytic factors GelE and Atn (also known as AtlA), which are important in biofilm formation in vitro, are dispensable in vivo. In contrast, the housekeeping sortase A (SrtA) is critical for biofilm formation and virulence in CAUTIs. Overall, this murine model represents a significant advance in the understanding of CAUTIs and underscores the importance of urinary catheterization during E. faecalis uropathogenesis. This model is also a valuable tool for the identification of virulence determinants that can serve as potential antimicrobial targets for the treatment of enterococcal infections.

  16. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion–induced allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:26771600

  17. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-12

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion-induced allergic contact dermatitis.

  18. Development of an Orientia tsutsugamushi Lc-1 Murine Intraperitoneal Challenge Model for Scrub Typhus: Determination of Murine Lethal Dose (MuLD50), Tissue Bacterial Loads, and Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lurchachaiwong, Woradee; McCardle, Wesley; Chan, Teik-Chye; Schuster, Anthony L; Richards, Allen L

    2015-09-01

    Currently, no vaccine has been developed to protect humans from naturally acquired heterologous Orientia tsutsugamushi infections. To enhance the validity of vaccine candidates, we are developing a murine chigger challenge model with the O. tsutsugamushi Lc-1-infected Leptotrombidium chiangraiensis Line-1. To this end, an intraperitoneal (i.p.) murine challenge model using an O. tsutsugamushi Lc-1 isolate was developed for eventual validation of the chigger challenge model. We have determined that the murine lethal dose that kills 50% of the challenged mice (MuLD50) of a liver/spleen homogenate developed from O. tsutsugamushi Lc-1-infected ICR Swiss mice to be 10(-6.9). Employing different inoculum doses of this homogenate, the bacterial load using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was determined to range from 60 to 1.6 × 10(5) genome equivalent copies (GEC)/μL of liver and 33.4 to 2.2 × 10(5) GEC/μL of spleen tissue. The clinical outcomes relative to homogenate dose levels followed a dose-dependent pattern. The successful development and characterization of the O. tsutsugamushi Lc-1 i.p. challenge model will assist in the development and validation of a mouse chigger challenge scrub typhus model.

  19. Mechanism of tumor remission by cytomegalovirus in a murine lymphoma model: evidence for involvement of virally induced cellular interleukin-15.

    PubMed

    Erlach, Katja C; Reddehase, Matthias J; Podlech, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    A murine model of B and T cell lymphomas in recipients after hematoablative conditioning for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has previously revealed a tumor-repressive, metastasis-inhibiting function of murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV). More recently, this prediction from the experimental model was put on trial in several clinical studies that indeed gave evidence for a lower incidence of tumor relapse associated with early reactivation of latent human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) after allogeneic HCT in patients treated against different types of hematopoietic malignancies, including lymphoma and acute as well as chronic leukemias. Due to the limitations inherent to clinical studies, the tumor-repressive role of hCMV remained observational with no approach to clarify mechanisms. Although the tumor-repressive mechanisms of mCMV and hCMV may differ and depend on the type of tumor, experimental approaches in the murine model might give valuable hints for concepts to follow in clinical research. We have previously shown for the liver-adapted A20-derived B cell lymphoma E12E that mCMV does not infect the lymphoma cells for causing cell death by viral cytopathogenicity but triggers tumor-selective apoptosis at a tissue site of tumor metastasis distant from a local site of infection. This finding suggested involvement of a cytokine that triggers apoptosis, directly or indirectly. Here we used a series of differential high-density microarray analyses to identify cellular genes whose expression is specifically upregulated at the site of virus entry only by viruses capable of triggering lymphoma cell apoptosis. This strategy identified interleukin-15 (IL-15) as most promising candidate, eventually confirmed by lymphoma repression with recombinant IL-15. PMID:25805565

  20. Development and evaluation of murine lung-specific disease models for Pseudomonas aeruginosa applicable to therapeutic testing

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenz, Matthew B.; Biller, Ashley E.; Cramer, Daniel E.; Kraenzle, Jennifer L.; Sotsky, Julie B.; Vanover, Carol D.; Yoder-Himes, Deborah R.; Pollard, Angela; Warawa, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen capable of causing a wide range of disease manifestations, including severe bacterial pneumonia. Recently, clinics have reported a rise in nosocomial infections with multidrug resistant (MDR) species, including MDR strains of P. aeruginosa. In order to quickly evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutics for MDR infections, highly reproducible and validated animal models need to be developed for pre-clinical testing. Here, we describe the characterization of two murine models to study MDR P. aeruginosa respiratory disease. We evaluated and compared these models using a non-invasive intratracheal instillation method and established the 50% lethal dose, course of infection, biometric parameters of disease and degree of pneumonia development for each model. Further, we tested meropenem as a proof-of-concept therapeutic and report efficacy data that suggests that the leukopenic model could serve a robust pre-clinical model to test novel therapeutics. PMID:25857733

  1. Beyond Survival: Curriculum Models for Senior Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramwell, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Rather than Tyler-style transmission models, process or transaction models are more appropriate for teaching older adults. Whereas Tyler models focus on achieving rigidly defined objectives, process models view education as activities worthwhile in themselves. (SK)

  2. Pharmacological correction of neonatal lethal hepatic dysfunction in a murine model of hereditary tyrosinaemia type I.

    PubMed

    Grompe, M; Lindstedt, S; al-Dhalimy, M; Kennaway, N G; Papaconstantinou, J; Torres-Ramos, C A; Ou, C N; Finegold, M

    1995-08-01

    Hereditary tyrosinaemia type I, a severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease, affects the liver and kidneys and is caused by deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH). Mice homozygous for a FAH gene disruption have a neonatal lethal phenotype caused by liver dysfunction and do not represent an adequate model of the human disease. Here we demonstrate that treatment of affected animals with 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoro-methylbenzyol)-1,3-cyclohexanedione abolished neonatal lethality, corrected liver function and partially normalized the altered expression pattern of hepatic mRNAs. The prolonged lifespan of affected animals resulted in a phenotype analogous to human tyrosinaemia type I including hepatocellular carcinoma. The adult FAH-/- mouse will serve as useful model for studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of hereditary tyrosinaemia type I as well as hepatic cancer. PMID:7545495

  3. Tumor necrosis factor alpha has a protective role in a murine model of systemic candidiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Louie, A; Baltch, A L; Smith, R P; Franke, M A; Ritz, W J; Singh, J K; Gordon, M A

    1994-01-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in host defense against systemic Candida albicans infection was evaluated in a murine model of systemic candidiasis in which uniform death occurred between 5 and 6 days after infection. TNF-alpha was first detected at 16 h postinfection and progressively increased thereafter. Peak levels (700 to 900 pg/ml) were measured in mice near death. Administration of 0.5 to 1.0 mg of polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) TNF-alpha antibody (TNF-alpha Ab) to mice 2 h preinfection neutralized serum TNF-alpha for up to 30 h. However, this regimen shortened survival from a mean of 5.5 days for IgG controls to 3.4 days (P = 1.9 x 10(-12)). Semiquantitative cultures of spleen, lung, liver, and kidney conducted at 1, 2, and 3 days postinfection found colony counts of spleen and kidney to be significantly higher for TNF-alpha Ab recipients but only for the first 48 h. Administration of 1.5 and 1.0 mg of TNF-alpha Ab at 2 h before and 48 h after fungal injection, respectively, shortened the mean survival from 4.9 to 2.3 days (P = 5.2 x 10(-8)). This regimen neutralized serum TNF-alpha throughout infection. With this regimen, colony counts of all organs were significantly higher in TNF-alpha Ab recipients at 1, 2, and 3 days postinfection. Histopathologic studies showed an increase in the number and size of C. albicans foci in tissues. Peripheral leukocyte counts and inflammatory response in tissue were similar for TNF-alpha Ab and IgG sham recipients. In vitro, incubation of C. albicans with four to eight times the peak serum levels of TNF-alpha for up to 24 h did not inhibit the rate of germ tube or pseudohypha formation. Thus, TNF-alpha that was produced during infection with C. albicans augmented host resistance against this organism and prolonged survival. The protective effect of TNF-alpha was not mediated by increased leukocytes in blood or tissues nor by a direct anticandidal effect of TNF-alpha. This study suggests that the

  4. Antifungal Treatments Delineate a Correlation between Cathepsins and Cytokines in Murine Model of Invasive Aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ashwani; Gahlaut, Anjum; Sharma, G L; Dabur, R

    2013-11-01

    In the pathogenesis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis both fungal and host factors play roles. Though cytokines and phagocyte, as host factors, have been shown to participate in defence against Aspergillus species yet the role of cysteine proteases, that is cathepsins, a lysosomal enzymes of phagocytes, remains unknown in fungal infection. Studies are available which shows that cytokines regulate the cysteine proteases processed immune molecules for their further action but their relationship with each other under fungal infection is not clear. Therefore, in this study, we demonstrate the substantial role of cathepsins and cytokines in aspergillosis. In the present murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, on seventh day of Aspergillus fumigatus infection, both kidney and liver showed significant (P<0.05) fungal burdens, which was also confirmed by histological analyses. The activity profiles of four cathepsins in the kidney and liver tissue were analysed and correlated with blood cytokines level in the presence and absence of antifungal compounds (amphotericin B, a standard drug and 2-(3,4-dimethyl-2,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrole-2-yl)-1-methylethyl pentanoate, isolated in our laboratory from natural source) treatment. The data illustrate that the reduction in fungal load in both organs probably results in a decreased local inflammatory response, as measured by decreased levels of interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 and increased level of interferon gamma in the antifungal compounds treated mice. Interestingly, this altered level of cytokines relates well with the activity level of cathepsins, that is decreased in interleukines (interleukinL-4/interleukin-10) and cathepsins (cathepsin B, cathepsin C and cathepsin L); and increase in interferon gamma and cathepsin H levels in the mice treated with antifungal compounds were observed. These observations support not only the negative (cathepsin B, cathepsin C and cathepsin L) and positive (cathepsin H) role of

  5. Antifungal Treatments Delineate a Correlation between Cathepsins and Cytokines in Murine Model of Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ashwani; Gahlaut, Anjum; Sharma, G. L.; Dabur, R.

    2013-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis both fungal and host factors play roles. Though cytokines and phagocyte, as host factors, have been shown to participate in defence against Aspergillus species yet the role of cysteine proteases, that is cathepsins, a lysosomal enzymes of phagocytes, remains unknown in fungal infection. Studies are available which shows that cytokines regulate the cysteine proteases processed immune molecules for their further action but their relationship with each other under fungal infection is not clear. Therefore, in this study, we demonstrate the substantial role of cathepsins and cytokines in aspergillosis. In the present murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, on seventh day of Aspergillus fumigatus infection, both kidney and liver showed significant (P<0.05) fungal burdens, which was also confirmed by histological analyses. The activity profiles of four cathepsins in the kidney and liver tissue were analysed and correlated with blood cytokines level in the presence and absence of antifungal compounds (amphotericin B, a standard drug and 2-(3,4-dimethyl-2,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrole-2-yl)-1-methylethyl pentanoate, isolated in our laboratory from natural source) treatment. The data illustrate that the reduction in fungal load in both organs probably results in a decreased local inflammatory response, as measured by decreased levels of interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 and increased level of interferon gamma in the antifungal compounds treated mice. Interestingly, this altered level of cytokines relates well with the activity level of cathepsins, that is decreased in interleukines (interleukinL-4/interleukin-10) and cathepsins (cathepsin B, cathepsin C and cathepsin L); and increase in interferon gamma and cathepsin H levels in the mice treated with antifungal compounds were observed. These observations support not only the negative (cathepsin B, cathepsin C and cathepsin L) and positive (cathepsin H) role of

  6. Aging and serum MCP-1 are associated with gut microbiome composition in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Melissa N.; Wong, Carmen P.; Duyck, Kyle M.; Hord, Norman; Ho, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Age is the primary risk factor for major human chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disorders, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Chronic, low-grade, systemic inflammation is associated with aging and the progression of immunosenescence. Immunosenescence may play an important role in the development of age-related chronic disease and the widely observed phenomenon of increased production of inflammatory mediators that accompany this process, referred to as “inflammaging.” While it has been demonstrated that the gut microbiome and immune system interact, the relationship between the gut microbiome and age remains to be clearly defined, particularly in the context of inflammation. The aim of our study was to clarify the associations between age, the gut microbiome, and pro-inflammatory marker serum MCP-1 in a C57BL/6 murine model. Results. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to profile the composition of fecal microbiota associated with young and aged mice. Our analysis identified an association between microbiome structure and mouse age and revealed specific groups of taxa whose abundances stratify young and aged mice. This includes the Ruminococcaceae, Clostridiaceae, and Enterobacteriaceae. We also profiled pro-inflammatory serum MCP-1 levels of each mouse and found that aged mice exhibited elevated serum MCP-1, a phenotype consistent with inflammaging. Robust correlation tests identified several taxa whose abundance in the microbiome associates with serum MCP-1 status, indicating that they may interact with the mouse immune system. We find that taxonomically similar organisms can exhibit differing, even opposite, patterns of association with the host immune system. We also find that many of the OTUs that associate with serum MCP-1 stratify individuals by age. Discussion. Our results demonstrate that gut microbiome composition is associated with age and the pro-inflammatory marker, serum MCP-1. The correlation between age

  7. Neutralization of IL-17 ameliorates uveitis but damages photoreceptors in a murine model of spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Uveitis, or intraocular inflammatory disease, is a frequent extra-articular manifestation of several forms of arthritis. Despite the frequent co-occurrence of uveitis and arthritis, little is understood of the eye's predisposition to this disease. We recently described a previously unreported uveitis in a murine model of spondyloarthropathy triggered by autoimmunity to aggrecan, a prominent proteoglycan (PG) macromolecule in cartilage. In contrast to the joint and spine, wherein interferon-gamma (IFNγ) deficiency reduced disease, IFNγ deficiency worsened uveitis. Given the regulatory role of IFNγ on the Th17 response and the current focus of anti-interleukin-17 therapeutics in patients with uveitis and spondyloarthritis, we sought to determine the extent to which interleukin (IL)-17 mediates uveitis in the absence of IFNγ. Methods Antigen specific T cell cytokine production was measured in splenocyte cultures using multiplex-ELISA. Transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the T cell receptor (TCR) recognizing the dominant arthritogenic epitope in the G1 domain of PG (TCR-Tg), also lacking IFNγ, were immunized with PG. Mice were then systemically administered an anti-IL-17 neutralizing antibody. The onset and severity of peripheral arthritis was evaluated by clinical scoring criteria and histology. Uveitis was assessed using intravital videomicroscopy, which visualizes leukocyte trafficking within the vasculature and tissue of the iris, and by histology. Results TCR-Tg splenocytes stimulated in vitro with recombinant G1 peptide demonstrated exacerbated production of cytokines, such as macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, MIP-1β, IL-1β, and most notably IL-17A as a consequence of IFNγ deficiency. In vivo, IL-17 inhibition prevented the component of PG-induced arthritis that occurs independently of IFNγ. Blockade of IL-17 ameliorated the ongoing leukocyte trafficking responses within the iris vasculature and tissue, which coincided with reduced

  8. Aging and serum MCP-1 are associated with gut microbiome composition in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Conley, Melissa N; Wong, Carmen P; Duyck, Kyle M; Hord, Norman; Ho, Emily; Sharpton, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Age is the primary risk factor for major human chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disorders, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Chronic, low-grade, systemic inflammation is associated with aging and the progression of immunosenescence. Immunosenescence may play an important role in the development of age-related chronic disease and the widely observed phenomenon of increased production of inflammatory mediators that accompany this process, referred to as "inflammaging." While it has been demonstrated that the gut microbiome and immune system interact, the relationship between the gut microbiome and age remains to be clearly defined, particularly in the context of inflammation. The aim of our study was to clarify the associations between age, the gut microbiome, and pro-inflammatory marker serum MCP-1 in a C57BL/6 murine model. Results. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to profile the composition of fecal microbiota associated with young and aged mice. Our analysis identified an association between microbiome structure and mouse age and revealed specific groups of taxa whose abundances stratify young and aged mice. This includes the Ruminococcaceae, Clostridiaceae, and Enterobacteriaceae. We also profiled pro-inflammatory serum MCP-1 levels of each mouse and found that aged mice exhibited elevated serum MCP-1, a phenotype consistent with inflammaging. Robust correlation tests identified several taxa whose abundance in the microbiome associates with serum MCP-1 status, indicating that they may interact with the mouse immune system. We find that taxonomically similar organisms can exhibit differing, even opposite, patterns of association with the host immune system. We also find that many of the OTUs that associate with serum MCP-1 stratify individuals by age. Discussion. Our results demonstrate that gut microbiome composition is associated with age and the pro-inflammatory marker, serum MCP-1. The correlation between age

  9. Biokinetics of nanoparticles and susceptibility to particulate exposure in a murine model of cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Persons with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at-risk for health effects from ambient air pollution but little is known about the interaction of nanoparticles (NP) with CF lungs. Here we study the distribution of inhaled NP in a murine CF model and aim to reveal mechanisms contributing to adverse effects of inhaled particles in susceptible populations. Methods Chloride channel defective CftrTgH (neoim) Hgu mice were used to analyze lung function, lung distribution and whole body biokinetics of inhaled NP, and inflammatory responses after intratracheal administration of NP. Distribution of 20-nm titanium dioxide NP in lungs was assessed on ultrathin sections immediately and 24 h after a one-hour NP inhalation. NP biokinetics was deduced from total and regional lung deposition and from whole body translocation of inhaled 30-nm iridium NP within 24 h after aerosol inhalation. Inflammatory responses were assessed within 7 days after carbon NP instillation. Results Cftr mutant females had moderately reduced lung compliance and slightly increased airway resistance compared to wild type mice. We found no genotype dependent differences in total, regional and head deposition or in secondary-organ translocation of inhaled iridium NP. Titanium dioxide inhalation resulted in higher NP uptake by alveolar epithelial cells in Cftr mutants. Instillation of carbon NP induced a comparable acute and transient inflammatory response in both genotypes. The twofold increase of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) neutrophils in Cftr mutant compared to wild type mice at day 3 but not at days 1 and 7, indicated an impaired capacity in inflammation resolution in Cftr mutants. Concomitant to the delayed decline of neutrophils, BAL granulocyte-colony stimulating factor was augmented in Cftr mutant mice. Anti-inflammatory 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid was generally significantly lower in BAL of Cftr mutant than in wild type mice. Conclusions Despite lacking alterations in lung deposition and

  10. A murine experimental model for the mechanical behaviour of viable right-ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Valdez-Jasso, Daniela; Simon, Marc A; Champion, Hunter C; Sacks, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    Although right-ventricular function is an important determinant of cardio-pulmonary performance in health and disease, right ventricular myocardium mechanical behaviour has received relatively little attention. We present a novel experimental method for quantifying the mechanical behaviour of transmurally intact, viable right-ventricular myocardium. Seven murine right ventricular free wall (RVFW) specimens were isolated and biaxial mechanical behaviour measured, along with quantification of the local transmural myofibre and collagen fibre architecture. We developed a complementary strain energy function based method to capture the average biomechanical response. Overall, murine RVFW revealed distinct mechanical anisotropy. The preferential alignment of the myofibres and collagen fibres to the apex-to-outflow-tract direction was consistent with this also being the mechanically stiffer axis. We also observed that the myofibre and collagen fibre orientations were remarkably uniform throughout the entire RVFW thickness. Thus, our findings indicate a close correspondence between the tissue microstructure and biomechanical behaviour of the RVFW myocardium, and are a first step towards elucidating the structure–function of non-contracted murine RVFW myocardium in health and disease. PMID:22848044

  11. Adaptation and failure of pancreatic β cells in murine models with different degrees of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Gomez, Gema; Yetukuri, Laxman; Velagapudi, Vidya; Campbell, Mark; Blount, Margaret; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Ros, Manuel; Orešič, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The events that contribute to the expansion of β-cell mass and enhanced β-cell function in insulin-resistant states have not been elucidated fully. Recently, we showed that β-cell adaptation failed dramatically in adult, insulin-resistant POKO mice, which contrasts with the appropriate expansion of β cells in their ob/ob littermates. Thus, we hypothesised that characterisation of the islets in these mouse models at an early age should provide a unique opportunity to: (1) identify mechanisms involved in sensing insulin resistance at the level of the β cells, (2) identify molecular effectors that contribute to increasing β-cell mass and function, and (3) distinguish primary events from secondary events that are more likely to be present at more advanced stages of diabetes. Our results define the POKO mouse as a model of early lipotoxicity. At 4 weeks of age, it manifests with inappropriate β-cell function and defects in proliferation markers. Other well-recognised pathogenic effectors that were observed previously in 16-week-old mice, such as increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), macrophage infiltration and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, are also present in both young POKO and young ob/ob mice, indicating the lack of predictive power with regards to the severity of β-cell failure. Of interest, the relatively preserved lipidomic profile in islets from young POKO mice contrasted with the large changes in lipid composition and the differences in the chain length of triacylglycerols in the serum, liver, muscle and adipose tissue in adult POKO mice. Later lipotoxic insults in adult β cells contribute to the failure of the POKO β cell. Our results indicate that the rapid development of insulin resistance and β-cell failure in POKO mice makes this model a useful tool to study early molecular events leading to insulin resistance and β-cell failure. Furthermore, comparisons with ob/ob mice might reveal important adaptive mechanisms in β cells with

  12. Competency-Based Adult Education: Florida Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elizabeth

    This compilation of program materials serves as an introduction to Florida's Brevard Community College's (BCC's) Competency-Based Adult High School Completion Project, a multi-year project designed to teach adult administrators, counselors, and teachers how to organize and implement a competency-based adult education (CBAE) program; to critique…

  13. A murine model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-ultrastructural evaluation of storage in the central nervous system and viscera.

    PubMed

    Galvin, Nancy; Vogler, Carole; Levy, Beth; Kovacs, Attila; Griffey, Megan; Sands, Mark S

    2008-01-01

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL), also known as Santavuori-Haltia disease, is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl-protein-thioesterase-1 (PPT1). Fatty acid-modified proteins are not degraded and accumulate as granular osmiophilic deposits in cells in the central nervous system; patients have blindness, seizures, progressive psychomotor deterioration, and die in early childhood. Although the disease manifests clinically primarily with neurological symptoms, visceral storage also accumulates. A murine model of INCL due to PPT1 deficiency exhibits clinical findings and pathology similar to those seen in patients with INCL. Homozygous PPT1-deficient mice have a shortened life span and neurological abnormalities including seizures, blindness, and mental and motor deficits. Widespread granular osmiophilic deposits (GRODs) accumulate in lysosomes in neurons and glia in the brain, retinal cells, kidney glomerular cells, aortic smooth muscle cells, and, in lesser amounts, in the fixed-tissue macrophage system. Accumulation of GRODs in aortic smooth muscle cells is accompanied by abnormalities in cardiac function and aortic root dilatation. This PPT1-deficient murine model is a well-defined genetic system that can be used to test potential therapies for lysosomal storage disease and to study the pathophysiology of INCL. PMID:17990914

  14. Effects of granulosa coculture on in-vitro oocyte meiotic maturation within a putatively less competent murine model.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Tong, Guo Qing; Ng, Soon Chye

    2004-09-15

    A less competent murine in vitro maturation (IVM) model was achieved by shortening the standard duration of in vivo PMSG stimulation from 48 to 24 h and selecting only naked/partially naked GV oocytes from a mixture of large and small follicles. Porcine granulosa coculture enhanced meiotic maturation within such a less competent model (37.3% versus 23.1%, P<0.05), while no significant enhancement was observed with macaque and murine granulosa coculture. Culture of porcine granulosa on extracellular matrix (ECM) gel resulted in a more differentiated morphology, but did not significantly further enhance the beneficial effects it already had on meiotic maturation. Increased concentrations of serum as well as the supplementation of gonadotrophins and follicular fluid within the culture milieu did not enhance IVM under both cell-free and coculture conditions. Porcine granulosa-conditioned medium also enhanced meiotic maturation (36.5% versus 26.7%, P<0.05), which was not diminished upon freeze-thawing (35.8% versus 22.6%, P<0.05). Enhancement of meiotic maturation by porcine granulosa coculture did not however translate to significant improvements in developmental competence, as assessed by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo culture to the blastocyst stage, followed by total cell counts. ECM gel had a detrimental effect on fertilization and developmental competence, even though it had no detrimental effect on meiotic maturation itself. PMID:15289048

  15. Investigations into the Immunotoxicity and Allergic Potential Induced by Topical Application of N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBBS) in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Marrocco, Antonella; Meade, B. Jean; Long, Carrie M.; Lukomska, Ewa; Marshall, Nikki B.; Anderson, Stacey E.

    2015-01-01

    N-Butylbenzene sulfonamide (NBBS) is a commonly used plasticizer found in numerous products. Due to its extensive use, lack of adequate toxicological data, and suspicion of toxicity based on the presence of structural alerts, it was nominated to the National Toxicology Program for comprehensive toxicological testing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for hypersensitivity and immune suppression following dermal exposure to NBBS using a murine model. NBBS tested negative in a combined irritancy/local lymph node assay (LLNA), classifying it as nonirritating and nonsensitizing. To estimate the immunosuppressive potential of NBBS, assays that assessed immunotoxicity were performed, including the immumnoglobulin (Ig) M response to T-cell-dependent antigen sheep red blood cells (SRBC), using the plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay and immune cell phenotyping. After a 28-d treatment with NBBS, mice exposed to the lowest concentration (25% NBBS) showed a significant increase in IgM-producing B cells in the spleen. No marked changes were identified in immune cell markers in the lymph node. In contrast to body weight, a significant elevation in kidney and liver weight was observed following dermal exposure to all concentrations of NBBS. These results demonstrate that dermal exposure to NBBS, other than liver and kidney toxicity, did not apparently induce immunotoxicity in a murine model. PMID:26291892

  16. Quality Assurance Model for Digital Adult Education Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimou, Helen; Kameas, Achilles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present a model for the quality assurance of digital educational material that is appropriate for adult education. The proposed model adopts the software quality standard ISO/IEC 9126 and takes into account adult learning theories, Bloom's taxonomy of learning objectives and two instructional design models: Kolb's model…

  17. Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons' Dendritic Remodeling and Increased Microglial Density in Primary Motor Cortex in a Murine Model of Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Urrego, Diana; Troncoso, Julieta; Múnera, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This work was aimed at characterizing structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with microglial density induced by facial nerve lesion using a murine facial paralysis model. Adult transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in projecting neurons, were submitted to either unilateral section of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Injured animals were sacrificed either 1 or 3 weeks after surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1). It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in the dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Dendritic arborization of the pyramidal cells underwent overall shrinkage. Apical dendrites suffered transient shortening while basal dendrites displayed sustained shortening. Moreover, dendrites suffered transient spine pruning. Significantly higher microglial cell density was found surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons after facial nerve lesion with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. These results suggest that facial nerve lesions elicit active dendrite remodeling due to pyramidal neuron and microglia interaction, which could be the pathophysiological underpinning of some neuropathic motor sequelae in humans.

  18. Comparison of in vitro mineralization by murine embryonic and adult stem cells cultured in an osteogenic medium.

    PubMed

    Shimko, Daniel A; Burks, Chris A; Dee, Kay C; Nauman, Eric A

    2004-01-01

    Nearly half a million bone-grafting procedures occurred in the United States in the year 2000. Tissue-engineered bone substitutes may mitigate difficulties associated with current grafting options. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could be a potential cell source for bone substitutes; however, direct comparisons between ESCs and other cell sources are lacking. Here we provide a direct, long-term, in vitro comparison of mineralization processes in adult, marrow-derived, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and ESCs from the 129/Sv+c/+p mouse strain. MSCs were observed to grow at a slower rate than ESCs. MSCs expressed seven times more alkaline phosphatase (AP) per cell than did ESCs and immediately showed type I collagen and osteocalcin production. ESCs also produced type I collagen and osteocalcin, but production was delayed. Mineral deposition by ESCs was nearly 50 times higher than by MSCs. Spectroscopic analysis showed the calcium-to-phosphorus ratio (Ca:P) of the ESC mineral (1.26:1) to be significantly higher than that of the MSCs (0.29:1), but still 25% lower than hydroxyapatite (1.67:1). Addition of basic fibroblast growth factor significantly inhibited AP expression, mineral deposition, and Ca:P ratios in MSCs and had little effect on ESCs. These functional characteristics may assist with cell selection for purposes of bone tissue engineering.

  19. Interferon-gamma but not TNF alpha promotes neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth of murine adult neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Galaxy; Goldshmit, Yona; Turnley, Ann M

    2004-05-01

    Neural trauma, such as traumatic brain injury or stroke, results in a vigorous inflammatory response at and near the site of injury, with cytokine production by endogenous glial cells and invading immune cells. Little is known of the effect that these cytokines have on neural stem cell function. Here we examine the effects of two inflammatory cytokines, interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), on adult neural stem cells. Neural stem cells grown in the presence of either cytokine failed to generate neurospheres. Cytotoxicity assays showed that TNF alpha but not IFN gamma was toxic to the neural stem cells under proliferative conditions. Under differentiating conditions, neither cytokine was toxic; however, IFN gamma enhanced neuronal differentiation, rapidly increasing beta III-tubulin positive cell numbers 3-4 fold and inhibiting astrocyte generation. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth and the number of neurites per neuron was enhanced in cells differentiated in the presence of IFN gamma. Therefore, both inflammatory cytokines examined have substantial, but different effects on neural stem cell function and suggests that regulation of the inflammatory environment following brain injury may influence the ability of neural stem cells to repair the damage. PMID:15081598

  20. A Proteomic Investigation of Hepatic Resistance to Ascaris in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Deslyper, Gwendoline; Colgan, Thomas J.; Cooper, Andrew J. R.; Holland, Celia V.; Carolan, James C.

    2016-01-01

    The helminth Ascaris causes ascariasis in both humans and pigs. Humans, especially children, experience significant morbidity including respiratory complications, growth deficits and intestinal obstruction. Given that 800 million people worldwide are infected by Ascaris, this represents a significant global public health concern. The severity of the symptoms and associated morbidity are related to the parasite burden and not all hosts are infected equally. While the pathology of the disease has been extensively examined, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance and susceptibility to this nematode infection is poor. In order to investigate host differences associated with heavy and light parasite burden, an experimental murine model was developed utilising Ascaris-susceptible and -resistant mice strains, C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca, respectively, which experience differential burdens of migratory Ascaris larvae in the host lungs. Previous studies identified the liver as the site where this difference in susceptibility occurs. Using a label free quantitative proteomic approach, we analysed the hepatic proteomes of day four post infection C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca mice with and without Ascaris infection to identify proteins changes potentially linked to both resistance and susceptibility amongst the two strains, respectively. Over 3000 proteins were identified in total and clear intrinsic differences were elucidated between the two strains. These included a higher abundance of mitochondrial proteins, particularly those associated with the oxidative phosphorylation pathway and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the relatively resistant CBA/Ca mice. We hypothesise that the increased ROS levels associated with higher levels of mitochondrial activity results in a highly oxidative cellular environment that has a dramatic effect on the nematode’s ability to successfully sustain a parasitic association with its resistant host. Under infection, both

  1. A Proteomic Investigation of Hepatic Resistance to Ascaris in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Deslyper, Gwendoline; Colgan, Thomas J; Cooper, Andrew J R; Holland, Celia V; Carolan, James C

    2016-08-01

    The helminth Ascaris causes ascariasis in both humans and pigs. Humans, especially children, experience significant morbidity including respiratory complications, growth deficits and intestinal obstruction. Given that 800 million people worldwide are infected by Ascaris, this represents a significant global public health concern. The severity of the symptoms and associated morbidity are related to the parasite burden and not all hosts are infected equally. While the pathology of the disease has been extensively examined, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance and susceptibility to this nematode infection is poor. In order to investigate host differences associated with heavy and light parasite burden, an experimental murine model was developed utilising Ascaris-susceptible and -resistant mice strains, C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca, respectively, which experience differential burdens of migratory Ascaris larvae in the host lungs. Previous studies identified the liver as the site where this difference in susceptibility occurs. Using a label free quantitative proteomic approach, we analysed the hepatic proteomes of day four post infection C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca mice with and without Ascaris infection to identify proteins changes potentially linked to both resistance and susceptibility amongst the two strains, respectively. Over 3000 proteins were identified in total and clear intrinsic differences were elucidated between the two strains. These included a higher abundance of mitochondrial proteins, particularly those associated with the oxidative phosphorylation pathway and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the relatively resistant CBA/Ca mice. We hypothesise that the increased ROS levels associated with higher levels of mitochondrial activity results in a highly oxidative cellular environment that has a dramatic effect on the nematode's ability to successfully sustain a parasitic association with its resistant host. Under infection, both

  2. Synergist Ablation as a Rodent Model to Study Satellite Cell Dynamics in Adult Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Tyler J; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    In adult skeletal muscles, satellite cells are the primary myogenic stem cells involved in myogenesis. Normally, they remain in a quiescent state until activated by a stimulus, after which they proliferate, differentiate, and fuse into an existing myofiber or form a de novo myofiber. To study satellite cell dynamics in adult murine models, most studies utilize regeneration models in which the muscle is severely damaged and requires the participation from satellite cells in order to repair. Here, we describe a model to study satellite cell behavior in muscle hypertrophy that is independent of muscle regeneration.Synergist ablation surgery involves the surgical removal of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles resulting in functional overload of the remaining plantaris muscle. This functional overload results in myofiber hypertrophy, as well as the activation, proliferation, and fusion of satellite cells into the myofibers. Within 2 weeks of functional overload, satellite cell content increases approximately 275 %, an increase that is accompanied with a ~60 % increase in the number of myonuclei. Therefore, this can be used as an alternative model to study satellite cell behavior in adulthood that is different from regeneration, and capable of revealing new satellite cell functions in regulating muscle adaptation. PMID:27492164

  3. Synergist Ablation as a Rodent Model to Study Satellite Cell Dynamics in Adult Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Tyler J; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    In adult skeletal muscles, satellite cells are the primary myogenic stem cells involved in myogenesis. Normally, they remain in a quiescent state until activated by a stimulus, after which they proliferate, differentiate, and fuse into an existing myofiber or form a de novo myofiber. To study satellite cell dynamics in adult murine models, most studies utilize regeneration models in which the muscle is severely damaged and requires the participation from satellite cells in order to repair. Here, we describe a model to study satellite cell behavior in muscle hypertrophy that is independent of muscle regeneration.Synergist ablation surgery involves the surgical removal of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles resulting in functional overload of the remaining plantaris muscle. This functional overload results in myofiber hypertrophy, as well as the activation, proliferation, and fusion of satellite cells into the myofibers. Within 2 weeks of functional overload, satellite cell content increases approximately 275 %, an increase that is accompanied with a ~60 % increase in the number of myonuclei. Therefore, this can be used as an alternative model to study satellite cell behavior in adulthood that is different from regeneration, and capable of revealing new satellite cell functions in regulating muscle adaptation.

  4. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using (211)At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Johnnie J; Bäck, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee; Balkin, Ethan R; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Fisher, Darrell R; Frayo, Shani L; Hylarides, Mark D; Green, Damian J; Gopal, Ajay K; Press, Oliver W; Pagel, John M

    2013-05-01

    Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using monoclonal antibodies labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse. β emitters are limited by lower energies and nonspecific cytotoxicity from longer path lengths compared with α emitters such as (211)At, which has a higher energy profile and shorter path length. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT using (211)At in a disseminated murine AML model. Biodistribution studies in leukemic SJL/J mice showed excellent localization of (211)At-anti-murine CD45 mAb (30F11) to marrow and spleen within 24 hours (18% and 79% injected dose per gram of tissue [ID/g], respectively), with lower kidney and lung uptake (8.4% and 14% ID/g, respectively). In syngeneic HSCT studies, (211)At-B10-30F11 RIT improved the median survival of leukemic mice in a dose-dependent fashion (123, 101, 61, and 37 days given 24, 20, 12, and 0 µCi, respectively). This approach had minimal toxicity with nadir white blood cell counts >2.7 K/µL 2 weeks after HSCT and recovery by 4 weeks. These data suggest that (211)At-anti-CD45 RIT in conjunction with HSCT may be a promising therapeutic option for AML. PMID:23471305

  5. Multistage histopathological image segmentation of Iba1-stained murine microglias in a focal ischemia model: methodological workflow and expert validation.

    PubMed

    Valous, Nektarios A; Lahrmann, Bernd; Zhou, Wei; Veltkamp, Roland; Grabe, Niels

    2013-03-15

    A multistage workflow was developed for segmenting and counting murine microglias from histopathological brightfield images, in a permanent focal cerebral ischemia model. Automated counts are useful, since for the assessment of inflammatory mechanisms in ischemic stroke there is a need to quantify the brain's responses to post-ischemia, which primarily is the rapid activation of microglial cells. Permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced in murine brain tissue samples. Positive cells were quantified by immunohistochemistry for the ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba1) as the microglia marker. Microglia cells were segmented in seven sequential steps: (i) contrast boosting using quaternion operations, (ii) intensity outlier normalization, (iii) nonlocal total variation denoising, (iv) histogram specification and contrast stretching, (v) homomorphic filtering, (vi) global thresholding, and (vii) morphological filtering. Workflow counts were validated on an image subset, with ground-truth data acquired from manual counts conducted by a neuropathologist. Automated workflow matched ground-truth counts pretty well; 80-90% accuracy was achieved, as regards to time after pMCAO and correspondence to ischemic/non-ischemic tissue. PMID:23274945

  6. Heart CD36 expression is increased in murine models of diabetes and in mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed Central

    Greenwalt, D E; Scheck, S H; Rhinehart-Jones, T

    1995-01-01

    High levels of CD36 expression are found in triglyceride storing and secreting cells such as differentiated adipocytes and mammary secretory epithelial cells and in some capillary endothelial cells. We have found high levels of CD36 in the capillary endothelium of murine adipose tissue and in cardiac and skeletal muscles. Muscle cells themselves were CD36 negative. No CD36 was found in brain endothelium. Cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues are highly oxidative and catabolize long-chain fatty acids as a source of energy while brain tissue does not use long-chain fatty acids for energy production. Since capillary endothelial cell CD36 expression appeared to correlate with parenchymal cell fatty acid utilization and since CD26 has been identified recently as a long-chain fatty acid-binding protein, we examined heart tissue CD36 expression in murine models of insulin-dependent (nonobese diabetic, NOD) and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (KKAY). Diabetic NOD and KKAY mice had serum triglyceride levels 2.6- and 4.2-fold higher, respectively, than normal mice and exhibited 7- and 3.5-fold higher levels of heart microsomal CD36, respectively, than control mice. Mice fed a 40% fat diet expressed heart tissue CD36 at a level 3.5-fold higher than those fed a 9% fat diet. These data suggest that endothelial cell CD36 expression is related to parenchymal cell lipid metabolism. Images PMID:7544802

  7. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using 211At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Bäck, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee; Balkin, Ethan R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frayo, Shani L.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using monoclonal antibodies labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse. β emitters are limited by lower energies and nonspecific cytotoxicity from longer path lengths compared with α emitters such as 211At, which has a higher energy profile and shorter path length. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT using 211At in a disseminated murine AML model. Biodistribution studies in leukemic SJL/J mice showed excellent localization of 211At-anti-murine CD45 mAb (30F11) to marrow and spleen within 24 hours (18% and 79% injected dose per gram of tissue [ID/g], respectively), with lower kidney and lung uptake (8.4% and 14% ID/g, respectively). In syngeneic HSCT studies, 211At-B10-30F11 RIT improved the median survival of leukemic mice in a dose-dependent fashion (123, 101, 61, and 37 days given 24, 20, 12, and 0 µCi, respectively). This approach had minimal toxicity with nadir white blood cell counts >2.7 K/µL 2 weeks after HSCT and recovery by 4 weeks. These data suggest that 211At-anti-CD45 RIT in conjunction with HSCT may be a promising therapeutic option for AML. PMID:23471305

  8. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using (211)At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Johnnie J; Bäck, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee; Balkin, Ethan R; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Fisher, Darrell R; Frayo, Shani L; Hylarides, Mark D; Green, Damian J; Gopal, Ajay K; Press, Oliver W; Pagel, John M

    2013-05-01

    Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using monoclonal antibodies labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse. β emitters are limited by lower energies and nonspecific cytotoxicity from longer path lengths compared with α emitters such as (211)At, which has a higher energy profile and shorter path length. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT using (211)At in a disseminated murine AML model. Biodistribution studies in leukemic SJL/J mice showed excellent localization of (211)At-anti-murine CD45 mAb (30F11) to marrow and spleen within 24 hours (18% and 79% injected dose per gram of tissue [ID/g], respectively), with lower kidney and lung uptake (8.4% and 14% ID/g, respectively). In syngeneic HSCT studies, (211)At-B10-30F11 RIT improved the median survival of leukemic mice in a dose-dependent fashion (123, 101, 61, and 37 days given 24, 20, 12, and 0 µCi, respectively). This approach had minimal toxicity with nadir white blood cell counts >2.7 K/µL 2 weeks after HSCT and recovery by 4 weeks. These data suggest that (211)At-anti-CD45 RIT in conjunction with HSCT may be a promising therapeutic option for AML.

  9. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  10. Phenotypic non-equivalence of murine (monocyte-) macrophage cells in biomaterial and inflammatory models.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Lisa M; Godek, Marisha L; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Grainger, David W

    2009-03-15

    Cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system including monocytes and macrophages (e.g., pooled human monocytes, bone marrow-derived macrophages, etc.) are often employed for in vitro assessment of novel biomaterials and to assay anti-inflammatory drug activity. In this context, numerous macrophage cells are treated interchangeably in the literature despite a lack of demonstrated equivalence among immortalized cell lines and further, between cell lines and primary-derived macrophages of different species. Three murine (monocyte-) macrophage cell lines (IC-21, J774A.1, and RAW 264.7), commonly utilizedin biomaterial and pharmaceutical screening research, have been compared with primary-derived murine bone marrow macrophages. Significant differences were discovered in the expression of cell surface proteins requisite for cell adhesion and activation among cell lines and primary-derived cells as well as between the different cell lines. Results demonstrate activation but with reduced cytokine expression to chemical stimulus (lipopolysaccharide) by cell lines compared with that of primary-derived macrophages. Limited correlation between cultured primary and immortalized cells in cytokine production, phenotype and intrinsic activation states has relevance to fidelity for in vitro testing. These differences warrant justification for selection of various cell lines for specific assay purposes, and merit caution if comparisons to primary cell types (i.e., for biocompatibility) are required. PMID:18357567

  11. Distribution of radiolabeled human and mouse monoclonal IgM antibodies in murine models.

    PubMed

    Halpern, S E; Hagan, P L; Chen, A; Birdwell, C R; Bartholomew, R M; Burnett, K G; David, G S; Poggenburg, K; Merchant, B; Carlo, D J

    1988-10-01

    The distribution and kinetics of six human and one murine monoclonal IgM antibodies (MoAb) were studied in BALB/c mice. Labeling was with 111In, 75Se, and 125I. The monomers and pentamers of certain MoAbs were studied. Human distribution studies were also performed. The serum containing [111In]MoAb was obtained from one of the patients 24 hr after administration and injected into mice which were then killed and assayed for 111In distribution. In general, the [75Se] and [111In]MoAbs had distribution and kinetic patterns that were similar while the 125I-labeled MoAbs dehalogenated after 4 hr. Monomers and pentamers had highly similar distributions suggesting that the distribution of IgMs may be based on factors other than molecular size. The murine IgM showed a somewhat different distribution in mice than did human IgMs. Serum from the patient containing [111In]MoAb had a distribution in mice similar to that of the patient with high liver and gastrointestinal uptake. The human imaging indicates that it is possible to target tumor with human IgM MoAbs, but significant problems remain in regard to their clinical use.

  12. Distribution of radiolabeled human and mouse monoclonal IgM antibodies in murine models

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, S.E.; Hagan, P.L.; Chen, A.; Birdwell, C.R.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Burnett, K.G.; David, G.S.; Poggenburg, K.; Merchant, B.; Carlo, D.J.

    1988-10-01

    The distribution and kinetics of six human and one murine monoclonal IgM antibodies (MoAb) were studied in BALB/c mice. Labeling was with /sup 111/In, /sup 75/Se, and /sup 125/I. The monomers and pentamers of certain MoAbs were studied. Human distribution studies were also performed. The serum containing (/sup 111/In)MoAb was obtained from one of the patients 24 hr after administration and injected into mice which were then killed and assayed for /sup 111/In distribution. In general, the (/sup 75/Se) and (/sup 111/In)MoAbs had distribution and kinetic patterns that were similar while the /sup 125/I-labeled MoAbs dehalogenated after 4 hr. Monomers and pentamers had highly similar distributions suggesting that the distribution of IgMs may be based on factors other than molecular size. The murine IgM showed a somewhat different distribution in mice than did human IgMs. Serum from the patient containing (/sup 111/In)MoAb had a distribution in mice similar to that of the patient with high liver and gastrointestinal uptake. The human imaging indicates that it is possible to target tumor with human IgM MoAbs, but significant problems remain in regard to their clinical use.

  13. Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase1 Is an Organ-Specific Mediator of End Organ Damage in a Murine Model of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sydow, Karsten; Schmitz, Christine; von Leitner, Eike-Christin; von Leitner, Robin; Klinke, Anna; Atzler, Dorothee; Krebs, Christian; Wieboldt, Hartwig; Ehmke, Heimo; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Meinertz, Thomas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Böger, Rainer H.; Magnus, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Background The endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular and overall mortality. Moreover, elevated ADMA plasma concentrations are associated with the extent of hypertension. However, data from small-sized clinical trials and experimental approaches using murine transgenic models have revealed conflicting results regarding the impact of ADMA and its metabolizing enzyme dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Methodology/Principal Findings Therefore, we investigated the role of ADMA and DDAH1 in hypertension-induced end organ damage using the uninephrectomized, deoxycorticosterone actetate salt, and angiotensin II-induced hypertension model in human DDAH1 (hDDAH1) overexpressing and wild-type (WT) mice. ADMA plasma concentrations differed significantly between hDDAH1 and WT mice at baseline, but did not significantly change during the induction of hypertension. hDDAH1 overexpression did not protect against hypertension-induced cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy. In addition, the hypertension-induced impairment of the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of aortic segments ex vivo was not significantly attenuated by hDDAH1 overexpression. However, hDDAH1 mice displayed an attenuated hypertensive inflammatory response in renal tissue, resulting in less hypertensive renal injury. Conclusion/Significance Our data reveal that hDDAH1 organ-specifically modulates the inflammatory response in this murine model of hypertension. The lack of protection in cardiac and aortic tissues may be due to DDAH1 tissue selectivity and/or the extent of hypertension by the used combined model. However, our study underlines the potency of hDDAH1 overexpression in modulating inflammatory processes as a crucial step in the pathogenesis of hypertension, which needs further experimental and clinical investigation. PMID:23110194

  14. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model.

    PubMed

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R; Hoffman, Michael D; Vella, Joseph B; Benoit, Danielle S W; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-07-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing.

  15. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model.

    PubMed

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R; Hoffman, Michael D; Vella, Joseph B; Benoit, Danielle S W; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-07-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing. PMID:26203392

  16. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R.; Hoffman, Michael D.; Vella, Joseph B.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-01-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing. PMID:26203392

  17. A natural human IgM that binds to gangliosides is therapeutic in murine models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohua; Denic, Aleksandar; Jordan, Luke R.; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Warrington, Arthur E.; Wootla, Bharath; Papke, Louisa M.; Zoecklein, Laurie J.; Yoo, Daehan; Shaver, Jonah; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Pease, Larry R.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating, fatal neurological disease that primarily affects spinal cord anterior horn cells and their axons for which there is no treatment. Here we report the use of a recombinant natural human IgM that binds to the surface of neurons and supports neurite extension, rHIgM12, as a therapeutic strategy in murine models of human ALS. A single 200 µg intraperitoneal dose of rHIgM12 increases survival in two independent genetic-based mutant SOD1 mouse strains (SOD1G86R and SOD1G93A) by 8 and 10 days, delays the onset of neurological deficits by 16 days, delays the onset of weight loss by 5 days, and preserves spinal cord axons and anterior horn neurons. Immuno-overlay of thin layer chromatography and surface plasmon resonance show that rHIgM12 binds with high affinity to the complex gangliosides GD1a and GT1b. Addition of rHIgM12 to neurons in culture increases α-tubulin tyrosination levels, suggesting an alteration of microtubule dynamics. We previously reported that a single peripheral dose of rHIgM12 preserved neurological function in a murine model of demyelination with axon loss. Because rHIgM12 improves three different models of neurological disease, we propose that the IgM might act late in the cascade of neuronal stress and/or death by a broad mechanism. PMID:26035393

  18. Expression of intronic miRNAs and their host gene Igf2 in a murine unilateral ureteral obstruction model

    PubMed Central

    Li, N.Q.; Yang, J.; Cui, L.; Ma, N.; Zhang, L.; Hao, L.R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the expression of miR-483 and miR-483* and the relationship among them, their host gene (Igf2), and other cytokines in a murine model of renal fibrosis. The extent of renal fibrosis was visualized using Masson staining, and fibrosis was scored 3 days and 1 and 2 weeks after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Expression of miR-483, miR-483* and various cytokine mRNAs was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Expression of miR-483 and miR-483* was significantly upregulated in the UUO model, particularly miR-483 expression was the greatest 2 weeks after surgery. Additionally, miR-483 and miR-483* expression negatively correlated with Bmp7 expression and positively correlated with Igf2, Tgfβ, Hgf, and Ctgf expression, as determined by Pearson's correlation analysis. Hgf expression significantly increased at 1 and 2 weeks after the surgery compared to the control group. This study showed that miR-483 and miR-483* expression was upregulated in a murine UUO model. These data suggest that miR-483 and miR-483* play a role in renal fibrosis and that miR-483* may interact with miR-483 in renal fibrosis. Thus, these miRNAs may play a role in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis and coexpression of their host gene Igf2. PMID:25831208

  19. Colonization of the murine hindgut by sacral crest-derived neural precursors: experimental support for an evolutionarily conserved model.

    PubMed

    Kapur, R P

    2000-11-01

    Enteric ganglia in the hindgut are derived from separate vagal and sacral neural crest populations. Two conflicting models, based primarily on avian data, have been proposed to describe the contribution of sacral neural crest cells. One hypothesizes early colonization of the hindgut shortly after neurulation, and the other states that sacral crest cells reside transiently in the extraenteric ganglion of Remak and colonize the hindgut much later, after vagal crest-derived neural precursors arrive. In this study, I show that Wnt1-lacZ-transgene expression, an "early" marker of murine neural crest cells, is inconsistent with the "early-colonization" model. Although Wnt1-lacZ-positive sacral crest cells populate pelvic ganglia in the mesenchyme surrounding the hindgut, they are not found in the gut prior to the arrival of vagal crest cells. Similarly, segments of murine hindgut harvested prior to the arrival of vagal crest cells and grafted under the renal capsule fail to develop enteric neurons, unless adjacent pelvic mesenchyme is included in the graft. When pelvic mesenchyme from DbetaH-nlacZ transgenic embryos is apposed with nontransgenic hindgut, neural precursors from the mesenchyme colonize the hindgut and form intramural ganglion cells that express the transgenic marker. Contribution of sacral crest-derived cells to the enteric nervous system is not affected by cocolonization of grafts by vagal crest-derived neuroglial precursors. The findings complement recent studies of avian chimeras and support an evolutionarily conserved model in which sacral crest cells first colonize the extramural ganglion and secondarily enter the hindgut mesenchyme.

  20. A natural human IgM that binds to gangliosides is therapeutic in murine models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohua; Denic, Aleksandar; Jordan, Luke R; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Warrington, Arthur E; Wootla, Bharath; Papke, Louisa M; Zoecklein, Laurie J; Yoo, Daehan; Shaver, Jonah; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Pease, Larry R; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating, fatal neurological disease that primarily affects spinal cord anterior horn cells and their axons for which there is no treatment. Here we report the use of a recombinant natural human IgM that binds to the surface of neurons and supports neurite extension, rHIgM12, as a therapeutic strategy in murine models of human ALS. A single 200 µg intraperitoneal dose of rHIgM12 increases survival in two independent genetic-based mutant SOD1 mouse strains (SOD1G86R and SOD1G93A) by 8 and 10 days, delays the onset of neurological deficits by 16 days, delays the onset of weight loss by 5 days, and preserves spinal cord axons and anterior horn neurons. Immuno-overlay of thin layer chromatography and surface plasmon resonance show that rHIgM12 binds with high affinity to the complex gangliosides GD1a and GT1b. Addition of rHIgM12 to neurons in culture increases α-tubulin tyrosination levels, suggesting an alteration of microtubule dynamics. We previously reported that a single peripheral dose of rHIgM12 preserved neurological function in a murine model of demyelination with axon loss. Because rHIgM12 improves three different models of neurological disease, we propose that the IgM might act late in the cascade of neuronal stress and/or death by a broad mechanism.

  1. Two novel inhibitory anti-human factor XI antibodies prevent cessation of blood flow in a murine venous thrombosis model.

    PubMed

    van Montfoort, M L; Knaup, V L; Marquart, J A; Bakhtiari, K; Castellino, F J; Hack, C E; Meijers, J C M

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation factor XI (FXI) is a promising target for anticoagulation, because of its major role in thrombosis and relatively minor role in haemostasis. This implies that inhibition of FXI can prevent thrombosis without causing bleeding. It was our aim to investigate the antithrombotic properties of two novel inhibitory anti-human FXI antibodies (αFXI-175 and αFXI-203). The in vitro properties of both antibodies were analysed using standard clotting assays and calibrated automated thrombography. For the in vivo model we used FXI knockout mice, in which FXI plasma levels were restored with purified human FXI. Thrombosis was induced by applying ferric chloride to the vena cava inferior, after which time to occlusion was analysed. A tail bleeding assay was used to investigate the safety of both antibodies. Using calibrated automated thrombography, both antibodies inhibited thrombin generation initiated via the intrinsic pathway. In contrast, upon tissue factor (TF)-initiated thrombin generation, αFXI-203 did not inhibit thrombin generation, while αFXI-175 inhibited thrombin generation only at low concentrations of TF. In the murine thrombosis model, the vena cava inferior remained patent for 25 minutes (min) in mice treated with αFXI-175 and for 12.5 min in αFXI-203 treated animals, which was significantly longer than in placebo-treated animals (5 min, p<0.05). Neither antibody caused severe blood loss in a tail bleeding assay. In conclusion, the two inhibitory antibodies against FXI prevented cessation of blood flow in a murine thrombosis model without inducing a bleeding tendency.

  2. Biodistribution of Infused Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells in Alzheimer's Disease-Like Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart, Jared; Darlington, Donna; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Sawmiller, Darrell R; Sanberg, Paul R; Tan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs), a prolific source of non-embryonic or adult stem cells, have emerged as effective and relatively safe immunomodulators and neuroprotectors, reducing behavioral impairment in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and stroke. In this report, we followed the bioavailability of HUCBCs in AD-like transgenic PSAPP mice and nontransgenic Sprague-Dawley rats. HUCBCs were injected into tail veins of mice or rats at a single dose of 1 × 10(6) or 2.2 × 10(6) cells, respectively, prior to harvesting of tissues at 24 h, 7 days, and 30 days after injection. For determination of HUCBC distribution, tissues from both species were subjected to total DNA isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the gene for human glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Our results show a relatively similar biodistribution and retention of HUCBCs in both mouse and rat organs. HUCBCs were broadly detected both in the brain and several peripheral organs, including the liver, kidney, and bone marrow, of both species, starting within 7 days and continuing up to 30 days posttransplantation. No HUCBCs were recovered in the peripheral circulation, even at 24 h posttransplantation. Therefore, HUCBCs reach several tissues including the brain following a single intravenous treatment, suggesting that this route can be a viable method of administration of these cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Isolation and (111)In-Oxine Labeling of Murine NK Cells for Assessment of Cell Trafficking in Orthotopic Lung Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Gaurav; Nayak, Tapan; Gerdes, Christian; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Signore, Alberto; de Vries, Erik F J

    2016-04-01

    A noninvasive in vivo imaging method for NK cell trafficking is essential to gain further understanding of the pathogenesis of NK cell mediated immune response to the novel cancer treatment strategies, and to discover the homing sites and physiological distribution of NK cells. Although human NK cells can be labeled for in vivo imaging, little is known about the murine NK cell labeling and its application in animal models. This study describes the isolation and ex vivo radiolabeling of murine NK cells for the evaluation of cell trafficking in an orthotopic model of human lung cancer in mice. Scid-Tg(FCGR3A)Blt transgenic SCID mice were used to isolate NK cells from mouse splenocytes using the CD49b (DX5) MicroBeads positive selection method. The purity and viability of the isolated NK cells were confirmed by FACS analysis. Different labeling buffers and incubation times were evaluated to optimize (111)In-oxine labeling conditions. Functionality of the radiolabeled NK cell was assessed by (51)Cr-release assay. We evaluated physiological distribution of (111)In-oxine labeled murine NK cells in normal SCID mice and biodistribution in irradiated and nonirradiated SCID mice with orthotopic A549 human lung tumor lesions. Imaging findings were confirmed by histology. Results showed that incubation with 0.011 MBq of (111)In-oxine per million murine NK cells in PBS (pH 7.4) for 20 min is the best condition that provides optimum labeling efficiency without affecting cell viability and functionality. Physiological distribution in normal SCID mice demonstrated NK cells homing mainly in the spleen, while (111)In released from NK cells was excreted via kidneys into urine. Biodistribution studies demonstrated a higher lung uptake in orthotopic lung tumor-bearing mice than control mice. In irradiated mice, lung tumor uptake of radiolabeled murine NK cells decreased between 24 h and 72 h postinjection (p.i.), which was accompanied by tumor regression, while in nonirradiated mice

  4. Effects of flecainide and quinidine on arrhythmogenic properties of Scn5a+/− murine hearts modelling the Brugada syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stokoe, Kate S; Balasubramaniam, Richard; Goddard, Catharine A; Colledge, William H; Grace, Andrew A; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2007-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is associated with a loss of Na+ channel function and an increased incidence of rapid polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) and sudden cardiac death. A programmed electrical stimulation (PES) technique assessed arrhythmic tendency in Langendorff-perfused wild-type (WT) and genetically modified (Scn5a+/−) ‘loss-of-function’ murine hearts in the presence and absence of flecainide and quinidine, and the extent to which Scn5a+/− hearts model the human BrS. Extra-stimuli (S2), applied to the right ventricular epicardium, followed trains of pacing stimuli (S1) at progressively reduced S1–S2 intervals. These triggered VT in 16 out of 29 untreated Scn5a+/− and zero out of 31 WT hearts. VT occurred in 11 out of 16 (10 μm) flecainide-treated WT and nine out of the 13 initially non-arrhythmogenic Scn5a+/− hearts treated with (1.0 μm) flecainide. Quinidine (10 μm) prevented VT in six out of six flecainide-treated WT and 13 out of the 16 arrhythmogenic Scn5a+/− hearts in parallel with its clinical effects. Paced electrogram fractionation analysis demonstrated increased electrogram durations, expressed as electrogram duration (EGD) ratios, with shortening S1–S2 intervals in arrhythmogenic Scn5a+/− hearts, and prolonged ventricular effective refractory periods (VERPs) in non-arrhythmogenic Scn5a+/− hearts. Flecainide increased EGD ratios in WT (at 10 μm) and non-arrhythmogenic Scn5a+/− hearts (at 1.0 μm), whereas quinidine (10 μm) reduced EGD ratios and prolonged VERPs in WT and arrhythmogenic Scn5a+/− hearts. However, epicardial and endocardial monophasic action potential recordings consistently demonstrated positive gradients of repolarization in WT, arrhythmogenic and non-arrhythmogenic Scn5a+/− hearts under all pharmacological conditions. Together, these findings demonstrate proarrhythmic effects of flecainide in WT and Scn5a+/− murine hearts that recapitulate its clinical effects. They further attribute the

  5. Efficacy of an experimental azithromycin cream for prophylaxis of tick-transmitted lyme disease spirochete infection in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Piesman, Joseph; Hojgaard, Andrias; Ullmann, Amy J; Dolan, Marc C

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to oral prophylaxis for the prevention of tick transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, we tested antibiotic cream prophylactic formulations in a murine model of spirochete infection. A 4% preparation of doxycycline cream afforded no protection, but a single application of 4% azithromycin cream was 100% protective when applied directly to the tick bite site at the time of tick removal. Indeed, the azithromycin cream was 100% effective when applied at up to 3 days after tick removal and protected 74% of mice exposed to tick bite when applied at up to 2 weeks after tick removal. Azithromycin cream was also protective when applied at a site distal to the tick bite site, suggesting that it was having a systemic effect in addition to a local transdermal effect. Mice that were protected from tick-transmitted infection did not seroconvert and did not infect larval ticks on xenodiagnosis. Azithromycin cream formulations appear to hold promise for Lyme disease prophylaxis. PMID:24165183

  6. Establishment of animal liver metastatic model for C-1300 murine neuroblastoma and immunotherapy for it using OK-432, streptococcus preparation.

    PubMed

    Naito, H; Ziegler, M M; Miyakawa, A; Tokunaga, O; Sasaki, M

    1992-01-01

    Intrasplenic administration of 1 x 10(6) C-1300 murine neuroblastoma cells induced spleen tumor in 78.6% of mice and liver metastasis in 64.3%. When mice were pretreated with carrageenan, an antimacrophage agent, the incidence of spleen and liver tumors in this system was lower, possibly due to the rebound increase in macrophage activity following the disappearance of the carrageenan effect. Continuous daily intraabdominal injection of 1 KE of OK-432 streptococcus preparation markedly reduced the appearance of liver metastasis (P less than 0.01), whereas the spleen mass was not reduced to such an extent. However, the survival rate of the OK-432-treated group did not differ greatly from that of the nontreated group. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the model of liver metastasis induced by intrasplenic administration of tumor cells and the effectiveness of OK-432 against liver metastasis formation.

  7. Vitamin A Deficiency Promotes Inflammation by Induction of Type 2 Cytokines in Experimental Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiwei; Zhang, Peng; Gu, Jingmin; Tian, Yuan; Gao, Xiuzhu; Liu, Yaqing; Jin, Zheng; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun; Li, Dong

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin A (VA) deficiency is one of the most common malnutrition conditions. Recent reports showed that VA plays an important role in the immune balance; lack of VA could result in enhanced type 2 immune response characterized by increased type 2 cytokine production and type 2 innate lymphoid cell infiltration and activation. Type 2 immune response plays protective role in anti-infection but plays pathological role in asthmatic disease. In order to investigate the role of VA in the asthmatic disease, we used ovalbumin-induced asthma murine model and observed the pathological changes between mouse-received VA-deficient and VA-sufficient diets. We also measured the type 2 cytokine expressions to reveal the potential mechanism. Our results showed that VA deficiency exacerbates ovalbumin-induced lung inflammation and type 2 cytokine productions. Thus, VA deficiency, or malnutrition in further extent, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of asthma. PMID:27525423

  8. Efficacy of species-specific protein antibiotics in a murine model of acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    PubMed Central

    McCaughey, Laura C.; Ritchie, Neil. D.; Douce, Gillian R.; Evans, Thomas J.; Walker, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Protein antibiotics, known as bacteriocins, are widely produced by bacteria for intraspecies competition. The potency and targeted action of bacteriocins suggests that they could be developed into clinically useful antibiotics against highly drug resistant Gram-negative pathogens for which there are few therapeutic options. Here we show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa specific bacteriocins, known as pyocins, show strong efficacy in a murine model of P. aeruginosa lung infection, with the concentration of pyocin S5 required to afford protection from a lethal infection at least 100-fold lower than the most commonly used inhaled antibiotic tobramycin. Additionally, pyocins are stable in the lung, poorly immunogenic at high concentrations and efficacy is maintained in the presence of pyocin specific antibodies after repeated pyocin administration. Bacteriocin encoding genes are frequently found in microbial genomes and could therefore offer a ready supply of highly targeted and potent antibiotics active against problematic Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:27444885

  9. Icariin attenuates glucocorticoid insensitivity mediated by repeated psychosocial stress on an ovalbumin-induced murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Li, Bei; Duan, Xiaohong; Xu, Changqing; Wu, Jinfeng; Liu, Baojun; Du, Yiji; Luo, Qingli; Jin, Hualiang; Gong, Weiyi; Dong, Jingcheng

    2014-04-01

    Evidence shows that psychosocial stress exacerbates asthma, but there is little intervention to alleviate negative effects of psychosocial stress on asthma. We investigated the role of icariin in anti-inflammation and anti-anxiety potential in a murine model combined psychosocial stress with allergic exposure. The results indicated that icariin administered remarkable increased activity in the center of the open field, reversed airway hyperresponsivenesss, reduced inflammatory cytokine infiltration to the lung and whole body and also in part recovered glucocorticoid responsiveness. Furthermore, our data also showed that icariin significantly inhibited increases of corticosterone and markedly increased glucocorticoid receptor mRNA and protein expression in the lungs of mice exposed to both stress and allergen. Collectively, we speculate that inducing glucocorticoid receptor modulation might be the potential mechanisms of icariin to facilitate corticosteroid responsiveness of cytokine production.

  10. Effect of exogenous administration of Candida albicans autoregulatory alcohols in a murine model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Martins, Margarida; Lazzell, Anna L; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Henriques, Mariana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2012-08-01

    Candida albicans supernatants contain a mixture of autoregulatory alcohols. In vitro, when added individually or in combination, these alcohols inhibit the yeast to filamentous form conversion. Here we evaluate the in vivo effect of the exogenous administration of a Cocktail solution simulating the composition of alcohols present in a C. albicans culture supernatant (1 ml; 94 μmol l(-1) isoamyl alcohol, 70 μmol l(-1) 2-phenylethanol, 3.2 n mol l(-1) E -nerolidol, and 18 n mol l(-1) E,E -farnesol) using the well established murine model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis. Mice injected intraperitoneally with the Cocktail solution demonstrated increased survival and decreased organ fungal burden compared to control mice. Histological observations suggest that the Cocktail, to some extent, has an inhibitory effect on cell filamentation within the kidney. These findings suggest that the exogenous administration of C. albicans autoregulatory alcohols displays a protective effect during disseminated candidiasis.

  11. Anti-asthmatic activities of an ethanol extract of Aster yomena in an ovalbumin-induced murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Sim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Hyun Seung; Lee, Sunkyung; Park, Dae Eun; Oh, Keunhee; Hwang, Kyung-A; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Kim, Hang-Rae

    2014-05-01

    Aster yomena is used in traditional remedies to treat cough, asthma and insect bites; however, its therapeutic mechanism is not completely understood. To elucidate the anti-asthmatic effect of A. yomena, we investigated the anti-asthmatic characteristics of an alcohol extract of A. yomena in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma model. In this study, we showed that A. yomena extract inhibited the overall pathophysiological features of asthma by suppressing Th2 responses and enzymes associated with the production of inflammatory mediators. This suppression resulted in decreased Th2 type cytokines and eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and OVA-specific IgE in serum. Additionally, A. yomena extract significantly decreased airway hyperresponsiveness and abrogated the histopathological changes in the lungs, which reached normal levels in the OVA-challenged mice treated with A. yomena extract. These findings suggest that A. yomena could be a promising natural agent for treating bronchial asthma in humans.

  12. Efficacy of an experimental azithromycin cream for prophylaxis of tick-transmitted lyme disease spirochete infection in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Piesman, Joseph; Hojgaard, Andrias; Ullmann, Amy J; Dolan, Marc C

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to oral prophylaxis for the prevention of tick transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, we tested antibiotic cream prophylactic formulations in a murine model of spirochete infection. A 4% preparation of doxycycline cream afforded no protection, but a single application of 4% azithromycin cream was 100% protective when applied directly to the tick bite site at the time of tick removal. Indeed, the azithromycin cream was 100% effective when applied at up to 3 days after tick removal and protected 74% of mice exposed to tick bite when applied at up to 2 weeks after tick removal. Azithromycin cream was also protective when applied at a site distal to the tick bite site, suggesting that it was having a systemic effect in addition to a local transdermal effect. Mice that were protected from tick-transmitted infection did not seroconvert and did not infect larval ticks on xenodiagnosis. Azithromycin cream formulations appear to hold promise for Lyme disease prophylaxis.

  13. Cardiac imaging using clinical 1.5 t MRI scanners in a murine ischemia/reperfusion model.

    PubMed

    Voelkl, Jakob G J; Haubner, Bernhard J; Kremser, Christian; Mayr, Agnes; Klug, Gert; Loizides, Alexander; Müller, Silvana; Pachinger, Otmar; Schocke, Michael; Metzler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    To perform cardiac imaging in mice without having to invest in expensive dedicated equipment, we adapted a clinical 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner for use in a murine ischemia/reperfusion model. Phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) sequence facilitated the determination of infarct sizes in vivo by late gadolinium enhancement. Results were compared to histological infarct areas in mice after ischemia/reperfusion procedure with a good correlation (r = 0.807, P < .001). In addition, fractional area change (FAC) was assessed with single slice cine MRI and was matched to infarct size (r = -0.837) and fractional shortening (FS) measured with echocardiography (r = 0.860); both P < .001. Here, we demonstrate the use of clinical 1.5 MRI scanners as a feasible method for basic phenotyping in mice. These widely available scanners are capable of investigating in vivo infarct dimensions as well as assessment of cardiac functional parameters in mice with reasonable throughput.

  14. A threshold of mechanical strain intensity for the direct activation of osteoblast function exists in a murine maxilla loading model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Natsuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Marcián, Petr; Borák, Libor; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2016-10-01

    The response to the mechanical loading of bone tissue has been extensively investigated; however, precisely how much strain intensity is necessary to promote bone formation remains unclear. Combination studies utilizing histomorphometric and numerical analyses were performed using the established murine maxilla loading model to clarify the threshold of mechanical strain needed to accelerate bone formation activity. For 7 days, 191 kPa loading stimulation for 30 min/day was applied to C57BL/6J mice. Two regions of interest, the AWAY region (away from the loading site) and the NEAR region (near the loading site), were determined. The inflammatory score increased in the NEAR region, but not in the AWAY region. A strain intensity map obtained from [Formula: see text] images was superimposed onto the images of the bone formation inhibitor, sclerostin-positive cell localization. The number of sclerostin-positive cells significantly decreased after mechanical loading of more than [Formula: see text] in the AWAY region, but not in the NEAR region. The mineral apposition rate, which shows the bone formation ability of osteoblasts, was accelerated at the site of surface strain intensity, namely around [Formula: see text], but not at the site of lower surface strain intensity, which was around [Formula: see text] in the AWAY region, thus suggesting the existence of a strain intensity threshold for promoting bone formation. Taken together, our data suggest that a threshold of mechanical strain intensity for the direct activation of osteoblast function and the reduction of sclerostin exists in a murine maxilla loading model in the non-inflammatory region.

  15. Comparison of postoperative corneal changes between dry eye and non-dry eye in a murine cataract surgery model

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jin Woo; Chung, Yeon Woong; Choi, Jin A; La, Tae Yoon; Jee, Dong Hyun; Cho, Yang Kyung

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the effects of the surgical insult of cataract surgery on corneal inflammatory infiltration, neovascularization (NV) and lymphangiogenesis (LY) between the dry eye and non-dry eye in murine cataract surgery models. METHODS We established two groups of animals, one with normal eyes (non-dry eye) and the second with induced dry eyes. In both groups, we used surgical insults to mimic human cataract surgery, which consisted of lens extraction, corneal incision and suture. After harvesting of corneas on the 9th postoperative day and immunohistochemical staining, we compared NV, LY and CD11b+ cell infiltration in the corneas. RESULTS Dry eye group had significantly more inflammatory infiltration (21.75%±7.17% vs 3.65%±1.49%; P=0.049). The dry eye group showed significantly more NV (48.21%±4.02% vs 26.24%±6.01%; P=0.016) and greater levels of LY (9.27%±0.48% vs 4.84%±1.15%; P=0.007). In corneas on which no surgery was performed, there was no induction of NV in both the dry and non-dry group, but dry eye group demonstrated more CD11b+ cells infiltration than the non-dry eye group (0.360%±0.160% vs 0.023%±0.006%; P=0.068). Dry eye group showed more NV than non-dry eye group in both topical PBS application and subconjunctival PBS injection (P=0.020 and 0.000, respectively). CONCLUSION In a murine cataract surgery model, preexisting dry eye can induce more postoperative NV, LY, and inflammation in corneal tissue. PMID:26949638

  16. Effect of Control-released Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Incorporated in β-Tricalcium Phosphate for Murine Cranial Model

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Azusa; Tajima, Satoshi; Tobita, Morikuni; Tanaka, Rica; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background: β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is used clinically as a bone substitute, but complete osteoinduction is slow. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is important in bone regeneration, but the biological effects are very limited because of the short half-life of the free form. Incorporation in gelatin allows slow release of growth factors during degradation. The present study evaluated whether control-released bFGF incorporated in β-TCP can promote bone regeneration in a murine cranial defect model. Methods: Bilateral cranial defects of 4 mm in diameter were made in 10-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats treated as follows: group 1, 20 μl saline as control; group 2, β-TCP disk in 20 μl saline; group 3, β-TCP disk in 50 μg bFGF solution; and group 4, β-TCP disk in 50 μg bFGF-containing gelatin hydrogel (n = 6 each). Histological and imaging analyses were performed at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after surgery. Results: The computed tomography value was lower in groups 3 and 4, whereas the rate of osteogenesis was higher histologically in group 4 than in the other groups. The appearance of tartrate-resistant acid phosphate–positive cells and osteocalcin-positive cells and disappearance of osteopontin-positive cells occurred earlier in group 4 than in the other groups. Conclusions: These findings suggest that control-released bFGF incorporated in β-TCP can accelerate bone regeneration in the murine cranial defect model and may be promising for the clinical treatment of cranial defects. PMID:25289319

  17. Gallium nitrate is efficacious in murine models of tuberculosis and inhibits key bacterial Fe-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Olakanmi, Oyebode; Kesavalu, Banurekha; Pasula, Rajamouli; Abdalla, Maher Y; Schlesinger, Larry S; Britigan, Bradley E

    2013-12-01

    Acquiring iron (Fe) is critical to the metabolism and growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Disruption of Fe metabolism is a potential approach for novel antituberculous therapy. Gallium (Ga) has many similarities to Fe. Biological systems are often unable to distinguish Ga(3+) from Fe(3+). Unlike Fe(3+), Ga(3+) cannot be physiologically reduced to Ga(2+). Thus, substituting Ga for Fe in the active site of enzymes may render them nonfunctional. We previously showed that Ga inhibits growth of M. tuberculosis in broth and within cultured human macrophages. We now report that Ga(NO3)3 shows efficacy in murine tuberculosis models. BALB/c SCID mice were infected intratracheally with M. tuberculosis, following which they received daily intraperitoneal saline, Ga(NO3)3, or NaNO3. All mice receiving saline or NaNO3 died. All Ga(NO3)3-treated mice survived. M. tuberculosis CFU in the lungs, liver, and spleen of the NaNO3-treated or saline-treated mice were significantly higher than those in Ga-treated mice. When BALB/c mice were substituted for BALB/c SCID mice as a chronic (nonlethal) infection model, Ga(NO3)3 treatment significantly decreased lung CFU. To assess the mechanism(s) whereby Ga inhibits bacterial growth, the effect of Ga on M. tuberculosis ribonucleotide reductase (RR) (a key enzyme in DNA replication) and aconitase activities was assessed. Ga decreased M. tuberculosis RR activity by 50 to 60%, but no additional decrease in RR activity was seen at Ga concentrations that completely inhibited mycobacterial growth. Ga decreased aconitase activity by 90%. Ga(NO3)3 shows efficacy in murine M. tuberculosis infection and leads to a decrease in activity of Fe-dependent enzymes. Additional work is warranted to further define Ga's mechanism of action and to optimize delivery forms for possible therapeutic uses in humans.

  18. Limitations of Murine Models for Assessment of Antibody-Mediated Therapies or Vaccine Candidates against Staphylococcus epidermidis Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinrong; Kesselly, Augustus; Lam, Hubert; Kleanthous, Harry; Yethon, Jeremy A.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is normally a commensal colonizer of human skin and mucus membranes, but, due to its ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices, it has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteremia or bloodstream infection is a frequent and costly complication resulting from biofilm fouling of medical devices. Our goal was to develop a murine model of S. epidermidis infection to identify potential vaccine targets for the prevention of S. epidermidis bacteremia. However, assessing the contribution of adaptive immunity to protection against S. epidermidis challenge was complicated by a highly efficacious innate immune response in mice. Naive mice rapidly cleared S. epidermidis infections from blood and solid organs, even when the animals were immunocompromised. Cyclophosphamide-mediated leukopenia reduced the size of the bacterial challenge dose required to cause lethality but did not impair clearance after a nonlethal challenge. Nonspecific innate immune stimulation, such as treatment with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, enhanced bacterial clearance. TLR2 signaling was confirmed to accelerate the clearance of S. epidermidis bacteremia, but TLR2−/− mice could still resolve a bloodstream infection. Furthermore, TLR2 signaling played no role in the clearance of bacteria from the spleen. In conclusion, these data suggest that S. epidermidis bloodstream infection is cleared in a highly efficient manner that is mediated by both TLR2-dependent and -independent innate immune mechanisms. The inability to establish a persistent infection in mice, even in immunocompromised animals, rendered these murine models unsuitable for meaningful assessment of antibody-mediated therapies or vaccine candidates. PMID:26857577

  19. Limitations of Murine Models for Assessment of Antibody-Mediated Therapies or Vaccine Candidates against Staphylococcus epidermidis Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Cole, Leah E; Zhang, Jinrong; Kesselly, Augustus; Anosova, Natalie G; Lam, Hubert; Kleanthous, Harry; Yethon, Jeremy A

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is normally a commensal colonizer of human skin and mucus membranes, but, due to its ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices, it has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteremia or bloodstream infection is a frequent and costly complication resulting from biofilm fouling of medical devices. Our goal was to develop a murine model of S. epidermidis infection to identify potential vaccine targets for the prevention of S. epidermidis bacteremia. However, assessing the contribution of adaptive immunity to protection against S. epidermidis challenge was complicated by a highly efficacious innate immune response in mice. Naive mice rapidly cleared S. epidermidis infections from blood and solid organs, even when the animals were immunocompromised. Cyclophosphamide-mediated leukopenia reduced the size of the bacterial challenge dose required to cause lethality but did not impair clearance after a nonlethal challenge. Nonspecific innate immune stimulation, such as treatment with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, enhanced bacterial clearance. TLR2 signaling was confirmed to accelerate the clearance of S. epidermidis bacteremia, but TLR2(-/-)mice could still resolve a bloodstream infection. Furthermore, TLR2 signaling played no role in the clearance of bacteria from the spleen. In conclusion, these data suggest that S. epidermidis bloodstream infection is cleared in a highly efficient manner that is mediated by both TLR2-dependent and -independent innate immune mechanisms. The inability to establish a persistent infection in mice, even in immunocompromised animals, rendered these murine models unsuitable for meaningful assessment of antibody-mediated therapies or vaccine candidates. PMID:26857577

  20. Dexamethasone Attenuates VEGF Expression and Inflammation but Not Barrier Dysfunction in a Murine Model of Ventilator–Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hegeman, Maria A.; Hennus, Marije P.; Cobelens, Pieter M.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Jansen, Nicolaas J. G.; Schultz, Marcus J.; van Vught, Adrianus J.; Heijnen, Cobi J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ventilator–induced lung injury (VILI) is characterized by vascular leakage and inflammatory responses eventually leading to pulmonary dysfunction. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of VILI. This study examines the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on VEGF expression, inflammation and alveolar–capillary barrier dysfunction in an established murine model of VILI. Methods Healthy male C57Bl/6 mice were anesthetized, tracheotomized and mechanically ventilated for 5 hours with an inspiratory pressure of 10 cmH2O (“lower” tidal volumes of ∼7.5 ml/kg; LVT) or 18 cmH2O (“higher” tidal volumes of ∼15 ml/kg; HVT). Dexamethasone was intravenously administered at the initiation of HVT–ventilation. Non–ventilated mice served as controls. Study endpoints included VEGF and inflammatory mediator expression in lung tissue, neutrophil and protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, PaO2 to FiO2 ratios and lung wet to dry ratios. Results Particularly HVT–ventilation led to alveolar–capillary barrier dysfunction as reflected by reduced PaO2 to FiO2 ratios, elevated alveolar protein levels and increased lung wet to dry ratios. Moreover, VILI was associated with enhanced VEGF production, inflammatory mediator expression and neutrophil infiltration. Dexamethasone treatment inhibited VEGF and pro–inflammatory response in lungs of HVT–ventilated mice, without improving alveolar–capillary permeability, gas exchange and pulmonary edema formation. Conclusions Dexamethasone treatment completely abolishes ventilator–induced VEGF expression and inflammation. However, dexamethasone does not protect against alveolar–capillary barrier dysfunction in an established murine model of VILI. PMID:23451215

  1. Limitations of Murine Models for Assessment of Antibody-Mediated Therapies or Vaccine Candidates against Staphylococcus epidermidis Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Cole, Leah E; Zhang, Jinrong; Kesselly, Augustus; Anosova, Natalie G; Lam, Hubert; Kleanthous, Harry; Yethon, Jeremy A

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is normally a commensal colonizer of human skin and mucus membranes, but, due to its ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices, it has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteremia or bloodstream infection is a frequent and costly complication resulting from biofilm fouling of medical devices. Our goal was to develop a murine model of S. epidermidis infection to identify potential vaccine targets for the prevention of S. epidermidis bacteremia. However, assessing the contribution of adaptive immunity to protection against S. epidermidis challenge was complicated by a highly efficacious innate immune response in mice. Naive mice rapidly cleared S. epidermidis infections from blood and solid organs, even when the animals were immunocompromised. Cyclophosphamide-mediated leukopenia reduced the size of the bacterial challenge dose required to cause lethality but did not impair clearance after a nonlethal challenge. Nonspecific innate immune stimulation, such as treatment with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, enhanced bacterial clearance. TLR2 signaling was confirmed to accelerate the clearance of S. epidermidis bacteremia, but TLR2(-/-)mice could still resolve a bloodstream infection. Furthermore, TLR2 signaling played no role in the clearance of bacteria from the spleen. In conclusion, these data suggest that S. epidermidis bloodstream infection is cleared in a highly efficient manner that is mediated by both TLR2-dependent and -independent innate immune mechanisms. The inability to establish a persistent infection in mice, even in immunocompromised animals, rendered these murine models unsuitable for meaningful assessment of antibody-mediated therapies or vaccine candidates.

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, α particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by γH2AX

  3. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, α particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by γH2AX

  4. The AOM/DSS murine model for the study of colon carcinogenesis: From pathways to diagnosis and therapy studies

    PubMed Central

    Robertis, Mariangela De; Massi, Emanuela; Poeta, Maria Luana; Carotti, Simone; Morini, Sergio; Cecchetelli, Loredana; Signori, Emanuela; Fazio, Vito Michele

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health problem in industrialized countries. Although inflammation-linked carcinogenesis is a well accepted concept and is often observed within the gastrointestinal tract, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Inflammation can indeed provide initiating and promoting stimuli and mediators, generating a tumour-prone microenvironment. Many murine models of sporadic and inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis have been developed in the last decade, including chemically induced CRC models, genetically engineered mouse models, and xenoplants. Among the chemically induced CRC models, the combination of a single hit of azoxymethane (AOM) with 1 week exposure to the inflammatory agent dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in rodents has proven to dramatically shorten the latency time for induction of CRC and to rapidly recapitulate the aberrant crypt foci–adenoma–carcinoma sequence that occurs in human CRC. Because of its high reproducibility and potency, as well as the simple and affordable mode of application, the AOM/DSS has become an outstanding model for studying colon carcinogenesis and a powerful platform for chemopreventive intervention studies. In this article we highlight the histopathological and molecular features and describe the principal genetic and epigenetic alterations and inflammatory pathways involved in carcinogenesis in AOM/DSS–treated mice; we also present a general overview of recent experimental applications and preclinical testing of novel therapeutics in the AOM/DSS model. PMID:21483655

  5. Augmentation of arginase 1 expression by exposure to air pollution exacerbates the airways hyperresponsiveness in murine models of asthma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Arginase overexpression contributes to airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma. Arginase expression is further augmented in cigarette smoking asthmatics, suggesting that it may be upregulated by environmental pollution. Thus, we hypothesize that arginase contributes to the exacerbation of respiratory symptoms following exposure to air pollution, and that pharmacologic inhibition of arginase would abrogate the pollution-induced AHR. Methods To investigate the role of arginase in the air pollution-induced exacerbation of airways responsiveness, we employed two murine models of allergic airways inflammation. Mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) and challenged with nebulized PBS (OVA/PBS) or OVA (OVA/OVA) for three consecutive days (sub-acute model) or 12 weeks (chronic model), which exhibit inflammatory cell influx and remodeling/AHR, respectively. Twenty-four hours after the final challenge, mice were exposed to concentrated ambient fine particles plus ozone (CAP+O3), or HEPA-filtered air (FA), for 4 hours. After the CAP+O3 exposures, mice underwent tracheal cannulation and were treated with an aerosolized arginase inhibitor (S-boronoethyl-L-cysteine; BEC) or vehicle, immediately before determination of respiratory function and methacholine-responsiveness using the flexiVent®. Lungs were then collected for comparison of arginase activity, protein expression, and immunohistochemical localization. Results Compared to FA, arginase activity was significantly augmented in the lungs of CAP+O3-exposed OVA/OVA mice in both the sub-acute and chronic models. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining revealed that the increased activity was due to arginase 1 expression in the area surrounding the airways in both models. Arginase inhibition significantly reduced the CAP+O3-induced increase in AHR in both models. Conclusions This study demonstrates that arginase is upregulated following environmental exposures in murine models of asthma, and contributes

  6. Adult Community Education: A Model for Regional Policy Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The adult community education (ACE) sector in the state of Victoria provides an example of best practice in regional rural policy in Australia that may serve as a model for other areas of government effort. In 1997, 309,000 Victorians enrolled in adult and community education courses, such as business and technical skills development, literacy and…

  7. Building a Data Based Model for Senior Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtenay, Bradley C.; And Others

    Research shows that developing a curriculum model for senior adult education requires consideration of at least four important factors: (1) the heterogeneous nature of the senior adult population; (2) their specific information and interest needs; (3) the specific nature of the learning activities; and (4) the specific barriers and facilitators…

  8. Infant Imitation from Televised Peer and Adult Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seehagen, Sabine; Herbert, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    Developmental changes in learning from peers and adults during the second year of life were assessed using an imitation paradigm. Independent groups of 15- and 24-month-old infants watched a prerecorded video of an unfamiliar child or adult model demonstrating a series of actions with objects. When learning was assessed immediately, 15-month-old…

  9. Sustained activation of fibroblast transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in a murine model of scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Takagawa, Shinsuke; Lakos, Gabriella; Mori, Yasuji; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Nishioka, Kiyoshi; Varga, John

    2003-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta is responsible for triggering a cascade of events leading to fibrosis in scleroderma. The Smads are intracellular signal transducers recently shown to mediate fibroblast activation and other profibrotic responses elicited by transforming growth factor-betain vitro. To understand better the involvement of Smads in the pathogenesis of fibrosis, we examined Smad expression and activation in situ in a murine model of scleroderma. Bleomycin injections induced striking dermal infiltration with macrophages by 3 d, and progressive fibrosis by 2 wk. Infiltrating macrophages and resident fibroblasts expressed Smad3, the positive mediator for transforming growth factor-beta responses. Importantly, in bleomycin-injected skin, fibroblasts showed predominantly nuclear localization of Smad3 and intense staining for phospho-Smad2/3. Furthermore, phosphorylated Smad2/3 in fibroblasts was detected even after the resolution of inflammation. Expression of Smad7, the endogenous inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling, was strongly induced in dermal cells by transforming growth factor-beta, but not by bleomycin injections. Collectively, these results indicate that bleomycin-induced murine scleroderma is associated with rapid and sustained induction of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in resident dermal fibroblasts. Despite apparent activation of the intracellular transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway in the lesional dermis, the expression of transforming growth factor-beta-inducible Smad7 was not upregulated. In light of the critical function of Smad7 as an endogenous inhibitor of Smad signaling that restricts the duration and magnitude of transforming growth factor-beta responses, and as a mediator of apoptosis, relative Smad7 deficiency observed in the present studies may account for sustained activation of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in lesional tissues. These findings raise the

  10. Roles of chaperone/usher pathways of Yersinia pestis in a murine model of plague and adhesion to host cells.

    PubMed

    Hatkoff, Matthew; Runco, Lisa M; Pujol, Celine; Jayatilaka, Indralatha; Furie, Martha B; Bliska, James B; Thanassi, David G

    2012-10-01

    Yersinia pestis and many other Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria use the chaperone/usher (CU) pathway to assemble virulence-associated surface fibers termed pili or fimbriae. Y. pestis has two well-characterized CU pathways: the caf genes coding for the F1 capsule and the psa genes coding for the pH 6 antigen. The Y. pestis genome contains additional CU pathways that are capable of assembling pilus fibers, but the roles of these pathways in the pathogenesis of plague are not understood. We constructed deletion mutations in the usher genes for six of the additional Y. pestis CU pathways. The wild-type (WT) and usher deletion strains were compared in the murine bubonic (subcutaneous) and pneumonic (intranasal) plague infection models. Y. pestis strains containing deletions in CU pathways y0348-0352, y1858-1862, and y1869-1873 were attenuated for virulence compared to the WT strain by the intranasal, but not subcutaneous, routes of infection, suggesting specific roles for these pathways during pneumonic plague. We examined binding of the Y. pestis WT and usher deletion strains to A549 human lung epithelial cells, HEp-2 human cervical epithelial cells, and primary human and murine macrophages. Y. pestis CU pathways y0348-0352 and y1858-1862 were found to contribute to adhesion to all host cells tested, whereas pathway y1869-1873 was specific for binding to macrophages. The correlation between the virulence attenuation and host cell binding phenotypes of the usher deletion mutants identifies three of the additional CU pathways of Y. pestis as mediating interactions with host cells that are important for the pathogenesis of plague.

  11. Targeted disruption of the murine Facc gene: Towards the establishment of a mouse model for Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Auerbach, W.; Buchwald, M.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital malformations and predisposition to malignancies. The gene responsible for the defect in FA group C has been cloned and designated the Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group C gene (FACC). A murine cDNA for this gene (Facc) was also cloned. Here we report our progress in the establishment of a mouse model for FA. The mouse Facc cDNA was used as probe to screen a genomic library of mouse strain 129. More than twenty positive clones were isolated. Three of them were mapped and found to be overlapping clones, encompassing the genomic region from exon 8 to the end of the 3{prime} UTR of the mouse cDNA. A targeting vector was constructed using the most 5{prime} mouse genomic sequence available. The end result of the homologous recombination is that exon 8 is deleted and the neo gene is inserted. The last exon, exon 14, is essential for the complementing function of the FACC gene product; the disruption in the middle of the murine Facc gene should render this locus biologically inactive. This targeting vector was linearized and electroporated into R1 embryonic stem (ES) cells which were derived from the 129 mouse. Of 102 clones screened, 19 positive cell lines were identified. Four targeted cell lines have been used to produce chimeric mice. 129-derived ES cells were aggregated ex vivo into the morulas derived from CD1 mice and then implanted into foster mothers. 22 chimeras have been obtained. Moderately and strongly chimeric mice have been bred to test for germline transmission. Progeny with the expected coat color derived from 2 chimeras are currently being examined to confirm transmission of the targeted allele.

  12. DETC Induces Leishmania Parasite Killing in Human In Vitro and Murine In Vivo Models: A Promising Therapeutic Alternative in Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Khouri, Ricardo; Novais, Fernanda; Santana, Gisélia; de Oliveira, Camila Indiani; Vannier dos Santos, Marcos André; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Van Weyenbergh, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy remains the primary tool for treatment and control of human leishmaniasis. However, currently available drugs present serious problems regarding side-effects, variable efficacy, and cost. Affordable and less toxic drugs are urgently needed for leishmaniasis. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate, by microscopy and viability assays, that superoxide dismutase inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC) dose-dependently induces parasite killing (p<0.001) and is able to “sterilize” Leishmania amazonensis infection at 2 mM in human macrophages in vitro. We also show that DETC-induced superoxide production (p<0.001) and parasite destruction (p<0.05) were reverted by the addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, indicating that DETC-induced killing occurs through oxidative damage. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopy demonstrates a rapid and highly selective destruction of amastigotes in the phagosome upon DETC treatment, without any apparent damage to the host cell, including its mitochondria. In addition, DETC significantly induced parasite killing in Leishmania promastigotes in axenic culture. In murine macrophages infected with Leishmania braziliensis, DETC significantly induced in vitro superoxide production (p = 0.0049) and parasite killing (p = 0.0043). In vivo treatment with DETC in BALB/C mice infected with Leishmania braziliensis caused a significant decrease in lesion size (p<0.0001), paralleled by a 100-fold decrease (p = 0.0087) in parasite burden. Conclusions/Significance Due to its strong leishmanicidal effect in human macrophages in vitro, its in vivo effectiveness in a murine model, and its previously demonstrated in vivo safety profile in HIV treatment, DETC treatment might be considered as a valuable therapeutic option in human leishmaniasis, including HIV/Leishmania co-infection. PMID:21200432

  13. Interferon-Inducible CXC Chemokines Directly Contribute to Host Defense against Inhalational Anthrax in a Murine Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Matthew A.; Burdick, Marie D.; Glomski, Ian J.; Boyer, Anne E.; Barr, John R.; Mehrad, Borna; Strieter, Robert M.; Hughes, Molly A.

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines have been found to exert direct, defensin-like antimicrobial activity in vitro, suggesting that, in addition to orchestrating cellular accumulation and activation, chemokines may contribute directly to the innate host response against infection. No observations have been made, however, demonstrating direct chemokine-mediated promotion of host defense in vivo. Here, we show that the murine interferon-inducible CXC chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 each exert direct antimicrobial effects in vitro against Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain spores and bacilli including disruptions in spore germination and marked reductions in spore and bacilli viability as assessed using CFU determination and a fluorometric assay of metabolic activity. Similar chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity was also observed against fully virulent Ames strain spores and encapsulated bacilli. Moreover, antibody-mediated neutralization of these CXC chemokines in vivo was found to significantly increase host susceptibility to pulmonary B. anthracis infection in a murine model of inhalational anthrax with disease progression characterized by systemic bacterial dissemination, toxemia, and host death. Neutralization of the shared chemokine receptor CXCR3, responsible for mediating cellular recruitment in response to CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, was not found to increase host susceptibility to inhalational anthrax. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel, receptor-independent antimicrobial role for the interferon-inducible CXC chemokines in pulmonary innate immunity in vivo. These data also support an immunomodulatory approach for effectively treating and/or preventing pulmonary B. anthracis infection, as well as infections caused by pathogenic and potentially, multi-drug resistant bacteria including other spore-forming organisms. PMID:21124994

  14. Ependymal damage in a Plasmodium yoelii yoelii lethal murine malaria model.

    PubMed

    Rivera Fernández, Norma; Colín Barenque, Laura; Romero Silva, Samanta E; Salas Garrido, Gerardo; Jiménez Rosey, Samantha G; Zepeda Rodríguez, Armando; Romero Romero, Laura P; Menchaca Gómez, Ángeles; Malagón Gutiérrez, Filiberto

    2015-02-01

    Malaria continues to be a major global health problem, and over 40% of the world's population is at risk. Severe or complicated malaria is defined by clinical or laboratory evidence of vital organ dysfunction, including dysfunction of the central nervous system (CNS). The pathogenesis of complicated malaria has not been completely elucidated; however, the development of the multiorgan affection seems to play an important role in the disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB) that protects the CNS against chemical insults. Historically, the BBB has received more attention in the pathogenesis of malaria than have the cerebrospinal fluid-brain barrier (CSFBB) and ependymal cells. This perspective may be misguided because, in the context of disease or toxicity, the CSFBB is more vulnerable to many foreign invaders than are the capillaries. Given the lack on studies of the damage to the CSFBB and ependymal epithelium in experimental murine malaria, the present study evaluated morphological changes in the ependymal cells of CD-1 male mice infected with lethal Plasmodium yoelii yoelii (Pyy) via histopathology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Samples were taken two, four and six days post-infection (PI). No lesions were observed upon the initial infection. By the fourth day PI, fourth ventricle ependymal samples exhibited disruptions and roughened epithelia. More severe injuries were observed at six days PI and included thickened cilia and deep separations between the ependymal intercellular spaces. In some of the analyzed areas, the absence of microvilli and cell layer detachment were observed, and some areas exhibited blebbing surfaces. The ependymal cell lesions observed in the CD1 male mice infected with lethal Pyy seemed to facilitate the paracellular permeability of the CSFBB and consequently promote the access of inflammatory mediators and toxic molecules through the barrier, which resulted in damage to the brain tissue. Understanding the mechanism of

  15. ICAM-1–expressing neutrophils exhibit enhanced effector functions in murine models of endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Woodfin, Abigail; Beyrau, Martina; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Ma, Bin; Whiteford, James R.; Hordijk, Peter L.; Hogg, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface of numerous cell types such as endothelial and epithelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and certain leukocyte subsets. With respect to the latter, ICAM-1 has been detected on neutrophils in several clinical and experimental settings, but little is known about the regulation of expression or function of neutrophil ICAM-1. In this study, we report on the de novo induction of ICAM-1 on the cell surface of murine neutrophils by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor, and zymosan particles in vitro. The induction of neutrophil ICAM-1 was associated with enhanced phagocytosis of zymosan particles and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Conversely, neutrophils from ICAM-1–deficient mice were defective in these effector functions. Mechanistically, ICAM-1–mediated intracellular signaling appeared to support neutrophil ROS generation and phagocytosis. In vivo, LPS-induced inflammation in the mouse cremaster muscle and peritoneal cavity led to ICAM-1 expression on intravascular and locally transmigrated neutrophils. The use of chimeric mice deficient in ICAM-1 on myeloid cells demonstrated that neutrophil ICAM-1 was not required for local neutrophil transmigration, but supported optimal intravascular and extravascular phagocytosis of zymosan particles. Collectively, the present results shed light on regulation of expression and function of ICAM-1 on neutrophils and identify it as an additional regulator of neutrophil effector responses in host defense. PMID:26647392

  16. ICAM-1-expressing neutrophils exhibit enhanced effector functions in murine models of endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Woodfin, Abigail; Beyrau, Martina; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Ma, Bin; Whiteford, James R; Hordijk, Peter L; Hogg, Nancy; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2016-02-18

    Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface of numerous cell types such as endothelial and epithelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and certain leukocyte subsets. With respect to the latter, ICAM-1 has been detected on neutrophils in several clinical and experimental settings, but little is known about the regulation of expression or function of neutrophil ICAM-1. In this study, we report on the de novo induction of ICAM-1 on the cell surface of murine neutrophils by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor, and zymosan particles in vitro. The induction of neutrophil ICAM-1 was associated with enhanced phagocytosis of zymosan particles and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Conversely, neutrophils from ICAM-1-deficient mice were defective in these effector functions. Mechanistically, ICAM-1-mediated intracellular signaling appeared to support neutrophil ROS generation and phagocytosis. In vivo, LPS-induced inflammation in the mouse cremaster muscle and peritoneal cavity led to ICAM-1 expression on intravascular and locally transmigrated neutrophils. The use of chimeric mice deficient in ICAM-1 on myeloid cells demonstrated that neutrophil ICAM-1 was not required for local neutrophil transmigration, but supported optimal intravascular and extravascular phagocytosis of zymosan particles. Collectively, the present results shed light on regulation of expression and function of ICAM-1 on neutrophils and identify it as an additional regulator of neutrophil effector responses in host defense. PMID:26647392

  17. Reduced synaptic activity in neuronal networks derived from embryonic stem cells of murine Rett syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Barth, Lydia; Sütterlin, Rosmarie; Nenniger, Markus; Vogt, Kaspar E

    2014-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental diseases such as the Rett syndrome (RTT) have received renewed attention, since the mechanisms involved may underlie a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In vertebrates early stages in the functional development of neurons and neuronal networks are difficult to study. Embryonic stem cell-derived neurons provide an easily accessible tool to investigate neuronal differentiation and early network formation. We used in vitro cultures of neurons derived from murine embryonic stem cells missing the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene (MeCP2-/y) and from wild type cells of the corresponding background. Cultures were assessed using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology and immunofluorescence. We studied the functional maturation of developing neurons and the activity of the synaptic connections they formed. Neurons exhibited minor differences in the developmental patterns for their intrinsic parameters, such as resting membrane potential and excitability; with the MeCP2-/y cells showing a slightly accelerated development, with shorter action potential half-widths at early stages. There was no difference in the early phase of synapse development, but as the cultures matured, significant deficits became apparent, particularly for inhibitory synaptic activity. MeCP2-/y embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cultures show clear developmental deficits that match phenotypes observed in slice preparations and thus provide a compelling tool to further investigate the mechanisms behind RTT pathophysiology.

  18. Detection of invasive infection caused by Fusarium solani and non-Fusarium solani species using a duplex quantitative PCR-based assay in a murine model of fusariosis.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Martínez, Leticia; Buitrago, Maria J; Castelli, Maria V; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2012-04-01

    A duplex Real Time PCR (RT-PCR) assay for detecting DNA of members of the genus Fusarium has been developed and validated by using two mouse models of invasive infection. The duplex RT-PCR technique employed two specific molecular beacon probes targeting a highly conserved region of the fungal rDNA gene. This technique showed a detection limit of 10 fg DNA per μl of sample and a specificity of 100%. The sensitivity in a total of 48 samples from a murine model of Fusarium solani infection was 93.9% for lung tissues and 86.7% for serum samples. In comparison, the sensitivity in a total of 45 samples of a F. oxysporum murine model infection was 87% for lung tissues and 42.8% for serum samples. This molecular technique could be a reliable method for the quantification and the evaluation of the disease in animal models and for the clinical diagnosis of fusariosis.

  19. Delayed Contrast Enhancement Imaging of a Murine Model for Ischemia Reperfusion with Carbon Nanotube Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Burk, Laurel M.; Wang, Ko-Han; Wait, John Matthew; Kang, Eunice; Willis, Monte; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z.

    2015-01-01

    We aim to demonstrate the application of free-breathing prospectively gated carbon nanotube (CNT) micro-CT by evaluating a myocardial infarction model with a delayed contrast enhancement technique. Evaluation of murine cardiac models using micro-CT imaging has historically been limited by extreme imaging requirements. Newly-developed CNT-based x-ray sources offer precise temporal resolution, allowing elimination of physiological motion through prospective gating. Using free-breathing, cardiac-gated CNT micro-CT, a myocardial infarction model can be studied non-invasively and with high resolution. Myocardial infarction was induced in eight male C57BL/6 mice aged 8–12 weeks. The ischemia reperfusion model was achieved by surgically occluding the LAD artery for 30 minutes followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Tail vein catheters were placed for contrast administration. Iohexol 300mgI/mL was administered followed by images obtained in diastole. Iodinated lipid blood pool contrast agent was then administered, followed with images at systole and diastole. Respiratory and cardiac signals were monitored externally and used to gate the scans of free-breathing subjects. Seven control animals were scanned using the same imaging protocol. After imaging, the heart was harvested, cut into 1mm slices and stained with TTC. Post-processing analysis was performed using ITK-Snap and MATLAB. All animals demonstrated obvious delayed contrast enhancement in the left ventricular wall following the Iohexol injection. The blood pool contrast agent revealed significant changes in cardiac function quantified by 3-D volume ejection fractions. All subjects demonstrated areas of myocardial infarct in the LAD distribution on both TTC staining and micro-CT imaging. The CNT micro-CT system aids straightforward, free-breathing, prospectively-gated 3-D murine cardiac imaging. Delayed contrast enhancement allows identification of infarcted myocardium after a myocardial ischemic event. We demonstrate

  20. Efficacy of Lysophosphatidylcholine in Combination with Antimicrobial Agents against Acinetobacter baumannii in Experimental Murine Peritoneal Sepsis and Pneumonia Models.

    PubMed

    Parra Millán, R; Jiménez Mejías, M E; Sánchez Encinales, V; Ayerbe Algaba, R; Gutiérrez Valencia, A; Pachón Ibáñez, M E; Díaz, C; Pérez Del Palacio, J; López Cortés, L F; Pachón, J; Smani, Y

    2016-08-01

    Immune response stimulation to prevent infection progression may be an adjuvant to antimicrobial treatment. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is an immunomodulator involved in immune cell recruitment and activation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LPC in combination with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem in experimental murine models of peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia. We used Acinetobacter baumannii strain Ab9, which is susceptible to colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem, and multidrug-resistant strain Ab186, which is susceptible to colistin and resistant to tigecycline and imipenem. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters for colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem and the 100% minimal lethal dose (MLD100) were determined for both strains. The therapeutic efficacies of LPC, colistin (60 mg/kg of body weight/day), tigecycline (10 mg/kg/day), and imipenem (180 mg/kg/day), alone or in combination, were assessed against Ab9 and Ab186 at the MLD100 in murine peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia models. The levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the same experimental models after inoculating mice with the MLD of both strains. LPC in combination with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem markedly enhanced the bacterial clearance of Ab9 and Ab186 from the spleen and lungs and reduced bacteremia and mouse mortality rates (P < 0.05) compared with those for colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem monotherapies. Moreover, at 4 h post-bacterial infection, Ab9 induced higher TNF-α and lower IL-10 levels than those with Ab186 (4 μg/ml versus 3 μg/ml [P < 0.05] and 2 μg/ml versus 3.4 μg/ml [P < 0.05], respectively). LPC treatment combined with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem modestly reduced the severity of infection by A. baumannii strains with different resistance phenotypes compared to LPC monotherapy in both

  1. Delayed contrast enhancement imaging of a murine model for ischemia reperfusion with carbon nanotube micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Burk, Laurel M; Wang, Ko-Han; Wait, John Matthew; Kang, Eunice; Willis, Monte; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z

    2015-01-01

    We aim to demonstrate the application of free-breathing prospectively gated carbon nanotube (CNT) micro-CT by evaluating a myocardial infarction model with a delayed contrast enhancement technique. Evaluation of murine cardiac models using micro-CT imaging has historically been limited by extreme imaging requirements. Newly-developed CNT-based x-ray sources offer precise temporal resolution, allowing elimination of physiological motion through prospective gating. Using free-breathing, cardiac-gated CNT micro-CT, a myocardial infarction model can be studied non-invasively and with high resolution. Myocardial infarction was induced in eight male C57BL/6 mice aged 8-12 weeks. The ischemia reperfusion model was achieved by surgically occluding the LAD artery for 30 minutes followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Tail vein catheters were placed for contrast administration. Iohexol 300 mgI/mL was administered followed by images obtained in diastole. Iodinated lipid blood pool contrast agent was then administered, followed with images at systole and diastole. Respiratory and cardiac signals were monitored externally and used to gate the scans of free-breathing subjects. Seven control animals were scanned using the same imaging protocol. After imaging, the heart was harvested, cut into 1mm slices and stained with TTC. Post-processing analysis was performed using ITK-Snap and MATLAB. All animals demonstrated obvious delayed contrast enhancement in the left ventricular wall following the Iohexol injection. The blood pool contrast agent revealed significant changes in cardiac function quantified by 3-D volume ejection fractions. All subjects demonstrated areas of myocardial infarct in the LAD distribution on both TTC staining and micro-CT imaging. The CNT micro-CT system aids straightforward, free-breathing, prospectively-gated 3-D murine cardiac imaging. Delayed contrast enhancement allows identification of infarcted myocardium after a myocardial ischemic event. We demonstrate

  2. Adoptive transfer of dendritic cells modulates immunogenesis and tolerogenesis in a neonatal model of murine cutaneous leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Loida V; Corado, José; Díaz, Nilka L; Tapia, Felix J

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the adoptive transfer of DCs on Leishmania (L.) mexicana-infected neonatal BALB/c mice. DCs were isolated and purified from the spleens of the following donor groups: a) Adult BALB/c mice infected during adulthood with L. (L) mexicana; b) Adult BALB/c mice infected during neonatal life; c) Healthy neonatal BALB/c mice; d) Healthy adult BALB/c mice. A neonatal model of infection, generated after inoculation with 5 × 105 promastigotes of L. (L) mexicana, was used as the infection control group. Sixteen hours after intraperitoneal transfer of DCs (1 × 103, 1 × 105, or 1 × 106 cells/ml), neonatal recipient BALB/c mice were infected. The adoptive transfer of DCs diminished disease progression in neonatal mice. This reduction depends on the quantity and provenance of transferred DCs, since the effect was more evident with high numbers of DCs from adult mice infected during adulthood and healthy neonatal mice. Protection was significantly reduced in animals receiving DCs from healthy adult mice but it was absent in mice receiving DCs from adult mice infected during neonatal life. These results suggest that genetic susceptibility to Leishmania infection can be modified during neonatal life, and that the period of life when antigens are encountered is crucial in influencing the capacity of DCs to induce resistance or tolerance. PMID:15670331

  3. A murine model of epicutaneous protein sensitization is useful to study efficacies of topical drugs in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Maili; Savinko, Terhi; Wolff, Henrik; Kvist, Peter H; Kemp, Kaare; Lauerma, Antti; Alenius, Harri

    2010-04-01

    We studied the suitability of our murine model for the treatment trials of atopic dermatitis (AD). In this model topical application of ovalbumin (OVA) together with bacterial superantigen, staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) induces a cutaneous disease resembling AD. Injured mouse skin was treated with three different drugs: a class III corticosteroid, a calcineurin inhibitor and a type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor. One-week treatment with corticosteroid and phosphodiesterase inhibitor remarkably decreased both epidermal and dermal thickness, whereas the calcineurin inhibitor affected only the epidermal thickness. All investigated drugs reduced the infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells onto OVA/SEB sensitized skin areas, whereas CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as CD11c+ dendritic cells variously diminished after corticosteroid and calcineurin inhibitor treatments. Cutaneous expression of interleukin -4, -13, -10 and interferon-gamma also decreased differently depending on drug type. Interestingly, the calcineurin inhibitor and phosphodiesterase inhibitor increased total IgE antibodies and decreased SEB-specific IgG2a antibodies in OVA/SEB sensitized mice. All these drugs can ameliorate cutaneous inflammation, although the degree of recovery depends on the type of the drug. In summary, our results show that this mouse model can be used to test new topical treatments for AD. PMID:20074670

  4. Initiation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in a murine 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide and alcohol carcinogenesis model

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Sarfo, Kwame; Scognamiglio, Theresa; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) are very common, aggressive tumors, and are often associated with alcohol and tobacco abuse. Because ESCCs exhibit high recurrence rates and are diagnosed at late stages, identification of prognostic and drug targets for prevention and treatment is critical. We used the 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) murine model of oral carcinogenesis and the Meadows-Cook model of alcohol abuse to assess changes in the expression of molecular markers during the initial stages of ESCC. Combining these two models, which mimic chronic alcohol and tobacco abuse in humans, we detected increased cellular proliferation (EGFR and Ki67 expression), increased canonical Wnt signaling and downstream elements (β-catenin, FoxM1, and S100a4 protein levels), changes in cellular adhesive properties (reduced E-cadherin in the basal layer of the esophageal epithelium), and increased levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and p38. Additionally, we found that treatment with ethanol alone increased the numbers of epithelial cells expressing solute carrier family 2 (facilitated glucose transporter, member 1) (SLC2A1) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), and increased the phosphorylation of p38. Thus, we identified both 4-NQO- and ethanol-specific targets in the initial stages of esophageal carcinogenesis, which should lead to the development of potential markers and therapeutic targets for human ESCC. PMID:25714027

  5. Demonstration of the preclinical correlate of protection for Staphylococcus aureus clumping factor A in a murine model of infection.

    PubMed

    Scully, Ingrid L; Timofeyeva, Yekaterina; Keeney, David; Matsuka, Yury V; Severina, Elena; McNeil, Lisa K; Nanra, Jasdeep; Hu, George; Liberator, Paul A; Jansen, Kathrin U; Anderson, Annaliesa S

    2015-10-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor clumping factor A (ClfA) is a component of an investigational S. aureus prophylactic vaccine. ClfA enables S. aureus to bind to fibrinogen and platelets during the initial stages of invasive disease. Here we demonstrate that ectopic expression of ClfA is sufficient to render nonpathogenic Lactococcus lactis lethal in a murine model of systemic infection. In contrast, L. lactis expressing ClfAY338A, which cannot bind fibrinogen, did not cause death in the mice. Pathogenicity was also prevented by immunization with ClfA. This model was then used to define a preclinical correlate of protection by measuring functional antibody in a S. aureus fibrinogen binding inhibition assay (FBI) and correlating that titer with protective outcomes. Although many humans have pre-existing antibodies that bind to ClfA, only sera with a threshold functional titer in the FBI were protective in this preclinical model. This confirms that fibrinogen binding is critical for ClfA-mediated pathogenesis and demonstrates that functional antibodies against ClfA are sufficient to protect against ClfA-mediated pathogenesis in vivo, enabling the definition of a preclinical correlate of protection for ClfA-containing vaccines based on FBI titer.

  6. A Novel Model of Severe Gallstone Pancreatitis: Murine Pancreatic Duct Ligation Results in Systemic Inflammation and Substantial Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Isaac; Yuan, Zuobiao; Meyerholz, David K.; Twait, Erik; Williard, Deborah E.; Kempuraj, Duraisamy

    2010-01-01

    Background Suitable experimental models of gallstone pancreatitis with systemic inflammation and mortality are limited. We developed a novel murine model of duct-ligation-induced acute pancreatitis associated with multiorgan dysfunction and severe mortality. Methods Laparotomy was done on C57/BL6 mice followed by pancreatic duct (PD) ligation, bile duct (BD) ligation without PD ligation, or sham operation. Results Only mice with PD ligation developed acute pancreatitis and had 100% mortality. Pulmonary compliance was significantly reduced after PD ligation but not BD ligation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophil count and interleukin-1β concentration, and the plasma creatinine level, were significantly elevated with PD ligation but not BD ligation. Pancreatic nuclear factor κB (p65) and activator protein 1 (c-Jun) were activated within 1 h of PD ligation. Conclusion PD-ligation-induced acute pancreatitis in mice is associated with systemic inflammation, acute lung injury, multiorgan dysfunction and death. The development of this novel model is an exciting and notable advance in the field. PMID:20975317

  7. Implant-associated localized osteitis in murine femur fracture by biofilm forming Staphylococcus aureus: a novel experimental model.

    PubMed

    Windolf, Ceylan D; Meng, Wei; Lögters, Tim T; MacKenzie, Colin R; Windolf, Joachim; Flohé, Sascha

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is the most common causative agent for implant-associated osteitis. The present study characterizes a novel model of a low grade acute SA osteitis with bone defect in the femur which is stabilized by a titanium locking plate. Wild-type Balb/c mice were osteotomized, fixed by a locking plate and infected with SA. Mice underwent debridement 7 and 14 days later and were sacrificed at Day 28. At Days 7, 14, and 28 after inoculation local and systemic cell populations and IL-6 were analyzed. Fracture healing was quantified by radiography. The control group underwent the same procedure without infection. The bacterial load of implant-associated osteitis with biofilm formation was quantified by counting CFU and real-time PCR. Fracture healing determined by radiography was delayed in infected compared to non-infected mice. Throughout the investigation period CFU and leukocyte counts, as well as IL-6 levels were found to be significantly elevated in infected mice at the infection site but not systemically. Our murine model allows the detailed investigation of implant associated localized osteitis with biofilm producing SA and its influence on fracture healing. The model provides a tool to analyze therapeutic or prophylactic approaches to the problem of biofilm-associated osteitis.

  8. Demonstration of the preclinical correlate of protection for Staphylococcus aureus clumping factor A in a murine model of infection.

    PubMed

    Scully, Ingrid L; Timofeyeva, Yekaterina; Keeney, David; Matsuka, Yury V; Severina, Elena; McNeil, Lisa K; Nanra, Jasdeep; Hu, George; Liberator, Paul A; Jansen, Kathrin U; Anderson, Annaliesa S

    2015-10-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor clumping factor A (ClfA) is a component of an investigational S. aureus prophylactic vaccine. ClfA enables S. aureus to bind to fibrinogen and platelets during the initial stages of invasive disease. Here we demonstrate that ectopic expression of ClfA is sufficient to render nonpathogenic Lactococcus lactis lethal in a murine model of systemic infection. In contrast, L. lactis expressing ClfAY338A, which cannot bind fibrinogen, did not cause death in the mice. Pathogenicity was also prevented by immunization with ClfA. This model was then used to define a preclinical correlate of protection by measuring functional antibody in a S. aureus fibrinogen binding inhibition assay (FBI) and correlating that titer with protective outcomes. Although many humans have pre-existing antibodies that bind to ClfA, only sera with a threshold functional titer in the FBI were protective in this preclinical model. This confirms that fibrinogen binding is critical for ClfA-mediated pathogenesis and demonstrates that functional antibodies against ClfA are sufficient to protect against ClfA-mediated pathogenesis in vivo, enabling the definition of a preclinical correlate of protection for ClfA-containing vaccines based on FBI titer. PMID:26319743

  9. Second-hand Smoke Increases Nitric Oxide and Alters the IgE Response in a Murine Model of Allergic Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Brian W. P.; Peake, Janice L.; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Kurup, Viswanath P.; Gershwin, Laurel J.

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) on nitric oxide (NO) and immunoglobulin (Ig) production in a murine model of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). Adult BALB/c mice were exposed to aged and diluted sidestream cigarette smoke from day 0 through day 43 to simulate “second-hand smoke”. During exposure, mice were sensitized to soluble Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) antigen intranasally between day 14 and 24. All Af sensitized mice in ambient air (Af + AIR) made elevated levels of IgE, IgG1, IgM, IgG2a and IgA. Af sensitized mice housed in ETS (Af + ETS) made similar levels of immunoglobulins except for IgE that was significantly reduced in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). However, immunohistochemical evaluation of the lung revealed a marked accumulation of IgE positive cells in the lung parenchyma of these Af + ETS mice. LPS stimulation of BAL cells revealed elevated levels of NO in the Af + AIR group, which was further enhanced in the Af+ETS group. In vitro restimulation of the BAL cells on day 45 showed a TH0 response with elevated levels of IL3, 4, 5, 10 and IFN-γ. However, by day 28 the response shifted such that TH2 cytokines increased while IFN-γ decreased. The Af + ETS group showed markedly reduced levels in all cytokines tested, including the inflammatory cytokine IL6, when compared to the Af+AIR group. These results demonstrate that ETS affects ABPA by further enhancing the NO production and reduces the TH2 and the inflammatory cytokines while altering the pattern of IgE responses. PMID:16050142

  10. Effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a murine allergic airway inflammation model

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro Koike, Eiko; Yanagisawa, Rie; Hirano, Seishiro; Nishikawa, Masataka; Takano, Hirohisa

    2009-06-15

    The development of nanotechnology has increased the risk of exposure to types of particles other than combustion-derived particles in the environment, namely, industrial nanomaterials. On the other hand, patients with bronchial asthma are sensitive to inhaled substances including particulate matters. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to a type of nano-sized carbon nanotube (multi-walled nanotubes: MWCNT) on allergic airway inflammation in vivo and their cellular mechanisms in vitro. In vivo, ICR mice were divided into 4 experimental groups. Vehicle, MWCNT (50 {mu}g/animal), ovalbumin (OVA), and OVA + MWCNT were repeatedly administered intratracheally. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cellularity, lung histology, levels of cytokines related to allergic inflammation in lung homogenates/BAL fluids (BALFs), and serum immunoglobulin levels were studied. Also, we evaluated the impact of MWCNT (0.1-1 {mu}g/ml) on the phenotype and function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. MWCNT aggravated allergen-induced airway inflammation characterized by the infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, and mononuclear cells in the lung, and an increase in the number of goblet cells in the bronchial epithelium. MWCNT with allergen amplified lung protein levels of Th cytokines and chemokines compared with allergen alone. MWCNT exhibited adjuvant activity for allergen-specific IgG{sub 1} and IgE. MWCNT significantly increased allergen (OVA)-specific syngeneic T-cell proliferation, particularly at a lower concentration in vitro. Taken together, MWCNT can exacerbate murine allergic airway inflammation, at least partly, via the promotion of a Th-dominant milieu. In addition, the exacerbation may be partly through the inappropriate activation of antigen-presenting cells including DC.

  11. Does murine spermatogenesis require WNT signalling? A lesson from Gpr177 conditional knockout mouse models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, J-X; Cheng, J-M; Hao, X-X; Wang, Y-Q; Wang, X-X; Liu, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Wingless-related MMTV integration site (WNT) proteins and several other components of the WNT signalling pathway are expressed in the murine testes. However, mice mutant for WNT signalling effector β-catenin using different Cre drivers have phenotypes that are inconsistent with each other. The complexity and overlapping expression of WNT signalling cascades have prevented researchers from dissecting their function in spermatogenesis. Depletion of the Gpr177 gene (the mouse orthologue of Drosophila Wntless), which is required for the secretion of various WNTs, makes it possible to genetically dissect the overall effect of WNTs in testis development. In this study, the Gpr177 gene was conditionally depleted in germ cells (Gpr177(flox/flox), Mvh-Cre; Gpr177(flox/flox), Stra8-Cre) and Sertoli cells (Gpr177(flox/flox), Amh-Cre). No obvious defects in fertility and spermatogenesis were observed in these three Gpr177 conditional knockout (cKO) mice at 8 weeks. However, late-onset testicular atrophy and fertility decline in two germ cell-specific Gpr177 deletion mice were noted at 8 months. In contrast, we did not observe any abnormalities of spermatogenesis and fertility, even in 8-month-old Gpr177(flox/flox), Amh-Cre mice. Elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected in Gpr177 cKO germ cells and Sertoli cells and exhibited an age-dependent manner. However, significant increase in the activity of Caspase 3 was only observed in germ cells from 8-month-old germ cell-specific Gpr177 knockout mice. In conclusion, GPR177 in Sertoli cells had no apparent influence on spermatogenesis, whereas loss of GPR177 in germ cells disrupted spermatogenesis in an age-dependent manner via elevating ROS levels and triggering germ cell apoptosis. PMID:27362799

  12. Pulsed Electric Fields for Burn Wound Disinfection in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Vecchio, Daniela; Khan, Saiqa; Hamblin, Michael R.; Austen, William G.; Sheridan, Robert L.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging bacterial resistance renders many antibiotics ineffective, making alternative strategies of wound disinfection important. Here the authors report on a new, physical burn wound disinfection method: pulsed electric fields (PEFs). High voltage, short PEFs create nonthermal, permanent damage to cell membranes, possibly by irreversible electroporation. In medicine, PEF technology has recently been used for nonthermal ablation of solid tumors. The authors have expanded the spectrum of PEF applications in medicine to burn wound disinfection. A third-degree burn was induced on the dorsal skin of C57BL/6 mice. Immediately after the injury, the burn wound was infected with Acinetobacter baumannii expressing the luxCDABE operon. Thirty minutes after infection, the infected areas were treated with 80 pulses delivered at 500 V/mm, 70 μs, 1 Hz. The authors used bioluminescence to quantify bacteria on skin. Three animals were used for each experimental condition. PEFs were effective in the disinfection of infected burned murine skin. The bacterial load reduction correlated with the number of delivered pulses. Forty pulses of 500 V/mm led to a 2.04 ± 0.29 Log10 reduction in bacterial load; 80 pulses led to the immediate 5.53 ± 0.30 Log10 reduction. Three hours after PEF, the bacterial reduction of the skin treated with 500 V/mm, 80 pulses was 4.91 ± 0.71 Log10. The authors introduce a new method of wound disinfection using high voltage, short PEFs. They believe that PEF technology may represent an important alternative to antibiotics in addressing bacterial contamination of wounds, particularly those contaminated with multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:25167374

  13. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Assessment of Faropenem in a Lethal Murine Bacillus anthracis Inhalation Postexposure Prophylaxis Model

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Stanley C.; Rubino, Christopher M.; Bassett, Jennifer; Miller, Lynda; Ambrose, Paul G.; Bhavnani, Sujata M.; Beaudry, Amber; Li, Jinfang; Stone, Kimberly Clawson; Critchley, Ian; Janjic, Nebojsa; Heine, Henry S.

    2010-01-01

    There are few options for prophylaxis after exposure to Bacillus anthracis, especially in children and women of childbearing potential. Faropenem is a β-lactam in the penem subclass that is being developed as an oral prodrug, faropenem medoxomil, for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Faropenem was shown to have in vitro activity against B. anthracis strains that variably express the bla1 β-lactamase (MIC range, ≤0.06 to 1 μg/ml). In this study we evaluated the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) relationships between the plasma faropenem free-drug (f) concentrations and efficacy against B. anthracis in a murine postexposure prophylaxis inhalation model. The plasma PKs and PKs-PDs of faropenem were evaluated in BALB/c mice following the intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of doses ranging from 2.5 to 160 mg/kg of body weight. For the evaluation of efficacy, mice received by inhalation aerosol doses of B. anthracis (Ames strain; faropenem MIC, 0.06 μg/ml) at 100 times the 50% lethal dose. The faropenem dosing regimens (10, 20, 40, and 80 mg/kg/day) were administered i.p. at 24 h postchallenge at 4-, 6-, and 12-h intervals for 14 days. The sigmoid maximum-threshold-of-efficacy (Emax) model fit the survival data, in which the free-drug area under the concentration-time curve (fAUC)/MIC ratio, the maximum concentration of free drug in plasma (fCmax)/MIC ratio, and the cumulative percentage of a 24-h period that the free-drug concentration exceeds the MIC under steady-state pharmacokinetic conditions (f %TMIC) were each evaluated. Assessment of f %TMIC demonstrated the strongest correlation with survival (R2 = 0.967) compared to the correlations achieved by assessment of fAUC/MIC or fCmax/MIC, for which minimal correlations were observed. The 50% effective dose (ED50), ED90, and ED99 corresponded to f %TMIC values of 10.6, 13.4, and 16.4%, respectively, and Emax was 89.3%. Overall, faropenem demonstrated a high level of activity against B

  14. A novel immune competent murine hypertrophic scar contracture model: a tool to elucidate disease mechanism and develop new therapies.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Magdy; Bond, Jennifer; Bergeron, Andrew; Miller, Kyle J; Ehanire, Tosan; Quiles, Carlos; Lorden, Elizabeth R; Medina, Manuel A; Fisher, Mark; Klitzman, Bruce; Selim, M Angelica; Leong, Kam W; Levinson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HSc) contraction following burn injury causes contractures. Contractures are painful and disfiguring. Current therapies are marginally effective. To study pathogenesis and develop new therapies, a murine model is needed. We have created a validated immune-competent murine HSc model. A third-degree burn was created on dorsum of C57BL/6 mice. Three days postburn, tissue was excised and grafted with ear skin. Graft contraction was analyzed and tissue harvested on different time points. Outcomes were compared with human condition to validate the model. To confirm graft survival, green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice were used, and histologic analysis was performed to differentiate between ear and back skin. Role of panniculus carnosus in contraction was analyzed. Cellularity was assessed with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Collagen maturation was assessed with Picro-sirius red. Mast cells were stained with Toluidine blue. Macrophages were detected with F4/80 immune. Vascularity was assessed with CD31 immune. RNA for contractile proteins was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Elastic moduli of skin and scar tissue were analyzed using a microstrain analyzer. Grafts contracted to ∼45% of their original size by day 14 and maintained their size. Grafting of GFP mouse skin onto wild-type mice, and analysis of dermal thickness and hair follicle density, confirmed graft survival. Interestingly, hair follicles disappeared after grafting and regenerated in ear skin configuration by day 30. Radiological analysis revealed that panniculus carnosus doesn't contribute to contraction. Microscopic analyses showed that grafts show increase in cellularity. Granulation tissue formed after day 3. Collagen analysis revealed increases in collagen maturation over time. CD31 stain revealed increased vascularity. Macrophages and mast cells were increased. qRT-PCR showed up-regulation of transforming growth factor beta, alpha smooth muscle

  15. Examining a Model of Life Satisfaction among Unemployed Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Ryan D.; Bott, Elizabeth M.; Allan, Blake A.; Torrey, Carrie L.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined a model of life satisfaction among a diverse sample of 184 adults who had been unemployed for an average of 10.60 months. Using the Lent (2004) model of life satisfaction as a framework, a model was tested with 5 hypothesized predictor variables: optimism, job search self-efficacy, job search support, job search…

  16. A Coping Model for Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draucker, Claire B.

    1995-01-01

    A group of 149 adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse was tested using a causal model that identifies relationships among sexual abuse situation characteristics, the accomplishment of cognitive coping tasks, and long-term effects. Results indicated the model did not fit the data. A revised model is proposed and examined. (JBJ)

  17. Expression and Function of S100A8/A9 (Calprotectin) in Human Typhoid Fever and the Murine Salmonella Model

    PubMed Central

    De Jong, Hanna K.; Achouiti, Ahmed; Koh, Gavin C. K. W.; Parry, Christopher M.; Baker, Stephen; Faiz, Mohammed Abul; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Vollaard, Albert M.; van Leeuwen, Ester M. M.; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; de Vos, Alex F.; Roth, Johannes; van der Poll, Tom; Vogl, Thomas; Wiersinga, Willem Joost

    2015-01-01

    Background Typhoid fever, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is a major cause of community-acquired bacteremia and death worldwide. S100A8 (MRP8) and S100A9 (MRP14) form bioactive antimicrobial heterodimers (calprotectin) that can activate Toll-like receptor 4, promoting lethal, endotoxin-induced shock and multi-organ failure. We aimed to characterize the expression and function of S100A8/A9 in patients with typhoid fever and in a murine invasive Salmonella model. Methods and principal findings S100A8/A9 protein levels were determined in acute phase plasma or feces from 28 Bangladeshi patients, and convalescent phase plasma from 60 Indonesian patients with blood culture or PCR-confirmed typhoid fever, and compared to 98 healthy control subjects. To functionally characterize the role of S100A8/A9, we challenged wildtype (WT) and S100A9-/- mice with S. Typhimurium and determined bacterial loads and inflammation 2- and 5- days post infection. We further assessed the antimicrobial function of recombinant S100A8/A9 on S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi replication in vitro. Typhoid fever patients demonstrated a marked increase of S100A8/A9 in acute phase plasma and feces and this increases correlated with duration of fever prior to admission. S100A8/A9 directly inhibited the growth of S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi in vitro in a dose and time dependent fashion. WT mice inoculated with S. Typhimurium showed increased levels of S100A8/A9 in both the liver and the systemic compartment but S100A9-/- mice were indistinguishable from WT mice with respect to bacterial growth, survival, and inflammatory responses, as determined by cytokine release, histopathology and organ injury. Conclusion S100A8/A9 is markedly elevated in human typhoid, correlates with duration of fever prior to admission and directly inhibits the growth of S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi in vitro. Despite elevated levels in the murine invasive Salmonella model, S100A8/A9 does not

  18. Ammonium glycyrrhizinate-loaded niosomes as a potential nanotherapeutic system for anti-inflammatory activity in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Marianecci, Carlotta; Rinaldi, Federica; Di Marzio, Luisa; Mastriota, Marica; Pieretti, Stefano; Celia, Christian; Paolino, Donatella; Iannone, Michelangelo; Fresta, Massimo; Carafa, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Liquorice extracts demonstrate therapeutic efficacy in treating dermatitis, eczema, and psoriasis when compared with corticosteroids. In this work, nonionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes, NSVs) containing polysorbate 20 (Tween 20), cholesterol, and cholesteryl hemisuccinate at different molar concentrations were used to prepare monoammonium glycyrrhizinate (AG)-loaded NSVs. The anti-inflammatory properties of AG-loaded NSVs were investigated in murine models. Methods The physicochemical properties of the NSVs were characterized using dynamic light scattering. The fluidity of the lipid bilayer was evaluated by measuring the fluorescence intensity of diphenylhexatriene. The drug entrapment efficiency of AG was assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography. The physicochemical stability of the NSVs was evaluated as a function of time using dynamic light scattering combined with Turbiscan Lab® Expert analysis. Serum stability was determined by incubating the NSVs with 10% v/v fetal bovine serum. The cytotoxic effects of the NSVs were investigated in human dermal fibroblasts using the Trypan blue dye exclusion assay (for cell mortality) and an MTT assay (for cell viability). Release profiles for the AG-loaded NSVs were studied in vitro using cellulose membranes. NSVs showing the most desirable physicochemical properties were selected to test for in vivo anti-inflammatory activity in murine models. The anti-inflammatory activity of the NSVs was investigated by measuring edema and nociception in mice stimulated with chemical agents. Results NSVs showed favorable physicochemical properties for in vitro and in vivo administration. In addition, they demonstrated long-term stability based on Turbiscan Lab Expert analysis. The membrane fluidity of the NSVs was not affected by self-assembling of the surfactants into colloidal structures. Fluorescence anisotropy was found to be independent of the molar ratios of cholesteryl hemisuccinate and/or cholesterol

  19. Contrast-enhanced X-ray detection of breast microcalcifications in a murine model using targeted gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2014-07-22

    Microcalcifications are deposits of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within breast tissue and the most common abnormality detected by mammography when screening for breast cancer due to exhibiting greater X-ray attenuation than the surrounding tissue. However, the detection of microcalcifications is limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate in vivo targeted delivery of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced detection of microcalcifications using computed tomography (CT). A murine model was developed for precise, a priori control over the level of microcalcification burden by injecting varying concentrations of HA crystals in a Matrigel carrier into mammary glands. The measured X-ray attenuation of microcalcifications containing varying HA concentrations demonstrated that the model was reproducible and able to recapitulate varying levels of microcalcification burden, including levels undetectable by CT in the absence of contrast enhancement. After intramammary delivery, BP-Au NPs provided enhanced contrast for the detection of microcalcifications that were otherwise below the CT detection limit. BP-Au NPs targeted microcalcifications due to specific binding to HA crystal surfaces, resulting in contrast between the HA microcalcification site and surrounding tissue which was visibly apparent (∼30-135 HU) within 2 days after delivery. Therefore, targeted BP-Au NPs enabled improved sensitivity and specificity for the detection of microcalcifications.

  20. Murine Depression Model and its Potential Applications for Discovering Foods and Farm Products with Antidepressant-Like Effects

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Tatsuhiko; Tomonaga, Shozo; Okayama, Tsuyoshi; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Advanced societies face increased health problems related to various stresses. Chronic psychological stress is a major risk factor for psychiatric disorders such as depression. Although therapeutic agents reduce several symptoms of depression, most have side effects in a broad range of the population. Furthermore, some victims of depression do not show significant improvement with any drugs, so alternative approaches are needed. Good dietary habits may potentially reduce depressive symptoms, but there is little scientific evidence thus far. Murine depression models are useful to test nutritional approaches in vivo. Our model mice subjected to a subchronic mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) paradigm show several alterations in physiological parameters and social behavior. These stress-induced symptoms in sCSDS mice can be used as cues to identify antidepressant-like natural resources including foods and farm products. We previously discovered that sCSDS mice show more vulnerability to social stress by changing dietary condition. In addition, we developed a more objective system for analyzing mouse behavior using a 3D depth-sensing camera to understand relationships between diet and behavior. The combination of sCSDS mice with 3D behavioral analysis is a powerful method for screening ingredients in foods and farm products for antidepressant-like effects. PMID:26973450

  1. Acute Inhibition of MEK Suppresses Congenital Melanocytic Nevus Syndrome in a Murine Model Driven by Activated NRAS and Wnt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Jeffrey S; Brock, Claire; Chen, Sheau-Chiann; Al-Olabi, Lara; Nixon, Colin; McGregor, Fiona; Paine, Simon; Chanudet, Estelle; Lambie, Wendy; Holmes, William M; Mullin, James M; Richmond, Ann; Wu, Hong; Blyth, Karen; King, Ayala; Kinsler, Veronica A; Adams, Peter D

    2015-08-01

    Congenital melanocytic nevus (CMN) syndrome is the association of pigmented melanocytic nevi with extra-cutaneous features, classically melanotic cells within the central nervous system, most frequently caused by a mutation of NRAS codon 61. This condition is currently untreatable and carries a significant risk of melanoma within the skin, brain, or leptomeninges. We have previously proposed a key role for Wnt signaling in the formation of melanocytic nevi, suggesting that activated Wnt signaling may be synergistic with activated NRAS in the pathogenesis of CMN syndrome. Some familial pre-disposition suggests a germ-line contribution to CMN syndrome, as does variability of neurological phenotypes in individuals with similar cutaneous phenotypes. Accordingly, we performed exome sequencing of germ-line DNA from patients with CMN to reveal rare or undescribed Wnt-signaling alterations. A murine model harboring activated NRAS(Q61K) and Wnt signaling in melanocytes exhibited striking features of CMN syndrome, in particular neurological involvement. In the first model of treatment for this condition, these congenital, and previously assumed permanent, features were profoundly suppressed by acute post-natal treatment with a MEK inhibitor. These data suggest that activated NRAS and aberrant Wnt signaling conspire to drive CMN syndrome. Post-natal MEK inhibition is a potential candidate therapy for patients with this debilitating condition.

  2. A protective role for keratinocyte growth factor in a murine model of chemotherapy and radiotherapy-induced mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, Luis . E-mail: borgesl@amgen.com; Rex, Karen L.; Chen, Jennifer N.; Wei, Ping; Kaufman, Stephen; Scully, Sheila; Pretorius, James K.; Farrell, Catherine L.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the activity of palifermin (rHuKGF) in a murine model of mucosal damage induced by a radiotherapy/chemotherapy (RT/CT) regimen mimicking treatment protocols used in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A model of mucosal damage induced by RT/CT was established by injecting female BDF1 mice with cisplatin (10 mg/kg) on Day 1; 5-fluorouracil (40 mg/kg/day) on Days 1-4, and irradiation (5 Gy/day) to the head and neck on Days 1-5. Palifermin was administered subcutaneously on Days -2 to 0 (5 mg/kg/day) and on Day 5 (5 mg/kg). Evaluations included body weight, organ weight, keratinocyte growth factor receptor expression, epithelial thickness, and cellular proliferation. Results: Initiation of the radiochemotherapeutic regimen resulted in a reduction in body weight in control animals. Palifermin administration suppressed weight loss and resulted in increased organ weight (salivary glands and small intestine), epithelial thickness (esophagus and tongue), and cellular proliferation (tongue and salivary glands). Conclusions: Administration of palifermin before RT/CT promotes cell proliferation and increases in epithelial thickness in the oral mucosa, salivary glands, and digestive tract. Palifermin administration before and after RT/CT mitigates weight loss and a trophic effect on the intestinal mucosa and salivary glands, suggesting that palifermin use should be investigated further in the RT/CT settings, in which intestinal mucositis and salivary gland dysfunction are predominant side effects of cytotoxic therapy.

  3. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  4. The anti-inflammatory effect of Ilex paraguariensis A. St. Hil (Mate) in a murine model of pleurisy.

    PubMed

    Luz, Ana Beatriz Gobbo; da Silva, Carlos Henrique Blum; Nascimento, Marcus Vinicius P S; de Campos Facchin, Bruno Matheus; Baratto, Bruna; Fröde, Tânia Silvia; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Dalmarco, Eduardo Monguilhott

    2016-07-01

    Ilex paraguariensis is a native plant from Southern America, where it is used as a beverage. In traditional medicine, it is used to treat many diseases including inflammation. However, we do not yet know precisely how this effect occurs. We therefore evaluated its anti-inflammatory effect in a murine model of pleurisy. The standardized CE, BF and ARF fractions, Caf, Rut and CGA were able to reduce leukocyte migration, exudate concentration, MPO and ADA activities and NOx levels. Moreover, I. paraguariensis also inhibited the release of Th1/Th17 pro-inflammatory cytokines, while increasing IL-10 production and improving the histological architecture of inflamed lungs. In addition, its major compounds decreased p65 NF-κB phosphorylation. Based on our results, we can conclude that I. paraguariensis exerts its anti-inflammatory action by attenuating the Th1/Th17 polarization in this model. This fact suggests that the use of this plant as a beverage can protect against Th1/Th17 inflammatory diseases.

  5. A nitrate ester of sedative alkyl alcohol improves muscle function and structure in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guqi; Lu, Qilong

    2013-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has major physiological and cellular effects on muscle growth, repair, and function. In most muscle biopsies from humans with myopathies, sarcolemma-localized neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is either reduced or not detected, particularly in dystrophin-deficient Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Abnormal NO signaling at the sarcolemmal level is integrally involved in the pathogenesis and accounts, at least in part, for the muscle weakness of DMD. Dystrophic muscle fibers exhibit an increased susceptibility to contraction-induced membrane damage. Muscle relaxants function to prevent muscle wasting by decreasing nerve impulses and reducing calcium influx that regulates tensing or tightening of muscle fibers. We have recently developed a new class of nitric esters that combines the pharmacological functions of NO and muscle relaxation. Here, we report the synthesis and properties of the nitric ester (MMPN) of 2-methyl-2-n-propyl-1,3-propanediol (MPP) and its effect in mdx dystrophic mice, a murine model of DMD. MMPN produced significant improvements in biochemical, pathological, and functional phenotypes in the mouse model. The endurance of exercise was extended by 47% in time to exhaustion and 84% in running distance. Serum CK level was decreased by 30%. Additionally, MMPN decreased intracellular free calcium concentration without causing skeletal muscle weakness. No hepatic or renal toxicities were observed during the study. Our investigations unveil a potential new treatment for muscular diseases.

  6. Reversibility of Hepatic Histological Damage after Surgical Temporary Obstruction of the Common Bile Duct in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Olguín, H. Juárez; Hernández, J. L. Figueroa; Guzman, D. Calderón; Medina, R. Alemón

    2011-01-01

    The reversibility of hepatic histological damage after restoring bile flow in a murine model was assessed. 25 male Balb C mice (25-35 g, age 6 weeks) were divided into 5 groups and their common bile duct (CBD) fastened to obstruct the release of gall bladder and liver contents. Group I, CBD untied at day 10, group II at day 15, and groups III and IV at days 20 and 30, respectively. Hematoxilin-eosin stained liver slices were analysed 0, 5, 10 and 20 days after restoring bile flow. Group I showed slight histological lesions (second stage), as cholangiolar bile pigment concretion, pericholangiolar and portal collagen accumulation; group II, mild lesions (third stage), as cholangiolar hamartomatous proliferation and bile duct portal fibrosis; group III showed severe lesions (fourth stage), as loss of functional parenchyma, and also the second and first stage lesions. Group IV died before 30 days. First stage corresponds to absent lesions (control group). Group I recovered totally, group II recovered only from slight lesions and group III had irreversible damage. Severity of lesions increased gradually and accumulatively, irreversible hepatic damage was achieved at 20 days and is deadly at 30 days. Our model of temporary CBD obstruction was suitable to assess reversibility of hepatic histological damage. PMID:23675215

  7. Long-term therapy with NTBC and tyrosine-restricted diet in a murine model of hereditary tyrosinemia type I.

    PubMed

    Al-Dhalimy, M; Overturf, K; Finegold, M; Grompe, M

    2002-01-01

    In human patients with hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT1) a combination therapy of 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)-1,3 cyclohexane dione (NTBC) and dietary restriction of phenylalanine and tyrosine is currently widely used. We previously reported that the use of NTBC in a murine model of HT1 abolished acute liver failure but did not prevent the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the setting of nonrestricted protein intake. Here we present the results obtained with higher doses of NTBC plus dietary tyrosine restriction on long-term follow up (>2 years). Liver function tests and succinylacetone levels were completely corrected with this regimen and cancer-free survival was improved when compared to historical controls. However, while no HT1 animals had HCC at age 13 months, the incidence was 2/16 (13%) at age 18 months and 1/6 (17%) after 24 months. Thus, even the most stringent therapy could not prevent the emergence of HCC in the mouse model of HT1, even when initiated prenatally.

  8. Lactoferrin dampens high-fructose corn syrup-induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Chieh; Hsieh, Chang-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome are related obesity, type 2 diabetes/insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Here we investigated how the anti-inflammatory properties of lactoferrin can protect against the onset of hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome by using a murine model administered with high-fructose corn syrup. Our results show that a high-fructose diet stimulates intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increases intestinal permeability, leading to the introduction of endotoxin into blood circulation and liver. Immunohistochemical staining of Toll-like receptor-4 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin indicated that lactoferrin can modulate lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory cascade. The important regulatory roles are played by adipokines including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and adiponectin, ultimately reducing hepatitis and decreasing serum alanine aminotransferase release. These beneficial effects of lactoferrin related to the downregulation of the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cascade in the liver. Furthermore, lactoferrin reduced serum and hepatic triglycerides to prevent lipid accumulation in the liver, and reduced lipid peroxidation, resulting in 4-hydroxynonenal accumulation. Lactoferrin reduced oral glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Lactoferrin administration thus significantly lowered liver weight, resulting from a decrease in the triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis that activates hepatic steatosis. Taken together, these results suggest that lactoferrin protected against high-fructose corn syrup induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:24816278

  9. Contrast-enhanced X-ray detection of breast microcalcifications in a murine model using targeted gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2014-07-22

    Microcalcifications are deposits of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within breast tissue and the most common abnormality detected by mammography when screening for breast cancer due to exhibiting greater X-ray attenuation than the surrounding tissue. However, the detection of microcalcifications is limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate in vivo targeted delivery of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced detection of microcalcifications using computed tomography (CT). A murine model was developed for precise, a priori control over the level of microcalcification burden by injecting varying concentrations of HA crystals in a Matrigel carrier into mammary glands. The measured X-ray attenuation of microcalcifications containing varying HA concentrations demonstrated that the model was reproducible and able to recapitulate varying levels of microcalcification burden, including levels undetectable by CT in the absence of contrast enhancement. After intramammary delivery, BP-Au NPs provided enhanced contrast for the detection of microcalcifications that were otherwise below the CT detection limit. BP-Au NPs targeted microcalcifications due to specific binding to HA crystal surfaces, resulting in contrast between the HA microcalcification site and surrounding tissue which was visibly apparent (∼30-135 HU) within 2 days after delivery. Therefore, targeted BP-Au NPs enabled improved sensitivity and specificity for the detection of microcalcifications. PMID:24992365

  10. Dual differentiation-exogenous mesenchymal stem cell therapy for traumatic spinal cord injury repair in a murine hemisection model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai; Schwarz, Edward M; Xie, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has shown tremendous promise as a therapy for repair of various tissues of the musculoskeletal, vascular, and central nervous systems. Based on this success, recent research in this field has focused on complex tissue damage, such as that which occurs from traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). As the critical event for successful exogenous, MSC therapy is their migration to the injury site, which allows for their anti-inflammatory and morphogenic effects on fracture healing, neuronal regeneration, and functional recover. Thus, there is a need for a cost-effective in vivo model that can faithfully recapitulate the salient features of the injury, therapy, and recovery. To address this, we review the recent advances in exogenous MSC therapy for TSCI and traumatic vertebral fracture repair and the existing challenges regarding their translational applications. We also describe a novel murine model designed to take advantage of multidisciplinary collaborations between musculoskeletal and neuroscience researchers, which is needed to establish an efficacious MSC therapy for TSCI.

  11. Lactoferrin dampens high-fructose corn syrup-induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Chieh; Hsieh, Chang-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome are related obesity, type 2 diabetes/insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Here we investigated how the anti-inflammatory properties of lactoferrin can protect against the onset of hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome by using a murine model administered with high-fructose corn syrup. Our results show that a high-fructose diet stimulates intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increases intestinal permeability, leading to the introduction of endotoxin into blood circulation and liver. Immunohistochemical staining of Toll-like receptor-4 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin indicated that lactoferrin can modulate lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory cascade. The important regulatory roles are played by adipokines including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and adiponectin, ultimately reducing hepatitis and decreasing serum alanine aminotransferase release. These beneficial effects of lactoferrin related to the downregulation of the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cascade in the liver. Furthermore, lactoferrin reduced serum and hepatic triglycerides to prevent lipid accumulation in the liver, and reduced lipid peroxidation, resulting in 4-hydroxynonenal accumulation. Lactoferrin reduced oral glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Lactoferrin administration thus significantly lowered liver weight, resulting from a decrease in the triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis that activates hepatic steatosis. Taken together, these results suggest that lactoferrin protected against high-fructose corn syrup induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome.

  12. Development of a Murine Infection Model with Leishmania killicki, Responsible for Cutaneous Leishmaniosis in Algeria: Application in Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Eddaikra, Naouel; Kherachi Djenad, Ihcene; Benbetka, Sihem; Benikhlef, Razika; Aït-Oudhia, Khatima; Moulti-Mati, Farida; Oury, Bruno; Sereno, Denis; Harrat, Zoubir

    2016-01-01

    In Algeria, Leishmania infantum, Leishmania major, and Leishmania killicki (Leishmania tropica) are responsible for cutaneous leishmaniosis. We established a murine model of L. killicki infection to investigate its infective capacity, some immunophysiopathological aspects, and its suitability for pharmacological purposes. Following the injection of L. major or L. killicki metacyclic promastigotes in the ear dermis of BALB/c mice, the course of infection was followed. The infection with L. killicki caused slower lesion formation than with L. major. The presence of L. killicki or L. major DNA and parasites was detected in the ear dermis and in lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Lesions induced by L. killicki were nonulcerative in their aspect, whereas those caused by L. major were highly ulcerative and necrotic, which matches well with the lesion phenotype reported in humans for L. killicki and L. major, respectively. The treatment of L. killicki lesions by injection of Glucantime® significantly reduced the lesion thickness and parasite burden. Ear dermal injection of BALB/c mice constitutes a model to study lesions physiopathology caused by L. killicki and presents interest for in vivo screening of new compounds against this pathogen, emerging in Algeria. PMID:26949705

  13. Housing temperature-induced stress drives therapeutic resistance in murine tumour models through β2-adrenergic receptor activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Jason W.-L.; Reed, Chelsey B.; Kokolus, Kathleen M.; Pitoniak, Rosemarie; Utley, Adam; Bucsek, Mark J.; Ma, Wen Wee; Repasky, Elizabeth A.; Hylander, Bonnie L.

    2015-03-01

    Cancer research relies heavily on murine models for evaluating the anti-tumour efficacy of therapies. Here we show that the sensitivity of several pancreatic tumour models to cytotoxic therapies is significantly increased when mice are housed at a thermoneutral ambient temperature of 30 °C compared with the standard temperature of 22 °C. Further, we find that baseline levels of norepinephrine as well as the levels of several anti-apoptotic molecules are elevated in tumours from mice housed at 22 °C. The sensitivity of tumours to cytotoxic therapies is also enhanced by administering a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist to mice housed at 22 °C. These data demonstrate that standard housing causes a degree of cold stress sufficient to impact the signalling pathways related to tumour-cell survival and affect the outcome of pre-clinical experiments. Furthermore, these data highlight the significant role of host physiological factors in regulating the sensitivity of tumours to therapy.

  14. The effect of alpha 1-blocker, bunazosin on a murine model of congestive heart failure induced by viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Matsumori, A; Okada, I; Tominaga, M; Kawai, C

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of an alpha 1-blocker, bunazosin, using an experimental murine model of congestive heart failure induced by viral myocarditis. This model is characterized by a high incidence of severe myocarditis and subsequent congestive heart failure, and is suitable for the evaluation of the effect of drugs. To estimate myocardial damage objectively and quantitatively, we used antimyosin monoclonal antibody in addition to histopathological grading. Four-week-old BALB/c mice were inoculated with encephalomyocarditis virus. The mice were injected daily with bunazosin or saline as a placebo from the day of viral inoculation until day 7 (protocol-I) or day 14 (protocol-II), or from day 4 to day 14 (protocol-III). They were then injected with 1.5 microCi of indium-111 labeled antimyosin antibody and were killed 24 h later. The antimyosin cardiac uptake was counted and histopathological grading was performed. The heart-weight to body-weight ratio, left ventricular dimension, histopathological grades and antimyosin cardiac uptake were significantly lower in the bunazosin group than in the placebo group in protocol-II, but not in protocol-I or protocol-III. Bunazosin showed a protective effect against viral myocarditis only when it was started early after infection and continued until the stage of congestive heart failure.

  15. Development of a Murine Infection Model with Leishmania killicki, Responsible for Cutaneous Leishmaniosis in Algeria: Application in Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Eddaikra, Naouel; Kherachi Djenad, Ihcene; Benbetka, Sihem; Benikhlef, Razika; Aït-Oudhia, Khatima; Moulti-Mati, Farida; Oury, Bruno; Sereno, Denis; Harrat, Zoubir

    2016-01-01

    In Algeria, Leishmania infantum, Leishmania major, and Leishmania killicki (Leishmania tropica) are responsible for cutaneous leishmaniosis. We established a murine model of L. killicki infection to investigate its infective capacity, some immunophysiopathological aspects, and its suitability for pharmacological purposes. Following the injection of L. major or L. killicki metacyclic promastigotes in the ear dermis of BALB/c mice, the course of infection was followed. The infection with L. killicki caused slower lesion formation than with L. major. The presence of L. killicki or L. major DNA and parasites was detected in the ear dermis and in lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Lesions induced by L. killicki were nonulcerative in their aspect, whereas those caused by L. major were highly ulcerative and necrotic, which matches well with the lesion phenotype reported in humans for L. killicki and L. major, respectively. The treatment of L. killicki lesions by injection of Glucantime® significantly reduced the lesion thickness and parasite burden. Ear dermal injection of BALB/c mice constitutes a model to study lesions physiopathology caused by L. killicki and presents interest for in vivo screening of new compounds against this pathogen, emerging in Algeria. PMID:26949705

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha processing inhibitor-1 inhibits skin fibrosis in a bleomycin-induced murine model of scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Terao, Mika; Murota, Hiroyuki; Kitaba, Shun; Katayama, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Elevated serum concentration of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor p55 (sTNFRp55) is known to correlate with the severity of systemic sclerosis (SSc). However, it has not been verified whether this increase contributes to the pathogenesis of SSc. In this study, we found that sTNFRp55 also is increased in the bleomycin (BLM)-induced murine model of SSc. Therefore, we examined the effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha processing inhibitor-1 (TAPI-1), the inhibitor of TNFRp55 sheddase, in this model. TAPI-1 was administered weekly to mice with skin fibrosis induced by daily BLM injections. TAPI-1 significantly suppressed BLM-induced skin thickness and the number of myofibroblasts. It also inhibited the increase of serum sTNFRp55 after 3 weeks of BLM injections. The mRNA expression of collagen type I alpha1, transforming growth factor-beta1 and alpha smooth muscle actin were decreased by TAPI-1 administration. Taken together, these findings indicate that targeting the TNFalpha converting enzyme might be a new type of therapy for patients with SSc. PMID:19758314

  17. Prefrontal deficits in a murine model overexpressing the down syndrome candidate gene dyrk1a.

    PubMed

    Thomazeau, Aurore; Lassalle, Olivier; Iafrati, Jillian; Souchet, Benoit; Guedj, Fayçal; Janel, Nathalie; Chavis, Pascale; Delabar, Jean; Manzoni, Olivier J

    2014-01-22

    The gene Dyrk1a is the mammalian ortholog of Drosophila minibrain. Dyrk1a localizes in the Down syndrome (DS) critical region of chromosome 21q22.2 and is a major candidate for the behavioral and neuronal abnormalities associated with DS. PFC malfunctions are a common denominator in several neuropsychiatric diseases, including DS, but the contribution of DYRK1A in PFC dysfunctions, in particular the synaptic basis for impairments of executive functions reported in DS patients, remains obscure. We quantified synaptic plasticity, biochemical synaptic markers, and dendritic morphology of deep layer pyramidal PFC neurons in adult mBACtgDyrk1a transgenic mice that overexpress Dyrk1a under the control of its own regulatory sequences. We found that overexpression of Dyrk1a largely increased the number of spines on oblique dendrites of pyramidal neurons, as evidenced by augmented spine density, higher PSD95 protein levels, and larger miniature EPSCs. The dendritic alterations were associated with anomalous NMDAR-mediated long-term potentiation and accompanied by a marked reduction in the pCaMKII/CaMKII ratio in mBACtgDyrk1a mice. Retrograde endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression (eCB-LTD) was ablated in mBACtgDyrk1a mice. Administration of green tea extracts containing epigallocatechin 3-gallate, a potent DYRK1A inhibitor, to adult mBACtgDyrk1a mice normalized long-term potentiation and spine anomalies but not eCB-LTD. However, inhibition of the eCB deactivating enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase normalized eCB-LTD in mBACtgDyrk1a mice. These data shed light on previously undisclosed participation of DYRK1A in adult PFC dendritic structures and synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, they suggest its involvement in DS-related endophenotypes and identify new potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:24453307

  18. A Recently Established Murine Model of Nasal Polyps Demonstrates Activation of B Cells, as Occurs in Human Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Sun Hye; Carter, Roderick G; Kato, Atsushi; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2016-08-01

    Animal model systems are invaluable for examining human diseases. Our laboratory recently established a mouse model of nasal polyps (NPs) and investigated similarities and differences between this mouse model and human NPs. We especially focus on the hypothesis that B cell activation occurs during NP generation in the murine model. After induction of ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinosinusitis, 6% ovalbumin and Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (10 ng) were instilled into the nasal cavity of mice three times per week for 8 weeks. The development of structures that somewhat resemble NPs (which we will refer to as NPs) was confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The mRNA and protein levels of various inflammatory cell markers and mediators were measured by real-time PCR in nasal tissue and by ELISA in nasal lavage fluid (NLF), respectively. Total Ig isotype levels in NLF were also quantitated using the Mouse Ig Isotyping Multiplex kit (EMD Millipore, Billerica, MA) on a Luminex 200 instrument (Life Technologies, Grand Island, NY). Similar to human NPs, there were significant increases in gene expression of inflammatory cell markers, such as CD19, CD138, CD11c, and mast cell protease-6 in nasal tissue samples of the NP group compared with those of the control group. In further investigations of B cell activation, mRNA expressions of B cell activating factor and a proliferation-inducing ligand were found to be significantly increased in mouse NP tissue. B cell-activating factor protein concentration and IgA and IgG1 levels in NLF were significantly higher in the NP group compared with the control group. In this study, the NP mouse model demonstrated enhanced B cell responses, which are reminiscent of B cell responses in human NPs. PMID:27163839

  19. Immunogenicity of murine solid tumor models as a defining feature of in vivo behavior and response to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Melissa G; Karimi, Saman S; Barry-Holson, Keegan; Angell, Trevor E; Murphy, Katherine A; Church, Connor H; Ohlfest, John R; Hu, Peisheng; Epstein, Alan L

    2013-01-01

    Immune profiling has been widely used to probe mechanisms of immune escape in cancer and identify novel targets for therapy. Two emerging uses of immune signatures are to identify likely responders to immunotherapy regimens among individuals with cancer and to understand the variable responses seen among subjects with cancer in immunotherapy trials. Here, the immune profiles of 6 murine solid tumor models (CT26, 4T1, MAD109, RENCA, LLC, and B16) were correlated to tumor regression and survival in response to 2 immunotherapy regimens. Comprehensive profiles for each model were generated using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry techniques, as well as functional studies of suppressor cell populations (regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells), to analyze intratumoral and draining lymphoid tissues. Tumors were stratified as highly or poorly immunogenic, with highly immunogenic tumors showing a significantly greater presence of T-cell costimulatory molecules and immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. An absence of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T lymphocytes and mature dendritic cells was seen across all models. Delayed tumor growth and increased survival with suppressor cell inhibition and tumor-targeted chemokine+/-dendritic cells vaccine immunotherapy were associated with high tumor immunogenicity in these models. Tumor MHC class I expression correlated with the overall tumor immunogenicity level and was a singular marker to predict immunotherapy response with these regimens. By using experimental tumor models as surrogates for human cancers, these studies demonstrate how select features of an immune profile may be utilized to identify patients most likely to respond to immunotherapy regimens. PMID:24145359

  20. Development of a diet-induced murine model of diabetes featuring cardinal metabolic and pathophysiological abnormalities of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jodie L.; Bridson, Tahnee L.; Alim, Md Abdul; Rush, Catherine M.; Rudd, Donna M.; Govan, Brenda L.; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The persistent rise in global incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) continues to have significant public health and economic implications. The availability of relevant animal models of T2D is critical to elucidating the complexity of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disease and the implications this has on susceptibility to T2D complications. Whilst many high-fat diet-induced rodent models of obesity and diabetes exist, growing appreciation of the contribution of high glycaemic index diets on the development of hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance highlight the requirement for animal models that more closely represent global dietary patterns reflective of modern society. To that end, we sought to develop and validate a murine model of T2D based on consumption of an energy-dense diet containing moderate levels of fat and a high glycaemic index to better reflect the aetiopathogenesis of T2D. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed an energy-dense (ED) diet and the development of pathological features used in the clinical diagnosis of T2D was assessed over a 30-week period. Compared with control mice, 87% of mice fed an ED diet developed pathognomonic signs of T2D including glucose intolerance, hyperglycaemia, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycosuria within 30 weeks. Furthermore, dyslipidaemia, chronic inflammation, alterations in circulating leucocytes and renal impairment were also evident in ED diet-fed mice compared with mice receiving standard rodent chow. Longitudinal profiling of metabolic and biochemical parameters provide support of an aetiologically and clinically relevant model of T2D that will serve as a valuable tool for mechanistic and therapeutic studies investigating the pathogenic complications of T2D. PMID:27402965

  1. Chinese herbal medicine (Tuhuai extract) exhibits topical anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activity in murine disease models

    PubMed Central

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Shi, Yuejun; Man, Mona; Lee, Seung Hun; Demerjian, Marianne; Chang, Sandra; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Elias, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    While psoriasis is one of the most common skin disorders in humans, effective, safe and inexpensive treatments are still largely unavailable. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been used for centuries for treating psoriasis and several reports claim that systemic administration of one such CHM, Tuhuai, mainly composed of flos sophorae, smilax glabra roxb and licorice, is effective in psoriasis. However, the mechanisms by which this CHM improves psoriasis are not yet clear. Two universal features of psoriasis are epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. Moreover, drugs that specifically inhibit epidermal hyperplasia and/or inflammation are widely used to treat psoriasis. Here, we investigated whether topical applications of Tuhuai extract exhibit anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activities in two murine models of inflammatory dermatoses. To assess Tuhuai's potential anti-proliferative effect, we disrupted epidermal barrier function twice-daily for 4 days in normal hairless mice followed by topical applications of either 1% Tuhuai extract or Vehicle to both flanks immediately after each barrier perturbation. Changes in epidermal proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL staining. To assess the anti-inflammatory effects of Tuhuai, both irritant (phorbol ester) and acute allergic contact dermatitis (oxazolone) models were used. Whereas topical Tuhuai extract did not alter epidermal proliferation or induce irritation in normal skin, it both reduced epidermal hyperplasia in the epidermal hyperproliferative model, and reduced inflammation in both irritant and allergic contact dermatitis models. As topical Tuhuai extract exhibits anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory properties in a variety of human models of inflammatory dermatoses, Tuhuai could provide an effective, relatively safe and inexpensive therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses, including psoriasis. PMID:18341576

  2. The Changing Nature of Adult Education in the Age of Transnational Migration: Toward a Model of Recognitive Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Shibao

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the changing nature of adult education in the age of transnational migration and proposes recognitive adult education as an inclusive model that acknowledges and affirms cultural difference and diversity as positive and desirable assets.

  3. Administration of mycobacterial Ag85A and IL-17A fusion protein attenuates airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rong; Guo, Sheng; Wang, Mei-yi; Li, Yan-hua; Wu, Liang-Xia; Ma, Hui; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-yong; Zhang, Jian-hua

    2013-12-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A contributes to the development of asthma, especially in severe asthma which has characteristic neutrophil infiltration in airways. However, IL-17A-blocking antibody could escalate T helper (Th) 2 cytokines, such as IL-13, IL-4 in murine models. We aimed at determining the effect of mycobacterial Ag85A and IL-17A fusion protein—Ag85A-IL-17A on airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma. IL-17A recombinant protein fused mycobacterial immunodominant antigen Ag85A was constructed, expressed and purified. The fusion protein was then administrated into BALB/c mice and its anti-inflammatory effects in the infiltration of inflammatory cells, Th2/Th17 cytokines in BALF, histopathological changes of lung tissues as well as chemokines in lung tissues were evaluated in the murine model of asthma. We found that administration of mycobacterial Ag85A and IL-17A fusion protein induced IL-17A specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G in sera and significantly decreased IL-17A and IL-6 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Ag85A-IL-17A vaccinated mice also showed marked reduction in the infiltration of inflammatory cells in peribronchiolar region and significant decrease in total cells, eosinophil cells and neutrophil cells in BALF. The increased levels of IL-13 and IL-4 in BALF of ovalbumin-sensitized mice were significantly reduced by the administration of Ag85A-IL-17A. Furthermore, CD3+CD4+IL-13+ splenocytes stimulated with OVA and CXCL1 mRNA, CCL2 mRNA and GATA-3 mRNA expressed in lung tissues were decreased markedly in Ag85A-IL-17A vaccinated group. Our results demonstrate remarkable antiallergic effects of Ag85A-IL-17A in a murine model of asthma and it may have protective effects on allergic asthma.

  4. Requirement of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa CbrA Sensor Kinase for Full Virulence in a Murine Acute Lung Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Amy T. Y.; Janot, Laure; Pena, Olga M.; Neidig, Anke; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Hilchie, Ashley; Levesque, Roger C.; Overhage, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is a major cause of respiratory tract and other nosocomial infections. The sensor kinase CbrA is a central regulator of carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in vitro also regulates virulence-related processes in P. aeruginosa. Here, we investigated the role of CbrA in two murine models of infection. In both peritoneal infections in leukopenic mice and lung infection models, the cbrA mutant was less virulent since substantially larger numbers of cbrA mutant bacteria were required to cause the same level of infection as wild-type or complemented bacteria. In contrast, in the chronic rat lung model the cbrA mutant grew and persisted as well as the wild type, indicating that the decrease of in vivo virulence of the cbrA mutant did not result from growth deficiencies on particular carbon substrates observed in vitro. In addition, a mutant in the cognate response regulator CbrB showed no defect in virulence in the peritoneal infection model, ruling out the involvement of certain alterations of virulence properties in the cbrA mutant including defective swarming motility, increased biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity, since these alterations are controlled through CbrB. Further investigations indicated that the mutant was more susceptible to uptake by phagocytes in vitro, resulting in greater overall bacterial killing. Consistent with the virulence defect, it took a smaller number of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae to kill the cbrA mutant than to kill the wild type. Transcriptional analysis of the cbrA mutant during D. discoideum infection led to the conclusion that CbrA played an important role in the iron metabolism, protection of P. aeruginosa against oxidative stress, and the regulation of certain virulence factors. PMID:24379284

  5. Requirement of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa CbrA sensor kinase for full virulence in a murine acute lung infection model.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Amy T Y; Janot, Laure; Pena, Olga M; Neidig, Anke; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Hilchie, Ashley; Levesque, Roger C; Overhage, Joerg; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is a major cause of respiratory tract and other nosocomial infections. The sensor kinase CbrA is a central regulator of carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in vitro also regulates virulence-related processes in P. aeruginosa. Here, we investigated the role of CbrA in two murine models of infection. In both peritoneal infections in leukopenic mice and lung infection models, the cbrA mutant was less virulent since substantially larger numbers of cbrA mutant bacteria were required to cause the same level of infection as wild-type or complemented bacteria. In contrast, in the chronic rat lung model the cbrA mutant grew and persisted as well as the wild type, indicating that the decrease of in vivo virulence of the cbrA mutant did not result from growth deficiencies on particular carbon substrates observed in vitro. In addition, a mutant in the cognate response regulator CbrB showed no defect in virulence in the peritoneal infection model, ruling out the involvement of certain alterations of virulence properties in the cbrA mutant including defective swarming motility, increased biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity, since these alterations are controlled through CbrB. Further investigations indicated that the mutant was more susceptible to uptake by phagocytes in vitro, resulting in greater overall bacterial killing. Consistent with the virulence defect, it took a smaller number of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae to kill the cbrA mutant than to kill the wild type. Transcriptional analysis of the cbrA mutant during D. discoideum infection led to the conclusion that CbrA played an important role in the iron metabolism, protection of P. aeruginosa against oxidative stress, and the regulation of certain virulence factors.

  6. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation of sulbactam against Acinetobacter baumannii in in vitro and murine thigh and lung infection models.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuta; Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Ikawa, Kazuro; Watanabe, Erika; Shigemi, Akari; Umezaki, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Koyo; Ueno, Keiichiro; Morikawa, Norifumi; Takeda, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a pathogen that has become globally associated with nosocomial infections. Sulbactam, a potent inhibitor of β-lactamases, was previously shown to be active against A. baumannii strains in vitro and effective against A. baumannii infections. However, a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis of sulbactam against A. baumannii infections has not yet been performed. This is necessary because optimisation of dosing regimens should be based on PK/PD analysis. Therefore, in vitro and in vivo PK/PD analyses of sulbactam were performed using murine thigh and lung infection models of A. baumannii to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of sulbactam. Sulbactam showed time-dependent bactericidal activity in vitro against A. baumannii. The PK/PD index that best correlated with its in vivo effects was the time that the free drug concentration remained above the minimum inhibitory concentration (fT>MIC) both in the thigh (R(2)=0.95) and lung (R(2)=0.96) infection models. Values of fT>MIC for a static effect and 1, 2 and 3log10 kill, respectively, were 21.0%, 32.9%, 43.6% and 57.3% in the thigh infection model and 20.4%, 24.5%, 29.3% and 37.3% in the lung infection model. Here we report the in vitro and in vivo time-dependent activities of sulbactam against A. baumannii infection and demonstrate that sulbactam was sufficiently bactericidal when an fT>MIC of >60% against A. baumannii thigh infection and >40% against A. baumannii lung infection was achieved.

  7. Anisakis simplex allergy: a murine model of anaphylaxis induced by parasitic proteins displays a mixed Th1/Th2 pattern

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, M L; Conejero, L; Higaki, Y; Martín, E; Pérez, C; Infante, S; Rubio, M; Zubeldia, J M

    2005-01-01

    The study of the singular hypersensitivity reactions to Anisakis simplex (A.s) proteins, may help us to undestand many of the unknown immune interactions between helmiths infections and allergy. We have developed a murine model of allergy to A. simplex, that mimics human A. simplex allergy to study the specific aspects of anaphylaxis induced by parasites. Male C3H/HeJ mice were intraperitoneally sensitized to A. simplex. Mice were then intravenous or orally challenged with A. simplex. Antigen-specific immunoglobulins, polyclonal IgE, anaphylactic symptoms, plasma histamine levels and cytokine profiles were determined. Comparative IgE immunoblot analyses were also performed. Specific IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a were detected in sensitized mice since week 3. Polyclonal IgE raised and peaked with different kinetics. Intravenous A. simplex challenge produced anaphylaxis in mice, accompanied by plasma histamine release. Oral A. simplex challenge in similarly sensitized mice did not caused symptoms nor histamine release. Numerous A. simplex allergens were recognized by sensitized mouse sera, some of them similar to human serum. The A. simplex stimulated splenocytes released IL-10, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-13 and IL-5. We describe a new animal model of anaphylaxis. It exhibits characteristics of type I hypersensitivity reactions to Anisakis simplex similar to those observed in allergic humans. Different responses to i.v. or oral A. simplex challenges emerged, which did not reflect a window tolerization period. The cytokine profile developed (mixed Th1/Th2 pattern) differed from the observed in classical models of anaphylaxis or allergy to food antigens. This model may permit to investigate the peculiar allergic reactions to parasitic proteins. PMID:16297154

  8. CD24 Is Not Required for Tumor Initiation and Growth in Murine Breast and Prostate Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Natascha; Neeb, Antje; Uhle, Tanja; Dimmler, Arno; Rothley, Melanie; Allgayer, Heike; Fodde, Riccardo; Sleeman, Jonathan Paul; Thiele, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    CD24 is a small, heavily glycosylated, GPI-linked membrane protein, whose expression has been associated with the tumorigenesis and progression of several types of cancer. Here, we studied the expression of CD24 in tumors of MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572/T+ and TRAMP genetic mouse models that spontaneously develop mammary or prostate carcinoma, respectively. We found that CD24 is expressed during tumor development in all three models. In MMTV-PyMT and Apc1572T/+ breast tumors, CD24 was strongly but heterogeneously expressed during early tumorigenesis, but decreased in more advanced stages, and accordingly was increased in poorly differentiated lesions compared with well differentiated lesions. In prostate tumors developing in TRAMP mice, CD24 expression was strong within hyperplastic lesions in comparison with non-hyperplastic regions, and heterogeneous CD24 expression was maintained in advanced prostate carcinomas. To investigate whether CD24 plays a functional role in tumorigenesis in these models, we crossed CD24 deficient mice with MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice, and assessed the influence of CD24 deficiency on tumor onset and tumor burden. We found that mice negative or positive for CD24 did not significantly differ in terms of tumor initiation and burden in the genetic tumor models tested, with the exception of Apc1572T/+ mice, in which lack of CD24 reduced the mammary tumor burden slightly but significantly. Together, our data suggest that while CD24 is distinctively expressed during the early development of murine mammary and