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Sample records for adult muscle regeneration

  1. Myocyte Dedifferentiation Drives Extraocular Muscle Regeneration in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Kasprick, Daniel S.; Junttila, Tyler L.; Grzegorski, Steven J.; Louie, Ke'ale W.; Chiari, Estelle F.; Kish, Phillip E.; Kahana, Alon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to characterize the injury response of extraocular muscles (EOMs) in adult zebrafish. Methods Adult zebrafish underwent lateral rectus (LR) muscle myectomy surgery to remove 50% of the muscle, followed by molecular and cellular characterization of the tissue response to the injury. Results Following myectomy, the LR muscle regenerated an anatomically correct and functional muscle within 7 to 10 days post injury (DPI). Following injury, the residual muscle stump was replaced by a mesenchymal cell population that lost cell polarity and expressed mesenchymal markers. Next, a robust proliferative burst repopulated the area of the regenerating muscle. Regenerating cells expressed myod, identifying them as myoblasts. However, both immunofluorescence and electron microscopy failed to identify classic Pax7-positive satellite cells in control or injured EOMs. Instead, some proliferating nuclei were noted to express mef2c at the very earliest point in the proliferative burst, suggesting myonuclear reprogramming and dedifferentiation. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling of regenerating cells followed by a second myectomy without repeat labeling resulted in a twice-regenerated muscle broadly populated by BrdU-labeled nuclei with minimal apparent dilution of the BrdU signal. A double-pulse experiment using BrdU and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) identified double-labeled nuclei, confirming the shared progenitor lineage. Rapid regeneration occurred despite a cell cycle length of 19.1 hours, whereas 72% of the regenerating muscle nuclei entered the cell cycle by 48 hours post injury (HPI). Dextran lineage tracing revealed that residual myocytes were responsible for muscle regeneration. Conclusions EOM regeneration in adult zebrafish occurs by dedifferentiation of residual myocytes involving a muscle-to-mesenchyme transition. A mechanistic understanding of myocyte reprogramming may facilitate novel approaches to the development of molecular

  2. Myogenic regulatory factors during regeneration of skeletal muscle in young, adult, and old rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, D. R.; Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1997-01-01

    Myogenic factor mRNA expression was examined during muscle regeneration after bupivacaine injection in Fischer 344/Brown Norway F1 rats aged 3, 18, and 31 mo of age (young, adult, and old, respectively). Mass of the tibialis anterior muscle in the young rats had recovered to control values by 21 days postbupivacaine injection but in adult and old rats remained 40% less than that of contralateral controls at 21 and 28 days of recovery. During muscle regeneration, myogenin mRNA was significantly increased in muscles of young, adult, and old rats 5 days after bupivacaine injection. Subsequently, myogenin mRNA levels in young rat muscle decreased to postinjection control values by day 21 but did not return to control values in 28-day regenerating muscles of adult and old rats. The expression of MyoD mRNA was also increased in muscles at day 5 of regeneration in young, adult, and old rats, decreased to control levels by day 14 in young and adult rats, and remained elevated in the old rats for 28 days. In summary, either a diminished ability to downregulate myogenin and MyoD mRNAs in regenerating muscle occurs in old rat muscles, or the continuing myogenic effort includes elevated expression of these mRNAs.

  3. Myogenin Regulates Exercise Capacity but Is Dispensable for Skeletal Muscle Regeneration in Adult mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Klein, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most prevalent inherited childhood muscle disorder in humans. mdx mice exhibit a similar pathophysiology to the human disorder allowing for an in-depth investigation of DMD. Myogenin, a myogenic regulatory factor, is best known for its role in embryonic myogenesis, but its role in adult muscle maintenance and regeneration is still poorly understood. Here, we generated an mdx:Myogflox/flox mouse harboring a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase transgene, which was used to conditionally delete Myog during adult life. After tamoxifen treatment, three groups of mice were created to study the effects of Myog deletion: mdx:Myogflox/flox mice (mdx), Myogflox/flox mice (wild-type), and mdx:MyogfloxΔ/floxΔ:Cre-ER mice (mdx:Myog-deleted). mdx:Myog-deleted mice exhibited no adverse phenotype and behaved normally. When run to exhaustion, mdx:Myog-deleted mice demonstrated an enhanced capacity for exercise compared to mdx mice, running nearly as far as wild-type mice. Moreover, these mice showed the same signature characteristics of muscle regeneration as mdx mice. Unexpectedly, we found that myogenin was dispensable for muscle regeneration. Factors associated with muscle fatigue, metabolism, and proteolysis were significantly altered in mdx:Myog-deleted mice, and this might contribute to their increased exercise capacity. Our results reveal novel functions for myogenin in adult muscle and suggest that reducing Myog expression in other muscle disease models may partially restore muscle function. PMID:21264243

  4. Myomaker is essential for muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Millay, Douglas P.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of injured adult skeletal muscle involves fusion of activated satellite cells to form new myofibers. Myomaker is a muscle-specific membrane protein required for fusion of embryonic myoblasts, but its potential involvement in adult muscle regeneration has not been explored. We show that myogenic basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors induce myomaker expression in satellite cells during acute and chronic muscle regeneration. Moreover, genetic deletion of myomaker in adult satellite cells completely abolishes muscle regeneration, resulting in severe muscle destruction after injury. Myomaker is the only muscle-specific protein known to be absolutely essential for fusion of embryonic and adult myoblasts. PMID:25085416

  5. STAT3 Regulates Self-Renewal of Adult Muscle Satellite Cells during Injury-Induced Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Han; Xiao, Fang; Wang, Gang; Wei, Xiuqing; Jiang, Lei; Chen, Yan; Zhu, Lin; Wang, Haixia; Diao, Yarui; Wang, Huating; Ip, Nancy Y; Cheung, Tom H; Wu, Zhenguo

    2016-08-23

    Recent studies have shown that STAT3 negatively regulates the proliferation of muscle satellite cells (MuSCs) and injury-induced muscle regeneration. These studies have been largely based on STAT3 inhibitors, which may produce off-target effects and are not cell type-specific in vivo. Here, we examine the role of STAT3 in MuSCs using two different mouse models: a MuSC-specific Stat3 knockout line and a Stat3 (MuSC-specific)/dystrophin (Dmd) double knockout (dKO) line. Stat3(-/-) MuSCs from both mutant lines were defective in proliferation. Moreover, in both mutant strains, the MuSC pool shrank, and regeneration was compromised after injury, with defects more pronounced in dKO mice along with severe muscle inflammation and fibrosis. We analyzed the transcriptomes of MuSCs from dKO and Dmd(-/-) control mice and identified multiple STAT3 target genes, including Pax7. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of STAT3 in adult MuSCs that regulates their self-renewal during injury-induced muscle regeneration. PMID:27524611

  6. Changes in neurotrophic factors of adult rat laryngeal muscles during nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Morato, Ignacio; Sharma, Sansar; Pitman, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) leads to the loss of ipsilateral laryngeal fold movement, with dysphonia, and occasionally dysphagia. Functional movement of the vocal folds is never restored due to misrouting of regenerating axons to agonist and antagonist laryngeal muscles. Changes of neurotrophic factor expression within denervated muscles occur after nerve injury and may influence nerve regeneration, axon guidance and muscle reinnervation. This study investigates the expression of certain neurotrophic factors in the laryngeal muscles during the course of axonal regeneration using RT-PCR. The timing of neurotrophic factor expression was correlated to the reinnervation of the laryngeal muscles by motor axons. Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Netrin-1 (NTN-1) increased their expression levels in laryngeal muscles after nerve section and during regeneration of RLN. The upregulation of trophic factors returned to control levels following regeneration of RLN. The expression levels of the neurotrophic factors were correlated with the innervation of regenerating axons into the denervated muscles. The results suggest that certain neurotrophic factor expression is strongly correlated to the reinnervation pattern of the regenerating RLN. These factors may be involved in guidance and neuromuscular junction formation during nerve regeneration. In the future, their manipulation may enhance the selective reinnervation of the larynx. PMID:27421227

  7. Muscle regeneration after sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bouglé, Adrien; Rocheteau, Pierre; Sharshar, Tarek; Chrétien, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Severe critical illness is often complicated by intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW), which is associated with increased ICU and post-ICU mortality, delayed weaning from mechanical ventilation and long-term functional disability. Several mechanisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ICU-AW, but muscle regeneration has not been investigated to any extent in this context, even though its involvement is suggested by the protracted functional consequences of ICU-AW. Recent data suggest that muscle regeneration could be impaired after sepsis, and that mesenchymal stem cell treatment could improve the post-injury muscle recovery. PMID:27193340

  8. The Satellite Cell in Male and Female, Developing and Adult Mouse Muscle: Distinct Stem Cells for Growth and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Alice; Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic cells found between the basal lamina and the sarcolemma of the muscle fibre. Satellite cells are the source of new myofibres; as such, satellite cell transplantation holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophies. We have investigated age and sex differences between mouse satellite cells in vitro and assessed the importance of these factors as mediators of donor cell engraftment in an in vivo model of satellite cell transplantation. We found that satellite cell numbers are increased in growing compared to adult and in male compared to female adult mice. We saw no difference in the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors between male and female mice, but distinct profiles were observed according to developmental stage. We show that, in contrast to adult mice, the majority of satellite cells from two week old mice are proliferating to facilitate myofibre growth; however a small proportion of these cells are quiescent and not contributing to this growth programme. Despite observed changes in satellite cell populations, there is no difference in engraftment efficiency either between satellite cells derived from adult or pre-weaned donor mice, male or female donor cells, or between male and female host muscle environments. We suggest there exist two distinct satellite cell populations: one for muscle growth and maintenance and one for muscle regeneration. PMID:22662253

  9. ‘Fast’ and ‘slow’ muscle fibres in hindlimb muscles of adult rats regenerate from intrinsically different satellite cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalhovde, JM; Jerkovic, R; Sefland, I; Cordonnier, C; Calabria, E; Schiaffino, S; Lømo, T

    2005-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was examined in regenerating fast extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow soleus (SOL) muscles of adult rats. Myotoxic bupivacaine was injected into SOL and EDL and the muscles were either denervated or neuromuscularly blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX) on the sciatic nerve. Three to 10 or 30 days later, denervated SOL or EDL, or innervated but neuromuscularly blocked EDL received a slow 20 Hz stimulus pattern through electrodes implanted on the muscles or along the fibular nerve to EDL below the TTX block. In addition, denervated SOL and EDL received a fast 100 Hz stimulus pattern. Denervated EDL and SOL stimulated with the same slow stimulus pattern expressed different amounts of type 1 MyHC protein (8%versus 35% at 10 days, 13%versus 87% at 30 days). Stimulated denervated and stimulated innervated (TTX blocked) EDL expressed the same amounts of type 1, 2A, 2X and 2B MyHC proteins. Cross-sections treated for in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry showed expression of type 1 MyHC in all SOL fibres but only in some scattered single or smaller groups of fibres in EDL. The results suggest that muscle fibres regenerate from intrinsically different satellite cells in EDL and SOL and within EDL. However, induction by different extrinsic factors arising in extracellular matrix or from muscle position and usage in the limb has not been excluded. No evidence for nerve-derived trophic influences was obtained. PMID:15564285

  10. Hindlimb suspension reduces muscle regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Truong, Q.; Macius, A.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of juvenile skeletal muscle to a weightless environment reduces growth and satellite cell mitotic activity. However, the effect of a weightless environment on the satellite cell population during muscle repair remains unknown. Muscle injury was induced in rat soleus muscles using the myotoxic snake venom, notexin. Rats were placed into hindlimb-suspended or weightbearing groups for 10 days following injury. Cellular proliferation during regeneration was evaluated using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) regenerated muscle mass, regenerated myofiber diameter, uninjured muscle mass, and uninjured myofiber diameter compared to weightbearing rats. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) BrdU labeling in uninjured soleus muscles compared to weight-bearing muscles. However, hindlimb suspension did not abolish muscle regeneration because myofibers formed in the injured soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended rats, and BrdU labeling was equivalent (P > 0.10) on myofiber segments isolated from the soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended and weightbearing rats following injury. Thus, hindlimb suspension (weightlessness) does not suppress satellite cell mitotic activity in regenerating muscles before myofiber formation, but reduces growth of the newly formed myofibers.

  11. Effects of Aging on Thyroarytenoid Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungah; Kletzien, Heidi; Connor, Nadine P.; Schultz, Edward; Chamberlain, Connie S.; Bless, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives/hypotheses Regenerative properties of age-associated changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles following injury are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the regenerative properties of the thyroarytenoid muscle (TA) in an aging rat model. The hypothesis was that, following myotoxic injury, old animals would exhibit a decrease in mitotic activities of muscle satellite cells when compared with younger rats, suggesting reduced regenerative potential in the aging rat TA. Study Design Animal group comparison. Method Regeneration responses following injury to the TA were examined in 18 young adult, middle-aged, and old Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats. TA muscle fiber cross sectional area (CSA), satellite cell mitosis (number/fiber), and regeneration index (CSA injured side/CSA non-injured side) were measured and compared across age groups. Results Young animals had a significantly higher regeneration index than the middle-aged and old groups. Within the lateral region of the TA (LTA), the regeneration index was significantly higher in the young animals than in the middle-aged and old animals. The regeneration index of the medial TA (MTA) was significantly higher than the LTA across all age groups. Conclusions The regenerative capacity of the TA muscle is impaired with increasing age. Evidence N/A PMID:22965923

  12. Comparative study of muscle regeneration following cardiotoxin and glycerol injury.

    PubMed

    Mahdy, Mohamed A A; Lei, Hsiao Yin; Wakamatsu, Jun-Ichi; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z; Nishimura, Takanori

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we examined muscle regeneration following two types of chemical injuries, cardiotoxin (CTX) and glycerol, in order to compare their effect on the morphological characteristics during muscle regeneration, in addition we studied the structural changes of the intramuscular connective tissue (IMCT) during the regeneration process, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after digestion of the cellular elements of the muscle with sodium hydroxide. Tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of adult male mice were injected either with CTX or glycerol. Muscle degeneration was greater in the CTX-injured model than in the glycerol-injured model at day 4 post injection. Muscle regeneration started at day 7 in both the CTX and glycerol models. However, the CTX-injured model showed a higher myotube density and larger myotube diameter than the glycerol-injured model at days 10 and 14 post injection. On other hand, adipocyte infiltration was detected in the glycerol-injured model. In contrast, no adipocytes could be detected in the CTX-injured model. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis showed a significant difference in myofiber damage and regeneration between the two models. SEM of the IMCT showed a transient increase in endomysial collagen deposition at early stages of regeneration in the CTX-injured model. In contrast, glycerol-injured model showed slight endomysial collagen deposition. Our results suggest that changes in IMCT affect the efficiency of muscle regeneration. Studying the three dimensional structure of IMCT may help clinical therapies to reduce skeletal muscle fibrosis. To our knowledge this is the first time the changes in IMCT following CTX and glycerol injury using SEM-cell maceration technique have been compared.

  13. Muscle Cells Provide Instructions for Planarian Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Witchley, Jessica N.; Mayer, Mirjam; Wagner, Daniel E.; Owen, Jared H.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration requires both potential and instructions for tissue replacement. In planarians, pluripotent stem cells have the potential to produce all new tissue. The identities of the cells that provide regeneration instructions are unknown. Here, we report that position control genes (PCGs) that control regeneration and tissue turnover are expressed in a subepidermal layer of nonneoblast cells. These subepidermal cells coexpress many PCGs. We propose that these subepidermal cells provide a system of body coordinates and positional information for regeneration, and identify them to be muscle cells of the planarian body wall. Almost all planarian muscle cells express PCGs, suggesting a dual function: contraction and control of patterning. PCG expression is dynamic in muscle cells after injury, even in the absence of neoblasts, suggesting that muscle is instructive for regeneration. We conclude that planarian regeneration involves two highly flexible systems: pluripotent neoblasts that can generate any new cell type and muscle cells that provide positional instructions for the regeneration of any body region. PMID:23954785

  14. Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through satellite cell expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Somik; Yin, Hongshan; Nam, Deokhwa; Li, Yong; Ma, Ke

    2015-02-01

    Circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timing mechanism governing diverse biological processes and the skeletal muscle possesses intrinsic functional clocks. Interestingly, although the essential clock transcription activator, Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), participates in maintenance of muscle mass, little is known regarding its role in muscle growth and repair. In this report, we investigate the in vivo function of Bmal1 in skeletal muscle regeneration using two muscle injury models. Bmal1 is highly up-regulated by cardiotoxin injury, and its genetic ablation significantly impairs regeneration with markedly suppressed new myofiber formation and attenuated myogenic induction. A similarly defective regenerative response is observed in Bmal1-null mice as compared to wild-type controls upon freeze injury. Lack of satellite cell expansion accounts for the regeneration defect, as Bmal1{sup −/−} mice display significantly lower satellite cell number with nearly abolished induction of the satellite cell marker, Pax7. Furthermore, satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts devoid of Bmal1 display reduced growth and proliferation ex vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that Bmal1 is an integral component of the pro-myogenic response that is required for muscle repair. This mechanism may underlie its role in preserving adult muscle mass and could be targeted therapeutically to prevent muscle-wasting diseases. - Highlights: • Bmal1 is highly inducible by muscle injury and myogenic stimuli. • Genetic ablation of Bmal1 significantly impairs muscle regeneration. • Bmal1 promotes satellite cell expansion during muscle regeneration. • Bmal1-deficient primary myoblasts display attenuated growth and proliferation.

  15. Cardiac muscle regeneration: lessons from development

    PubMed Central

    Mercola, Mark; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Schneider, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    The adult human heart is an ideal target for regenerative intervention since it does not functionally restore itself after injury yet has a modest regenerative capacity that could be enhanced by innovative therapies. Adult cardiac cells with regenerative potential share gene expression signatures with early fetal progenitors that give rise to multiple cardiac cell types, suggesting that the evolutionarily conserved regulatory networks that drive embryonic heart development might also control aspects of regeneration. Here we discuss commonalities of development and regeneration, and the application of the rich developmental biology heritage to achieve therapeutic regeneration of the human heart. PMID:21325131

  16. Biologic-free mechanically induced muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cezar, Christine A.; Roche, Ellen T.; Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Duda, Georg N.; Walsh, Conor J.; Mooney, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Severe skeletal muscle injuries are common and can lead to extensive fibrosis, scarring, and loss of function. Clinically, no therapeutic intervention exists that allows for a full functional restoration. As a result, both drug and cellular therapies are being widely investigated for treatment of muscle injury. Because muscle is known to respond to mechanical loading, we investigated instead whether a material system capable of massage-like compressions could promote regeneration. Magnetic actuation of biphasic ferrogel scaffolds implanted at the site of muscle injury resulted in uniform cyclic compressions that led to reduced fibrous capsule formation around the implant, as well as reduced fibrosis and inflammation in the injured muscle. In contrast, no significant effect of ferrogel actuation on muscle vascularization or perfusion was found. Strikingly, ferrogel-driven mechanical compressions led to enhanced muscle regeneration and a ∼threefold increase in maximum contractile force of the treated muscle at 2 wk compared with no-treatment controls. Although this study focuses on the repair of severely injured skeletal muscle, magnetically stimulated bioagent-free ferrogels may find broad utility in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:26811474

  17. How sex hormones promote skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Velders, Martina; Diel, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration efficiency declines with age for both men and women. This decline impacts on functional capabilities in the elderly and limits their ability to engage in regular physical activity and to maintain independence. Aging is associated with a decline in sex hormone production. Therefore, elucidating the effects of sex hormone substitution on skeletal muscle homeostasis and regeneration after injury or disuse is highly relevant for the aging population, where sarcopenia affects more than 30 % of individuals over 60 years of age. While the anabolic effects of androgens are well known, the effects of estrogens on skeletal muscle anabolism have only been uncovered in recent times. Hence, the purpose of this review is to provide a mechanistic insight into the regulation of skeletal muscle regenerative processes by both androgens and estrogens. Animal studies using estrogen receptor (ER) antagonists and receptor subtype selective agonists have revealed that estrogens act through both genomic and non-genomic pathways to reduce leukocyte invasion and increase satellite cell numbers in regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. Although animal studies have been more conclusive than human studies in establishing a role for sex hormones in the attenuation of muscle damage, data from a number of recent well controlled human studies is presented to support the notion that hormonal therapies and exercise induce added positive effects on functional measures and lean tissue mass. Based on the fact that aging human skeletal muscle retains the ability to adapt to exercise with enhanced satellite cell activation, combining sex hormone therapies with exercise may induce additive effects on satellite cell accretion. There is evidence to suggest that there is a 'window of opportunity' after the onset of a hypogonadal state such as menopause, to initiate a hormonal therapy in order to achieve maximal benefits for skeletal muscle health. Novel receptor subtype selective

  18. Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through satellite cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Somik; Yin, Hongshan; Nam, Deokhwa; Li, Yong; Ma, Ke

    2015-02-01

    Circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timing mechanism governing diverse biological processes and the skeletal muscle possesses intrinsic functional clocks. Interestingly, although the essential clock transcription activator, Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), participates in maintenance of muscle mass, little is known regarding its role in muscle growth and repair. In this report, we investigate the in vivo function of Bmal1 in skeletal muscle regeneration using two muscle injury models. Bmal1 is highly up-regulated by cardiotoxin injury, and its genetic ablation significantly impairs regeneration with markedly suppressed new myofiber formation and attenuated myogenic induction. A similarly defective regenerative response is observed in Bmal1-null mice as compared to wild-type controls upon freeze injury. Lack of satellite cell expansion accounts for the regeneration defect, as Bmal1(-/-) mice display significantly lower satellite cell number with nearly abolished induction of the satellite cell marker, Pax7. Furthermore, satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts devoid of Bmal1 display reduced growth and proliferation ex vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that Bmal1 is an integral component of the pro-myogenic response that is required for muscle repair. This mechanism may underlie its role in preserving adult muscle mass and could be targeted therapeutically to prevent muscle-wasting diseases.

  19. Localization of coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in normal and regenerating human muscle.

    PubMed

    Sinnreich, M; Shaw, C A; Pari, G; Nalbantoglu, J; Holland, P C; Karpati, G

    2005-08-01

    The primary receptor for Adenovirus and Coxsackie virus (CAR) serves as main port of entry of the adenovirus vector mediating gene transfer into skeletal muscle. Information about CAR expression in normal and diseased human skeletal muscle is lacking. C'- or N'-terminally directed polyclonal antibodies against CAR were generated and immunohistochemical analysis of CAR on morphologically normal and regenerating human skeletal muscle of children and adults was performed. In morphologically normal human muscle fibers, CAR immunoreactivity was limited to the neuromuscular junction. In regenerating muscle fibers, CAR was abundantly co-expressed with markers of regeneration. The function of CAR at the neuromuscular junction is currently unknown. Co-expression of CAR with markers of regeneration suggests that CAR is developmentally regulated, and may serve as a marker of skeletal muscle fiber regeneration.

  20. [Regeneration capacity of skeletal muscle].

    PubMed

    Wernig, A

    2003-07-01

    The organotypic stem cell of skeletal muscle has previously been known as satellite cell. They allow muscle fiber growth during ontogenesis, enable fiber hypertrophy and are responsible for the very efficient repair of muscle fibers. This efficient apparatus is to some degree counterbalanced by an enormous use of the satellite cell pool: fiber atrophy probably is accompanied by loss of myonuclei such that every reversal of atrophy is bound to use new myonuclei i.e. satellite cells. How often in life does this occur? Hard to say. Moreover, the potent repair capacity is challenged by an unexpected vulnerability of skeletal muscle fibers: Passive stretching of contracted muscles may cause multiple "microdamage," disruption of contractile elements or tiny areas of true necrosis (focal necrosis). How often does this happen? Well, for many of us at least once per year when we go up and down mountains during vacation time, followed by sour muscles. Others may decide to change his/her (locomotor) behaviour by severe onset of jogging; it may happen that they suffer kidney failure on Monday due to muscle microdamage and the transfer of myoproteins into the serum over weekend. Also 20 minutes of stepping up and down something like a chair will do: There is a remarkable increase in kreatin kinase and other muscle derived proteins which lasts for days and is bound to reflect some muscle damage. How about sportsmen and worker who repeatedly use their muscles in such a way? We don't have answers yet to most of these questions, but considerable amount of information has been collected over the last years both in animal and--less--in human. What is common in all cases of growth and repair is the proliferation of the satellite cells and their consequent incorporation and fusion with the parent fiber. This way focal damage is repaired often without visible reminders. We would run out of satellite cells were they not stem cells: After division one daughter remains a satellite cell

  1. Decreased muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) expression in regenerating muscle after muscle-damaging exercise.

    PubMed

    Okada, Atsushi; Ono, Yusuke; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Itoi, Eiji

    2008-10-01

    A muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase, Muscle Atrophy F-box (MAFbx), is known to mediate the degradation of muscle-specific transcription factor MyoD in vitro. Its regulation in regenerating skeletal muscle, however, has not been clarified. We looked for evidence of MAFbx downregulation in the course of regeneration after muscle damaging exercise. The soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of mice were subjected to forced eccentric contraction by electrical stimulation to induce muscle damage. The expression of developmental myosin heavy chain (MHCd) suggested that muscle regeneration took place from Day 3 after exercise. mRNA and protein expression of MAFbx decreased on Days 3, 5, and 7, while MyoD protein increased on Days 3, 5, and 7. Although further study is required to establish the causal relationships, downregulation of MAFbx may have reduced MyoD degradation in favor of muscle regeneration.

  2. Cellular Players in Skeletal Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ceafalan, Laura Cristina; Popescu, Bogdan Ovidiu; Hinescu, Mihail Eugen

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle, a tissue endowed with remarkable endogenous regeneration potential, is still under focused experimental investigation mainly due to treatment potential for muscle trauma and muscular dystrophies. Resident satellite cells with stem cell features were enthusiastically described quite a long time ago, but activation of these cells is not yet controlled by any medical interventions. However, after thorough reports of their existence, survival, activation, and differentiation there are still many questions to be answered regarding the intimate mechanism of tissue regeneration. This review delivers an up-to-date inventory of the main known key players in skeletal muscle repair, revealed by various models of tissue injuries in mechanical trauma, toxic lesions, and muscular dystrophy. A better understanding of the spatial and temporal relationships between various cell populations, with different physical or paracrine interactions and phenotype changes induced by local or systemic signalling, might lead to a more efficient approach for future therapies. PMID:24779022

  3. Satellite Cells and Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Nicolas A; Bentzinger, C Florian; Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Skeletal muscles are essential for vital functions such as movement, postural support, breathing, and thermogenesis. Muscle tissue is largely composed of long, postmitotic multinucleated fibers. The life-long maintenance of muscle tissue is mediated by satellite cells, lying in close proximity to the muscle fibers. Muscle satellite cells are a heterogeneous population with a small subset of muscle stem cells, termed satellite stem cells. Under homeostatic conditions all satellite cells are poised for activation by stimuli such as physical trauma or growth signals. After activation, satellite stem cells undergo symmetric divisions to expand their number or asymmetric divisions to give rise to cohorts of committed satellite cells and thus progenitors. Myogenic progenitors proliferate, and eventually differentiate through fusion with each other or to damaged fibers to reconstitute fiber integrity and function. In the recent years, research has begun to unravel the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms controlling satellite cell behavior. Nonetheless, an understanding of the complex cellular and molecular interactions of satellite cells with their dynamic microenvironment remains a major challenge, especially in pathological conditions. The goal of this review is to comprehensively summarize the current knowledge on satellite cell characteristics, functions, and behavior in muscle regeneration and in pathological conditions.

  4. Runx1 Transcription Factor Is Required for Myoblasts Proliferation during Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Umansky, Kfir Baruch; Gruenbaum-Cohen, Yael; Tsoory, Michael; Feldmesser, Ester; Goldenberg, Dalia; Brenner, Ori; Groner, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Following myonecrosis, muscle satellite cells proliferate, differentiate and fuse, creating new myofibers. The Runx1 transcription factor is not expressed in naïve developing muscle or in adult muscle tissue. However, it is highly expressed in muscles exposed to myopathic damage yet, the role of Runx1 in muscle regeneration is completely unknown. Our study of Runx1 function in the muscle’s response to myonecrosis reveals that this transcription factor is activated and cooperates with the MyoD and AP-1/c-Jun transcription factors to drive the transcription program of muscle regeneration. Mice lacking dystrophin and muscle Runx1 (mdx - /Runx1 f/f), exhibit impaired muscle regeneration leading to age-dependent muscle waste, gradual decrease in motor capabilities and a shortened lifespan. Runx1-deficient primary myoblasts are arrested at cell cycle G1 and consequently differentiate. Such premature differentiation disrupts the myoblasts’ normal proliferation/differentiation balance, reduces the number and size of regenerating myofibers and impairs muscle regeneration. Our combined Runx1-dependent gene expression, ChIP-seq, ATAC-seq and histone H3K4me1/H3K27ac modification analyses revealed a subset of Runx1-regulated genes that are co-occupied by MyoD and c-Jun in mdx - /Runx1 f/f muscle. The data provide unique insights into the transcriptional program driving muscle regeneration and implicate Runx1 as an important participant in the pathology of muscle wasting diseases. PMID:26275053

  5. Thyroid hormones regulate skeletal muscle regeneration after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Leal, Anna Lúcia R C; Albuquerque, João Paulo C; Matos, Marina S; Fortunato, Rodrigo S; Carvalho, Denise P; Rosenthal, Doris; da Costa, Vânia Maria Corrêa

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the effects of hypo- and hyperthyroid statuses during the initial phase of skeletal muscle regeneration in rats. To induce hypo- or hyperthyroidism, adult male Wistar rats were treated with methimazole (0.03%) or T4 (10 μg/100 g), respectively, for 10 days. Three days before sacrifice, a crush injury was produced in the solear muscles of one half of the animals, while the other half remained intact. T3, T4, TSH, and leptin serum levels were not affected by the injury. Serum T3 and T4 levels were significantly increased in hyperthyroid and hyper-injury animals. Hypothyroidism was confirmed by the significant increase in serum TSH levels in hypothyroid and hypo-injury animals. Injury increased cell infiltration and macrophage accumulation especially in hyperthyroid animals. Both type 2 and type 3 deiodinases were induced by lesion, and the opposite occurred with the type 1 isoform, at least in the control and hyperthyroid groups. Injury increased both MyoD and myogenin expression in all the studied groups, but only MyoD expression was increased by thyroidal status only at the protein level. We conclude that thyroid hormones modulate skeletal muscle regeneration possibly by regulating the inflammatory process, as well as MyoD and myogenin expression in the injured tissue.

  6. Bex1 knock out mice show altered skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Jae Hyung Smiley, Mark A.; Lovering, Richard M.; Margolis, Frank L.

    2007-11-16

    Bex1 and Calmodulin (CaM) are upregulated during skeletal muscle regeneration. We confirm this finding and demonstrate the novel finding that they interact in a calcium-dependent manner. To study the role of Bex1 and its interaction with CaM in skeletal muscle regeneration, we generated Bex1 knock out (Bex1-KO) mice. These mice appeared to develop normally and are fertile, but displayed a functional deficit in exercise performance compared to wild type (WT) mice. After intramuscular injection of cardiotoxin, which causes extensive and reproducible myotrauma followed by recovery, regenerating muscles of Bex1-KO mice exhibited elevated and prolonged cell proliferation, as well as delayed cell differentiation, compared to WT mice. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that Bex1-KO mice show altered muscle regeneration, and allow us to propose that the interaction of Bex1 with Ca{sup 2+}/CaM may be involved in skeletal muscle regeneration.

  7. Distinct roles for Ste20-like kinase SLK in muscle function and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell growth and terminal differentiation are controlled by complex signaling systems that regulate the tissue-specific expression of genes controlling cell fate and morphogenesis. We have previously reported that the Ste20-like kinase SLK is expressed in muscle tissue and is required for cell motility. However, the specific function of SLK in muscle tissue is still poorly understood. Methods To gain further insights into the role of SLK in differentiated muscles, we expressed a kinase-inactive SLK from the human skeletal muscle actin promoter. Transgenic muscles were surveyed for potential defects. Standard histological procedures and cardiotoxin-induced regeneration assays we used to investigate the role of SLK in myogenesis and muscle repair. Results High levels of kinase-inactive SLK in muscle tissue produced an overall decrease in SLK activity in muscle tissue, resulting in altered muscle organization, reduced litter sizes, and reduced breeding capacity. The transgenic mice did not show any differences in fiber-type distribution but displayed enhanced regeneration capacity in vivo and more robust differentiation in vitro. Conclusions Our results show that SLK activity is required for optimal muscle development in the embryo and muscle physiology in the adult. However, reduced kinase activity during muscle repair enhances regeneration and differentiation. Together, these results suggest complex and distinct roles for SLK in muscle development and function. PMID:23815977

  8. Pericytes: multitasking cells in the regeneration of injured, diseased, and aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria L; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are perivascular cells that envelop and make intimate connections with adjacent capillary endothelial cells. Recent studies show that they may have a profound impact in skeletal muscle regeneration, innervation, vessel formation, fibrosis, fat accumulation, and ectopic bone formation throughout life. In this review, we summarize and evaluate recent advances in our understanding of pericytes' influence on adult skeletal muscle pathophysiology. We also discuss how further elucidating their biology may offer new approaches to the treatment of conditions characterized by muscle wasting.

  9. Myoanatomy and anterior muscle regeneration of the fireworm Eurythoe cf. complanata (Annelida: Amphinomidae).

    PubMed

    Weidhase, Michael; Bleidorn, Christoph; Beckers, Patrick; Helm, Conrad

    2016-03-01

    Amphinomidae or so-called "fireworms" are known for their inflammatory substances and their regeneration ability. Recent transcriptome-based molecular analyses revealed that these remarkable annelids are a basal branching taxon outside the annelid main radiation (Pleistoannelida). Although several studies dealing with analyses of the morphology of these annelids have been published, detailed investigations of the anterior muscle regeneration and the musculature in general are largely lacking for amphinomids. Using histology, phalloidin labeling together with subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy (cLSM), and further light microscopic image acquisition of different regeneration stages, we here present the first morphological study describing the myoanatomy and muscular regeneration. During anterior muscular regeneration, longitudinal muscle bundles develop prior to transverse muscle fibers and segment boundaries. Additionally, Eurythoe cf. complanata develops an independent muscular ring surrounding the mouth opening in an early stage of regeneration. Detailed investigation of adult body wall musculature and the parapodial muscle complex in amphinomids show that E. cf. complanata bears well-developed dorsal and ventral longitudinal muscle bundles as well as outer transverse muscles comparable to the pattern described for several Pleistoannelida. Furthermore, the biramous parapodia possess a complex meshwork of distinct muscle fibers allowing detailed comparisons with other annelid families.

  10. Myoanatomy and anterior muscle regeneration of the fireworm Eurythoe cf. complanata (Annelida: Amphinomidae).

    PubMed

    Weidhase, Michael; Bleidorn, Christoph; Beckers, Patrick; Helm, Conrad

    2016-03-01

    Amphinomidae or so-called "fireworms" are known for their inflammatory substances and their regeneration ability. Recent transcriptome-based molecular analyses revealed that these remarkable annelids are a basal branching taxon outside the annelid main radiation (Pleistoannelida). Although several studies dealing with analyses of the morphology of these annelids have been published, detailed investigations of the anterior muscle regeneration and the musculature in general are largely lacking for amphinomids. Using histology, phalloidin labeling together with subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy (cLSM), and further light microscopic image acquisition of different regeneration stages, we here present the first morphological study describing the myoanatomy and muscular regeneration. During anterior muscular regeneration, longitudinal muscle bundles develop prior to transverse muscle fibers and segment boundaries. Additionally, Eurythoe cf. complanata develops an independent muscular ring surrounding the mouth opening in an early stage of regeneration. Detailed investigation of adult body wall musculature and the parapodial muscle complex in amphinomids show that E. cf. complanata bears well-developed dorsal and ventral longitudinal muscle bundles as well as outer transverse muscles comparable to the pattern described for several Pleistoannelida. Furthermore, the biramous parapodia possess a complex meshwork of distinct muscle fibers allowing detailed comparisons with other annelid families. PMID:26596681

  11. Low Intensity Exercise Training Improves Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Potential

    PubMed Central

    Pietrangelo, Tiziana; Di Filippo, Ester S.; Mancinelli, Rosa; Doria, Christian; Rotini, Alessio; Fanò-Illic, Giorgio; Fulle, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether 12 days of low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude (598 m a.s.l.) improves skeletal muscle regeneration in sedentary adult women. Methods: Satellite cells were obtained from the vastus lateralis skeletal muscle of seven women before and after this exercise training at low altitude. They were investigated for differentiation aspects, superoxide anion production, antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial potential variation after a depolarizing insult, intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, and micro (mi)RNA expression (miR-1, miR-133, miR-206). Results: In these myogenic populations of adult stem cells, those obtained after exercise training, showed increased Fusion Index and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. This exercise training also generally reduced superoxide anion production in cells (by 12–67%), although not in two women, where there was an increase of ~15% along with a reduced superoxide dismutase activity. miRNA expression showed an exercise-induced epigenetic transcription profile that was specific according to the reduced or increased superoxide anion production of the cells. Conclusions: The present study shows that low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude improves the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle in adult women. The differentiation of cells was favored by increased intracellular calcium concentration and increased the fusion index. This low-to-moderate training at low altitude also depicted the epigenetic signature of cells. PMID:26733888

  12. Planarian Body-Wall Muscle: Regeneration and Function beyond a Simple Skeletal Support

    PubMed Central

    Cebrià, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    The body-wall musculature of adult planarians consists of intricately organized muscle fibers, which after amputation are regenerated rapidly and with great precision through the proliferation and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. These traits make the planarian body-wall musculature a potentially useful model for the study of cell proliferation, differentiation, and pattern formation. Planarian body-wall muscle shows some ambiguous features common to both skeletal and smooth muscle cells. However, its skeletal nature is implied by the expression of skeletal myosin heavy-chain genes and the myogenic transcription factor myoD. Where and when planarian stem cells become committed to the myogenic lineage during regeneration, how the new muscle cells are integrated into the pre-existing muscle net, and the identity of the molecular pathway controlling the myogenic gene program are key aspects of planarian muscle regeneration that need to be addressed. Expression of the conserved transcription factor myoD has been recently demonstrated in putative myogenic progenitors. Moreover, recent studies suggest that differentiated muscle cells may provide positional information to planarian stem cells during regeneration. Here, I review the limited available knowledge on planarian muscle regeneration. PMID:26904543

  13. Challenges to acellular biological scaffold mediated skeletal muscle tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Corona, Benjamin T; Greising, Sarah M

    2016-10-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) injuries present a complex and heterogeneous clinical problem that results in a chronic loss of muscle tissue and strength. The primary limitation to muscle tissue regeneration after VML injury is the frank loss of all native muscle constituents in the defect, especially satellite cells and the basal lamina. Recent advancements in regenerative medicine have set forth encouraging and emerging translational and therapeutic options for these devastating injuries including the surgical implantation of acellular biological scaffolds. While these biomaterials can modulate the wound environment, the existing data do not support their capacity to promote appreciable muscle fiber regeneration that can contribute to skeletal muscle tissue functional improvements. An apparent restriction of endogenous satellite cell (i.e., pax7(+)) migration to acellular biological scaffolds likely underlies this deficiency. This work critically evaluates the role of an acellular biological scaffold in orchestrating skeletal muscle tissue regeneration, specifically when used as a regenerative medicine approach for VML injury. PMID:27472161

  14. Challenges to acellular biological scaffold mediated skeletal muscle tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Corona, Benjamin T; Greising, Sarah M

    2016-10-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) injuries present a complex and heterogeneous clinical problem that results in a chronic loss of muscle tissue and strength. The primary limitation to muscle tissue regeneration after VML injury is the frank loss of all native muscle constituents in the defect, especially satellite cells and the basal lamina. Recent advancements in regenerative medicine have set forth encouraging and emerging translational and therapeutic options for these devastating injuries including the surgical implantation of acellular biological scaffolds. While these biomaterials can modulate the wound environment, the existing data do not support their capacity to promote appreciable muscle fiber regeneration that can contribute to skeletal muscle tissue functional improvements. An apparent restriction of endogenous satellite cell (i.e., pax7(+)) migration to acellular biological scaffolds likely underlies this deficiency. This work critically evaluates the role of an acellular biological scaffold in orchestrating skeletal muscle tissue regeneration, specifically when used as a regenerative medicine approach for VML injury.

  15. A developmentally regulated switch from stem cells to dedifferentiation for limb muscle regeneration in newts.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Ng, Nathaniel Chuen Yin; Yang Yu, Zhan; Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Maruo, Fumiaki; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-01-01

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, is able to repeatedly regenerate its limbs throughout its lifespan, whereas other amphibians deteriorate or lose their ability to regenerate limbs after metamorphosis. It remains to be determined whether such an exceptional ability of the newt is either attributed to a strategy, which controls regeneration in larvae, or on a novel one invented by the newt after metamorphosis. Here we report that the newt switches the cellular mechanism for limb regeneration from a stem/progenitor-based mechanism (larval mode) to a dedifferentiation-based one (adult mode) as it transits beyond metamorphosis. We demonstrate that larval newts use stem/progenitor cells such as satellite cells for new muscle in a regenerated limb, whereas metamorphosed newts recruit muscle fibre cells in the stump for the same purpose. We conclude that the newt has evolved novel strategies to secure its regenerative ability of the limbs after metamorphosis. PMID:27026263

  16. A developmentally regulated switch from stem cells to dedifferentiation for limb muscle regeneration in newts.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Ng, Nathaniel Chuen Yin; Yang Yu, Zhan; Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Maruo, Fumiaki; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-03-30

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, is able to repeatedly regenerate its limbs throughout its lifespan, whereas other amphibians deteriorate or lose their ability to regenerate limbs after metamorphosis. It remains to be determined whether such an exceptional ability of the newt is either attributed to a strategy, which controls regeneration in larvae, or on a novel one invented by the newt after metamorphosis. Here we report that the newt switches the cellular mechanism for limb regeneration from a stem/progenitor-based mechanism (larval mode) to a dedifferentiation-based one (adult mode) as it transits beyond metamorphosis. We demonstrate that larval newts use stem/progenitor cells such as satellite cells for new muscle in a regenerated limb, whereas metamorphosed newts recruit muscle fibre cells in the stump for the same purpose. We conclude that the newt has evolved novel strategies to secure its regenerative ability of the limbs after metamorphosis.

  17. A developmentally regulated switch from stem cells to dedifferentiation for limb muscle regeneration in newts

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Ng, Nathaniel Chuen Yin; Yang Yu, Zhan; Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Maruo, Fumiaki; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-01-01

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, is able to repeatedly regenerate its limbs throughout its lifespan, whereas other amphibians deteriorate or lose their ability to regenerate limbs after metamorphosis. It remains to be determined whether such an exceptional ability of the newt is either attributed to a strategy, which controls regeneration in larvae, or on a novel one invented by the newt after metamorphosis. Here we report that the newt switches the cellular mechanism for limb regeneration from a stem/progenitor-based mechanism (larval mode) to a dedifferentiation-based one (adult mode) as it transits beyond metamorphosis. We demonstrate that larval newts use stem/progenitor cells such as satellite cells for new muscle in a regenerated limb, whereas metamorphosed newts recruit muscle fibre cells in the stump for the same purpose. We conclude that the newt has evolved novel strategies to secure its regenerative ability of the limbs after metamorphosis. PMID:27026263

  18. Long-duration muscle dedifferentiation during limb regeneration in axolotls.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Han; Huang, Ting-Yu; Chen, Bo-Sung; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Lee, Hsuan-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Although still debated, limb regeneration in salamanders is thought to depend on the dedifferentiation of remnant tissue occurring early after amputation and generating the progenitor cells that initiate regeneration. This dedifferentiation has been demonstrated previously by showing the fragmentation of muscle fibers into mononucleated cells and by revealing the contribution of mature muscle fibers to the regenerates by using lineage-tracing studies. Here, we provide additional evidence of dedifferentiation by showing that Pax7 (paired-box protein-7) transcripts are expressed at the ends of remnant muscle fibers in axolotls by using in situ hybridization and by demonstrating the presence of Pax7+ muscle-fiber nuclei in the early bud and mid-bud stages by means of immunohistochemical staining. During the course of regeneration, the remnant muscles did not progress; instead, muscle progenitors migrated out from the remnants and proliferated and differentiated in the new tissues at an early stage of differentiation. The regenerating muscles and remnant muscles were largely disconnected, and this left a gap between them until extremely late in the late stage of differentiation, at which point the new and old muscles connected together. Notably, Pax7 transcripts were detected in the regions of muscles that faced these gaps; thus, Pax7 expression might indicate dedifferentiation in the remnant-muscle ends and partial differentiation in the regenerating muscles. The roles of this long-duration dedifferentiation in the remnants remain unknown. However, the results presented here could support the hypothesis that long-duration muscle dedifferentiation facilitates the connection and fusion between the new and old muscles that are both in an immature state; this is because immature Pax7+ myoblasts readily fuse during developmental myogenesis. PMID:25671422

  19. Long-Duration Muscle Dedifferentiation during Limb Regeneration in Axolotls

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Han; Huang, Ting-Yu; Chen, Bo-Sung; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Lee, Hsuan-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Although still debated, limb regeneration in salamanders is thought to depend on the dedifferentiation of remnant tissue occurring early after amputation and generating the progenitor cells that initiate regeneration. This dedifferentiation has been demonstrated previously by showing the fragmentation of muscle fibers into mononucleated cells and by revealing the contribution of mature muscle fibers to the regenerates by using lineage-tracing studies. Here, we provide additional evidence of dedifferentiation by showing that Pax7 (paired-box protein-7) transcripts are expressed at the ends of remnant muscle fibers in axolotls by using in situ hybridization and by demonstrating the presence of Pax7+ muscle-fiber nuclei in the early bud and mid-bud stages by means of immunohistochemical staining. During the course of regeneration, the remnant muscles did not progress; instead, muscle progenitors migrated out from the remnants and proliferated and differentiated in the new tissues at an early stage of differentiation. The regenerating muscles and remnant muscles were largely disconnected, and this left a gap between them until extremely late in the late stage of differentiation, at which point the new and old muscles connected together. Notably, Pax7 transcripts were detected in the regions of muscles that faced these gaps; thus, Pax7 expression might indicate dedifferentiation in the remnant-muscle ends and partial differentiation in the regenerating muscles. The roles of this long-duration dedifferentiation in the remnants remain unknown. However, the results presented here could support the hypothesis that long-duration muscle dedifferentiation facilitates the connection and fusion between the new and old muscles that are both in an immature state; this is because immature Pax7+ myoblasts readily fuse during developmental myogenesis. PMID:25671422

  20. Expression of the dermatomyositis autoantigen Mi-2 in regenerating muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mammen, Andrew L.; Casciola-Rosen, Livia A.; Hall, John C.; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Corse, Andrea M.; Rosen, Antony

    2010-01-01

    Objective Autoantibodies against the chromatin remodeler Mi-2 are found in a distinct subset of patients with dermatomyositis (DM). Previous quantitative immunoblotting experiments demonstrated that Mi-2 protein is up-regulated in DM muscle. We undertook this study to define the population of cells expressing high levels of Mi-2 in DM muscle and to explore the regulation and functional role of Mi-2 during muscle regeneration. Methods We analyzed the expression of Mi-2 in human muscle biopsy specimens using immunofluorescence. Then, we used cardiotoxin (CTX) to induce muscle injury and repair in the mouse; Mi-2 expression during muscle regeneration was studied in this model by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analysis. Finally, we utilized a cell culture system of muscle differentiation to artificially modulate Mi-2 levels during myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Results In DM muscle, increased Mi-2 expression is preferentially found in myofibers within fascicles affected by perifascicular atrophy, particularly in the centralized nuclei of small perifascicular muscle fibers expressing markers of regeneration. In the mouse, Mi-2 is dramatically and persistently up-regulated during muscle regeneration in vivo. Premature silencing of Mi-2 with RNAi in vitro resulted in accelerated myoblast differentiation. Conclusions Mi-2 expression is markedly up-regulated during muscle regeneration in the mouse model. It is also up-regulated in DM myofibers expressing markers of regeneration. In vitro studies suggest that this protein may play a role in modulating the kinetics of myoblast differentiation. We propose that high levels of Mi-2 expression in DM muscle biopsies reflect the presence of incompletely differentiated muscle cells. PMID:19950298

  1. Genomic-wide transcriptional profiling in primary myoblasts reveals Runx1-regulated genes in muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Umansky, Kfir Baruch; Feldmesser, Ester; Groner, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    In response to muscle damage the muscle adult stem cells are activated and differentiate into myoblasts that regenerate the damaged tissue. We have recently showed that following myopathic damage the level of the Runx1 transcription factor (TF) is elevated and that during muscle regeneration this TF regulates the balance between myoblast proliferation and differentiation (Umansky et al.). We employed Runx1-dependent gene expression, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), Assay for Transposase-Accessible Chromatin with high-throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) and histone H3K4me1/H3K27ac modification analyses to identify a subset of Runx1-regulated genes that are co-occupied by the TFs MyoD and c-Jun and are involved in muscle regeneration (Umansky et al.). The data is available at the GEO database under the superseries accession number GSE56131. PMID:26697350

  2. Chemokine receptor CCR2 involvement in skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Warren, Gordon L; Hulderman, Tracy; Mishra, Dawn; Gao, Xin; Millecchia, Lyndell; O'Farrell, Laura; Kuziel, William A; Simeonova, Petia P

    2005-03-01

    Chemokines, signaling through the CCR2 receptor, are highly expressed in injured skeletal muscle. Their target specificity depends on the cellular expression of the specific receptors. Here we demonstrate that, in freeze-injured muscle, CCR2 co-localized with Mac-3, a marker of activated macrophages as well as with myogenin, a marker of activated muscle precursor cells. The degeneration/regeneration process in skeletal muscle of CCR2-/- and wild-type mice was not significantly different at day 3. However in contrast to the regenerated muscle of the wild-type mice, the muscle from CCR2-/- mice was characterized by impaired regeneration, inflammation, and fibrotic response at day 14, increased fat infiltration, fibrosis, and calcification at day 21, and impaired strength recovery until at least 28 days post-injury. Consistently, the increased expression of Mac-1 and TNF-alpha was prolonged in the injured muscle of CCR2-/- mice. The expression pattern of the myogenic factors MyoD and myogenin was similar for both types of mice, while NCAM, which is associated with the initiation of fusion of muscle precursor cells, was more increased in the injured muscle of CCR2-/- mice. In conclusion, the study delineates that signaling through CCR2 is involved in muscle precursor cell activities necessary for complete and rapid regeneration of injured skeletal muscle. PMID:15601671

  3. Leucine supplementation improves regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Silva, Meiricris T; da Cunha, Fernanda M; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2015-12-01

    The decreased regenerative capacity of old skeletal muscles involves disrupted turnover of proteins. This study investigated whether leucine supplementation in old rats could improve muscle regenerative capacity. Young and old male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine; then, the muscles were cryolesioned and examined after 3 and 10 days. Leucine supplementation attenuated the decrease in the expression of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in young and old muscles on day 3 post-injury and promoted an increase in the cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers from both young and old soleus muscles on day 10 post-injury. This supplementation decreased the levels of ubiquitinated proteins and increased the proteasome activity in young regenerating muscles, but the opposite effect was observed in old regenerating muscles. Moreover, leucine decreased the inflammation area and induced an increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells in both young and old muscles. Our results suggest that leucine supplementation improves the regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats, through the preservation of certain biological responses upon leucine supplementation. Such responses comprise the decrease in the inflammation area, increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells and size of regenerating myofibers, combined with the modulation of components of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  4. Influence of icing on muscle regeneration after crush injury to skeletal muscles in rats.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Ryo; Fujita, Naoto; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Kawada, Shigeo; Ishii, Naokata; Miki, Akinori

    2011-02-01

    The influence of icing on muscle regeneration after crush injury was examined in the rat extensor digitorum longus. After the injury, animals were randomly divided into nonicing and icing groups. In the latter, ice packs were applied for 20 min. Due to the icing, degeneration of the necrotic muscle fibers and differentiation of satellite cells at early stages of regeneration were retarded by ∼1 day. In the icing group, the ratio of regenerating fibers showing central nucleus at 14 days after the injury was higher, and cross-sectional area of the muscle fibers at 28 days was evidently smaller than in the nonicing group. Besides, the ratio of collagen fibers area at 14 and 28 days after the injury in the icing group was higher than in the nonicing group. These findings suggest that icing applied soon after the injury not only considerably retarded muscle regeneration but also induced impairment of muscle regeneration along with excessive collagen deposition. Macrophages were immunohistochemically demonstrated at the injury site during degeneration and early stages of regeneration. Due to icing, chronological changes in the number of macrophages and immunohistochemical expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and IGF-I were also retarded by 1 to 2 days. Since it has been said that macrophages play important roles not only for degeneration, but also for muscle regeneration, the influence of icing on macrophage activities might be closely related to a delay in muscle regeneration, impairment of muscle regeneration, and redundant collagen synthesis. PMID:21164157

  5. The CXCR4/SDF1 axis improves muscle regeneration through MMP-10 activity.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, Miriam; Sainz, Neira; Abizanda, Gloria; Orbe, Josune; Rodriguez, José Antonio; Páramo, José Antonio; Prósper, Felipe; Pérez-Ruiz, Ana

    2014-06-15

    The CXCR4/SDF1 axis participates in various cellular processes, including cell migration, which is essential for skeletal muscle repair. Although increasing evidence has confirmed the role of CXCR4/SDF1 in embryonic muscle development, the function of this pathway during adult myogenesis remains to be fully elucidated. In addition, a role for CXCR4 signaling in muscle maintenance and repair has only recently emerged. Here, we have demonstrated that CXCR4 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1) are up-regulated in injured muscle, suggesting their involvement in the repair process. In addition, we found that notexin-damaged muscles showed delayed muscle regeneration on treatment with CXCR4 agonist (AMD3100). Accordingly, small-interfering RNA-mediated silencing of SDF1 or CXCR4 in injured muscles impaired muscle regeneration, whereas the addition of SDF1 ligand accelerated repair. Furthermore, we identified that CXCR4/SDF1-regulated muscle repair was dependent on matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10) activity. Thus, our findings support a model in which MMP-10 activity modulates CXCR4/SDF1 signaling, which is essential for efficient skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:24548137

  6. The CXCR4/SDF1 Axis Improves Muscle Regeneration Through MMP-10 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bobadilla, Miriam; Sainz, Neira; Abizanda, Gloria; Orbe, Josune; Rodriguez, José Antonio; Páramo, José Antonio; Prósper, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The CXCR4/SDF1 axis participates in various cellular processes, including cell migration, which is essential for skeletal muscle repair. Although increasing evidence has confirmed the role of CXCR4/SDF1 in embryonic muscle development, the function of this pathway during adult myogenesis remains to be fully elucidated. In addition, a role for CXCR4 signaling in muscle maintenance and repair has only recently emerged. Here, we have demonstrated that CXCR4 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1) are up-regulated in injured muscle, suggesting their involvement in the repair process. In addition, we found that notexin-damaged muscles showed delayed muscle regeneration on treatment with CXCR4 agonist (AMD3100). Accordingly, small-interfering RNA-mediated silencing of SDF1 or CXCR4 in injured muscles impaired muscle regeneration, whereas the addition of SDF1 ligand accelerated repair. Furthermore, we identified that CXCR4/SDF1-regulated muscle repair was dependent on matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10) activity. Thus, our findings support a model in which MMP-10 activity modulates CXCR4/SDF1 signaling, which is essential for efficient skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:24548137

  7. miR-378 attenuates muscle regeneration by delaying satellite cell activation and differentiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ping; Han, Wanhong; Li, Changyin; Li, Hu; Zhu, Dahai; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal muscle mass and homeostasis during postnatal muscle development and regeneration largely depend on adult muscle stem cells (satellite cells). We recently showed that global overexpression of miR-378 significantly reduced skeletal muscle mass in mice. In the current study, we used miR-378 transgenic (Tg) mice to assess the in vivo functional effects of miR-378 on skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. Cross-sectional analysis of skeletal muscle tissues showed that the number and size of myofibers were significantly lower in miR-378 Tg mice than in wild-type mice. Attenuated cardiotoxin-induced muscle regeneration in miR-378 Tg mice was found to be associated with delayed satellite cell activation and differentiation. Mechanistically, miR-378 was found to directly target Igf1r in muscle cells both in vitro and in vivo These miR-378 Tg mice may provide a model for investigating the physiological and pathological roles of skeletal muscle in muscle-associated diseases in humans, particularly in sarcopenia. PMID:27563005

  8. Echinoderms; potential model systems for studies on muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    García-Arrarás, José E.; Dolmatov, Igor Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Organisms of the phylum Echinodermata show some of the most impressive regenerative feats within the animal kingdom. Following injury or self-induced autotomy, species in this phylum can regenerate most tissues and organs, being the regeneration of the muscular systems one of the best studied. Even though echinoderms are closely related to chordates, they are little known in the biomedical field, and therefore their uses to study pharmacological effects on muscle formation and/or regeneration have been extremely limited. In order to rectify this lack of knowledge, we describe here the echinoderm muscular systems, particularly the somatic and visceral muscle components. In addition, we provide details of the processes that are known to take place during muscle regeneration, namely dedifferentiation, myogenesis and new muscle formation. Finally, we provide the available information on molecular and pharmacological studies that involve echinoderm muscle regeneration. We expect that by making this information accessible, researchers consider the use of echinoderms as model systems for pharmacological studies in muscle development and regeneration. PMID:20041824

  9. Leucine supplementation improves skeletal muscle regeneration after cryolesion in rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Baptista, Igor L; Carlassara, Eduardo O C; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to provide further insight into the role of leucine supplementation in the skeletal muscle regeneration process, focusing on myofiber size and strength recovery. Young (2-month-old) rats were subjected or not to leucine supplementation (1.35 g/kg per day) started 3 days prior to cryolesion. Then, soleus muscles were cryolesioned and continued receiving leucine supplementation until 1, 3 and 10 days later. Soleus muscles from leucine-supplemented animals displayed an increase in myofiber size and a reduction in collagen type III expression on post-cryolesion day 10. Leucine was also effective in reducing FOXO3a activation and ubiquitinated protein accumulation in muscles at post-cryolesion days 3 and 10. In addition, leucine supplementation minimized the cryolesion-induced decrease in tetanic strength and increase in fatigue in regenerating muscles at post-cryolesion day 10. These beneficial effects of leucine were not accompanied by activation of any elements of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin signalling pathway in the regenerating muscles. Our results show that leucine improves myofiber size gain and strength recovery in regenerating soleus muscles through attenuation of protein ubiquitination. In addition, leucine might have therapeutic effects for muscle recovery following injury and in some muscle diseases.

  10. Roles of nonmyogenic mesenchymal progenitors in pathogenesis and regeneration of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Ikemoto-Uezumi, Madoka; Tsuchida, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle possesses a remarkable regenerative ability that is dependent on satellite cells. However, skeletal muscle is replaced by fatty and fibrous connective tissue in several pathological conditions. Fatty and fibrous connective tissue becomes a major cause of muscle weakness and leads to further impairment of muscle function. Because the occurrence of fatty and fibrous connective tissue is usually associated with severe destruction of muscle, the idea that dysregulation of the fate switch in satellite cells may underlie this pathological change has emerged. However, recent studies identified nonmyogenic mesenchymal progenitors in skeletal muscle and revealed that fatty and fibrous connective tissue originates from these progenitors. Later, these progenitors were also demonstrated to be the major contributor to heterotopic ossification in skeletal muscle. Because nonmyogenic mesenchymal progenitors represent a distinct cell population from satellite cells, targeting these progenitors could be an ideal therapeutic strategy that specifically prevents pathological changes of skeletal muscle, while preserving satellite cell-dependent regeneration. In addition to their roles in pathogenesis of skeletal muscle, nonmyogenic mesenchymal progenitors may play a vital role in muscle regeneration by regulating satellite cell behavior. Conversely, muscle cells appear to regulate behavior of nonmyogenic mesenchymal progenitors. Thus, these cells regulate each other reciprocally and a proper balance between them is a key determinant of muscle integrity. Furthermore, nonmyogenic mesenchymal progenitors have been shown to maintain muscle mass in a steady homeostatic condition. Understanding the nature of nonmyogenic mesenchymal progenitors will provide valuable insight into the pathophysiology of skeletal muscle. In this review, we focus on nonmyogenic mesenchymal progenitors and discuss their roles in muscle pathogenesis, regeneration, and homeostasis. PMID

  11. Molecular targets of androgen signaling that characterize skeletal muscle recovery and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    MacKrell, James G.; Yaden, Benjamin C.; Bullock, Heather; Chen, Keyue; Shetler, Pamela; Bryant, Henry U.; Krishnan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    The high regenerative capacity of adult skeletal muscle relies on a self-renewing depot of adult stem cells, termed muscle satellite cells (MSCs). Androgens, known mediators of overall body composition and specifically skeletal muscle mass, have been shown to regulate MSCs. The possible overlapping function of androgen regulation of muscle growth and MSC activation has not been carefully investigated with regards to muscle regeneration.Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine coinciding androgen-mediated genetic changes in an in vitro MSC model and clinically relevant in vivo models. A gene signature was established via microarray analysis for androgen-mediated MSC engagement and highlighted several markers including follistatin (FST), IGF-1, C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In an in vivo muscle atrophy model, androgen re-supplementation significantly increased muscle size and expression of IGF-1, FST, and HGF, while significantly decreasing expression of GR. Biphasic gene expression profiles over the 7-day re-supplementation period identifed temporal androgen regulation of molecular targets involved in satellite cell engagement into myogenesis. In a muscle injury model, removal of androgens resulted in delayed muscle recovery and regeneration. Modifications in the androgen signaling gene signature, along with reduced Pax7 and MyoD expression, suggested that limited MSC activation and increased inflammation contributed to the delayed regeneration. However, enhanced MSC activation in the androgen-deplete mouse injury model was driven by an androgen receptor (AR) agonist. These results provide novel in vitro and in vivo evidence describing molecular targets of androgen signaling, while also increasing support for translational use of AR agonists in skeletal muscle recovery and regeneration. PMID:26457071

  12. Angiopoietin-1 enhances skeletal muscle regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mofarrahi, Mahroo; McClung, Joseph M.; Kontos, Christopher D.; Davis, Elaine C.; Tappuni, Bassman; Moroz, Nicolay; Pickett, Amy E.; Huck, Laurent; Harel, Sharon; Danialou, Gawiyou

    2015-01-01

    Activation of muscle progenitor cell myogenesis and endothelial cell angiogenesis is critical for the recovery of skeletal muscle from injury. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), a ligand of Tie-2 receptors, enhances angiogenesis and skeletal muscle satellite cell survival; however, its role in skeletal muscle regeneration after injury is unknown. We assessed the effects of Ang-1 on fiber regeneration, myogenesis, and angiogenesis in injured skeletal muscle (tibialis anterior, TA) in mice. We also assessed endogenous Ang-1 levels and localization in intact and injured TA muscles. TA fiber injury was triggered by cardiotoxin injection. Endogenous Ang-1 mRNA levels immediately decreased in response to cardiotoxin then increased during the 2 wk. Ang-1 protein was expressed in satellite cells, both in noninjured and recovering TA muscles. Positive Ang-1 staining was present in blood vessels but not in nerve fibers. Four days after the initiation of injury, injection of adenoviral Ang-1 into injured muscles resulted in significant increases in in situ TA muscle contractility, muscle fiber regeneration, and capillary density. In cultured human skeletal myoblasts, recombinant Ang-1 protein increased survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation into myotubes. The latter effect was associated with significant upregulation of the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors MyoD and Myogenin and certain genes involved in cell cycle regulation. We conclude that Ang-1 strongly enhances skeletal muscle regeneration in response to fiber injury and that this effect is mediated through induction of the myogenesis program in muscle progenitor cells and the angiogenesis program in endothelial cells. PMID:25608750

  13. Macrophages modulate adult zebrafish tail fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Timothy A; Strand, Nicholas S; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Tsung-Yang, Chao; Rabinowitz, Jeremy S; Moon, Randall T

    2014-07-01

    Neutrophils and macrophages, as key mediators of inflammation, have defined functionally important roles in mammalian tissue repair. Although recent evidence suggests that similar cells exist in zebrafish and also migrate to sites of injury in larvae, whether these cells are functionally important for wound healing or regeneration in adult zebrafish is unknown. To begin to address these questions, we first tracked neutrophils (lyzC(+), mpo(+)) and macrophages (mpeg1(+)) in adult zebrafish following amputation of the tail fin, and detailed a migratory timecourse that revealed conserved elements of the inflammatory cell response with mammals. Next, we used transgenic zebrafish in which we could selectively ablate macrophages, which allowed us to investigate whether macrophages were required for tail fin regeneration. We identified stage-dependent functional roles of macrophages in mediating fin tissue outgrowth and bony ray patterning, in part through modulating levels of blastema proliferation. Moreover, we also sought to detail molecular regulators of inflammation in adult zebrafish and identified Wnt/β-catenin as a signaling pathway that regulates the injury microenvironment, inflammatory cell migration and macrophage phenotype. These results provide a cellular and molecular link between components of the inflammation response and regeneration in adult zebrafish. PMID:24961798

  14. Therapies for sarcopenia and regeneration of old skeletal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, Miranda D

    2014-01-01

    Age related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function (sarcopenia) reduces independence and the quality of life for individuals, and leads to falls and fractures with escalating health costs for the rapidly aging human population. Thus there is much interest in developing interventions to reduce sarcopenia. One area that has attracted recent attention is the proposed use of myogenic stem cells to improve regeneration of old muscles. This mini-review challenges the fundamental need for myogenic stem cell therapy for sarcopenia. It presents evidence that demonstrates the excellent capacity of myogenic stem cells from very old rodent and human muscles to form new muscles after experimental myofiber necrosis. The many factors required for successful muscle regeneration are considered with a strong focus on integration of components of old muscle bioarchitecture. The fundamental role of satellite cells in homeostasis of normal aging muscles and the incidence of endogenous regeneration in old muscles is questioned. These issues, combined with problems for clinical myogenic stem cell therapies for severe muscle diseases, raise fundamental concerns about the justification for myogenic stem cell therapy for sarcopenia. PMID:25101758

  15. Combination of small RNAs for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, NaJung; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony; Lee, Sang Jin

    2016-03-01

    Selectively controlling the expression of the target genes through RNA interference (RNAi) has significant therapeutic potential for injuries or diseases of tissues. We used this strategy to accelerate and enhance skeletal muscle regeneration for the treatment of muscular atrophy. In this study, we used myostatin small interfering (si)RNA (siGDF-8), a major inhibitory factor in the development and postnatal regeneration of skeletal muscle and muscle-specific microRNAs (miR-1 and -206) to further accelerate muscle regeneration. This combination of 3 small RNAs significantly improved the gene expression of myogenic regulatory factors in vitro, suggesting myogenic activation. Moreover, cell proliferation and myotube formation improved without compromising each other, which indicates the myogenic potential of this combination of small RNAs. The recovery of chemically injured tibialis anterior muscles in rats was significantly accelerated, both functionally and structurally. This novel combination of siRNA and miRNAs has promising therapeutic potential to improve in situ skeletal muscle regeneration.

  16. Biochemical and mechanical environment cooperatively regulate skeletal muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Calve, Sarah; Simon, Hans-Georg

    2012-01-01

    During forelimb regeneration in the newt Notophthalmus viridescens, the dynamic expression of a transitional matrix rich in hyaluronic acid, tenascin-C, and fibronectin controls muscle cell behavior in vivo and in vitro. However, the influence of extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling on tissue stiffness and the cellular response to mechanical variations during regeneration was unknown. By measuring the transverse stiffness of tissues in situ, we found undifferentiated regenerative blastemas were less stiff than differentiated stump muscle (13.3±1.6 vs. 16.6±1.2 kPa). To directly determine how ECM and stiffness combine to affect skeletal muscle fragmentation, migration, and fusion, we coated silicone-based substrates ranging from 2 to 100 kPa with matrices representative of transitional (tenascin-C and fibronectin) and differentiated environments (laminin and Matrigel). Using live-cell imaging, we found softer tenascin-C-coated substrates significantly enhanced migration and fragmentation of primary newt muscle cells. In contrast, stiffer substrates coated with laminin, Matrigel, or fibronectin increased differentiation while suppressing migration and fragmentation. These data support our in vivo observations that a transitional matrix of reduced stiffness regulates muscle plasticity and progenitor cell recruitment into the regenerative blastema. These new findings will enable the determination of how biochemical and mechanical cues from the ECM control genetic pathways that drive regeneration.—Calve, S., Simon, H.-G. Biochemical and mechanical environment cooperatively regulate skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:22415307

  17. Pericytes: multitasking cells in the regeneration of injured, diseased, and aged skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria L.; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are perivascular cells that envelop and make intimate connections with adjacent capillary endothelial cells. Recent studies show that they may have a profound impact in skeletal muscle regeneration, innervation, vessel formation, fibrosis, fat accumulation, and ectopic bone formation throughout life. In this review, we summarize and evaluate recent advances in our understanding of pericytes' influence on adult skeletal muscle pathophysiology. We also discuss how further elucidating their biology may offer new approaches to the treatment of conditions characterized by muscle wasting. PMID:25278877

  18. PEDF-derived peptide promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through its mitogenic effect on muscle progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Chiang, Yi-Pin; Chuang, Chih-Kuang; Chen, Show-Li; Hsieh, Jui-Wen; Lan, Yu-Wen

    2015-01-01

    In response injury, intrinsic repair mechanisms are activated in skeletal muscle to replace the damaged muscle fibers with new muscle fibers. The regeneration process starts with the proliferation of satellite cells to give rise to myoblasts, which subsequently differentiate terminally into myofibers. Here, we investigated the promotion effect of pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) on muscle regeneration. We report that PEDF and a synthetic PEDF-derived short peptide (PSP; residues Ser93-Leu112) induce satellite cell proliferation in vitro and promote muscle regeneration in vivo. Extensively, soleus muscle necrosis was induced in rats by bupivacaine, and an injectable alginate gel was used to release the PSP in the injured muscle. PSP delivery was found to stimulate satellite cell proliferation in damaged muscle and enhance the growth of regenerating myofibers, with complete regeneration of normal muscle mass by 2 wk. In cell culture, PEDF/PSP stimulated C2C12 myoblast proliferation, together with a rise in cyclin D1 expression. PEDF induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt, and STAT3 in C2C12 myoblasts. Blocking the activity of ERK, Akt, or STAT3 with pharmacological inhibitors attenuated the effects of PEDF/PSP on the induction of C2C12 cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine pulse-labeling demonstrated that PEDF/PSP stimulated primary rat satellite cell proliferation in myofibers in vitro. In summary, we report for the first time that PSP is capable of promoting the regeneration of skeletal muscle. The signaling mechanism involves the ERK, AKT, and STAT3 pathways. These results show the potential utility of this PEDF peptide for muscle regeneration. PMID:26040897

  19. Muscle Satellite Cell Protein Teneurin-4 Regulates Differentiation During Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kana; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Ito, Naoki; Kikura, Naomi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2015-10-01

    Satellite cells are maintained in an undifferentiated quiescent state, but during muscle regeneration they acquire an activated stage, and initiate to proliferate and differentiate as myoblasts. The transmembrane protein teneurin-4 (Ten-4) is specifically expressed in the quiescent satellite cells; however, its cellular and molecular functions remain unknown. We therefore aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in muscle satellite cells. In the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of Ten-4-deficient mice, the number and the size of myofibers, as well as the population of satellite cells, were reduced with/without induction of muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we found an accelerated activation of satellite cells in the regenerated Ten-4-deficient TA muscle. The cell culture analysis using primary satellite cells showed that Ten-4 suppressed the progression of myogenic differentiation. Together, our findings revealed that Ten-4 functions as a crucial player in maintaining the quiescence of muscle satellite cells.

  20. Mesodermal iPSC–derived progenitor cells functionally regenerate cardiac and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Swinnen, Melissa; Giacomazzi, Giorgia; Camps, Jordi; Barthélemy, Ines; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Caluwé, Ellen; Grosemans, Hanne; Thorrez, Lieven; Pelizzo, Gloria; Muijtjens, Manja; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Blot, Stephane; Janssens, Stefan; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Conditions such as muscular dystrophies (MDs) that affect both cardiac and skeletal muscles would benefit from therapeutic strategies that enable regeneration of both of these striated muscle types. Protocols have been developed to promote induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to differentiate toward cardiac or skeletal muscle; however, there are currently no strategies to simultaneously target both muscle types. Tissues exhibit specific epigenetic alterations; therefore, source-related lineage biases have the potential to improve iPSC-driven multilineage differentiation. Here, we determined that differential myogenic propensity influences the commitment of isogenic iPSCs and a specifically isolated pool of mesodermal iPSC-derived progenitors (MiPs) toward the striated muscle lineages. Differential myogenic propensity did not influence pluripotency, but did selectively enhance chimerism of MiP-derived tissue in both fetal and adult skeletal muscle. When injected into dystrophic mice, MiPs engrafted and repaired both skeletal and cardiac muscle, reducing functional defects. Similarly, engraftment into dystrophic mice of canine MiPs from dystrophic dogs that had undergone TALEN-mediated correction of the MD-associated mutation also resulted in functional striatal muscle regeneration. Moreover, human MiPs exhibited the same capacity for the dual differentiation observed in murine and canine MiPs. The findings of this study suggest that MiPs should be further explored for combined therapy of cardiac and skeletal muscles. PMID:26571398

  1. Regeneration of Zebrafish CNS: Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sukla; Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration in the animal kingdom is one of the most fascinating problems that have allowed scientists to address many issues of fundamental importance in basic biology. However, we came to know that the regenerative capability may vary across different species. Among vertebrates, fish and amphibians are capable of regenerating a variety of complex organs through epimorphosis. Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. The focus of the present paper is on spinal cord regeneration in adult zebrafish. We intend to discuss our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) that allows formation of proliferating progenitors and controls neurogenesis, which involve changes in epigenetic and transcription programs. Unlike mammals, zebrafish retains radial glia, a nonneuronal cell type in their adult central nervous system. Injury induced proliferation involves radial glia which proliferate, transcribe embryonic genes, and can give rise to new neurons. Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming. PMID:27382491

  2. Regeneration of Zebrafish CNS: Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sukla; Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration in the animal kingdom is one of the most fascinating problems that have allowed scientists to address many issues of fundamental importance in basic biology. However, we came to know that the regenerative capability may vary across different species. Among vertebrates, fish and amphibians are capable of regenerating a variety of complex organs through epimorphosis. Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. The focus of the present paper is on spinal cord regeneration in adult zebrafish. We intend to discuss our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) that allows formation of proliferating progenitors and controls neurogenesis, which involve changes in epigenetic and transcription programs. Unlike mammals, zebrafish retains radial glia, a nonneuronal cell type in their adult central nervous system. Injury induced proliferation involves radial glia which proliferate, transcribe embryonic genes, and can give rise to new neurons. Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming. PMID:27382491

  3. Regeneration of Zebrafish CNS: Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sukla; Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration in the animal kingdom is one of the most fascinating problems that have allowed scientists to address many issues of fundamental importance in basic biology. However, we came to know that the regenerative capability may vary across different species. Among vertebrates, fish and amphibians are capable of regenerating a variety of complex organs through epimorphosis. Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. The focus of the present paper is on spinal cord regeneration in adult zebrafish. We intend to discuss our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) that allows formation of proliferating progenitors and controls neurogenesis, which involve changes in epigenetic and transcription programs. Unlike mammals, zebrafish retains radial glia, a nonneuronal cell type in their adult central nervous system. Injury induced proliferation involves radial glia which proliferate, transcribe embryonic genes, and can give rise to new neurons. Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming.

  4. Crustacean muscles: atrophy and regeneration during molting

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural basis of atrophy of claw closer muscle of the land crab and the organization of myofibrils and sacroplasmic reticulum during the hydrolysis of protein that occurs during proecdysis was examined. The changes that occur in contractile proteins during claw muscle atrophy and the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteinases (CDP) in myofilament degradation were investigated. (ACR)

  5. Biomimetic Scaffolds for Regeneration of Volumetric Muscle Loss in Skeletal Muscle Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Grasman, Jonathan M.; Zayas, Michelle J.; Page, Ray; Pins, George D.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries typically result from traumatic incidents such as combat injuries where soft-tissue extremity injuries are present in one of four cases. Further, about 4.5 million reconstructive surgical procedures are performed annually as a result of car accidents, cancer ablation, or cosmetic procedures. These combat- and trauma-induced skeletal muscle injuries are characterized by volumetric muscle loss (VML), which significantly reduces the functionality of the injured muscle. While skeletal muscle has an innate repair mechanism, it is unable to compensate for VML injuries because large amounts of tissue including connective tissue and basement membrane are removed or destroyed. This results in in a significant need to develop off-the-shelf biomimetic scaffolds to direct skeletal muscle regeneration. Here, the structure and organization of native skeletal muscle tissue is described in order to reveal clear design parameters that are necessary for scaffolds to mimic in order to successfully regenerate muscular tissue. We review the literature with respect to the materials and methodologies used to develop scaffolds for skeletal muscle tissue regeneration as well as the limitations of these materials. We further discuss the variety of cell sources and different injury models to provide some context for the multiple approaches used to evaluate these scaffold materials. Recent findings are highlighted to address the state of the field and directions are outlined for future strategies, both in scaffold design and in the use of different injury models to evaluate these materials, for regenerating functional skeletal muscle. PMID:26219862

  6. Drug-induced regeneration in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Strehin, Iossif; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Gourevitch, Dmitri; Clark, Lise; Leferovich, John; Messersmith, Phillip B.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Whereas amphibians regenerate lost appendages spontaneously, mammals generally form scars over the injury site through the process of wound repair. The MRL mouse strain is an exception among mammals because it shows a spontaneous regenerative healing trait and so can be used to investigate proregenerative interventions in mammals. We report that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a central molecule in the process of regeneration in adult MRL mice. The degradation of HIF-1α protein, which occurs under normoxic conditions, is mediated by prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs). We used the drug 1,4-dihydrophenonthrolin-4-one-3-carboxylic acid (1,4-DPCA), a PHD inhibitor, to stabilize constitutive expression of HIF-1α protein. A locally injectable hydrogel containing 1,4-DPCA was designed to achieve controlled delivery of the drug over 4 to 10 days. Subcutaneous injection of the 1,4-DPCA/hydrogel into Swiss Webster mice that do not show a regenerative phenotype increased stable expression of HIF-1α protein over 5 days, providing a functional measure of drug release in vivo. Multiple peripheral subcutaneous injections of the 1,4-DPCA/hydrogel over a 10-day period led to regenerative wound healing in Swiss Webster mice after ear hole punch injury. Increased expression of the HIF-1α protein may provide a starting point for future studies on regeneration in mammals. PMID:26041709

  7. Human Satellite Cell Transplantation and Regeneration from Diverse Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoti; Wilschut, Karlijn J; Kouklis, Gayle; Tian, Hua; Hesse, Robert; Garland, Catharine; Sbitany, Hani; Hansen, Scott; Seth, Rahul; Knott, P Daniel; Hoffman, William Y; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-09-01

    Identification of human satellite cells that fulfill muscle stem cell criteria is an unmet need in regenerative medicine. This hurdle limits understanding how closely muscle stem cell properties are conserved among mice and humans and hampers translational efforts in muscle regeneration. Here, we report that PAX7 satellite cells exist at a consistent frequency of 2-4 cells/mm of fiber in muscles of the human trunk, limbs, and head. Xenotransplantation into mice of 50-70 fiber-associated, or 1,000-5,000 FACS-enriched CD56(+)/CD29(+) human satellite cells led to stable engraftment and formation of human-derived myofibers. Human cells with characteristic PAX7, CD56, and CD29 expression patterns populated the satellite cell niche beneath the basal lamina on the periphery of regenerated fibers. After additional injury, transplanted satellite cells robustly regenerated to form hundreds of human-derived fibers. Together, these findings conclusively delineate a source of bona-fide endogenous human muscle stem cells that will aid development of clinical applications.

  8. Identification, isolation and expansion of myoendothelial cells involved in leech muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Annalisa; Banfi, Serena; Gerosa, Laura; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Noonan, Douglas M; Valvassori, Roberto; de Eguileor, Magda

    2009-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle in vertebrates contains myoendothelial cells that express both myogenic and endothelial markers, and which are able to differentiate into myogenic cells to contribute to muscle regeneration. In spite of intensive research efforts, numerous questions remain regarding the role of cytokine signalling on myoendothelial cell differentiation and muscle regeneration. Here we used Hirudo medicinalis (Annelid, leech) as an emerging new model to study myoendothelial cells and muscle regeneration. Although the leech has relative anatomical simplicity, it shows a striking similarity with vertebrate responses and is a reliable model for studying a variety of basic events, such as tissue repair. Double immunohistochemical analysis were used to characterize myoendothelial cells in leeches and, by injecting in vivo the matrigel biopolymer supplemented with the cytokine Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), we were able to isolate this specific cell population expressing myogenic and endothelial markers. We then evaluated the effect of VEGF on these cells in vitro. Our data indicate that, similar to that proposed for vertebrates, myoendothelial cells of the leech directly participate in myogenesis both in vivo and in vitro, and that VEGF secretion is involved in the recruitment and expansion of these muscle progenitor cells. PMID:19876402

  9. Dystrophin deficiency is associated with myotendinous junction defects in prenecrotic and fully regenerated skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Law, D. J.; Tidball, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the major site of force transmission from myofibrils across the muscle cell membrane to the extracellular matrix. The MTJ is thus an appropriate model system in which to test the hypothesis that dystrophin, the gene product absent in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, functions as a structural link between the muscle cytoskeleton and the cell membrane. We studied changes in MTJ structure in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice during periods of growth and aging that spanned prenecrotic, necrotic, and regenerative phases of postnatal muscle development in mdx mice. Prenecrotic animals were found to exhibit structural defects at MTJs that were similar to those described previously in animals at the peak of necrosis, including a reduction in lateral associations between thin filaments and the MTJ membrane. These defects therefore occur before necrosis and may be directly related to the absence of dystrophin. Observations of regenerating and fully regenerated MTJs in adult animals show that the defects are still present, indicating that normal thin filament-membrane associations are never formed in dystrophin-deficient muscle. However, in prenecrotic as well as regenerated adult mdx muscle, the MTJ membrane is only slightly less folded than in age-matched controls. This indicates that mdx muscle possesses some dystrophin-independent mechanism that allows for the initial formation of MTJs, despite the absence of dystrophin. The presence of the defect in normal, lateral, thin filament-membrane associations in mdx muscle, regardless of age, supports the hypothesis that dystrophin functions as a structural link between thin filaments and the membrane. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8494050

  10. Progressive impairment of muscle regeneration in muscleblind-like 3 isoform knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Poulos, Michael G.; Batra, Ranjan; Li, Moyi; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chaolin; Darnell, Robert B.; Swanson, Maurice S.

    2013-01-01

    The muscleblind-like (MBNL) genes encode alternative splicing factors that are essential for the postnatal development of multiple tissues, and the inhibition of MBNL activity by toxic C(C)UG repeat RNAs is a major pathogenic feature of the neuromuscular disease myotonic dystrophy. While MBNL1 controls fetal-to-adult splicing transitions in muscle and MBNL2 serves a similar role in the brain, the function of MBNL3 in vivo is unknown. Here, we report that mouse Mbnl3, which encodes protein isoforms that differ in the number of tandem zinc-finger RNA-binding motifs and subcellular localization, is expressed primarily during embryonic development but also transiently during injury-induced adult skeletal muscle regeneration. Mbnl3 expression is required for normal C2C12 myogenic differentiation and high-throughput sequencing combined with cross-linking/immunoprecipitation analysis indicates that Mbnl3 binds preferentially to the 3′ untranslated regions of genes implicated in cell growth and proliferation. In addition, Mbnl3ΔE2 isoform knockout mice, which fail to express the major Mbnl3 nuclear isoform, show age-dependent delays in injury-induced muscle regeneration and impaired muscle function. These results suggest that Mbnl3 inhibition by toxic RNA expression may be a contributing factor to the progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting characteristic of myotonic dystrophy. PMID:23660517

  11. Myocyte-derived Tnfsf14 is a survival factor necessary for myoblast differentiation and skeletal muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Waldemer-Streyer, R J; Chen, J

    2015-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle tissue has a uniquely robust capacity for regeneration, which gradually declines with aging or is compromised in muscle diseases. The cellular mechanisms regulating adult myogenesis remain incompletely understood. Here we identify the cytokine tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (Tnfsf14) as a positive regulator of myoblast differentiation in culture and muscle regeneration in vivo. We find that Tnfsf14, as well as its cognate receptors herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) and lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR), are expressed in both differentiating myocytes and regenerating myofibers. Depletion of Tnfsf14 or either receptor inhibits myoblast differentiation and promotes apoptosis. Our results also suggest that Tnfsf14 regulates myogenesis by supporting cell survival and maintaining a sufficient pool of cells for fusion. In addition, we show that Akt mediates the survival and myogenic function of Tnfsf14. Importantly, local knockdown of Tnfsf14 is found to impair injury-induced muscle regeneration in a mouse model, affirming an important physiological role for Tnfsf14 in myogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrate that localized overexpression of Tnfsf14 potently enhances muscle regeneration, and that this regenerative capacity of Tnfsf14 is dependent on Akt signaling. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel regulator of skeletal myogenesis and implicate Tnfsf14 in future therapeutic development. PMID:26720335

  12. Exercise conditioning in old mice improves skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Joanisse, Sophie; Nederveen, Joshua P; Baker, Jeff M; Snijders, Tim; Iacono, Carlo; Parise, Gianni

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal muscle possesses the ability to regenerate after injury, but this ability is impaired or delayed with aging. Regardless of age, muscle retains the ability to positively respond to stimuli, such as exercise. We examined whether exercise is able to improve regenerative response in skeletal muscle of aged mice. Twenty-two-month-old male C57Bl/6J mice (n = 20) underwent an 8-wk progressive exercise training protocol [old exercised (O-Ex) group]. An old sedentary (O-Sed) and a sedentary young control (Y-Ctl) group were included. Animals were subjected to injections of cardiotoxin into the tibialis anterior muscle. The tibialis anterior were harvested before [O-Ex/O-Sed/Y-Ctl control (CTL); n = 6], 10 d (O-Ex/O-Sed/Y-Ctl d 10; n = 8), and 28 d (O-Ex/O-Sed/Y-Ctl d 28; n = 6) postinjection. Average fiber cross-sectional area was reduced in all groups at d 10 (CTL: O-Ex: 2499 ± 140; O-Sed: 2320 ± 165; Y-Ctl: 2474 ± 269; d 10: O-Ex: 1191 ± 100; O-Sed: 1125 ± 99; Y-Ctl: 1481 ± 167 µm(2); P < 0.05), but was restored to control values in O-Ex and Y-Ctl groups at d 28 (O-Ex: 2257 ± 181; Y-Ctl: 2398 ± 171 µm(2); P > 0.05). Satellite cell content was greater at CTL in O-Ex (2.6 ± 0.4 satellite cells/100 fibers) compared with O-Sed (1.0 ± 0.1% satellite cells/100 fibers; P < 0.05). Exercise conditioning appears to improve ability of skeletal muscle to regenerate after injury in aged mice.-Joanisse, S., Nederveen, J. P., Baker, J. M., Snijders, T., Iacono, C., Parise, G. Exercise conditioning in old mice improves skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:27306336

  13. Asymmetric division of clonal muscle stem cells coordinates muscle regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, David B; Nguyen, Phong Dang; Siegel, Ashley L; Ehrlich, Ophelia V; Sonntag, Carmen; Phan, Jennifer M N; Berger, Silke; Ratnayake, Dhanushika; Hersey, Lucy; Berger, Joachim; Verkade, Heather; Hall, Thomas E; Currie, Peter D

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is an example of a tissue that deploys a self-renewing stem cell, the satellite cell, to effect regeneration. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted a role for asymmetric divisions in renewing rare "immortal" stem cells and generating a clonal population of differentiation-competent myoblasts. However, this model currently lacks in vivo validation. We define a zebrafish muscle stem cell population analogous to the mammalian satellite cell and image the entire process of muscle regeneration from injury to fiber replacement in vivo. This analysis reveals complex interactions between satellite cells and both injured and uninjured fibers and provides in vivo evidence for the asymmetric division of satellite cells driving both self-renewal and regeneration via a clonally restricted progenitor pool.

  14. Fundamental differences in dedifferentiation and stem cell recruitment during skeletal muscle regeneration in two salamander species.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Guzmán, Tatiana; Wang, Heng; Khattak, Shahryar; Schuez, Maritta; Roensch, Kathleen; Nacu, Eugeniu; Tazaki, Akira; Joven, Alberto; Tanaka, Elly M; Simon, András

    2014-02-01

    Salamanders regenerate appendages via a progenitor pool called the blastema. The cellular mechanisms underlying regeneration of muscle have been much debated but have remained unclear. Here we applied Cre-loxP genetic fate mapping to skeletal muscle during limb regeneration in two salamander species, Notophthalmus viridescens (newt) and Ambystoma mexicanum (axolotl). Remarkably, we found that myofiber dedifferentiation is an integral part of limb regeneration in the newt, but not in axolotl. In the newt, myofiber fragmentation results in proliferating, PAX7(-) mononuclear cells in the blastema that give rise to the skeletal muscle in the new limb. In contrast, myofibers in axolotl do not generate proliferating cells, and do not contribute to newly regenerated muscle; instead, resident PAX7(+) cells provide the regeneration activity. Our results therefore show significant diversity in limb muscle regeneration mechanisms among salamanders and suggest that multiple strategies may be feasible for inducing regeneration in other species, including mammals. PMID:24268695

  15. Fundamental differences in dedifferentiation and stem cell recruitment during skeletal muscle regeneration in two salamander species.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Guzmán, Tatiana; Wang, Heng; Khattak, Shahryar; Schuez, Maritta; Roensch, Kathleen; Nacu, Eugeniu; Tazaki, Akira; Joven, Alberto; Tanaka, Elly M; Simon, András

    2014-02-01

    Salamanders regenerate appendages via a progenitor pool called the blastema. The cellular mechanisms underlying regeneration of muscle have been much debated but have remained unclear. Here we applied Cre-loxP genetic fate mapping to skeletal muscle during limb regeneration in two salamander species, Notophthalmus viridescens (newt) and Ambystoma mexicanum (axolotl). Remarkably, we found that myofiber dedifferentiation is an integral part of limb regeneration in the newt, but not in axolotl. In the newt, myofiber fragmentation results in proliferating, PAX7(-) mononuclear cells in the blastema that give rise to the skeletal muscle in the new limb. In contrast, myofibers in axolotl do not generate proliferating cells, and do not contribute to newly regenerated muscle; instead, resident PAX7(+) cells provide the regeneration activity. Our results therefore show significant diversity in limb muscle regeneration mechanisms among salamanders and suggest that multiple strategies may be feasible for inducing regeneration in other species, including mammals.

  16. The rejuvenating effect of pregnancy on muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Falick Michaeli, Tal; Laufer, Neri; Sagiv, Jitka Yehudit; Dreazen, Avigail; Granot, Zvi; Pikarsky, Eli; Bergman, Yehudit; Gielchinsky, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Aging is characterized by reduced tissue regenerative capacity attributed to a diminished responsiveness of tissue-specific stem cells. With increasing age, resident precursor cells in muscle tissues show a markedly impaired propensity to proliferate in response to damage. However, exposure to factors present in the serum of young mice restores the regenerative capacity of aged precursor cells. As pregnancy represents a unique biological model of a partially shared blood system between young and old organisms, we hypothesized that pregnancy in aged mice would have a rejuvenating effect on the mother. To test this hypothesis, we assessed muscle regeneration in response to injury in young and aged pregnant and nonpregnant mice. Muscle regeneration in the aged pregnant mice was improved relative to that in age-matched nonpregnant mice. The beneficial effect of pregnancy was transient, lasting up to 2 months after delivery, and appeared to be attributable to activation of satellite cells via the Notch signaling pathway, thus supporting the possibility that pregnancy induces activation of aged dormant muscle progenitor cells. PMID:25773509

  17. MMP-10 is required for efficient muscle regeneration in mouse models of injury and muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, Míriam; Sáinz, Neira; Rodriguez, José Antonio; Abizanda, Gloria; Orbe, Josune; de Martino, Alba; García Verdugo, José Manuel; Páramo, José A; Prósper, Felipe; Pérez-Ruiz, Ana

    2014-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of endopeptidases that are involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix components, have been implicated in skeletal muscle regeneration. Among the MMPs, MMP-2 and MMP-9 are upregulated in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a fatal X-linked muscle disorder. However, inhibition or overexpression of specific MMPs in a mouse model of DMD (mdx) has yielded mixed results regarding disease progression, depending on the MMP studied. Here, we have examined the role of MMP-10 in muscle regeneration during injury and muscular dystrophy. We found that skeletal muscle increases MMP-10 protein expression in response to damage (notexin) or disease (mdx mice), suggesting its role in muscle regeneration. In addition, we found that MMP-10-deficient muscles displayed impaired recruitment of endothelial cells, reduced levels of extracellular matrix proteins, diminished collagen deposition, and decreased fiber size, which collectively contributed to delayed muscle regeneration after injury. Also, MMP-10 knockout in mdx mice led to a deteriorated dystrophic phenotype. Moreover, MMP-10 mRNA silencing in injured muscles (wild-type and mdx) reduced muscle regeneration, while addition of recombinant human MMP-10 accelerated muscle repair, suggesting that MMP-10 is required for efficient muscle regeneration. Furthermore, our data suggest that MMP-10-mediated muscle repair is associated with VEGF/Akt signaling. Thus, our findings indicate that MMP-10 is critical for skeletal muscle maintenance and regeneration during injury and disease. PMID:24123596

  18. Epimorphic regeneration approach to tissue replacement in adult mammals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urodeles and fetal mammals are capable of impressive epimorphic regeneration in a variety of tissues, whereas the typical default response to injury in adult mammals consists of inflammation and scar tissue formation. One component of epimorphic regeneration is the recruitment of resident progenitor...

  19. Cryotherapy Reduces Inflammatory Response Without Altering Muscle Regeneration Process and Extracellular Matrix Remodeling of Rat Muscle.

    PubMed

    Vieira Ramos, Gracielle; Pinheiro, Clara Maria; Messa, Sabrina Peviani; Delfino, Gabriel Borges; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Salvini, Tania de Fátima; Durigan, Joao Luiz Quagliotti

    2016-01-01

    The application of cryotherapy is widely used in sports medicine today. Cooling could minimize secondary hypoxic injury through the reduction of cellular metabolism and injury area. Conflicting results have also suggested cryotherapy could delay and impair the regeneration process. There are no definitive findings about the effects of cryotherapy on the process of muscle regeneration. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a clinical-like cryotherapy on inflammation, regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling on the Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of rats 3, 7 and 14 days post-injury. It was observed that the intermittent application of cryotherapy (three 30-minute sessions, every 2 h) in the first 48 h post-injury decreased inflammatory processes (mRNA levels of TNF-α, NF-κB, TGF-β and MMP-9 and macrophage percentage). Cryotherapy did not alter regeneration markers such as injury area, desmin and Myod expression. Despite regulating Collagen I and III and their growth factors, cryotherapy did not alter collagen deposition. In summary, clinical-like cryotherapy reduces the inflammatory process through the decrease of macrophage infiltration and the accumulation of the inflammatory key markers without influencing muscle injury area and ECM remodeling. PMID:26725948

  20. Cryotherapy Reduces Inflammatory Response Without Altering Muscle Regeneration Process and Extracellular Matrix Remodeling of Rat Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vieira Ramos, Gracielle; Pinheiro, Clara Maria; Messa, Sabrina Peviani; Delfino, Gabriel Borges; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Salvini, Tania de Fátima; Durigan, Joao Luiz Quagliotti

    2016-01-01

    The application of cryotherapy is widely used in sports medicine today. Cooling could minimize secondary hypoxic injury through the reduction of cellular metabolism and injury area. Conflicting results have also suggested cryotherapy could delay and impair the regeneration process. There are no definitive findings about the effects of cryotherapy on the process of muscle regeneration. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a clinical-like cryotherapy on inflammation, regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling on the Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of rats 3, 7 and 14 days post-injury. It was observed that the intermittent application of cryotherapy (three 30-minute sessions, every 2 h) in the first 48 h post-injury decreased inflammatory processes (mRNA levels of TNF-α, NF-κB, TGF-β and MMP-9 and macrophage percentage). Cryotherapy did not alter regeneration markers such as injury area, desmin and Myod expression. Despite regulating Collagen I and III and their growth factors, cryotherapy did not alter collagen deposition. In summary, clinical-like cryotherapy reduces the inflammatory process through the decrease of macrophage infiltration and the accumulation of the inflammatory key markers without influencing muscle injury area and ECM remodeling. PMID:26725948

  1. Methods for Mitochondria and Mitophagy Flux Analyses in Stem Cells of Resting and Regenerating Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    García-Prat, Laura; Martínez-Vicente, Marta; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria generate most of the cell's supply of ATP as a source of energy. They are also implicated in the control of cell's growth and death. Because of these critical functions, mitochondrial fitness is key for cellular homeostasis. Often, however, mitochondria become defective following damage or stress. To prevent accumulation of damaged mitochondria, the cells clear them through mitophagy, which is defined as the selective degradation of mitochondria by autophagy (the process for degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged organelles in lysosomes). Recently, constitutive mitophagic activity has been reported in quiescent muscle stem cells (satellite cells), which sustain regeneration of skeletal muscle. In response to muscle damage, these cells activate, expand, and differentiate to repair damaged myofibers. Mitophagy was shown to be required for maintenance of satellite cells in their healthy quiescent state. Conversely, damaged mitochondria accumulated in satellite cells with aging and this was attributed to defective mitophagy. This caused increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of muscle stem cell regenerative capacity at old age. In this chapter, we describe different experimental strategies to evaluate mitochondria status and mitophagy in muscle stem cells from mice. They should improve our ability to study muscle stem homeostasis in adult life, and their loss of function in aging and disease. PMID:27492176

  2. MicroRNA-155 facilitates skeletal muscle regeneration by balancing pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nie, M; Liu, J; Yang, Q; Seok, H Y; Hu, X; Deng, Z-L; Wang, D-Z

    2016-06-09

    Skeletal muscle has remarkable regeneration capacity and regenerates in response to injury. Muscle regeneration largely relies on muscle stem cells called satellite cells. Satellite cells normally remain quiescent, but in response to injury or exercise they become activated and proliferate, migrate, differentiate, and fuse to form multinucleate myofibers. Interestingly, the inflammatory process following injury and the activation of the myogenic program are highly coordinated, with myeloid cells having a central role in modulating satellite cell activation and regeneration. Here, we show that genetic deletion of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in mice substantially delays muscle regeneration. Surprisingly, miR-155 does not appear to directly regulate the proliferation or differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, miR-155 is highly expressed in myeloid cells, is essential for appropriate activation of myeloid cells, and regulates the balance between pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages during skeletal muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, we found that miR-155 suppresses SOCS1, a negative regulator of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, during the initial inflammatory response upon muscle injury. Our findings thus reveal a novel role of miR-155 in regulating initial immune responses during muscle regeneration and provide a novel miRNA target for improving muscle regeneration in degenerative muscle diseases.

  3. MicroRNA-155 facilitates skeletal muscle regeneration by balancing pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nie, M; Liu, J; Yang, Q; Seok, H Y; Hu, X; Deng, Z-L; Wang, D-Z

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has remarkable regeneration capacity and regenerates in response to injury. Muscle regeneration largely relies on muscle stem cells called satellite cells. Satellite cells normally remain quiescent, but in response to injury or exercise they become activated and proliferate, migrate, differentiate, and fuse to form multinucleate myofibers. Interestingly, the inflammatory process following injury and the activation of the myogenic program are highly coordinated, with myeloid cells having a central role in modulating satellite cell activation and regeneration. Here, we show that genetic deletion of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in mice substantially delays muscle regeneration. Surprisingly, miR-155 does not appear to directly regulate the proliferation or differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, miR-155 is highly expressed in myeloid cells, is essential for appropriate activation of myeloid cells, and regulates the balance between pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages during skeletal muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, we found that miR-155 suppresses SOCS1, a negative regulator of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, during the initial inflammatory response upon muscle injury. Our findings thus reveal a novel role of miR-155 in regulating initial immune responses during muscle regeneration and provide a novel miRNA target for improving muscle regeneration in degenerative muscle diseases. PMID:27277683

  4. Targeted expression of IGF-1 transgene to skeletal muscle accelerates muscle and motor neuron regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rabinovsky, Eric D; Gelir, Ethem; Gelir, Seda; Lui, Hui; Kattash, Maan; DeMayo, Francesco J; Shenaq, Saleh M; Schwartz, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Currently, there is no known medical treatment that hastens the repair of damaged nerve and muscle. Using IGF-1 transgenic mice that specifically express human recombinant IGF-1 in skeletal muscle, we test the hypotheses that targeted gene expression of IGF-1 in skeletal muscle enhances motor nerve regeneration after a nerve crush injury. The IGF-1 transgene affects the initiation of the muscle repair process after nerve injury as shown by increased activation of SCA-1positive myogenic stem cells. Increased satellite cell differentiation and proliferation are observed in IGF-1 transgenic mice, shown by increased expression of Cyclin D1, MyoD, and myogenin. Expression of myogenin and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits, initially increased in both wild-type and IGF-1 transgenic mice, are restored to normal levels at a faster rate in IGF-1 transgenic mice, which indicates a rescue of nerve-evoked muscle activity. Expression of the IGF-1 transgene in skeletal muscle results in accelerated recovery of saltatory nerve conduction, increased innervation as detected by neurofilament expression, and faster recovery of muscle mass. These studies demonstrate that local expression of IGF-1 augments the repair of injured nerve and muscle.

  5. Fate of 3H-thymidine labelled myogenic cells in regeneration of muscle isografts.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, E; Mares, V; Stichová, J

    1976-03-01

    Intact and denervated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of 20-day-old inbred Lewis-Wistar rats were labelled with 3H-thymidine. Ninety minutes after the injection of the isotope 4.0% of the nuclei were labelled in the intact (i.e. innervated) and 9.6% in the muscles, denervated 3 days before administration of the isotope. The labelled EDL muscles were grafted into the bed of the previously removed EDL muscles of inbred animals and these isografts were studied 30 days later. In the EDL muscles, regenerated from innervated isografts only occasionally labelled endothelial cells were found whereas in the muscles regenerated from denervated isografts also parenchymal muscle nuclei were regularly labelled. The incidence of labelled nuclei in the regenerated EDL muscles was, however, about 20 times lower than in the donor EDL muscles. The presen experiments provide a direct proof of utilization of donor satelite cell nuclei for regeneration in grafted muscle tissue. With respect to the low incidence of labelled nuclei in regenerated EDL muscles, other sources of cells apparently also contribute to the regeneration process.

  6. Role of reactive oxygen species in the defective regeneration seen in aging muscle.

    PubMed

    Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2013-12-01

    The ability of muscles to regenerate successfully following damage diminishes with age and this appears to be a major contributor to the development of muscle weakness and physical frailty. Successful muscle regeneration is dependent on appropriate reinnervation of regenerating muscle. Age-related changes in the interactions between nerve and muscle are poorly understood but may play a major role in the defective regeneration. During aging there is defective redox homeostasis and an accumulation of oxidative damage in nerve and muscle that may contribute to defective regeneration. The aim of this review is to summarise the evidence that abnormal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in nerve and/or muscle may be responsible for the defective regeneration that contributes to the degeneration of skeletal muscle observed during aging. Identifying the importance of ROS generation in skeletal muscle during aging could have fundamental implications for interventions to prevent muscle degeneration and treatments to reverse the age-related decline in muscle mass and function. PMID:23851030

  7. "Role of reactive oxygen species in the defective regeneration seen in aging muscle."

    PubMed Central

    Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of muscles to regenerate successfully following damage diminishes with age and this appears to be a major contributor to the development of muscle weakness and physical frailty. Successful muscle regeneration is dependent on appropriate re-innervation of regenerating muscle. Age-related changes in the interactions between nerve and muscle are poorly understood but may play a major role in the defective regeneration. During aging there is defective redox homeostasis and an accumulation of oxidative damage in nerve and muscle that may contribute to defective regeneration. The aim of this review is to summarise the evidence that abnormal Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation in nerve and/or muscle may be responsible for the defective regeneration that contributes to the degeneration of skeletal muscle observed during aging. Identifying the importance of ROS generation in skeletal muscle during aging could have fundamental implications for interventions to prevent muscle degeneration and treatments to reverse the age-related decline in muscle mass and function. PMID:23851030

  8. Regeneration of specific innervation in Xenopus pectoralis muscle.

    PubMed

    Harada, Y; Grinnell, A D

    1996-12-01

    We investigated the motor unit organization and precision of reinnervation in the Xenopus pectoralis muscle following different manipulations, including crush or section of the posterior pectoralis nerve, foreign nerve innervation, and crush coupled with activity modulation or block. Most fibers have two neuromuscular junctions, and multielectrode recordings were used to identify the axonal origin of all inputs to both junctions on most or all fibers covering about 25% of the muscle surface. Following simple nerve crush, a highly organized innervation pattern was restored, indistinguishable from the normal pattern, including selective innervation of fibers of similar input resistance (R(in)), compact motor unit organization, and high incidence of exclusive innervation of both end plates on each fiber by the same axon (distributed mononeuronal innervation, or a/a pattern). Initial reinnervation was equally precise when nerve conduction in the regenerating nerve was blocked by tetrodotoxin. More distant or repeated nerve crush or nerve section delayed and reduced the precision of reinnervation, but the majority of fibers still received input to both end plates by the same axon, often in combination with others. A foreign nerve, the pectoralis sternalis, which in its own muscle forms only single end plates, showed less precise reinnervation, but still had an incidence of a/a innervation far above chance. These data imply the expression and recognition of remarkably precise chemospecific cues even in mature animals, superimposed on which is a further refinement by synapse elimination, probably based on an activity-dependent process.

  9. Reprogramming adult cells during organ regeneration in forest species

    PubMed Central

    Abarca, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of regenerating whole plants from somatic differentiated cells emphasizes the plasticity of plant development. Cell-type respecification during regeneration can be induced in adult tissues as a consequence of injuries, changes in external or internal stimuli or changes in positional information. However, in many plant species, switching the developmental program of adult cells prior to organ regeneration is difficult, especially in forest species. Besides its impact on forest productivity, basic information on the flexibility of cell differentiation is necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the epigenetic control of cell differentiation and plant development. Studies of reprogramming adult cells in terms of regulative expression changes of selected genes will be of great interest to unveil basic mechanisms regulating cellular plasticity. PMID:19820297

  10. PTEN Inhibition Improves Muscle Regeneration in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhaoyong; Wang, Huiling; Lee, In Hee; Modi, Swati; Wang, Xiaonan; Du, Jie; Mitch, William E.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Mechanisms impairing wound healing in diabetes are poorly understood. To identify mechanisms, we induced insulin resistance by chronically feeding mice a high-fat diet (HFD). We also examined the regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) during muscle regeneration because augmented IGF-1 signaling can improve muscle regeneration. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Muscle regeneration was induced by cardiotoxin injury, and we evaluated satellite cell activation and muscle maturation in HFD-fed mice. We also measured PIP3 and the enzymes regulating its level, IRS-1–associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and PTEN. Using primary cultures of muscle, we examined how fatty acids affect PTEN expression and how PTEN knockout influences muscle growth. Mice with muscle-specific PTEN knockout were used to examine how the HFD changes muscle regeneration. RESULTS The HFD raised circulating fatty acids and impaired the growth of regenerating myofibers while delaying myofiber maturation and increasing collagen deposition. These changes were independent of impaired proliferation of muscle progenitor or satellite cells but were principally related to increased expression of PTEN, which reduced PIP3 in muscle. In cultured muscle cells, palmitate directly stimulated PTEN expression and reduced cell growth. Knocking out PTEN restored cell growth. In mice, muscle-specific PTEN knockout improved the defects in muscle repair induced by HFD. CONCLUSIONS Insulin resistance impairs muscle regeneration by preventing myofiber maturation. The mechanism involves fatty acid–stimulated PTEN expression, which lowers muscle PIP3. If similar pathways occur in diabetic patients, therapeutic strategies directed at improving the repair of damaged muscle could include suppression of PTEN activity. PMID:20200318

  11. Stem Cell-Mediated Regeneration of the Adult Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic injury of the adult mammalian brain is often associated with persistent functional deficits as its potential for regeneration and capacity to rebuild lost neural structures is limited. However, the discovery that neural stem cells (NSCs) persist throughout life in discrete regions of the brain, novel approaches to induce the formation of neuronal and glial cells, and recently developed strategies to generate tissue for exogenous cell replacement strategies opened novel perspectives how to regenerate the adult brain. Here, we will review recently developed approaches for brain repair and discuss future perspectives that may eventually allow for developing novel treatment strategies in acute and chronic brain injury. PMID:27781019

  12. Mest but Not MiR-335 Affects Skeletal Muscle Growth and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hiramuki, Yosuke; Sato, Takahiko; Furuta, Yasuhide; Surani, M Azim; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    When skeletal muscle fibers are injured, they regenerate and grow until their sizes are adjusted to surrounding muscle fibers and other relevant organs. In this study, we examined whether Mest, one of paternally expressed imprinted genes that regulates body size during development, and miR-335 located in the second intron of the Mest gene play roles in muscle regeneration. We generated miR-335-deficient mice, and found that miR-335 is a paternally expressed imprinted microRNA. Although both Mest and miR-335 are highly expressed during muscle development and regeneration, only Mest+/- (maternal/paternal) mice show retardation of body growth. In addition to reduced body weight in Mest+/-; DMD-null mice, decreased muscle growth was observed in Mest+/- mice during cardiotoxin-induced regeneration, suggesting roles of Mest in muscle regeneration. Moreover, expressions of H19 and Igf2r, maternally expressed imprinted genes were affected in tibialis anterior muscle of Mest+/-; DMD-null mice compared to DMD-null mice. Thus, Mest likely mediates muscle regeneration through regulation of imprinted gene networks in skeletal muscle.

  13. Changes in contractile activation characteristics of rat fast and slow skeletal muscle fibres during regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gregorevic, Paul; Plant, David R; Stupka, Nicole; Lynch, Gordon S

    2004-01-01

    Damaged skeletal muscle fibres are replaced with new contractile units via muscle regeneration. Regenerating muscle fibres synthesize functionally distinct isoforms of contractile and regulatory proteins but little is known of their functional properties during the regeneration process. An advantage of utilizing single muscle fibre preparations is that assessment of their function is based on the overall characteristics of the contractile apparatus and regulatory system and as such, these preparations are sensitive in revealing not only coarse, but also subtle functional differences between muscle fibres. We examined the Ca2+- and Sr2+-activated contractile characteristics of permeabilized fibres from rat fast-twitch (extensor digitorum longus) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles at 7, 14 and 21 days following myotoxic injury, to test the hypothesis that fibres from regenerating fast and slow muscles have different functional characteristics to fibres from uninjured muscles. Regenerating muscle fibres had ∼10% of the maximal force producing capacity (Po) of control (uninjured) fibres, and an altered sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ at 7 days post-injury. Increased force production and a shift in Ca2+ sensitivity consistent with fibre maturation were observed during regeneration such that Po was restored to 36–45% of that in control fibres by 21 days, and sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was similar to that of control (uninjured) fibres. The findings support the hypothesis that regenerating muscle fibres have different contractile activation characteristics compared with mature fibres, and that they adopt properties of mature fast- or slow-twitch muscle fibres in a progressive manner as the regeneration process is completed. PMID:15181161

  14. Regeneration of supraspinal projection neurons in the adult goldfish.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S C; Jadhao, A G; Rao, P D

    1993-08-27

    Regeneration of descending supraspinal projections were identified in adult goldfish following administration of HRP to different levels of the spinal cord. While in the untreated normal fish 17 nuclei were shown to project into the spinal cord, only 11 of them seem to have participated in the process of regeneration. The nuclei whose axons regenerated include the nucleus ventromedialis (NVMD), nucleus of the median longitudinal fasciculus (NMLF), nucleus reticularis superior (NRS), nucleus reticularis medialis (NRM), nucleus reticularis inferior (NRI), anterior octaval nucleus (AON), magnocellular octaval nucleus (MON), descending octaval nucleus (DON) and certain neurons of the facial lobe. The neurons of the magnocellular preoptic nucleus (NPO), raphe nucleus (NR), Mauthner cell (MC), posterior octaval nucleus (PON) and somata located adjacent to the descending trigeminal tract were not labeled. The nuclei that apparently participated in the regeneration process were significantly larger in size than the corresponding cell bodies in the untreated normal fish.

  15. Low intensity laser therapy accelerates muscle regeneration in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; Rodrigues, Natalia C.; Assis, Livia L.; Peviani, Sabrina S.; Durigan, Joao L.; Moreira, Fernando M.A.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Parizotto, Nivaldo A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Elderly people suffer from skeletal muscle disorders that undermine their daily activity and quality of life; some of these problems can be listed as but not limited to: sarcopenia, changes in central and peripheral nervous system, blood hypoperfusion, regenerative changes contributing to atrophy, and muscle weakness. Determination, proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in the regenerative process are regulated by specific transcription factors, known as myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). In the elderly, the activation of MRFs is inefficient which hampers the regenerative process. Recent studies found that low intensity laser therapy (LILT) has a stimulatory effect in the muscle regeneration process. However, the effects of this therapy when associated with aging are still unknown. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the effects of LILT (λ=830 nm) on the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of aged rats. Subjects and methods The total of 56 male Wistar rats formed two population sets: old and young, with 28 animals in each set. Each of these sets were randomly divided into four groups of young rats (3 months of age) with n=7 per group and four groups of aged rats (10 months of age) with n=7 per group. These groups were submitted to cryoinjury + laser irradiation, cryoinjury only, laser irradiation only and the control group (no cryoinjury/no laser irradiation). The laser treatment was performed for 5 consecutive days. The first laser application was done 24 h after the injury (on day 2) and on the seventh day, the TA muscle was dissected and removed under anesthesia. After this the animals were euthanized. Histological analyses with toluidine blue as well as hematoxylin-eosin staining (for counting the blood capillaries) were performed for the lesion areas. In addition, MyoD and VEGF mRNA was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results The results showed significant elevation (p<0.05) in MyoD and VEGF genes expression levels

  16. ENHANCING ADULT NERVE REGENERATION THROUGH THE KNOCKDOWN OF RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Kimberly J.; Krishnan, Anand; Martinez, Jose A.; Purdy, Kaylynn; Singh, Bhagat; Eaton, Shane; Zochodne, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Tumour suppressor pathways may offer novel targets capable of altering the plasticity of post-mitotic adult neurons. Here we describe a role for retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, widely expressed in adult sensory neurons and their axons, during regeneration. In adult sensory neurons, Rb siRNA knockdown or Rb1 deletion in vitro enhances neurite outgrowth and branching. Plasticity is achieved in part through upregulation of neuronal PPARγ; its antagonism inhibits Rb siRNA plasticity whereas a PPARγ agonist increases growth. In an in vivo regenerative paradigm following complete peripheral nerve trunk transection, direct delivery of Rb siRNA prompts increased outgrowth of axons from proximal stumps and entrains Schwann cells to accompany them for greater distances. Similarly Rb siRNA delivery following a nerve crush improves behavioural indices of motor and sensory recovery in mice. The overall findings indicate that inhibition of tumour suppressor molecules has a role to play in promoting adult neuron regeneration. PMID:24752312

  17. Autophagy regulates cytoplasmic remodeling during cell reprogramming in a zebrafish model of muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Kish, Phillip E.; Louie, Ke'ale W.; Grzegorski, Steven J.; Klionsky, Daniel J.; Kahana, Alon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell identity involves both selective gene activity and specialization of cytoplasmic architecture and protein machinery. Similarly, reprogramming differentiated cells requires both genetic program alterations and remodeling of the cellular architecture. While changes in genetic and epigenetic programs have been well documented in dedifferentiating cells, the pathways responsible for remodeling the cellular architecture and eliminating specialized protein complexes are not as well understood. Here, we utilize a zebrafish model of adult muscle regeneration to study cytoplasmic remodeling during cell dedifferentiation. We describe activation of autophagy early in the regenerative response to muscle injury, while blocking autophagy using chloroquine or Atg5 and Becn1 knockdown reduced the rate of regeneration with accumulation of sarcomeric and nuclear debris. We further identify Casp3/caspase 3 as a candidate mediator of cellular reprogramming and Fgf signaling as an important activator of autophagy in dedifferentiating myocytes. We conclude that autophagy plays a critical role in cell reprogramming by regulating cytoplasmic remodeling, facilitating the transition to a less differentiated cell identity. PMID:27467399

  18. Synergist Ablation as a Rodent Model to Study Satellite Cell Dynamics in Adult Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Tyler J; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    In adult skeletal muscles, satellite cells are the primary myogenic stem cells involved in myogenesis. Normally, they remain in a quiescent state until activated by a stimulus, after which they proliferate, differentiate, and fuse into an existing myofiber or form a de novo myofiber. To study satellite cell dynamics in adult murine models, most studies utilize regeneration models in which the muscle is severely damaged and requires the participation from satellite cells in order to repair. Here, we describe a model to study satellite cell behavior in muscle hypertrophy that is independent of muscle regeneration.Synergist ablation surgery involves the surgical removal of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles resulting in functional overload of the remaining plantaris muscle. This functional overload results in myofiber hypertrophy, as well as the activation, proliferation, and fusion of satellite cells into the myofibers. Within 2 weeks of functional overload, satellite cell content increases approximately 275 %, an increase that is accompanied with a ~60 % increase in the number of myonuclei. Therefore, this can be used as an alternative model to study satellite cell behavior in adulthood that is different from regeneration, and capable of revealing new satellite cell functions in regulating muscle adaptation. PMID:27492164

  19. Synergist Ablation as a Rodent Model to Study Satellite Cell Dynamics in Adult Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Tyler J; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    In adult skeletal muscles, satellite cells are the primary myogenic stem cells involved in myogenesis. Normally, they remain in a quiescent state until activated by a stimulus, after which they proliferate, differentiate, and fuse into an existing myofiber or form a de novo myofiber. To study satellite cell dynamics in adult murine models, most studies utilize regeneration models in which the muscle is severely damaged and requires the participation from satellite cells in order to repair. Here, we describe a model to study satellite cell behavior in muscle hypertrophy that is independent of muscle regeneration.Synergist ablation surgery involves the surgical removal of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles resulting in functional overload of the remaining plantaris muscle. This functional overload results in myofiber hypertrophy, as well as the activation, proliferation, and fusion of satellite cells into the myofibers. Within 2 weeks of functional overload, satellite cell content increases approximately 275 %, an increase that is accompanied with a ~60 % increase in the number of myonuclei. Therefore, this can be used as an alternative model to study satellite cell behavior in adulthood that is different from regeneration, and capable of revealing new satellite cell functions in regulating muscle adaptation.

  20. Muscle Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor α Promotes Axonal Regeneration and Functional Recovery Following Peripheral Nerve Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy; Spearry, Rachel P.; Leahy, Kendra M.; Robitz, Rachel; Trinh, Dennis S.; Mason, Carter O.; Zurbrugg, Rebekah J.; Batt, Myra K.; Paul, Richard J.; Maclennan, A. John

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) administration maintains, protects, and promotes the regeneration of both motor neurons (MNs) and skeletal muscle in a wide variety of models. Expression of CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα), an essential CNTF receptor component, is greatly increased in skeletal muscle following neuromuscular insult. Together the data suggest that muscle CNTFRα may contribute to neuromuscular maintenance, protection, and/or regeneration in vivo. To directly address the role of muscle CNTFRα, we selectively-depleted it in vivo by using a “floxed” CNTFRα mouse line and a gene construct (mlc1f-Cre) that drives the expression of Cre specifically in skeletal muscle. The resulting mice were challenged with sciatic nerve crush. Counting of nerve axons and retrograde tracing of MNs indicated that muscle CNTFRα contributes to MN axonal regeneration across the lesion site. Walking track analysis indicated that muscle CNTFRα is also required for normal recovery of motor function. However, the same muscle CNTFRα depletion unexpectedly had no detected effect on the maintenance or regeneration of the muscle itself, even though exogenous CNTF has been shown to affect these functions. Similarly, MN survival and lesion-induced terminal sprouting were unaffected. Therefore, muscle CNTFRα is an interesting new example of a muscle growth factor receptor that, in vivo under physiological conditions, contributes much more to neuronal regeneration than to the maintenance or regeneration of the muscle itself. This novel form of muscle–neuron interaction also has implications in the therapeutic targeting of the neuromuscular system in MN disorders and following nerve injury. PMID:23504871

  1. EMPOWERING ADULT STEM CELLS FOR MYOCARDIAL REGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Mohsin, Sadia; Siddiqi, Sailay; Collins, Brett; Sussman, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment strategies for heart failure remain a high priority for ongoing research due to the profound unmet need in clinical disease coupled with lack of significant translational progress. The underlying issue is the same whether the cause is acute damage, chronic stress from disease, or aging: progressive loss of functional cardiomyocytes and diminished hemodynamic output. To stave off cardiomyocyte losses, a number of strategic approaches have been embraced in recent years involving both molecular and cellular approaches to augment myocardial structure and performance. Resultant excitement surrounding regenerative medicine in the heart has been tempered by realizations that reparative processes in the heart are insufficient to restore damaged myocardium to normal functional capacity and that cellular cardiomyoplasty is hampered by poor survival, proliferation, engraftment and differentiation of the donated population. To overcome these limitations, a combination of molecular and cellular approaches needs to be adopted involving use of genetic engineering to enhance resistance to cell death and increase regenerative capacity. This review will highlight biological properties of approached to potentiate stem cell-mediated regeneration to promote enhanced myocardial regeneration, persistence of donated cells, and long lasting tissue repair. Optimizing cell delivery and harnessing the power of survival signaling cascades for ex vivo genetic modification of stem cells prior to reintroduction into the patient will be critical to enhance the efficacy of cellular cardiomyoplasty. Once this goal is achieved, then cell-based therapy has great promise for treatment of heart failure to combat the loss of cardiac structure and function associated with acute damage, chronic disease or aging. PMID:22158649

  2. Characteristics of the Localization of Connexin 43 in Satellite Cells during Skeletal Muscle Regeneration In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ishido, Minenori; Kasuga, Norikatsu

    2015-04-28

    For myogenesis, new myotubes are formed by the fusion of differentiated myoblasts. In the sequence of events for myotube formation, intercellular communication through gap junctions composed of connexin 43 (Cx43) plays critical roles in regulating the alignment and fusion of myoblasts in advances of myotube formation in vitro. On the other hand, the relationship between the expression patterns of Cx43 and the process of myotube formation in satellite cells during muscle regeneration in vivo remains poorly understood. The present study investigated the relationship between Cx43 and satellite cells in muscle regeneration in vivo. The expression of Cx43 was detected in skeletal muscles on day 1 post-muscle injury, but not in control muscles. Interestingly, the expression of Cx43 was not localized on the inside of the basement membrane of myofibers in the regenerating muscles. Moreover, although the clusters of differentiated satellite cells, which represent a more advanced stage of myotube formation, were observed on the inside of the basement membrane of myofibers in regenerating muscles, the expression of Cx43 was not localized in the clusters of these satellite cells. Therefore, in the present study, it was suggested that Cx43 may not directly contribute to muscle regeneration via satellite cells. PMID:26019374

  3. Characteristics of the Localization of Connexin 43 in Satellite Cells during Skeletal Muscle Regeneration In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ishido, Minenori; Kasuga, Norikatsu

    2015-04-28

    For myogenesis, new myotubes are formed by the fusion of differentiated myoblasts. In the sequence of events for myotube formation, intercellular communication through gap junctions composed of connexin 43 (Cx43) plays critical roles in regulating the alignment and fusion of myoblasts in advances of myotube formation in vitro. On the other hand, the relationship between the expression patterns of Cx43 and the process of myotube formation in satellite cells during muscle regeneration in vivo remains poorly understood. The present study investigated the relationship between Cx43 and satellite cells in muscle regeneration in vivo. The expression of Cx43 was detected in skeletal muscles on day 1 post-muscle injury, but not in control muscles. Interestingly, the expression of Cx43 was not localized on the inside of the basement membrane of myofibers in the regenerating muscles. Moreover, although the clusters of differentiated satellite cells, which represent a more advanced stage of myotube formation, were observed on the inside of the basement membrane of myofibers in regenerating muscles, the expression of Cx43 was not localized in the clusters of these satellite cells. Therefore, in the present study, it was suggested that Cx43 may not directly contribute to muscle regeneration via satellite cells.

  4. Exosomes from differentiating human skeletal muscle cells trigger myogenesis of stem cells and provide biochemical cues for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Suk; Yoon, Hwa In; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Choi, Young Chan; Yang, Seong Hyun; Kim, In-San; Cho, Yong Woo

    2016-01-28

    Exosomes released from skeletal muscle cells play important roles in myogenesis and muscle development via the transfer of specific signal molecules. In this study, we investigated whether exosomes secreted during myotube differentiation from human skeletal myoblasts (HSkM) could induce a cellular response from human adipose-derived stem cells (HASCs) and enhance muscle regeneration in a muscle laceration mouse model. The exosomes contained various signal molecules including myogenic growth factors related to muscle development, such as insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), and platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA). Interestingly, exosome-treated HASCs fused with neighboring cells at early time points and exhibited a myotube-like phenotype with increased expression of myogenic proteins (myosin heavy chain and desmin). On day 21, mRNAs of terminal myogenic genes were also up-regulated in exosome-treated HASCs. Moreover, in vivo studies demonstrated that exosomes from differentiating HSkM reduced the fibrotic area and increased the number of regenerated myofibers in the injury site, resulting in significant improvement of skeletal muscle regeneration. Our findings suggest that exosomes act as a biochemical cue directing stem cell differentiation and provide a cell-free therapeutic approach for muscle regeneration.

  5. Increased sphingosine-1-phosphate improves muscle regeneration in acutely injured mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Presently, there is no effective treatment for the lethal muscle wasting disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here we show that increased sphingosine-1-phoshate (S1P) through direct injection or via the administration of the small molecule 2-acetyl-4(5)-tetrahydroxybutyl imidazole (THI), an S1P lyase inhibitor, has beneficial effects in acutely injured dystrophic muscles of mdx mice. Methods We treated mdx mice with and without acute injury and characterized the histopathological and functional effects of increasing S1P levels. We also tested exogenous and direct administration of S1P on mdx muscles to examine the molecular pathways under which S1P promotes regeneration in dystrophic muscles. Results Short-term treatment with THI significantly increased muscle fiber size and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle specific force in acutely injured mdx limb muscles. In addition, the accumulation of fibrosis and fat deposition, hallmarks of DMD pathology and impaired muscle regeneration, were lower in the injured muscles of THI-treated mdx mice. Furthermore, increased muscle force was observed in uninjured EDL muscles with a longer-term treatment of THI. Such regenerative effects were linked to the response of myogenic cells, since intramuscular injection of S1P increased the number of Myf5nlacz/+ positive myogenic cells and newly regenerated myofibers in injured mdx muscles. Intramuscular injection of biotinylated-S1P localized to muscle fibers, including newly regenerated fibers, which also stained positive for S1P receptor 1 (S1PR1). Importantly, plasma membrane and perinuclear localization of phosphorylated S1PR1 was observed in regenerating muscle fibers of mdx muscles. Intramuscular increases of S1P levels, S1PR1 and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P-rpS6), and elevated EDL muscle specific force, suggest S1P promoted the upregulation of anabolic pathways that mediate skeletal muscle mass and function. Conclusions These data show that S1P is

  6. Heart regeneration in adult MRL mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leferovich, John M.; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Samulewicz, Stefan; Zhang, Xiang-Ming; Zwas, Donna; Lankford, Edward B.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2001-08-01

    The reaction of cardiac tissue to acute injury involves interacting cascades of cellular and molecular responses that encompass inflammation, hormonal signaling, extracellular matrix remodeling, and compensatory adaptation of myocytes. Myocardial regeneration is observed in amphibians, whereas scar formation characterizes cardiac ventricular wound healing in a variety of mammalian injury models. We have previously shown that the MRL mouse strain has an extraordinary capacity to heal surgical wounds, a complex trait that maps to at least seven genetic loci. Here, we extend these studies to cardiac wounds and demonstrate that a severe transmural, cryogenically induced infarction of the right ventricle heals extensively within 60 days, with the restoration of normal myocardium and function. Scarring is markedly reduced in MRL mice compared with C57BL/6 mice, consistent with both the reduced hydroxyproline levels seen after injury and an elevated cardiomyocyte mitotic index of 10-20% for the MRL compared with 1-3% for the C57BL/6. The myocardial response to injury observed in these mice resembles the regenerative process seen in amphibians.

  7. Expression of the Dermatomyositis Autoantigen TIF1γ in Regenerating Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mohassel, Payam; Rosen, Paul; Casciola-Rosen, Livia; Pak, Katherine; Mammen, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Autoantibodies against TIF1γ are found in many patients with dermatomyositis (DM). Although TIF1γ is known to play a role in the differentiation of other tissues, its functional role in muscle regeneration has not been elucidated. This study was undertaken to explore the regulation and functional role of this protein during muscle differentiation and regeneration. Methods TIF1γ expression was analyzed in human muscle biopsy specimens using immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblotting analyses were used to study TIF1γ expression in a mouse model of muscle injury and repair. The effect of premature TIF1γ silencing on muscle differentiation was studied in cultured mouse myoblasts. Results In muscle biopsy specimens from DM patients, TIF1γ was expressed at low levels in the nuclei of histologically normal muscle cells but at high levels in the centralized nuclei of atrophic, perifascicular myofibers expressing markers of regeneration. TIF1γ levels were also increased in regenerating myonuclei following muscle injury in mice. Premature silencing of TIF1γ in vitro using siRNA did not accelerate the expression of myogenin, a transcription factor that plays a central role in regulating relatively early stages of muscle differentiation. However, premature silencing of TIF1γ did accelerate myotube fusion and the expression of myosin heavy chain (MyHC), a later marker of muscle differentiation. Conclusion The DM autoantigen TIF1γ is markedly upregulated during muscle regeneration in human and mouse muscle cells. Premature silencing of this protein in cultured myoblasts accelerates MyHC expression and myoblast fusion. However, TIF1γ may function independently of, or downstream from myogenin. PMID:25186009

  8. Suppression of macrophage functions impairs skeletal muscle regeneration with severe fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Segawa, Masashi; Fukada, So-ichiro Yamamoto, Yukiko; Yahagi, Hiroshi; Kanematsu, Masanori; Sato, Masaki; Ito, Takahito; Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Hayashi, Shin'ichi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-10-15

    When damaged, skeletal muscle regenerates. In the early phases of regeneration, inflammatory cells such as neutrophils/granulocytes and macrophages infiltrate damaged muscle tissue. To reveal the roles of macrophages during skeletal muscle regeneration, we injected an antibody, AFS98 that blocks the binding of M-CSF to its receptor into normal mice that received muscle damages. Anti-M-CSF receptor administration suppressed macrophage but not neutrophil infiltration. Histological study indicated that suppression of macrophages function leads to the incomplete muscle regeneration. In addition FACS and immunohistochemical study showed that the acute lack of macrophages delayed proliferation and differentiation of muscle satellite cells in vivo. Furthermore, mice injected with the anti-M-CSF receptor antibody exhibited not only adipogenesis, but also significant collagen deposition, i.e., fibrosis and continuous high expression of connective tissue growth factor. Finally we indicate that these fibrosis markers were strongly enriched in CD90(+) cells that do not include myogenic cells. These results indicate that macrophages directly affect satellite cell proliferation and that a macrophage deficiency severely impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and causes fibrosis.

  9. Akirin1 (Mighty), a novel promyogenic factor regulates muscle regeneration and cell chemotaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, Monica Senna; Dyer, Kelly; Bracegirdle, Jeremy; Platt, Leanne; Thomas, Mark; Siriett, Victoria; Kambadur, Ravi; Sharma, Mridula

    2009-07-15

    Akirin1 (Mighty) is a downstream target gene of myostatin and has been shown to be a promyogenic factor. Although expressed in many tissues, akirin1 is negatively regulated by myostatin specifically in skeletal muscle tissue. In this manuscript we have characterized the possible function of akirin1 in postnatal muscle growth. Molecular and immunohistological analyses indicated that while low levels of akirin1 are associated with quiescent satellite cells (SC), higher levels of akirin1 are detected in activated proliferating SC indicating that akirin1 could be associated with satellite cell activation. In addition to SC, macrophages also express akirin1, and increased expression of akirin1 resulted in more efficient chemotaxis of both macrophages and myoblasts. Akirin1 appears to regulate chemotaxis of both macrophages and myoblasts by reorganising actin cytoskeleton, leading to more efficient lamellipodia formation via a PI3 kinase dependent pathway. Expression analysis during muscle regeneration also indicated that akirin1 expression is detected very early (day 2) in regenerating muscle, and expression gradually peaks to coincide the nascent myotube formation stage of muscle regeneration. Based on these results we propose that akirin1 could be acting as a transducer of early signals of muscle regeneration. Thus, we speculate that myostatin regulates key steps of muscle regeneration including chemotaxis of inflammatory cells, SC activation and migration through akirin1.

  10. Dystroglycanopathy muscles lacking functional glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan retain regeneration capacity.

    PubMed

    Awano, Hiroyuki; Blaeser, Anthony; Wu, Bo; Lu, Pei; Keramaris-Vrantsis, Elizabeth; Lu, Qi

    2015-06-01

    In dystroglycanopathies, lack of glycosylated alpha-dystroglycan (α-DG) alters membrane fragility leading to fiber damage and repetitive cycles of muscle degeneration and regeneration. However the effect of the glycosylation of α-DG on muscle regeneration is not clearly understood. In this study, we examined the regenerative capacity of dystrophic muscles in vivo in FKRP mutant and LARGE(myd) mice with little and complete lack of functionally glycosylated α-DG (F-α-DG) respectively. The number of regenerating fibers expressing embryonic myosin heavy chain (eMyHC) in the diseased muscles up to the age of 10 months is higher than or at similar levels to wild type muscle after notexin and polyethyleminine insults. The process of fiber maturation is not significantly affected by the lack of F-α-DG assessed by size distribution. The earlier appearance of a larger number of regenerating fibers after injury is consistent with the observation that the populations of myogenic satellite cells are increased and being readily activated in the dystroglycanopathy muscles. F-α-DG is expressed at trace amounts in undifferentiated myoblasts, but increases in differentiated myotubes in vitro. We therefore conclude that muscle regeneration is not impaired in the early stage of the dystroglycanopathies, and F-α-DG does not play a significant role in myogenic cell proliferation and fiber formation and maturation.

  11. Electrical stimulation of embryonic neurons for 1 hour improves axon regeneration and the number of reinnervated muscles that function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Grumbles, Robert M; Thomas, Christine K

    2013-07-01

    Motoneuron death after spinal cord injury or disease results in muscle denervation, atrophy, and paralysis. We have previously transplanted embryonic ventral spinal cord cells into the peripheral nerve to reinnervate denervated muscles and to reduce muscle atrophy, but reinnervation was incomplete. Here, our aim was to determine whether brief electrical stimulation of embryonic neurons in the peripheralnerve changes motoneuron survival, axon regeneration, and muscle reinnervation and function because neural depolarization is crucial for embryonic neuron survival and may promote activity-dependent axon growth. At 1 week after denervation by sciatic nerve section, embryonic day 14 to 15 cells were purified for motoneurons, injected into the tibial nerve of adult Fischer rats, and stimulated immediatelyfor up to 1 hour. More myelinated axons were present in tibial nerves 10 weeks after transplantation when transplants had been stimulated acutely at 1 Hz for 1 hour. More muscles were reinnervated if the stimulation treatment lasted for 1 hour. Reinnervation reduced muscle atrophy, with or without the stimulation treatment. These data suggest that brief stimulation of embryonic neurons promotes axon growth, which has a long-term impact on muscle reinnervation and function. Muscle reinnervation is important because it may enable the use of functional electrical stimulation to restore limb movements. PMID:23771218

  12. Recent advances in bone regeneration using adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zigdon-Giladi, Hadar; Rudich, Utai; Michaeli Geller, Gal; Evron, Ayelet

    2015-04-26

    Bone is a highly vascularized tissue reliant on the close spatial and temporal association between blood vessels and bone cells. Therefore, cells that participate in vasculogenesis and osteogenesis play a pivotal role in bone formation during prenatal and postnatal periods. Nevertheless, spontaneous healing of bone fracture is occasionally impaired due to insufficient blood and cellular supply to the site of injury. In these cases, bone regeneration process is interrupted, which might result in delayed union or even nonunion of the fracture. Nonunion fracture is difficult to treat and have a high financial impact. In the last decade, numerous technological advancements in bone tissue engineering and cell-therapy opened new horizon in the field of bone regeneration. This review starts with presentation of the biological processes involved in bone development, bone remodeling, fracture healing process and the microenvironment at bone healing sites. Then, we discuss the rationale for using adult stem cells and listed the characteristics of the available cells for bone regeneration. The mechanism of action and epigenetic regulations for osteogenic differentiation are also described. Finally, we review the literature for translational and clinical trials that investigated the use of adult stem cells (mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and CD34(+) blood progenitors) for bone regeneration.

  13. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40(phox) and p47(phox)) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration. PMID:26853930

  14. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-02-08

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40(phox) and p47(phox)) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration.

  15. Laser microdissection-based expression analysis of key genes involved in muscle regeneration in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Mario; Sarria, Yaris; Ruiz-Roig, Claudia; Munell, Francina; Roig-Quilis, Manuel

    2007-10-01

    We have used the mdx mice strain (C57BL/10ScSn-mdx) as an experimental subject for the study of reiterative skeletal muscle necrosis-regeneration with basement membrane preservation. In young mdx muscle, by means of Hematoxylin-Eosin staining, different types of degenerative-regenerative groups (DRG) can be recognized and assigned to a defined muscle regeneration phase. To evaluate the expression of known key-regulatory genes in muscle regeneration, we have applied Laser Capture Microdissection technique to obtain tissue from different DRGs encompassing the complete skeletal muscle regenerative process. The expression of MyoD, Myf-5 and Myogenin showed a rapid increase in the first two days post-necrosis, which were followed by MRF4 expression, when newly regenerating fibers started to appear (3-5days post-necrosis). MHCd mRNA levels, undetectable in mature non-injured fibers, increased progressively from the first day post-necrosis and reached its maximum level of expression in DRGs showing basophilic regenerating fibers. TGFbeta-1 mRNA expression showed a prompt and strong increase following fiber necrosis that persisted during the inflammatory phase, and progressively decreased when new regenerating fibers began to appear. In contrast, IGF-2 mRNA expression decreased during the first days post-necrosis but was followed by a progressive rise in its expression coinciding with the appearance of the newly formed myofibers, reaching the maximum expression levels in DRGs composed of medium caliber basophilic regenerating myofibers (5-7 days post-necrosis). mdx degenerative-regenerative group typing, in conjunction with laser microdissection-based gene expression analysis, opens up a new approach to the molecular study of skeletal muscle regeneration.

  16. Annexin A1 Deficiency does not Affect Myofiber Repair but Delays Regeneration of Injured Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Leikina, Evgenia; Defour, Aurelia; Melikov, Kamran; Van der Meulen, Jack H.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Bhuvanendran, Shivaprasad; Gebert, Claudia; Pfeifer, Karl; Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.

    2015-01-01

    Repair and regeneration of the injured skeletal myofiber involves fusion of intracellular vesicles with sarcolemma and fusion of the muscle progenitor cells respectively. In vitro experiments have identified involvement of Annexin A1 (Anx A1) in both these fusion processes. To determine if Anx A1 contributes to these processes during muscle repair in vivo, we have assessed muscle growth and repair in Anx A1-deficient mouse (AnxA1−/−). We found that the lack of Anx A1 does not affect the muscle size and repair of myofibers following focal sarcolemmal injury and lengthening contraction injury. However, the lack of Anx A1 delayed muscle regeneration after notexin-induced injury. This delay in muscle regeneration was not caused by a slowdown in proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, lack of Anx A1 lowered the proportion of differentiating myoblasts that managed to fuse with the injured myofibers by days 5 and 7 after notexin injury as compared to the wild type (w.t.) mice. Despite this early slowdown in fusion of Anx A1−/− myoblasts, regeneration caught up at later times post injury. These results establish in vivo role of Anx A1 in cell fusion required for myofiber regeneration and not in intracellular vesicle fusion needed for repair of myofiber sarcolemma. PMID:26667898

  17. Annexin A1 Deficiency does not Affect Myofiber Repair but Delays Regeneration of Injured Muscles.

    PubMed

    Leikina, Evgenia; Defour, Aurelia; Melikov, Kamran; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Bhuvanendran, Shivaprasad; Gebert, Claudia; Pfeifer, Karl; Chernomordik, Leonid V; Jaiswal, Jyoti K

    2015-01-01

    Repair and regeneration of the injured skeletal myofiber involves fusion of intracellular vesicles with sarcolemma and fusion of the muscle progenitor cells respectively. In vitro experiments have identified involvement of Annexin A1 (Anx A1) in both these fusion processes. To determine if Anx A1 contributes to these processes during muscle repair in vivo, we have assessed muscle growth and repair in Anx A1-deficient mouse (AnxA1-/-). We found that the lack of Anx A1 does not affect the muscle size and repair of myofibers following focal sarcolemmal injury and lengthening contraction injury. However, the lack of Anx A1 delayed muscle regeneration after notexin-induced injury. This delay in muscle regeneration was not caused by a slowdown in proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, lack of Anx A1 lowered the proportion of differentiating myoblasts that managed to fuse with the injured myofibers by days 5 and 7 after notexin injury as compared to the wild type (w.t.) mice. Despite this early slowdown in fusion of Anx A1-/- myoblasts, regeneration caught up at later times post injury. These results establish in vivo role of Anx A1 in cell fusion required for myofiber regeneration and not in intracellular vesicle fusion needed for repair of myofiber sarcolemma. PMID:26667898

  18. Making Skeletal Muscle from Progenitor and Stem Cells: Development versus Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lydia; Rozo, Michelle E.; Lepper, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    For locomotion, vertebrate animals use the force generated by contractile skeletal muscles. These muscles form an actin/myosin-based bio-machinery that is attached to skeletal elements to effect body movement and maintain posture. The mechanics, physiology, and homeostasis of skeletal muscles in normal and disease states are of significant clinical interest. How muscles originate from progenitors during embryogenesis has attracted considerable attention from developmental biologists. How skeletal muscles regenerate and repair themselves after injury by the use of stem cells is an important process to maintain muscle homeostasis throughout lifetime. In recent years, much progress has been made towards uncovering the origins of myogenic progenitors and stem cells as well as the regulation of these cells during development and regeneration. PMID:22737183

  19. Stabilin-2 modulates the efficiency of myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Yoon; Yun, Youngeun; Lim, Jung-Suk; Kim, Mi-Jin; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-San

    2016-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is essential for the formation of skeletal muscle myofibres. Studies have shown that phosphatidylserine is necessary for myoblast fusion, but the underlying mechanism is not known. Here we show that the phosphatidylserine receptor stabilin-2 acts as a membrane protein for myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration. Stabilin-2 expression is induced during myogenic differentiation, and is regulated by calcineurin/NFAT signalling in myoblasts. Forced expression of stabilin-2 in myoblasts is associated with increased myotube formation, whereas deficiency of stabilin-2 results in the formation of small, thin myotubes. Stab2-deficient mice have myofibres with small cross-sectional area and few myonuclei and impaired muscle regeneration after injury. Importantly, myoblasts lacking stabilin-2 have reduced phosphatidylserine-dependent fusion. Collectively, our results show that stabilin-2 contributes to phosphatidylserine-dependent myoblast fusion and provide new insights into the molecular mechanism by which phosphatidylserine mediates myoblast fusion during muscle growth and regeneration. PMID:26972991

  20. Stabilin-2 modulates the efficiency of myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Yoon; Yun, Youngeun; Lim, Jung-Suk; Kim, Mi-Jin; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-San

    2016-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is essential for the formation of skeletal muscle myofibres. Studies have shown that phosphatidylserine is necessary for myoblast fusion, but the underlying mechanism is not known. Here we show that the phosphatidylserine receptor stabilin-2 acts as a membrane protein for myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration. Stabilin-2 expression is induced during myogenic differentiation, and is regulated by calcineurin/NFAT signalling in myoblasts. Forced expression of stabilin-2 in myoblasts is associated with increased myotube formation, whereas deficiency of stabilin-2 results in the formation of small, thin myotubes. Stab2-deficient mice have myofibres with small cross-sectional area and few myonuclei and impaired muscle regeneration after injury. Importantly, myoblasts lacking stabilin-2 have reduced phosphatidylserine-dependent fusion. Collectively, our results show that stabilin-2 contributes to phosphatidylserine-dependent myoblast fusion and provide new insights into the molecular mechanism by which phosphatidylserine mediates myoblast fusion during muscle growth and regeneration. PMID:26972991

  1. Transplantated Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Embryonic Stem Cells Promote Muscle Regeneration and Accelerate Functional Recovery of Injured Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ninagawa, Nana Takenaka; Isobe, Eri; Hirayama, Yuri; Murakami, Rumi; Komatsu, Kazumi; Nagai, Masataka; Kobayashi, Mami; Kawabata, Yuka

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We previously established that mesenchymal stem cells originating from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells (E-MSCs) showed markedly higher potential for differentiation into skeletal muscles in vitro than common mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Further, the E-MSCs exhibited a low risk for teratoma formation. Here we evaluate the potential of E-MSCs for differentiation into skeletal muscles in vivo and reveal the regeneration and functional recovery of injured muscle by transplantation. E-MSCs were transplanted into the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle 24 h following direct clamping. After transplantation, the myogenic differentiation of E-MSCs, TA muscle regeneration, and re-innervation were morphologically analyzed. In addition, footprints and gaits of each leg under spontaneous walking were measured by CatWalk XT, and motor functions of injured TA muscles were precisely analyzed. Results indicate that >60% of transplanted E-MSCs differentiated into skeletal muscles. The cross-sectional area of the injured TA muscles of E-MSC–transplanted animals increased earlier than that of control animals. E-MSCs also promotes re-innervation of the peripheral nerves of injured muscles. Concerning function of the TA muscles, we reveal that transplantation of E-MSCs promotes the recovery of muscles. This is the first report to demonstrate by analysis of spontaneous walking that transplanted cells can accelerate the functional recovery of injured muscles. Taken together, the results show that E-MSCs have a high potential for differentiation into skeletal muscles in vivo as well as in vitro. The transplantation of E-MSCs facilitated the functional recovery of injured muscles. Therefore, E-MSCs are an efficient cell source in transplantation. PMID:23914336

  2. Macrophages commit postnatal endothelium-derived progenitors to angiogenesis and restrict endothelial to mesenchymal transition during muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zordan, P; Rigamonti, E; Freudenberg, K; Conti, V; Azzoni, E; Rovere-Querini, P; Brunelli, S

    2014-01-01

    The damage of the skeletal muscle prompts a complex and coordinated response that involves the interactions of many different cell populations and promotes inflammation, vascular remodeling and finally muscle regeneration. Muscle disorders exist in which the irreversible loss of tissue integrity and function is linked to defective neo-angiogenesis with persistence of tissue necrosis and inflammation. Here we show that macrophages (MPs) are necessary for efficient vascular remodeling in the injured muscle. In particular, MPs sustain the differentiation of endothelial-derived progenitors to contribute to neo-capillary formation, by secreting pro-angiogenic growth factors. When phagocyte infiltration is compromised endothelial-derived progenitors undergo a significant endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EndoMT), possibly triggered by the activation of transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenetic protein signaling, collagen accumulates and the muscle is replaced by fibrotic tissue. Our findings provide new insights in EndoMT in the adult skeletal muscle, and suggest that endothelial cells in the skeletal muscle may represent a new target for therapeutic intervention in fibrotic diseases. PMID:24481445

  3. Osteopontin, inflammation and myogenesis: influencing regeneration, fibrosis and size of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pagel, Charles N; Wasgewatte Wijesinghe, Dimuthu K; Taghavi Esfandouni, Neda; Mackie, Eleanor J

    2014-06-01

    Osteopontin is a multifunctional matricellular protein that is expressed by many cell types. Through cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions the molecule elicits a number of responses from a broad range of target cells via its interaction with integrins and the hyaluronan receptor CD44. In many tissues osteopontin has been found to be involved in important physiological and pathological processes, including tissue repair, inflammation and fibrosis. Post-natal skeletal muscle is a highly differentiated and specialised tissue that retains a remarkable capacity for regeneration following injury. Regeneration of skeletal muscle requires the co-ordinated activity of inflammatory cells that infiltrate injured muscle and are responsible for initiating muscle fibre degeneration and phagocytosis of necrotic tissue, and muscle precursor cells that regenerate the injured muscle fibres. This review focuses on the current evidence that osteopontin plays multiple roles in skeletal muscle, with particular emphasis on its role in regeneration and fibrosis following injury, and in determining the severity of myopathic diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  4. Atlas of Cellular Dynamics during Zebrafish Adult Kidney Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    McCampbell, Kristen K.; Springer, Kristin N.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is a useful animal model to study the signaling pathways that orchestrate kidney regeneration, as its renal nephrons are simple, yet they maintain the biological complexity inherent to that of higher vertebrate organisms including mammals. Recent studies have suggested that administration of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin in zebrafish mimics human acute kidney injury (AKI) through the induction of nephron damage, but the timing and details of critical phenotypic events associated with the regeneration process, particularly in existing nephrons, have not been characterized. Here, we mapped the temporal progression of cellular and molecular changes that occur during renal epithelial regeneration of the proximal tubule in the adult zebrafish using a platform of histological and expression analysis techniques. This work establishes the timing of renal cell death after gentamicin injury, identifies proliferative compartments within the kidney, and documents gene expression changes associated with the regenerative response of proliferating cells. These data provide an important descriptive atlas that documents the series of events that ensue after damage in the zebrafish kidney, thus availing a valuable resource for the scientific community that can facilitate the implementation of zebrafish research to delineate the mechanisms that control renal regeneration. PMID:26089919

  5. Aligned Nanofibers for Regenerating Arteries, Nerves, and Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClendon, Mark Trosper

    annular gap containing PA solution with a rotating rod. Using the shear aligning properties of PA solutions this rotating surface in contact with the PA solution induced a high degree of alignment in the nanofibers which was subsequently locked in place by introducing gelating calcium ions. again say something about what this fabrication procedure entails Cells encapsulated within these tubes responded to the alignment by extending in the circumferential direction mimicking the same cellular alignment observed in native arteries. A similar design strategy was also used to align nanofibers within the core of biopolymer nerve conduits, and these scaffolds were implanted in a rat sciatic nerve model. Histological and behavioral observations confirmed that PA implants sustained regeneration rates comparable to autologous grafts and significantly better than empty biopolymer grafts. Furthermore, these nanofiber gels were used as a vehicle to deliver stem cells into muscle tissue. A specialized injector was designed to introduce aligned PA gels into mouse leg muscles in a 1cm long channel. Bioluminescence and histology showed that stem cell engraftment into myofibers was greatly enhanced when delivered by PA gels compared to saline solution. The final section of this thesis describes a new series of PA molecules designed to degrade upon exposure to UV lightstate here why is this of interest in the context of the work described in the thesis. This was done to understand the degradation behavior of PA nanofibers and provide a controlled approach to changing the rheological properties post gelation.The three PA molecules in this series contained the same peptide sequence V3A3E3, while varying the location of a nitrobenzyl UV-reactive group along the backbone of the molecule. This system allowed for a quick reaction that cleaves the molecule at the reactive nitrobenzyl site without introducing any other reactive molecules. While all three molecules produced nanofibers that remained

  6. Muscle regeneration in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice studied by gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Turk, R; Sterrenburg, E; de Meijer, EJ; van Ommen, G-JB; den Dunnen, JT; 't Hoen, PAC

    2005-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, is lethal. In contrast, dystrophin-deficient mdx mice recover due to effective regeneration of affected muscle tissue. To characterize the molecular processes associated with regeneration, we compared gene expression levels in hindlimb muscle tissue of mdx and control mice at 9 timepoints, ranging from 1–20 weeks of age. Results Out of 7776 genes, 1735 were differentially expressed between mdx and control muscle at at least one timepoint (p < 0.05 after Bonferroni correction). We found that genes coding for components of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex are generally downregulated in the mdx mouse. Based on functional characteristics such as membrane localization, signal transduction, and transcriptional activation, 166 differentially expressed genes with possible functions in regeneration were analyzed in more detail. The majority of these genes peak at the age of 8 weeks, where the regeneration activity is maximal. The following pathways are activated, as shown by upregulation of multiple members per signalling pathway: the Notch-Delta pathway that plays a role in the activation of satellite cells, and the Bmp15 and Neuregulin 3 signalling pathways that may regulate proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. In DMD patients, only few of the identified regeneration-associated genes were found activated, indicating less efficient regeneration processes in humans. Conclusion Based on the observed expression profiles, we describe a model for muscle regeneration in mdx mice, which may provide new leads for development of DMD therapies based on the improvement of muscle regeneration efficacy. PMID:16011810

  7. Six1 regulates MyoD expression in adult muscle progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yubing; Chakroun, Imane; Yang, Dabo; Horner, Ellias; Liang, Jieyi; Aziz, Arif; Chu, Alphonse; De Repentigny, Yves; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Kothary, Rashmi; Blais, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent satellite cells are myogenic progenitors that enable regeneration of skeletal muscle. One of the early events of satellite cell activation following myotrauma is the induction of the myogenic regulatory factor MyoD, which eventually induces terminal differentiation and muscle function gene expression. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which MyoD is induced during activation of satellite cells in mouse muscle undergoing regeneration. We show that Six1, a transcription factor essential for embryonic myogenesis, also regulates MyoD expression in muscle progenitor cells. Six1 knock-down by RNA interference leads to decreased expression of MyoD in myoblasts. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays reveal that Six1 binds the Core Enhancer Region of MyoD. Further, transcriptional reporter assays demonstrate that Core Enhancer Region reporter gene activity in myoblasts and in regenerating muscle depends on the expression of Six1 and on Six1 binding sites. Finally, we provide evidence indicating that Six1 is required for the proper chromatin structure at the Core Enhancer Region, as well as for MyoD binding at its own enhancer. Together, our results reveal that MyoD expression in satellite cells depends on Six1, supporting the idea that Six1 plays an important role in adult myogenesis, in addition to its role in embryonic muscle formation. PMID:23840772

  8. An acellular biologic scaffold does not regenerate appreciable de novo muscle tissue in rat models of volumetric muscle loss injury.

    PubMed

    Aurora, Amit; Roe, Janet L; Corona, Benjamin T; Walters, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) derived scaffolds continue to be investigated for the treatment of volumetric muscle loss (VML) injuries. Clinically, ECM scaffolds have been used for lower extremity VML repair; in particular, MatriStem™, a porcine urinary bladder matrix (UBM), has shown improved functional outcomes and vascularization, but limited myogenesis. However, efficacy of the scaffold for the repair of traumatic muscle injuries has not been examined systematically. In this study, we demonstrate that the porcine UBM scaffold when used to repair a rodent gastrocnemius musculotendinous junction (MTJ) and tibialis anterior (TA) VML injury does not support muscle tissue regeneration. In the MTJ model, the scaffold was completely resorbed without tissue remodeling, suggesting that the scaffold may not be suitable for the clinical repair of muscle-tendon injuries. In the TA VML injury, the scaffold remodeled into a fibrotic tissue and showed functional improvement, but not due to muscle fiber regeneration. The inclusion of physical rehabilitation also did not improve functional response or tissue remodeling. We conclude that the porcine UBM scaffold when used to treat VML injuries may hasten the functional recovery through the mechanism of scaffold mediated functional fibrosis. Thus for appreciable muscle regeneration, repair strategies that incorporate myogenic cells, vasculogenic accelerant and a myoconductive scaffold need to be developed.

  9. Epicardial FSTL1 reconstitution regenerates the adult mammalian heart

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ke; Serpooshan, Vahid; Hurtado, Cecilia; Diez-Cuñado, Marta; Zhao, Mingming; Maruyama, Sonomi; Zhu, Wenhong; Fajardo, Giovanni; Noseda, Michela; Nakamura, Kazuto; Tian, Xueying; Liu, Qiaozhen; Wang, Andrew; Matsuura, Yuka; Bushway, Paul; Cai, Wenqing; Savchenko, Alex; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Schneider, Michael D.; van den Hoff, Maurice J. B.; Butte, Manish J.; Yang, Phillip C.; Walsh, Kenneth; Zhou, Bin; Bernstein, Daniel; Mercola, Mark; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The elucidation of factors that activate the regeneration of the adult mammalian heart is of major scientific and therapeutic importance. Here we found that epicardial cells contain a potent cardiogenic activity identified as follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1). Epicardial Fstl1 declines following myocardial infarction and is replaced by myocardial expression. Myocardial Fstl1 does not promote regeneration, either basally or upon transgenic overexpression. Application of the human Fstl1 protein (FSTL1) via an epicardial patch stimulates cell cycle entry and division of pre-existing cardiomyocytes, improving cardiac function and survival in mouse and swine models of myocardial infarction. The data suggest that the loss of epicardial FSTL1 is a maladaptive response to injury, and that its restoration would be an effective way to reverse myocardial death and remodelling following myocardial infarction in humans. PMID:26375005

  10. Epicardial FSTL1 reconstitution regenerates the adult mammalian heart.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ke; Serpooshan, Vahid; Hurtado, Cecilia; Diez-Cuñado, Marta; Zhao, Mingming; Maruyama, Sonomi; Zhu, Wenhong; Fajardo, Giovanni; Noseda, Michela; Nakamura, Kazuto; Tian, Xueying; Liu, Qiaozhen; Wang, Andrew; Matsuura, Yuka; Bushway, Paul; Cai, Wenqing; Savchenko, Alex; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Schneider, Michael D; van den Hoff, Maurice J B; Butte, Manish J; Yang, Phillip C; Walsh, Kenneth; Zhou, Bin; Bernstein, Daniel; Mercola, Mark; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2015-09-24

    The elucidation of factors that activate the regeneration of the adult mammalian heart is of major scientific and therapeutic importance. Here we found that epicardial cells contain a potent cardiogenic activity identified as follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1). Epicardial Fstl1 declines following myocardial infarction and is replaced by myocardial expression. Myocardial Fstl1 does not promote regeneration, either basally or upon transgenic overexpression. Application of the human Fstl1 protein (FSTL1) via an epicardial patch stimulates cell cycle entry and division of pre-existing cardiomyocytes, improving cardiac function and survival in mouse and swine models of myocardial infarction. The data suggest that the loss of epicardial FSTL1 is a maladaptive response to injury, and that its restoration would be an effective way to reverse myocardial death and remodelling following myocardial infarction in humans.

  11. Aligned Nanofibers for Regenerating Arteries, Nerves, and Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClendon, Mark Trosper

    annular gap containing PA solution with a rotating rod. Using the shear aligning properties of PA solutions this rotating surface in contact with the PA solution induced a high degree of alignment in the nanofibers which was subsequently locked in place by introducing gelating calcium ions. again say something about what this fabrication procedure entails Cells encapsulated within these tubes responded to the alignment by extending in the circumferential direction mimicking the same cellular alignment observed in native arteries. A similar design strategy was also used to align nanofibers within the core of biopolymer nerve conduits, and these scaffolds were implanted in a rat sciatic nerve model. Histological and behavioral observations confirmed that PA implants sustained regeneration rates comparable to autologous grafts and significantly better than empty biopolymer grafts. Furthermore, these nanofiber gels were used as a vehicle to deliver stem cells into muscle tissue. A specialized injector was designed to introduce aligned PA gels into mouse leg muscles in a 1cm long channel. Bioluminescence and histology showed that stem cell engraftment into myofibers was greatly enhanced when delivered by PA gels compared to saline solution. The final section of this thesis describes a new series of PA molecules designed to degrade upon exposure to UV lightstate here why is this of interest in the context of the work described in the thesis. This was done to understand the degradation behavior of PA nanofibers and provide a controlled approach to changing the rheological properties post gelation.The three PA molecules in this series contained the same peptide sequence V3A3E3, while varying the location of a nitrobenzyl UV-reactive group along the backbone of the molecule. This system allowed for a quick reaction that cleaves the molecule at the reactive nitrobenzyl site without introducing any other reactive molecules. While all three molecules produced nanofibers that remained

  12. Skeletal muscle damage and impaired regeneration due to LPL-mediated lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tamilarasan, K P; Temmel, H; Das, S K; Al Zoughbi, W; Schauer, S; Vesely, P W; Hoefler, G

    2012-01-01

    According to the concept of lipotoxicity, ectopic accumulation of lipids in non-adipose tissue induces pathological changes. The most prominent effects are seen in fatty liver disease, lipid cardiomyopathy, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance and skeletal muscle myopathy. We used the MCK(m)-hLPL mouse distinguished by skeletal and cardiac muscle-specific human lipoprotein lipase (hLPL) overexpression to investigate effects of lipid overload in skeletal muscle. We were intrigued to find that ectopic lipid accumulation induced proteasomal activity, apoptosis and skeletal muscle damage. In line with these findings we observed reduced Musculus gastrocnemius and Musculus quadriceps mass in transgenic animals, accompanied by severely impaired physical endurance. We suggest that muscle loss was aggravated by impaired muscle regeneration as evidenced by reduced cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers after cardiotoxin-induced injury in MCK(m)-hLPL mice. Similarly, an almost complete loss of myogenic potential was observed in C2C12 murine myoblasts upon overexpression of LPL. Our findings directly link lipid overload to muscle damage, impaired regeneration and loss of performance. These findings support the concept of lipotoxicity and are a further step to explain pathological effects seen in muscle of obese patients, patients with the metabolic syndrome and patients with cancer-associated cachexia. PMID:22825472

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 ablation in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles reduces angiogenesis resulting in impaired growth of regenerated muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daigo; Nakamura, Akinori; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2011-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a family of endopeptidases classified into subgroups based on substrate preference in normal physiological processes such as embryonic development and tissue remodeling, as well as in various disease processes via degradation of extracellular matrix components. Among the MMPs, MMP-9 and MMP-2 have been reported to be up-regulated in skeletal muscles in the lethal X-linked muscle disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is caused by loss of dystrophin. A recent study showed that deletion of the MMP9 gene in mdx, a mouse model for DMD, improved skeletal muscle pathology and function; however, the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle is not well known. In this study, we aimed at verifying the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle by using mdx mice with genetic ablation of MMP-2 (mdx/MMP-2(-/-)). We found impairment of regenerated muscle fiber growth with reduction of angiogenesis in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), an important angiogenesis-related factor, decreased in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. MMP-2 had not a critical role in the degradation of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) components such as β-dystroglycan and β-sarcoglycan in the regeneration process of the dystrophic muscle. Accordingly, MMP-2 may be essential for growth of regenerated muscle fibers through VEGF-associated angiogenesis in the dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle.

  14. CaMKK2 Suppresses Muscle Regeneration through the Inhibition of Myoblast Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Cheng; Zhang, Duo; Zhao, Lei; Li, Yan; Yao, Xiaohan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Shengjie; Liu, Wei; Cao, Hongchao; Yu, Shuxian; Wang, Yucheng; Jiang, Jingjing; Wang, Hui; Li, Xihua; Ying, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has a major role in locomotion and muscle disorders are associated with poor regenerative efficiency. Therefore, a deeper understanding of muscle regeneration is needed to provide a new insight for new therapies. CaMKK2 plays a role in the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase cascade; however, its role in skeletal muscle remains unknown. Here, we found that CaMKK2 expression levels were altered under physiological and pathological conditions including postnatal myogensis, freeze or cardiotoxin-induced muscle regeneration, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Overexpression of CaMKK2 suppressed C2C12 myoblast proliferation and differentiation, while inhibition of CaMKK2 had opposite effect. We also found that CaMKK2 is able to activate AMPK in C2C12 myocytes. Inhibition of AMPK could attenuate the effect of CaMKK2 overexpression, while AMPK agonist could abrogate the effect of CaMKK2 knockdown on C2C12 cell differentiation and proliferation. These results suggest that CaMKK2 functions as an AMPK kinase in muscle cells and AMPK mediates the effect of CaMKK2 on myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Our data also indicate that CaMKK2 might inhibit myoblast proliferation through AMPK-mediated cell cycle arrest by inducing cdc2-Tyr15 phosphorylation and repress differentiation through affecting PGC1α transcription. Lastly, we show that overexpressing CaMKK2 in the muscle of mice via electroporation impaired the muscle regeneration during freeze-induced injury, indicating that CaMKK2 could serve as a potential target to treat patients with muscle injury or myopathies. Together, our study reveals a new role for CaMKK2 as a negative regulator of myoblast differentiation and proliferation and sheds new light on the molecular regulation of muscle regeneration. PMID:27783047

  15. Motor activity affects adult skeletal muscle re-innervation acting via tyrosine kinase receptors.

    PubMed

    Sartini, Stefano; Bartolini, Fanny; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Betti, Michele; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Lattanzi, Davide; Di Palma, Michael; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2013-05-01

    Recently, muscle expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein under activity control has been reported. BDNF is a neurotrophin known to be involved in axon sprouting in the CNS. Hence, we set out to study the effect of chronic treadmill mid-intensity running on adult rat muscle re-innervation, and to explore the involvement of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors. After nerve crush, muscle re-innervation was evaluated using intracellular recordings, tension recordings, immunostaining and Western blot analyses. An enhanced muscle multiple innervation was found in running rats that was fully reversed to control values blocking Trk receptors or interrupting the running activity. An increase in muscle multiple innervation was also found in sedentary rats treated with a selective TrkB receptor agonist. The expression of TrkB receptors by intramuscular axons was demonstrated, and increased muscle expression of BDNF was found in running animals. The increase in muscle multiple innervation was consistent with the faster muscle re-innervation that we found in running animals. We conclude that, when regenerating axons contact muscle cells, muscle activity progressively increases modulating BDNF and possibly other growth factors, which in turn, acting via Trk receptors, induce axon sprouting to re-innervate skeletal muscle.

  16. Is salamander limb regeneration really perfect? Anatomical and morphogenetic analysis of forelimb muscle regeneration in GFP-transgenic axolotls as a basis for regenerative, developmental, and evolutionary studies.

    PubMed

    Diogo, R; Nacu, E; Tanaka, E M

    2014-06-01

    The axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum is one of the most commonly used model organisms in developmental and regenerative studies because it can reconstitute what is believed to be a completely normal anatomical and functional forelimb/hindlimb after amputation. However, to date it has not been confirmed whether each regenerated forelimb muscle is really a "perfect" copy of the original muscle. This study describes the regeneration of the arm, forearm, hand, and some pectoral muscles (e.g., coracoradialis) in transgenic axolotls that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in muscle fibers. The observations found that: (1) there were muscle anomalies in 43% of the regenerated forelimbs; (2) however, on average in each regenerated forelimb there are anomalies in only 2.5% of the total number of muscles examined, and there were no significant differences observed in the specific insertion and origin of the other muscles analyzed; (3) one of the most notable and common anomalies (seen in 35% of the regenerated forelimbs) was the presence of a fleshy coracoradialis at the level of the arm; this is a particularly outstanding configuration because in axolotls and in urodeles in general this muscle only has a thin tendon at the level of the arm, and the additional fleshy belly in the regenerated arms is strikingly similar to the fleshy biceps brachii of amniotes, suggesting a remarkable parallel between a regeneration defect and a major phenotypic change that occurred during tetrapod limb evolution; (4) during forelimb muscle regeneration there was a clear proximo-distal and radio-ulnar morphogenetic gradient, as seen in normal development, but also a ventro-dorsal gradient in the order of regeneration, which was not previously described in the literature. These results have broader implications for regenerative, evolutionary, developmental and morphogenetic studies. PMID:24692358

  17. CX3CR1 deficiency promotes muscle repair and regeneration by enhancing macrophage ApoE production

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Ludovic; Perrin, Hélène; de Chanville, Camille Baudesson; Saclier, Marielle; Hermand, Patricia; Poupel, Lucie; Guyon, Elodie; Licata, Fabrice; Carpentier, Wassila; Vilar, José; Mounier, Rémi; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Benhabiles, Nora; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Combadiere, Béhazine; Combadiere, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Muscle injury triggers inflammation in which infiltrating mononuclear phagocytes are crucial for tissue regeneration. The interaction of the CCL2/CCR2 and CX3CL1/CX3CR1 chemokine axis that guides phagocyte infiltration is incompletely understood. Here, we show that CX3CR1 deficiency promotes muscle repair and rescues Ccl2−/− mice from impaired muscle regeneration as a result of altered macrophage function, not infiltration. Transcriptomic analysis of muscle mononuclear phagocytes reveals that Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is upregulated in mice with efficient regeneration. ApoE treatment enhances phagocytosis by mononuclear phagocytes in vitro, and restores phagocytic activity and muscle regeneration in Ccl2−/− mice. Because CX3CR1 deficiency may compensate for defective CCL2-dependant monocyte recruitment by modulating ApoE-dependent macrophage phagocytic activity, targeting CX3CR1 expressed by macrophages might be a powerful therapeutic approach to improve muscle regeneration. PMID:26632270

  18. CX3CR1 deficiency promotes muscle repair and regeneration by enhancing macrophage ApoE production.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Ludovic; Perrin, Hélène; de Chanville, Camille Baudesson; Saclier, Marielle; Hermand, Patricia; Poupel, Lucie; Guyon, Elodie; Licata, Fabrice; Carpentier, Wassila; Vilar, José; Mounier, Rémi; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Benhabiles, Nora; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Combadiere, Béhazine; Combadiere, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Muscle injury triggers inflammation in which infiltrating mononuclear phagocytes are crucial for tissue regeneration. The interaction of the CCL2/CCR2 and CX3CL1/CX3CR1 chemokine axis that guides phagocyte infiltration is incompletely understood. Here, we show that CX3CR1 deficiency promotes muscle repair and rescues Ccl2(-/-) mice from impaired muscle regeneration as a result of altered macrophage function, not infiltration. Transcriptomic analysis of muscle mononuclear phagocytes reveals that Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is upregulated in mice with efficient regeneration. ApoE treatment enhances phagocytosis by mononuclear phagocytes in vitro, and restores phagocytic activity and muscle regeneration in Ccl2(-/-) mice. Because CX3CR1 deficiency may compensate for defective CCL2-dependant monocyte recruitment by modulating ApoE-dependent macrophage phagocytic activity, targeting CX3CR1 expressed by macrophages might be a powerful therapeutic approach to improve muscle regeneration. PMID:26632270

  19. G-CSF supports long-term muscle regeneration in mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hayashiji, Nozomi; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Hara, Mie; Ito, Naoki; Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Seki, Tomohisa; Tohyama, Shugo; Kodaira, Masaki; Kunitomi, Akira; Kashimura, Shin; Takei, Makoto; Saito, Yuki; Okata, Shinichiro; Egashira, Toru; Endo, Jin; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-04-13

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a chronic and life-threatening disease that is initially supported by muscle regeneration but eventually shows satellite cell exhaustion and muscular dysfunction. The life-long maintenance of skeletal muscle homoeostasis requires the satellite stem cell pool to be preserved. Asymmetric cell division plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the satellite cell pool. Here we show that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) is asymmetrically expressed in activated satellite cells. G-CSF positively affects the satellite cell population during multiple stages of differentiation in ex vivo cultured fibres. G-CSF could be important in developing an effective therapy for DMD based on its potential to modulate the supply of multiple stages of regenerated myocytes. This study shows that the G-CSF-G-CSFR axis is fundamentally important for long-term muscle regeneration, functional maintenance and lifespan extension in mouse models of DMD with varying severities.

  20. Epimorphic regeneration approach to tissue replacement in adult mammals

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vineet; Johnson, Scott A.; Reing, Janet; Zhang, Li; Tottey, Stephen; Wang, Gang; Hirschi, Karen K.; Braunhut, Susan; Gudas, Lorraine J.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Urodeles and fetal mammals are capable of impressive epimorphic regeneration in a variety of tissues, whereas the typical default response to injury in adult mammals consists of inflammation and scar tissue formation. One component of epimorphic regeneration is the recruitment of resident progenitor and stem cells to a site of injury. Bioactive molecules resulting from degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to recruit a variety of progenitor and stem cells in vitro in adult mammals. The ability to recruit multipotential cells to the site of injury by in vivo administration of chemotactic ECM degradation products in a mammalian model of digit amputation was investigated in the present study. Adult, 6- to 8-week-old C57/BL6 mice were subjected to midsecond phalanx amputation of the third digit of the right hind foot and either treated with chemotactic ECM degradation products or left untreated. At 14 days after amputation, mice treated with ECM degradation products showed an accumulation of heterogeneous cells that expressed markers of multipotency, including Sox2, Sca1, and Rex1 (Zfp42). Cells isolated from the site of amputation were capable of differentiation along neuroectodermal and mesodermal lineages, whereas cells isolated from control mice were capable of differentiation along only mesodermal lineages. The present findings demonstrate the recruitment of endogenous stem cells to a site of injury, and/or their generation/proliferation therein, in response to ECM degradation products. PMID:19966310

  1. Age-associated repression of type 1 inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor impairs muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bora; Lee, Seung-Min; Bahn, Young Jae; Lee, Kwang-Pyo; Kang, Moonkyung; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Woo, Sun-Hee; Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Eunhee; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass and power decrease with age, leading to impairment of mobility and metabolism in the elderly. Ca2+ signaling is crucial for myoblast differentiation as well as muscle contraction through activation of transcription factors and Ca2+-dependent kinases and phosphatases. Ca2+ channels, such as dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), two-pore channel (TPC) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (ITPR), function to maintain Ca2+ homeostasis in myoblasts. Here, we observed a significant decrease in expression of type 1 IP3 receptor (ITPR1), but not types 2 and 3, in aged mice skeletal muscle and isolated myoblasts, compared with those of young mice. ITPR1 knockdown using shRNA-expressing viruses in C2C12 myoblasts and tibialis anterior muscle of mice inhibited myotube formation and muscle regeneration after injury, respectively, a typical phenotype of aged muscle. This aging phenotype was associated with repression of muscle-specific genes and activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. ERK inhibition by U0126 not only induced recovery of myotube formation in old myoblasts but also facilitated muscle regeneration after injury in aged muscle. The conserved decline in ITPR1 expression in aged human skeletal muscle suggests utility as a potential therapeutic target for sarcopenia, which can be treated using ERK inhibition strategies. PMID:27658230

  2. Regeneration and Maintenance of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walthers, Christopher M.

    Tissue engineering is an emerging field of biomedical engineering that involves growing artificial organs to replace those lost to disease or injury. Within tissue engineering, there is a demand for artificial smooth muscle to repair tissues of the digestive tract, bladder, and vascular systems. Attempts to develop engineered smooth muscle tissues capable of contracting with sufficient strength to be clinically relevant have so far proven unsatisfactory. The goal of this research was to develop and sustain mature, contractile smooth muscle. Survival of implanted SMCs is critical to sustain the benefits of engineered smooth muscle. Survival of implanted smooth muscle cells was studied with layered, electrospun polycaprolactone implants with lasercut holes ranging from 0--25% porosity. It was found that greater angiogenesis was associated with increased survival of implanted cells, with a large increase at a threshold between 20% and 25% porosity. Heparan sulfate coatings improved the speed of blood vessel infiltration after 14 days of implantation. With these considerations, thicker engineered tissues may be possible. An improved smooth muscle tissue culture technique was utilized. Contracting smooth muscle was produced in culture by maintaining the native smooth muscle tissue organization, specifically by sustaining intact smooth muscle strips rather than dissociating tissue in to isolated smooth muscle cells. Isolated cells showed a decrease in maturity and contained fewer enteric neural and glial cells. Muscle strips also exhibited periodic contraction and regular fluctuation of intracellular calclium. The muscle strip maturity persisted after implantation in omentum for 14 days on polycaprolactone scaffolds. A low-cost, disposable bioreactor was developed to further improve maturity of cultured smooth muscle cells in an environment of controlled cyclical stress.The bioreactor consistently applied repeated mechanical strain with controllable inputs for strain

  3. Fibrosis-Inducing Strategies in Regenerating Dystrophic and Normal Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Pessina, Patrizia; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2016-01-01

    The excessive accumulation of collagens (fibrosis) impairs the function of vital tissues and organs. Fibrosis is a hallmark of severe muscular dystrophies, such as the incurable Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), where skeletal muscle is substituted by scar (fibrotic) tissue as disease advances. One of the major obstacles in increasing our ability to combat fibrosis-driven muscular dystrophy progression is that no optimal in vivo models of muscle fibrosis are currently available, limiting fibrosis research and the development of novel therapies. In this chapter we describe different experimental strategies to accelerate and enhance muscle fibrosis in vivo in the widely used animal model for DMD, the mdx mouse. Since excessive tissue scarring also hampers the normal regeneration process after muscle injury, we have extended these fibrogenic strategies to the muscle of normal (non-diseased) mice. These strategies will allow fibrosis induction and assessment in a wide array of genetically modified mouse lines in physiological and pathological conditions of muscle regeneration. They should eventually improve our ability to combat fibrosis and foster muscle regeneration in DMD. PMID:27492167

  4. Novel Therapeutic Effects of Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma for Muscle Regeneration and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Won; Kang, Sung Un; Kim, Yang Eun; Park, Ju Kyeong; Yang, Sang Sik; Kim, Yeon Soo; Lee, Yun Sang; Lee, Yuijina; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can repair muscle tissue damage, but significant loss of muscle tissue or its long-lasting chronic degeneration makes injured skeletal muscle tissue difficult to restore. It has been demonstrated that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP) can be used in many biological areas including regenerative medicine. Therefore, we determined whether NTP, as a non-contact biological external stimulator that generates biological catalyzers, can induce regeneration of injured muscle without biomaterials. Treatment with NTP in the defected muscle of a Sprague Dawley (SD) rat increased the number of proliferating muscle cells 7 days after plasma treatment (dapt) and rapidly induced formation of muscle tissue and muscle cell differentiation at 14 dapt. In addition, in vitro experiments also showed that NTP could induce muscle cell proliferation and differentiation of human muscle cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that NTP promotes restoration of muscle defects through control of cell proliferation and differentiation without biological or structural supporters, suggesting that NTP has the potential for use in muscle tissue engineering and regenerative therapies. PMID:27349181

  5. Rapid release of growth factors regenerates force output in volumetric muscle loss injuries.

    PubMed

    Grasman, Jonathan M; Do, Duc M; Page, Raymond L; Pins, George D

    2015-12-01

    A significant challenge in the design and development of biomaterial scaffolds is to incorporate mechanical and biochemical cues to direct organized tissue growth. In this study, we investigated the effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) loaded, crosslinked fibrin (EDCn-HGF) microthread scaffolds on skeletal muscle regeneration in a mouse model of volumetric muscle loss (VML). The rapid, sustained release of HGF significantly enhanced the force production of muscle tissue 60 days after injury, recovering more than 200% of the force output relative to measurements recorded immediately after injury. HGF delivery increased the number of differentiating myoblasts 14 days after injury, and supported an enhanced angiogenic response. The architectural morphology of microthread scaffolds supported the ingrowth of nascent myofibers into the wound site, in contrast to fibrin gel implants which did not support functional regeneration. Together, these data suggest that EDCn-HGF microthreads recapitulate several of the regenerative cues lost in VML injuries, promote remodeling of functional muscle tissue, and enhance the functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. Further, by strategically incorporating specific biochemical factors and precisely tuning the structural and mechanical properties of fibrin microthreads, we have developed a powerful platform technology that may enhance regeneration in other axially aligned tissues.

  6. Key changes in denervated muscles and their impact on regeneration and reinnervation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Chawla, Aditya; Spinner, Robert J.; Yu, Cong; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.; Wang, Huan

    2014-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction becomes progressively less receptive to regenerating axons if nerve repair is delayed for a long period of time. It is difficult to ascertain the denervated muscle's residual receptivity by time alone. Other sensitive markers that closely correlate with the extent of denervation should be found. After a denervated muscle develops a fibrillation potential, muscle fiber conduction velocity, muscle fiber diameter, muscle wet weight, and maximal isometric force all decrease; remodeling increases neuromuscular junction fragmentation and plantar area, and expression of myogenesis-related genes is initially up-regulated and then down-regulated. All these changes correlate with both the time course and degree of denervation. The nature and time course of these denervation changes in muscle are reviewed from the literature to explore their roles in assessing both the degree of detrimental changes and the potential success of a nerve repair. Fibrillation potential amplitude, muscle fiber conduction velocity, muscle fiber diameter, mRNA expression levels of myogenic regulatory factors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor could all reflect the severity and length of denervation and the receptiveness of denervated muscle to regenerating axons, which could possibly offer an important clue for surgical choices and predict the outcomes of delayed nerve repair. PMID:25422641

  7. Skeletal Muscle Regeneration and Oxidative Stress Are Altered in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Neal X.; Organ, Jason M.; Zarse, Chad; O’Neill, Kalisha; Conway, Richard G.; Konrad, Robert J.; Bacallao, Robert L.; Allen, Matthew R.; Moe, Sharon M.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy and impaired muscle function are associated with lower health-related quality of life, and greater disability and mortality risk in those with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the pathogenesis of skeletal dysfunction in CKD is unknown. We used a slow progressing, naturally occurring, CKD rat model (Cy/+ rat) with hormonal abnormalities consistent with clinical presentations of CKD to study skeletal muscle signaling. The CKD rats demonstrated augmented skeletal muscle regeneration with higher activation and differentiation signals in muscle cells (i.e. lower Pax-7; higher MyoD and myogenin RNA expression). However, there was also higher expression of proteolytic markers (Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1) in CKD muscle relative to normal. CKD animals had higher indices of oxidative stress compared to normal, evident by elevated plasma levels of an oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxy-2' -deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), increased muscle expression of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and Nox4 and altered mitochondria morphology. Furthermore, we show significantly higher serum levels of myostatin and expression of myostatin in skeletal muscle of CKD animals compared to normal. Taken together, these data show aberrant regeneration and proteolytic signaling that is associated with oxidative stress and high levels of myostatin in the setting of CKD. These changes likely play a role in the compromised skeletal muscle function that exists in CKD. PMID:27486747

  8. Wnt/β-catenin signaling promotes regeneration after adult zebrafish spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Strand, Nicholas S; Hoi, Kimberly K; Phan, Tien M T; Ray, Catherine A; Berndt, Jason D; Moon, Randall T

    2016-09-01

    Unlike mammals, zebrafish can regenerate their injured spinal cord and regain control of caudal tissues. It was recently shown that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary for spinal cord regeneration in the larval zebrafish. However, the molecular mechanisms of regeneration may or may not be conserved between larval and adult zebrafish. To test this, we assessed the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling after spinal cord injury in the adult zebrafish. We show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is increased after spinal cord injury in the adult zebrafish. Moreover, overexpression of Dkk1b inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the regenerating spinal cord of adult zebrafish. Dkk1b overexpression also inhibited locomotor recovery, axon regeneration, and glial bridge formation in the injured spinal cord. Thus, our data illustrate a conserved role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling in adult and larval zebrafish spinal cord regeneration.

  9. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Janghra, Narinder; Morgan, Jennifer E.; Sewry, Caroline A.; Wilson, Francis X.; Davies, Kay E.; Muntoni, Francesco; Tinsley, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ –sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these tools to quantify

  10. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Janghra, Narinder; Morgan, Jennifer E; Sewry, Caroline A; Wilson, Francis X; Davies, Kay E; Muntoni, Francesco; Tinsley, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ -sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these tools to quantify

  11. UTX demethylase activity is required for satellite cell–mediated muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chaochen; Nakka, Kiran; Benyoucef, Aissa; Sebastian, Soji; Zhuang, Lenan; Chu, Alphonse; Palii, Carmen G.; Camellato, Brendan; Brand, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    The X chromosome–encoded histone demethylase UTX (also known as KDM6A) mediates removal of repressive trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) to establish transcriptionally permissive chromatin. Loss of UTX in female mice is embryonic lethal. Unexpectedly, male UTX-null mice escape embryonic lethality due to expression of UTY, a paralog that lacks H3K27 demethylase activity, suggesting an enzyme-independent role for UTX in development and thereby challenging the need for active H3K27 demethylation in vivo. However, the requirement for active H3K27 demethylation in stem cell–mediated tissue regeneration remains untested. Here, we employed an inducible mouse KO that specifically ablates Utx in satellite cells (SCs) and demonstrated that active H3K27 demethylation is necessary for muscle regeneration. Loss of UTX in SCs blocked myofiber regeneration in both male and female mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that UTX mediates muscle regeneration through its H3K27 demethylase activity, as loss of demethylase activity either by chemical inhibition or knock-in of demethylase-dead UTX resulted in defective muscle repair. Mechanistically, dissection of the muscle regenerative process revealed that the demethylase activity of UTX is required for expression of the transcription factor myogenin, which in turn drives differentiation of muscle progenitors. Thus, we have identified a critical role for the enzymatic activity of UTX in activating muscle-specific gene expression during myofiber regeneration and have revealed a physiological role for active H3K27 demethylation in vivo. PMID:26999603

  12. Myogenic Progenitors from Mouse Pluripotent Stem Cells for Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Magli, Alessandro; Incitti, Tania; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2016-01-01

    Muscle homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells which, in both pathologic and non-pathologic conditions, are able to repair or generate new muscle fibers. Although muscle stem cells have tremendous regenerative potential, their application in cell therapy protocols is prevented by several restrictions, including the limited ability to grow ex vivo. Since pluripotent stem cells have the unique potential to both self-renew and expand almost indefinitely, they have become an attractive source of progenitors for regenerative medicine studies. Our lab has demonstrated that embryonic stem cell (ES)-derived myogenic progenitors retain the ability to repair existing muscle fibers and contribute to the pool of resident stem cells. Because of their relevance in both cell therapy and disease modeling, in this chapter we describe the protocol to derive myogenic progenitors from murine ES cells followed by their intramuscular delivery in a murine muscular dystrophy model. PMID:27492174

  13. Myoferlin regulation by NFAT in muscle injury, regeneration and repair

    PubMed Central

    Demonbreun, Alexis R.; Lapidos, Karen A.; Heretis, Konstantina; Levin, Samantha; Dale, Rodney; Pytel, Peter; Svensson, Eric C.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Ferlin proteins mediate membrane-fusion events in response to Ca2+. Myoferlin, a member of the ferlin family, is required for normal muscle development, during which it mediates myoblast fusion. We isolated both damaged and intact myofibers from a mouse model of muscular dystrophy using laser-capture microdissection and found that the levels of myoferlin mRNA and protein were increased in damaged myofibers. To better define the components of the muscle-injury response, we identified a discreet 1543-bp fragment of the myoferlin promoter, containing multiple NFAT-binding sites, and found that this was sufficient to drive high-level myoferlin expression in cells and in vivo. This promoter recapitulated normal myoferlin expression in that it was downregulated in healthy myofibers and was upregulated in response to myofiber damage. Transgenic mice expressing GFP under the control of the myoferlin promoter were generated and GFP expression in this model was used to track muscle damage in vivo after muscle injury and in muscle disease. Myoferlin modulates the response to muscle injury through its activity in both myoblasts and mature myofibers. PMID:20571050

  14. Myoferlin regulation by NFAT in muscle injury, regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Demonbreun, Alexis R; Lapidos, Karen A; Heretis, Konstantina; Levin, Samantha; Dale, Rodney; Pytel, Peter; Svensson, Eric C; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2010-07-15

    Ferlin proteins mediate membrane-fusion events in response to Ca(2+). Myoferlin, a member of the ferlin family, is required for normal muscle development, during which it mediates myoblast fusion. We isolated both damaged and intact myofibers from a mouse model of muscular dystrophy using laser-capture microdissection and found that the levels of myoferlin mRNA and protein were increased in damaged myofibers. To better define the components of the muscle-injury response, we identified a discreet 1543-bp fragment of the myoferlin promoter, containing multiple NFAT-binding sites, and found that this was sufficient to drive high-level myoferlin expression in cells and in vivo. This promoter recapitulated normal myoferlin expression in that it was downregulated in healthy myofibers and was upregulated in response to myofiber damage. Transgenic mice expressing GFP under the control of the myoferlin promoter were generated and GFP expression in this model was used to track muscle damage in vivo after muscle injury and in muscle disease. Myoferlin modulates the response to muscle injury through its activity in both myoblasts and mature myofibers.

  15. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong; Jiang, Qinyang; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Kuang, Shihuan

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7(CreER) and Mtor(flox/flox) mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes.

  16. Nfix Regulates Temporal Progression of Muscle Regeneration through Modulation of Myostatin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Giuliana; Antonini, Stefania; Bonfanti, Chiara; Monteverde, Stefania; Vezzali, Chiara; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Cossu, Giulio; Messina, Graziella

    2016-01-01

    Summary Nfix belongs to a family of four highly conserved proteins that act as transcriptional activators and/or repressors of cellular and viral genes. We previously showed a pivotal role for Nfix in regulating the transcriptional switch from embryonic to fetal myogenesis. Here, we show that Nfix directly represses the Myostatin promoter, thus controlling the proper timing of satellite cell differentiation and muscle regeneration. Nfix-null mice display delayed regeneration after injury, and this deficit is reversed upon in vivo Myostatin silencing. Conditional deletion of Nfix in satellite cells results in a similar delay in regeneration, confirming the functional requirement for Nfix in satellite cells. Moreover, mice lacking Nfix show reduced myofiber cross sectional area and a predominant slow twitching phenotype. These data define a role for Nfix in postnatal skeletal muscle and unveil a mechanism for Myostatin regulation, thus providing insights into the modulation of its complex signaling pathway. PMID:26923583

  17. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong; Jiang, Qinyang; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-07-17

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7{sup CreER} and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes. - Highlights: • Pax7{sup CreER} was used to delete Mtor gene in satellite cells. • Satellite cell specific deletion of Mtor impairs muscle regeneration. • mTOR is necessary for satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. • Deletion of Mtor leads to reduced expression of key myogenic genes.

  18. BRE facilitates skeletal muscle regeneration by promoting satellite cell motility and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lihai; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho

    2016-01-06

    The function of the Bre gene in satellite cells was investigated during skeletal muscle regeneration. The tibialis anterior leg muscle was experimentally injured in Bre knockout mutant (BRE-KO) mice. It was established that the accompanying muscle regeneration was impaired as compared with their normal wild-type counterparts (BRE-WT). There were significantly fewer pax7(+) satellite cells and smaller newly formed myofibers present in the injury sites of BRE-KO mice. Bre was required for satellite cell fusion and myofiber formation. The cell fusion index and average length of newly-formed BRE-KO myofibers were found to be significantly reduced as compared with BRE-WT myofibers. It is well established that satellite cells are highly invasive which confers on them the homing ability to reach the muscle injury sites. Hence, we tracked the migratory behavior of these cells using time-lapse microscopy. Image analysis revealed no difference in directionality of movement between BRE-KO and BRE-WT satellite cells but there was a significant decrease in the velocity of BRE-KO cell movement. Moreover, chemotactic migration assays indicated that BRE-KO satellite cells were significantly less responsive to chemoattractant SDF-1α than BRE-WT satellite cells. We also established that BRE normally protects CXCR4 from SDF-1α-induced degradation. In sum, BRE facilitates skeletal muscle regeneration by enhancing satellite cell motility, homing and fusion.

  19. BRE facilitates skeletal muscle regeneration by promoting satellite cell motility and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lihai; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The function of the Bre gene in satellite cells was investigated during skeletal muscle regeneration. The tibialis anterior leg muscle was experimentally injured in Bre knockout mutant (BRE-KO) mice. It was established that the accompanying muscle regeneration was impaired as compared with their normal wild-type counterparts (BRE-WT). There were significantly fewer pax7+ satellite cells and smaller newly formed myofibers present in the injury sites of BRE-KO mice. Bre was required for satellite cell fusion and myofiber formation. The cell fusion index and average length of newly-formed BRE-KO myofibers were found to be significantly reduced as compared with BRE-WT myofibers. It is well established that satellite cells are highly invasive which confers on them the homing ability to reach the muscle injury sites. Hence, we tracked the migratory behavior of these cells using time-lapse microscopy. Image analysis revealed no difference in directionality of movement between BRE-KO and BRE-WT satellite cells but there was a significant decrease in the velocity of BRE-KO cell movement. Moreover, chemotactic migration assays indicated that BRE-KO satellite cells were significantly less responsive to chemoattractant SDF-1α than BRE-WT satellite cells. We also established that BRE normally protects CXCR4 from SDF-1α-induced degradation. In sum, BRE facilitates skeletal muscle regeneration by enhancing satellite cell motility, homing and fusion. PMID:26740569

  20. HMGB1 expression and muscle regeneration in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies and degenerative joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Cseri, Karolina; Vincze, János; Cseri, Julianna; Fodor, János; Csernátony, Zoltán; Csernoch, László; Dankó, Katalin

    2015-06-01

    The High-Mobility Group Box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a known nuclear protein which may be released from the nucleus into the cytoplasm and the extracellular space. It is believed that the mobilized HMGB1 plays role in the autoimmune processes as an alarmin, stimulating the immune response. In addition, muscle regeneration and differentiation may also be altered in the inflammatory surroundings. Biopsy specimens derived from patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) such as polymyositis or dermatomyositis were compared to muscle samples from patients undergoing surgical interventions for coxarthrosis. The biopsy and surgery specimens were used for Western blot analysis, for immunohistochemical detection of HMGB1 in histological preparations and for cell culturing to examine cell proliferation and differentiation. Our data show lower HMGB1 expression, impaired proliferation and slightly altered fusion capacity in the primary cell cultures started from IIM specimens than in cultures of coxarthrotic muscles. The ratio of regenerating muscle fibres with centralised nuclei (myotubes) is lower in the IIM samples than in the coxarthrotic ones but corticosteroid treatment shifts the ratio towards the coxarthrotic value. Our data suggest that the impaired regeneration capacity should also be considered to be behind the muscle weakness in IIM patients. The role of HMGB1 as a pathogenic signal requires further investigation.

  1. Local Overexpression of V1a-Vasopressin Receptor Enhances Regeneration in Tumor Necrosis Factor-Induced Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Alessandra; Toschi, Angelica; Murfuni, Ivana; Pelosi, Laura; Sica, Gigliola; Adamo, Sergio; Scicchitano, Bianca Maria

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy occurs during disuse and aging, or as a consequence of chronic diseases such as cancer and diabetes. It is characterized by progressive loss of muscle tissue due to hypotrophic changes, degeneration, and an inability of the regeneration machinery to replace damaged myofibers. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a proinflammatory cytokine known to mediate muscle atrophy in many chronic diseases and to inhibit skeletal muscle regeneration. In this study, we investigated the role of Arg-vasopressin-(AVP-)dependent pathways in muscles in which atrophy was induced by local overexpression of TNF. AVP is a potent myogenesis-promoting factor and is able to enhance skeletal muscle regeneration by stimulating Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase and calcineurin signaling. We performed morphological and molecular analyses and demonstrated that local over-expression of the AVP receptor V1a enhances regeneration of atrophic muscle. By upregulating the regeneration/differentiation markers, modulating the inflammatory response, and attenuating fibrogenesis, the stimulation of AVP-dependent pathways creates a favourable environment for efficient and sustained muscle regeneration and repair even in the presence of elevated levels of TNF. This study highlights a novel in vivo role for AVP-dependent pathways, which may represent an interesting strategy to counteract muscle decline in aging or in muscular pathologies. PMID:24971321

  2. Persistent Muscle Fiber Regeneration in Long Term Denervation. Past, Present, Future.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Ugo; Boncompagni, Simona; Gobbo, Valerio; Rossini, Katia; Zampieri, Sandra; Mosole, Simone; Ravara, Barbara; Nori, Alessandra; Stramare, Roberto; Ambrosio, Francesco; Piccione, Francesco; Masiero, Stefano; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Gargiulo, Paolo; Protasi, Feliciano; Kern, Helmut; Pond, Amber; Marcante, Andrea

    2015-03-11

    Despite the ravages of long term denervation there is structural and ultrastructural evidence for survival of muscle fibers in mammals, with some fibers surviving at least ten months in rodents and 3-6 years in humans. Further, in rodents there is evidence that muscle fibers may regenerate even after repeated damage in the absence of the nerve, and that this potential is maintained for several months after denervation. While in animal models permanently denervated muscle sooner or later loses the ability to contract, the muscles may maintain their size and ability to function if electrically stimulated soon after denervation. Whether in mammals, humans included, this is a result of persistent de novo formation of muscle fibers is an open issue we would like to explore in this review. During the past decade, we have studied muscle biopsies from the quadriceps muscle of Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) patients suffering with Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome, a condition that fully and irreversibly disconnects skeletal muscle fibers from their damaged innervating motor neurons. We have demonstrated that human denervated muscle fibers survive years of denervation and can be rescued from severe atrophy by home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation (h-bFES). Using immunohistochemistry with both non-stimulated and the h-bFES stimulated human muscle biopsies, we have observed the persistent presence of muscle fibers which are positive to labeling by an antibody which specifically recognizes the embryonic myosin heavy chain (MHCemb). Relative to the total number of fibers present, only a small percentage of these MHCemb positive fibers are detected, suggesting that they are regenerating muscle fibers and not pre-existing myofibers re-expressing embryonic isoforms. Although embryonic isoforms of acetylcholine receptors are known to be re-expressed and to spread from the end-plate to the sarcolemma of muscle fibers in early phases of muscle denervation, we suggest that the MHCemb

  3. Persistent Muscle Fiber Regeneration in Long Term Denervation. Past, Present, Future.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Ugo; Boncompagni, Simona; Gobbo, Valerio; Rossini, Katia; Zampieri, Sandra; Mosole, Simone; Ravara, Barbara; Nori, Alessandra; Stramare, Roberto; Ambrosio, Francesco; Piccione, Francesco; Masiero, Stefano; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Gargiulo, Paolo; Protasi, Feliciano; Kern, Helmut; Pond, Amber; Marcante, Andrea

    2015-03-11

    Despite the ravages of long term denervation there is structural and ultrastructural evidence for survival of muscle fibers in mammals, with some fibers surviving at least ten months in rodents and 3-6 years in humans. Further, in rodents there is evidence that muscle fibers may regenerate even after repeated damage in the absence of the nerve, and that this potential is maintained for several months after denervation. While in animal models permanently denervated muscle sooner or later loses the ability to contract, the muscles may maintain their size and ability to function if electrically stimulated soon after denervation. Whether in mammals, humans included, this is a result of persistent de novo formation of muscle fibers is an open issue we would like to explore in this review. During the past decade, we have studied muscle biopsies from the quadriceps muscle of Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) patients suffering with Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome, a condition that fully and irreversibly disconnects skeletal muscle fibers from their damaged innervating motor neurons. We have demonstrated that human denervated muscle fibers survive years of denervation and can be rescued from severe atrophy by home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation (h-bFES). Using immunohistochemistry with both non-stimulated and the h-bFES stimulated human muscle biopsies, we have observed the persistent presence of muscle fibers which are positive to labeling by an antibody which specifically recognizes the embryonic myosin heavy chain (MHCemb). Relative to the total number of fibers present, only a small percentage of these MHCemb positive fibers are detected, suggesting that they are regenerating muscle fibers and not pre-existing myofibers re-expressing embryonic isoforms. Although embryonic isoforms of acetylcholine receptors are known to be re-expressed and to spread from the end-plate to the sarcolemma of muscle fibers in early phases of muscle denervation, we suggest that the MHCemb

  4. Targeted ablation of IKK2 improves skeletal muscle strength, maintains mass, and promotes regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mourkioti, Foteini; Kratsios, Paschalis; Luedde, Tom; Song, Yao-Hua; Delafontaine, Patrick; Adami, Raffaella; Parente, Valeria; Bottinelli, Roberto; Pasparakis, Manolis; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2006-01-01

    NF-κB is a major pleiotropic transcription factor modulating immune, inflammatory, cell survival, and proliferative responses, yet the relevance of NF-κB signaling in muscle physiology and disease is less well documented. Here we show that muscle-restricted NF-κB inhibition in mice, through targeted deletion of the activating kinase inhibitor of NF-κB kinase 2 (IKK2), shifted muscle fiber distribution and improved muscle force. In response to denervation, IKK2 depletion protected against atrophy, maintaining fiber type, size, and strength, increasing protein synthesis, and decreasing protein degradation. IKK2-depleted mice with a muscle-specific transgene expressing a local Igf-1 isoform (mIgf-1) showed enhanced protection against muscle atrophy. In response to muscle damage, IKK2 depletion facilitated skeletal muscle regeneration through enhanced satellite cell activation and reduced fibrosis. Our results establish IKK2/NF-κB signaling as an important modulator of muscle homeostasis and suggest a combined role for IKK inhibitors and growth factors in the therapy of muscle diseases. PMID:17080195

  5. Calpain 3 Expression Pattern during Gastrocnemius Muscle Atrophy and Regeneration Following Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ronghua; Yan, Yingying; Yao, Jian; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Jianmei; Liu, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Calpain 3 (CAPN3), also known as p94, is a skeletal muscle-specific member of the calpain family that is involved in muscular dystrophy; however, the roles of CAPN3 in muscular atrophy and regeneration are yet to be understood. In the present study, we attempted to explain the effect of CAPN3 in muscle atrophy by evaluating CAPN3 expression in rat gastrocnemius muscle following reversible sciatic nerve injury. After nerve injury, the wet weight ratio and cross sectional area (CSA) of gastrocnemius muscle were decreased gradually from 1–14 days and then recovery from 14–28 days. The active form of CAPN3 (~62 kDa) protein decreased slightly on day 3 and then increased from day 7 to 14 before a decrease from day 14 to 28. The result of linear correlation analysis showed that expression of the active CAPN3 protein level was negatively correlated with muscle wet weight ratio. CAPN3 knockdown by short interfering RNA (siRNA) injection improved muscle recovery on days 7 and 14 after injury as compared to that observed with control siRNA treatment. Depletion of CAPN3 gene expression could promote myoblast differentiation in L6 cells. Based on these findings, we conclude that the expression pattern of the active CAPN3 protein is linked to muscle atrophy and regeneration following denervation: its upregulation during early stages may promote satellite cell renewal by inhibiting differentiation, whereas in later stages, CAPN3 expression may be downregulated to stimulate myogenic differentiation and enhance recovery. These results provide a novel mechanistic insight into the role of CAPN3 protein in muscle regeneration after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26569227

  6. Regeneration of central cholinergic neurones in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Svendgaard, N A; Björklund, A; Stenevi, U

    1976-01-30

    The regrowth of lesioned central acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-positive axons in the adult rat was studied in irides implanted to two different brain sites: in the caudal diencephalon and hippocampus, and in the hippocampal fimbria. At both implantation sites the cholinergic septo-hippocampal pathways were transected. At 2-4 weeks after lesion, newly formed, probably sprouting fibres could be followed in abundance from the lesioned proximal axon stumps into the iris transplant. Growth of newly formed AChE-positive fibres into the transplant was also observed from lesioned axons in the anterior thalamus, and to a minor extent also from the dorsal and ventral tegmental AChE-positive pathways and the habenulo-interpeduncular tract. The regrowth process of the sprouting AChE-positive, presumed cholinergic fibres into the iris target was studied in further detail in whole-mount preparations of the transplants. For this purpose the irides were removed from the brain, unfolded, spread out on microscope slides, and then stained for AChE. During the first 2-4 weeks after transplantation the sprouting central fibres grew out over large areas of the iris. The new fibres branched profusely into a terminal plexus that covered maximally about half of the iris surface, and in some areas the patterning of the regenerated central fibres mimicked closely that of the normal autonomic cholinergic innervation of the iris. In one series of experiments the AChE-staining was combined with fluorescence histochemical visualization of regenerated adrenergic fibres in the same specimens. In many areas there was a striking congruence in the distributional patterns of the regenerated central cholinergic and adrenergic fibres in the transplant. This indicates that - as in the normal iris - the sprouting cholinergic axons (primarily originating in the lesioned septo-hippocampal pathways) and adrenergic axons (primarily originating in the lesioned axons of the locus neurones) regenerate together

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibition ameliorates pathogenesis and improves skeletal muscle regeneration in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Mittal, Ashwani; Makonchuk, Denys Y.; Bhatnagar, Shephali; Kumar, Ashok

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked genetic disorder of skeletal muscle caused by mutation in dystrophin gene. Although the degradation of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix, inflammation and fibrosis are the common pathological features in DMD, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the role and the mechanisms by which increased levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) protein causes myopathy in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. The levels of MMP-9 but not tissue inhibitor of MMPs were drastically increased in skeletal muscle of mdx mice. Besides skeletal muscle, infiltrating macrophages were found to contribute significantly to the elevated levels of MMP-9 in dystrophic muscle. In vivo administration of a nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitory peptide, NBD, blocked the expression of MMP-9 in dystrophic muscle of mdx mice. Deletion of Mmp9 gene in mdx mice improved skeletal muscle structure and functions and reduced muscle injury, inflammation and fiber necrosis. Inhibition of MMP-9 increased the levels of cytoskeletal protein β-dystroglycan and neural nitric oxide synthase and reduced the amounts of caveolin-3 and transforming growth factor-β in myofibers of mdx mice. Genetic ablation of MMP-9 significantly augmented the skeletal muscle regeneration in mdx mice. Finally, pharmacological inhibition of MMP-9 activity also ameliorated skeletal muscle pathogenesis and enhanced myofiber regeneration in mdx mice. Collectively, our study suggests that the increased production of MMP-9 exacerbates dystrophinopathy and MMP-9 represents as one of the most promising therapeutic targets for the prevention of disease progression in DMD. PMID:19401296

  8. Different Requirement for Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Limb Regeneration of Larval and Adult Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Maruoka, Tamae; Ochi, Haruki; Aruga, Akio; Ohgo, Shiro; Ogino, Hajime; Tamura, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Background In limb regeneration of amphibians, the early steps leading to blastema formation are critical for the success of regeneration, and the initiation of regeneration in an adult limb requires the presence of nerves. Xenopus laevis tadpoles can completely regenerate an amputated limb at the early limb bud stage, and the metamorphosed young adult also regenerates a limb by a nerve-dependent process that results in a spike-like structure. Blockage of Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibits the initiation of tadpole limb regeneration, but it remains unclear whether limb regeneration in young adults also requires Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Methodology/Principal Findings We expressed heat-shock-inducible (hs) Dkk1, a Wnt antagonist, in transgenic Xenopus to block Wnt/β-catenin signaling during forelimb regeneration in young adults. hsDkk1 did not inhibit limb regeneration in any of the young adult frogs, though it suppressed Wnt-dependent expression of genes (fgf-8 and cyclin D1). When nerve supply to the limbs was partially removed, however, hsDkk1 expression blocked limb regeneration in young adult frogs. Conversely, activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by a GSK-3 inhibitor rescued failure of limb-spike regeneration in young adult frogs after total removal of nerve supply. Conclusions/Significance In contrast to its essential role in tadpole limb regeneration, our results suggest that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is not absolutely essential for limb regeneration in young adults. The different requirement for Wnt/β-catenin signaling in tadpoles and young adults appears to be due to the projection of nerve axons into the limb field. Our observations suggest that nerve-derived signals and Wnt/β-catenin signaling have redundant roles in the initiation of limb regeneration. Our results demonstrate for the first time the different mechanisms of limb regeneration initiation in limb buds (tadpoles) and developed limbs (young adults) with reference to nerve-derived signals

  9. β2-Adrenoceptor is involved in connective tissue remodeling in regenerating muscles by decreasing the activity of MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Silva, Meiricris T; Nascimento, Tábata L; Pereira, Marcelo G; Siqueira, Adriane S; Brum, Patrícia C; Jaeger, Ruy G; Miyabara, Elen H

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the role of β2-adrenoceptors in the connective tissue remodeling of regenerating muscles from β2-adrenoceptor knockout (β2KO) mice. Tibialis anterior muscles from β2KO mice were cryolesioned and analyzed after 3, 10, and 21 days. Regenerating muscles from β2KO mice showed a significant increase in the area density of the connective tissue and in the amount of collagen at 10 days compared with wild-type (WT) mice. A greater increase occurred in the expression levels of collagen I, III, and IV in regenerating muscles from β2KO mice evaluated at 10 days compared with WT mice; this increase continued at 21 days, except for collagen III. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2) activity increased to a similar extent in regenerating muscles from both β2KO and WT mice at 3 and 10 days. This was also the case for MMP-9 activity in regenerating muscles from both β2KO and WT mice at 3 days; however, at 10 days post-cryolesion, this activity returned to baseline levels only in WT mice. MMP-3 activity was unaltered in regenerating muscles at 10 days. mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor-α increased in regenerating muscles from WT and β2KO mice at 3 days and, at 10 days post-cryolesion, returned to baseline only in WT mice. mRNA levels of interleukin-6 increased in muscles from WT mice at 3 days post-cryolesion and returned to baseline at 10 days post-cryolesion but were unchanged in β2KO mice. Our results suggest that the β2-adrenoceptor contributes to collagen remodeling during muscle regeneration by decreasing MMP-9 activity. PMID:26896238

  10. β2-Adrenoceptor is involved in connective tissue remodeling in regenerating muscles by decreasing the activity of MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Silva, Meiricris T; Nascimento, Tábata L; Pereira, Marcelo G; Siqueira, Adriane S; Brum, Patrícia C; Jaeger, Ruy G; Miyabara, Elen H

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the role of β2-adrenoceptors in the connective tissue remodeling of regenerating muscles from β2-adrenoceptor knockout (β2KO) mice. Tibialis anterior muscles from β2KO mice were cryolesioned and analyzed after 3, 10, and 21 days. Regenerating muscles from β2KO mice showed a significant increase in the area density of the connective tissue and in the amount of collagen at 10 days compared with wild-type (WT) mice. A greater increase occurred in the expression levels of collagen I, III, and IV in regenerating muscles from β2KO mice evaluated at 10 days compared with WT mice; this increase continued at 21 days, except for collagen III. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2) activity increased to a similar extent in regenerating muscles from both β2KO and WT mice at 3 and 10 days. This was also the case for MMP-9 activity in regenerating muscles from both β2KO and WT mice at 3 days; however, at 10 days post-cryolesion, this activity returned to baseline levels only in WT mice. MMP-3 activity was unaltered in regenerating muscles at 10 days. mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor-α increased in regenerating muscles from WT and β2KO mice at 3 days and, at 10 days post-cryolesion, returned to baseline only in WT mice. mRNA levels of interleukin-6 increased in muscles from WT mice at 3 days post-cryolesion and returned to baseline at 10 days post-cryolesion but were unchanged in β2KO mice. Our results suggest that the β2-adrenoceptor contributes to collagen remodeling during muscle regeneration by decreasing MMP-9 activity.

  11. Estrogen-related receptor-α (ERRα) deficiency in skeletal muscle impairs regeneration in response to injury.

    PubMed

    LaBarge, Samuel; McDonald, Marisa; Smith-Powell, Leslie; Auwerx, Johan; Huss, Janice M

    2014-03-01

    The estrogen-related receptor-α (ERRα) regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and glucose and fatty acid oxidation during differentiation in skeletal myocytes. However, whether ERRα controls metabolic remodeling during skeletal muscle regeneration in vivo is unknown. We characterized the time course of skeletal muscle regeneration in wild-type (M-ERRαWT) and muscle-specific ERRα(-/-) (M-ERRα(-/-)) mice after injury by intramuscular cardiotoxin injection. M-ERRα(-/-) mice exhibited impaired regeneration characterized by smaller myofibers with increased centrally localized nuclei and reduced mitochondrial density and cytochrome oxidase and citrate synthase activities relative to M-ERRαWT. Transcript levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A, nuclear respiratory factor-2a, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ coactivator (PGC)-1β, were downregulated in the M-ERRα(-/-) muscles at the onset of myogenesis. Furthermore, coincident with delayed myofiber recovery, we observed reduced muscle ATP content (-45% vs. M-ERRαWT) and enhanced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in M-ERRα(-/-) muscle. We subsequently demonstrated that pharmacologic postinjury AMPK activation was sufficient to delay muscle regeneration in WT mice. AMPK activation induced ERRα transcript expression in M-ERRαWT muscle and in C2C12 myotubes through induction of the Esrra promoter, indicating that ERRα may control gene regulation downstream of the AMPK pathway. Collectively, these results suggest that ERRα deficiency during muscle regeneration impairs recovery of mitochondrial energetic capacity and perturbs AMPK activity, resulting in delayed myofiber repair.

  12. Utrophin is a regeneration-associated protein transiently present at the sarcolemma of regenerating skeletal muscle fibers in dystrophin-deficient hypertrophic feline muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lin, S; Gaschen, F; Burgunder, J M

    1998-08-01

    Utrophin, an autosomal homologue of dystrophin, has been suggested as a possible therapeutic replacement of dystrophin in Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD). We have undertaken this study to examine the expression of utrophin in the skeletal muscle of dystrophin-deficient cats, a spontaneous animal model for dystrophinopathy. Dystrophin was normal in size, but very low in quantity by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Utrophin was heterogeneously overexpressed at extrajunctional sarcolemma of regenerating muscle fibers, as defined by overexpression of the myogenic markers: vimentin, desmin, and developmental isoform of myosin heavy chain (MHCd). Muscle regeneration occurred in 6 stages as assessed by fiber size, and immunolabeling of desmin, vimentin, and MHCd. Differential developmental patterns of utrophin, alpha-sarcoglycan, and beta-dystroglycan expression were seen with an increase followed by a decrease and with changes in their respective location. These results suggest that utrophin is a regeneration-associated protein. It can functionally replace dystrophin in anchoring dystrophin-associated proteins (DAPs). However, the expression of utrophin and its anchored DAPs is restricted to the period of muscle regeneration and tends to decrease in late stages. This study therefore suggests a novel role of utrophin during skeletal muscle regeneration.

  13. In vitro construction and in vivo regeneration of esophageal bilamellar muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lei; Gong, Changfeng; Zhu, Yabin

    2016-04-01

    In order to induce esophageal muscle cells' orientation, the silicon wafer with prototype 1 and prototype 2 was designed. Prototype 1 has micro-channels of 200 µm width and 30 µm depth with 30 µm wide wall as the interval. Prototype 2 has channels of 100 µm width and 30 µm depth with a discontinuous wall which has 30 µm gap for each 100 µm channel. The poly(ester urethane) scaffolds with pattern prototype 1 and prototype 2 were fabricated using solution casting method and abbreviated as PU1 and PU2, respectively. Silk fibroin was grafted individually on PU1 and PU2 surface (PU1-SF, PU2-SF) using our previous protocol, aiming at improving scaffolds' biocompatibility. The primary esophageal smooth muscle cell was seeded to evaluate the scaffolds' cytocompatibility in vitro. Characterizations like MTT assay, immunocytochemistry, scanning electron microscope, and Western blotting were applied. After that, poly(ester urethane) scaffolds with double patterns, prototype 1 on the exterior, and prototype 2 in the lumen were implanted into the rabbit esophagous to test the regeneration of the muscle tissue. Results from these preliminary tests showed that the growth and differentiation of primary smooth muscle cells were promoted, but also the muscle tissue with endocircular and exolongitudinal architecture was in regenerating, against non-constitution in the animals without the patterned scaffold or with poly(ester urethane) plane membrane at the defaulted sites. This micro-channel pattern together with silk fibroin grafting and vascular endothelial growth factor coating greatly promoted the regeneration of esophageal muscle with normal histological structure. PMID:26823400

  14. Comparative Study of Injury Models for Studying Muscle Regeneration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, David; Besnard, Aurore; Latil, Mathilde; Jouvion, Grégory; Briand, David; Thépenier, Cédric; Pascal, Quentin; Guguin, Aurélie; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2016-01-01

    Background A longstanding goal in regenerative medicine is to reconstitute functional tissus or organs after injury or disease. Attention has focused on the identification and relative contribution of tissue specific stem cells to the regeneration process. Relatively little is known about how the physiological process is regulated by other tissue constituents. Numerous injury models are used to investigate tissue regeneration, however, these models are often poorly understood. Specifically, for skeletal muscle regeneration several models are reported in the literature, yet the relative impact on muscle physiology and the distinct cells types have not been extensively characterised. Methods We have used transgenic Tg:Pax7nGFP and Flk1GFP/+ mouse models to respectively count the number of muscle stem (satellite) cells (SC) and number/shape of vessels by confocal microscopy. We performed histological and immunostainings to assess the differences in the key regeneration steps. Infiltration of immune cells, chemokines and cytokines production was assessed in vivo by Luminex®. Results We compared the 4 most commonly used injury models i.e. freeze injury (FI), barium chloride (BaCl2), notexin (NTX) and cardiotoxin (CTX). The FI was the most damaging. In this model, up to 96% of the SCs are destroyed with their surrounding environment (basal lamina and vasculature) leaving a “dead zone” devoid of viable cells. The regeneration process itself is fulfilled in all 4 models with virtually no fibrosis 28 days post-injury, except in the FI model. Inflammatory cells return to basal levels in the CTX, BaCl2 but still significantly high 1-month post-injury in the FI and NTX models. Interestingly the number of SC returned to normal only in the FI, 1-month post-injury, with SCs that are still cycling up to 3-months after the induction of the injury in the other models. Conclusions Our studies show that the nature of the injury model should be chosen carefully depending on the

  15. Kidney Regeneration: Common Themes From the Embryo to the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Cirio, M. Cecilia; de Groh, Eric D.; de Caestecker, Mark P.; Davidson, Alan J.; Hukriede, Neil A.

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate kidney has an inherent ability to regenerate following acute damage. Successful regeneration of the injured kidney requires the rapid replacement of damaged tubular epithelial cells and reconstitution of normal tubular function. Identifying the cells that participate in the regeneration process as well as the molecular mechanisms involved may reveal therapeutic targets for the treatment of kidney disease. Renal regeneration is associated with the expression of genetic pathways that are necessary for kidney organogenesis, suggesting that the regenerating tubular epithelium may be ‘reprogrammed’ to a less-differentiated, progenitor state. This review will highlight data from various vertebrate models supporting the hypothesis that nephrogenic genes are reactivated as part of the process of kidney regeneration following acute kidney injury (AKI). Emphasis will be placed on the reactivation of developmental pathways and how our understanding of the resulting regeneration process may be enhanced by lessons learned in the embryonic kidney. PMID:24005792

  16. Effects of age on aneural regeneration of soleus muscle in rat.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D M; Schmalbruch, H

    1995-01-01

    1. The ability of autografted soleus muscles to regenerate without innervation was investigated in young (two groups: 17 days or 35 g and 5 weeks or 100 g) and old (10 weeks or 300 g and 19 months or 700 g) rats. 2. Tetanic force and fibre area of the regenerated muscles were followed in 35, 100 and 300 g rats and found to reach a maximum 10-15 days after the operation and then declined. 3. Maximal tetanic force and fibre area were greater in old than in young rats; the largest increase was seen between 100 and 300 g rats. The relaxation phase of the twitch became shorter in the 700 g animals. The force per cross-sectional area appeared to fall with age. The length of the new fibres, inferred from the width of the length-force curve, increased only slightly with age. 4. Ten days after grafting, autophagocytosis of necrotic fibres was completed in young but not in old rats. The new fibres in young rats had one central nucleus per cross-section and fibre size was unimodally distributed; fibres in old rats had multiple internal nuclei and the size distribution was bimodal due to the presence of large fibres. 5. Previous results indicating greater muscle regeneration in young than in old rats may reflect more vigorous reinnervation in young animals rather than a greater myogenic potential. Increased fibre size of regenerated muscles of old compared with young rats may be attributed to the larger amount of necrotic material which is mitogenic for satellite cells, or to age-dependent changes of the expression of cell adhesion molecules. Enhanced lateral fusion of myotubes would give rise to large fibres with multiple internal nuclei. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8568686

  17. Inducible depletion of satellite cells in adult, sedentary mice impairs muscle regenerative capacity without affecting sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Fry, Christopher S; Lee, Jonah D; Mula, Jyothi; Kirby, Tyler J; Jackson, Janna R; Liu, Fujun; Yang, Lin; Mendias, Christopher L; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2015-01-01

    A key determinant of geriatric frailty is sarcopenia, the age-associated loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. Although the etiology of sarcopenia is unknown, the correlation during aging between the loss of activity of satellite cells, which are endogenous muscle stem cells, and impaired muscle regenerative capacity has led to the hypothesis that the loss of satellite cell activity is also a cause of sarcopenia. We tested this hypothesis in male sedentary mice by experimentally depleting satellite cells in young adult animals to a degree sufficient to impair regeneration throughout the rest of their lives. A detailed analysis of multiple muscles harvested at various time points during aging in different cohorts of these mice showed that the muscles were of normal size, despite low regenerative capacity, but did have increased fibrosis. These results suggest that lifelong reduction of satellite cells neither accelerated nor exacerbated sarcopenia and that satellite cells did not contribute to the maintenance of muscle size or fiber type composition during aging, but that their loss may contribute to age-related muscle fibrosis.

  18. Skeletal muscle regeneration via engineered tissue culture over electrospun nanofibrous chitosan/PVA scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kheradmandi, Mahsa; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ebrahim; Ghiaseddin, Ali; Ganji, Fariba

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue shows a remarkable potential in regeneration of injured tissue. However, in some of chronic and volumetric muscle damages, the native tissue is incapable to repair and remodeling the trauma. In the same condition, stem-cell therapy increased regeneration in situations of deficient muscle repair, but the major problem seems to be the lack of ability to attachment and survive of injected cells on the exact location. In this study, chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibrous scaffold was studied to promote cell attachment and provide mechanical support during regeneration. Scaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and tensile test. Degradation and swelling behavior of scaffold were studied for 20 days. The cell-scaffold interaction was characterized by MTT assay for 10 days and in vivo biocompatibility of scaffold in a rabbit model was evaluated. Results showed that cells had a good viability, adhesion, growth, and spread on the scaffold, which make this mat a desirable engineered muscular graft. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1720-1727, 2016.

  19. Muscle organizers in Drosophila: the role of persistent larval fibers in adult flight muscle development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, E. R.; Fernandes, J.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    In many organisms muscle formation depends on specialized cells that prefigure the pattern of the musculature and serve as templates for myoblast organization and fusion. These include muscle pioneers in insects and muscle organizing cells in leech. In Drosophila, muscle founder cells have been proposed to play a similar role in organizing larval muscle development during embryogenesis. During metamorphosis in Drosophila, following histolysis of most of the larval musculature, there is a second round of myogenesis that gives rise to the adult muscles. It is not known whether muscle founder cells organize the development of these muscles. However, in the thorax specific larval muscle fibers do not histolyze at the onset of metamorphosis, but instead serve as templates for the formation of a subset of adult muscles, the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs). Because these persistent larval muscle fibers appear to be functioning in many respects like muscle founder cells, we investigated whether they were necessary for DLM development by using a microbeam laser to ablate them singly and in combination. We found that, in the absence of the larval muscle fibers, DLMs nonetheless develop. Our results show that the persistent larval muscle fibers are not required to initiate myoblast fusion, to determine DLM identity, to locate the DLMs in the thorax, or to specify the total DLM fiber volume. However, they are required to regulate the number of DLM fibers generated. Thus, while the persistent larval muscle fibers are not obligatory for DLM fiber formation and differentiation, they are necessary to ensure the development of the correct number of fibers.

  20. Trpc1 ion channel modulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway during myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zanou, Nadège; Schakman, Olivier; Louis, Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T; Dietrich, Alexander; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Gailly, Philippe

    2012-04-27

    We previously showed in vitro that calcium entry through Trpc1 ion channels regulates myoblast migration and differentiation. In the present work, we used primary cell cultures and isolated muscles from Trpc1(-/-) and Trpc1(+/+) murine model to investigate the role of Trpc1 in myoblast differentiation and in muscle regeneration. In these models, we studied regeneration consecutive to cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury and observed a significant hypotrophy and a delayed regeneration in Trpc1(-/-) muscles consisting in smaller fiber size and increased proportion of centrally nucleated fibers. This was accompanied by a decreased expression of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myf5, and myogenin and of one of their targets, the developmental MHC (MHCd). Consequently, muscle tension was systematically lower in muscles from Trpc1(-/-) mice. Importantly, the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway, which plays a crucial role in muscle growth and regeneration, was down-regulated in regenerating Trpc1(-/-) muscles. Indeed, phosphorylation of both Akt and p70S6K proteins was decreased as well as the activation of PI3K, the main upstream regulator of the Akt. This effect was independent of insulin-like growth factor expression. Akt phosphorylation also was reduced in Trpc1(-/-) primary myoblasts and in control myoblasts differentiated in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) or pretreated with EGTA-AM or wortmannin, suggesting that the entry of Ca(2+) through Trpc1 channels enhanced the activity of PI3K. Our results emphasize the involvement of Trpc1 channels in skeletal muscle development in vitro and in vivo, and identify a Ca(2+)-dependent activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway during myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration.

  1. Trpc1 Ion Channel Modulates Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/Akt Pathway during Myoblast Differentiation and Muscle Regeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Zanou, Nadège; Schakman, Olivier; Louis, Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T.; Dietrich, Alexander; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Gailly, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed in vitro that calcium entry through Trpc1 ion channels regulates myoblast migration and differentiation. In the present work, we used primary cell cultures and isolated muscles from Trpc1−/− and Trpc1+/+ murine model to investigate the role of Trpc1 in myoblast differentiation and in muscle regeneration. In these models, we studied regeneration consecutive to cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury and observed a significant hypotrophy and a delayed regeneration in Trpc1−/− muscles consisting in smaller fiber size and increased proportion of centrally nucleated fibers. This was accompanied by a decreased expression of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myf5, and myogenin and of one of their targets, the developmental MHC (MHCd). Consequently, muscle tension was systematically lower in muscles from Trpc1−/− mice. Importantly, the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway, which plays a crucial role in muscle growth and regeneration, was down-regulated in regenerating Trpc1−/− muscles. Indeed, phosphorylation of both Akt and p70S6K proteins was decreased as well as the activation of PI3K, the main upstream regulator of the Akt. This effect was independent of insulin-like growth factor expression. Akt phosphorylation also was reduced in Trpc1−/− primary myoblasts and in control myoblasts differentiated in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ or pretreated with EGTA-AM or wortmannin, suggesting that the entry of Ca2+ through Trpc1 channels enhanced the activity of PI3K. Our results emphasize the involvement of Trpc1 channels in skeletal muscle development in vitro and in vivo, and identify a Ca2+-dependent activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway during myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration. PMID:22399301

  2. Muscle regeneration during hindlimb unloading results in a reduction in muscle size after reloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Pulvermacher, P. M.; Schultz, E.

    2001-01-01

    The hindlimb-unloading model was used to study the ability of muscle injured in a weightless environment to recover after reloading. Satellite cell mitotic activity and DNA unit size were determined in injured and intact soleus muscles from hindlimb-unloaded and age-matched weight-bearing rats at the conclusion of 28 days of hindlimb unloading, 2 wk after reloading, and 9 wk after reloading. The body weights of hindlimb-unloaded rats were significantly (P < 0.05) less than those of weight-bearing rats at the conclusion of hindlimb unloading, but they were the same (P > 0.05) as those of weight-bearing rats 2 and 9 wk after reloading. The soleus muscle weight, soleus muscle weight-to-body weight ratio, myofiber diameter, number of nuclei per millimeter, and DNA unit size were significantly (P < 0.05) smaller for the injured soleus muscles from hindlimb-unloaded rats than for the soleus muscles from weight-bearing rats at each recovery time. Satellite cell mitotic activity was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the injured soleus muscles from hindlimb-unloaded rats than from weight-bearing rats 2 wk after reloading, but it was the same (P > 0.05) as in the injured soleus muscles from weight-bearing rats 9 wk after reloading. The injured soleus muscles from hindlimb-unloaded rats failed to achieve weight-bearing muscle size 9 wk after reloading, because incomplete compensation for the decrease in myonuclear accretion and DNA unit size expansion occurred during the unloading period.

  3. Sex hormones establish a reserve pool of adult muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Han, Gi-Chan; Seo, Ji-Yun; Park, Inkuk; Park, Wookjin; Jeong, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Su Hyeon; Bae, Sung-Hwan; Seong, Jinwoo; Yum, Min-Kyu; Hann, Sang-Hyeon; Kwon, Young-Guen; Seo, Daekwan; Choi, Man Ho; Kong, Young-Yun

    2016-09-01

    Quiescent satellite cells, known as adult muscle stem cells, possess a remarkable ability to regenerate skeletal muscle following injury throughout life. Although they mainly originate from multipotent stem/progenitor cells of the somite, the mechanism underlying the establishment of quiescent satellite cell populations is unknown. Here, we show that sex hormones induce Mind bomb 1 (Mib1) expression in myofibres at puberty, which activates Notch signalling in cycling juvenile satellite cells and causes them to be converted into adult quiescent satellite cells. Myofibres lacking Mib1 fail to send Notch signals to juvenile satellite cells, leading to impaired cell cycle exit and depletion. Our findings reveal that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis drives Mib1 expression in the myofibre niche. Moreover, the same axis regulates the re-establishment of quiescent satellite cell populations following injury. Our data show that sex hormones establish adult quiescent satellite cell populations by regulating the myofibre niche at puberty and re-establish them during regeneration.

  4. Sex hormones establish a reserve pool of adult muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Han, Gi-Chan; Seo, Ji-Yun; Park, Inkuk; Park, Wookjin; Jeong, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Su Hyeon; Bae, Sung-Hwan; Seong, Jinwoo; Yum, Min-Kyu; Hann, Sang-Hyeon; Kwon, Young-Guen; Seo, Daekwan; Choi, Man Ho; Kong, Young-Yun

    2016-09-01

    Quiescent satellite cells, known as adult muscle stem cells, possess a remarkable ability to regenerate skeletal muscle following injury throughout life. Although they mainly originate from multipotent stem/progenitor cells of the somite, the mechanism underlying the establishment of quiescent satellite cell populations is unknown. Here, we show that sex hormones induce Mind bomb 1 (Mib1) expression in myofibres at puberty, which activates Notch signalling in cycling juvenile satellite cells and causes them to be converted into adult quiescent satellite cells. Myofibres lacking Mib1 fail to send Notch signals to juvenile satellite cells, leading to impaired cell cycle exit and depletion. Our findings reveal that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis drives Mib1 expression in the myofibre niche. Moreover, the same axis regulates the re-establishment of quiescent satellite cell populations following injury. Our data show that sex hormones establish adult quiescent satellite cell populations by regulating the myofibre niche at puberty and re-establish them during regeneration. PMID:27548913

  5. A systems-based investigation into vitamin D and skeletal muscle repair, regeneration, and hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Owens, Daniel J; Sharples, Adam P; Polydorou, Ioanna; Alwan, Nura; Donovan, Timothy; Tang, Jonathan; Fraser, William D; Cooper, Robert G; Morton, James P; Stewart, Claire; Close, Graeme L

    2015-12-15

    Skeletal muscle is a direct target for vitamin D. Observational studies suggest that low 25[OH]D correlates with functional recovery of skeletal muscle following eccentric contractions in humans and crush injury in rats. However, a definitive association is yet to be established. To address this gap in knowledge in relation to damage repair, a randomised, placebo-controlled trial was performed in 20 males with insufficient concentrations of serum 25(OH)D (45 ± 25 nmol/l). Prior to and following 6 wk of supplemental vitamin D3 (4,000 IU/day) or placebo (50 mg of cellulose), participants performed 20 × 10 damaging eccentric contractions of the knee extensors, with peak torque measured over the following 7 days of recovery. Parallel experimentation using isolated human skeletal muscle-derived myoblast cells from biopsies of 14 males with low serum 25(OH)D (37 ± 11 nmol/l) were subjected to mechanical wound injury, which enabled corresponding in vitro studies of muscle repair, regeneration, and hypertrophy in the presence and absence of 10 or 100 nmol 1α,25(OH)2D3. Supplemental vitamin D3 increased serum 25(OH)D and improved recovery of peak torque at 48 h and 7 days postexercise. In vitro, 10 nmol 1α,25(OH)2D3 improved muscle cell migration dynamics and resulted in improved myotube fusion/differentiation at the biochemical, morphological, and molecular level together with increased myotube hypertrophy at 7 and 10 days postdamage. Together, these preliminary data are the first to characterize a role for vitamin D in human skeletal muscle regeneration and suggest that maintaining serum 25(OH)D may be beneficial for enhancing reparative processes and potentially for facilitating subsequent hypertrophy. PMID:26506852

  6. Re-regeneration of lower jaws and the dental lamina in adult urodeles.

    PubMed

    Graver, H T

    1978-09-01

    Transverse amputations were carried out through one-third fully regenerated jaw segments and through normal tissue of the mandible on the same and opposite sides of the jaw in adults of Notophthalmus viridescens. Collectively the results suggest that, in adult urodeles, the mandible and the dental lamina can be replaced in an identical manner more than one time. Although the major histological events are the same in jaw regeneration and re-regeneration, regrowth is more rapid in re-regeneration. It appears that recently differentiated tissues of the regenerate have a higher capacity for regeneration than normal tissues amputated for the first time. Re-regeneration of the jaw occurs by growth of the original regenerate cartilage which has undergone reorganization. In re-regeneration, the skeletal elements exhibit no polarity and regrowth occurs in both directions, while the dental lamina possesses an anterior-posterior polarity and can regrow in an anterior direction only. Information concerning the mechanisms involved in the regenerative events remain to be determined.

  7. Adult axolotls can regenerate original neuronal diversity in response to brain injury.

    PubMed

    Amamoto, Ryoji; Huerta, Violeta Gisselle Lopez; Takahashi, Emi; Dai, Guangping; Grant, Aaron K; Fu, Zhanyan; Arlotta, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The axolotl can regenerate multiple organs, including the brain. It remains, however, unclear whether neuronal diversity, intricate tissue architecture, and axonal connectivity can be regenerated; yet, this is critical for recovery of function and a central aim of cell replacement strategies in the mammalian central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate that, upon mechanical injury to the adult pallium, axolotls can regenerate several of the populations of neurons present before injury. Notably, regenerated neurons acquire functional electrophysiological traits and respond appropriately to afferent inputs. Despite the ability to regenerate specific, molecularly-defined neuronal subtypes, we also uncovered previously unappreciated limitations by showing that newborn neurons organize within altered tissue architecture and fail to re-establish the long-distance axonal tracts and circuit physiology present before injury. The data provide a direct demonstration that diverse, electrophysiologically functional neurons can be regenerated in axolotls, but challenge prior assumptions of functional brain repair in regenerative species. PMID:27156560

  8. Muscle dissatisfaction in young adult men

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Backround Appearance concerns are of increasing importance in young men's lives. We investigated whether muscle dissatisfaction is associated with psychological symptoms, dietary supplement or anabolic steroid use, or physical activity in young men. Methods As a part of a questionnaire assessment of health-related behaviors in the population-based FinnTwin16 study, we assessed factors associated with muscle dissatisfaction in 1245 men aged 22–27 using logistic regression models. Results Of men, 30% experienced high muscle dissatisfaction, while 12% used supplements/steroids. Of highly muscle-dissatisfied men, 21.5% used supplements/steroids. Mean body mass index, waist circumference, or leisure aerobic activity index did not differ between individuals with high/low muscle dissatisfaction. Muscle dissatisfaction was significantly associated with a psychological and psychosomatic problems, alcohol and drug use, lower height satisfaction, sedentary lifestyle, poor subjective physical fitness, and lower life satisfaction. Conclusion Muscle dissatisfaction and supplement/steroid use are relatively common, and are associated with psychological distress and markers of sedentary lifestyle. PMID:16594989

  9. Muscle niche-driven Insulin-Notch-Myc cascade reactivates dormant Adult Muscle Precursors in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Aradhya, Rajaguru; Zmojdzian, Monika; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-12-09

    How stem cells specified during development keep their non-differentiated quiescent state, and how they are reactivated, remain poorly understood. Here, we applied a Drosophila model to follow in vivo behavior of adult muscle precursors (AMPs), the transient fruit fly muscle stem cells. We report that emerging AMPs send out thin filopodia that make contact with neighboring muscles. AMPs keep their filopodia-based association with muscles throughout their dormant state but also when they start to proliferate, suggesting that muscles could play a role in AMP reactivation. Indeed, our genetic analyses indicate that muscles send inductive dIlp6 signals that switch the Insulin pathway ON in closely associated AMPs. This leads to the activation of Notch, which regulates AMP proliferation via dMyc. Altogether, we report that Drosophila AMPs display homing behavior to muscle niche and that the niche-driven Insulin-Notch-dMyc cascade plays a key role in setting the activated state of AMPs.

  10. Phospholipase D1 facilitates second-phase myoblast fusion and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Teng, Shuzhi; Stegner, David; Chen, Qin; Hongu, Tsunaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Chen, Li; Kanaho, Yasunori; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Frohman, Michael A; Huang, Ping

    2015-02-01

    Myoblast differentiation and fusion is a well-orchestrated multistep process that is essential for skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Phospholipase D1 (PLD1) has been implicated in the initiation of myoblast differentiation in vitro. However, whether PLD1 plays additional roles in myoblast fusion and exerts a function in myogenesis in vivo remains unknown. Here we show that PLD1 expression is up-regulated in myogenic cells during muscle regeneration after cardiotoxin injury and that genetic ablation of PLD1 results in delayed myofiber regeneration. Myoblasts derived from PLD1-null mice or treated with PLD1-specific inhibitor are unable to form mature myotubes, indicating defects in second-phase myoblast fusion. Concomitantly, the PLD1 product phosphatidic acid is transiently detected on the plasma membrane of differentiating myocytes, and its production is inhibited by PLD1 knockdown. Exogenous lysophosphatidylcholine, a key membrane lipid for fusion pore formation, partially rescues fusion defect resulting from PLD1 inhibition. Thus these studies demonstrate a role for PLD1 in myoblast fusion during myogenesis in which PLD1 facilitates the fusion of mononuclear myocytes with nascent myotubes. PMID:25428992

  11. Phospholipase D1 facilitates second-phase myoblast fusion and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Teng, Shuzhi; Stegner, David; Chen, Qin; Hongu, Tsunaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Chen, Li; Kanaho, Yasunori; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Frohman, Michael A; Huang, Ping

    2015-02-01

    Myoblast differentiation and fusion is a well-orchestrated multistep process that is essential for skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Phospholipase D1 (PLD1) has been implicated in the initiation of myoblast differentiation in vitro. However, whether PLD1 plays additional roles in myoblast fusion and exerts a function in myogenesis in vivo remains unknown. Here we show that PLD1 expression is up-regulated in myogenic cells during muscle regeneration after cardiotoxin injury and that genetic ablation of PLD1 results in delayed myofiber regeneration. Myoblasts derived from PLD1-null mice or treated with PLD1-specific inhibitor are unable to form mature myotubes, indicating defects in second-phase myoblast fusion. Concomitantly, the PLD1 product phosphatidic acid is transiently detected on the plasma membrane of differentiating myocytes, and its production is inhibited by PLD1 knockdown. Exogenous lysophosphatidylcholine, a key membrane lipid for fusion pore formation, partially rescues fusion defect resulting from PLD1 inhibition. Thus these studies demonstrate a role for PLD1 in myoblast fusion during myogenesis in which PLD1 facilitates the fusion of mononuclear myocytes with nascent myotubes.

  12. mTOR regulates skeletal muscle regeneration in vivo through kinase-dependent and kinase-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yejing; Wu, Ai-Luen; Warnes, Christine; Liu, Jianming; Zhang, Chongben; Kawasome, Hideki; Terada, Naohiro; Boppart, Marni D; Schoenherr, Christopher J; Chen, Jie

    2009-12-01

    Rapamycin-sensitive signaling is required for skeletal muscle differentiation and remodeling. In cultured myoblasts, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been reported to regulate differentiation at different stages through distinct mechanisms, including one that is independent of mTOR kinase activity. However, the kinase-independent function of mTOR remains controversial, and no in vivo studies have examined those mTOR myogenic mechanisms previously identified in vitro. In this study, we find that rapamycin impairs injury-induced muscle regeneration. To validate the role of mTOR with genetic evidence and to probe the mechanism of mTOR function, we have generated and characterized transgenic mice expressing two mutants of mTOR under the control of human skeletal actin (HSA) promoter: rapamycin-resistant (RR) and RR/kinase-inactive (RR/KI). Our results show that muscle regeneration in rapamycin-administered mice is restored by RR-mTOR expression. In the RR/KI-mTOR mice, nascent myofiber formation during the early phase of regeneration proceeds in the presence of rapamycin, but growth of the regenerating myofibers is blocked by rapamycin. Igf2 mRNA levels increase drastically during early regeneration, which is sensitive to rapamycin in wild-type muscles but partially resistant to rapamycin in both RR- and RR/KI-mTOR muscles, consistent with mTOR regulation of Igf2 expression in a kinase-independent manner. Furthermore, systemic ablation of S6K1, a target of mTOR kinase, results in impaired muscle growth but normal nascent myofiber formation during regeneration. Therefore, mTOR regulates muscle regeneration through kinase-independent and kinase-dependent mechanisms at the stages of nascent myofiber formation and myofiber growth, respectively.

  13. Muscle MRI Findings in Childhood/Adult Onset Pompe Disease Correlate with Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bonaparte, Sebastián; Segovia, Sonia; Llauger, Jaume; Belmonte, Izaskun; Pedrosa, Irene; Alejaldre, Aída; Mayos, Mercè; Suárez-Cuartín, Guillermo; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Enzyme replacement therapy has shown to be effective for childhood/adult onset Pompe disease (AOPD). The discovery of biomarkers useful for monitoring disease progression is one of the priority research topics in Pompe disease. Muscle MRI could be one possible test but the correlation between muscle MRI and muscle strength and function has been only partially addressed so far. Methods We studied 34 AOPD patients using functional scales (Manual Research Council scale, hand held myometry, 6 minutes walking test, timed to up and go test, time to climb up and down 4 steps, time to walk 10 meters and Motor Function Measure 20 Scale), respiratory tests (Forced Vital Capacity seated and lying, Maximun Inspiratory Pressure and Maximum Expiratory Pressure), daily live activities scales (Activlim) and quality of life scales (Short Form-36 and Individualized Neuromuscular Quality of Life questionnaire). We performed a whole body muscle MRI using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging centered on thighs and lower trunk region. Results T1w whole body muscle MRI showed a homogeneous pattern of muscle involvement that could also be found in pre-symptomatic individuals. We found a strong correlation between muscle strength, muscle functional scales and the degree of muscle fatty replacement in muscle MRI analyzed using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging studies. Moreover, muscle MRI detected mild degree of fatty replacement in paraspinal muscles in pre-symptomatic patients. Conclusion Based on our findings, we consider that muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic patients under treatment. Take home message Muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful to follow-up patients in daily clinic. PMID:27711114

  14. Dietary Flaxseed Mitigates Impaired Skeletal Muscle Regeneration: in Vivo, in Vitro and in Silico Studies

    PubMed Central

    Carotenuto, Felicia; Costa, Alessandra; Albertini, Maria Cristina; Rocchi, Marco Bruno Luigi; Rudov, Alexander; Coletti, Dario; Minieri, Marilena; Di Nardo, Paolo; Teodori, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diets enriched with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) have been shown to exert a positive impact on muscle diseases. Flaxseed is one of the richest sources of n-3 PUFA acid α-linolenic acid (ALA). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of flaxseed and ALA in models of skeletal muscle degeneration characterized by high levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF). Methods: The in vivo studies were carried out on dystrophic hamsters affected by muscle damage associated with high TNF plasma levels and fed with a long-term 30% flaxseed-supplemented diet. Differentiating C2C12 myoblasts treated with TNF and challenged with ALA represented the in vitro model. Skeletal muscle morphology was scrutinized by applying the Principal Component Analysis statistical method. Apoptosis, inflammation and myogenesis were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Finally, an in silico analysis was carried out to predict the possible pathways underlying the effects of n-3 PUFAs. Results: The flaxseed-enriched diet protected the dystrophic muscle from apoptosis and preserved muscle myogenesis by increasing the myogenin and alpha myosin heavy chain. Moreover, it restored the normal expression pattern of caveolin-3 thereby allowing protein retention at the sarcolemma. ALA reduced TNF-induced apoptosis in differentiating myoblasts and prevented the TNF-induced inhibition of myogenesis, as demonstrated by the increased expression of myogenin, myosin heavy chain and caveolin-3, while promoting myotube fusion. The in silico investigation revealed that FAK pathways may play a central role in the protective effects of ALA on myogenesis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that flaxseed may exert potent beneficial effects by preserving skeletal muscle regeneration and homeostasis partly through an ALA-mediated action. Thus, dietary flaxseed and ALA may serve as a useful strategy for treating patients with muscle dystrophies. PMID:26941581

  15. The leech: a novel invertebrate model for studying muscle regeneration and diseases.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Annalisa; Banfi, Serena; Bianchi, Cristiano; Gabriella, Greco; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Noonan, Douglas M; Valvassori, Roberto; de Eguileor, Magda

    2010-01-01

    We focused our studies on the leech, Hirudo medicinalis. This invertebrate has a relative anatomical simplicity and is a reliable model for studying a variety of basic events, such as tissue repair, which has a striking similarity with vertebrate responses. Hirudo is also a good invertebrate model to test the actions of drugs and gene products, since the responses evoked by the different stimuli are clear and easily detectable due to their small size and anatomical simplicity. Here we review the use of this invertebrate model to investigate muscle regeneration and the role of hematopoietic stem cells in this process. Our recent data, summarized in this review, demonstrate that the injection of an appropriate combination of the matrigel biopolymer supplemented with Vascular Endothelial Growth factor (VEGF) in the leech Hirudo medicinalis is a remarkably effective tool for isolating a specific population of hematopoietic/endothelial precursor cells, which in turn can differentiate in muscle cells. Thus leeches can be considered as a new emerging model for studying endothelial and hematopoietic precursors cells involved in muscle post-natal growth and regeneration processes. PMID:20041825

  16. Deletion of Mbtps1 (Pcsk8, S1p, Ski-1) Gene in Osteocytes Stimulates Soleus Muscle Regeneration and Increased Size and Contractile Force with Age.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Jeff P; Huffman, Nichole T; Vallejo, Julian; Brotto, Leticia; Chittur, Sridar V; Breggia, Anne; Stern, Amber; Huang, Jian; Mo, Chenglin; Seidah, Nabil G; Bonewald, Lynda; Brotto, Marco

    2016-02-26

    Conditional deletion of Mbtps1 (cKO) protease in bone osteocytes leads to an age-related increase in mass (12%) and in contractile force (30%) in adult slow twitch soleus muscles (SOL) with no effect on fast twitch extensor digitorum longus muscles. Surprisingly, bone from 10-12-month-old cKO animals was indistinguishable from controls in size, density, and morphology except for a 25% increase in stiffness. cKO SOL exhibited increased expression of Pax7, Myog, Myod1, Notch, and Myh3 and 6-fold more centralized nuclei, characteristics of postnatal regenerating muscle, but only in type I myosin heavy chain-expressing cells. Increased expression of gene pathways mediating EGF receptor signaling, circadian exercise, striated muscle contraction, and lipid and carbohydrate oxidative metabolism were also observed in cKO SOL. This muscle phenotype was not observed in 3-month-old mice. Although Mbtps1 mRNA and protein expression was reduced in cKO bone osteocytes, no differences in Mbtps1 or cre recombinase expression were observed in cKO SOL, explaining this age-related phenotype. Understanding bone-muscle cross-talk may provide a fresh and novel approach to prevention and treatment of age-related muscle loss. PMID:26719336

  17. Abnormal Skeletal Muscle Regeneration plus Mild Alterations in Mature Fiber Type Specification in Fktn-Deficient Dystroglycanopathy Muscular Dystrophy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Steven J.; Modi, Jill N.; Melick, Garrett A.; Abousaud, Marin I.; Luan, Junna; Fortunato, Marisa J.; Beedle, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylated α-dystroglycan provides an essential link between extracellular matrix proteins, like laminin, and the cellular cytoskeleton via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. In secondary dystroglycanopathy muscular dystrophy, glycosylation abnormalities disrupt a complex O-mannose glycan necessary for muscle structural integrity and signaling. Fktn-deficient dystroglycanopathy mice develop moderate to severe muscular dystrophy with skeletal muscle developmental and/or regeneration defects. To gain insight into the role of glycosylated α-dystroglycan in these processes, we performed muscle fiber typing in young (2, 4 and 8 week old) and regenerated muscle. In mice with Fktn disruption during skeletal muscle specification (Myf5/Fktn KO), newly regenerated fibers (embryonic myosin heavy chain positive) peaked at 4 weeks old, while total regenerated fibers (centrally nucleated) were highest at 8 weeks old in tibialis anterior (TA) and iliopsoas, indicating peak degeneration/regeneration activity around 4 weeks of age. In contrast, mature fiber type specification at 2, 4 and 8 weeks old was relatively unchanged. Fourteen days after necrotic toxin-induced injury, there was a divergence in muscle fiber types between Myf5/Fktn KO (skeletal-muscle specific) and whole animal knockout induced with tamoxifen post-development (Tam/Fktn KO) despite equivalent time after gene deletion. Notably, Tam/Fktn KO retained higher levels of embryonic myosin heavy chain expression after injury, suggesting a delay or abnormality in differentiation programs. In mature fiber type specification post-injury, there were significant interactions between genotype and toxin parameters for type 1, 2a, and 2x fibers, and a difference between Myf5/Fktn and Tam/Fktn study groups in type 2b fibers. These data suggest that functionally glycosylated α-dystroglycan has a unique role in muscle regeneration and may influence fiber type specification post-injury. PMID:26751696

  18. AMP-activated protein kinase stimulates Warburg-like glycolysis and activation of satellite cells during muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xing; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Dodson, Mike V; Du, Min

    2015-10-30

    Satellite cells are the major myogenic stem cells residing inside skeletal muscle and are indispensable for muscle regeneration. Satellite cells remain largely quiescent but are rapidly activated in response to muscle injury, and the derived myogenic cells then fuse to repair damaged muscle fibers or form new muscle fibers. However, mechanisms eliciting metabolic activation, an inseparable step for satellite cell activation following muscle injury, have not been defined. We found that a noncanonical Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway is rapidly activated in response to muscle injury, which activates AMPK and induces a Warburg-like glycolysis in satellite cells. AMPKα1 is the dominant AMPKα isoform expressed in satellite cells, and AMPKα1 deficiency in satellite cells impairs their activation and myogenic differentiation during muscle regeneration. Drugs activating noncanonical Shh promote proliferation of satellite cells, which is abolished because of satellite cell-specific AMPKα1 knock-out. Taken together, AMPKα1 is a critical mediator linking noncanonical Shh pathway to Warburg-like glycolysis in satellite cells, which is required for satellite activation and muscle regeneration.

  19. Transplanted Endothelial Progenitor Cells Improve Ischemia Muscle Regeneration in Mice by Diffusion Tensor MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yingying; James, Judy R.; Shlapak, Darya P.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in repairing ischemia tissues. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was applied to detect the architectural organization of skeletal muscle. This study investigated the feasibility and accuracy of using the DTI to evaluate effectiveness of EPCs treatment. Mouse bone marrow-derived EPCs were isolated, cultured, characterized, and transplanted to hindlimb ischemia mice model. DTI was performed on the hindlimb at postischemia time points. The edema regions of diffusion restriction (high signal in diffusion weighted imaging) were decreased in the ischemic muscle of EPCs treated mice after 14 days compared with the controls. These results from DTI show the lower apparent diffusion coefficient and eigenvalues (λ1, λ2, and λ3) and the higher fractional anisotropy and fiber counts of ischemic muscle on 7 and 14 days after EPCs treatment compared to the controls. There was a significant correlation between fiber counts calculated by DTI and survival fibers evaluated by histological section (r = 0.873, P < 0.01). Our study demonstrated that the time frame for muscle fiber regeneration after EPCs transplantation was significantly shortened in vivo. DTI could be a useful tool for noninvasive evaluation of muscle tissue damage and repair in animal models and patient with ischemic diseases. PMID:27656214

  20. Transplanted Endothelial Progenitor Cells Improve Ischemia Muscle Regeneration in Mice by Diffusion Tensor MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yingying; James, Judy R.; Shlapak, Darya P.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in repairing ischemia tissues. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was applied to detect the architectural organization of skeletal muscle. This study investigated the feasibility and accuracy of using the DTI to evaluate effectiveness of EPCs treatment. Mouse bone marrow-derived EPCs were isolated, cultured, characterized, and transplanted to hindlimb ischemia mice model. DTI was performed on the hindlimb at postischemia time points. The edema regions of diffusion restriction (high signal in diffusion weighted imaging) were decreased in the ischemic muscle of EPCs treated mice after 14 days compared with the controls. These results from DTI show the lower apparent diffusion coefficient and eigenvalues (λ1, λ2, and λ3) and the higher fractional anisotropy and fiber counts of ischemic muscle on 7 and 14 days after EPCs treatment compared to the controls. There was a significant correlation between fiber counts calculated by DTI and survival fibers evaluated by histological section (r = 0.873, P < 0.01). Our study demonstrated that the time frame for muscle fiber regeneration after EPCs transplantation was significantly shortened in vivo. DTI could be a useful tool for noninvasive evaluation of muscle tissue damage and repair in animal models and patient with ischemic diseases.

  1. Transplanted Endothelial Progenitor Cells Improve Ischemia Muscle Regeneration in Mice by Diffusion Tensor MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xin-Gui; Bai, Yingying; James, Judy R; Shlapak, Darya P; Ju, Shenghong

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in repairing ischemia tissues. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was applied to detect the architectural organization of skeletal muscle. This study investigated the feasibility and accuracy of using the DTI to evaluate effectiveness of EPCs treatment. Mouse bone marrow-derived EPCs were isolated, cultured, characterized, and transplanted to hindlimb ischemia mice model. DTI was performed on the hindlimb at postischemia time points. The edema regions of diffusion restriction (high signal in diffusion weighted imaging) were decreased in the ischemic muscle of EPCs treated mice after 14 days compared with the controls. These results from DTI show the lower apparent diffusion coefficient and eigenvalues (λ1, λ2, and λ3) and the higher fractional anisotropy and fiber counts of ischemic muscle on 7 and 14 days after EPCs treatment compared to the controls. There was a significant correlation between fiber counts calculated by DTI and survival fibers evaluated by histological section (r = 0.873, P < 0.01). Our study demonstrated that the time frame for muscle fiber regeneration after EPCs transplantation was significantly shortened in vivo. DTI could be a useful tool for noninvasive evaluation of muscle tissue damage and repair in animal models and patient with ischemic diseases. PMID:27656214

  2. V-ATPase Proton Pumping Activity Is Required for Adult Zebrafish Appendage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Joana; Aires, Rita; Becker, Jörg D.; Jacinto, António; Certal, Ana C.; Rodríguez-León, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ion channels and transporters generates ion-specific fluxes that encode electrical and/or chemical signals with biological significance. Even though it is long known that some of those signals are crucial for regeneration, only in recent years the corresponding molecular sources started to be identified using mainly invertebrate or larval vertebrate models. We used adult zebrafish caudal fin as a model to investigate which and how ion transporters affect regeneration in an adult vertebrate model. Through the combined use of biophysical and molecular approaches, we show that V-ATPase activity contributes to a regeneration-specific H+ ef`flux. The onset and intensity of both V-ATPase expression and H+ efflux correlate with the different regeneration rate along the proximal-distal axis. Moreover, we show that V-ATPase inhibition impairs regeneration in adult vertebrate. Notably, the activity of this H+ pump is necessary for aldh1a2 and mkp3 expression, blastema cell proliferation and fin innervation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of V-ATPase during adult vertebrate regeneration. PMID:24671205

  3. V-ATPase proton pumping activity is required for adult zebrafish appendage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Joana; Aires, Rita; Becker, Jörg D; Jacinto, António; Certal, Ana C; Rodríguez-León, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ion channels and transporters generates ion-specific fluxes that encode electrical and/or chemical signals with biological significance. Even though it is long known that some of those signals are crucial for regeneration, only in recent years the corresponding molecular sources started to be identified using mainly invertebrate or larval vertebrate models. We used adult zebrafish caudal fin as a model to investigate which and how ion transporters affect regeneration in an adult vertebrate model. Through the combined use of biophysical and molecular approaches, we show that V-ATPase activity contributes to a regeneration-specific H+ ef`flux. The onset and intensity of both V-ATPase expression and H+ efflux correlate with the different regeneration rate along the proximal-distal axis. Moreover, we show that V-ATPase inhibition impairs regeneration in adult vertebrate. Notably, the activity of this H+ pump is necessary for aldh1a2 and mkp3 expression, blastema cell proliferation and fin innervation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of V-ATPase during adult vertebrate regeneration.

  4. Is salamander hindlimb regeneration similar to that of the forelimb? Anatomical and morphogenetic analysis of hindlimb muscle regeneration in GFP-transgenic axolotls as a basis for regenerative and developmental studies.

    PubMed

    Diogo, R; Murawala, P; Tanaka, E M

    2014-04-01

    The axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum is one of the most used model organisms in developmental and regenerative studies because it is commonly said that it can reconstitute a normal and fully functional forelimb/hindlimb after amputation. However, there is not a publication that has described in detail the regeneration of the axolotl hindlimb muscles. Here we describe and illustrate, for the first time, the regeneration of the thigh, leg and foot muscles in transgenic axolotls that express green fluorescent protein in muscle fibers and compare our results with data obtained by us and by other authors about axolotl forelimb regeneration and about fore- and hindlimb ontogeny in axolotls, frogs and other tetrapods. Our observations and comparisons point out that: (1) there are no muscle anomalies in any regenerated axolotl hindlimbs, in clear contrast to our previous study of axolotl forelimb regeneration, where we found muscle anomalies in 43% of the regenerated forelimbs; (2) during axolotl hindlimb regeneration there is a proximo-distal and a tibio-fibular morphogenetic gradient in the order of muscle regeneration and differentiation, but not a ventro-dorsal gradient, whereas our previous studies showed that in axolotl forelimb muscle regeneration there are proximo-distal, radio-ulnar and ventro-dorsal morphogenetic gradients. We discuss the broader implications of these observations for regenerative, evolutionary, developmental and morphogenetic studies.

  5. Is salamander hindlimb regeneration similar to that of the forelimb? Anatomical and morphogenetic analysis of hindlimb muscle regeneration in GFP-transgenic axolotls as a basis for regenerative and developmental studies.

    PubMed

    Diogo, R; Murawala, P; Tanaka, E M

    2014-04-01

    The axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum is one of the most used model organisms in developmental and regenerative studies because it is commonly said that it can reconstitute a normal and fully functional forelimb/hindlimb after amputation. However, there is not a publication that has described in detail the regeneration of the axolotl hindlimb muscles. Here we describe and illustrate, for the first time, the regeneration of the thigh, leg and foot muscles in transgenic axolotls that express green fluorescent protein in muscle fibers and compare our results with data obtained by us and by other authors about axolotl forelimb regeneration and about fore- and hindlimb ontogeny in axolotls, frogs and other tetrapods. Our observations and comparisons point out that: (1) there are no muscle anomalies in any regenerated axolotl hindlimbs, in clear contrast to our previous study of axolotl forelimb regeneration, where we found muscle anomalies in 43% of the regenerated forelimbs; (2) during axolotl hindlimb regeneration there is a proximo-distal and a tibio-fibular morphogenetic gradient in the order of muscle regeneration and differentiation, but not a ventro-dorsal gradient, whereas our previous studies showed that in axolotl forelimb muscle regeneration there are proximo-distal, radio-ulnar and ventro-dorsal morphogenetic gradients. We discuss the broader implications of these observations for regenerative, evolutionary, developmental and morphogenetic studies. PMID:24325444

  6. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  7. Role of TNF-α signaling in regeneration of cardiotoxin-injured muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuen-Ei; Gerken, Eric; Zhang, Yingmin; Zhan, Mei; Mohan, Raja K.; Li, Andrew S.; Reid, Michael B.; Li, Yi-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Recent data suggest a physiological role for the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α in skeletal muscle regeneration. However, the underlying mechanism is not understood. In the present study, we analyzed TNF-α-activated signaling pathways involved in myogenesis in soleus muscle injured by cardiotoxin (CTX) in TNF-α receptor double-knockout mice (p55−/−p75−/−). We found that activation of p38MAPK, which is critical for myogenesis, was blocked in CTX-injured p55−/−p75−/− soleus on day 3 postinjury when myogenic differentiation was being initiated, while activation of ERK1/2 and JNK MAPK, as well as transcription factor NF-κB, was not reduced. Consequently, the phosphorylation of transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor-2C, which is catalyzed by p38 and crucial for the expression of muscle-specific genes, was blunted. Meanwhile, expression of p38-dependent differentiation marker myogenin and p21 were suppressed. In addition, expression of cyclin D1 was fivefold that in wild-type (WT) soleus. These results suggest that myogenic differentiation is blocked or delayed in the absence of TNF-α signaling. Histological studies revealed abnormalities in regenerating p55−/−p75−/− soleus. On day 5 postinjury, new myofiber formation was clearly observed in WT soleus but not in p55−/−p75−/− soleus. To the contrary, p55−/−p75−/− soleus displayed renewed inflammation and dystrophic calcification. On day 12 postinjury, the muscle architecture of WT soleus was largely restored. Yet, in p55−/−p75−/− soleus, multifocal areas of inflammation, myofiber death, and myofibers with smaller cross-sectional area were observed. Functional studies demonstrated an attenuated recovery of contractile force in injured p55−/−p75−/− soleus. These data suggest that TNF-α signaling plays a critical regulatory role in muscle regeneration. PMID:16079187

  8. Concise Review: Quiescence in Adult Stem Cells: Biological Significance and Relevance to Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rumman, Mohammad; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Kassem, Moustapha

    2015-10-01

    Adult stem cells (ASCs) are tissue resident stem cells responsible for tissue homeostasis and regeneration following injury. In uninjured tissues, ASCs exist in a nonproliferating, reversibly cell cycle-arrested state known as quiescence or G0. A key function of the quiescent state is to preserve stemness in ASCs by preventing precocious differentiation, and thus maintaining a pool of undifferentiated ASCs. Recent evidences suggest that quiescence is an actively maintained state and that excessive or defective quiescence may lead to compromised tissue regeneration or tumorigenesis. The aim of this review is to provide an update regarding the biological mechanisms of ASC quiescence and their role in tissue regeneration.

  9. Extracellular deposition of matrilin-2 controls the timing of the myogenic program during muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Deák, Ferenc; Mátés, Lajos; Korpos, Éva; Zvara, Ágnes; Szénási, Tibor; Kiricsi, Mónika; Mendler, Luca; Keller-Pintér, Anikó; Ózsvári, Béla; Juhász, Hajnalka; Sorokin, Lydia; Dux, László; Mermod, Nicolas; Puskás, László G.; Kiss, Ibolya

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we identify a role for the matrilin-2 (Matn2) extracellular matrix protein in controlling the early stages of myogenic differentiation. We observed Matn2 deposition around proliferating, differentiating and fusing myoblasts in culture and during muscle regeneration in vivo. Silencing of Matn2 delayed the expression of the Cdk inhibitor p21 and of the myogenic genes Nfix, MyoD and Myog, explaining the retarded cell cycle exit and myoblast differentiation. Rescue of Matn2 expression restored differentiation and the expression of p21 and of the myogenic genes. TGF-β1 inhibited myogenic differentiation at least in part by repressing Matn2 expression, which inhibited the onset of a positive-feedback loop whereby Matn2 and Nfix activate the expression of one another and activate myoblast differentiation. In vivo, myoblast cell cycle arrest and muscle regeneration was delayed in Matn2−/− relative to wild-type mice. The expression levels of Trf3 and myogenic genes were robustly reduced in Matn2−/− fetal limbs and in differentiating primary myoblast cultures, establishing Matn2 as a key modulator of the regulatory cascade that initiates terminal myogenic differentiation. Our data thus identify Matn2 as a crucial component of a genetic switch that modulates the onset of tissue repair. PMID:24895400

  10. Robust regeneration of adult zebrafish lateral line hair cells reflects continued precursor pool maintenance.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Ivan A; Kappedal, Ryan; Mackenzie, Scott M; Hailey, Dale W; Hoffman, Trevor L; Schilling, Thomas F; Raible, David W

    2015-06-15

    We have examined lateral line hair cell and support cell maintenance in adult zebrafish when growth is largely complete. We demonstrate that adult zebrafish not only replenish hair cells after a single instance of hair cell damage, but also maintain hair cells and support cells after multiple rounds of damage and regeneration. We find that hair cells undergo continuous turnover in adult zebrafish in the absence of damage. We identify mitotically-distinct support cell populations and show that hair cells regenerate from underlying support cells in a region-specific manner. Our results demonstrate that there are two distinct support cell populations in the lateral line, which may help explain why zebrafish hair cell regeneration is extremely robust, retained throughout life, and potentially unlimited in regenerative capacity.

  11. Robust regeneration of adult zebrafish lateral line hair cells reflects continued precursor pool maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Ivan A.; Kappedal, Ryan; Mackenzie, Scott M.; Hailey, Dale W.; Hoffman, Trevor L.; Schilling, Thomas F.; Raible, David W.

    2015-01-01

    We have examined lateral line hair cell and support cell maintenance in adult zebrafish when growth is largely complete. We demonstrate that adult zebrafish not only replenish hair cells after a single instance of hair cell damage, but also maintain hair cells and support cells after multiple rounds of damage and regeneration. We find that hair cells undergo continuous turnover in adult zebrafish in the absence of damage. We identify mitotically-distinct support cell populations and show that hair cells regenerate from underlying support cells in a region-specific manner. Our results demonstrate that there are two distinct support cell populations in the lateral line, which may help explain why zebrafish hair cell regeneration is extremely robust, retained throughout life, and potentially unlimited in regenerative capacity. PMID:25869855

  12. Liver graft regeneration in right lobe adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y-F; Huang, T-L; Chen, T-Y; Tsang, L L-C; Ou, H-Y; Yu, C-Y; Concejero, A; Wang, C-C; Wang, S-H; Lin, T-S; Liu, Y-W; Yang, C-H; Yong, C-C; Chiu, K-W; Jawan, B; Eng, H-L; Chen, C-L

    2009-06-01

    Optimal portal flow is one of the essentials in adequate liver function, graft regeneration and outcome of the graft after right lobe adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT). The relations among factors that cause sufficient liver graft regeneration are still unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential predisposing factors that encourage liver graft regeneration after ALDLT. The study population consisted of right lobe ALDLT recipients from Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Taiwan. The records, preoperative images, postoperative Doppler ultrasound evaluation and computed tomography studies performed 6 months after transplant were reviewed. The volume of the graft 6 months after transplant divided by the standard liver volume was calculated as the regeneration ratio. The predisposing risk factors were compiled from statistical analyses and included age, recipient body weight, native liver disease, spleen size before transplant, patency of the hepatic venous graft, graft weight-to-recipient weight ratio (GRWR), posttransplant portal flow, vascular and biliary complications and rejection. One hundred forty-five recipients were enrolled in this study. The liver graft regeneration ratio was 91.2 +/- 12.6% (range, 58-151). The size of the spleen (p = 0.00015), total portal flow and GRWR (p = 0.005) were linearly correlated with the regeneration rate. Patency of the hepatic venous tributary reconstructed was positively correlated to graft regeneration and was statistically significant (p = 0.017). Splenic artery ligation was advantageous to promote liver regeneration in specific cases but splenectomy did not show any positive advantage. Spleen size is a major factor contributing to portal flow and may directly trigger regeneration after transplant. Control of sufficient portal flow and adequate hepatic outflow are important factors in graft regeneration.

  13. Patterns and cellular mechanisms of arm regeneration in adult starfish Asterias rollestoni bell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Tingjun; Fan, Xianyuan; Du, Yutang; Sun, Wenjie; Zhang, Shaofeng; Li, Jiaxin

    2011-09-01

    To understand the mechanisms of starfish regeneration, the arms of adult starfish Asterias rollestoni Bell were amputated and their regeneration patterns and cellular mechanisms were studied. It was found that cells in the outer epidermis and inner parietal peritoneum near the end of the stump began to dedifferentiate 4 d after amputation. The dedifferentiated cells in the outer epidermis proliferated, migrated to the wound site and formed a thickened pre-epidermis which would then re-differentiate gradually into mature epidermis. The new parietal peritoneum formed on the coelomic side of wound might be from the curvely elongated parietal peritoneum, resulting from the dedifferentiated and proliferated cells by extension. Afterwards, the proliferated cells made the outer epidermis and inner parietal peritoneum invaginate into the interior dermis and formed blastema-like structures together with induced dedifferentiated dermal cells. Most interestingly, the arm regeneration in A. rollestoni was achieved synchronously by de novo arm-bud formation and growth, and arm-stump elongation. The crucial aspects of arm-bud formation included cell dedifferentiation, proliferation and migration, while those of arm-stump elongation included cell dedifferentiation, proliferation, invagination, and arm-wall-across blastema-like structure formation. The unique pattern and cellular mechanisms of amputated arm regeneration make it easier to understand the rapid regeneration process of adult starfish. This study may lay solid foundations for the research into molecular mechanisms of echinoderm regeneration.

  14. Limb Regeneration is Impaired in an Adult Zebrafish Model of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ansgar S.; Sarras, Michael P.; Intine, Robert V.

    2010-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio Rerio) is an established model organism for the study of developmental processes, human disease and tissue regeneration. We report that limb regeneration is severely impaired in our newly developed adult zebrafish model of type I diabetes. Intraperitoneal streptozocin injection of adult, wild type zebrafish results in a sustained hyperglycemic state as determined by elevated fasting blood glucose values and increased glycation of serum protein. Serum insulin levels are also decreased and pancreas immunohistochemisty revealed a lesser amount of insulin signal in hyperglycemic fish. Additionally, the diabetic complications of retinal thinning and glomerular basement membrane thickening (early signs of retinopathy and nephropathy) resulting from the hyperglycemic state were evident in streptozocin injected fish at three weeks. Most significantly, limb regeneration, following caudal fin amputation, is severely impaired in diabetic zebrafish. Nonspecific toxic effects outside the pancreas were not found to contribute to impaired limb regeneration. This experimental system using adult zebrafish facilitates a broad spectrum of genetic and molecular approaches to study regeneration in the diabetic background. PMID:20840523

  15. Lens regeneration in juvenile and adult rabbits measured by image analysis.

    PubMed

    Gwon, A E; Jones, R L; Gruber, L J; Mantras, C

    1992-06-01

    Secondary cataract growth commonly occurs after extracapsular cataract extraction. The proliferation of this regrowth occurs at rates related to many factors. In this study, the authors analyzed the amount of lens regeneration after endocapsular lens extraction that leaves the anterior and posterior capsules relatively intact. The analysis was performed in New Zealand albino rabbits with the aid of image analysis measurements in young and adult animals. The effect of low vacuum suction of the anterior capsule on the growth was determined. Lens regeneration was used as a measure of the growth potential of the leftover epithelial cells in the capsule bag. The results showed that lens regeneration was significantly faster in younger rabbits. However, low vacuum suction had no effect on the growth rate. Potential therapeutic agents for preventing secondary cataracts may be better analyzed with image analysis processing of lens regeneration, a precise and rapid measurement technique.

  16. Molecular Basis for the Nerve Dependence of Limb Regeneration in an Adult Vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anoop; Godwin, James W.; Gates, Phillip B.; Garza-Garcia, A. Acely; Brockes, Jeremy P.

    2009-01-01

    The limb blastemal cells of an adult salamander regenerate the structures distal to the level of amputation, and the surface protein Prod 1 is a critical determinant of their proximodistal identity. The Anterior Gradient protein family member nAG is a secreted ligand for Prod 1, and a growth factor for cultured newt blastemal cells. nAG is sequentially expressed after amputation in the regenerating nerve and the wound epidermis, the key tissues of the stem cell niche, and its expression in both locations is abrogated by denervation. The local expression of nAG after electroporation is sufficient to rescue a denervated blastema and regenerate the distal structures. Our analysis brings together the positional identity of the blastema and the classical nerve dependence of limb regeneration. PMID:17975060

  17. Role of Growth Factors in Modulation of the Microvasculature in Adult Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Smythe, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Post-natal skeletal muscle is a highly plastic tissue that has the capacity to regenerate rapidly following injury, and to undergo significant modification in tissue mass (i.e. atrophy/hypertrophy) in response to global metabolic changes. These processes are reliant largely on soluble factors that directly modulate muscle regeneration and mass. However, skeletal muscle function also depends on an adequate blood supply. Thus muscle regeneration and changes in muscle mass, particularly hypertrophy, also demand rapid changes in the microvasculature. Recent evidence clearly demonstrates a critical role for soluble growth factors in the tight regulation of angiogenic expansion of the muscle microvasculature. Furthermore, exogenous modulation of these factors has the capacity to impact directly on angiogenesis and thus, indirectly, on muscle regeneration, growth and performance. This chapter reviews recent developments in understanding the role of growth factors in modulating the skeletal muscle microvasculature, and the potential therapeutic applications of exogenous angiogenic and anti-angiogenic mediators in promoting effective growth and regeneration, and ameliorating certain diseases, of skeletal muscle. PMID:27003400

  18. Muscle power failure in mobility-limited adults: preserved single muscle fibre function despite reduced whole muscle size, quality and neuromuscular activiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the physiological and gender determinants of the age-related loss of muscle power in 31 healthy middle-aged adults (aged 40-55 years), 28 healthy older adults (70-85 years) and 34 mobility-limited older adults (70-85 years). We hypothesized that leg extensor muscle power woul...

  19. Acupuncture plus Low-Frequency Electrical Stimulation (Acu-LFES) Attenuates Diabetic Myopathy by Enhancing Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhen; Robinson, Alayna; Hu, Li; Klein, Janet D.; Hassounah, Faten; Li, Min; Wang, Haidong; Cai, Hui; Wang, Xiaonan H.

    2015-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity are increased in patients with muscle atrophy resulting from catabolic diseases such as diabetes. At present there is no pharmacological treatment that successfully reverses muscle wasting from catabolic conditions. We hypothesized that acupuncture plus low frequency electric stimulation (Acu-LFES) would mimic the impact of exercise and prevent diabetes-induced muscle loss. Streptozotocin (STZ) was used to induce diabetes in mice. The mice were then treated with Acu-LFES for 15 minutes daily for 14 days. Acupuncture points were selected according to the WHO Standard Acupuncture Nomenclature guide. The needles were connected to an SDZ-II electronic acupuncture device delivering pulses at 20Hz and 1mA. Acu-LFES prevented soleus and EDL muscle weight loss and increased hind-limb muscle grip function in diabetic mice. Muscle regeneration capacity was significantly increased by Acu-LFES. The expression of Pax7, MyoD, myogenin and embryo myosin heavy chain (eMyHC) was significantly decreased in diabetic muscle vs. control muscle. The suppressed levels in diabetic muscle were reversed by Acu-LFES. The IGF-1 signaling pathway was also upregulated by Acu-LFES. Phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR and p70S6K were downregulated by diabetes leading to a decline in muscle mass, however, Acu-LFES countered the diabetes-induced decline. In addition, microRNA-1 and -206 were increased by Acu-LFES after 24 days of treatment. We conclude that Acu-LFES is effective in counteracting diabetes-induced skeletal muscle atrophy by increasing IGF-1 and its stimulation of muscle regeneration. PMID:26230945

  20. Age-related changes in miR-143-3p:Igfbp5 interactions affect muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Arroquia, Ana; McCormick, Rachel; Molloy, Andrew P; McArdle, Anne; Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna

    2016-04-01

    A common characteristic of aging is defective regeneration of skeletal muscle. The molecular pathways underlying age-related decline in muscle regenerative potential remain elusive. microRNAs are novel gene regulators controlling development and homeostasis and the regeneration of most tissues, including skeletal muscle. Here, we use satellite cells and primary myoblasts from mice and humans and an in vitro regeneration model, to show that disrupted expression of microRNA-143-3p and its target gene, Igfbp5, plays an important role in muscle regeneration in vitro. We identified miR-143 as a regulator of the insulin growth factor-binding protein 5 (Igfbp5) in primary myoblasts and show that the expression of miR-143 and its target gene is disrupted in satellite cells from old mice. Moreover, we show that downregulation of miR-143 during aging may act as a compensatory mechanism aiming at improving myogenesis efficiency; however, concomitant upregulation of miR-143 target gene, Igfbp5, is associated with increased cell senescence, thus affecting myogenesis. Our data demonstrate that dysregulation of miR-143-3p:Igfbp5 interactions in satellite cells with age may be responsible for age-related changes in satellite cell function. PMID:26762731

  1. Muscle niche-driven Insulin-Notch-Myc cascade reactivates dormant Adult Muscle Precursors in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Aradhya, Rajaguru; Zmojdzian, Monika; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    How stem cells specified during development keep their non-differentiated quiescent state, and how they are reactivated, remain poorly understood. Here, we applied a Drosophila model to follow in vivo behavior of adult muscle precursors (AMPs), the transient fruit fly muscle stem cells. We report that emerging AMPs send out thin filopodia that make contact with neighboring muscles. AMPs keep their filopodia-based association with muscles throughout their dormant state but also when they start to proliferate, suggesting that muscles could play a role in AMP reactivation. Indeed, our genetic analyses indicate that muscles send inductive dIlp6 signals that switch the Insulin pathway ON in closely associated AMPs. This leads to the activation of Notch, which regulates AMP proliferation via dMyc. Altogether, we report that Drosophila AMPs display homing behavior to muscle niche and that the niche-driven Insulin-Notch-dMyc cascade plays a key role in setting the activated state of AMPs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08497.001 PMID:26650355

  2. Continued Expression of Neonatal Myosin Heavy Chain in Adult Dystrophic Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandman, Everett

    1985-02-01

    The expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms was examined in normal and dystrophic chicken muscle with a monoclonal antibody specific for neonatal myosin. Adult dystrophic muscle continued to contain neonatal myosin long after it disappeared from adult normal muscle. A new technique involving western blotting and peptide mapping demonstrated that the immunoreactive myosin in adult dystrophic muscle was identical to that found in neonatal normal muscle. Immunocytochemistry revealed that all fibers in the dystrophic muscle failed to repress neonatal myosin heavy chain. These studies suggest that muscular dystrophy inhibits the myosin gene switching that normally occurs during muscle maturation.

  3. Differential effects of leucine supplementation in young and aged mice at the onset of skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Perry, Richard A; Brown, Lemuel A; Lee, David E; Brown, Jacob L; Baum, Jamie I; Greene, Nicholas P; Washington, Tyrone A

    2016-07-01

    Aging decreases the ability of skeletal muscle to respond to injury. Leucine has been demonstrated to target protein synthetic pathways in skeletal muscle thereby enhancing this response. However, the effect of aging on leucine-induced alterations in protein synthesis at the onset of skeletal muscle regeneration has not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine if aging alters skeletal muscle regeneration and leucine-induced alterations in markers of protein synthesis. The tibialis anterior of young (3 months) and aged (24 months) female C57BL/6J mice were injected with either bupivacaine or PBS, and the mice were given ad libitum access to leucine-supplemented or normal drinking water. Protein and gene expression of markers of protein synthesis and degradation, respectively, were analyzed at three days post-injection. Following injury in young mice, leucine supplementation was observed to elevate only p-p70S6K. In aged mice, leucine was shown to elicit higher p-mTOR content with and without injury, and p-4EBP-1 content post-injury. Additionally in aged mice, leucine was shown to elicit higher content of relative p70S6K post-injury. Our study shows that leucine supplementation affects markers of protein synthesis at the onset of skeletal muscle regeneration differentially in young and aged mice. PMID:27327351

  4. Macrophages in Injured Skeletal Muscle: A Perpetuum Mobile Causing and Limiting Fibrosis, Prompting or Restricting Resolution and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bosurgi, Lidia; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages are present in regenerating skeletal muscles and participate in the repair process. This is due to a unique feature of macrophages, i.e., their ability to perceive signals heralding ongoing tissue injury and to broadcast the news to cells suited at regenerating the tissue such as stem and progenitor cells. Macrophages play a complex role in the skeletal muscle, probably conveying information on the pattern of healing which is appropriate to ensure an effective healing of the tissue, yielding novel functional fibers. Conversely, they are likely to be involved in limiting the efficacy of regeneration, with formation of fibrotic scars and fat replacement of the tissue when the original insult persists. In this review we consider the beneficial versus the detrimental actions of macrophages during the response to muscle injury, with attention to the available information on the molecular code macrophages rely on to guide, throughout the various phases of muscle healing, the function of conventional and unconventional stem cells. Decrypting this code would represent a major step forward toward the establishment of novel targeted therapies for muscle diseases. PMID:22566851

  5. Localization of 5'-ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase in regenerating (and normal) limb tissues of the adult newt Notophthalmus viridescens.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A J; Woerthwein, K F

    1975-08-11

    The regenerating forelimb of the adult newt, Notophthalmus viridescens was investigated for 5'-nucleotidase (5' ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase, 3.1.3.5) acitivity. The newt's humeri were surgically removed, and after a twenty-one-day recovery period, the forelimbs amputated above the elbows. Regenerates were sampled at predetermined times for specific phases in the progress of regeneration, frozen, sectioned in a cryostat, and the sections fixed in 10% cold formol calcium. The Wachstein and Meisel [25] lead procedure at neutral pH was used predominately in these experiments, although tests were also conducted with Gomori's [14] calcium, Allen's [21] highly alkaline procedures. The substrates used to obtain specific enzyme reactions were adenine, cytosine, guanine, uracil and inosine 5'-monophosphate nucleotides. Sodium beta-glycerophosphate served as a non-specific phosphomonoesterase substrate, distilled water replaced substrate, and inhibitors such as zinc and cyanide ions were used as control measures to assist in increasing the precision in interpreting the results obtained. The most reactive 5'-nucleotidase (5'-Nase) loci were in the walls of the blood vascular system, mysial and neural sheaths, dermis, and periosteum: the principal cells involved were macrophages, endothelium of blood vessels, and fibrocytes of connective tissues. A moderate enzyme response was elicited from secretory cells of some of the subcutaneous glands, hypertrophied chondrocytes and osteogenic centers, chondrocytes in the articular regions and within red blood cells and leucocytes. Normal, injured and degenerating, or regenerating striated muscle and nerve fibers were judged unreactive for 5'-Nase. The epidermis and wound epithelium displayed negative responses for 5'-Nase. Cells forming the regeneration blastema were 5'-Nase reactive during the early formative phase, but with growth and development of the blastema into bulb and conic forms, these cells did not respond for this enzyme

  6. Chondroitin sulfate is a crucial determinant for skeletal muscle development/regeneration and improvement of muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Tadahisa; Koyama, Shinji; Yabuta, Yumi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Skeletal muscle formation and regeneration require myoblast fusion to form multinucleated myotubes or myofibers, yet their molecular regulation remains incompletely understood. We show here that the levels of extra- and/or pericellular chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains in differentiating C2C12 myoblast culture are dramatically diminished at the stage of extensive syncytial myotube formation. Forced down-regulation of CS, but not of hyaluronan, levels enhanced myogenic differentiation in vitro. This characteristic CS reduction seems to occur through a cell-autonomous mechanism that involves HYAL1, a known catabolic enzyme for hyaluronan and CS. In vivo injection of a bacterial CS-degrading enzyme boosted myofiber regeneration in a mouse cardiotoxin-induced injury model and ameliorated dystrophic pathology in mdx muscles. Our data suggest that the control of CS abundance is a promising new therapeutic approach for the treatment of skeletal muscle injury and progressive muscular dystrophies.

  7. Muscle fiber regeneration in human permanent lower motoneuron denervation: relevance to safety and effectiveness of FES-training, which induces muscle recovery in SCI subjects.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Ugo; Rossini, Katia; Mayr, Winfried; Kern, Helmut

    2005-03-01

    Morphologic characteristics of the long-term denervated muscle in animals suggest that some original fibers are lost and some of those seen are the result of repeated cycles of fiber regeneration. Muscle biopsies from lower motoneuron denervated patients enrolled in the EU Project RISE show the characteristics of long-term denervation. They present a few atrophic or severely atrophic myofibers dispersed among adipocytes and connective tissue (denervated degenerated muscle, DDM). Monoclonal antibody for embryonic myosin shows that regenerative events are present from 1- to 37-years postspinal cord injury (SCI). After 2- to 10-years FES-training the muscle cryosections present mainly large round myofibers. In the FES-trained muscles the regenerative events are present, but at a lower rate than long-term denervated muscles (myofiber per mm2 of cryosection area: 0.8 +/- 1.3 in FES vs. 2.3 +/- 2.3 in DDM, mean +/- SD, P = 0.011). In our opinion this is a sound additional evidence of effectiveness of the Kern's electrical stimulation protocol for FES of DDM. In any case, the overall results demonstrate that the FES-training is safe: at least it does not induce more myofiber damage/regeneration than denervation per se.

  8. Adult axolotls can regenerate original neuronal diversity in response to brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Amamoto, Ryoji; Huerta, Violeta Gisselle Lopez; Takahashi, Emi; Dai, Guangping; Grant, Aaron K; Fu, Zhanyan; Arlotta, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The axolotl can regenerate multiple organs, including the brain. It remains, however, unclear whether neuronal diversity, intricate tissue architecture, and axonal connectivity can be regenerated; yet, this is critical for recovery of function and a central aim of cell replacement strategies in the mammalian central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate that, upon mechanical injury to the adult pallium, axolotls can regenerate several of the populations of neurons present before injury. Notably, regenerated neurons acquire functional electrophysiological traits and respond appropriately to afferent inputs. Despite the ability to regenerate specific, molecularly-defined neuronal subtypes, we also uncovered previously unappreciated limitations by showing that newborn neurons organize within altered tissue architecture and fail to re-establish the long-distance axonal tracts and circuit physiology present before injury. The data provide a direct demonstration that diverse, electrophysiologically functional neurons can be regenerated in axolotls, but challenge prior assumptions of functional brain repair in regenerative species. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13998.001 PMID:27156560

  9. Peripheral Axons of the Adult Zebrafish Maxillary Barbel Extensively Remyelinate During Sensory Appendage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Alex C.; Mark, Tiffany E.; Hogan, Ann K.; Topczewski, Jacek; LeClair, Elizabeth E.

    2013-01-01

    Myelination is a cellular adaptation allowing rapid conduction along axons. We have investigated peripheral axons of the zebrafish maxillary barbel (ZMB), an optically clear sensory appendage. Each barbel carries taste buds, solitary chemosensory cells, and epithelial nerve endings, all of which regenerate after amputation (LeClair and Topczewski [2010] PLoS One 5:e8737). The ZMB contains axons from the facial nerve; however, myelination within the barbel itself has not been established. Transcripts of myelin basic protein (mbp) are expressed in normal and regenerating adult barbels, indicating activity in both maintenance and repair. Myelin was confirmed in situ by using toluidine blue, an anti-MBP antibody, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adult ZMB contains ~180 small-diameter axons (<2 μm), approximately 60% of which are myelinated. Developmental myelination was observed via whole-mount immunohistochemistry 4-6 weeks postfertilization, showing myelin sheaths lagging behind growing axons. Early-regenerating axons (10 days postsurgery), having no or few myelin layers, were disorganized within a fibroblast-rich collagenous scar. Twenty-eight days postsurgery, barbel axons had grown out several millimeters and were organized with compact myelin sheaths. Fiber types and axon areas were similar between normal and regenerated tissue; within 4 weeks, regenerating axons restored ~85% of normal myelin thickness. Regenerating barbels express multiple promyelinating transcription factors (sox10, oct6 = pou3f1; krox20a/b = egr2a/b) typical of Schwann cells. These observations extend our understanding of the zebrafish peripheral nervous system within a little-studied sensory appendage. The accessible ZMB provides a novel context for studying axon regeneration, Schwann cell migration, and remyelination in a model vertebrate. PMID:22592645

  10. Stem Cell Differentiation Toward the Myogenic Lineage for Muscle Tissue Regeneration: A Focus on Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ostrovidov, Serge; Shi, Xuetao; Sadeghian, Ramin Banan; Salehi, Sahar; Fujie, Toshinori; Bae, Hojae; Ramalingam, Murugan; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue engineering is one of the important ways for regenerating functionally defective muscles. Among the myopathies, the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive disease due to mutations of the dystrophin gene leading to progressive myofiber degeneration with severe symptoms. Although current therapies in muscular dystrophy are still very challenging, important progress has been made in materials science and in cellular technologies with the use of stem cells. It is therefore useful to review these advances and the results obtained in a clinical point of view. This article focuses on the differentiation of stem cells into myoblasts, and their application in muscular dystrophy. After an overview of the different stem cells that can be induced to differentiate into the myogenic lineage, we introduce scaffolding materials used for muscular tissue engineering. We then described some widely used methods to differentiate different types of stem cell into myoblasts. We highlight recent insights obtained in therapies for muscular dystrophy. Finally, we conclude with a discussion on stem cell technology. We discussed in parallel the benefits brought by the evolution of the materials and by the expansion of cell sources which can differentiate into myoblasts. We also discussed on future challenges for clinical applications and how to accelerate the translation from the research to the clinic in the frame of DMD.

  11. Characterizing upper limb muscle volume and strength in older adults: a comparison with young adults.

    PubMed

    Vidt, Meghan E; Daly, Melissa; Miller, Michael E; Davis, Cralen C; Marsh, Anthony P; Saul, Katherine R

    2012-01-10

    Aging is associated with the loss of muscle volume (MV) and force leading to difficulties with activities of daily living. However, the relationship between upper limb MV and joint strength has not been characterized for older adults. Quantifying this relationship may help our understanding of the functional declines of the upper limb that older adults experience. Our objective was to assess the relationship between upper limb MV and maximal isometric joint moment-generating capacity (IJM) in a single cohort of healthy older adults (age ≥ 65 years) for 6 major functional groups (32 muscles). MV was determined from MRI for 18 participants (75.1±4.3 years). IJM at the shoulder (abduction/adduction), elbow (flexion/extension), and wrist (flexion/extension) was measured. MV and IJM measurements were compared to previous reports for young adults (28.6±4.5 years). On average older adults had 16.5% less total upper limb MV compared to young adults. Additionally, older adult wrist extensors composed a significantly increased percentage of upper limb MV. Older adult IJM was reduced across all joints, with significant differences for shoulder abductors (p<0.0001), adductors (p=0.01), and wrist flexors (p<0.0001). Young adults were strongest at the shoulder, which was not the case for older adults. In older adults, 40.6% of the variation in IJM was accounted for by MV changes (p≤0.027), compared to 81.0% in young adults. We conclude that for older adults, MV and IJM are, on average, reduced but the significant linear relationship between MV and IJM is maintained. These results suggest that older adult MV and IJM cannot be simply scaled from young adults.

  12. The neonate versus adult mammalian immune system in cardiac repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Susanne; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2016-07-01

    The immune system is a crucial player in tissue homeostasis and wound healing. A sophisticated cascade of events triggered upon injury ensures protection from infection and initiates and orchestrates healing. While the neonatal mammal can readily regenerate damaged tissues, adult regenerative capacity is limited to specific tissue types, and in organs such as the heart, adult wound healing results in fibrotic repair and loss of function. Growing evidence suggests that the immune system greatly influences the balance between regeneration and fibrotic repair. The neonate mammalian immune system has impaired pro-inflammatory function, is prone to T-helper type 2 responses and has an immature adaptive immune system skewed towards regulatory T cells. While these characteristics make infants susceptible to infection and prone to allergies, it may also provide an immunological environment permissive of regeneration. In this review we will give a comprehensive overview of the immune cells involved in healing and regeneration of the heart and explore differences between the adult and neonate immune system that may explain differences in regenerative ability. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  13. Effects of icing or heat stress on the induction of fibrosis and/or regeneration of injured rat soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Shibaguchi, Tsubasa; Sugiura, Takao; Fujitsu, Takanori; Nomura, Takumi; Yoshihara, Toshinori; Naito, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Ogura, Akihiko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2016-07-01

    The effects of icing or heat stress on the regeneration of injured soleus muscle were investigated in male Wistar rats. Bupivacaine was injected into soleus muscles bilaterally to induce muscle injury. Icing (0 °C, 20 min) was carried out immediately after the injury. Heat stress (42 °C, 30 min) was applied every other day during 2-14 days after the bupivacaine injection. Injury-related increase in collagen deposition was promoted by icing. However, the level of collagen deposition in heat-stressed animals was maintained at control levels throughout the experimental period and was significantly lower than that in icing-treated animals at 15 and 28 days after bupivacaine injection. Furthermore, the recovery of muscle mass, protein content, and muscle fiber size of injured soleus toward control levels was partially facilitated by heat stress. These results suggest that, compared with icing, heat stress may be a beneficial treatment for successful muscle regeneration at least by reducing fibrosis. PMID:26759024

  14. A new type of Schwann cell graft transplantation to promote optic nerve regeneration in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Mo, Xiaofen; Guo, Wenyi; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Peihua; Wang, Yan; Rong, Xianfang; Tian, Jie; Sun, Xinghuai

    2010-12-01

    Like other parts of the central nervous system, the adult mammalian optic nerve is difficult to regenerate after injury. Transplantation of the peripheral nerve or a Schwann cell (SC) graft can promote injured axonal regrowth. We tried to develop a new type of tissue-engineered SC graft that consisted of SCs seeded onto a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan conduit. Meanwhile, SCs were transfected along the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) gene in vitro by electroporation to increase their neurotrophic effect. Four weeks after transplantation, GAP-43 labelled regenerating axons were found in the SC grafts, and axons in the CNTF-SC graft were longer than those in the SC graft. Tissue-engineered SC grafts can provide a feasible environment for optic nerve regeneration and may become an alternative for bridging damaged nerves and repairing nerve defects in the future.

  15. Abnormal limb regeneration in adult newts exposed to the fungicide Maneb 80. A histological study.

    PubMed

    Zavanella, T; Zaffaroni, N P; Arias, E

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the fungicide Maneb 80 (manganese ethylenebisdithiocarbamate, 80% active ingredient) on the regenerating limb of the adult crested newt, Triturus cristatus carnifex, was studied. Female newts were exposed percutaneously to 5 ppm Maneb 80. One group of control newts was exposed to the inert ingredients of Maneb 80 (sodium lignin sulfonate and n-butylnaphthalene sulfonate), and another control group was kept in tap water. The limbs were examined histologically at weekly intervals throughout the regeneration period and at the end of the experiment (10-12 wk postamputation). The regenerating limbs of all the animals exposed to Maneb 80 showed growth retardation and skeletal abnormalities. Histological examination provided evidence that vascular disturbances are important for the genesis of the developmental abnormalities induced by Maneb 80. The inert ingredients had a promoting effect on limb growth and had no teratogenic effects under our experimental conditions. There were no histological differences between the two control groups.

  16. From ontogenesis to regeneration: learning how to instruct adult cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Isotta; Forte, Elvira; Angelini, Francesco; Giacomello, Alessandro; Messina, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Since the first observations over two centuries ago by Lazzaro Spallanzani on the extraordinary regenerative capacity of urodeles, many attempts have been made to understand the reasons why such ability has been largely lost in metazoa and whether or how it can be restored, even partially. In this context, important clues can be derived from the systematic analysis of the relevant distinctions among species and of the pathways involved in embryonic development, which might be induced and/or recapitulated in adult tissues. This chapter provides an overview on regeneration and its mechanisms, starting with the lesson learned from lower vertebrates, and will then focus on recent advancements and novel insights concerning regeneration in the adult mammalian heart, including the discovery of resident cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). Subsequently, it explores all the important pathways involved in regulating differentiation during development and embryogenesis, and that might potentially provide important clues on how to activate and/or modulate regenerative processes in the adult myocardium, including the potential activation of endogenous CPCs. Furthermore the importance of the stem cell niche is discussed, and how it is possible to create in vitro a microenvironment and culture system to provide adult CPCs with the ideal conditions promoting their regenerative ability. Finally, the state of clinical translation of cardiac cell therapy is presented. Overall, this chapter provides a new perspective on how to approach cardiac regeneration, taking advantage of important lessons from development and optimizing biotechnological tools to obtain the ideal conditions for cell-based cardiac regenerative therapy.

  17. Skeletal muscle power: a critical determinant of physical functioning in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle power declines earlier and more precipitously with advancing age compared to muscle strength. Peak muscle power has also emerged as an important predictor of functional limitations in older adults. Our current working hypothesis is focused on examining lower extremity muscle power as a more d...

  18. Multipotent (adult) and pluripotent stem cells for heart regeneration: what are the pros and cons?

    PubMed

    Liao, Song-Yan; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2013-12-24

    Heart failure after myocardial infarction is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Existing medical and interventional therapies can only reduce the loss of cardiomyocytes during myocardial infarction but are unable to replenish the permanent loss of cardiomyocytes after the insult, which contributes to progressive pathological left ventricular remodeling and progressive heart failure. As a result, cell-based therapies using multipotent (adult) stem cells and pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells) have been explored as potential therapeutic approaches to restore cardiac function in heart failure. Nevertheless, the optimal cell type with the best therapeutic efficacy and safety for heart regeneration is still unknown. In this review, the potential pros and cons of different types of multipotent (adult) stem cells and pluripotent stem cells that have been investigated in preclinical and clinical studies are reviewed, and the future perspective of stem cell-based therapy for heart regeneration is discussed.

  19. Common micro-RNA signature in skeletal muscle damage and regeneration induced by Duchenne muscular dystrophy and acute ischemia.

    PubMed

    Greco, Simona; De Simone, Marco; Colussi, Claudia; Zaccagnini, Germana; Fasanaro, Pasquale; Pescatori, Mario; Cardani, Rosanna; Perbellini, Riccardo; Isaia, Eleonora; Sale, Patrizio; Meola, Giovanni; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Gaetano, Carlo; Martelli, Fabio

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this work was to identify micro-RNAs (miRNAs) involved in the pathological pathways activated in skeletal muscle damage and regeneration by both dystrophin absence and acute ischemia. Eleven miRNAs were deregulated both in MDX mice and in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients (DMD signature). Therapeutic interventions ameliorating the mdx-phenotype rescued DMD-signature alterations. The significance of DMD-signature changes was characterized using a damage/regeneration mouse model of hind-limb ischemia and newborn mice. According to their expression, DMD-signature miRNAs were divided into 3 classes. 1) Regeneration miRNAs, miR-31, miR-34c, miR-206, miR-335, miR-449, and miR-494, which were induced in MDX mice and in DMD patients, but also in newborn mice and in newly formed myofibers during postischemic regeneration. Notably, miR-206, miR-34c, and miR-335 were up-regulated following myoblast differentiation in vitro. 2) Degenerative-miRNAs, miR-1, miR-29c, and miR-135a, that were down-modulated in MDX mice, in DMD patients, in the degenerative phase of the ischemia response, and in newborn mice. Their down-modulation was linked to myofiber loss and fibrosis. 3) Inflammatory miRNAs, miR-222 and miR-223, which were expressed in damaged muscle areas, and their expression correlated with the presence of infiltrating inflammatory cells. These findings show an important role of miRNAs in physiopathological pathways regulating muscle response to damage and regeneration.

  20. Connective tissue cells, but not muscle cells, are involved in establishing the proximo-distal outcome of limb regeneration in the axolotl.

    PubMed

    Nacu, Eugen; Glausch, Mareen; Le, Huy Quang; Damanik, Febriyani Fiain Rochel; Schuez, Maritta; Knapp, Dunja; Khattak, Shahryar; Richter, Tobias; Tanaka, Elly M

    2013-02-01

    During salamander limb regeneration, only the structures distal to the amputation plane are regenerated, a property known as the rule of distal transformation. Multiple cell types are involved in limb regeneration; therefore, determining which cell types participate in distal transformation is important for understanding how the proximo-distal outcome of regeneration is achieved. We show that connective tissue-derived blastema cells obey the rule of distal transformation. They also have nuclear MEIS, which can act as an upper arm identity regulator, only upon upper arm amputation. By contrast, myogenic cells do not obey the rule of distal transformation and display nuclear MEIS upon amputation at any proximo-distal level. These results indicate that connective tissue cells, but not myogenic cells, are involved in establishing the proximo-distal outcome of regeneration and are likely to guide muscle patterning. Moreover, we show that, similarly to limb development, muscle patterning in regeneration is influenced by β-catenin signalling.

  1. Regeneration of plantlets from the callus of stem segments of adult plants of Ficus religiosa L.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, V S; Narayan, P

    1985-10-01

    Stem segments of adult plants of Ficus religiosa L. cultured on MS medium containing 1.0 mg/l 2,4-D produced callus. Shoots were regenerated when the induced calli were transferred to medium supplemented with 0.05 to 2.0 mg/l BAP. Callus derived shoots produced roots and developed into plantlets when transferred to medium supplemented with 1.0 mg/l NAA. PMID:24253982

  2. Activity-sensitive signaling by muscle-derived insulin-like growth factors in the developing and regenerating neuromuscular system.

    PubMed

    Caroni, P

    1993-08-27

    In the nervous system, activity-sensitive retrograde signaling pathways couple the status of postsynaptic activation to elimination of collaterals during development and collateral sprouting in the adult. This article presents evidence supporting the hypothesis that in the neuromuscular system, skeletal muscle fiber derived insulin-like growth factors play a central role in such signaling. This evidence includes (1) timing and activity-sensitive expression of IGFs in skeletal muscle fibers, (2) identification of an IGF- and activity-sensitive retrograde signaling pathway from developing muscle to motoneurons in the spinal cord, (3) demonstration that IGFs in the muscle are both sufficient and necessary to induce interstitial cell proliferation and intramuscular nerve sprouting in adult muscle.

  3. Matrilin-2, an extracellular adaptor protein, is needed for the regeneration of muscle, nerve and other tissues

    PubMed Central

    Korpos, Éva; Deák, Ferenc; Kiss, Ibolya

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) performs essential functions in the differentiation, maintenance and remodeling of tissues during development and regeneration, and it undergoes dynamic changes during remodeling concomitant to alterations in the cell-ECM interactions. Here we discuss recent data addressing the critical role of the widely expressed ECM protein, matrilin-2 (Matn2) in the timely onset of differentiation and regeneration processes in myogenic, neural and other tissues and in tumorigenesis. As a multiadhesion adaptor protein, it interacts with other ECM proteins and integrins. Matn2 promotes neurite outgrowth, Schwann cell migration, neuromuscular junction formation, skeletal muscle and liver regeneration and skin wound healing. Matn2 deposition by myoblasts is crucial for the timely induction of the global switch toward terminal myogenic differentiation during muscle regeneration by affecting transforming growth factor beta/bone morphogenetic protein 7/Smad and other signal transduction pathways. Depending on the type of tissue and the pathomechanism, Matn2 can also promote or suppress tumor growth. PMID:26199591

  4. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications. PMID:27338364

  5. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-06-21

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications.

  6. Regenerating and denervated human muscle fibers and satellite cells express neural cell adhesion molecule recognized by monoclonal antibodies to natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Illa, I; Leon-Monzon, M; Dalakas, M C

    1992-01-01

    The monoclonal antibodies anti-Leu-19 and anti-NKH-1 recognize the CD56 differentiation antigen expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and on a T-cell subset. Because CD56 is an isoform of neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM), we examined its expression on human muscle using antibodies to Leu-19, NKH-1, and purified N-CAM in an immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and immunoprecipitation study on 70 muscle biopsy specimens from various muscle diseases and on human muscle in tissue culture. Anti-Leu-19, anti-NKH-1, and anti-N-CAM had identical immunoreactive patterns. In tissue sections, they specifically recognized the satellite cells and the regenerating or newly denervated muscle fibers; in tissue cultures, they immunoreacted with myoblasts and myotubes; and in the homogenates of myopathic muscle and cultured myotubes, they immunoprecipitated the same glycoprotein of 145- to 220-kd. The study concludes that (1) the commercially available monoclonal antibodies to NK cells, Leu-19 and NKH-1, are immunocytochemical markers for the satellite cells and the regenerating or newly denervated muscle fibers complementing conventional techniques in the diagnosis of patients with neuromuscular disorders; and (2) the CD56 is a common antigen shared by NK cells and muscle fibers during certain stages of muscle maturation, regeneration, or denervation. When expressed in the muscle, CD56 may facilitate the adhesion of cytotoxic lymphocytes to the muscle and play a role in muscle fiber injury.

  7. Comparison of short- with long-term regeneration results after digital nerve reconstruction with muscle-in-vein conduits

    PubMed Central

    Schiefer, Jennifer Lynn; Schulz, Lukas; Rath, Rebekka; Stahl, Stéphane; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Manoli, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Muscle-in-vein conduits are used alternatively to nerve grafts for bridging nerve defects. The purpose of this study was to examine short- and long-term regeneration results after digital nerve reconstruction with muscle-in-vein conduits. Static and moving two-point discriminations and Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments were used to evaluate sensory recovery 6–12 months and 14–35 months after repair of digital nerves with muscle-in-vein in 7 cases. Both follow-ups were performed after clinical signs of progressing regeneration disappeared. In 4 of 7 cases, a further recovery of both two-point discriminations and in another case of only the static two-point discrimination of 1–3 mm could be found between the short-term and long-term follow-up examination. Moreover, a late recovery of both two-point discriminations was demonstrated in another case. Four of 7 cases showed a sensory improvement by one Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments. This pilot study suggests that sensory recovery still takes place even when clinical signs of progressing regeneration disappear. PMID:26692868

  8. Neuron regeneration reverses 3-acetylpyridine-induced cell loss in the cerebral cortex of adult lizards.

    PubMed

    Font, E; García-Verdugo, J M; Alcántara, S; López-García, C

    1991-06-14

    Systemic administration of the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine to adult lizards results in extensive loss of neurons in the medial cerebral cortex, other brain areas remaining largely unaffected. After the neurotoxic trauma, new cells are produced by mitotic division of cells in the ventricular wall. The new cells migrate along radial glial fibers and replace lost neurons in the medial cortex. Electron microscopic examination of cells labeled with [3H]thymidine confirms that the newly generated cells are neurons. Thus, neuron regeneration can occur in the cerebral cortex of adult lizards.

  9. Serotonin promotes acinar dedifferentiation following pancreatitis-induced regeneration in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Saponara, Enrica; Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Bombardo, Marta; Buzzi, Raphael; Silva, Alberto B; Malagola, Ermanno; Tian, Yinghua; Hehl, Adrian B; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seleznik, Gitta M; Zabel, Anja; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The exocrine pancreas exhibits a distinctive capacity for tissue regeneration and renewal following injury. This regenerative ability has important implications for a variety of disorders, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, understanding its underlying mechanisms may help in developing therapeutic interventions. Serotonin has been recognized as a potent mitogen for a variety of cells and tissues. Here we investigated whether serotonin exerts a mitogenic effect in pancreatic acinar cells in three regenerative models, inflammatory tissue injury following pancreatitis, tissue loss following partial pancreatectomy, and thyroid hormone-stimulated acinar proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological techniques were used to modulate serotonin levels in vivo. Acinar dedifferentiation and cell cycle progression during the regenerative phase were investigated over the course of 2 weeks. By comparing acinar proliferation in the different murine models of regeneration, we found that serotonin did not affect the clonal regeneration of mature acinar cells. Serotonin was, however, required for acinar dedifferentiation following inflammation-mediated tissue injury. Specifically, lack of serotonin resulted in delayed up-regulation of progenitor genes and delayed the formation of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and defective acinar cell proliferation. We identified serotonin-dependent acinar secretion as a key step in progenitor-based regeneration, as it promoted acinar cell dedifferentiation and the recruitment of type 2 macrophages. Finally, we identified a regulatory Hes1-Ptfa axis in the uninjured adult pancreas, activated by zymogen secretion. Our findings indicated that serotonin plays a critical role in the regeneration of the adult pancreas following pancreatitis by promoting the dedifferentiation of acinar cells.

  10. Serotonin promotes acinar dedifferentiation following pancreatitis-induced regeneration in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Saponara, Enrica; Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Bombardo, Marta; Buzzi, Raphael; Silva, Alberto B; Malagola, Ermanno; Tian, Yinghua; Hehl, Adrian B; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seleznik, Gitta M; Zabel, Anja; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The exocrine pancreas exhibits a distinctive capacity for tissue regeneration and renewal following injury. This regenerative ability has important implications for a variety of disorders, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, understanding its underlying mechanisms may help in developing therapeutic interventions. Serotonin has been recognized as a potent mitogen for a variety of cells and tissues. Here we investigated whether serotonin exerts a mitogenic effect in pancreatic acinar cells in three regenerative models, inflammatory tissue injury following pancreatitis, tissue loss following partial pancreatectomy, and thyroid hormone-stimulated acinar proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological techniques were used to modulate serotonin levels in vivo. Acinar dedifferentiation and cell cycle progression during the regenerative phase were investigated over the course of 2 weeks. By comparing acinar proliferation in the different murine models of regeneration, we found that serotonin did not affect the clonal regeneration of mature acinar cells. Serotonin was, however, required for acinar dedifferentiation following inflammation-mediated tissue injury. Specifically, lack of serotonin resulted in delayed up-regulation of progenitor genes and delayed the formation of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and defective acinar cell proliferation. We identified serotonin-dependent acinar secretion as a key step in progenitor-based regeneration, as it promoted acinar cell dedifferentiation and the recruitment of type 2 macrophages. Finally, we identified a regulatory Hes1-Ptfa axis in the uninjured adult pancreas, activated by zymogen secretion. Our findings indicated that serotonin plays a critical role in the regeneration of the adult pancreas following pancreatitis by promoting the dedifferentiation of acinar cells. PMID:26235267

  11. Cellular dynamics of regeneration reveals role of two distinct Pax7 stem cell populations in larval zebrafish muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    Pipalia, Tapan G.; Koth, Jana; Roy, Shukolpa D.; Hammond, Christina L.; Kawakami, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterogeneity of stem cells or their niches is likely to influence tissue regeneration. Here we reveal stem/precursor cell diversity during wound repair in larval zebrafish somitic body muscle using time-lapse 3D confocal microscopy on reporter lines. Skeletal muscle with incision wounds rapidly regenerates both slow and fast muscle fibre types. A swift immune response is followed by an increase in cells at the wound site, many of which express the muscle stem cell marker Pax7. Pax7+ cells proliferate and then undergo terminal differentiation involving Myogenin accumulation and subsequent loss of Pax7 followed by elongation and fusion to repair fast muscle fibres. Analysis of pax7a and pax7b transgenic reporter fish reveals that cells expressing each of the duplicated pax7 genes are distinctly localised in uninjured larvae. Cells marked by pax7a only or by both pax7a and pax7b enter the wound rapidly and contribute to muscle wound repair, but each behaves differently. Low numbers of pax7a-only cells form nascent fibres. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that the more numerous pax7b-marked cells frequently fuse to pre-existing fibres, contributing more strongly than pax7a-only cells to repair of damaged fibres. pax7b-marked cells are more often present in rows of aligned cells that are observed to fuse into a single fibre, but more rarely contribute to nascent regenerated fibres. Ablation of a substantial portion of nitroreductase-expressing pax7b cells with metronidazole prior to wounding triggered rapid pax7a-only cell accumulation, but this neither inhibited nor augmented pax7a-only cell-derived myogenesis and thus altered the cellular repair dynamics during wound healing. Moreover, pax7a-only cells did not regenerate pax7b cells, suggesting a lineage distinction. We propose a modified founder cell and fusion-competent cell model in which pax7a-only cells initiate fibre formation and pax7b cells contribute to fibre growth. This newly discovered cellular

  12. Monoclonal antibodies against muscle actin isoforms: epitope identification and analysis of isoform expression by immunoblot and immunostaining in normal and regenerating skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Higher vertebrates (mammals and birds) express six different highly conserved actin isoforms that can be classified in three subgroups: 1) sarcomeric actins, α-skeletal (α-SKA) and α-cardiac (α-CAA), 2) smooth muscle actins (SMAs), α-SMA and γ-SMA, and 3) cytoplasmic actins (CYAs), β-CYA and γ-CYA. The variations among isoactins, in each subgroup, are due to 3-4 amino acid differences located in their acetylated N-decapeptide sequence. The first monoclonal antibody (mAb) against an actin isoform (α-SMA) was produced and characterized in our laboratory in 1986 (Skalli  et al., 1986) . We have further obtained mAbs against the 5 other isoforms. In this report, we focus on the mAbs anti-α-SKA and anti-α-CAA obtained after immunization of mice with the respective acetylated N-terminal decapeptides using the Repetitive Immunizations at Multiple Sites Strategy (RIMMS). In addition to the identification of their epitope by immunoblotting, we describe the expression of the 2 sarcomeric actins in mature skeletal muscle and during muscle repair after micro-lesions. In particular, we analyze the expression of α-CAA, α-SKA and α-SMA by co-immunostaining in a time course frame during the muscle repair process. Our results indicate that a restricted myocyte population expresses α-CAA and suggest a high capacity of self-regeneration in muscle cells. These antibodies may represent a helpful tool for the follow-up of muscle regeneration and pathological changes. PMID:27335638

  13. Influence of Botulinumtoxin A on the Expression of Adult MyHC Isoforms in the Masticatory Muscles in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice (Mdx-Mice)

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Teodor

    2016-01-01

    The most widespread animal model to investigate Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the mdx-mouse. In contrast to humans, phases of muscle degeneration are replaced by regeneration processes; hence there is only a restricted time slot for research. The aim of the study was to investigate if an intramuscular injection of BTX-A is able to break down muscle regeneration and has direct implications on the gene expression of myosin heavy chains in the corresponding treated and untreated muscles. Therefore, paralysis of the right masseter muscle was induced in adult healthy and dystrophic mice by a specific intramuscular injection of BTX-A. After 21 days the mRNA expression and protein content of MyHC isoforms of the right and left masseter, temporal, and the tongue muscle were determined using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot technique. MyHC-IIa and MyHC-I-mRNA expression significantly increased in the paralyzed masseter muscle of control-mice, whereas MyHC-IIb and MyHC-IIx/d-mRNA were decreased. In dystrophic muscles no effect of BTX-A could be detected at the level of MyHC. This study suggests that BTX-A injection is a suitable method to simulate DMD-pathogenesis in healthy mice but further investigations are necessary to fully analyse the BTX-A effect and to generate sustained muscular atrophy in mdx-mice.

  14. Influence of Botulinumtoxin A on the Expression of Adult MyHC Isoforms in the Masticatory Muscles in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice (Mdx-Mice)

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Teodor

    2016-01-01

    The most widespread animal model to investigate Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the mdx-mouse. In contrast to humans, phases of muscle degeneration are replaced by regeneration processes; hence there is only a restricted time slot for research. The aim of the study was to investigate if an intramuscular injection of BTX-A is able to break down muscle regeneration and has direct implications on the gene expression of myosin heavy chains in the corresponding treated and untreated muscles. Therefore, paralysis of the right masseter muscle was induced in adult healthy and dystrophic mice by a specific intramuscular injection of BTX-A. After 21 days the mRNA expression and protein content of MyHC isoforms of the right and left masseter, temporal, and the tongue muscle were determined using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot technique. MyHC-IIa and MyHC-I-mRNA expression significantly increased in the paralyzed masseter muscle of control-mice, whereas MyHC-IIb and MyHC-IIx/d-mRNA were decreased. In dystrophic muscles no effect of BTX-A could be detected at the level of MyHC. This study suggests that BTX-A injection is a suitable method to simulate DMD-pathogenesis in healthy mice but further investigations are necessary to fully analyse the BTX-A effect and to generate sustained muscular atrophy in mdx-mice. PMID:27689088

  15. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanoparticle and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) electrospun scaffold characterization for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    McKeon-Fischer, Kristin D; Browe, Daniel P; Olabisi, Ronke M; Freeman, Joseph W

    2015-11-01

    Injuries to peripheral nerves and/or skeletal muscle can cause scar tissue formation and loss of function. The focus of this article is the creation of a conductive, biocompatible scaffold with appropriate mechanical properties to regenerate skeletal muscle. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanoparticles (Np) were electrospun with poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) to form conductive scaffolds. During electrospinning, ribboning, larger fiber diameters, and unaligned scaffolds were observed with increasing PEDOT amounts. To address this, PEDOT Np were sonicated prior to electrospinning, which resulted in decreased conductivity and increased mechanical properties. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were added to the 1:2 solution in an effort to increase conductivity. However, the addition of MWCNT had little effect on scaffold conductivity, and the elastic modulus and yield stress of the scaffold increased as a result. Rat muscle cells attached and were active on the 1-10, 1-2, 3-4, and 1-1 PCL-PEDOT scaffolds; however, the 3-4 scaffolds had the lowest level of metabolic activity. Although the scaffolds were cytocompatible, further development of the fabrication method is necessary to produce more highly aligned scaffolds capable of promoting skeletal muscle cell alignment and eventual regeneration. PMID:25855940

  16. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanoparticle and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) electrospun scaffold characterization for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    McKeon-Fischer, Kristin D; Browe, Daniel P; Olabisi, Ronke M; Freeman, Joseph W

    2015-11-01

    Injuries to peripheral nerves and/or skeletal muscle can cause scar tissue formation and loss of function. The focus of this article is the creation of a conductive, biocompatible scaffold with appropriate mechanical properties to regenerate skeletal muscle. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanoparticles (Np) were electrospun with poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) to form conductive scaffolds. During electrospinning, ribboning, larger fiber diameters, and unaligned scaffolds were observed with increasing PEDOT amounts. To address this, PEDOT Np were sonicated prior to electrospinning, which resulted in decreased conductivity and increased mechanical properties. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were added to the 1:2 solution in an effort to increase conductivity. However, the addition of MWCNT had little effect on scaffold conductivity, and the elastic modulus and yield stress of the scaffold increased as a result. Rat muscle cells attached and were active on the 1-10, 1-2, 3-4, and 1-1 PCL-PEDOT scaffolds; however, the 3-4 scaffolds had the lowest level of metabolic activity. Although the scaffolds were cytocompatible, further development of the fabrication method is necessary to produce more highly aligned scaffolds capable of promoting skeletal muscle cell alignment and eventual regeneration.

  17. Gαi2 Signaling Is Required for Skeletal Muscle Growth, Regeneration, and Satellite Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, Giulia C.; Feige, Jerome N.; Bombard, Florian; Heier, Annabelle; Morvan, Fredric; Nürnberg, Bernd; Leiss, Veronika; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that activation of Gαi2, an α subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex, induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy and myoblast differentiation. To determine whether Gαi2 is required for skeletal muscle growth or regeneration, Gαi2-null mice were analyzed. Gαi2 knockout mice display decreased lean body mass, reduced muscle size, and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration after cardiotoxin-induced injury. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of Gαi2 in satellite cells (SCs) leads to defective satellite cell proliferation, fusion, and differentiation ex vivo. The impaired differentiation is consistent with the observation that the myogenic regulatory factors MyoD and Myf5 are downregulated upon knockdown of Gαi2. Interestingly, the expression of microRNA 1 (miR-1), miR-27b, and miR-206, three microRNAs that have been shown to regulate SC proliferation and differentiation, is increased by a constitutively active mutant of Gαi2 [Gαi2(Q205L)] and counterregulated by Gαi2 knockdown. As for the mechanism, this study demonstrates that Gαi2(Q205L) regulates satellite cell differentiation into myotubes in a protein kinase C (PKC)- and histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent manner. PMID:24298018

  18. A Tunable Silk Hydrogel Device for Studying Limb Regeneration in Adult Xenopus Laevis.

    PubMed

    Golding, Anne; Guay, Justin A; Herrera-Rincon, Celia; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L

    2016-01-01

    In certain amphibian models limb regeneration can be promoted or inhibited by the local wound bed environment. This research introduces a device that can be utilized as an experimental tool to characterize the conditions that promotes limb regeneration in the adult frog (Xenopus laevis) model. In particular, this device was designed to manipulate the local wound environment via a hydrogel insert. Initial characterization of the hydrogel insert revealed that this interaction had a significant influence on mechanical forces to the animal, due to the contraction of the hydrogel. The material and mechanical properties of the hydrogel insert were a factor in the device design in relation to the comfort of the animal and the ability to effectively manipulate the amputation site. The tunable features of the hydrogel were important in determining the pro-regenerative effects in limb regeneration, which was measured by cartilage spike formation and quantified by micro-computed tomography. The hydrogel insert was a factor in the observed morphological outcomes following amputation. Future work will focus on characterizing and optimizing the device's observed capability to manipulate biological pathways that are essential for limb regeneration. However, the present work provides a framework for the role of a hydrogel in the device and a path forward for more systematic studies. PMID:27257960

  19. A Tunable Silk Hydrogel Device for Studying Limb Regeneration in Adult Xenopus Laevis

    PubMed Central

    Golding, Anne; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-01-01

    In certain amphibian models limb regeneration can be promoted or inhibited by the local wound bed environment. This research introduces a device that can be utilized as an experimental tool to characterize the conditions that promotes limb regeneration in the adult frog (Xenopus laevis) model. In particular, this device was designed to manipulate the local wound environment via a hydrogel insert. Initial characterization of the hydrogel insert revealed that this interaction had a significant influence on mechanical forces to the animal, due to the contraction of the hydrogel. The material and mechanical properties of the hydrogel insert were a factor in the device design in relation to the comfort of the animal and the ability to effectively manipulate the amputation site. The tunable features of the hydrogel were important in determining the pro-regenerative effects in limb regeneration, which was measured by cartilage spike formation and quantified by micro-computed tomography. The hydrogel insert was a factor in the observed morphological outcomes following amputation. Future work will focus on characterizing and optimizing the device’s observed capability to manipulate biological pathways that are essential for limb regeneration. However, the present work provides a framework for the role of a hydrogel in the device and a path forward for more systematic studies. PMID:27257960

  20. Empowering Adult Stem Cells for Myocardial Regeneration V2.0: Success in Small Steps.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Kathleen M; Sussman, Mark A

    2016-03-01

    Much has changed since our survey of the landscape for myocardial regeneration powered by adult stem cells 4 years ago.(1) The intervening years since that first review has witnessed an explosive expansion of studies that advance both understanding and implementation of adult stem cells in promoting myocardial repair. Painstaking research from innumerable laboratories throughout the world is prying open doors that may lead to restoration of myocardial structure and function in the wake of pathological injury. This global effort has produced deeper mechanistic comprehension coupled with an evolving appreciation for the complexity of myocardial regeneration in the adult context. Undaunted by both known and (as yet) unknown challenges, pursuit of myocardial regenerative medicine mediated by adult stem cell therapy has gathered momentum fueled by tantalizing clues and visionary goals. This concise review takes a somewhat different perspective than our initial treatise, taking stock of the business sector that has become an integral part of the field while concurrently updating state of affairs in cutting edge research. Looking retrospectively at advancement over the years as all reviews eventually must, the fundamental lesson to be learned is best explained by Jonatan Mårtensson: "Success will never be a big step in the future. Success is a small step taken just now."

  1. Pro-Insulin-Like Growth Factor-II Ameliorates Age-Related Inefficient Regenerative Response by Orchestrating Self-Reinforcement Mechanism of Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto-Uezumi, Madoka; Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shiomi, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2015-08-01

    Sarcopenia, age-related muscle weakness, increases the frequency of falls and fractures in elderly people, which can trigger severe muscle injury. Rapid and successful recovery from muscle injury is essential not to cause further frailty and loss of independence. In fact, we showed insufficient muscle regeneration in aged mice. Although the number of satellite cells, muscle stem cells, decreases with age, the remaining satellite cells maintain the myogenic capacity equivalent to young mice. Transplantation of young green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Tg mice-derived satellite cells into young and aged mice revealed that age-related deterioration of the muscle environment contributes to the decline in regenerative capacity of satellite cells. Thus, extrinsic changes rather than intrinsic changes in satellite cells appear to be a major determinant of inefficient muscle regeneration with age. Comprehensive protein expression analysis identified a decrease in insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) level in regenerating muscle of aged mice. We found that pro- and big-IGF-II but not mature IGF-II specifically express during muscle regeneration and the expressions are not only delayed but also decreased in absolute quantity with age. Supplementation of pro-IGF-II in aged mice ameliorated the inefficient regenerative response by promoting proliferation of satellite cells, angiogenesis, and suppressing adipogenic differentiation of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)α(+) mesenchymal progenitors. We further revealed that pro-IGF-II but not mature IGF-II specifically inhibits the pathological adipogenesis of PDGFRα(+) cells. Together, these results uncovered a distinctive pro-IGF-II-mediated self-reinforcement mechanism of muscle regeneration and suggest that supplementation of pro-IGF-II could be one of the most effective therapeutic approaches for muscle injury in elderly people.

  2. Myogenic Akt signaling attenuates muscular degeneration, promotes myofiber regeneration and improves muscle function in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michelle H.; Kay, Danielle I.; Rudra, Renuka T.; Chen, Bo Ming; Hsu, Nigel; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Martinez, Leonel; Spencer, Melissa J.; Walsh, Kenneth; Grinnell, Alan D.; Crosbie, Rachelle H.

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the most common form of childhood muscular dystrophy, is caused by X-linked inherited mutations in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin deficiencies result in the loss of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex at the plasma membrane, which leads to structural instability and muscle degeneration. Previously, we induced muscle-specific overexpression of Akt, a regulator of cellular metabolism and survival, in mdx mice at pre-necrotic (<3.5 weeks) ages and demonstrated upregulation of the utrophin–glycoprotein complex and protection against contractile-induced stress. Here, we found that delaying exogenous Akt treatment of mdx mice after the onset of peak pathology (>6 weeks) similarly increased the abundance of compensatory adhesion complexes at the extrasynaptic sarcolemma. Akt introduction after onset of pathology reverses the mdx histopathological measures, including decreases in blood serum albumin infiltration. Akt also improves muscle function in mdx mice as demonstrated through in vivo grip strength tests and in vitro contraction measurements of the extensor digitorum longus muscle. To further explore the significance of Akt in myofiber regeneration, we injured wild-type muscle with cardiotoxin and found that Akt induced a faster regenerative response relative to controls at equivalent time points. We demonstrate that Akt signaling pathways counteract mdx pathogenesis by enhancing endogenous compensatory mechanisms. These findings provide a rationale for investigating the therapeutic activation of the Akt pathway to counteract muscle wasting. PMID:21245083

  3. NRIP is newly identified as a Z-disc protein, activating calmodulin signaling for skeletal muscle contraction and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Hsiung; Chen, Wen-Pin; Yan, Wan-Lun; Huang, Yuan-Chun; Chang, Szu-Wei; Fu, Wen-Mei; Su, Ming-Jai; Yu, I-Shing; Tsai, Tzung-Chieh; Yan, Yu-Ting; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Chen, Show-Li

    2015-11-15

    Nuclear receptor interaction protein (NRIP, also known as DCAF6 and IQWD1) is a Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin-binding protein. In this study, we newly identify NRIP as a Z-disc protein in skeletal muscle. NRIP-knockout mice were generated and found to have reduced muscle strength, susceptibility to fatigue and impaired adaptive exercise performance. The mechanisms of NRIP-regulated muscle contraction depend on NRIP being downstream of Ca(2+) signaling, where it stimulates activation of both 'calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1' (CaN-NFATc1; also known as NFATC1) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) through interaction with calmodulin (CaM), resulting in the induction of mitochondrial activity and the expression of genes encoding the slow class of myosin, and in the regulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis through the internal Ca(2+) stores of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, NRIP-knockout mice have a delayed regenerative capacity. The amount of NRIP can be enhanced after muscle injury and is responsible for muscle regeneration, which is associated with the increased expression of myogenin, desmin and embryonic myosin heavy chain during myogenesis, as well as for myotube formation. In conclusion, NRIP is a novel Z-disc protein that is important for skeletal muscle strength and regenerative capacity.

  4. Regenerating tail muscles in lizard contain Fast but not Slow Myosin indicating that most myofibers belong to the fast twitch type for rapid contraction.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, L

    2015-10-01

    During tail regeneration in lizards a large mass of muscle tissue is formed in form of segmental myomeres of similar size located under the dermis of the new tail. These muscles accumulate glycogen and a fast form of myosin typical for twitch myofibers as it is shown by light and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry using an antibody directed against a Fast Myosin Heavy Chain. High resolution immunogold labeling shows that an intense labeling for fast myosin is localized over the thick filaments of the numerous myofibrils in about 70% of the regenerated myofibers while the labeling becomes less intense in the remaining muscle fibers. The present observations indicate that at least two subtypes of Fast Myosin containing muscle fibers are regenerated, the prevalent type was of the fast twitch containing few mitochondria, sparse glycogen, numerous smooth endoplasmic reticulum vesicles. The second, and less frequent type was a Fast-Oxidative-Glycolitic twitch fiber containing more mitochondria, a denser cytoplasm and myofibrils. Since their initial differentiation, myoblasts, myotubes and especially the regenerated myofibers do not accumulate any immuno-detectable Slow Myosin Heavy Chain. The study indicates that most of the segmental muscles of the regenerated tail serve for the limited bending of the tail during locomotion and trashing after amputation of the regenerated tail, a phenomenon that facilitates predator escape.

  5. Expression and localization of augmenter of liver regeneration in human muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Polimeno, Lorenzo; Pesetti, Barbara; Giorgio, Floriana; Moretti, Biagio; Resta, Leonardo; Rossi, Roberta; Annoscia, Emanuele; Patella, Vittorio; Notarnicola, Angela; Mallamaci, Rosanna; Francavilla, Antonio

    2009-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mt-DNA) disorders and abnormal regulation of nuclear-derived proteins devoted to the cross-talk between the two cellular genomes have recently interested researchers in the field of neuromuscular diseases. We have identified, isolated and sequenced a new gene, augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) that stimulates in vivo hepatocyte proliferation and up-regulates mt-DNA expression and ATP production. ALR protein (Alrp) is mainly located, in rat, in the mitochondrial inter-membrane space and its mRNA is particularly abundant in brain, muscle, testis and liver, tissues whose activity is mostly dependent on mitochondrial metabolism. Studies on rat Alrp sequence revealed the presence of homologous amino-acid sections into proteins derived from mouse, human, Drosophyla, plants and even DNA viruses. In this article, we evaluated ALR expression in normal human muscular tissues, both as protein and as mRNA. The data, obtained by molecular biology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, demonstrated that: (i) Alrp and ALR mRNA are present in human muscular tissue; (ii) Alrp is particularly expressed in muscular fibres rich in mitochondria; (iii) Alrp is localized in the mitochondrial inter-membrane space or associated to mitochondrial cristae; and (iv) in subjects younger then 35 years of age, ALR mRNA expression is different between male and female subjects. In conclusion, the present data set Alrp, as a factor associated with mitochondria also in human tissue, call for future studies aimed at establishing Alrp as an important factor involved in the molecular events that trigger neuromuscular diseases.

  6. Expression and localization of augmenter of liver regeneration in human muscle tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Polimeno; Barbara, Pesetti; Floriana, Giorgio; Biagio, Moretti; Leonardo, Resta; Roberta, Rossi; Emanuele, Annoscia; Vittorio, Patella; Angela, Notarnicola; Rosanna, Mallamaci; Antonio, Francavilla

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mt-DNA) disorders and abnormal regulation of nuclear-derived proteins devoted to the cross-talk between the two cellular genomes have recently interested researchers in the field of neuromuscular diseases. We have identified, isolated and sequenced a new gene, augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) that stimulates in vivo hepatocyte proliferation and up-regulates mt-DNA expression and ATP production. ALR protein (Alrp) is mainly located, in rat, in the mitochondrial inter-membrane space and its mRNA is particularly abundant in brain, muscle, testis and liver, tissues whose activity is mostly dependent on mitochondrial metabolism. Studies on rat Alrp sequence revealed the presence of homologous amino-acid sections into proteins derived from mouse, human, Drosophyla, plants and even DNA viruses. In this article, we evaluated ALR expression in normal human muscular tissues, both as protein and as mRNA. The data, obtained by molecular biology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, demonstrated that: (i) Alrp and ALR mRNA are present in human muscular tissue; (ii) Alrp is particularly expressed in muscular fibres rich in mitochondria; (iii) Alrp is localized in the mitochondrial inter-membrane space or associated to mitochondrial cristae; and (iv) in subjects younger then 35 years of age, ALR mRNA expression is different between male and female subjects. In conclusion, the present data set Alrp, as a factor associated with mitochondria also in human tissue, call for future studies aimed at establishing Alrp as an important factor involved in the molecular events that trigger neuromuscular diseases. PMID:19659900

  7. Recent advancements in understanding endogenous heart regeneration-insights from adult zebrafish and neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Nicole; Harrison, Michael R; Krainock, Michael; Kim, Richard; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2016-10-01

    Enhancing the endogenous regenerative capacity of the mammalian heart is a promising strategy that can lead to potential treatment of injured cardiac tissues. Studies on heart regeneration in zebrafish and neonatal mice have shown that cardiomyocyte proliferation is essential for replenishing myocardium. We will review recent advancements that have demonstrated the importance of Neuregulin 1/ErbB2 and innervation in regulating cardiomyocyte proliferation using both adult zebrafish and neonatal mouse heart regeneration models. Emerging findings suggest that different populations of macrophages and inflammation might contribute to regenerative versus fibrotic responses. Finally, we will discuss variation in the severity of the cardiac injury and size of the wound, which may explain the range of outcomes observed in different injury models.

  8. EGFR/Ras/MAPK signaling mediates adult midgut epithelial homeostasis and regeneration in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Huaqi; Grenley, Marc O.; Bravo, Maria-Jose; Blumhagen, Rachel Z.; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Many tissues in higher animals undergo dynamic homeostatic growth, wherein damaged or aged cells are replaced by the progeny of resident stem cells. To maintain homeostasis, stem cells must respond to tissue needs. Here we show that in response to damage or stress in the intestinal (midgut) epithelium of adult Drosophila, multiple EGFR ligands and rhomboids (intramembrane proteases that activate some EGFR ligands) are induced, leading to the activation of EGFR signaling in intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Activation of EGFR signaling promotes ISC division and midgut epithelium regeneration, thus maintaining tissue homeostasis. ISCs defective in EGFR signaling cannot grow or divide, are poorly maintained, and cannot support midgut epithelium regeneration following enteric infection by the bacterium, Pseudomonas entomophila. Furthermore, ISC proliferation induced by Jak/Stat signaling is dependent upon EGFR signaling. Thus the EGFR/Ras/MAPK signaling pathway plays central, essential roles in ISC maintenance and the feedback system that mediates intestinal homeostasis. PMID:21167805

  9. Dpp signaling determines regional stem cell identity in the regenerating adult Drosophila gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2013-07-11

    The gastrointestinal tract is lined by a series of epithelia that share functional requirements but also have distinct, highly specialized roles. Distinct populations of somatic stem cells (SCs) regenerate these epithelia, yet the mechanisms that maintain regional identities of these SCs are not well understood. Here, we identify a role for the BMP-like Dpp signaling pathway in diversifying regenerative processes in the adult gastrointestinal tract of Drosophila. Dpp secreted from enterocytes at the boundary between the posterior midgut and the middle midgut (MM) sets up a morphogen gradient that selectively directs copper cell (CC) regeneration from gastric SCs in the MM and thus determines the size of the CC region. In vertebrates, deregulation of BMP signaling has been associated with Barrett's metaplasia, wherein the squamous esophageal epithelium is replaced by a columnar epithelium, suggesting that the maintenance of regional SC identities by BMP is conserved.

  10. Distribution and role in regeneration of N-CAM in the basal laminae of muscle and Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Rieger, F; Nicolet, M; Pinçon-Raymond, M; Murawsky, M; Levi, G; Edelman, G M

    1988-08-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) is a membrane glycoprotein involved in neuron-neuron and neuron-muscle adhesion. It can be synthesized in various forms by both nerve and muscle and it becomes concentrated at the motor endplate. Biochemical analysis of a frog muscle extract enriched in basal lamina revealed the presence of a polydisperse, polysialylated form of N-CAM with an average Mr of approximately 160,000 as determined by SDS-PAGE, which was converted to a form of 125,000 Mr by treatment with neuraminidase. To define further the role of N-CAM in neuromuscular junction organization, we studied the distribution of N-CAM in an in vivo preparation of frog basal lamina sheaths obtained by inducing the degeneration of both nerve and muscle fibers. Immunoreactive material could be readily detected by anti-N-CAM antibodies in such basal lamina sheaths. Ultrastructural analysis using immunogold techniques revealed N-CAM in close association with the basal lamina sheaths, present in dense accumulation at places that presumably correspond to synaptic regions. N-CAM epitopes were also associated with collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix. The ability of anti-N-CAM antibodies to perturb nerve regeneration and reinnervation of the remaining basal lamina sheaths was then examined. In control animals, myelinating Schwann cells wrapped around the regenerated axon and reinnervation occurred only at the old synaptic areas; new contacts between nerve and basal lamina had a terminal Schwann cell capping the nerve terminal. In the presence of anti-N-CAM antibodies, three major abnormalities were observed in the regeneration and reinnervation processes: (a) regenerated axons in nerve trunks that had grown back into the old Schwann cell basal lamina were rarely associated with myelinating Schwann cell processes, (b) ectopic synapses were often present, and (c) many of the axon terminals lacked a terminal Schwann cell capping the nerve-basal lamina contact area. These

  11. Regeneration of stereocilia of hair cells by forced Atoh1 expression in the adult mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Ming; Chen, Wei; Guo, Wei-Wei; Jia, Shuping; Sun, Jian-He; Liu, Hui-Zhan; Young, Wie-Yen; He, David Z Z

    2012-01-01

    The hallmark of mechanosensory hair cells is the stereocilia, where mechanical stimuli are converted into electrical signals. These delicate stereocilia are susceptible to acoustic trauma and ototoxic drugs. While hair cells in lower vertebrates and the mammalian vestibular system can spontaneously regenerate lost stereocilia, mammalian cochlear hair cells no longer retain this capability. We explored the possibility of regenerating stereocilia in the noise-deafened guinea pig cochlea by cochlear inoculation of a viral vector carrying Atoh1, a gene critical for hair cell differentiation. Exposure to simulated gunfire resulted in a 60-70 dB hearing loss and extensive damage and loss of stereocilia bundles of both inner and outer hair cells along the entire cochlear length. However, most injured hair cells remained in the organ of Corti for up to 10 days after the trauma. A viral vector carrying an EGFP-labeled Atoh1 gene was inoculated into the cochlea through the round window on the seventh day after noise exposure. Auditory brainstem response measured one month after inoculation showed that hearing thresholds were substantially improved. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the damaged/lost stereocilia bundles were repaired or regenerated after Atoh1 treatment, suggesting that Atoh1 was able to induce repair/regeneration of the damaged or lost stereocilia. Therefore, our studies revealed a new role of Atoh1 as a gene critical for promoting repair/regeneration of stereocilia and maintaining injured hair cells in the adult mammal cochlea. Atoh1-based gene therapy, therefore, has the potential to treat noise-induced hearing loss if the treatment is carried out before hair cells die. PMID:23029493

  12. Tail regeneration and ependymal outgrowth in the adult newt, Notophthalmus viridescens, are adversely affected by experimentally produced ischemia.

    PubMed

    Tassava, Roy A; Huang, Yan

    2005-12-01

    Spinal axons of the adult newt will regenerate when the spinal cord is severed or when the tail is amputated. Ischemia and associated hypoxia have been correlated with poor central nervous system regeneration in mammals. To test the effects of ischemia on newt spinal cord regeneration, the spinal cord and major blood vessels of the newt tail were severed 2 cm caudal to the cloaca as a primary injury. This primary injury severely reduced circulation in the caudal direction for 7 days; by day 8, circulation was largely restored. After various periods of time after primary injury, tails were amputated 1 cm caudal to the primary injury (in the area of ischemia) and tested for regeneration. If the tail was amputated within 5 days of the primary injury, regeneration did not occur. If amputation was 7 days or longer after the primary injury, a regenerative response occurred. Histology showed that in the non-regenerating tails the spinal cord and associated ependyma, known to be important to tail regeneration, had degenerated in the rostral direction. Such degeneration was prevented when tails were first amputated and allowed to form blastemas before the primary injury. The data indicate that the first 5-7 days of blastema formation are particularly sensitive to compromised blood flow (ischemia/hypoxia). It follows that mechanisms must be present in the adult newt to reduce ischemia to a minimum and thus allow ependymal outgrowth and tail regeneration.

  13. GaAs 904-nm laser irradiation improves myofiber mass recovery during regeneration of skeletal muscle previously damaged by crotoxin.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lucila H; Silva, Meiricris T; Gutierrez, Rita M; Conte, Talita C; Toledo, Cláudio A; Aoki, Marcelo S; Liebano, Richard E; Miyabara, Elen H

    2012-09-01

    This work investigated the effect of gallium arsenide (GaAs) irradiation (power: 5 mW; intensity: 77.14 mW/cm(2), spot: 0.07 cm(2)) on regenerating skeletal muscles damaged by crotoxin (CTX). Male C57Bl6 mice were divided into six groups (n = 5 each): control, treated only with laser at doses of 1.5 J or 3 J, CTX-injured and, CTX-injured and treated with laser at doses of 1.5 J or 3 J. The injured groups received a CTX injection into the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. After 3 days, TA muscles were submitted to GaAs irradiation at doses of 1.5 or 3 J (once a day, during 5 days) and were killed on the eighth day. Muscle histological sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) in order to determine the myofiber cross-sectional area (CSA), the previously injured muscle area (PIMA) and the area density of connective tissue. The gene expression of MyoD and myogenin was detected by real-time PCR. GaAs laser at a dose of 3 J, but not 1.5 J, significantly increased the CSA of regenerating myofibers and reduced the PIMA and the area density of intramuscular connective tissue of CTX-injured muscles. MyoD gene expression increased in the injured group treated with GaAs laser at a dose of 1.5 J. The CTX-injured, 3-J GaAs laser-treated, and the CTX-injured and treated with 3-J laser groups showed an increase in myogenin gene expression when compared to the control group. Our results suggest that GaAs laser treatment at a dose of 3 J improves skeletal muscle regeneration by accelerating the recovery of myofiber mass.

  14. Expression of developmental myosin and morphological characteristics in adult rat skeletal muscle following exercise-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, H K; Plyley, M J; Rodgers, C D; McKee, N H

    1999-07-01

    The extent and stability of the expression of developmental isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MHCd), and their association with cellular morphology, were determined in adult rat skeletal muscle fibres following injury induced by eccentrically-biased exercise. Adult female Wistar rats [274 (10) g] were either assigned as non-exercised controls or subjected to 30 min of treadmill exercise (grade, -16 degrees; speed, 15 m x min(-1)), and then sacrificed following 1, 2, 4, 7, or 12 days of recovery (n = 5-6 per group). Histologically and immunohistologically stained serial, transverse cryosections of the soleus (S), vastus intermedius (VI), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were examined using light microscopy and digital imaging. Fibres staining positively for MHCd (MHCd+) were seldom detected in the TA. In the VI and S, higher proportions of MHCd+ fibres (0.8% and 2.5%, respectively) were observed in rats at 4 and 7 days post-exercise, in comparison to all other groups combined (0.2%, 1.2%; P < or = 0.01). In S, MHCd+ fibres were observed less frequently by 12 days (0.7%) than at 7 days (2.6%) following exercise. The majority (85.1%) of the MHCd+ fibres had morphological characteristics indicative of either damage, degeneration, repair or regeneration. Most of the MHCd+ fibres also expressed adult slow, and/or fast myosin heavy chain. Quantitatively, the MHCd+ fibres were smaller (< 2500 microm2) and more angular than fibres not expressing MHCd. Thus, there was a transient increase in a small, but distinct population of MHCd+ fibres following unaccustomed, functional exercise in adult rat S and VI muscles. The observed close coupling of MHCd expression with morphological changes within muscle fibres suggests that these characteristics have a common, initial exercise-induced injury-related stimulus.

  15. NGF induces adult stem Leydig cells to proliferate and differentiate during Leydig cell regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Huaxi; Yang, Yan; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Ge, Renshan; Su, Zhijian; Huang, Yadong

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Nerve growth factor has shown significant changes on mRNA levels during Adult Leydig cells regeneration. •We established the organ culture model of rat seminiferous tubules with ethane dimethyl sulphonate (EDS) treatment. •Nerve growth factor has shown proliferation and differentiation-promoting effects on Adult stem Leydig cells. •Nerve growth factor induces progenitor Leydig cells to proliferate and differentiate and immature Leydig cells to proliferate. -- Abstract: Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been reported to be involved in male reproductive physiology. However, few reports have described the activity of NGF during Leydig cell development. The objective of the present study was to examine the role of NGF during stem-Leydig-cell (SLC) regeneration. We investigated the effects of NGF on Leydig-cell (LC) regeneration by measuring mRNA levels in the adult rat testis after ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS) treatment. Furthermore, we used the established organ culture model of rat seminiferous tubules to examine the regulation of NGF during SLC proliferation and differentiation using EdU staining, real-time PCR and western blotting. Progenitor Leydig cells (PLCs) and immature Leydig cells (ILCs) were also used to investigate the effects of NGF on LCs at different developmental stages. NGF mRNA levels changed significantly during Leydig-cell regeneration in vivo. In vitro, NGF significantly promoted the proliferation of stem Leydig cells and also induced steroidogenic enzyme gene expression and 3β-HSD protein expression. The data from PLCs and ILCs showed that NGF could increase Cyclin D1 and Hsd 17b3 mRNA levels in PLCs and Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in ILCs. These results indicate that NGF may play an important role during LC regeneration by regulating the proliferation and differentiation of LCs at different developmental stages, from SLCs to PLCs and from PLCs to ILCs. The discovery of this effect of NGF on Leydig cells will provide useful

  16. Constitutive expression of Yes-associated protein (Yap) in adult skeletal muscle fibres induces muscle atrophy and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Judson, Robert N; Gray, Stuart R; Walker, Claire; Carroll, Andrew M; Itzstein, Cecile; Lionikas, Arimantas; Zammit, Peter S; De Bari, Cosimo; Wackerhage, Henning

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the Hippo pathway member Yes-associated protein (Yap, gene name Yap1) in skeletal muscle fibres in vivo. Specifically we bred an inducible, skeletal muscle fibre-specific knock-in mouse model (MCK-tTA-hYAP1 S127A) to test whether the over expression of constitutively active Yap (hYAP1 S127A) is sufficient to drive muscle hypertrophy or stimulate changes in fibre type composition. Unexpectedly, after 5-7 weeks of constitutive hYAP1 S127A over expression, mice suddenly and rapidly lost 20-25% body weight and suffered from gait impairments and kyphosis. Skeletal muscles atrophied by 34-40% and the muscle fibre cross sectional area decreased by ≈40% when compared to control mice. Histological analysis revealed evidence of skeletal muscle degeneration and regeneration, necrotic fibres and a NADH-TR staining resembling centronuclear myopathy. In agreement with the histology, mRNA expression of markers of regenerative myogenesis (embryonic myosin heavy chain, Myf5, myogenin, Pax7) and muscle protein degradation (atrogin-1, MuRF1) were significantly elevated in muscles from transgenic mice versus control. No significant changes in fibre type composition were detected using ATPase staining. The phenotype was largely reversible, as a cessation of hYAP1 S127A expression rescued body and muscle weight, restored muscle morphology and prevented further pathological progression. To conclude, high Yap activity in muscle fibres does not induce fibre hypertrophy nor fibre type changes but instead results in a reversible atrophy and deterioration. PMID:23544078

  17. Constitutive Expression of Yes-Associated Protein (Yap) in Adult Skeletal Muscle Fibres Induces Muscle Atrophy and Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Robert N.; Gray, Stuart R.; Walker, Claire; Carroll, Andrew M.; Itzstein, Cecile; Lionikas, Arimantas; Zammit, Peter S.; De Bari, Cosimo; Wackerhage, Henning

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the Hippo pathway member Yes-associated protein (Yap, gene name Yap1) in skeletal muscle fibres in vivo. Specifically we bred an inducible, skeletal muscle fibre-specific knock-in mouse model (MCK-tTA-hYAP1 S127A) to test whether the over expression of constitutively active Yap (hYAP1 S127A) is sufficient to drive muscle hypertrophy or stimulate changes in fibre type composition. Unexpectedly, after 5–7 weeks of constitutive hYAP1 S127A over expression, mice suddenly and rapidly lost 20–25% body weight and suffered from gait impairments and kyphosis. Skeletal muscles atrophied by 34–40% and the muscle fibre cross sectional area decreased by ≈40% when compared to control mice. Histological analysis revealed evidence of skeletal muscle degeneration and regeneration, necrotic fibres and a NADH-TR staining resembling centronuclear myopathy. In agreement with the histology, mRNA expression of markers of regenerative myogenesis (embryonic myosin heavy chain, Myf5, myogenin, Pax7) and muscle protein degradation (atrogin-1, MuRF1) were significantly elevated in muscles from transgenic mice versus control. No significant changes in fibre type composition were detected using ATPase staining. The phenotype was largely reversible, as a cessation of hYAP1 S127A expression rescued body and muscle weight, restored muscle morphology and prevented further pathological progression. To conclude, high Yap activity in muscle fibres does not induce fibre hypertrophy nor fibre type changes but instead results in a reversible atrophy and deterioration. PMID:23544078

  18. Fetal and adult fibroblasts display intrinsic differences in tendon tissue engineering and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qiao-Mei; Chen, Jia Lin; Shen, Wei Liang; Yin, Zi; Liu, Huan Huan; Fang, Zhi; Heng, Boon Chin; Ouyang, Hong Wei; Chen, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Injured adult tendons do not exhibit optimal healing through a regenerative process, whereas fetal tendons can heal in a regenerative fashion without scar formation. Hence, we compared FFs (mouse fetal fibroblasts) and AFs (mouse adult fibroblasts) as seed cells for the fabrication of scaffold-free engineered tendons. Our results demonstrated that FFs had more potential for tendon tissue engineering, as shown by higher levels of tendon-related gene expression. In the in situ AT injury model, the FFs group also demonstrated much better structural and functional properties after healing, with higher levels of collagen deposition and better microstructure repair. Moreover, fetal fibroblasts could increase the recruitment of fibroblast-like cells and reduce the infiltration of inflammatory cells to the injury site during the regeneration process. Our results suggest that the underlying mechanisms of better regeneration with FFs should be elucidated and be used to enhance adult tendon healing. This may assist in the development of future strategies to treat tendon injuries. PMID:24992450

  19. Distinct effects of inflammation on preconditioning and regeneration of the adult zebrafish heart

    PubMed Central

    de Preux Charles, Anne-Sophie; Bise, Thomas; Baier, Felix; Marro, Jan; Jaźwińska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The adult heart is able to activate cardioprotective programmes and modifies its architecture in response to physiological or pathological changes. While mammalian cardiac remodelling often involves hypertrophic expansion, the adult zebrafish heart exploits hyperplastic growth. This capacity depends on the responsiveness of zebrafish cardiomyocytes to mitogenic signals throughout their entire life. Here, we have examined the role of inflammation on the stimulation of cell cycle activity in the context of heart preconditioning and regeneration. We used thoracotomy as a cardiac preconditioning model and cryoinjury as a model of cardiac infarction in the adult zebrafish. First, we performed a spatio-temporal characterization of leucocytes and cycling cardiac cells after thoracotomy. This analysis revealed a concomitance between the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the stimulation of the mitotic activity. However, decreasing the immune response using clodronate liposome injection, PLX3397 treatment or anti-inflammatory drugs surprisingly had no effect on the re-entry of cardiac cells into the cell cycle. In contrast, reducing inflammation using the same strategies after cryoinjury strongly impaired cardiac cell mitotic activity and the regenerative process. Taken together, our results show that, while the immune response is not necessary to induce cell-cycle activity in intact preconditioned hearts, inflammation is required for the regeneration of injured hearts in zebrafish. PMID:27440424

  20. Fetal and adult fibroblasts display intrinsic differences in tendon tissue engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiao-Mei; Chen, Jia Lin; Shen, Wei Liang; Yin, Zi; Liu, Huan Huan; Fang, Zhi; Heng, Boon Chin; Ouyang, Hong Wei; Chen, Xiao

    2014-07-03

    Injured adult tendons do not exhibit optimal healing through a regenerative process, whereas fetal tendons can heal in a regenerative fashion without scar formation. Hence, we compared FFs (mouse fetal fibroblasts) and AFs (mouse adult fibroblasts) as seed cells for the fabrication of scaffold-free engineered tendons. Our results demonstrated that FFs had more potential for tendon tissue engineering, as shown by higher levels of tendon-related gene expression. In the in situ AT injury model, the FFs group also demonstrated much better structural and functional properties after healing, with higher levels of collagen deposition and better microstructure repair. Moreover, fetal fibroblasts could increase the recruitment of fibroblast-like cells and reduce the infiltration of inflammatory cells to the injury site during the regeneration process. Our results suggest that the underlying mechanisms of better regeneration with FFs should be elucidated and be used to enhance adult tendon healing. This may assist in the development of future strategies to treat tendon injuries.

  1. Trop2 marks transient gastric fetal epithelium and adult regenerating cells after epithelial damage

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez Vallone, Valeria; Leprovots, Morgane; Strollo, Sandra; Vasile, Gabriela; Lefort, Anne; Libert, Frederick; Vassart, Gilbert; Garcia, Marie-Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mouse fetal intestinal progenitors lining the epithelium prior to villogenesis grow as spheroids when cultured ex vivo and express the transmembrane glycoprotein Trop2 as a marker. Here, we report the characterization of Trop2-expressing cells from fetal pre-glandular stomach, growing as immortal undifferentiated spheroids, and their relationship with gastric development and regeneration. Trop2+ cells generating gastric spheroids differed from adult glandular Lgr5+ stem cells, but appeared highly related to fetal intestinal spheroids. Although they shared a common spheroid signature, intestinal and gastric fetal spheroid-generating cells expressed organ-specific transcription factors and were committed to intestinal and glandular gastric differentiation, respectively. Trop2 expression was transient during glandular stomach development, being lost at the onset of gland formation, whereas it persisted in the squamous forestomach. Undetectable under homeostasis, Trop2 was strongly re-expressed in glands after acute Lgr5+ stem cell ablation or following indomethacin-induced injury. These highly proliferative reactive adult Trop2+ cells exhibited a transcriptome displaying similarity with that of gastric embryonic Trop2+ cells, suggesting that epithelium regeneration in adult stomach glands involves the partial re-expression of a fetal genetic program. PMID:26989172

  2. The Time Course Effects of Electroacupuncture on Promoting Skeletal Muscle Regeneration and Inhibiting Excessive Fibrosis after Contusion in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongguo; Luo, Dan; Xiao, Cheng; Lin, Peng; Liu, Shouyao; Xu, Qianwei; Wang, Yunting

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the longitudinal effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on Zusanli (ST36) and Ashi acupoints in promoting skeletal muscle regeneration and inhibiting excessive fibrosis after contusion in rabbits. Sixty rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: normal, contusion, EA, and recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-I (rhIGF-I). An acute skeletal muscle contusion was produced on the right gastrocnemius (GM) by an instrument-based drop-mass technique. EA was performed for 15 minutes every two days with 0.4 mA (2 Hz), and GM injections were executed with rhIGF-I (0.25 mL once a week). Rabbits treated with EA had a higher T-SOD and T-AOC serum activities and lower MDA serum level, the blood perfusion of which was also significantly higher. In the EA group, the diameter of the myofibril was uniform and the arrangement was regular, contrary to the contusion group. The number and diameter of regenerative myofibers and MHC expression were increased in the EA group. EA treatment significantly decreased fibrosis formation and reduced both GDF-8 and p-Smad2/3 expressions in injured muscle. Our data indicate that EA may promote myofiber regeneration and reduce excessive fibrosis by improving blood flow and antioxidant capacities. Additionally, EA may regulate signaling factor expression after contusion. PMID:23990848

  3. The time course effects of electroacupuncture on promoting skeletal muscle regeneration and inhibiting excessive fibrosis after contusion in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongguo; Luo, Dan; Xiao, Cheng; Lin, Peng; Liu, Shouyao; Xu, Qianwei; Wang, Yunting

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the longitudinal effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on Zusanli (ST36) and Ashi acupoints in promoting skeletal muscle regeneration and inhibiting excessive fibrosis after contusion in rabbits. Sixty rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: normal, contusion, EA, and recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-I (rhIGF-I). An acute skeletal muscle contusion was produced on the right gastrocnemius (GM) by an instrument-based drop-mass technique. EA was performed for 15 minutes every two days with 0.4 mA (2 Hz), and GM injections were executed with rhIGF-I (0.25 mL once a week). Rabbits treated with EA had a higher T-SOD and T-AOC serum activities and lower MDA serum level, the blood perfusion of which was also significantly higher. In the EA group, the diameter of the myofibril was uniform and the arrangement was regular, contrary to the contusion group. The number and diameter of regenerative myofibers and MHC expression were increased in the EA group. EA treatment significantly decreased fibrosis formation and reduced both GDF-8 and p-Smad2/3 expressions in injured muscle. Our data indicate that EA may promote myofiber regeneration and reduce excessive fibrosis by improving blood flow and antioxidant capacities. Additionally, EA may regulate signaling factor expression after contusion. PMID:23990848

  4. Effect of low-energy laser irradiation and antioxidant supplementation on cell apoptosis during skeletal muscle post-injury regeneration in pigs.

    PubMed

    Otrocka-Domagała, I; Mikołajczyk, A; Paździor-Czapula, K; Gesek, M; Rotkiewicz, T; Mikiewicz, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-energy laser irradiation, coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E supplementation on the apoptosis of macrophages and muscle precursor cells during skeletal muscle regeneration after bupivacaine-induced injury. The experiment was conducted on 75 gilts, divided into 5 experimental groups: I--control, II--low-energy laser irradiation, III--coenzyme Q10, IV--coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E, V--vitamin E. Muscle necrosis was induced by injection of 0.5% bupivacaine hydrochloride. The animals were euthanized on subsequent days after injury. Samples were formalin fixed and processed routinely for histopathology. Apoptosis was detected using the TUNEL method. The obtained results indicate that low-energy laser irradiation has a beneficial effect on macrophages and muscle precursor cell activity during muscle post-injury regeneration and protects these cells against apoptosis. Vitamin E has a slightly lower protective effect, limited mainly to the macrophages. Coenzyme Q10 co-supplemented with vitamin E increases the activity of macrophages and muscle precursor cells, myotube and young muscle formation. Importantly, muscle precursor cells seem to be more sensitive to apoptosis than macrophages in the environment of regenerating damaged muscle. PMID:26618584

  5. Intrinsic Ability of Adult Stem Cell in Skeletal Muscle: An Effective and Replenishable Resource to the Establishment of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Machida, Masanao; Hidaka, Ryo; Asashima, Makoto; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells play an essential role in mammalian organ maintenance and repair throughout adulthood since they ensure that organs retain their ability to regenerate. The choice of cell fate by adult stem cells for cellular proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation into multiple lineages is critically important for the homeostasis and biological function of individual organs. Responses of stem cells to stress, injury, or environmental change are precisely regulated by intercellular and intracellular signaling networks, and these molecular events cooperatively define the ability of stem cell throughout life. Skeletal muscle tissue represents an abundant, accessible, and replenishable source of adult stem cells. Skeletal muscle contains myogenic satellite cells and muscle-derived stem cells that retain multipotent differentiation abilities. These stem cell populations have the capacity for long-term proliferation and high self-renewal. The molecular mechanisms associated with deficits in skeletal muscle and stem cell function have been extensively studied. Muscle-derived stem cells are an obvious, readily available cell resource that offers promise for cell-based therapy and various applications in the field of tissue engineering. This review describes the strategies commonly used to identify and functionally characterize adult stem cells, focusing especially on satellite cells, and discusses their potential applications. PMID:23818907

  6. Comparative analysis of skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in children and adults: a 31P-MRS study.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Sébastien; Tonson, Anne; Le Fur, Yann; Cozzone, Patrick; Bendahan, David

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the oxidative capacity of the forearm flexor muscles in vivo between children and adults using 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Seven boys (11.7 +/- 0.6 y) and 10 men (35.6 +/- 7.8 year) volunteered to perform a 3 min dynamic finger flexions exercise against a standardized weight (15% of the maximal voluntary contraction). Muscle oxidative capacity was quantified on the basis of phosphocreatine (PCr) post-exercise recovery kinetics analysis. End-of-exercise pH was not significantly different between children and adults (6.6 +/- 0.2 vs. 6.5 +/- 0.2), indicating that indices of PCr recovery kinetics can be reliably compared. The rate constant of PCr recovery (kPCr) and the maximum rate of aerobic ATP production were about 2-fold higher in young boys than in men (kPCr: 1.7 +/- 1.2 vs. 0.7 +/- 0.2 min(-1); Vmax: 49.7 +/- 24.6 vs. 29.4 +/- 7.9 mmol.L(-1).min(-1), p < 0.05). Our results clearly illustrate a greater mitochondrial oxidative capacity in the forearm flexor muscles of young children. This larger ATP regeneration capacity through aerobic mechanisms in children could be one of the factors accounting for their greater resistance to fatigue during high-intensity intermittent exercise. PMID:18641715

  7. CD13 promotes mesenchymal stem cell-mediated regeneration of ischemic muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Mamunur; Subramani, Jaganathan; Ghosh, Mallika; Denninger, Jiyeon K.; Takeda, Kotaro; Fong, Guo-Hua; Carlson, Morgan E.; Shapiro, Linda H.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent, tissue-resident cells that can facilitate tissue regeneration and thus, show great promise as potential therapeutic agents. Functional MSCs have been isolated and characterized from a wide array of adult tissues and are universally identified by the shared expression of a core panel of MSCs markers. One of these markers is the multifunctional cell surface peptidase CD13 that has been shown to be expressed on human and murine MSCs from many tissues. To investigate whether this universal expression indicates a functional role for CD13 in MSC biology we isolated, expanded and characterized MSCs from bone marrow of wild type (WT) and CD13KO mice. Characterization of these cells demonstrated that both WT and CD13KO MSCs expressed the full complement of MSC markers (CD29, CD44, CD49e, CD105, Sca1), showed comparable proliferation rates and were capable of differentiating toward the adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. However, MSCs lacking CD13 were unable to differentiate into vascular cells, consistent with our previous characterization of CD13 as an angiogenic regulator. Compared to WT MSCs, adhesion and migration on various extracellular matrices of CD13KO MSCs were significantly impaired, which correlated with decreased phospho-FAK levels and cytoskeletal alterations. Crosslinking human MSCs with activating CD13 antibodies increased cell adhesion to endothelial monolayers and induced FAK activation in a time dependent manner. In agreement with these in vitro data, intramuscular injection of CD13KO MSCs in a model of severe ischemic limb injury resulted in significantly poorer perfusion, decreased ambulation, increased necrosis and impaired vascularization compared to those receiving WT MSCs. This study suggests that CD13 regulates FAK activation to promote MSC adhesion and migration, thus, contributing to MSC-mediated tissue repair. CD13 may present a viable target to enhance the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell

  8. Production of transgenic adult plants from clementine mandarin by enhancing cell competence for transformation and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Magdalena; Navarro, Antonio; Navarro, Luis; Peña, Leandro

    2008-01-01

    Genetic transformation of mature trees is difficult because adult tissues are recalcitrant to Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection and transformation and because transgenic mature events are less competent for regeneration. We have shown that reinvigoration allows manipulation of the vegetative phase to increase the potential for transformation and regeneration without loss of competence for flowering and fruiting. To produce transgenic plants from clementine mandarin (Citrus clementina hort. ex Tanaka), we optimized the conditions of the source material both ex vitro and in vitro. Grafting of mature buds on juvenile rootstocks in the spring and preventing multiple bud sprouting by removing all but one bud permitted selection of vigorous first flushes for in vitro culture. Use of additional virulence genes from A. tumefaciens to increase transformation frequency and optimization of culture media and conditions to enhance explant cell competence for T-DNA integration and organogenesis resulted in efficient and reliable transgenic plant production. Transformed regenerants from explants, cultured in media without antibiotics, were identified by a screenable marker (either beta-glucuronidase or green fluorescent protein (GFP)), creating the possibility of generating transgenic clementine plants without antibiotic resistance marker genes. Stable integration of foreign genes was demonstrated by Southern blot analysis, and expression of these foreign genes was confirmed by detection of GFP fluorescence in leaves, floral organs and fruits of the transgenic plants.

  9. Muscle Size Not Density Predicts Variance in Muscle Strength and Neuromuscular Performance in Healthy Adult Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Benjamin K; Gerrits, Tom A J; Horan, Sean A; Beck, Belinda R

    2016-06-01

    Weeks, BK, Gerrits, TAJ, Horan, SA, and Beck, BR. Muscle size not density predicts variance in muscle strength and neuromuscular performance in healthy adult men and women. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1577-1584, 2016-The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT)-derived measures of muscle area and density and markers of muscle strength and performance in men and women. Fifty-two apparently healthy adults (26 men, 26 women; age 33.8 ± 12.0 years) volunteered to participate. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (XR-800; Norland Medical Systems, Inc., Trumbull, CT, USA) was used to determine whole body and regional lean and fat tissue mass, whereas pQCT (XCT-3000; Stratec, Pforzheim, Germany) was used to determine muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) and muscle density of the leg, thigh, and forearm. Ankle plantar flexor and knee extensor strengths were examined using isokinetic dynamometry, and grip strength was examined with dynamometry. Impulse generated during a maximal vertical jump was used as an index of neuromuscular performance. Thigh, forearm, and leg MCSA strongly predicted variance in knee extensor (R = 0.77, p < 0.001) and grip strength (R = 0.77, p < 0.001) and weakly predicted variance in ankle plantar flexor strength (R = 0.20, p < 0.001), respectively, whereas muscle density was only a weak predictor of variance in knee extensor strength (R = 0.18, p < 0.001). Thigh and leg MCSA accounted for 79 and 69% of the variance in impulse generated from a maximal vertical jump (p < 0.001), whereas thigh muscle density predicted only 18% of the variance (p < 0.002). In conclusion, we found that pQCT-derived muscle area is more strongly related to strength and neuromuscular performance than muscle density in adult men and women.

  10. Regeneration and characterization of adult mouse hippocampal neurons in a defined in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Kucku; Das, Mainak; Bhargava, Neelima; Stancescu, Maria; Molnar, Peter; Kindy, Mark S; Hickman, James J

    2009-02-15

    Although the majority of human illnesses occur during adulthood, most of the available in vitro disease models are based upon cells obtained from embryonic/fetal tissues because of the difficulties involved with culturing adult cells. Development of adult mouse neuronal cultures has a special significance because of the abundance of transgenic disease models that use this species. In this study a novel cell culture method has been developed that supports the long-term survival and physiological regeneration of adult mouse hippocampal cells in a serum-free defined environment. In this well-defined, controlled system, adult mouse hippocampal cells survived for up to 21 days in culture. The cultured cells exhibited typical hippocampal neuronal morphology and electrophysiological properties after recovery from the trauma of dissociation, and stained positive for the expected neuronal markers. This system has great potential as an investigative tool for in vitro studies of adult diseases, the aging brain or transgenic models of age-associated disorders. PMID:18955083

  11. MuSK levels differ between adult skeletal muscles and influence postsynaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Punga, Anna R; Maj, Marcin; Lin, Shuo; Meinen, Sarina; Rüegg, Markus A

    2011-03-01

    Muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) is involved in the formation and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), and is necessary for NMJ integrity. As muscle involvement is strikingly selective in pathological conditions in which MuSK is targeted, including congenital myasthenic syndrome with MuSK mutation and MuSK antibody-seropositive myasthenia gravis, we hypothesized that the postsynaptic response to MuSK-agrin signalling differs between adult muscles. Transcript levels of postsynaptic proteins were compared between different muscles in wild-type adult mice. MuSK expression was high in the soleus and sternomastoid muscles and low in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and omohyoid muscles. The acetylcholine receptor (AChR) α subunit followed a similar expression pattern, whereas expression of Dok-7, Lrp4 and rapsyn was comparable between the muscles. We subsequently examined muscles in mice that overexpressed a miniaturized form of neural agrin or MuSK. In these transgenic mice, the soleus and sternomastoid muscles responded with formation of ectopic AChR clusters, whereas such clusters were almost absent in the EDL and omohyoid muscles. Electroporation of Dok-7 revealed its important role as an activator of MuSK in AChR cluster formation in adult muscles. Together, our findings indicate for the first time that adult skeletal muscles harbour different endogenous levels of MuSK and that these levels determine the ability to form ectopic AChR clusters upon overexpression of agrin or MuSK. We believe that these findings are important for our understanding of adult muscle plasticity and the selective muscle involvement in neuromuscular disorders in which MuSK is diminished. PMID:21255125

  12. Interactions between muscle stem cells, mesenchymal-derived cells and immune cells in muscle homeostasis, regeneration and disease.

    PubMed

    Farup, J; Madaro, L; Puri, P L; Mikkelsen, U R

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the importance of reciprocal functional interactions between different types of mononuclear cells in coordinating the repair of injured muscles. In particular, signals released from the inflammatory infiltrate and from mesenchymal interstitial cells (also known as fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs)) appear to instruct muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to break quiescence, proliferate and differentiate. Interestingly, conditions that compromise the functional integrity of this network can bias muscle repair toward pathological outcomes that are typically observed in chronic muscular disorders, that is, fibrotic and fatty muscle degeneration as well as myofiber atrophy. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of this network in physiological and pathological conditions, and anticipate the potential contribution of its cellular components to relatively unexplored conditions, such as aging and physical exercise. PMID:26203859

  13. Interactions between muscle stem cells, mesenchymal-derived cells and immune cells in muscle homeostasis, regeneration and disease

    PubMed Central

    Farup, J; Madaro, L; Puri, P L; Mikkelsen, U R

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the importance of reciprocal functional interactions between different types of mononuclear cells in coordinating the repair of injured muscles. In particular, signals released from the inflammatory infiltrate and from mesenchymal interstitial cells (also known as fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs)) appear to instruct muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to break quiescence, proliferate and differentiate. Interestingly, conditions that compromise the functional integrity of this network can bias muscle repair toward pathological outcomes that are typically observed in chronic muscular disorders, that is, fibrotic and fatty muscle degeneration as well as myofiber atrophy. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of this network in physiological and pathological conditions, and anticipate the potential contribution of its cellular components to relatively unexplored conditions, such as aging and physical exercise. PMID:26203859

  14. Interactions between muscle stem cells, mesenchymal-derived cells and immune cells in muscle homeostasis, regeneration and disease.

    PubMed

    Farup, J; Madaro, L; Puri, P L; Mikkelsen, U R

    2015-07-23

    Recent evidence has revealed the importance of reciprocal functional interactions between different types of mononuclear cells in coordinating the repair of injured muscles. In particular, signals released from the inflammatory infiltrate and from mesenchymal interstitial cells (also known as fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs)) appear to instruct muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to break quiescence, proliferate and differentiate. Interestingly, conditions that compromise the functional integrity of this network can bias muscle repair toward pathological outcomes that are typically observed in chronic muscular disorders, that is, fibrotic and fatty muscle degeneration as well as myofiber atrophy. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of this network in physiological and pathological conditions, and anticipate the potential contribution of its cellular components to relatively unexplored conditions, such as aging and physical exercise.

  15. LncRNA Dum interacts with Dnmts to regulate Dppa2 expression during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yu; Bao, Xichen; Zhu, Xihua; Kwok, Yvonne Ka-Yin; Sun, Kun; Chen, Xiaona; Huang, Yongheng; Jauch, Ralf; Esteban, Miguel A; Sun, Hao; Wang, Huating

    2015-03-01

    Emerging studies document the roles of long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) in regulating gene expression at chromatin level but relatively less is known how they regulate DNA methylation. Here we identify an lncRNA, Dum (developmental pluripotency-associated 2 (Dppa2) Upstream binding Muscle lncRNA) in skeletal myoblast cells. The expression of Dum is dynamically regulated during myogenesis in vitro and in vivo. It is also transcriptionally induced by MyoD binding upon myoblast differentiation. Functional analyses show that it promotes myoblast differentiation and damage-induced muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, Dum was found to silence its neighboring gene, Dppa2, in cis through recruiting Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Furthermore, intrachromosomal looping between Dum locus and Dppa2 promoter is necessary for Dum/Dppa2 interaction. Collectively, we have identified a novel lncRNA that interacts with Dnmts to regulate myogenesis.

  16. LncRNA Dum interacts with Dnmts to regulate Dppa2 expression during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yu; Bao, Xichen; Zhu, Xihua; Kwok, Yvonne Ka-yin; Sun, Kun; Chen, Xiaona; Huang, Yongheng; Jauch, Ralf; Esteban, Miguel A; Sun, Hao; Wang, Huating

    2015-01-01

    Emerging studies document the roles of long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) in regulating gene expression at chromatin level but relatively less is known how they regulate DNA methylation. Here we identify an lncRNA, Dum (developmental pluripotency-associated 2 (Dppa2) Upstream binding Muscle lncRNA) in skeletal myoblast cells. The expression of Dum is dynamically regulated during myogenesis in vitro and in vivo. It is also transcriptionally induced by MyoD binding upon myoblast differentiation. Functional analyses show that it promotes myoblast differentiation and damage-induced muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, Dum was found to silence its neighboring gene, Dppa2, in cis through recruiting Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Furthermore, intrachromosomal looping between Dum locus and Dppa2 promoter is necessary for Dum/Dppa2 interaction. Collectively, we have identified a novel lncRNA that interacts with Dnmts to regulate myogenesis. PMID:25686699

  17. LncRNA Dum interacts with Dnmts to regulate Dppa2 expression during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yu; Bao, Xichen; Zhu, Xihua; Kwok, Yvonne Ka-Yin; Sun, Kun; Chen, Xiaona; Huang, Yongheng; Jauch, Ralf; Esteban, Miguel A; Sun, Hao; Wang, Huating

    2015-03-01

    Emerging studies document the roles of long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) in regulating gene expression at chromatin level but relatively less is known how they regulate DNA methylation. Here we identify an lncRNA, Dum (developmental pluripotency-associated 2 (Dppa2) Upstream binding Muscle lncRNA) in skeletal myoblast cells. The expression of Dum is dynamically regulated during myogenesis in vitro and in vivo. It is also transcriptionally induced by MyoD binding upon myoblast differentiation. Functional analyses show that it promotes myoblast differentiation and damage-induced muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, Dum was found to silence its neighboring gene, Dppa2, in cis through recruiting Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Furthermore, intrachromosomal looping between Dum locus and Dppa2 promoter is necessary for Dum/Dppa2 interaction. Collectively, we have identified a novel lncRNA that interacts with Dnmts to regulate myogenesis. PMID:25686699

  18. Adult c-kit(pos) cardiac stem cells are necessary and sufficient for functional cardiac regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Georgina M; Vicinanza, Carla; Smith, Andrew J; Aquila, Iolanda; Leone, Angelo; Waring, Cheryl D; Henning, Beverley J; Stirparo, Giuliano Giuseppe; Papait, Roberto; Scarfò, Marzia; Agosti, Valter; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Indolfi, Ciro; Ottolenghi, Sergio; Torella, Daniele; Nadal-Ginard, Bernardo

    2013-08-15

    The epidemic of heart failure has stimulated interest in understanding cardiac regeneration. Evidence has been reported supporting regeneration via transplantation of multiple cell types, as well as replication of postmitotic cardiomyocytes. In addition, the adult myocardium harbors endogenous c-kit(pos) cardiac stem cells (eCSCs), whose relevance for regeneration is controversial. Here, using different rodent models of diffuse myocardial damage causing acute heart failure, we show that eCSCs restore cardiac function by regenerating lost cardiomyocytes. Ablation of the eCSC abolishes regeneration and functional recovery. The regenerative process is completely restored by replacing the ablated eCSCs with the progeny of one eCSC. eCSCs recovered from the host and recloned retain their regenerative potential in vivo and in vitro. After regeneration, selective suicide of these exogenous CSCs and their progeny abolishes regeneration, severely impairing ventricular performance. These data show that c-kit(pos) eCSCs are necessary and sufficient for the regeneration and repair of myocardial damage. PMID:23953114

  19. Effects of estradiol and methoxychlor on Leydig cell regeneration in the adult rat testis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingbing; Chen, Dongxin; Jiang, Zheli; Li, Jingyang; Liu, Shiwen; Dong, Yaoyao; Yao, Wenwen; Akingbemi, Benson; Ge, Renshan; Li, Xiaokun

    2014-05-06

    The objective of the present study is to determine whether methoxychlor (MXC) exposure in adulthood affects rat Leydig cell regeneration and to compare its effects with estradiol (E2). Adult 90-day-old male Sprague-Dawley rats received ethane dimethane sulfonate (EDS) to eliminate the adult Leydig cell population. Subsequently, rats were randomly assigned to four groups and gavaged with corn oil (control), 0.25 mg/kg E2 and 10 or 100 mg/kg MXC daily from days 5 to 30 post-EDS treatment. The results showed that MXC and E2 reduced serum testosterone levels on day 58 post-EDS treatment. qPCR showed Hsd17b3 mRNA levels were downregulated 7-15 fold by E2 and MXC, indicating that development of the new population of Leydig cells was arrested at the earlier stage. This observation was supported by the results of histochemical staining, which demonstrated that Leydig cells in MXC-treated testis on day 58 post-EDS treatment were mostly progenitor Leydig cells. However, Pdgfb mRNA levels were downregulated, while Lif transcript levels were increased by MXC. In contrast, E2 did not affect gene expression for these growth factors. In conclusion, our findings indicated that both MXC and E2 delayed rat Leydig cell regeneration in the EDS-treated model, presumably acting by different mechanisms.

  20. Effects of Estradiol and Methoxychlor on Leydig Cell Regeneration in the Adult Rat Testis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bingbing; Chen, Dongxin; Jiang, Zheli; Li, Jingyang; Liu, Shiwen; Dong, Yaoyao; Yao, Wenwen; Akingbemi, Benson; Ge, Renshan; Li, Xiaokun

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine whether methoxychlor (MXC) exposure in adulthood affects rat Leydig cell regeneration and to compare its effects with estradiol (E2). Adult 90-day-old male Sprague-Dawley rats received ethane dimethane sulfonate (EDS) to eliminate the adult Leydig cell population. Subsequently, rats were randomly assigned to four groups and gavaged with corn oil (control), 0.25 mg/kg E2 and 10 or 100 mg/kg MXC daily from days 5 to 30 post-EDS treatment. The results showed that MXC and E2 reduced serum testosterone levels on day 58 post-EDS treatment. qPCR showed Hsd17b3 mRNA levels were downregulated 7–15 fold by E2 and MXC, indicating that development of the new population of Leydig cells was arrested at the earlier stage. This observation was supported by the results of histochemical staining, which demonstrated that Leydig cells in MXC-treated testis on day 58 post-EDS treatment were mostly progenitor Leydig cells. However, Pdgfb mRNA levels were downregulated, while Lif transcript levels were increased by MXC. In contrast, E2 did not affect gene expression for these growth factors. In conclusion, our findings indicated that both MXC and E2 delayed rat Leydig cell regeneration in the EDS-treated model, presumably acting by different mechanisms. PMID:24806340

  1. Mending broken hearts: cardiac development as a basis for adult heart regeneration and repair

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Mei; Olson, Eric N.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    As the adult mammalian heart has limited potential for regeneration and repair, the loss of cardiomyocytes during injury and disease can result in heart failure and death. The cellular processes and regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart through ‘reawakening’ pathways that are active during embryogenesis. Heart function has been restored in rodents by reprogramming non-myocytes into cardiomyocytes, by expressing transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and T-box 5 (TBX5)) and microRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499) that control cardiomyocyte identity. Stimulating cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation and proliferation by activating mitotic signalling pathways involved in embryonic heart growth represents a complementary approach for heart regeneration and repair. Recent advances in understanding the mechanistic basis of heart development offer exciting opportunities for effective therapies for heart failure. PMID:23839576

  2. Identification of adult nephron progenitors capable of kidney regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Diep, Cuong Q; Ma, Dongdong; Deo, Rahul C; Holm, Teresa M; Naylor, Richard W; Arora, Natasha; Wingert, Rebecca A; Bollig, Frank; Djordjevic, Gordana; Lichman, Benjamin; Zhu, Hao; Ikenaga, Takanori; Ono, Fumihito; Englert, Christoph; Cowan, Chad A; Hukriede, Neil A; Handin, Robert I; Davidson, Alan J

    2011-02-01

    Loss of kidney function underlies many renal diseases. Mammals can partly repair their nephrons (the functional units of the kidney), but cannot form new ones. By contrast, fish add nephrons throughout their lifespan and regenerate nephrons de novo after injury, providing a model for understanding how mammalian renal regeneration may be therapeutically activated. Here we trace the source of new nephrons in the adult zebrafish to small cellular aggregates containing nephron progenitors. Transplantation of single aggregates comprising 10-30 cells is sufficient to engraft adults and generate multiple nephrons. Serial transplantation experiments to test self-renewal revealed that nephron progenitors are long-lived and possess significant replicative potential, consistent with stem-cell activity. Transplantation of mixed nephron progenitors tagged with either green or red fluorescent proteins yielded some mosaic nephrons, indicating that multiple nephron progenitors contribute to a single nephron. Consistent with this, live imaging of nephron formation in transparent larvae showed that nephrogenic aggregates form by the coalescence of multiple cells and then differentiate into nephrons. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the zebrafish kidney probably contains self-renewing nephron stem/progenitor cells. The identification of these cells paves the way to isolating or engineering the equivalent cells in mammals and developing novel renal regenerative therapies.

  3. Effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated from Wharton's Jelly of the Umbilical Cord and Conditioned Media on Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Using a Myectomy Model

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, T.; Armada-da Silva, P. A. S.; Amorim, I.; Rêma, A.; Caseiro, A. R.; Gärtner, A.; Rodrigues, M.; Lopes, M. A.; Bártolo, P. J.; Santos, J. D.; Luís, A. L.; Maurício, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has good regenerative capacity, but the extent of muscle injury and the developed fibrosis might prevent complete regeneration. The in vivo application of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs) of the umbilical cord and the conditioned media (CM) where the HMSCs were cultured and expanded, associated with different vehicles to induce muscle regeneration, was evaluated in a rat myectomy model. Two commercially available vehicles and a spherical hydrogel developed by our research group were used. The treated groups obtained interesting results in terms of muscle regeneration, both in the histological and in the functional assessments. A less evident scar tissue, demonstrated by collagen type I quantification, was present in the muscles treated with HMSCs or their CM. In terms of the histological evaluation performed by ISO 10993-6 scoring, it was observed that HMSCs apparently have a long-term negative effect, since the groups treated with CM presented better scores. CM could be considered an alternative to the in vivo transplantation of these cells, as it can benefit from the local tissue response to secreted molecules with similar results in terms of muscular regeneration. Searching for an optimal vehicle might be the key point in the future of skeletal muscle tissue engineering. PMID:25379040

  4. Effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated from Wharton's Jelly of the Umbilical Cord and Conditioned Media on Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Using a Myectomy Model.

    PubMed

    Pereira, T; Armada-da Silva, P A S; Amorim, I; Rêma, A; Caseiro, A R; Gärtner, A; Rodrigues, M; Lopes, M A; Bártolo, P J; Santos, J D; Luís, A L; Maurício, A C

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has good regenerative capacity, but the extent of muscle injury and the developed fibrosis might prevent complete regeneration. The in vivo application of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs) of the umbilical cord and the conditioned media (CM) where the HMSCs were cultured and expanded, associated with different vehicles to induce muscle regeneration, was evaluated in a rat myectomy model. Two commercially available vehicles and a spherical hydrogel developed by our research group were used. The treated groups obtained interesting results in terms of muscle regeneration, both in the histological and in the functional assessments. A less evident scar tissue, demonstrated by collagen type I quantification, was present in the muscles treated with HMSCs or their CM. In terms of the histological evaluation performed by ISO 10993-6 scoring, it was observed that HMSCs apparently have a long-term negative effect, since the groups treated with CM presented better scores. CM could be considered an alternative to the in vivo transplantation of these cells, as it can benefit from the local tissue response to secreted molecules with similar results in terms of muscular regeneration. Searching for an optimal vehicle might be the key point in the future of skeletal muscle tissue engineering.

  5. Conditioned medium derived from umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells regenerates atrophied muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Z-Hun; Kim, Sun-Mi; Choi, Yong-Soo

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the regenerative effects and regulatory mechanisms of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs)-derived conditioned medium (CM) in atrophied muscles using an in vivo model. To determine the appropriate harvest point of UC-CM, active factor content was analyzed in the secretome over time. A muscle atrophy model was induced in rats by hindlimb suspension (HS) for 2 weeks. Next, UC-CM was injected directly into the soleus muscle of both hind legs to assess its regenerative efficacy on atrophy-related factors after 1 week of HS. During HS, muscle mass and muscle fiber size were significantly reduced by over 2-fold relative to untreated controls. Lactate accumulation within the muscles was similarly increased. By contrast, all of the above analytical factors were significantly improved in HS-induced rats by UC-CM injection compared with saline injection. Furthermore, the expression levels of desmin and skeletal muscle actin were significantly elevated by UC-CM treatment. Importantly, UC-CM effectively suppressed expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin E3-ligases, muscle ring finger 1 and muscle atrophy F-box by 2.3- and 2.1-fold, respectively. UC-CM exerted its actions by stimulating the phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling cascade. These findings suggest that UC-CM provides an effective stimulus to recover muscle status and function in atrophied muscles. PMID:27457384

  6. Conditioned medium derived from umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells regenerates atrophied muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Z-Hun; Kim, Sun-Mi; Choi, Yong-Soo

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the regenerative effects and regulatory mechanisms of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs)-derived conditioned medium (CM) in atrophied muscles using an in vivo model. To determine the appropriate harvest point of UC-CM, active factor content was analyzed in the secretome over time. A muscle atrophy model was induced in rats by hindlimb suspension (HS) for 2 weeks. Next, UC-CM was injected directly into the soleus muscle of both hind legs to assess its regenerative efficacy on atrophy-related factors after 1 week of HS. During HS, muscle mass and muscle fiber size were significantly reduced by over 2-fold relative to untreated controls. Lactate accumulation within the muscles was similarly increased. By contrast, all of the above analytical factors were significantly improved in HS-induced rats by UC-CM injection compared with saline injection. Furthermore, the expression levels of desmin and skeletal muscle actin were significantly elevated by UC-CM treatment. Importantly, UC-CM effectively suppressed expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin E3-ligases, muscle ring finger 1 and muscle atrophy F-box by 2.3- and 2.1-fold, respectively. UC-CM exerted its actions by stimulating the phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling cascade. These findings suggest that UC-CM provides an effective stimulus to recover muscle status and function in atrophied muscles.

  7. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Van Spyk, Elyse Noelani; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-01-01

    Historically work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as liver, fat and muscle. In recent years, skin is emerging as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging and carcinogenesis. Morphologically skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration -- the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell-type specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of the skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar UV radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. The skin also provides opportunities to interrogate clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model for investigating the

  8. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Plikus, Maksim V; Van Spyk, Elyse N; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-06-01

    Historically, work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as the liver, fat, and muscle. In recent years, skin has emerged as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging, and carcinogenesis. Morphologically, skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable, and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration: the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell type-specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it also represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. Skin also provides opportunities to interrogate the clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model

  9. Ectoderm to mesoderm lineage switching during axolotl tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Echeverri, Karen; Tanaka, Elly M

    2002-12-01

    Foreign environments may induce adult stem cells to switch lineages and populate multiple tissue types, but whether this mechanism is used for tissue repair remains uncertain. Urodele amphibians can regenerate fully functional, multitissue structures including the limb and tail. To determine whether lineage switching is an integral feature of this regeneration, we followed individual spinal cord cells live during tail regeneration in the axolotl. Spinal cord cells frequently migrate into surrounding tissue to form regenerating muscle and cartilage. Thus, in axolotls, cells switch lineage during a real example of regeneration. PMID:12471259

  10. Identification of MicroRNAs Linked to Regulators of Muscle Protein Synthesis and Regeneration in Young and Old Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zacharewicz, Evelyn; Della Gatta, Paul; Reynolds, John; Garnham, Andrew; Crowley, Tamsyn; Russell, Aaron P.; Lamon, Séverine

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the course of ageing there is a natural and progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass. The onset and progression of age-related muscle wasting is associated with an attenuated activation of Akt-mTOR signalling and muscle protein synthesis in response to anabolic stimuli such as resistance exercise. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are novel and important post-transcriptional regulators of numerous cellular processes. The role of miRNAs in the regulation of muscle protein synthesis following resistance exercise is poorly understood. This study investigated the changes in skeletal muscle miRNA expression following an acute bout of resistance exercise in young and old subjects with a focus on the miRNA species predicted to target Akt-mTOR signalling. Results Ten young (24.2±0.9 years) and 10 old (66.6±1.1 years) males completed an acute resistance exercise bout known to maximise muscle protein synthesis, with muscle biopsies collected before and 2 hours after exercise. We screened the expression of 754 miRNAs in the muscle biopsies and found 26 miRNAs to be regulated with age, exercise or a combination of both factors. Nine of these miRNAs are highly predicted to regulate targets within the Akt-mTOR signalling pathway and 5 miRNAs have validated binding sites within the 3′ UTRs of several members of the Akt-mTOR signalling pathway. The miR-99/100 family of miRNAs notably emerged as potentially important regulators of skeletal muscle mass in young and old subjects. Conclusion This study has identified several miRNAs that were regulated with age or with a single bout of resistance exercise. Some of these miRNAs were predicted to influence Akt-mTOR signalling, and therefore potentially skeletal muscle mass. These miRNAs should be considered as candidate targets for in vivo modulation. PMID:25460913

  11. Regeneration of organs and tissues in lower vertebrates during and after space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitashov, V. I.; Brushlinskaya, N. V.; Grigoryan, E. N.; Tuchkova, S. Ya.; Anton, H. J.

    In this paper most important data obtained in studies on the effect of space flight conditions on regeneration in the adult newt are summarized. We demonstrate a phenomenon of synchronization of limb and lens regeneration and increase in its rate during and after space flight. We also describe a peculiarities of cell proliferation in lens, limb and tail regenerates and of the process of minced muscle regeneration.

  12. Long-Term Therapy With Omega-3 Ameliorates Myonecrosis and Benefits Skeletal Muscle Regeneration in Mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Apolinário, Leticia Montanholi; De Carvalho, Samara Camaçari; Santo Neto, Humberto; Marques, Maria Julia

    2015-09-01

    In Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD) and in the mdx mouse model of DMD, a lack of dystrophin leads to myonecrosis and cardiorespiratory failure. Several lines of evidence suggest a detrimental role of the inflammatory process in the dystrophic process. Previously, we demonstrated that short-term therapy with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), at early stages of disease, ameliorated dystrophy progression in the mdx mouse. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of a long-term therapy with omega-3 later in dystrophy progression. Three-month-old mdx mice received omega-3 (300 mg/kg) or vehicle by gavage for 5 months. The quadriceps and diaphragm muscles were removed and processed for histopathology and Western blot. Long-term therapy with omega-3 increased the regulatory protein MyoD and muscle regeneration and reduced markers of inflammation (TNF-α and NF-kB) in both muscles studied. The present study supports the long-term use of omega-3 at later stages of dystrophy as a promising option to be investigated in DMD clinical trials.

  13. Inducing myoblast re-entry into the cell cycle: a potential mechanism for laser-enhanced skeletal muscle regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Fang, Y.; Zhang, C. P.; Chen, P.; Wang, C. Z.; Kang, H. X.; Shen, B. J.; Liang, J.; Fu, X. B.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on the cell cycle and proliferative activity of cultured myoblasts, and sought to elucidate the possible cellular mechanism by which LLLI promotes the regeneration of skeletal muscle in vivo. Primary myoblasts isolated from rat hindlegs were irradiated with helium-neon laser light at different energy densities. Distributions of cell-cycle subpopulations and the expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins in myoblasts were assessed using flow cytometric analysis and western blot assay. It was found that laser irradiation stimulated cell-cycle entry; induced the expression of cyclin A and cyclin D; and increased cell proliferation index and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation as compared to the unirradiated control cells, indicating LLLI augmented the number of proliferative myoblasts in the S phase and G2/M phase of the cell cycle. These results suggest that LLLI at certain fluxes and wavelengths could activate quiescent myoblasts, leading to cell division and facilitating new myofiber formation. This could contribute to the improvement of skeletal muscle regeneration following trauma and myopathic diseases.

  14. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Expression in Normal and Diseased Human Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oronzi Scott, M.; Sylvester, J. E.; Heiman-Patterson, T.; Shi, Y.-J.; Fieles, W.; Stedman, H.; Burghes, A.; Ray, P.; Worton, R.; Fischbeck, K. H.

    1988-03-01

    A probe for the 5' end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene was used to study expression of the gene in normal human muscle, myogenic cell cultures, and muscle from patients with DMD. Expression was found in RNA from normal fetal muscle, adult cardiac and skeletal muscle, and cultured muscle after myoblast fusion. In DMD muscle, expression of this portion of the gene was also revealed by in situ RNA hybridization, particularly in regenerating muscle fibers.

  15. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a

  16. Muscle performance and physical function are associated with voluntary rate of neuromuscular activation in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Participants were recruited to three experimental groups: middle-aged healthy adults (MH), older healthy adults (OH), and older adults with mobility limitations (OML). OH and OML were primarily differentiated by performance on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Muscle performance (accele...

  17. The Akt/mTOR pathway: Data comparing young and aged mice with leucine supplementation at the onset of skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Perry, Richard A; Brown, Lemuel A; Lee, David E; Brown, Jacob L; Baum, Jamie I; Greene, Nicholas P; Washington, Tyrone A

    2016-09-01

    The data described herein is related to the article "Differential Effects of Leucine Supplementation in Young and Aged Mice at the Onset of Skeletal Muscle Regeneration" [1]. Aging is associated with a decreased ability of skeletal muscle to regenerate following injury. Leucine supplementation has been extensively shown, in young subjects, to promote protein synthesis during regeneration; however, the effects of leucine supplementation on the Akt/mTOR pathway in aged mice at the onset of muscle regeneration are not fully elucidated. In this article, we present data on the Akt/mTOR protein synthesis pathway at the onset of muscle regeneration in young and aged C57BL/6J mice that are and are not receiving leucine supplementation. More specifically, protein content of total Akt, mTOR, p70S6K and 4EBP-1 are presented. Additionally, we provide relative (phosphorylated:total) protein content comparisons of these targets as they present themselves in young and aged mice who have neither been injured nor received leucine supplementation. Lastly, markers of atrophy (FoxO1/O3, MuRF-1, Atrogin-1) are also reported in these young and aged control groups. PMID:27617277

  18. Muscle Weakness Thresholds for Prediction of Diabetes in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Mark D.; Zhang, Peng; Choksi, Palak; Markides, Kyriakos S.; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the known links between weakness and early mortality, what remains to be fully understood is the extent to which strength preservation is associated with protection from cardiometabolic diseases such as diabetes. Purpose The purposes of this study were to determine the association between muscle strength and diabetes among adults, and to identify age- and sex-specific thresholds of low strength for detection of risk. Methods A population-representative sample of 4,066 individuals, aged 20–85 years, was included from the combined 2011–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey datasets. Strength was assessed using a hand-held dynamometer, and the single largest reading from either hand was normalized to body mass. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association between normalized grip strength and risk of diabetes, as determined by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels (≥6.5% [≥48 mmol/mol]), while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measures, and television viewing time. Results For every 0.05 decrement in normalized strength, there was a 1.26 times increased adjusted odds for diabetes in men and women. Women were at lower odds of having diabetes (OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.29–0.82), whereas age, waist circumference and lower income were inversely associated. Optimal sex- and age-specific weakness thresholds to detect diabetes were 0.56, 0.50, and 0.45 for men, and 0.42, 0.38, and 0.33 for women, for ages 20–39 years, 40–59 years, and 60–80 years. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance We present thresholds of strength that can be incorporated into a clinical setting for identifying adults that are at risk for developing diabetes, and that might benefit from lifestyle interventions to reduce risk. PMID:26744337

  19. Skeletal muscle microRNA and messenger RNA profiling in cofilin-2 deficient mice reveals cell cycle dysregulation hindering muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Morton, Sarah U; Joshi, Mugdha; Savic, Talia; Beggs, Alan H; Agrawal, Pankaj B

    2015-01-01

    Congenital myopathies are rare skeletal muscle diseases presenting in early age with hypotonia and weakness often linked to a genetic defect. Mutations in the gene for cofilin-2 (CFL2) have been identified in several families as a cause of congenital myopathy with nemaline bodies and cores. Here we explore the global messenger and microRNA expression patterns in quadriceps muscle samples from cofillin-2-null mice and compare them with sibling-matched wild-type mice to determine the molecular pathways and mechanisms involved. Cell cycle processes are markedly dysregulated, with altered expression of genes involved in mitotic spindle formation, and evidence of loss of cell cycle checkpoint regulation. Importantly, alterations in cell cycle, apoptosis and proliferation pathways are present in both mRNA and miRNA expression patterns. Specifically, p21 transcript levels were increased, and the expression of p21 targets, such as cyclin D and cyclin E, was decreased. We therefore hypothesize that deficiency of cofilin-2 is associated with interruption of the cell cycle at several checkpoints, hindering muscle regeneration. Identification of these pathways is an important step towards developing appropriate therapies against various congenital myopathies. PMID:25874796

  20. Skeletal Muscle MicroRNA and Messenger RNA Profiling in Cofilin-2 Deficient Mice Reveals Cell Cycle Dysregulation Hindering Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Sarah U.; Joshi, Mugdha; Savic, Talia; Beggs, Alan H.; Agrawal, Pankaj B.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital myopathies are rare skeletal muscle diseases presenting in early age with hypotonia and weakness often linked to a genetic defect. Mutations in the gene for cofilin-2 (CFL2) have been identified in several families as a cause of congenital myopathy with nemaline bodies and cores. Here we explore the global messenger and microRNA expression patterns in quadriceps muscle samples from cofillin-2-null mice and compare them with sibling-matched wild-type mice to determine the molecular pathways and mechanisms involved. Cell cycle processes are markedly dysregulated, with altered expression of genes involved in mitotic spindle formation, and evidence of loss of cell cycle checkpoint regulation. Importantly, alterations in cell cycle, apoptosis and proliferation pathways are present in both mRNA and miRNA expression patterns. Specifically, p21 transcript levels were increased, and the expression of p21 targets, such as cyclin D and cyclin E, was decreased. We therefore hypothesize that deficiency of cofilin-2 is associated with interruption of the cell cycle at several checkpoints, hindering muscle regeneration. Identification of these pathways is an important step towards developing appropriate therapies against various congenital myopathies. PMID:25874796

  1. Prevalence of reduced muscle strength in older U.S. adults: United States, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Looker, Anne C; Wang, Chia-Yih

    2015-01-01

    Five percent of adults aged 60 and over had weak muscle strength and 13% had intermediate muscle strength, as defined by the new FNIH criteria. Weak muscle strength is clinically relevant because it is associated with slow gait speed, an important mobility impairment. It is also linked to an increased risk of death. The prevalence of reduced muscle strength increased with age and was higher in non-Hispanic Asian and Hispanic persons than in non-Hispanic white or non-Hispanic black persons. Decreasing muscle strength was linked with increased difficulty in rising from an armless chair, which is another important type of mobility impairment. PMID:25633238

  2. Natural ECM as biomaterial for scaffold based cardiac regeneration using adult bone marrow derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sreejit, P; Verma, R S

    2013-04-01

    Cellular therapy using stem cells for cardiac diseases has recently gained much interest in the scientific community due to its potential in regenerating damaged and even dead tissue and thereby restoring the organ function. Stem cells from various sources and origin are being currently used for regeneration studies directly or along with differentiation inducing agents. Long term survival and minimal side effects can be attained by using autologous cells and reduced use of inducing agents. Cardiomyogenic differentiation of adult derived stem cells has been previously reported using various inducing agents but the use of a potentially harmful DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-azaC) has been found to be critical in almost all studies. Alternate inducing factors and conditions/stimulant like physical condition including electrical stimulation, chemical inducers and biological agents have been attempted by numerous groups to induce cardiac differentiation. Biomaterials were initially used as artificial scaffold in in vitro studies and later as a delivery vehicle. Natural ECM is the ideal biological scaffold since it contains all the components of the tissue from which it was derived except for the living cells. Constructive remodeling can be performed using such natural ECM scaffolds and stem cells since, the cells can be delivered to the site of infraction and once delivered the cells adhere and are not "lost". Due to the niche like conditions of ECM, stem cells tend to differentiate into tissue specific cells and attain several characteristics similar to that of functional cells even in absence of any directed differentiation using external inducers. The development of niche mimicking biomaterials and hybrid biomaterial can further advance directed differentiation without specific induction. The mechanical and electrical integration of these materials to the functional tissue is a problem to be addressed. The search for the perfect extracellular matrix for

  3. DLL4 promotes continuous adult intestinal lacteal regeneration and dietary fat transport

    PubMed Central

    Bernier-Latmani, Jeremiah; Cisarovsky, Christophe; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Bruand, Marine; Jaquet, Muriel; Davanture, Suzel; Ragusa, Simone; Siegert, Stefanie; Dormond, Olivier; Benedito, Rui; Radtke, Freddy; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Petrova, Tatiana V.

    2015-01-01

    The small intestine is a dynamic and complex organ that is characterized by constant epithelium turnover and crosstalk among various cell types and the microbiota. Lymphatic capillaries of the small intestine, called lacteals, play key roles in dietary fat absorption and the gut immune response; however, little is known about the molecular regulation of lacteal function. Here, we performed a high-resolution analysis of the small intestinal stroma and determined that lacteals reside in a permanent regenerative, proliferative state that is distinct from embryonic lymphangiogenesis or quiescent lymphatic vessels observed in other tissues. We further demonstrated that this continuous regeneration process is mediated by Notch signaling and that the expression of the Notch ligand delta-like 4 (DLL4) in lacteals requires activation of VEGFR3 and VEGFR2. Moreover, genetic inactivation of Dll4 in lymphatic endothelial cells led to lacteal regression and impaired dietary fat uptake. We propose that such a slow lymphatic regeneration mode is necessary to match a unique need of intestinal lymphatic vessels for both continuous maintenance, due to the constant exposure to dietary fat and mechanical strain, and efficient uptake of fat and immune cells. Our work reveals how lymphatic vessel responses are shaped by tissue specialization and uncover a role for continuous DLL4 signaling in the function of adult lymphatic vasculature. PMID:26529256

  4. Streptomycin ototoxicity and hair cell regeneration in the adult pigeon utricle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, T. C.; Dye, B. J.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to develop a technique to investigate the regeneration of utricular hair cells in the adult pigeon (Columba livia) following complete hair cell loss through administration of streptomycin. STUDY DESIGN: Experimental animal study. METHODS: Animals were divided into four groups. Group 1 received 10 to 15 days of systemic streptomycin injections. Animals in Groups 2 and 3 received a single direct placement of a 1-, 2-, 4-, or 8-mg streptomycin dose into the perilymphatic space. Animals in Groups 1 and 2 were analyzed within 1 week from injection to investigate hair cell destruction, whereas Group 3 was investigated at later dates to study hair cell recovery. Group 4 animals received a control injection of saline into the perilymphatic space. Damage and recovery were quantified by counting hair cells in isolated utricles using scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: Although systemic injections failed to reliably achieve complete utricular hair cell destruction, a single direct placement of a 2-, 4-, or 8-mg streptomycin dose caused complete destruction within the first week. Incomplete hair cell loss was observed with the 1-mg dose. Over the long term, regeneration of the hair cells was seen with the 2-mg dose but not the 8-mg dose. Control injections of saline into the perilymphatic space caused no measurable hair cell loss. CONCLUSIONS: Direct placement of streptomycin into the perilymph is an effective, reliable method for complete destruction of utricular hair cells while preserving the regenerative potential of the neuroepithelium.

  5. Nuclear envelope dystrophies show a transcriptional fingerprint suggesting disruption of Rb-MyoD pathways in muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bakay, Marina; Wang, Zuyi; Melcon, Gisela; Schiltz, Louis; Xuan, Jianhua; Zhao, Po; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Seo, Jinwook; Pegoraro, Elena; Angelini, Corrado; Shneiderman, Ben; Escolar, Diana; Chen, Yi-Wen; Winokur, Sara T; Pachman, Lauren M; Fan, Chenguang; Mandler, Raul; Nevo, Yoram; Gordon, Erynn; Zhu, Yitan; Dong, Yibin; Wang, Yue; Hoffman, Eric P

    2006-04-01

    Mutations of lamin A/C (LMNA) cause a wide range of human disorders, including progeria, lipodystrophy, neuropathies and autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD). EDMD is also caused by X-linked recessive loss-of-function mutations of emerin, another component of the inner nuclear lamina that directly interacts with LMNA. One model for disease pathogenesis of LMNA and emerin mutations is cell-specific perturbations of the mRNA transcriptome in terminally differentiated cells. To test this model, we studied 125 human muscle biopsies from 13 diagnostic groups (125 U133A, 125 U133B microarrays), including EDMD patients with LMNA and emerin mutations. A Visual and Statistical Data Analyzer (VISDA) algorithm was used to statistically model cluster hierarchy, resulting in a tree of phenotypic classifications. Validations of the diagnostic tree included permutations of U133A and U133B arrays, and use of two probe set algorithms (MAS5.0 and MBEI). This showed that the two nuclear envelope defects (EDMD LMNA, EDMD emerin) were highly related disorders and were also related to fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). FSHD has recently been hypothesized to involve abnormal interactions of chromatin with the nuclear envelope. To identify disease-specific transcripts for EDMD, we applied a leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation approach using LMNA patient muscle as a test data set, with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) validations in both LMNA and emerin patient muscle. A high proportion of top-ranked and validated transcripts were components of the same transcriptional regulatory pathway involving Rb1 and MyoD during muscle regeneration (CRI-1, CREBBP, Nap1L1, ECREBBP/p300), where each was specifically upregulated in EDMD. Using a muscle regeneration time series (27 time points) we develop a transcriptional model for downstream consequences of LMNA and emerin mutations. We propose that key interactions between the nuclear

  6. Activation of satellite cells and the regeneration of human skeletal muscle are expedited by ingestion of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Abigail L; Rasmussen, Lotte K; Kadi, Fawzi; Schjerling, Peter; Helmark, Ida C; Ponsot, Elodie; Aagaard, Per; Durigan, João Luiz Q; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-06-01

    With this study we investigated the role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in human skeletal muscle regeneration. Young men ingested NSAID [1200 mg/d ibuprofen (IBU)] or placebo (PLA) daily for 2 wk before and 4 wk after an electrical stimulation-induced injury to the leg extensor muscles of one leg. Muscle biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis muscles before and after stimulation (2.5 h and 2, 7, and 30 d) and were assessed for satellite cells and regeneration by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR, and we also measured telomere length. After injury, and compared with PLA, IBU was found to augment the proportion of ActiveNotch1(+) satellite cells at 2 d [IBU, 29 ± 3% vs. PLA, 19 ± 2% (means ± sem)], satellite cell content at 7 d [IBU, 0.16 ± 0.01 vs. PLA, 0.12 ± 0.01 (Pax7(+) cells/fiber)], and to expedite muscle repair at 30 d. The PLA group displayed a greater proportion of embryonic myosin(+) fibers and a residual ∼2-fold increase in mRNA levels of matrix proteins (all P < 0.05). Endomysial collagen was also elevated with PLA at 30 d. Minimum telomere length shortening was not observed. In conclusion, ingestion of NSAID has a potentiating effect on Notch activation of satellite cells and muscle remodeling during large-scale regeneration of injured human skeletal muscle.-Mackey, A. L., Rasmussen, L. K., Kadi, F., Schjerling, P., Helmark, I. C., Ponsot, E., Aagaard, P., Durigan, J. L. Q., Kjaer, M. Activation of satellite cells and the regeneration of human skeletal muscle are expedited by ingestion of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication. PMID:26936358

  7. Regeneration of skeletal muscle fibers from autologous satellite cells multiplied in vitro. An experimental model for testing cultured cell myogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Alameddine, H.S.; Dehaupas, M.; Fardeau, M. )

    1989-07-01

    An experimental model used to test in vivo myogenicity of autologous satellite cells multiplied in vitro is described. Free muscle autotransplantation served as the basis and was combined with x-irradiation. Administration of 1500, 2500, and 3500 rad doses 24 hours before or after ischemia showed that inhibition of spontaneous regeneration is dose dependent and more efficient when irradiation was applied before injury. A single dose of 2500 rad before injury resulted in the formation of a cystic structure ideal for cell implantation. FITC-latex beads and/or carbocyanine dyes were internalized by mononucleated satellite cells in vitro. Labeling did not affect survival or development of these cells. No sign of marker release or spreading from labeled to unlabeled cells was detectable unless by the fusion process. These labels were retained for several weeks. Grafting of labeled dense cellular suspensions into x-irradiated ischemic muscles indicated that satellite cells retain their myogenic characteristic and are able to reform fully differentiated muscle fibers. 55 references.

  8. Lithium Alters the Morphology of Neurites Regenerating from Cultured Adult Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S. M.; Patel, C. H.; Feng, A. S.; Kollmar, R.

    2013-01-01

    The small-molecule drug lithium (as a monovalent ion) promotes neurite regeneration and functional recovery, is easy to administer, and is approved for human use to treat bipolar disorder. Lithium exerts its neuritogenic effect mainly by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3, a constitutively-active serine/threonine kinase that is regulated by neurotrophin and “wingless-related MMTV integration site” (Wnt) signaling. In spiral ganglion neurons of the cochlea, the effects of lithium and the function of glycogen synthase kinase 3 have not been investigated. We, therefore, set out to test whether lithium modulates neuritogenesis from adult spiral ganglion neurons. Primary cultures of dissociated spiral ganglion neurons from adult mice were exposed to lithium at concentrations between 0 and 12.5 mM. The resulting neurite morphology and growth-cone appearance were measured in detail by using immunofluorescence microscopy and image analysis. We found that lithium altered the morphology of regenerating neurites and their growth cones in a differential, concentration-dependent fashion. Low concentrations of 0.5 to 2.5 mM (around the half-maximal inhibitory concentration for glycogen synthase kinase 3 and the recommended therapeutic serum concentration for bipolar disorder) enhanced neurite sprouting and branching. A high concentration of 12.5 mM, in contrast, slowed elongation. As the lithium concentration rose from low to high, the microtubules became increasingly disarranged and the growth cones more arborized. Our results demonstrate that lithium selectively stimulates phases of neuritogenesis that are driven by microtubule reorganization. In contrast, most other drugs that have previously been tested on spiral ganglion neurons are reported to inhibit neurite outgrowth or affect only elongation. Lithium sensitivity is a necessary, but not sufficient condition for the involvement of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Our results are, therefore, consistent with, but do not

  9. Methods for promoting wound healing and muscle regeneration with the cell signaling protein Nell1

    SciTech Connect

    Culiat, Cymbeline T.

    2011-03-22

    The present invention provides methods for promoting wound healing and treating muscle atrophy in a mammal in need. The method comprises administering to the mammal a Nell1 protein or a Nell1 nucleic acid molecule.

  10. Methods for promoting wound healing and muscle regeneration with the cell signaling protein Nell1

    SciTech Connect

    Culiat, Cymbeline T

    2014-11-04

    The present invention provides methods for promoting wound healing and treating muscle atrophy in a mammal in need. The method comprises administering to the mammal a Nell1 protein or a Nell1 nucleic acid molecule.

  11. Impact of longus colli muscle massage on the strength and endurance of the deep neck flexor muscle of adults.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wontae

    2013-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of longus colli muscle massage on the strength and endurance of the deep neck flexor muscle in adults. [Subjects] A total of 60 subjects were divided into an experimental group of 30 subjects and a control group of 30 subjects. [Methods] The experimental group received massage of the longus colli muscle, which is the deep neck flexor muscle, and the control group received superficial neck muscle massage. The strength and endurance of both the experimental group and the control group were measured before and after the intervention using a pressure biofeedback unit (PBU). [Results] After the experiment, the strength of DNF of the experimental group showed a statistically significant increase, and the endurance of DNF of the experimental group showed an increase in its average value. The independent sample t-test revealed no statistically significant differences in the groups. [Conclusion] Massage of the longus colli muscle, which is the deep neck flexor, was shown to improve its strength and endurance, which are measures of neck stabilization. Therefore, longus colli muscle massage can be performed for patients who cannot perform neck-stabilizing exercises or before performing other neck-stabilizing exercises.

  12. An In Vitro Adult Mouse Muscle-nerve Preparation for Studying the Firing Properties of Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Joy A.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Hochman, Shawn; Wilkinson, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle sensory neurons innervating muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs encode length and force changes essential to proprioception. Additional afferent fibers monitor other characteristics of the muscle environment, including metabolite buildup, temperature, and nociceptive stimuli. Overall, abnormal activation of sensory neurons can lead to movement disorders or chronic pain syndromes. We describe the isolation of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and nerve for in vitro study of stretch-evoked afferent responses in the adult mouse. Sensory activity is recorded from the nerve with a suction electrode and individual afferents can be analyzed using spike sorting software. In vitro preparations allow for well controlled studies on sensory afferents without the potential confounds of anesthesia or altered muscle perfusion. Here we describe a protocol to identify and test the response of muscle spindle afferents to stretch. Importantly, this preparation also supports the study of other subtypes of muscle afferents, response properties following drug application and the incorporation of powerful genetic approaches and disease models in mice. PMID:25285602

  13. Dendritic Cell-Like Cells Accumulate in Regenerating Murine Skeletal Muscle after Injury and Boost Adaptive Immune Responses Only upon a Microbial Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wirsdörfer, Florian; Bangen, Jörg M.; Pastille, Eva; Schmitz, Daniel; Flohé, Sascha; Schumak, Beatrix; Flohé, Stefanie B.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury causes a local sterile inflammatory response. In parallel, a state of immunosuppression develops distal to the site of tissue damage. Granulocytes and monocytes that are rapidly recruited to the site of injury contribute to tissue regeneration. In this study we used a mouse model of traumatic skeletal muscle injury to investigate the previously unknown role of dendritic cells (DCs) that accumulate in injured tissue. We injected the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) into the skeletal muscle of injured or sham-treated mice to address the ability of these DCs in antigen uptake, migration, and specific T cell activation in the draining popliteal lymph node (pLN). Immature DC-like cells appeared in the skeletal muscle by 4 days after injury and subsequently acquired a mature phenotype, as indicated by increased expression of the costimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86. After the injection of OVA into the muscle, OVA-loaded DCs migrated into the pLN. The migration of DC-like cells from the injured muscle was enhanced in the presence of the microbial stimulus lipopolysaccharide at the site of antigen uptake and triggered an increased OVA-specific T helper cell type 1 (Th1) response in the pLN. Naïve OVA-loaded DCs were superior in Th1-like priming in the pLN when adoptively transferred into the skeletal muscle of injured mice, a finding indicating the relevance of the microenvironment in the regenerating skeletal muscle for increased Th1-like priming. These findings suggest that DC-like cells that accumulate in the regenerating muscle initiate a protective immune response upon microbial challenge and thereby overcome injury-induced immunosuppression. PMID:27196728

  14. A transcriptome for the study of early processes of retinal regeneration in the adult newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenta; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Takayanagi, Miyako; Yasumuro, Hirofumi; Inami, Wataru; Kunahong, Ailidana; Casco-Robles, Roman M; Toyama, Fubito; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2014-01-01

    Retinal regeneration in the adult newt is a useful system to uncover essential mechanisms underlying the regeneration of body parts of this animal as well as to find clues to treat retinal disorders such as proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Here, to facilitate the study of early processes of retinal regeneration, we provide a de novo assembly transcriptome and inferred proteome of the Japanese fire bellied newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster), which was obtained from eyeball samples of day 0-14 after surgical removal of the lens and neural retina. This transcriptome (237,120 in silico transcripts) contains most information of cDNAs/ESTs which has been reported in newts (C. pyrrhogaster, Pleurodeles waltl and Notophthalmus viridescence) thus far. On the other hand, de novo assembly transcriptomes reported lately for N. viridescence only covered 16-31% of this transcriptome, suggesting that most constituents of this transcriptome are specific to the regenerating eye tissues of C. pyrrhogaster. A total of 87,102 in silico transcripts of this transcriptome were functionally annotated. Coding sequence prediction in combination with functional annotation revealed that 76,968 in silico transcripts encode protein/peptides recorded in public databases so far, whereas 17,316 might be unique. qPCR and Sanger sequencing demonstrated that this transcriptome contains much information pertaining to genes that are regulated in association with cell reprogramming, cell-cycle re-entry/proliferation, and tissue patterning in an early phase of retinal regeneration. This data also provides important insight for further investigations addressing cellular mechanisms and molecular networks underlying retinal regeneration as well as differences between retinal regeneration and disorders. This transcriptome can be applied to ensuing comprehensive gene screening steps, providing candidate genes, regardless of whether annotated or unique, to uncover essential mechanisms underlying early processes of

  15. Scar formation and lack of regeneration in adult and neonatal liver after stromal injury.

    PubMed

    Masuzaki, Ryota; Zhao, Sophia R; Csizmadia, Eva; Yannas, Ioannis; Karp, Seth J

    2013-01-01

    Known as a uniquely regenerative tissue, the liver shows a remarkable capacity to heal without scarring after many types of acute injury. In contrast, during chronic liver disease, the liver responds with fibrosis, which can progress to cirrhosis and ultimately liver failure. The cause of this shift from a nonfibrotic to a fibrotic response is unknown. We hypothesized that stromal injury is a key event that prevents restoration of normal liver architecture. To test this, we developed a model of stromal injury using a surgical incision through the normal liver in adult and neonatal mice. This injury produces minimal cell death but locally complete stromal (extracellular matrix) disruption. The adult liver responds with inflammation and stellate cell activation, culminating in fibrosis characterized by collagen deposition. This sequence of events is remarkably similar to the fibrotic response leading to cirrhosis. Studies in neonates reveal a similar fibrotic response to a stromal injury. These findings suggest that extracellular matrix disruption leads not to regeneration but rather to scar, similar to other mammalian organs. These findings may shed light on the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease, and suggest therapeutic strategies. PMID:23228176

  16. The Link between Dietary Protein Intake, Skeletal Muscle Function and Health in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Jamie I.; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass and function are progressively lost with age, a condition referred to as sarcopenia. By the age of 60, many older adults begin to be affected by muscle loss. There is a link between decreased muscle mass and strength and adverse health outcomes such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Data suggest that increasing dietary protein intake at meals may counterbalance muscle loss in older individuals due to the increased availability of amino acids, which stimulate muscle protein synthesis by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORC1). Increased muscle protein synthesis can lead to increased muscle mass, strength and function over time. This review aims to address the current recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for protein and whether or not this value meets the needs for older adults based upon current scientific evidence. The current RDA for protein is 0.8 g/kg body weight/day. However, literature suggests that consuming protein in amounts greater than the RDA can improve muscle mass, strength and function in older adults. PMID:27417778

  17. Urinary bladder smooth muscle regeneration utilizing bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell seeded elastomeric poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) based thin films.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arun K; Hota, Partha V; Matoka, Derek J; Fuller, Natalie J; Jandali, Danny; Thaker, Hatim; Ameer, Guillermo A; Cheng, Earl Y

    2010-08-01

    Bladder regeneration studies have yielded inconclusive results possibly due to the use of unfavorable cells and primitive scaffold design. We hypothesized that human mesenchymal stem cells seeded onto poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) elastomeric thin films would provide a suitable milieu for partial bladder regeneration. POCfs were created by reacting citric acid with 1,8-octanediol and seeded on opposing faces with human MSCs and urothelial cells; normal bladder smooth muscle cells and UCs, or unseeded POCfs. Partial cystectomized nude rats were augmented with the aforementioned POCfs, enveloped with omentum and sacrificed at 4 and 10 weeks. Isolated bladders were subjected to Trichrome and anti-human gamma-tubulin, calponin, caldesmon, smooth muscle gamma-actin, and elastin stainings. Mechanical testing of POCfs revealed a Young's modulus of 138 kPa with elongation 137% its initial length without permanent deformation demonstrating its high uniaxial elastic potential. Trichrome and immunofluorescent staining of MSC/UC POCf augmented bladders exhibited typical bladder architecture with muscle bundle formation and the expression and retention of bladder smooth muscle contractile proteins of human derivation. Quantitative morphometry of MSC/UC samples revealed muscle/collagen ratios approximately 1.75x greater than SMC/UC controls at 10 weeks. Data demonstrate MSC seeded POCfs support partial regeneration of bladder tissue in vivo.

  18. Validation of Manual Muscle Testing and a Subset of Eight Muscles (MMT8) for Adult and Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Lisa G.; Koziol, Deloris; Giannini, Edward H.; Jain, Minal S.; Smith, Michaele R.; Whitney-Mahoney, Kristi; Feldman, Brian M.; Wright, Susan J.; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Villalba, Maria L.; Lovell, Daniel J.; Bowyer, Suzanne L.; Plotz, Paul H.; Miller, Frederick W.; Hicks, Jeanne E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To validate manual muscle testing (MMT) for strength assessment in juvenile and adult dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM). Methods Seventy-three children and 45 adult DM/PM patients were assessed at baseline and reevaluated 6–9 months later. We compared Total MMT (a group of 24 proximal, distal, and axial muscles) and Proximal MMT (7 proximal muscle groups) tested bilaterally on a 0–10 scale with 144 subsets of six and 96 subsets of eight muscle groups tested unilaterally. Expert consensus was used to rank the best abbreviated MMT subsets for face validity and ease of assessment. Results The Total, Proximal and best MMT subsets had excellent internal reliability (rs:Total MMT 0.91–0.98), and consistency (Cronbach’s α 0.78–0.97). Inter- and intra-rater reliability were acceptable (Kendall’s W 0.68–0.76; rs 0.84–0.95). MMT subset scores correlated highly with Total and Proximal MMT scores and with the Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale, and correlated moderately with physician global activity, functional disability, magnetic resonance imaging, axial and distal MMT scores and, in adults, with creatine kinase. The standardized response mean for Total MMT was 0.56 in juveniles and 0.75 in adults. Consensus was reached to use a subset of eight muscles (neck flexors, deltoids, biceps, wrist extensors, gluteus maximus and medius, quadriceps and ankle dorsiflexors) that performed as well as the Total and Proximal MMT, and had good face validity and ease of assessment. Conclusions These findings aid in standardizing the use of MMT for assessing strength as an outcome measure for myositis. PMID:20391500

  19. Aging-Related Geniohyoid Muscle Atrophy Is Related to Aspiration Status in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background. Age-related muscle weakness due to atrophy and fatty infiltration in orofacial muscles may be related to swallowing deficits in older adults. An important component of safe swallowing is the geniohyoid (GH) muscle, which helps elevate and stabilize the hyoid bone, thus protecting the airway. This study aimed to explore whether aging and aspiration in older adults were related to GH muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration. Method. Eighty computed tomography scans of the head and neck from 40 healthy older (average age 78 years) and 40 younger adults (average age 32 years) were analyzed. Twenty aspirators and 20 nonaspirators from the 40 older adults had been identified previously. Two-dimensional views in the sagittal and coronal planes were used to measure the GH cross-sectional area and fatty infiltration. Results. GH cross-sectional area was larger in men than in women (p < .05). Decreased cross-sectional area was associated with aging (p < .05), and cross-sectional area was significantly smaller in aspirators compared with nonaspirators, but only among the older men (p < .01). Increasing fatty infiltration was associated with aging in the middle (p < .05) and posterior (p < .01) portions of the GH muscle. There was no significant difference in fatty infiltration of the GH muscle among aspirators and nonaspirators. Conclusion. GH muscle atrophy was associated with aging and aspiration. Fatty infiltration in the GH muscle was increased with aging but not related to aspiration status. These findings suggest that GH muscle atrophy may be a component of decreased swallowing safety and aspiration in older adults and warrants further investigation. PMID:23112114

  20. Relationship Between Respiratory Muscle Strength and Conventional Sarcopenic Indices in Young Adults: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Hee Joon; Lee, Sang Yoon; Seo, Kyung Mook; Kang, Si Hyun; Suh, Hoon Chang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationships between respiratory muscle strength and conventional sarcopenic indices such as skeletal muscle mass and limb muscle strength. Methods Eighty-nine young adult volunteers who had no history of medical or musculoskeletal disease were enrolled. Skeletal muscle mass was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis and expressed as a skeletal muscle mass index (SMI). Upper and lower limb muscle strength were evaluated by hand grip strength (HGS) and isometric knee extensor muscle strength, respectively. Peak expiratory flow (PEF), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) were evaluated using a spirometer to demonstrate respiratory muscle strength. The relationships between respiratory muscle strength and sarcopenic indices were investigated using Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression analysis adjusted by age, height, and body mass index. Results MIP showed positive correlations with SMI (r=0.457 in men, r=0.646 in women; both p<0.01). MIP also correlated with knee extensor strength (p<0.01 in both sexes) and HGS (p<0.05 in men, p<0.01 in women). However, PEF and MEP had no significant correlations with these sarcopenic variables. In multivariate regression analysis, MIP was the only independent factor related to SMI (p<0.01). Conclusion Among the respiratory muscle strength variables, MIP was the only value associated with skeletal muscle mass. PMID:26798601

  1. Characteristic muscle activity patterns during gait initiation in the healthy younger and older adults.

    PubMed

    Khanmohammadi, Roya; Talebian, Saeed; Hadian, Mohammad Reza; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Bagheri, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    It is thought that gait initiation (GI) might be an optimal task for identifying postural control deficiencies. Thus, the aim of this study was to clarify the strategies adopted by older subjects during this task. 16 healthy younger and 15 healthy older adults participated in the study. Subjects were instructed to begin forward stepping with their dominant limb in response to an auditory stimulus. The mean muscle activity, co-contraction index, and intra-subject coefficients of variation (intra-subject CVs) of dominant limb muscles in different phases of GI were measured. The level of association between the co-contraction index and intra-subject CV of muscles was also explored. This study showed that in the anticipatory phase, the younger group had larger amplitudes and more intra-subject CVs than older the group, particularly for the tibialis anterior muscle. However, the co-contraction index was greater in older subjects relative to younger subjects. During the weight transition phase, tibialis anterior, semitendinosus and vastus lateralis muscles of older adults had a lower amplitude as compared to younger adults. However, during the locomotor phase, the activity of tibialis anterior was greater in comparison to younger adults. Also, during this phase, similar to the anticipatory phase, the co-contraction index between tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles was greater in older subjects relative to younger subjects. Additionally, the larger co-contraction index of some muscles was associated with smaller intra-subject CV. These findings suggest that muscle behaviors are altered with aging and older adults employ different strategies in the different phases of GI as compared to younger adults.

  2. Defects in ErbB-dependent establishment of adult melanocyte stem cells reveal independent origins for embryonic and regeneration melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Keith A; Budi, Erine H; Teasley, Daniel C; Gottlieb, Andrew Y; Parichy, David M; Johnson, Stephen L

    2009-07-01

    Adult stem cells are responsible for maintaining and repairing tissues during the life of an organism. Tissue repair in humans, however, is limited compared to the regenerative capabilities of other vertebrates, such as the zebrafish (Danio rerio). An understanding of stem cell mechanisms, such as how they are established, their self-renewal properties, and their recruitment to produce new cells is therefore important for the application of regenerative medicine. We use larval melanocyte regeneration following treatment with the melanocytotoxic drug MoTP to investigate these mechanisms in Melanocyte Stem Cell (MSC) regulation. In this paper, we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase, erbb3b, is required for establishing the adult MSC responsible for regenerating the larval melanocyte population. Both the erbb3b mutant and wild-type fish treated with the ErbB inhibitor, AG1478, develop normal embryonic melanocytes but fail to regenerate melanocytes after MoTP-induced melanocyte ablation. By administering AG1478 at different time points, we show that ErbB signaling is only required for regeneration prior to MoTP treatment and before 48 hours of development, consistent with a role in establishing MSCs. We then show that overexpression of kitla, the Kit ligand, in transgenic larvae leads to recruitment of MSCs, resulting in overproliferation of melanocytes. Furthermore, kitla overexpression can rescue AG1478-blocked regeneration, suggesting that ErbB signaling is required to promote the progression and specification of the MSC from a pre-MSC state. This study provides evidence that ErbB signaling is required for the establishment of adult MSCs during embryonic development. That this requirement is not shared with the embryonic melanocytes suggests that embryonic melanocytes develop directly, without proceeding through the ErbB-dependent MSC. Moreover, the shared requirement of larval melanocyte regeneration and metamorphic melanocytes that develops at the larval-to-adult

  3. Relationships between metabolic rate, muscle electromyograms, and swim performance of adult chinook salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R. ); Brown, Richard S. ); Cullinan, Valerie I. ); Mesa, Matthew G.; VanderKooi, S P.; McKinstry, Craig A. )

    2003-10-01

    We measured oxygen consumption rates of adult spring Chinook salmon and compared these values to other species of Pacific salmon. Our results indicated that adult salmon achieve their maximum level of oxygen consumption at about their upper critical swim speed. It is also at this speed that the majority of the energy supplied to the swimming fish switches from red muscle (powered by aerobic metabolism) to white muscle (powered by anaerobic metabolism). Determining the swimming performance of adult salmon will assist managers in developing fishways and other means to safely pass fish over hydroelectric dams and other man-made structures.

  4. Fibroadipogenic progenitors mediate the ability of HDAC inhibitors to promote regeneration in dystrophic muscles of young, but not old Mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Mozzetta, Chiara; Consalvi, Silvia; Saccone, Valentina; Tierney, Matthew; Diamantini, Adamo; Mitchell, Kathryn J; Marazzi, Giovanna; Borsellino, Giovanna; Battistini, Luca; Sassoon, David; Sacco, Alessandra; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) exert beneficial effects in mdx mice, by promoting endogenous regeneration; however, the cellular determinants of HDACi activity on dystrophic muscles have not been determined. We show that fibroadipogenic progenitors (FAP) influence the regeneration potential of satellite cells during disease progression in mdx mice and mediate HDACi ability to selectively promote regeneration at early stages of disease. FAPs from young mdx mice promote, while FAPs from old mdx mice repress, satellite cell-mediated formation of myotubes. In young mdx mice HDACi inhibited FAP adipogenic potential, while enhancing their ability to promote differentiation of adjacent satellite cells, through upregulation of the soluble factor follistatin. By contrast, FAPs from old mdx mice were resistant to HDACi-mediated inhibition of adipogenesis and constitutively repressed satellite cell-mediated formation of myotubes. We show that transplantation of FAPs from regenerating young muscles restored HDACi ability to increase myofibre size in old mdx mice. These results reveal that FAPs are key cellular determinants of disease progression in mdx mice and mediate a previously unappreciated stage-specific beneficial effect of HDACi in dystrophic muscles. PMID:23505062

  5. Upper Limb Strength and Muscle Volume in Healthy Middle-Aged Adults.

    PubMed

    Saul, Katherine R; Vidt, Meghan E; Gold, Garry E; Murray, Wendy M

    2015-12-01

    Our purpose was to characterize shoulder muscle volume and isometric moment, as well as their relationship, for healthy middle- aged adults. Muscle volume and maximum isometric joint moment were assessed for 6 functional muscle groups of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist in 10 middle-aged adults (46–60 y, 5M, 5F). Compared with young adults, shoulder abductors composed a smaller percentage of total muscle volume (P = .0009) and there was a reduction in shoulder adductor strength relative to elbow flexors (P = .012). We observed a consistent ordering of moment-generating capacity among functional groups across subjects. Although total muscle volume spanned a 2.3-fold range, muscle volume was distributed among functional groups in a consistent manner across subjects. On average, 72% of the variation in joint moment could be explained by the corresponding functional group muscle volume. These data are useful for improved modeling of upper limb musculoskeletal performance in middle-aged subjects, and may improve computational predictions of function for this group. PMID:26155870

  6. Impact of nutrition on muscle mass, strength, and performance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Mithal, A; Bonjour, J-P; Boonen, S; Burckhardt, P; Degens, H; El Hajj Fuleihan, G; Josse, R; Lips, P; Morales Torres, J; Rizzoli, R; Yoshimura, N; Wahl, D A; Cooper, C; Dawson-Hughes, B

    2013-05-01

    Muscle strength plays an important role in determining risk for falls, which result in fractures and other injuries. While bone loss has long been recognized as an inevitable consequence of aging, sarcopenia-the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that occurs with advancing age-has recently received increased attention. A review of the literature was undertaken to identify nutritional factors that contribute to loss of muscle mass. The role of protein, acid-base balance, vitamin D/calcium, and other minor nutrients like B vitamins was reviewed. Muscle wasting is a multifactorial process involving intrinsic and extrinsic alterations. A loss of fast twitch fibers, glycation of proteins, and insulin resistance may play an important role in the loss of muscle strength and development of sarcopenia. Protein intake plays an integral part in muscle health and an intake of 1.0-1.2 g/kg of body weight per day is probably optimal for older adults. There is a moderate [corrected] relationship between vitamin D status and muscle strength. Chronic ingestion of acid-producing diets appears to have a negative impact on muscle performance, and decreases in vitamin B12 and folic acid intake may also impair muscle function through their action on homocysteine. An adequate nutritional intake and an optimal dietary acid-base balance are important elements of any strategy to preserve muscle mass and strength during aging.

  7. Fgfr4 is required for effective muscle regeneration in vivo: Delineation of a MyoD-Tead2-Fgfr4 transcriptional pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Po; Caretti, Giuseppina; Mitchell, Stephanie; McKeehan, Wallace L; Boskey, Adele L.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Sartorelli, Vittorio

    2005-01-01

    Fgfr4 has been shown to be important for appropriate muscle development in chick limb buds, however, Fgfr4 null mice show no phenotype. Here, we show that staged induction of muscle regeneration in Fgfr4 null mice becomes highly abnormal at the time point when Fgfr4 is normally expressed. By 7 days of regeneration, differentiation of myotubes became poorly coordinated and delayed by both histology and embryonic myosin heavy chain staining. By 14 days, much of the muscle was replaced by fat and calcifications. To begin to dissect the molecular pathways involving Fgfr4, we queried the promoter sequences for transcriptional factor binding sites, and tested candidate regulators in a 27 time point regeneration series. The Fgfr4 promoter region contained a Tead protein binding site (M-CAT 5′-CATTCCT-3′), and Tead2 showed induction during regeneration commensurate with Fgfr4 regulation. Co-transfection of Tead2 and Fgfr4 promoter reporter constructs into C2C12 myotubes showed Tead2 to activate Fgfr4, and mutation of the M-CAT motif in the Fgfr4 promoter abolished these effects. Immunostaining for Tead2 showed timed expression in myotube nuclei consistent with the mRNA data. Query of the expression timing and genomic sequences of Tead2 suggested direct regulation by MyoD, and, consistent with this, MyoD directly bound to two strong E-boxes in the first intron of Tead2 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Moreover, co-transfection of MyoD and Tead2 intron reporter constructs into 10T1/2 cells activated reporter activity in a dose dependent manner. This activation was greatly reduced when the two E-boxes were mutated. Our data suggest a novel MyoD-Tead2-Fgfr4 pathway important for effective muscle regeneration. PMID:16267055

  8. Amphibian tail regeneration in space: effect on the pigmentation of the blastema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinfeld, S.; Foulquier, F.; Mitashov, V.; Bruchlinskaia, N.; Duprat, A. M.

    In Urodele amphibians, the tail regenerates after section. This regeneration, including tissues as different as bone (vertebrae), muscle, epidermis and central nervous system (spinal cord), was studied in adult Pleurodeles sent aboard the russian satellite Bion 10 and compared with tail regeneration in synchronous controls. Spinal cord, muscle and cartilage regeneration occurred in space animals as in synchronous controls. One of the most important differences between the two groups was the pigmentation of the blastemas: it was shown in laboratory, to be not due to a difference in light intensity.

  9. Human Adipose Tissue Derived Stem Cells as a Source of Smooth Muscle Cells in the Regeneration of Muscular Layer of Urinary Bladder Wall

    PubMed Central

    SALEM, Salah Abood; HWIE, Angela Ng Min; SAIM, Aminuddin; CHEE KONG, Christopher Ho; SAGAP, Ismail; SINGH, Rajesh; YUSOF, Mohd Reusmaazran; MD ZAINUDDIN, Zulkifili; HJ IDRUS, Ruszymah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adipose tissue provides an abundant source of multipotent cells, which represent a source of cell-based regeneration strategies for urinary bladder smooth muscle repair. Our objective was to confirm that adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can be differentiated into smooth muscle cells. Methods: In this study, adipose tissue samples were digested with 0.075% collagenase, and the resulting ADSCs were cultured and expanded in vitro. ADSCs at passage two were differentiated by incubation in smooth muscle inductive media (SMIM) consisting of MCDB I31 medium, 1% FBS, and 100 U/mL heparin for three and six weeks. ADSCs in non-inductive media were used as controls. Characterisation was performed by cell morphology and gene and protein expression. Result: The differentiated cells became elongated and spindle shaped, and towards the end of six weeks, sporadic cell aggregation appeared that is typical of smooth muscle cell culture. Smooth muscle markers (i.e. alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA), calponin, and myosin heavy chain (MHC)) were used to study gene expression. Expression of these genes was detected by PCR after three and six weeks of differentiation. At the protein expression level, ASMA, MHC, and smoothelin were expressed after six weeks of differentiation. However, only ASMA and smoothelin were expressed after three weeks of differentiation. Conclusion: Adipose tissue provides a possible source of smooth muscle precursor cells that possess the potential capability of smooth muscle differentiation. This represents a promising alternative for urinary bladder smooth muscle repair. PMID:24044001

  10. Exposure to microgravity for 30 days onboard Bion M1 caused muscle atrophy and decreased regeneration in the mouse femoral Quadriceps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Eleonora; Radugina, Elena A.; Almeida, Eduardo; Blaber, Elizabeth; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Markitantova, Yulia

    Mechanical unloading of muscle during spaceflight in microgravity is known to cause muscular atrophy, changes in muscle fiber type composition, gene expression, and reductions in regenerative muscle growth. Although limited data exists for long-term effects of microgravity in human muscle, these processes have mostly been studied in rodents for short periods of time, up to two weeks of spaceflight. Here we report on how 30-day, long-term, mechanical unloading in microgravity affects mouse muscle of the femoral Quadriceps group. To conduct these studies we used muscle tissue from 6 mice from the NASA Biospecimen Sharing Program conducted in collaboration with the Institute for Biomedical Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences, during the Russian Bion M1 biosatellite mission in 2013. Muscle morphology observed in histological sections shows signs of extensive atrophy and regenerative hypoplasia. Specifically, we observed a two-fold decrease in the number of myonuclei and low density of myofibrils, their separation and fragmentation. Despite obvious atrophy, muscle regeneration nevertheless appears to have continued after 30 days in microgravity as evidenced by thin and short newly formed muscle fibers. Many of them however showed evidence of apoptosis and degradation of synthesized fibrils, suggesting long-term unloading in microgravity affects late stages of myofiber differentiation. Ground asynchronous and vivarium control animals showed normal, well-developed tissue structure with sufficient blood and nerve supply and evidence of regenerative formation of new muscle fibers free of apoptotic nuclei. Myofiber nuclei stress responses in spaceflight animals was detected by positive nuclear immunolocalization of c-jun and c-myc proteins. Regenerative activity of satellite cells in muscle was localized with pax-7, MyoD and MCad immunostaining, and did not appear altered in microgravity. In summary, long-term spaceflight in microgravity causes significant atrophy

  11. Muscle and connective tissue progenitor populations show distinct Twist1 and Twist3 expression profiles during axolotl limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kragl, Martin; Roensch, Kathleen; Nüsslein, Ina; Tazaki, Akira; Taniguchi, Yuka; Tarui, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Agata, Kiyokazu; Tanaka, Elly M

    2013-01-01

    Limb regeneration involves re-establishing a limb development program from cells within adult tissues. Identifying molecular handles that provide insight into the relationship between cell differentiation status and cell lineage is an important step to study limb blastema cell formation. Here, using single cell PCR, focusing on newly isolated Twist1 sequences, we molecularly profile axolotl limb blastema cells using several progenitor cell markers. We link their molecular expression profile to their embryonic lineage via cell tracking experiments. We use in situ hybridization to determine the spatial localization and extent of overlap of different markers and cell types. Finally, we show by single cell PCR that the mature axolotl limb harbors a small but significant population of Twist1(+) cells. PMID:23103585

  12. Environmental changes in oxygen tension reveal ROS-dependent neurogenesis and regeneration in the adult newt brain.

    PubMed

    Hameed, L Shahul; Berg, Daniel A; Belnoue, Laure; Jensen, Lasse D; Cao, Yihai; Simon, András

    2015-01-01

    Organisms need to adapt to the ecological constraints in their habitat. How specific processes reflect such adaptations are difficult to model experimentally. We tested whether environmental shifts in oxygen tension lead to events in the adult newt brain that share features with processes occurring during neuronal regeneration under normoxia. By experimental simulation of varying oxygen concentrations, we show that hypoxia followed by re-oxygenation lead to neuronal death and hallmarks of an injury response, including activation of neural stem cells ultimately leading to neurogenesis. Neural stem cells accumulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) during re-oxygenation and inhibition of ROS biosynthesis counteracts their proliferation as well as neurogenesis. Importantly, regeneration of dopamine neurons under normoxia also depends on ROS-production. These data demonstrate a role for ROS-production in neurogenesis in newts and suggest that this role may have been recruited to the capacity to replace lost neurons in the brain of an adult vertebrate. PMID:26485032

  13. Environmental changes in oxygen tension reveal ROS-dependent neurogenesis and regeneration in the adult newt brain.

    PubMed

    Hameed, L Shahul; Berg, Daniel A; Belnoue, Laure; Jensen, Lasse D; Cao, Yihai; Simon, András

    2015-10-20

    Organisms need to adapt to the ecological constraints in their habitat. How specific processes reflect such adaptations are difficult to model experimentally. We tested whether environmental shifts in oxygen tension lead to events in the adult newt brain that share features with processes occurring during neuronal regeneration under normoxia. By experimental simulation of varying oxygen concentrations, we show that hypoxia followed by re-oxygenation lead to neuronal death and hallmarks of an injury response, including activation of neural stem cells ultimately leading to neurogenesis. Neural stem cells accumulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) during re-oxygenation and inhibition of ROS biosynthesis counteracts their proliferation as well as neurogenesis. Importantly, regeneration of dopamine neurons under normoxia also depends on ROS-production. These data demonstrate a role for ROS-production in neurogenesis in newts and suggest that this role may have been recruited to the capacity to replace lost neurons in the brain of an adult vertebrate.

  14. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches.

  15. Prostate-regenerating capacity of cultured human adult prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, M; Taylor, R A; Richards, M G; Sved, P; Wong, J; Eisinger, D; Xie, C; Salomon, R; Risbridger, G P; Dong, Q

    2010-01-01

    Experimentation with the progenitor/stem cells in adult prostate epithelium can be inconvenient due to a tight time line from tissue acquisition to cell isolation and to downstream experiments. To circumvent this inconvenience, we developed a simple technical procedure for culturing epithelial cells derived from human prostate tissue. In this study, benign prostate tissue was enzymatically digested and fractionated into epithelium and stroma, which were then cultured in the medium designed for prostate epithelial and stromal cells, respectively. The cultured cells were analyzed by immunocytochemical staining and flow cytometry. Prostate tissue-regenerating capacity of cultured cells in vitro was determined by co-culturing epithelial and stromal cells in dihydrotestosterone-containing RPMI. Cell lineages in formed acini-like structures were determined by immunohistochemistry. The culture of epithelial cells mainly consisted of basal cells. A minor population was negative for known lineage markers and positive for CD133. The culture also contained cells with high activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase. After co-culturing with stromal cells, the epithelial cells were able to form acini-like structures containing multiple cell lineages. Thus, the established culture of prostate epithelial cells provides an alternative source for studying progenitor/stem cells of prostate epithelium.

  16. Regeneration of the perineurium after microsurgical resection examined with immunolabeling for tenascin-C and alpha smooth muscle actin.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Michiro; Okui, Nobuyuki; Tatebe, Masahiro; Shinohara, Takaaki; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2011-04-01

    The regenerative process of the perineurium and nerve function were examined using an in vivo model of perineurium resection in the rat sciatic nerve. Our hypothesis is that the regenerative process of the perineurium can be demonstrated by immunolabeling for tenascin-C and alpha smooth muscle actin after microsurgical resection of the perineurium in vivo. A total of 38 Lewis rats were used. Eight-week-old animals were assigned to one of two groups: the epi-perineurium removal group or the sham group. Under operative microscopy, the sciatic nerve was dissected from surrounding tissues at the thigh level from the ischial tuberosity to the fossa poplitea. The epi-perineurium was carefully removed by cutting circumferentially and stripping distally for 15 mm. For CatWalk® dynamic gait analysis, only right sciatic nerves underwent surgery; the left sciatic nerves were left intact. For pathological and electrophysiological tests, both the right and left sciatic nerves underwent surgery. Analysis of data was performed at each time interval with a two-group t-test. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. After resection of a 15-mm section of the epi-perineurium, immediate endoneurial swelling occurred in the outer portion and spread into the central portion. Although demyelination and axonal degeneration were found in the swollen area, remyelination and recovery of electrophysiological function were seen after regeneration of the perineurium. An immunohistological and electron microscopic study revealed that the perineurium regenerated via fusion of the residual interfascicular perineurium and endoneurial fibroblast-like cells of mesenchymal origin. CatWalk gait analysis showed not only motor paresis but also neuropathic pain during the early phases of this model. PMID:21265831

  17. Attenuated Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2–Mediated Bone Regeneration in a Rat Model of Composite Bone and Muscle Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mon-Tzu A.; Uhrig, Brent A.; Boerckel, Joel David; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Lundgren, Taran L.; Warren, Gordon L.; Guldberg, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Extremity injuries involving large bone defects with concomitant severe muscle damage are a significant clinical challenge often requiring multiple treatment procedures and possible amputation. Even if limb salvage is achieved, patients are typically left with severe short- and long-term disabilities. Current preclinical animal models do not adequately mimic the severity, complexity, and loss of limb function characteristic of these composite injuries. The objectives of this study were to establish a composite injury model that combines a critically sized segmental bone defect with an adjacent volumetric muscle loss injury, and then use this model to quantitatively assess human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2)–mediated tissue regeneration and restoration of limb function. Surgeries were performed on rats in three experimental groups: muscle injury (8-mm-diameter full-thickness defect in the quadriceps), bone injury (8-mm nonhealing defect in the femur), or composite injury combining the bone and muscle defects. Bone defects were treated with 2 μg of rhBMP-2 delivered in the pregelled alginate injected into a cylindrical perforated nanofiber mesh. Bone regeneration was quantitatively assessed using microcomputed tomography, and limb function was assessed using gait analysis and muscle strength measurements. At 12 weeks postsurgery, treated bone defects without volumetric muscle loss were consistently bridged. In contrast, the volume and mechanical strength of regenerated bone were attenuated by 45% and 58%, respectively, in the identically treated composite injury group. At the same time point, normalized muscle strength was reduced by 51% in the composite injury group compared to either single injury group. At 2 weeks, the gait function was impaired in all injury groups compared to baseline with the composite injury group displaying the greatest functional deficit. We conclude that sustained delivery of rhBMP-2 at a dose sufficient to induce bridging of

  18. Regeneration of adult rat spinal cord is promoted by the soluble KDI domain of gamma1 laminin.

    PubMed

    Wiksten, Markus; Väänänen, Antti J; Liebkind, Ron; Liesi, Päivi

    2004-11-01

    Regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) of adult mammals is hampered by formation of a glial scar and by proteins released from the myelin sheaths of injured neuronal pathways. Our recent data indicate that the KDI (Lys-Asp-Ile) domain of gamma1 laminin neutralizes both glial- and myelin-derived inhibitory signals and promotes survival and neurite outgrowth of cultured human spinal cord neurons. We show that after complete transection of the adult rat spinal cord, animals receiving onsite infusion of the KDI domain via osmotic mini-pumps recover and are able to sustain their body weights and walk with their hindlimbs. Animals treated with placebo suffer from irreversible hindlimb paralysis. Microscopic and molecular analyses of the spinal cords indicate that the KDI domain reduces tissue damage at the lesion site and enables neurite outgrowth through the injured area to effect functional recovery of the initially paralyzed animals. That the KDI domain enhances regeneration of acute spinal cord injuries in the adult rat suggests that it may be used to promote regeneration of spinal cord injuries in humans.

  19. Proprioceptive acuity predicts muscle co-contraction of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis in older adults' dynamic postural control.

    PubMed

    Craig, C E; Goble, D J; Doumas, M

    2016-05-13

    Older adults use a different muscle strategy to cope with postural instability, in which they 'co-contract' the muscles around the ankle joint. It has been suggested that this is a compensatory response to age-related proprioceptive decline however this view has never been assessed directly. The current study investigated the association between proprioceptive acuity and muscle co-contraction in older adults. We compared muscle activity, by recording surface electromyography (EMG) from the bilateral tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles, in young (aged 18-34) and older adults (aged 65-82) during postural assessment on a fixed and sway-referenced surface at age-equivalent levels of sway. We performed correlations between muscle activity and proprioceptive acuity, which was assessed using an active contralateral matching task. Despite successfully inducing similar levels of sway in the two age groups, older adults still showed higher muscle co-contraction. A stepwise regression analysis showed that proprioceptive acuity measured using variable error was the best predictor of muscle co-contraction in older adults. However, despite suggestions from previous research, proprioceptive error and muscle co-contraction were negatively correlated in older adults, suggesting that better proprioceptive acuity predicts more co-contraction. Overall, these results suggest that although muscle co-contraction may be an age-specific strategy used by older adults, it is not to compensate for age-related proprioceptive deficits.

  20. Proprioceptive acuity predicts muscle co-contraction of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis in older adults' dynamic postural control.

    PubMed

    Craig, C E; Goble, D J; Doumas, M

    2016-05-13

    Older adults use a different muscle strategy to cope with postural instability, in which they 'co-contract' the muscles around the ankle joint. It has been suggested that this is a compensatory response to age-related proprioceptive decline however this view has never been assessed directly. The current study investigated the association between proprioceptive acuity and muscle co-contraction in older adults. We compared muscle activity, by recording surface electromyography (EMG) from the bilateral tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles, in young (aged 18-34) and older adults (aged 65-82) during postural assessment on a fixed and sway-referenced surface at age-equivalent levels of sway. We performed correlations between muscle activity and proprioceptive acuity, which was assessed using an active contralateral matching task. Despite successfully inducing similar levels of sway in the two age groups, older adults still showed higher muscle co-contraction. A stepwise regression analysis showed that proprioceptive acuity measured using variable error was the best predictor of muscle co-contraction in older adults. However, despite suggestions from previous research, proprioceptive error and muscle co-contraction were negatively correlated in older adults, suggesting that better proprioceptive acuity predicts more co-contraction. Overall, these results suggest that although muscle co-contraction may be an age-specific strategy used by older adults, it is not to compensate for age-related proprioceptive deficits. PMID:26905952

  1. Further amputations of the tail in adult Triturus carnifex: contribution to the study on the nature of regenerated spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Margotta, Vito

    2008-01-01

    Adult Urodele Amphibians, if deprived of the tail, are able to fully regenerate it. This occurs owing to a typical epimorphic phenomenon which takes place in various phases. Within this matter, in particular on the reconstruction of the caudal nervous component, literature sources refer to a great quantity of research following only one amputation of the tail. Being aware of these data we programmed to investigate the possible persistence, decrease or disappearance of the medullary regenerative power after repeated amputations of the regenerated tail. With this objective in view, we have performed on adult Triturus carnifex a series of such operations at time spaced out from one another. In previous experiments, the amputations of the tail have been before seven and then nine. In the current experiment, the same specimens have been subjected to further removals of the tail. This study has developed into three cycles going on over a period of more than ten years. Overall, our panorama rising from the integration of present results and those of former observations is in agreement with what occurs in the area which is the centre of the beginnings of medullary regeneration processes and the bibliographic information concerning the pre-blastematic and blastematic phases. In the subsequent morphogenetic and differentiative phases, however, with the recurrence of the re-establishment of the spinal cord, these events proceed more slowly (gap which reduces when the time interval starting from the operation increases) than in the spinal cords which regenerated after only one tail amputation. Furthermore, although the regenerated spinal cords, if compared to normal spinal cord, show some anomalies (regarding medullary length and diameter, distribution of the spinal nerves and ganglia), the regenerated spinal cords (as well-known uncapable to re-form the Mauthner fibres and supplied with the Rohon-Beard sensitive neurons), their nerves and ganglia reacquire the same complex

  2. Clinico pathological study of adult dermatomyositis: Importance of muscle histology in the diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Karri, Sudhir Babu; Kannan, Meena Anga Muthu; Rajashekhar, Liza; Uppin, Megha S.; Challa, Sundaram

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To study the histological features on muscle biopsy and correlate them with clinical features, other laboratory data in adult patients to make a diagnosis of dermatomyositis (DM), applying the European Neuromuscular center (ENMC) criteria. Materials and Methods: Adult patients who fulfilled clinical, laboratory, and muscle biopsy findings according to ENMC criteria for DM during the period 2010–2013 were included in the study. Cryostat sections of muscle biopsy were reviewed with emphasis on Perifascicular atrophy (PFA), perivascular/endomysial inflammation. Muscular dystrophies and metabolic myopathies were excluded by appropriate immunohistochemistry and special stains. Results: The diagnosis of adult DM was made in 45 patients out of 170 clinically suspected idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. These included 33 definite, 4 probable, 7 possible sine dermatitis, and 1 amyopathic DM. All patients with definite DM had typical rash and proximal muscle weakness and muscle biopsy showed PFA with or without inflammation. Thirteen patients had quadriparesis, neck muscle weakness, dysphagia/dysphonia at presentation. Patients with probable DM had rash and showed perivascular/endomysial inflammation with no PFA. Possible DM sine dermatitis showed PFA with perivascular/endomysial infiltrates. One patient of amyopathic DM had typical heliotrope rash and characteristic skin biopsy. Conclusions: Histological features are important for the diagnosis of DM. Relying on PFA for diagnosis of definite DM underestimates the true frequency of DM. PMID:26019418

  3. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and their relation with bone and muscle health in adults.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Kelsey M; Sahni, Shivani; Kerstetter, Jane E; Kenny, Anne M; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-09-01

    Age-related bone and muscle loss are major public health problems. Investigational therapies to reduce these losses include anti-inflammatory dietary supplementations, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Surprisingly, this topic has received little attention in the osteoporosis community. Recent research highlights the role of PUFA in inflammatory regulation of bone remodeling via cellular pathways. Emerging research suggests significant roles for PUFA in reducing bone and muscle loss with aging; however, findings are conflicted for PUFA and fracture risk. Limited studies suggest a relation between higher omega-3 FA and better muscle/bone in older adults. This review highlights new research since 2008 and synthesizes our current understanding of PUFA in relation to bone and muscle. Across study designs, evidence indicates that PUFA has positive effects upon bone. As data are sparse, future clinical trials and prospective studies are important to determine the long term benefits of PUFA supplementation upon bone and muscle outcomes. PMID:23857286

  4. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and their relation with bone and muscle health in adults

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Kelsey M; Sahni, Shivani; Kerstetter, Jane E; Kenny, Anne M; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-01-01

    Age-related bone and muscle loss are major public health problems. Investigational therapies to reduce these losses include anti-inflammatory dietary supplementations, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Surprisingly, this topic has received little attention in the osteoporosis community. Recent research highlights the role of PUFA in inflammatory regulation of bone remodeling via cellular pathways. Emerging research suggests significant roles for PUFA in reducing bone and muscle loss with aging; however, findings are conflicted for PUFA and fracture risk. Limited studies suggest a relation between higher omega-3 FA and better muscle/bone in older adults. This review highlights new research since 2008 and synthesizes our current understanding of PUFA in relation to bone and muscle. Across study designs, evidence indicates that PUFA has positive effects upon bone. As data are sparse, future clinical trials and prospective studies are important to determine the long term benefits of PUFA supplementation upon bone and muscle outcomes. PMID:23857286

  5. Extracellular Control of Limb Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calve, S.; Simon, H.-G.

    Adult newts possess the ability to completely regenerate organs and appendages. Immediately after limb loss, the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes dramatic changes that may provide mechanical and biochemical cues to guide the formation of the blastema, which is comprised of uncommitted stem-like cells that proliferate to replace the lost structure. Skeletal muscle is a known reservoir for blastema cells but the mechanism by which it contributes progenitor cells is still unclear. To create physiologically relevant culture conditions for the testing of primary newt muscle cells in vitro, the spatio-temporal distribution of ECM components and the mechanical properties of newt muscle were analyzed. Tenascin-C and hyaluronic acid (HA) were found to be dramatically upregulated in the amputated limb and were co-expressed around regenerating skeletal muscle. The transverse stiffness of muscle measured in situ was used as a guide to generate silicone-based substrates of physiological stiffness. Culturing newt muscle cells under different conditions revealed that the cells are sensitive to both matrix coating and substrate stiffness: Myoblasts on HA-coated soft substrates display a rounded morphology and become more elongated as the stiffness of the substrate increases. Coating of soft substrates with matrigel or fibronectin enhanced cell spreading and eventual cell fusion.

  6. CuZnSOD gene deletion targeted to skeletal muscle leads to loss of contractile force but does not cause muscle atrophy in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Davis, Carol; Sakellariou, George K.; Shi, Yun; Kayani, Anna C.; Pulliam, Daniel; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Richardson, Arlan; Jackson, Malcolm J.; McArdle, Anne; Brooks, Susan V.; Van Remmen, Holly

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that deletion of CuZnSOD in mice (Sod1−/− mice) leads to accelerated loss of muscle mass and contractile force during aging. To dissect the relative roles of skeletal muscle and motor neurons in this process, we used a Cre-Lox targeted approach to establish a skeletal muscle-specific Sod1-knockout (mKO) mouse to determine whether muscle-specific CuZnSOD deletion is sufficient to cause muscle atrophy. Surprisingly, mKO mice maintain muscle masses at or above those of wild-type control mice up to 18 mo of age. In contrast, maximum isometric specific force measured in gastrocnemius muscle is significantly reduced in the mKO mice. We found no detectable increases in global measures of oxidative stress or ROS production, no reduction in mitochondrial ATP production, and no induction of adaptive stress responses in muscle from mKO mice. However, Akt-mTOR signaling is elevated and the number of muscle fibers with centrally located nuclei is increased in skeletal muscle from mKO mice, which suggests elevated regenerative pathways. Our data demonstrate that lack of CuZnSOD restricted to skeletal muscle does not lead to muscle atrophy but does cause muscle weakness in adult mice and suggest loss of CuZnSOD may potentiate muscle regenerative pathways.—Zhang, Y., Davis, C., Sakellariou, G.K., Shi, Y., Kayani, A.C., Pulliam, D., Bhattacharya, A., Richardson, A., Jackson, M.J., McArdle, A., Brooks, S.V., Van Remmen, H. CuZnSOD gene deletion targeted to skeletal muscle leads to loss of contractile force but does not cause muscle atrophy in adult mice. PMID:23729587

  7. Calsequestrins in skeletal and cardiac muscle from adult Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Sandra; Mosole, Simone; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Argenton, Francesco; Volpe, Pompeo; Nori, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    Calsequestrin (Casq) is a high capacity, low affinity Ca(2+)-binding protein, critical for Ca(2+)-buffering in cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. All vertebrates have multiple genes encoding for different Casq isoforms. Increasing interest has been focused on mammalian and human Casq genes since mutations of both cardiac (Casq2) and skeletal muscle (Casq1) isoforms cause different, and sometime severe, human pathologies. Danio rerio (zebrafish) is a powerful model for studying function and mutations of human proteins. In this work, expression, biochemical properties cellular and sub-cellular localization of D. rerio native Casq isoforms are investigated. By quantitative PCR, three mRNAs were detected in skeletal muscle and heart with different abundances. Three zebrafish Casqs: Casq1a, Casq1b and Casq2 were identified by mass spectrometry (Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002455). Skeletal and cardiac zebrafish calsequestrins share properties with mammalian Casq1 and Casq2. Skeletal Casqs were found primarily, but not exclusively, at the sarcomere Z-line level where terminal cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum are located. PMID:26585961

  8. Insulin Resistance Is Associated With Decreased Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Nondiabetic Adults Aged ≥70 Years

    PubMed Central

    Barzilay, Joshua I.; Cotsonis, George A.; Walston, Jeremy; Schwartz, Ann V.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Miljkovic, Iva; Harris, Tamara B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Lower-limb muscle strength is reduced in many people with diabetes. In this study, we examined whether quadriceps muscle strength is reduced in relation to insulin resistance in well-functioning ambulatory nondiabetic individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants (age ≥70 years) underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning to ascertain muscle and fat mass, tests of quadriceps strength, computed tomography scanning of the quadriceps to gauge muscle lipid content, and fasting insulin and glucose level measurements from which homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was derived. RESULTS In regression analysis, quadriceps strength per kilogram of muscle mass was negatively associated (P < 0.0001) with HOMA-IR independent of other factors negatively associated with strength such as increased age, female sex, low-physical activity, impaired fasting glucose, and increased total body fat. Muscle lipid content was not associated with strength. CONCLUSIONS A small decrease in quadriceps muscle force is associated with increased HOMA-IR in well-functioning nondiabetic adults, suggesting that diminished quadriceps muscle strength begins before diabetes. PMID:19171728

  9. Cardiac regeneration: epicardial mediated repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hearts of lower vertebrates such as fish and salamanders display scarless regeneration following injury, although this feature is lost in adult mammals. The remarkable capacity of the neonatal mammalian heart to regenerate suggests that the underlying machinery required for the regenerative process is evolutionarily retained. Recent studies highlight the epicardial covering of the heart as an important source of the signalling factors required for the repair process. The developing epicardium is also a major source of cardiac fibroblasts, smooth muscle, endothelial cells and stem cells. Here, we examine animal models that are capable of scarless regeneration, the role of the epicardium as a source of cells, signalling mechanisms implicated in the regenerative process and how these mechanisms influence cardiomyocyte proliferation. We also discuss recent advances in cardiac stem cell research and potential therapeutic targets arising from these studies. PMID:26702046

  10. Adult Thymic Medullary Epithelium Is Maintained and Regenerated by Lineage-Restricted Cells Rather Than Bipotent Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ohigashi, Izumi; Zuklys, Saulius; Sakata, Mie; Mayer, Carlos E; Hamazaki, Yoko; Minato, Nagahiro; Hollander, Georg A; Takahama, Yousuke

    2015-11-17

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) play an essential role in establishing self-tolerance in T cells. mTECs originate from bipotent TEC progenitors that generate both mTECs and cortical TECs (cTECs), although mTEC-restricted progenitors also have been reported. Here, we report in vivo fate-mapping analysis of cells that transcribe β5t, a cTEC trait expressed in bipotent progenitors, during a given period in mice. We show that, in adult mice, most mTECs are derived from progenitors that transcribe β5t during embryogenesis and the neonatal period up to 1 week of age. The contribution of adult β5t(+) progenitors was minor even during injury-triggered regeneration. Our results further demonstrate that adult mTEC-restricted progenitors are derived from perinatal β5t(+) progenitors. These results indicate that the adult thymic medullary epithelium is maintained and regenerated by mTEC-lineage cells that pass beyond the bipotent stage during early ontogeny. PMID:26549457

  11. Pancreatic-derived pathfinder cells enable regeneration of critically damaged adult pancreatic tissue and completely reverse streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Karen; Chen, Daxin; MacIntyre, Alan; McGlynn, Liane M; Montague, Paul; Charif, Rawiya; Subramaniam, Murali; George, W D; Payne, Anthony P; Davies, R Wayne; Dorling, Anthony; Shiels, Paul G

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate that intravenous delivery of human, or rat, pancreas-derived pathfinder (PDP) cells can totally regenerate critically damaged adult tissue and restore normal function across a species barrier. We have used a mouse model of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes to demonstrate this. Normoglycemia was restored and maintained for up to 89 days following the induction of diabetes and subsequent intravenous delivery of PDP cells. Normal pancreatic histology also appeared to be restored, and treated diabetic animals gained body weight. Regenerated tissue was primarily of host origin, with few rat or human cells detectable by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Crucially, the insulin produced by these animals was overwhelmingly murine in origin and was both types I and II, indicative of a process of developmental recapitulation. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using intravenous administration of adult cells to regenerate damaged tissue. Critically, they enhance our understanding of the mechanisms relating to such repair and suggest a means for novel therapeutic intervention in loss of tissue and organ function with age.

  12. Ultrastructural immunolocalization of nestin in the regenerating tail of lizards shows its presence during cytoskeletal modifications in the epidermis, muscles and nerves.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    Nestin has been considered a neural stem cell marker, and represents an intermediate filament protein likely involved in restructuring the cytoskeleton in different cell types. The present ultrastructural study has immunodetected nestin especially in the wound epidermis, regenerating myotubes and in the growing nerves of the regenerating tail of lizards. In keratinocytes of the stratified wound epidermis nestin is present in the irregular electron-paler meshwork located along the cell perimeter and among keratin bundles converging into desmosomes. In the regenerating muscles nestin-immunoreactivity remains confined to some external regions along the myotubes and in the cytoplasmic ends of the myotubes not occupied by myofibrils. A diffuse nestin immunolabeling is also present among the neurofilaments of growing axons, in Schwann cells and in ependymal cells of the regenerating spinal cord of the tail. The localization of nestin in sites of cytoskeletal remodeling in keratinocytes, myotubes, ependymal cells and axons, suggests that this protein is associated to the reassembling of keratin tonofilaments in moving keratinocytes, assembling of contractile proteins in myotubes, and in the organization of neurofilaments during the growth and myelination of axons within the regenerating lizard tail.

  13. Myogenic differentiation potential of human tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells and their potential for use to promote skeletal muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    PARK, SAEYOUNG; CHOI, YOONYOUNG; JUNG, NAMHEE; YU, YEONSIL; RYU, KYUNG-HA; KIM, HAN SU; JO, INHO; CHOI, BYUNG-OK; JUNG, SUNG-CHUL

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are regarded as an important source of cells which may be used to promote the regeneration of skeletal muscle (SKM) which has been damaged due to defects in the organization of muscle tissue caused by congenital diseases, trauma or tumor removal. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which require less invasive harvesting techniques, represent a valuable source of cells for stem cell therapy. In the present study, we demonstrated that human tonsil-derived MSCs (T-MSCs) may differentiate into myogenic cells in vitro and that the transplantation of myoblasts and myocytes generated from human T-MSCs mediates the recovery of muscle function in vivo. In order to induce myogenic differentiation, the T-MSC-derived spheres were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/nutrient mixture F-12 (DMEM/F-12) supplemented with 1 ng/ml transforming growth factor-β, non-essential amino acids and insulin-transferrin-selenium for 4 days followed by culture in myogenic induction medium [low-glucose DMEM containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 10 ng/ml insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1)] for 14 days. The T-MSCs sequentially differentiated into myoblasts and skeletal myocytes, as evidenced by the increased expression of skeletal myogenesis-related markers [including α-actinin, troponin I type 1 (TNNI1) and myogenin] and the formation of myotubes in vitro. The in situ transplantation of T-MSCs into mice with a partial myectomy of the right gastrocnemius muscle enhanced muscle function, as demonstrated by gait assessment (footprint analysis), and restored the shape of SKM without forming teratomas. Thus, T-MSCs may differentiate into myogenic cells and effectively regenerate SKM following injury. These results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of T-MSCs to promote SKM regeneration following injury. PMID:27035161

  14. Promoting axon regeneration in the adult CNS by modulation of the melanopsin/GPCR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songshan; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Li; Gao, Xin; Wang, Xuejie; Liu, Wen; Wang, Yuqi; Jiang, Songshan; Wong, Yung Hou; Zhang, Yifeng; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Cell-type–specific G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling regulates distinct neuronal responses to various stimuli and is essential for axon guidance and targeting during development. However, its function in axonal regeneration in the mature CNS remains elusive. We found that subtypes of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) in mice maintained high mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) levels after axotomy and that the light-sensitive GPCR melanopsin mediated this sustained expression. Melanopsin overexpression in the RGCs stimulated axonal regeneration after optic nerve crush by up-regulating mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1). The extent of the regeneration was comparable to that observed after phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) knockdown. Both the axon regeneration and mTOR activity that were enhanced by melanopsin required light stimulation and Gq/11 signaling. Specifically, activating Gq in RGCs elevated mTOR activation and promoted axonal regeneration. Melanopsin overexpression in RGCs enhanced the amplitude and duration of their light response, and silencing them with Kir2.1 significantly suppressed the increased mTOR signaling and axon regeneration that were induced by melanopsin. Thus, our results provide a strategy to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury by modulating neuronal activity through GPCR signaling. PMID:26831088

  15. Abdominal muscle strength is related to the quality of life among older adults with lumbar osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Suenimeire; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Brandino, Hugo Evangelista; Ferreira, Vânia Tie Koga; Scheicher, Marcos Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the association between abdominal muscle strength and quality of life among older adults with lumbar osteoarthritis. A blind, cross-sectional study was conducted involving 40 older adults: 20 with lumbar osteoarthritis (12 women and 8 men, mean age of 65.90 ± 4.80 years) and 20 controls (14 women and 6 men, mean age of 67.90 ± 4.60 years). The volunteers were submitted to an abdominal muscle strength test. Quality of life was evaluated using the SF-36 questionnaire. Both abdominal muscle strength and quality of life scores were significantly lower in the group with lumbar osteoarthritis in comparison to the controls (p < 0.05). Moreover, significant and positive associations were found between abdominal muscle strength and the subscales of the SF-36 questionnaire (p < 0.05, 0.421 ≥ rs ≤ 0.694). Based on the present findings, older adults with lumbar osteoarthritis with greater abdominal muscle strength have a better quality of life.

  16. Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen at 1.25 Atmospheres Absolute with Normal Air on Macrophage Number and Infiltration during Rat Skeletal Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Naoto; Ono, Miharu; Tomioka, Tomoka; Deie, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Use of mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute (2026.54 hPa) with normal air is emerging as a common complementary treatment for severe muscle injury. Although hyperbaric oxygen at over 2 atmospheres absolute with 100% O2 promotes healing of skeletal muscle injury, it is not clear whether mild hyperbaric oxygen is equally effective. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute (1266.59 hPa) with normal air on muscle regeneration. The tibialis anterior muscle of male Wistar rats was injured by injection of bupivacaine hydrochloride, and rats were randomly assigned to a hyperbaric oxygen experimental group or to a non-hyperbaric oxygen control group. Immediately after the injection, rats were exposed to hyperbaric oxygen, and the treatment was continued for 28 days. The cross-sectional area of centrally nucleated muscle fibers was significantly larger in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 and 7 days after injury. The number of CD68- or CD68- and CD206-positive cells was significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. Additionally, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. The number of Pax7- and MyoD- or MyoD- and myogenin-positive nuclei per mm2 and the expression levels of these proteins were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 days after injury. These results suggest that mild hyperbaric oxygen promotes skeletal muscle regeneration in the early phase after injury, possibly due to reduced hypoxic conditions leading to accelerated macrophage infiltration and phenotype transition. In conclusion, mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute with normal air is an appropriate support therapy for severe muscle injuries. PMID:25531909

  17. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute with normal air on macrophage number and infiltration during rat skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoto; Ono, Miharu; Tomioka, Tomoka; Deie, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Use of mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute (2026.54 hPa) with normal air is emerging as a common complementary treatment for severe muscle injury. Although hyperbaric oxygen at over 2 atmospheres absolute with 100% O2 promotes healing of skeletal muscle injury, it is not clear whether mild hyperbaric oxygen is equally effective. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute (1266.59 hPa) with normal air on muscle regeneration. The tibialis anterior muscle of male Wistar rats was injured by injection of bupivacaine hydrochloride, and rats were randomly assigned to a hyperbaric oxygen experimental group or to a non-hyperbaric oxygen control group. Immediately after the injection, rats were exposed to hyperbaric oxygen, and the treatment was continued for 28 days. The cross-sectional area of centrally nucleated muscle fibers was significantly larger in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 and 7 days after injury. The number of CD68- or CD68- and CD206-positive cells was significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. Additionally, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. The number of Pax7- and MyoD- or MyoD- and myogenin-positive nuclei per mm2 and the expression levels of these proteins were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 days after injury. These results suggest that mild hyperbaric oxygen promotes skeletal muscle regeneration in the early phase after injury, possibly due to reduced hypoxic conditions leading to accelerated macrophage infiltration and phenotype transition. In conclusion, mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute with normal air is an appropriate support therapy for severe muscle injuries.

  18. Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in Dystrophin-Deficient Muscle Cells: Effects on Regeneration Capacity, Inflammation Response and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Aline Barbosa; Moraes, Luis Henrique Rapucci; Mizobuti, Daniela Sayuri; Fogaça, Aline Reis; Moraes, Fernanda Dos Santos Rapucci; Hermes, Tulio de Almeida; Pertille, Adriana; Minatel, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated low-level laser therapy (LLLT) effects on some physiological pathways that may lead to muscle damage or regeneration capacity in dystrophin-deficient muscle cells of mdx mice, the experimental model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Primary cultures of mdx skeletal muscle cells were irradiated only one time with laser and analyzed after 24 and 48 hours. The LLLT parameter used was 830 nm wavelengths at 5 J/cm² fluence. The following groups were set up: Ctrl (untreated C57BL/10 primary muscle cells), mdx (untreated mdx primary muscle cells), mdx LA 24 (mdx primary muscle cells - LLLT irradiated and analyzed after 24 h), and mdx LA 48 (mdx primary muscle cells - LLLT irradiated and analyzed after 48 h). The mdx LA 24 and mdx LA 48 groups showed significant increase in cell proliferation, higher diameter in muscle cells and decreased MyoD levels compared to the mdx group. The mdx LA 48 group showed significant increase in Myosin Heavy Chain levels compared to the untreated mdx and mdx LA 24 groups. The mdx LA 24 and mdx LA 48 groups showed significant increase in [Ca2+]i. The mdx group showed significant increase in H2O2 production and 4-HNE levels compared to the Ctrl group and LLLT treatment reduced this increase. GSH levels and GPx, GR and SOD activities increased in the mdx group. Laser treatment reduced the GSH levels and GR and SOD activities in dystrophic muscle cells. The mdx group showed significant increase in the TNF-α and NF-κB levels, which in turn was reduced by the LLLT treatment. Together, these results suggest that the laser treatment improved regenerative capacity and decreased inflammatory response and oxidative stress in dystrophic muscle cells, indicating that LLLT could be a helpful alternative therapy to be associated with other treatment for dystrophinopathies.

  19. Wii balance board exercise improves balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults.

    PubMed

    Siriphorn, Akkradate; Chamonchant, Dannaovarat

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The potential health benefits of the Nintendo Wii balance board exercise have been widely investigated. However, no study has been conducted to examine the benefits of Wii exercise for overweight young adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise performed on a Nintendo Wii balance board on the balance and lower limb muscle strength in overweight young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Within-subject repeated measures analysis was used. Sixteen young adults (aged 21.87±1.13 years, body mass index 24.15 ± 0.50 kg/m(2)) were recruited. All subjects performed an exercise program on a Wii balance board for 8 weeks (30 min/session, twice a week for 8 weeks). A NeuroCom Balance Master and a hand-held dynamometer were used to measure balance performance and lower limb muscle strength. [Results] According to the comparison of pre- and post-intervention measurements, the Wii balance board exercise program significantly improved the limit of stability parameters. There was also a significant increase in strength of four lower-limb muscle groups: the hip flexor, knee flexor, ankle dorsiflexor and ankle plantarflexor. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that a Wii balance board exercise program can be used to improve the balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults. PMID:25642034

  20. Wii balance board exercise improves balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults.

    PubMed

    Siriphorn, Akkradate; Chamonchant, Dannaovarat

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The potential health benefits of the Nintendo Wii balance board exercise have been widely investigated. However, no study has been conducted to examine the benefits of Wii exercise for overweight young adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise performed on a Nintendo Wii balance board on the balance and lower limb muscle strength in overweight young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Within-subject repeated measures analysis was used. Sixteen young adults (aged 21.87±1.13 years, body mass index 24.15 ± 0.50 kg/m(2)) were recruited. All subjects performed an exercise program on a Wii balance board for 8 weeks (30 min/session, twice a week for 8 weeks). A NeuroCom Balance Master and a hand-held dynamometer were used to measure balance performance and lower limb muscle strength. [Results] According to the comparison of pre- and post-intervention measurements, the Wii balance board exercise program significantly improved the limit of stability parameters. There was also a significant increase in strength of four lower-limb muscle groups: the hip flexor, knee flexor, ankle dorsiflexor and ankle plantarflexor. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that a Wii balance board exercise program can be used to improve the balance and lower limb muscle strength of overweight young adults.

  1. Secondary muscle pathology and metabolic dysregulation in adults with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Paul M.; Hurvitz, Edward A.; Burant, Charles F.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is caused by an insult to or malformation of the developing brain which affects motor control centers and causes alterations in growth, development, and overall health throughout the life span. In addition to the disruption in development caused by the primary neurological insult, CP is associated with exaggerated sedentary behaviors and a hallmark accelerated progression of muscle pathology compared with typically developing children and adults. Factors such as excess adipose tissue deposition and altered partitioning, insulin resistance, and chronic inflammation may increase the severity of muscle pathology throughout adulthood and lead to cardiometabolic disease risk and/or early mortality. We describe a model of exaggerated health risk represented in adults with CP and discuss the mechanisms and secondary consequences associated with chronic sedentary behavior, obesity, aging, and muscle spasticity. Moreover, we highlight novel evidence that implicates aberrant inflammation in CP as a potential mechanism linking both metabolic and cognitive dysregulation in a cyclical pattern. PMID:22912367

  2. Effect of seven days of spaceflight on hindlimb muscle protein, RNA and DNA in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of seven days of spaceflight on skeletal muscle (soleus, gastrocnemius, EDL) content of protein, RNA and DNA were determined in adult rats. Whereas total protein contents were reduced in parallel with muscle weights, myofibrillar protein appeared to be more affected. There were no significant changes in absolute DNA contents, but a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in DNA concentration (microgram/milligram) in soleus muscles from flight rats. Absolute RNA contents were significantly (P less than 0.025) decreased in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of flight rats, with RNA concentrations reduced 15-30 percent. These results agree with previous ground-based observations on the suspended rat with unloaded hindlimbs and support continued use of this model.

  3. Regeneration strategies after the adult mammalian central nervous system injury—biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yudan; Yang, Zhaoyang; Li, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has very restricted intrinsic regeneration ability under the injury or disease condition. Innovative repair strategies, therefore, are urgently needed to facilitate tissue regeneration and functional recovery. The published tissue repair/regeneration strategies, such as cell and/or drug delivery, has been demonstrated to have some therapeutic effects on experimental animal models, but can hardly find clinical applications due to such methods as the extremely low survival rate of transplanted cells, difficulty in integrating with the host or restriction of blood–brain barriers to administration patterns. Using biomaterials can not only increase the survival rate of grafts and their integration with the host in the injured CNS area, but also sustainably deliver bioproducts to the local injured area, thus improving the microenvironment in that area. This review mainly introduces the advances of various strategies concerning facilitating CNS regeneration. PMID:27047678

  4. Further amputations of the tail in adult Triturus carnifex: contribution to the study on the nature of regenerated spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Margotta, Vito

    2008-01-01

    Adult Urodele Amphibians, if deprived of the tail, are able to fully regenerate it. This occurs owing to a typical epimorphic phenomenon which takes place in various phases. Within this matter, in particular on the reconstruction of the caudal nervous component, literature sources refer to a great quantity of research following only one amputation of the tail. Being aware of these data we programmed to investigate the possible persistence, decrease or disappearance of the medullary regenerative power after repeated amputations of the regenerated tail. With this objective in view, we have performed on adult Triturus carnifex a series of such operations at time spaced out from one another. In previous experiments, the amputations of the tail have been before seven and then nine. In the current experiment, the same specimens have been subjected to further removals of the tail. This study has developed into three cycles going on over a period of more than ten years. Overall, our panorama rising from the integration of present results and those of former observations is in agreement with what occurs in the area which is the centre of the beginnings of medullary regeneration processes and the bibliographic information concerning the pre-blastematic and blastematic phases. In the subsequent morphogenetic and differentiative phases, however, with the recurrence of the re-establishment of the spinal cord, these events proceed more slowly (gap which reduces when the time interval starting from the operation increases) than in the spinal cords which regenerated after only one tail amputation. Furthermore, although the regenerated spinal cords, if compared to normal spinal cord, show some anomalies (regarding medullary length and diameter, distribution of the spinal nerves and ganglia), the regenerated spinal cords (as well-known uncapable to re-form the Mauthner fibres and supplied with the Rohon-Beard sensitive neurons), their nerves and ganglia reacquire the same complex

  5. Morphological and physiological regeneration in the auditory system of adult Mecopoda elongata (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).

    PubMed

    Krüger, Silke; Butler, Casey S; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2011-02-01

    Orthopterans are suitable model organisms for investigations of regeneration mechanisms in the auditory system. Regeneration has been described in the auditory systems of locusts (Caelifera) and of crickets (Ensifera). In this study, we comparatively investigate the neural regeneration in the auditory system in the bush cricket Mecopoda elongata. A crushing of the tympanal nerve in the foreleg of M. elongata results in a loss of auditory information transfer. Physiological recordings of the tympanal nerve suggest outgrowing fibers 5 days after crushing. An anatomical regeneration of the fibers within the central nervous system starts 10 days after crushing. The neuronal projection reaches the target area at day 20. Threshold values to low frequency airborne sound remain high after crushing, indicating a lower regeneration capability of this group of fibers. However, within the central target area the low frequency areas are also innervated. Recordings of auditory interneurons show that the regenerating fibers form new functional connections starting at day 20 after crushing.

  6. Maintaining Eastern newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) for regeneration research.

    PubMed

    Simon, Hans-Georg; Odelberg, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    The adult Eastern newt, Notophthalmus viridescens, has long served as a model for appendage as well as heart muscle regeneration studies. Newt tissues include all major cell types known in other vertebrates and mammals, including bone, cartilage, tendon, muscle, nerves, dermis, and epidermis. Therefore, these aquatic salamanders make an excellent model for studying the regeneration of complex tissues. Regeneration of adult tissues requires the integration of new tissues with preexisting tissues to form a functioning unit through a process that is not yet well understood. Scale is also an issue, because the regenerating tissues or structures are magnitudes larger than their embryonic counterparts during development, and therefore, it is likely that different physics and mechanics apply. Regardless, regeneration recapitulates to some degree developmental processes. In this chapter, we will describe basic methods for maintaining adult Eastern newts in the laboratory for the study of regeneration. To determine similarities and differences between development and regeneration at the cellular and molecular level, there is also a need for embryonic newt tissue. We therefore also outline a relatively simple way to produce and raise newt embryos in the laboratory.

  7. Effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoguang; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Kim, Bokun; Katayama, Yasutomi; Wakaba, Kyousuke; Wang, Zhennan; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity and to verify whether the rate of change in foot structure is related to that in ankle muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven adults with obesity completed a 12-week program in which the intensity of physical activity performed was gradually increased. Physical activity was monitored using a three-axis accelerometer. Foot structure was assessed using a three-dimensional foot scanner, while ankle muscle strength was measured using a dynamometry. [Results] With the increasing physical activity, the participants’ feet became thinner (the rearfoot width, instep height, and girth decreased) and the arch became higher (the arch height index increased) and stiffer (the arch stiffness index increased); the ankle muscle strength also increased after the intervention. Additionally, the changes in the arch height index and arch stiffness index were not associated with changes in ankle muscle strength. [Conclusion] Increasing physical activity may be one possible approach to improve foot structure and function in individuals with obesity.

  8. Effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoguang; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Kim, Bokun; Katayama, Yasutomi; Wakaba, Kyousuke; Wang, Zhennan; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity and to verify whether the rate of change in foot structure is related to that in ankle muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven adults with obesity completed a 12-week program in which the intensity of physical activity performed was gradually increased. Physical activity was monitored using a three-axis accelerometer. Foot structure was assessed using a three-dimensional foot scanner, while ankle muscle strength was measured using a dynamometry. [Results] With the increasing physical activity, the participants' feet became thinner (the rearfoot width, instep height, and girth decreased) and the arch became higher (the arch height index increased) and stiffer (the arch stiffness index increased); the ankle muscle strength also increased after the intervention. Additionally, the changes in the arch height index and arch stiffness index were not associated with changes in ankle muscle strength. [Conclusion] Increasing physical activity may be one possible approach to improve foot structure and function in individuals with obesity. PMID:27630426

  9. The effects of sling exercise using vibration on trunk muscle activities of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngin; Kang, Hyungkyu

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of sling exercises with and without vibration on the muscular activity of the internal oblique (IO), rectus abdominis (RA), multifidus (MF), and erector spinae (ES) muscles of healthy adults. [Methods] Eleven healthy university students (11 men) with a mean age of 22.8 years were enrolled in this study. Subjects performed supine and prone bridge exercises with the knees flexed using a sling suspension system with and without vibration. The amplitudes of the EMG activities of selected trunk muscles (internal oblique, rectus abdominis, erector spinae, multifidus) were recorded. Two types of exercise conditions were executed in a random sequence for 5 seconds each. The signals detected from the middle 3 seconds (after discarding the signals of the first and the last one seconds) were used in the analysis. A 3-minute break was given after each exercise to minimize muscle fatigue. [Results] During the supine bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES muscles were significantly higher than those of the supine bridge exercise without vibration. Additionally, during the prone bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES were significantly higher than those of the prone bridge exercise without vibration. [Conclusion] Sling exercises with vibration improved the trunk muscle activities of healthy adults compared to the sling exercises without vibration. The information presented here is important for clinicians who use lumbar stabilization exercises as an evaluation tool or a rehabilitation exercise. PMID:24259778

  10. Effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoguang; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Kim, Bokun; Katayama, Yasutomi; Wakaba, Kyousuke; Wang, Zhennan; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity and to verify whether the rate of change in foot structure is related to that in ankle muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven adults with obesity completed a 12-week program in which the intensity of physical activity performed was gradually increased. Physical activity was monitored using a three-axis accelerometer. Foot structure was assessed using a three-dimensional foot scanner, while ankle muscle strength was measured using a dynamometry. [Results] With the increasing physical activity, the participants’ feet became thinner (the rearfoot width, instep height, and girth decreased) and the arch became higher (the arch height index increased) and stiffer (the arch stiffness index increased); the ankle muscle strength also increased after the intervention. Additionally, the changes in the arch height index and arch stiffness index were not associated with changes in ankle muscle strength. [Conclusion] Increasing physical activity may be one possible approach to improve foot structure and function in individuals with obesity. PMID:27630426

  11. The effects of sling exercise using vibration on trunk muscle activities of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngin; Kang, Hyungkyu

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of sling exercises with and without vibration on the muscular activity of the internal oblique (IO), rectus abdominis (RA), multifidus (MF), and erector spinae (ES) muscles of healthy adults. [Methods] Eleven healthy university students (11 men) with a mean age of 22.8 years were enrolled in this study. Subjects performed supine and prone bridge exercises with the knees flexed using a sling suspension system with and without vibration. The amplitudes of the EMG activities of selected trunk muscles (internal oblique, rectus abdominis, erector spinae, multifidus) were recorded. Two types of exercise conditions were executed in a random sequence for 5 seconds each. The signals detected from the middle 3 seconds (after discarding the signals of the first and the last one seconds) were used in the analysis. A 3-minute break was given after each exercise to minimize muscle fatigue. [Results] During the supine bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES muscles were significantly higher than those of the supine bridge exercise without vibration. Additionally, during the prone bridge exercise with vibration, the activities of the IO, RA, MF, and ES were significantly higher than those of the prone bridge exercise without vibration. [Conclusion] Sling exercises with vibration improved the trunk muscle activities of healthy adults compared to the sling exercises without vibration. The information presented here is important for clinicians who use lumbar stabilization exercises as an evaluation tool or a rehabilitation exercise.

  12. IP(3)-dependent, post-tetanic calcium transients induced by electrostimulation of adult skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Casas, Mariana; Figueroa, Reinaldo; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Escobar, Matías; Molgó, Jordi; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2010-10-01

    Tetanic electrical stimulation induces two separate calcium signals in rat skeletal myotubes, a fast one, dependent on Cav 1.1 or dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors and related to contraction, and a slow signal, dependent on DHPR and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP(3)Rs) and related to transcriptional events. We searched for slow calcium signals in adult muscle fibers using isolated adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers from 5-7-wk-old mice, loaded with fluo-3. When stimulated with trains of 0.3-ms pulses at various frequencies, cells responded with a fast calcium signal associated with muscle contraction, followed by a slower signal similar to one previously described in cultured myotubes. Nifedipine inhibited the slow signal more effectively than the fast one, suggesting a role for DHPR in its onset. The IP(3)R inhibitors Xestospongin B or C (5 µM) also inhibited it. The amplitude of post-tetanic calcium transients depends on both tetanus frequency and duration, having a maximum at 10-20 Hz. At this stimulation frequency, an increase of the slow isoform of troponin I mRNA was detected, while the fast isoform of this gene was inhibited. All three IP(3)R isoforms were present in adult muscle. IP(3)R-1 was differentially expressed in different types of muscle fibers, being higher in a subset of fast-type fibers. Interestingly, isolated fibers from the slow soleus muscle did not reveal the slow calcium signal induced by electrical stimulus. These results support the idea that IP(3)R-dependent slow calcium signals may be characteristic of distinct types of muscle fibers and may participate in the activation of specific transcriptional programs of slow and fast phenotype. PMID:20837675

  13. IP3-dependent, post-tetanic calcium transients induced by electrostimulation of adult skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Mariana; Figueroa, Reinaldo; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Escobar, Matías; Molgó, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    Tetanic electrical stimulation induces two separate calcium signals in rat skeletal myotubes, a fast one, dependent on Cav 1.1 or dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors and related to contraction, and a slow signal, dependent on DHPR and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and related to transcriptional events. We searched for slow calcium signals in adult muscle fibers using isolated adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers from 5–7-wk-old mice, loaded with fluo-3. When stimulated with trains of 0.3-ms pulses at various frequencies, cells responded with a fast calcium signal associated with muscle contraction, followed by a slower signal similar to one previously described in cultured myotubes. Nifedipine inhibited the slow signal more effectively than the fast one, suggesting a role for DHPR in its onset. The IP3R inhibitors Xestospongin B or C (5 µM) also inhibited it. The amplitude of post-tetanic calcium transients depends on both tetanus frequency and duration, having a maximum at 10–20 Hz. At this stimulation frequency, an increase of the slow isoform of troponin I mRNA was detected, while the fast isoform of this gene was inhibited. All three IP3R isoforms were present in adult muscle. IP3R-1 was differentially expressed in different types of muscle fibers, being higher in a subset of fast-type fibers. Interestingly, isolated fibers from the slow soleus muscle did not reveal the slow calcium signal induced by electrical stimulus. These results support the idea that IP3R-dependent slow calcium signals may be characteristic of distinct types of muscle fibers and may participate in the activation of specific transcriptional programs of slow and fast phenotype. PMID:20837675

  14. Leg and trunk muscle coordination and postural sway during increasingly difficult standing balance tasks in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Donath, Lars; Kurz, Eduard; Roth, Ralf; Zahner, Lukas; Faude, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Ageing impairs body balance and increases older adults' fall risk. Balance training can improve intrinsic fall risk factors. However, age comparisons of muscle activity responses during balance tasks are lacking. This study investigated relative muscle activity, muscle coordination and postural sway during various recommended static balance training tasks. Muscle activity (%MVC), amplitude ratios (AR) and co-activity (CAI) were determined during standing tasks for 30s (1: double limb stance on a foam surface, eyes open; 2: double limb stance on firm ground, eyes closed; 3: double limb stance, feet in step position on a foam surface, eyes open; 4: double limb stance, feet in step position on firm ground, eyes closed; 5: single limb stance on firm ground, eyes open) in 20 healthy young adults (24±2 y) and 20 older adults (73±6 y). Surface electromyography (SEMG) was applied (SENIAM guidelines) to ankle (tibialis anterior, soleus, medial gastrocnemius, peroneus longus) and thigh (vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus) muscles (non-dominant leg). Electrodes over trunk (multifidus and internal oblique) muscles were applied bilaterally. Two- to six-fold higher levels of relative muscle activity were found in older adults for ankle (0.0002muscles. Co-activation was elevated in young adults for the trunk (0.001adults for the ankle (0.009muscle coordination patterns during all stance conditions at the ankle (0.06<ηp(2)<0.28) and the trunk (0.14<ηp(2)<0.23). Older adults had higher electrophysiological costs for all stance conditions. Muscle coordination showed inverse activity patterns at the ankle and trunk. Optimal balance and strength training programs should take into account age-specific alterations in muscle activity.

  15. Transient overexpression of cyclin D2/CDK4/GLP1 genes induces proliferation and differentiation of adult pancreatic progenitors and mediates islet regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuyuan; Shimoda, Masyuki; Chen, Jiaxi; Matsumodo, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of β-cell regeneration remains poorly understood. Cyclin D2/CDK4 expresses in normal β cells and maintains adult β-cell growth. We hypothesized that gene therapy with cyclin D2/CDK4/GLP-1 plasmids targeted to the pancreas of STZ-treated rats by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) would force cell cycle re-entry of residual G0-phase islet cells into G1/S phase to regenerate β cells. A single UTMD treatment induced β-cell regeneration with reversal of diabetes for 6 mo without evidence of toxicity. We observed that this β-cell regeneration was not mediated by self-replication of pre-existing β cells. Instead, cyclin D2/CDK4/GLP-1 initiated robust proliferation of adult pancreatic progenitor cells that exist within islets and terminally differentiate to mature islets with β cells and α cells. PMID:22373529

  16. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype.

  17. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype. PMID:23321639

  18. Nebulin deficiency in adult muscle causes sarcomere defects and muscle-type-dependent changes in trophicity: novel insights in nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Frank; Buck, Danielle; De Winter, Josine; Kolb, Justin; Meng, Hui; Birch, Camille; Slater, Rebecca; Escobar, Yael Natelie; Smith, John E; Yang, Lin; Konhilas, John; Lawlor, Michael W; Ottenheijm, Coen; Granzier, Henk L

    2015-09-15

    Nebulin is a giant filamentous protein that is coextensive with the actin filaments of the skeletal muscle sarcomere. Nebulin mutations are the main cause of nemaline myopathy (NEM), with typical adult patients having low expression of nebulin, yet the roles of nebulin in adult muscle remain poorly understood. To establish nebulin's functional roles in adult muscle, we studied a novel conditional nebulin KO (Neb cKO) mouse model in which nebulin deletion was driven by the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promotor. Neb cKO mice are born with high nebulin levels in their skeletal muscles, but within weeks after birth nebulin expression rapidly falls to barely detectable levels Surprisingly, a large fraction of the mice survive to adulthood with low nebulin levels (<5% of control), contain nemaline rods and undergo fiber-type switching toward oxidative types. Nebulin deficiency causes a large deficit in specific force, and mechanistic studies provide evidence that a reduced fraction of force-generating cross-bridges and shortened thin filaments contribute to the force deficit. Muscles rich in glycolytic fibers upregulate proteolysis pathways (MuRF-1, Fbxo30/MUSA1, Gadd45a) and undergo hypotrophy with smaller cross-sectional areas (CSAs), worsening their force deficit. Muscles rich in oxidative fibers do not have smaller weights and can even have hypertrophy, offsetting their specific-force deficit. These studies reveal nebulin as critically important for force development and trophicity in adult muscle. The Neb cKO phenocopies important aspects of NEM (muscle weakness, oxidative fiber-type predominance, variable trophicity effects, nemaline rods) and will be highly useful to test therapeutic approaches to ameliorate muscle weakness. PMID:26123491

  19. Nebulin deficiency in adult muscle causes sarcomere defects and muscle-type-dependent changes in trophicity: novel insights in nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Frank; Buck, Danielle; De Winter, Josine; Kolb, Justin; Meng, Hui; Birch, Camille; Slater, Rebecca; Escobar, Yael Natelie; Smith, John E.; Yang, Lin; Konhilas, John; Lawlor, Michael W.; Ottenheijm, Coen; Granzier, Henk L.

    2015-01-01

    Nebulin is a giant filamentous protein that is coextensive with the actin filaments of the skeletal muscle sarcomere. Nebulin mutations are the main cause of nemaline myopathy (NEM), with typical adult patients having low expression of nebulin, yet the roles of nebulin in adult muscle remain poorly understood. To establish nebulin's functional roles in adult muscle, we studied a novel conditional nebulin KO (Neb cKO) mouse model in which nebulin deletion was driven by the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promotor. Neb cKO mice are born with high nebulin levels in their skeletal muscles, but within weeks after birth nebulin expression rapidly falls to barely detectable levels Surprisingly, a large fraction of the mice survive to adulthood with low nebulin levels (<5% of control), contain nemaline rods and undergo fiber-type switching toward oxidative types. Nebulin deficiency causes a large deficit in specific force, and mechanistic studies provide evidence that a reduced fraction of force-generating cross-bridges and shortened thin filaments contribute to the force deficit. Muscles rich in glycolytic fibers upregulate proteolysis pathways (MuRF-1, Fbxo30/MUSA1, Gadd45a) and undergo hypotrophy with smaller cross-sectional areas (CSAs), worsening their force deficit. Muscles rich in oxidative fibers do not have smaller weights and can even have hypertrophy, offsetting their specific-force deficit. These studies reveal nebulin as critically important for force development and trophicity in adult muscle. The Neb cKO phenocopies important aspects of NEM (muscle weakness, oxidative fiber-type predominance, variable trophicity effects, nemaline rods) and will be highly useful to test therapeutic approaches to ameliorate muscle weakness. PMID:26123491

  20. The effect of basketball training on the muscle strength of adults with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Tsimaras, Vasilios K; Samara, Christina A; Kotzamanidou, Marianna C; Bassa, Eleni I; Fotiadou, Eleni G; Kotzamanidis, Christos M

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of basketball training on the muscle strength of adults with mental retardation (MR). Twenty-four adults with and without MR were separated into 3 groups. Eight adults (mean age 25.4 years) with normal IQ constituted the control group (NIQ). Eight adults (mean age 26.5 years) with MR and all participating in a 4-year systematic basketball exercise program constituted the trained group (MR-T), and 8 adults (mean age 25.3 years) with MR exercised occasionally for recreational reasons formed the MR-R group. Parameters measured were isometric and isokinetic concentric and eccentric muscle strength. All subjects performed a leg strength test on a Cybex Norm isokinetic dynamometer. Analysis of variance was used to examine mean differences between the values of the 3 groups. A significance level of 0.05 was used for all tests. The NIQ group showed a statistically significant difference in all measured values compared to the MR groups. The MR-T group presented higher absolute and relative torque scores for both knee extensors and flexors than the MR-R group, whereas the MR-R group presented statistically higher antagonistic activity for both knee extensors and flexors than the MR-T group. In addition, both MR groups presented statistically higher antagonistic activity for both knee extensors and flexors compared to the NIQ group. Data support participation on a systematic and well-designed basketball training program to improve muscle strength levels of adults with MR. Participation in basketball without necessarily focusing on developing specific fitness components may be an effective training strategy for the promotion of strength of adults with MR.

  1. Effects of intramuscular administration of 1α,25(OH)2D3 during skeletal muscle regeneration on regenerative capacity, muscular fibrosis, and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Hirunsai, Muthita

    2016-06-15

    The recent discovery of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in regenerating muscle raises the question regarding the action of vitamin D3 on skeletal muscle regeneration. To investigate the action of vitamin D3 on this process, the tibialis anterior muscle of male C57BL/6 mice (10 wk of age) was injected with 1.2% BaCl2 to induce extensive muscle injury. The bioactive form of vitamin D3 [1α,25(OH)2D3] was administered daily via intramuscular injections during the regenerative phase (days 4-7 postinjury). Physiological and supraphysiological doses of 1α,25(OH)2D3 relative to 1 μg/kg muscle wet weight and mouse body weight were investigated. Muscle samples were collected on day 8 postinjury to examine proteins related to vitamin D3 metabolism (VDR, CYP24A1, and CYP27B1), satellite cell differentiation and regenerative muscle fiber formation [myogenin and embryonic myosin heavy chain (EbMHC)], protein synthesis signaling (Akt, p70 S6K1, 4E-BP1, and myostatin), fiber-type composition (fast and slow MHCs), fibrous formation (vimentin), and angiogenesis (CD31). Administration of 1α,25(OH)2D3 at physiological and supraphysiological doses enhanced VDR expression in regenerative muscle. Moreover, CYP24A1 and vimentin expression was increased, accompanying decreased myogenin and EbMHC expression at the supraphysiological dose. However, there was no change in CYP27B1, Akt, p70 S6K1, 4E-BP1, myostatin, fast and slow MHCs, or CD31 expression at any dose investigated. Taken together, administration of 1α,25(OH)2D3 at a supraphysiological dose decreased satellite cell differentiation, delayed regenerative muscle fiber formation, and increased muscular fibrosis. However, protein synthesis signaling, fiber-type composition, and angiogenesis were not affected by either 1α,25(OH)2D3 administration at a physiological or supraphysiological dose. PMID:27032903

  2. Effects of bridge exercises with a sling and vibrations on abdominal muscle thickness in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Gong, Won-tae

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to examine the changes in the thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (Io) muscles using ultrasonography in adults who performed bridge exercises with the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and a sling and received micro vibrations. In total, 32 subjects were divided into a therapy (n= 16) and control (n= 16) groups. The therapy group completed nine sets, with four repetitions, of bridge exercises with the sling and received vibrations. The control group completed nine sets, with four repetitions, of bridge exercises with the sling and did not receive vibrations. The thicknesses of the TrA and Io muscles were measured in both groups using ultrasonography before and after therapy. According to the pressure applied to the biofeedback unit, both groups showed significant changes in the thicknesses of the TrA and Io muscles after therapy (P< 0.05). The change in the thickness of the TrA muscle after therapy was significantly different between the 2 groups when the pressures applied at 38, 42, and 46 mmHg (P< 0.05). Moreover, the change in the thickness of the Io muscle did not significantly different between the 2 groups at any of the pressures applied (P> 0.05). These findings indicate that approximately 15 minutes of vibrations during bridge exercises on unstable surfaces with a sling facilitates the activation of the deep trunk muscles and further enhances the activation of the TrA.

  3. Actin-Cytoskeleton- and Rock-Mediated INM Are Required for Photoreceptor Regeneration in the Adult Zebrafish Retina

    PubMed Central

    Lahne, Manuela; Li, Jingling; Marton, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of retinal neurons in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) induces a robust regenerative response mediated by the reentry of the resident Müller glia into the cell cycle. Upon initiating Müller glia proliferation, their nuclei migrate along the apicobasal axis of the retina in phase with the cell cycle in a process termed interkinetic nuclear migration (INM). We examined the mechanisms governing this cellular process and explored its function in regenerating the adult zebrafish retina. Live-cell imaging revealed that the majority of Müller glia nuclei migrated to the outer nuclear layer (ONL) to divide. These Müller glia formed prominent actin filaments at the rear of nuclei that had migrated to the ONL. Inhibiting actin filament formation or Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (Rock) activity, which is necessary for phosphorylation of myosin light chain and actin myosin-mediated contraction, disrupted INM with increased numbers of mitotic nuclei remaining in the basal inner nuclear layer, the region where Müller glia typically reside. Double knockdown of Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase 2a (Rock2a) and Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase 2b (Rock2b) similarly disrupted INM and reduced Müller glial cell cycle reentry. In contrast, Rock inhibition immediately before the onset of INM did not affect Müller glia proliferation, but subsequently reduced neuronal progenitor cell proliferation due to early cell cycle exit. Long-term, Rock inhibition increased the generation of mislocalized ganglion/amacrine cells at the expense of rod and cone photoreceptors. In summary, INM is driven by an actin-myosin-mediated process controlled by Rock2a and Rock2b activity, which is required for sufficient proliferation and regeneration of photoreceptors after light damage. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The human retina does not replace lost or damaged neurons, ultimately causing vision impairment. In contrast, zebrafish are capable of regenerating lost neurons. Understanding the mechanisms

  4. The specific contributions of force and velocity to muscle power in older adults.

    PubMed

    Pojednic, Rachele M; Clark, David J; Patten, Carolynn; Reid, Kieran; Phillips, Edward M; Fielding, Roger A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relative importance of the force-based and velocity-based measures of muscle performance to explain inter-individual differences in power production capability and functional task performance. Participants included seventy-nine men and women: middle-aged healthy adults (MH: 40-55years), older healthy adults (OH: 70-85years), and older adults with mobility limitations (OML: 70-85years). Muscle power at 180°/s, isometric maximal torque, and maximal contraction velocity at 40% 1RM were measured during unilateral leg extension. The Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) was used to differentiate between healthy and mobility limited older adults. Functional task performance was assessed using multiple chair rise and stair climb tests. Leg extensor force (torque), but not maximal contraction velocity, was significantly associated with muscle power in MH. Both torque and velocity were significantly associated with muscle power in OH. Maximal velocity, but not torque, was associated with power in OML. Maximal velocity demonstrated an association with multiple chair rise time and stair climb time in OML, but not MH or OH. It is concluded that movement velocity is an increasingly important determinant of maximal power output with advancing age. Furthermore, movement velocity is also a critical component of functional task performance with aging and may contribute to functional deficits. These findings help to explain why the rate-dependent variable power has emerged as a critical component of both assessment and rehabilitation of muscular performance and physical function in older adults.

  5. Overexpression of LARGE suppresses muscle regeneration via down-regulation of insulin-like growth factor 1 and aggravates muscular dystrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Saito, Fumiaki; Kanagawa, Motoi; Ikeda, Miki; Hagiwara, Hiroki; Masaki, Toshihiro; Ohkuma, Hidehiko; Katanosaka, Yuki; Shimizu, Teruo; Sonoo, Masahiro; Toda, Tatsushi; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2014-09-01

    Several types of muscular dystrophy are caused by defective linkage between α-dystroglycan (α-DG) and laminin. Among these, dystroglycanopathy, including Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), results from abnormal glycosylation of α-DG. Recent studies have shown that like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (LARGE) strongly enhances the laminin-binding activity of α-DG. Therefore, restoration of the α-DG-laminin linkage by LARGE is considered one of the most promising possible therapies for muscular dystrophy. In this study, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress LARGE (LARGE Tg) and crossed them with dy(2J) mice and fukutin conditional knockout mice, a model for laminin α2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) and FCMD, respectively. Remarkably, in both the strains, the transgenic overexpression of LARGE resulted in an aggravation of muscular dystrophy. Using morphometric analyses, we found that the deterioration of muscle pathology was caused by suppression of muscle regeneration. Overexpression of LARGE in C2C12 cells further demonstrated defects in myotube formation. Interestingly, a decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) was identified in both LARGE Tg mice and LARGE-overexpressing C2C12 myotubes. Supplementing the C2C12 cells with IGF-1 restored the defective myotube formation. Taken together, our findings indicate that the overexpression of LARGE aggravates muscular dystrophy by suppressing the muscle regeneration and this adverse effect is mediated via reduced expression of IGF-1.

  6. Muscle dynamics differences between legs in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Eamonn P; Harrison, Andrew J

    2007-02-01

    Differences in muscle dynamics between the preferred and nonpreferred jumping legs of subjects in maximal, explosive exercise were examined. Eight subjects performed nonfatiguing bouts of single-legged drop jumps and rebound jumps on a force sledge apparatus. Measures of flight time, reactive strength index, peak vertical force, and vertical leg-spring stiffness were obtained for 3 drop jumps and 3 rebound jumps on both legs. Subjects utilized a stiffer leg spring and a more explosive jumping action in the nonpreferred leg when performing a cyclical rebound jumping task in comparison to a single drop jump task (observed through differences in vertical leg-spring stiffness, peak vertical force, and reactive strength index, p < 0.05). The preferred leg performed equally well in both tasks. Between-leg analysis showed no differences in dependent variables between the preferred and the nonpreferred leg in the rebound jumping protocol. However, the drop jump protocol showed significant performance differences, with flight time and reactive strength index greater in the preferred leg than the nonpreferred leg (p < 0.05). We hypothesize that, throughout the lifespan, both legs are equally trained in cyclical rebound jumping tasks through running. However, because a preferred leg must be selected when performing any one-off, single-legged jump, imbalances in this specific task develop over time with consistent selection of a preferred jumping leg. The data demonstrate that the rebound jump protocol is representative of the symmetrical mechanics of forward running and that leg-spring stiffness is modulated depending on the demands of the specific task involved. Strength and conditioning practitioners should give careful consideration to appropriate jump protocol selection and should exercise caution when comparing laboratory results to data gathered in field testing. PMID:17313262

  7. Constitutive properties of adult mammalian cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Koide, M.; Cowles, B. A.; Gharpuray, V.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the constitutive properties of the cardiac muscle cell play a causative role in the development of diastolic dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiocytes from normal and pressure-hypertrophied cats were embedded in an agarose gel, placed on a stretching device, and subjected to a change in stress (sigma), and resultant changes in cell strain (epsilon) were measured. These measurements were used to examine the passive elastic spring, viscous damping, and myofilament activation. The passive elastic spring was assessed in protocol A by increasing the sigma on the agarose gel at a constant rate to define the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship. Viscous damping was assessed in protocol B from the loop area between the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship during an increase and then a decrease in sigma. In both protocols, myofilament activation was minimized by a reduction in [Ca2+]i. Myofilament activation effects were assessed in protocol C by defining cardiocyte sigma versus epsilon during an increase in sigma with physiological [Ca2+]i. In protocol A, the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship was similar in normal and hypertrophied cells. In protocol B, the loop area was greater in hypertrophied than normal cardiocytes. In protocol C, the sigma-versus-epsilon relation in hypertrophied cardiocytes was shifted to the left compared with normal cells. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in viscous damping and myofilament activation in combination may cause pressure-hypertrophied cardiocytes to resist changes in shape during diastole and contribute to diastolic dysfunction.

  8. Platelet-Rich Plasma and Skeletal Muscle Healing: A Molecular Analysis of the Early Phases of the Regeneration Process in an Experimental Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Dimauro, Ivan; Grasso, Loredana; Fittipaldi, Simona; Fantini, Cristina; Mercatelli, Neri; Racca, Silvia; Geuna, Stefano; Di Gianfrancesco, Alessia; Caporossi, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has received increasing interest in applied medicine, being widely used in clinical practice with the aim of stimulating tissue healing. Despite the reported clinical success, there is still a lack of knowledge when considering the biological mechanisms at the base of the activity of PRP during the process of muscle healing. The aim of the present study was to verify whether the local delivery of PRP modulates specific molecular events involved in the early stages of the muscle regeneration process. The right flexor sublimis muscle of anesthetized Wistar rats was mechanically injured and either treated with PRP or received no treatment. At day 2 and 5 after surgery, the animals were sacrificed and the muscle samples evaluated at molecular levels. PRP treatment increased significantly the mRNA level of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, and TGF-β1. This phenomenon induced an increased expression at mRNA and/or protein levels of several myogenic regulatory factors such as MyoD1, Myf5 and Pax7, as well as the muscular isoform of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF-1Eb). No effect was detected with respect to VEGF-A expression. In addition, PRP application modulated the expression of miR-133a together with its known target serum response factor (SRF); increased the phosphorylation of αB-cristallin, with a significant improvement in several apoptotic parameters (NF-κB-p65 and caspase 3), indexes of augmented cell survival. The results of the present study indicates that the effect of PRP in skeletal muscle injury repair is due both to the modulation of the molecular mediators of the inflammatory and myogenic pathways, and to the control of secondary pathways such as those regulated by myomiRNAs and heat shock proteins, which contribute to proper and effective tissue regeneration. PMID:25054279

  9. What is the Optimal Amount of Protein to Support Post-Exercise Skeletal Muscle Reconditioning in the Older Adult?

    PubMed

    Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Holwerda, Andrew M; Phillips, Stuart M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-09-01

    Hyperaminoacidemia following protein ingestion enhances the anabolic effect of resistance-type exercise by increasing the stimulation of muscle protein synthesis and attenuating the exercise-mediated increase in muscle protein breakdown rates. Although factors such as the source of protein ingested and the timing of intake relative to exercise can impact post-exercise muscle protein synthesis rates, the amount of protein ingested after exercise appears to be the key nutritional factor dictating the magnitude of the muscle protein synthetic response during post-exercise recovery. In younger adults, muscle protein synthesis rates after resistance-type exercise respond in a dose-dependent manner to ingested protein and are maximally stimulated following ingestion of ~20 g of protein. In contrast to younger adults, older adults are less sensitive to smaller doses of ingested protein (less than ~20 g) after exercise, as evidenced by an attenuated increase in muscle protein synthesis rates during post-exercise recovery. However, older muscle appears to retain the capacity to display a robust stimulation of muscle protein synthesis in response to the ingestion of greater doses of protein (~40 g), and such an amount may be required for older adults to achieve a robust stimulation of muscle protein synthesis during post-exercise recovery. The aim of this article is to discuss the current state of evidence regarding the dose-dependent relationship between dietary protein ingestion and changes in skeletal muscle protein synthesis during recovery from resistance-type exercise in older adults. We provide recommendations on the amount of protein that may be required to maximize skeletal muscle reconditioning in response to resistance-type exercise in older adults. PMID:26894275

  10. Retinal Afferent Ingrowth to Neocortical Transplants in the Adult Rat Superior Colliculus is due to the Regeneration of Damaged Axons

    PubMed Central

    Ross, D. T.; Das, G. D.

    1994-01-01

    Retinal afferent ingrowth to embryonic neural transplants in the adult rat superior colliculus may represent either sprouting of intact axons or the regeneration of transected axons. If ingrowth represents regeneration of damaged retinofugai axons, then lesions that axotomize more retinofugal axons at the transplantation site should induce greater retinal afferent ingrowth. Alternately, if ingrowth represents terminal or collateral sprouting of intact retinofugal axons at or near the transplant/host optic layer interface, then the magnitude of retinal afferent ingrowth should be directly related to the total area of this interface. To test between these two hypotheses surgical knife wounds were made either parallel (in the sagittal plane) or perpendicular (in the transverse plane) to the course of axons in the stratum opticum, embryonic neocortical tissue was transplanted at the coordinates of these tectal slits, and retinal afferent ingrowth visualized 1-90 days after surgery using anterogradely transported HRP. A zone of traumatic reaction (ztr) in the optic layers was seen in every case, characterized by hypertrophied axons and swollen terminal clubs at 1 day. Between 30 and 90 days the damaged retinofugal axons in the zone formed dense fascicles and neuroma-like tangles. Retinal afferent ingrowth occurred only across transplant interface regions with the ztr. The magnitude of ingrowth was directly related to the area of the ztr interface and not the total optic layer interface area. Retinal afferent ingrowth appears to reflect the intrinsic regenerative capacity of adult mammalian retinal ganglion cells and not sprouting of undamaged axons. PMID:7703292

  11. Cardiomyocyte proliferation and progenitor cell recruitment underlie therapeutic regeneration after myocardial infarction in the adult mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Malliaras, Konstantinos; Zhang, Yiqiang; Seinfeld, Jeffrey; Galang, Giselle; Tseliou, Eleni; Cheng, Ke; Sun, Baiming; Aminzadeh, Mohammad; Marbán, Eduardo

    2013-02-01

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) have been shown to regenerate infarcted myocardium in patients after myocardial infarction (MI). However, whether the cells of the newly formed myocardium originate from the proliferation of adult cardiomyocytes or from the differentiation of endogenous stem cells remains unknown. Using genetic fate mapping to mark resident myocytes in combination with long-term BrdU pulsing, we investigated the origins of postnatal cardiomyogenesis in the normal, infarcted and cell-treated adult mammalian heart. In the normal mouse heart, cardiomyocyte turnover occurs predominantly through proliferation of resident cardiomyocytes at a rate of ∼1.3-4%/year. After MI, new cardiomyocytes arise from both progenitors as well as pre-existing cardiomyocytes. Transplantation of CDCs upregulates host cardiomyocyte cycling and recruitment of endogenous progenitors, while boosting heart function and increasing viable myocardium. The observed phenomena cannot be explained by cardiomyocyte polyploidization, bi/multinucleation, cell fusion or DNA repair. Thus, CDCs induce myocardial regeneration by differentially upregulating two mechanisms of endogenous cell proliferation.

  12. Environmental changes in oxygen tension reveal ROS-dependent neurogenesis and regeneration in the adult newt brain

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, L Shahul; Berg, Daniel A; Belnoue, Laure; Jensen, Lasse D; Cao, Yihai; Simon, András

    2015-01-01

    Organisms need to adapt to the ecological constraints in their habitat. How specific processes reflect such adaptations are difficult to model experimentally. We tested whether environmental shifts in oxygen tension lead to events in the adult newt brain that share features with processes occurring during neuronal regeneration under normoxia. By experimental simulation of varying oxygen concentrations, we show that hypoxia followed by re-oxygenation lead to neuronal death and hallmarks of an injury response, including activation of neural stem cells ultimately leading to neurogenesis. Neural stem cells accumulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) during re-oxygenation and inhibition of ROS biosynthesis counteracts their proliferation as well as neurogenesis. Importantly, regeneration of dopamine neurons under normoxia also depends on ROS-production. These data demonstrate a role for ROS-production in neurogenesis in newts and suggest that this role may have been recruited to the capacity to replace lost neurons in the brain of an adult vertebrate. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08422.001 PMID:26485032

  13. Krüppel-like Factor 7 engineered for transcriptional activation promotes axon regeneration in the adult corticospinal tract.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Murray G; Wang, Zimei; Lerch, Jessica K; Motti, Dario; Zhang, Yi Ping; Shields, Christopher B; Lee, Jae K; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; Lemmon, Vance P; Bixby, John L

    2012-05-01

    Axon regeneration in the central nervous system normally fails, in part because of a developmental decline in the intrinsic ability of CNS projection neurons to extend axons. Members of the KLF family of transcription factors regulate regenerative potential in developing CNS neurons. Expression of one family member, KLF7, is down-regulated developmentally, and overexpression of KLF7 in cortical neurons in vitro promotes axonal growth. To circumvent difficulties in achieving high neuronal expression of exogenous KLF7, we created a chimera with the VP16 transactivation domain, which displayed enhanced neuronal expression compared with the native protein while maintaining transcriptional activation and growth promotion in vitro. Overexpression of VP16-KLF7 overcame the developmental loss of regenerative ability in cortical slice cultures. Adult corticospinal tract (CST) neurons failed to up-regulate KLF7 in response to axon injury, and overexpression of VP16-KLF7 in vivo promoted both sprouting and regenerative axon growth in the CST of adult mice. These findings identify a unique means of promoting CST axon regeneration in vivo by reengineering a developmentally down-regulated, growth-promoting transcription factor. PMID:22529377

  14. Regulatory Mechanism of Muscle Disuse Atrophy in Adult Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    lowered levels of spermatid formation. Hormonal changes due to testes atrophy must be considered in future experiments where related effects may modify muscle, bone or other tissue changes. Also, some new assessments of past results (published by many researchers) may warrant revised interpretations. The blood pressure studies and the testicular function results were presented and reviewed during an invited lecture at the University of Bordeaux II during the Animals in Space Symposium in March 1993. In summary, each of these three projects complied with the objectives of the proposal and serve to demonstrate the utility of animal models in preparations and interpretations of space flight results. All funding has been expended in accordance with the approved budget.

  15. Sustaining intrinsic growth capacity of adult neurons promotes spinal cord regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Simona; Skinner, Kate; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2005-11-01

    The peripheral axonal branch of primary sensory neurons readily regenerates after peripheral nerve injury, but the central branch, which courses in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord, does not. However, if a peripheral nerve is transected before a spinal cord injury, sensory neurons that course in the dorsal columns will regenerate, presumably because their intrinsic growth capacity is enhanced by the priming peripheral nerve lesion. As the effective priming lesion is made before the spinal cord injury it would clearly have no clinical utility, and unfortunately, a priming lesion made after a spinal cord injury results in an abortive regenerative response. Here, we show that two priming lesions, one made at the time of a spinal cord injury and a second 1 week after a spinal cord injury, in fact, promote dramatic regeneration, within and beyond the lesion. The first lesion, we hypothesize, enhances intrinsic growth capacity, and the second one sustains it, providing a paradigm for promoting CNS regeneration after injury. primary afferents | dorsal columns | neurite outgrowth | sprouting | priming

  16. Undernutrition during pregnancy in mice leads to dysfunctional cardiac muscle respiration in adult offspring

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Brittany; Thrush, A. Brianne; Quizi, Jessica; Antoun, Ghadi; McIntosh, Nathan; Al-Dirbashi, Osama Y.; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with an increased risk of developing obesity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. However, its effect on energetics in heart remains unknown. In the present study, we examined respiration in cardiac muscle and liver from adult mice that were undernourished in utero. We report that in utero undernutrition is associated with impaired cardiac muscle energetics, including decreased fatty acid oxidative capacity, decreased maximum oxidative phosphorylation rate and decreased proton leak respiration. No differences in oxidative characteristics were detected in liver. We also measured plasma acylcarnitine levels and found that short-chain acylcarnitines are increased with in utero undernutrition. Results reveal the negative impact of suboptimal maternal nutrition on adult offspring cardiac energy metabolism, which may have life-long implications for cardiovascular function and disease risk. PMID:26182362

  17. Diminished Foot and Ankle Muscle Volumes in Young Adults With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Snell, Shannon; Handsfield, Geoffrey G.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Wombacher, Emily; Fry, Rachel; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Park, Joseph S.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI) have demonstrated altered neuromuscular function and decreased muscle strength when compared with healthy counterparts without a history of ankle sprain. Up to this point, muscle volumes have not been analyzed in patients with CAI to determine whether deficits in muscle size are present following recurrent sprain. Purpose: To analyze intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle muscle volumes and 4-way ankle strength in young adults with and without CAI. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Five patients with CAI (mean age, 23.0 ± 4 years; 1 male, 4 females) and 5 healthy controls (mean age, 23.8 ± 4.5 years; 1 male, 4 females) volunteered for this study. Novel fast-acquisition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to scan from above the femoral condyles through the foot and ankle. The perimeter of each muscle was outlined on each axial slice and then the 2-dimensional area was multiplied by the slice thickness (5 mm) to calculate the muscle volume. Plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion isometric strength were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Patients with CAI were compared with healthy controls on all measures of muscle volume and strength. Extrinsic muscle volumes of patients with CAI were also compared with a normative database of healthy controls (n = 24) by calculating z scores for each muscle individually for each CAI subject. Results: The CAI group had smaller total shank, superficial posterior compartment, soleus, adductor hallucis obliqus, and flexor hallucis brevis muscle volumes compared with healthy controls as indicated by group means and associated 90% CIs that did not overlap. Cohen d effect sizes for the significant group differences were all large and ranged from 1.46 to 3.52, with 90% CIs that did not cross zero. The CAI group had lower eversion, dorsiflexion, and 4-way composite ankle strength, all with group means and associated 90

  18. MRF4 negatively regulates adult skeletal muscle growth by repressing MEF2 activity.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Irene; Ciciliot, Stefano; Dyar, Kenneth A; Abraham, Reimar; Murgia, Marta; Agatea, Lisa; Akimoto, Takayuki; Bicciato, Silvio; Forcato, Mattia; Pierre, Philippe; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Rigby, Peter W J; Carvajal, Jaime J; Blaauw, Bert; Calabria, Elisa; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factor MRF4 is highly expressed in adult skeletal muscle but its function is unknown. Here we show that Mrf4 knockdown in adult muscle induces hypertrophy and prevents denervation-induced atrophy. This effect is accompanied by increased protein synthesis and widespread activation of muscle-specific genes, many of which are targets of MEF2 transcription factors. MEF2-dependent genes represent the top-ranking gene set enriched after Mrf4 RNAi and a MEF2 reporter is inhibited by co-transfected MRF4 and activated by Mrf4 RNAi. The Mrf4 RNAi-dependent increase in fibre size is prevented by dominant negative MEF2, while constitutively active MEF2 is able to induce myofibre hypertrophy. The nuclear localization of the MEF2 corepressor HDAC4 is impaired by Mrf4 knockdown, suggesting that MRF4 acts by stabilizing a repressor complex that controls MEF2 activity. These findings open new perspectives in the search for therapeutic targets to prevent muscle wasting, in particular sarcopenia and cachexia. PMID:27484840

  19. Characterization of diverse forms of myosin heavy chain expressed in adult human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Saez, L; Leinwand, L A

    1986-01-01

    In an attempt to define myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene organization and expression in adult human skeletal muscle, we have isolated and characterized genomic sequences corresponding to different human sarcomeric MHC genes (1). In this report, we present the complete DNA sequence of two different adult human skeletal muscle MHC cDNA clones, one of which encodes the entire light meromyosin (LMM) segment of MHC and represents the longest described MHC cDNA sequence. Additionally, both clones provide new sequence data from a 228 amino acid segment of the MHC tail for which no protein or DNA sequence has been previously available. One clone encodes a "fast" form of skeletal muscle MHC while the other clone most closely resembles a MHC form described in rat cardiac ventricles. We show that the 3' untranslated region of skeletal MHC cDNAs are homologous from widely separated species as are cardiac MHC cDNAs. However, there is no homology between the 3' untranslated region of cardiac and skeletal muscle MHCs. Isotype-specific preservation of MHC 3' untranslated sequences during evolution suggests a functional role for these regions. Images PMID:2421254

  20. Angiotensin-II blockage, muscle strength, and exercise capacity in physically independent older adults

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Vinícius A.; Probst, Vanessa S.; Nogari, Bruna M.; Teixeira, Denilson C.; Felcar, Josiane M.; Santos, Denis C.; Gomes, Marcus Vinícius M.; Andraus, Rodrigo A. C.; Fernandes, Karen B. P.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to assess the exercise capacity and muscle strength in elderly people using drugs for angiotensin-II blockage. [Subjects and Methods] Four hundred and seven older adults were recruited for this study. Data about comorbidities and medication use were recorded and the individuals were divided into three groups: control group- elderly people with normal exercise capacity (n=235); angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group − individuals using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (n=140); and angiotensin-II receptor blocker group- patients using angiotensin-II receptor blockers (n= 32). Exercise capacity was evaluated by a 6-minute walking test and muscle strength was measured using a handgrip dynamometer. [Results] Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 99 ± 12%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 101 ± 14%) showed higher predicted values in the 6-minute walking test than the control group patients (mean: 96 ± 10%). Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 105 ± 19%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 105.1 ± 18.73%) showed higher predicted values of muscle strength than control group patients (mean: 98.15 ± 18.77%). [Conclusion] Older adults using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers have better functional exercise capacity and muscle strength. PMID:27065543

  1. Angiotensin-II blockage, muscle strength, and exercise capacity in physically independent older adults.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Vinícius A; Probst, Vanessa S; Nogari, Bruna M; Teixeira, Denilson C; Felcar, Josiane M; Santos, Denis C; Gomes, Marcus Vinícius M; Andraus, Rodrigo A C; Fernandes, Karen B P

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to assess the exercise capacity and muscle strength in elderly people using drugs for angiotensin-II blockage. [Subjects and Methods] Four hundred and seven older adults were recruited for this study. Data about comorbidities and medication use were recorded and the individuals were divided into three groups: control group- elderly people with normal exercise capacity (n=235); angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group - individuals using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (n=140); and angiotensin-II receptor blocker group- patients using angiotensin-II receptor blockers (n= 32). Exercise capacity was evaluated by a 6-minute walking test and muscle strength was measured using a handgrip dynamometer. [Results] Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 99 ± 12%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 101 ± 14%) showed higher predicted values in the 6-minute walking test than the control group patients (mean: 96 ± 10%). Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 105 ± 19%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 105.1 ± 18.73%) showed higher predicted values of muscle strength than control group patients (mean: 98.15 ± 18.77%). [Conclusion] Older adults using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers have better functional exercise capacity and muscle strength.

  2. Mef2 Interacts with the Notch Pathway during Adult Muscle Development in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Charlotte; Kasherov, Petar; Silber, Joël; Lalouette, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Myogenesis of indirect flight muscles (IFMs) in Drosophila melanogaster follows a well-defined cellular developmental scheme. During embryogenesis, a set of cells, the Adult Muscle Precursors (AMPs), are specified. These cells will become proliferating myoblasts during the larval stages which will then give rise to the adult IFMs. Although the cellular aspect of this developmental process is well studied, the molecular biology behind the different stages is still under investigation. In particular, the interactions required during the transition from proliferating myoblasts to differentiated myoblasts ready to fuse to the muscle fiber. It has been previously shown that the Notch pathway is active in proliferating myoblasts, and that this pathway is inhibited in developing muscle fibers. Furthermore, the Myocyte Enhancing Factor 2 (Mef2), Vestigial (Vg) and Scalloped (Sd) transcription factors are necessary for IFM development and that Vg is required for Notch pathway repression in differentiating fibers. Here we examine the interactions between Notch and Mef2 and mechanisms by which the Notch pathway is inhibited during differentiation. We show that Mef2 is capable of inhibiting the Notch pathway in non myogenic cells. A previous screen for Mef2 potential targets identified Delta a component of the Notch pathway. Dl is expressed in Mef2 and Sd-positive developing fibers. Our results show that Mef2 and possibly Sd regulate a Dl enhancer specifically expressed in the developing IFMs and that Mef2 is required for Dl expression in developing IFMs. PMID:25247309

  3. MRF4 negatively regulates adult skeletal muscle growth by repressing MEF2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Irene; Ciciliot, Stefano; Dyar, Kenneth A.; Abraham, Reimar; Murgia, Marta; Agatea, Lisa; Akimoto, Takayuki; Bicciato, Silvio; Forcato, Mattia; Pierre, Philippe; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Rigby, Peter W. J.; Carvajal, Jaime J.; Blaauw, Bert; Calabria, Elisa; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factor MRF4 is highly expressed in adult skeletal muscle but its function is unknown. Here we show that Mrf4 knockdown in adult muscle induces hypertrophy and prevents denervation-induced atrophy. This effect is accompanied by increased protein synthesis and widespread activation of muscle-specific genes, many of which are targets of MEF2 transcription factors. MEF2-dependent genes represent the top-ranking gene set enriched after Mrf4 RNAi and a MEF2 reporter is inhibited by co-transfected MRF4 and activated by Mrf4 RNAi. The Mrf4 RNAi-dependent increase in fibre size is prevented by dominant negative MEF2, while constitutively active MEF2 is able to induce myofibre hypertrophy. The nuclear localization of the MEF2 corepressor HDAC4 is impaired by Mrf4 knockdown, suggesting that MRF4 acts by stabilizing a repressor complex that controls MEF2 activity. These findings open new perspectives in the search for therapeutic targets to prevent muscle wasting, in particular sarcopenia and cachexia. PMID:27484840

  4. Muscle Strength, Physical Activity, and Functional Limitations in Older Adults with Central Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Cassandra M.; Batsis, John A.; Vasquez, Elizabeth; McQuoid, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity and muscle weakness are independently associated with increased risk of physical and functional impairment in older adults. It is unknown whether physical activity (PA) and muscle strength combined provide added protection against functional impairment. This study examines the association between muscle strength, PA, and functional outcomes in older adults with central obesity. Methods. Prevalence and odds of physical (PL), ADL, and IADL limitation were calculated for 6,388 community dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 with central obesity. Individuals were stratified by sex-specific hand grip tertiles and PA. Logistic models were adjusted for age, education, comorbidities, and body-mass index and weighted. Results. Overall prevalence of PL and ADL and IADL limitations were progressively lower by grip category. Within grip categories, prevalence was lower for individuals who were active than those who were inactive. Adjusted models showed significantly lower odds of PL OR 0.42 [0.31, 0.56]; ADL OR 0.60 [0.43, 0.84], and IADL OR 0.46 [0.35, 0.61] for those in the highest grip strength category as compared to those in the lowest grip category. Conclusion. Improving grip strength in obese elders who are not able to engage in traditional exercise is important for reducing odds of physical and functional impairment. PMID:27034833

  5. Muscle mechanical properties of adult and older rats submitted to exercise after immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Fábio Yoshikazu; Camargo, Regina Celi Trindade; Job, Aldo Eloizo; Ozaki, Guilherme Akio Tamura; Koike, Tatiana Emy; Camargo Filho, José Carlos Silva

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the effects of immobilization, free remobilization and remobilization by physical exercise about mechanical properties of skeletal muscle of rats of two age groups. Methods 56 Wistar rats divided into two groups according to age, an adult group (five months) and an older group (15 months). These groups were subdivided in: control, immobilized, free remobilized and remobilized by physical exercise. The pelvic limb of rats was immobilized for seven days. The exercise protocol consisted of five swimming sessions, once per day and 25 minutes per session. The gastrocnemius muscle was subjected to tensile tests, and evaluated the properties: load at the maximum limit, stretching at the maximum limit and stiffness. Results The immobilization reduced the values of load at the maximum limit and the remobilization protocols were not sufficient to restore control levels in adult group and older rats. The stretching at the maximum limit differs only in the older group. Conclusions The immobilization reduces the muscle's ability to bear loads and exercise protocol tends to restore the default at control values in adult and older rats. The age factor only interfered in the stretching at the maximum limit, inducing a reduction of this property in the post-immobilization. Level of Evidence II, Investigating the Results of Treatment. PMID:24453606

  6. Silencing of Dok-7 in Adult Rat Muscle Increases Susceptibility to Passive Transfer Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Alejandro M; Stevens, Jo A A; Mané-Damas, Marina; Molenaar, Peter; Duimel, Hans; Verheyen, Fons; Cossins, Judith; Beeson, David; De Baets, Marc H; Losen, Mario; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2016-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mediated by autoantibodies that target proteins at the neuromuscular junction, primarily the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and the muscle-specific kinase. Because downstream of kinase 7 (Dok-7) is essential for the full activation of muscle-specific kinase and consequently for dense clustering of AChRs, we hypothesized that reduced levels of Dok-7 increase the susceptibility to passive transfer MG. To test this hypothesis, Dok-7 expression was reduced by transfecting shRNA-coding plasmids into the tibialis anterior muscle of adult rats by in vivo electroporation. Subclinical MG was subsequently induced with a low dose of anti-AChR monoclonal antibody 35. Neuromuscular transmission was significantly impaired in Dok-7-siRNA-electroporated legs compared with the contralateral control legs, which correlated with a reduction of AChR protein levels at the neuromuscular junction (approximately 25%) in Dok-7-siRNA-electroporated muscles, compared with contralateral control muscles. These results suggest that a reduced expression of Dok-7 may play a role in the susceptibility to passive transfer MG, by rendering AChR clusters less resistant to the autoantibody attack. PMID:27658713

  7. cap alpha. -skeletal and. cap alpha. -cardiac actin genes are coexpressed in adult human skeletal muscle and heart

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, P.; Ponte, P.; Blau, H.; Kedes, L.

    1983-11-01

    The authors determined the actin isotypes encoded by 30 actin cDNA clones previously isolated from an adult human muscle cDNA library. Using 3' untranslated region probes, derived from ..cap alpha.. skeletal, ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin cDNAs and from an ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin genomic clone, they showed that 28 of the cDNAs correspond to ..cap alpha..-skeletal actin transcripts. Unexpectedly, however, the remaining two cDNA clones proved to derive from ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin mRNA. Sequence analysis confirmed that the two skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin cDNAs are derived from transcripts of the cloned ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin gene. Comparison of total actin mRNA levels in adult skeletal muscle and adult heart revealed that the steady-state levels in skeletal muscle are about twofold greater, per microgram of total cellular RNA, than those in heart. Thus, in skeletal muscle and in heart, both of the sarcomeric actin mRNA isotypes are quite abundant transcripts. They conclude that ..cap alpha..-skeletal and ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin genes are coexpressed as an actin pair in human adult striated muscles. Since the smooth-muscle actins (aortic and stomach) and the cytoplasmic actins (..beta.. and ..gamma..) are known to be coexpressed in smooth muscle and nonmuscle cells, respectively, they postulate that coexpression of actin pairs may be a common feature of mammalian actin gene expression in all tissues.

  8. Adult Stem Cells Seeded on Electrospinning Silk Fibroin Nanofiberous Scaffold Enhance Wound Repair and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sheng-Yang; Peng, Li-Hua; Shan, Ying-Hui; Niu, Jie; Xiong, Jie; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2016-06-01

    Development of novel strategy stimulating the healing with skin appendages regeneration is the critical goal for wound therapy. In this study, influence of the transplantation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and epidermal stem cells (ESCs) with the nanofiberous scaffold prepared from silk fibroin protein in wound re-epithelization, collagen synthesis, as well as the skin appendages regeneration were investigated. It was shown that both the transplantation of MSCs and ESCs could significantly accelerate the skin re-epithelization, stimulate the collagen synthesis. Furthermore, the regenerative features of MSCs and ESCs in activating the blood vessels and hair follicles formation, respectively were suggested. These results demonstrated that the electrospinning nanofiberous scaffold is an advantageous carrier for the cells transplantation, but also provided the experimental proofs for the application of MSCs and ESCs as promising therapeutics in skin tissue engineering. PMID:27427589

  9. Improved knee extensor strength with resistance training associates with muscle specific miRNAs in older adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, María L; Marsh, Anthony P; Leng, Iris; Nicklas, Barbara J; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-02-01

    Regular exercise, particularly resistance training (RT), is the only therapy known to consistently improve muscle strength and quality (force per unit of mass) in older persons, but there is considerable variability in responsiveness to training. Identifying sensitive diagnostic biomarkers of responsiveness to RT may inform the design of a more efficient exercise regimen to improve muscle strength in older adults. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. We quantified six muscle specific miRNAs (miR-1, -133a, -133b, -206, -208b and -499) in both muscle tissue and blood plasma, and their relationship with knee extensor strength in seven older (age=70.5 ± 2.5 years) adults before and after 5 months of RT. MiRNAs differentially responded to RT; muscle miR-133b decreased, while all plasma miRNAs tended to increase. Percent changes in knee extensor strength with RT showed strong positive correlations with percent changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, and -206 and with percent changes in plasma and plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio. Baseline level of plasma or plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio further predicts muscle response to RT, while changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, and -206 may correlate with muscle TNNT1 gene alternative splicing in response to RT. Our results indicate that RT alters muscle specific miRNAs in muscle and plasma, and that these changes account for some of the variation in strength responses to RT in older adults.

  10. Muscle stem cells at a glance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu Xin; Dumont, Nicolas A.; Rudnicki, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Muscle stem cells facilitate the long-term regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle. This self-renewing population of satellite cells has only recently been defined through genetic and transplantation experiments. Although muscle stem cells remain in a dormant quiescent state in uninjured muscle, they are poised to activate and produce committed progeny. Unlike committed myogenic progenitor cells, the self-renewal capacity gives muscle stem cells the ability to engraft as satellite cells and capitulate long-term regeneration. Similar to other adult stem cells, understanding the molecular regulation of muscle stem cells has significant implications towards the development of pharmacological or cell-based therapies for muscle disorders. This Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster will review satellite cell characteristics and therapeutic potential, and provide an overview of the muscle stem cell hallmarks: quiescence, self-renewal and commitment. PMID:25300792

  11. Hypothyroid-mediated changes in adult rat diaphragm muscle contractile properties and MHC isoform expression.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, L E; Zhan, W Z; Sieck, G C

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of acute hypothyroidism on myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition and contractile properties in the adult rat diaphragm muscle. Hypothyroidism was induced by the addition of propylthiouracil (0.05%) in the drinking water for a period of 3 wk. MHC isoform composition of control and hypothyroid diaphragm muscles was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In vitro isometric contractile properties of midcostal diaphragm muscle segements were measured at 26 degrees C, whereas the maximal unloaded shortening velocity was measured at 15 degrees C with the "slack test" method. Serum triiodothyronine and thyroxine values were significantly lower in the hypothyroid compared with the control group. A small but significant increase in the percentage of slow MHC isoform in the diaphragm was observed with acute hypothyroidism, whereas the percentage of the fast MHC isoforms (2A, 2X, and 2B) did not significantly differ between groups. Peak twitch force did not differ between groups. However, twitch contraction and half-relaxation times were significantly prolonged in the hypothyroid group compared with control. Maximal specific force was reduced in the hypothyroid compared with the control group, averaging 15.7 and 19.8 N/cm2, respectively (P < 0.05). The maximal unloaded shortening velocity averaged 4.3 and 8.2 muscle lengths/s in the hypothyroid and control groups, respectively (P < 0.05). We conclude that acute hypothyroidism results in alterations in adult diaphragm muscle contractile properties that cannot be attributed solely to changes in MHC isoform composition.

  12. Propofol and AZD3043 Inhibit Adult Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Jonsson Fagerlund, Malin; Krupp, Johannes; Dabrowski, Michael A

    2016-02-06

    Propofol is a widely used general anaesthetic with muscle relaxant properties. Similarly as propofol, the new general anaesthetic AZD3043 targets the GABAA receptor for its anaesthetic effects, but the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has not been investigated. Notably, there is a gap of knowledge about the interaction between propofol and the nAChRs found in the adult neuromuscular junction. The objective was to evaluate whether propofol or AZD3043 interact with the α1β1δε, α3β2, or α7 nAChR subtypes that can be found in the neuromuscular junction and if there are any differences in affinity for those subtypes between propofol and AZD3043. Human nAChR subtypes α1β1δε, α3β2, and α7 were expressed into Xenopus oocytes and studied with an automated voltage-clamp. Propofol and AZD3043 inhibited ACh-induced currents in all of the nAChRs studied with inhibitory concentrations higher than those needed for general anaesthesia. AZD3043 was a more potent inhibitor at the adult muscle nAChR subtype compared to propofol. Propofol and AZD3043 inhibit nAChR subtypes that can be found in the adult NMJ in concentrations higher than needed for general anaesthesia. This finding needs to be evaluated in an in vitro nerve-muscle preparation and suggests one possible explanation for the muscle relaxant effect of propofol seen during higher doses.

  13. Propofol and AZD3043 Inhibit Adult Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson Fagerlund, Malin; Krupp, Johannes; Dabrowski, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Propofol is a widely used general anaesthetic with muscle relaxant properties. Similarly as propofol, the new general anaesthetic AZD3043 targets the GABAA receptor for its anaesthetic effects, but the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has not been investigated. Notably, there is a gap of knowledge about the interaction between propofol and the nAChRs found in the adult neuromuscular junction. The objective was to evaluate whether propofol or AZD3043 interact with the α1β1δε, α3β2, or α7 nAChR subtypes that can be found in the neuromuscular junction and if there are any differences in affinity for those subtypes between propofol and AZD3043. Human nAChR subtypes α1β1δε, α3β2, and α7 were expressed into Xenopus oocytes and studied with an automated voltage-clamp. Propofol and AZD3043 inhibited ACh-induced currents in all of the nAChRs studied with inhibitory concentrations higher than those needed for general anaesthesia. AZD3043 was a more potent inhibitor at the adult muscle nAChR subtype compared to propofol. Propofol and AZD3043 inhibit nAChR subtypes that can be found in the adult NMJ in concentrations higher than needed for general anaesthesia. This finding needs to be evaluated in an in vitro nerve-muscle preparation and suggests one possible explanation for the muscle relaxant effect of propofol seen during higher doses. PMID:26861354

  14. Impaired glucose metabolism and exercise capacity with muscle-specific glycogen synthase 1 (gys1) deletion in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Xirouchaki, Chrysovalantou E.; Mangiafico, Salvatore P.; Bate, Katherine; Ruan, Zheng; Huang, Amy M.; Tedjosiswoyo, Bing Wilari; Lamont, Benjamin; Pong, Wynne; Favaloro, Jenny; Blair, Amy R.; Zajac, Jeffrey D.; Proietto, Joseph; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Muscle glucose storage and muscle glycogen synthase (gys1) defects have been associated with insulin resistance. As there are multiple mechanisms for insulin resistance, the specific role of glucose storage defects is not clear. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of muscle-specific gys1 deletion on glucose metabolism and exercise capacity. Methods Tamoxifen inducible and muscle specific gys-1 KO mice were generated using the Cre/loxP system. Mice were subjected to glucose tolerance tests, euglycemic/hyperinsulinemic clamps and exercise tests. Results gys1-KO mice showed ≥85% reduction in muscle gys1 mRNA and protein concentrations, 70% reduction in muscle glycogen levels, postprandial hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia and impaired glucose tolerance. Under insulin-stimulated conditions, gys1-KO mice displayed reduced glucose turnover and muscle glucose uptake, indicative of peripheral insulin resistance, as well as increased plasma and muscle lactate levels and reductions in muscle hexokinase II levels. gys1-KO mice also exhibited markedly reduced exercise and endurance capacity. Conclusions Thus, muscle-specific gys1 deletion in adult mice results in glucose intolerance due to insulin resistance and reduced muscle glucose uptake as well as impaired exercise and endurance capacity. In brief This study demonstrates why the body prioritises muscle glycogen storage over liver glycogen storage despite the critical role of the liver in supplying glucose to the brain in the fasting state and shows that glycogen deficiency results in impaired glucose metabolism and reduced exercise capacity. PMID:26977394

  15. Neuronal regeneration in the cerebellum of adult teleost fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus: guidance of migrating young cells by radial glia.

    PubMed

    Clint, S C; Zupanc, G K

    2001-09-23

    In contrast to mammals, adult fish exhibit an enormous potential to replace injured brain neurons by newly generated ones. In the present study, the role of radial glia, identified by immunostaining against fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), was examined in this process of neuronal regeneration. Approximately 8 days after application of a mechanical lesion to the corpus cerebelli in the teleost fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus, the areal density of radial glial fibers increased markedly in the ipsilateral dorsal molecular layer compared to shorter survival times, or to the densities found in the intact brain or in the hemisphere contralateral to the lesion. This density remained elevated throughout the time period of up to 100 days examined. The increase in fiber density was followed approximately 2 days later by a rise in the areal density of young cells, characterized by labeling with the nuclear dye DAPI, in the ipsilateral dorsal molecular layer. Based on this remarkable spatio-temporal correlation, and the frequently observed close apposition of elongated young cells to radial glial fibers, we hypothesize that radial glia play an important role in the guidance of migrating young cells from their proliferation zones to the site of lesion where regeneration takes place.

  16. Prolongation of Relaxation Time in Extraocular Muscles With Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Adult Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Krysta R.; Stevens, Shanlee M.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that short-term treatment with brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) would alter the contractile characteristics of rabbit extraocular muscle (EOM). Methods One week after injections of BDNF in adult rabbit superior rectus muscles, twitch properties were determined in treated and control muscles in vitro. Muscles were also examined for changes in mean cross-sectional areas, neuromuscular junction size, and percent of myofibers expressing specific myosin heavy chain isoforms, and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (SERCA) 1 and 2. Results Brain derived neurotrophic factor–treated muscles had prolonged relaxation times compared with control muscles. Time to 50% relaxation, time to 100% relaxation, and maximum rate of relaxation were increased by 24%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. No significant differences were seen in time to peak force, twitch force, or maximum rate of contraction. Brain derived neurotrophic factor treatment significantly increased mean cross-sectional areas of slow twitch and tonic myofibers, with increased areas ranging from 54% to 146%. Brain derived neurotrophic factor also resulted in an increased percentage of slow twitch myofibers in the orbital layers, ranging from 54% to 77%, and slow-tonic myofibers, ranging from 44% to 62%. No significant c