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Sample records for adult muscle stem

  1. Muscle Stem Cells: A Model System for Adult Stem Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Ddw; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells, originally termed satellite cells for their position adjacent to differentiated muscle fibers, are absolutely required for the process of skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last decade, satellite cells have become one of the most studied adult stem cell systems and have emerged as a standard model not only in the field of stem cell-driven tissue regeneration but also in stem cell dysfunction and aging. Here, we provide background in the field and discuss recent advances in our understanding of muscle stem cell function and dysfunction, particularly in the case of aging, and the potential involvement of muscle stem cells in genetic diseases such as the muscular dystrophies.

  2. Comparative analysis of mesenchymal stem cells from adult mouse adipose, muscle, and fetal muscle.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hulong; Yu, Bing; Huang, Zhiqing; Yang, Xuerong; Liu, Zehui; Mao, Xiangbing; Tian, Gang; He, Jun; Han, Guoquan; Chen, Hong; Mao, Qian; Chen, Daiwen

    2013-02-01

    Recently, increasing evidence supports that adult stem cells are the part of a natural system for tissue growth and repair. This study focused on the differences of mesenchymal stem cells from adult adipose (ADSCs), skeletal muscle (MDSCs) and fetal muscle (FMSCs) in biological characteristics, which is the key to cell therapy success. Stem cell antigen 1 (Sca-1) expression of MDSCs and FMSCs at passage 3 was two times more than that at passage 1 (P < 0.0001). After 28-day myogenic induction, higher expression levels of skeletal muscle-specific genes were observed in MDSCs than FMSCs (P < 0.01), and the lowest expression levels were demonstrated in ADSCs among three cells (P < 0.01). Besides, M-Cad and MyHC expressions in ADSCs were not detected by immunofluorescence or real-time quantitative PCR. Furthermore, after 14 days adipogenic induction, PPARγ2, LPL and aP2 mRNA expressions were higher in ADSCs vs. MDSCs (P < 0.01). Besides, MSCs from adult or fetal muscle expressed higher OCN and OPN than ADSCs after 28 days osteogenic induction (P < 0.01). Taken together, our results suggested that cell source and developmental stage had great impacts on biological properties of mesenchymal stem cells, and proper consideration of all the issues is necessary.

  3. Preparation of adult muscle fiber-associated stem/precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Conboy, Michael J; Conboy, Irina M

    2010-01-01

    In our studies of muscle regeneration we have developed, modified, and optimized techniques to isolate and study the stem and precursor cells to muscle tissue. Our goals have been to obtain for study muscle fibers in bulk, or the fiber-associated cells, separately from the other cells found in muscle. Using these techniques, myofiber-associated cells may be isolated from neonatal through adult muscle, from resting or from regenerating muscle, thus allowing one to investigate the cellular populations participating during the time course of these events. The protocol is applicable to any age and condition of muscle and may be adapted for other tissues.

  4. Muscle regeneration by adipose tissue-derived adult stem cells attached to injectable PLGA spheres.

    PubMed

    Kim, MiJung; Choi, Yu Suk; Yang, Seung Hye; Hong, Hea-Nam; Cho, Sung-Woo; Cha, Sang Myun; Pak, Jhang Ho; Kim, Chan Wha; Kwon, Seog Woon; Park, Chan Jeoung

    2006-09-22

    The [corrected] use of adult stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering and regeneration strategies represents a promising approach for skeletal muscle repair. We have evaluated the combination of adipose tissue-derived adult stem cells (ADSCs) obtained from autologous liposuction and injectable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) spheres for muscle regeneration. ADSCs attached to PLGA spheres and PLGA spheres alone were cultured in myogenic medium for 21 days and injected subcutaneously into the necks of nude mice. After 30 and 60 days, the mice were sacrificed, and newly formed tissues were analyzed by immunostaining, H and E staining, and RT-PCR. We found that ADSCs attached to PLGA spheres, but not PLGA spheres alone, were able to generate muscle tissue. These findings suggest that ADSCs and PLGA spheres are useful materials for muscle tissue engineering and that their combination can be used in clinical settings for muscle regeneration.

  5. Myf5 haploinsufficiency reveals distinct cell fate potentials for adult skeletal muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Chrétien, Fabrice; Jory, Aurélie; Sambasivan, Ramkumar; Negroni, Elisa; Flamant, Patricia; Soubigou, Guillaume; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Di Santo, James; Cumano, Ana; Mouly, Vincent; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2012-04-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cell fate in adult mice is regulated by crucial transcription factors, including the determination genes Myf5 and Myod. The precise role of Myf5 in regulating quiescent muscle stem cells has remained elusive. Here we show that most, but not all, quiescent satellite cells express Myf5 protein, but at varying levels, and that resident Myf5 heterozygous muscle stem cells are more primed for myogenic commitment compared with wild-type satellite cells. Paradoxically however, heterotypic transplantation of Myf5 heterozygous cells into regenerating muscles results in higher self-renewal capacity compared with wild-type stem cells, whereas myofibre regenerative capacity is not altered. By contrast, Pax7 haploinsufficiency does not show major modifications by transcriptome analysis. These observations provide a mechanism linking Myf5 levels to muscle stem cell heterogeneity and fate by exposing two distinct and opposing phenotypes associated with Myf5 haploinsufficiency. These findings have important implications for how stem cell fates can be modulated by crucial transcription factors while generating a pool of responsive heterogeneous cells.

  6. Effect of mesenchymal stem cells on induced skeletal muscle chemodenervation atrophy in adult male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Azza S; Al-Ghonemy, Nabila M; Ahmed, Samah M; Mohamed, Samar R

    2017-04-01

    The present research was conducted to evaluate the effect of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) as a potential therapeutic tool for improvement of skeletal muscle recovery after induced chemodenervation atrophy by repeated local injection of botulinum toxin-A in the right tibialis anterior muscle of adult male albino rats. Forty five adult Wistar male albino rats were classified into control and experimental groups. Experimental group was further subdivided into 3 equal subgroups; induced atrophy, BM-MSCs treated and recovery groups. Biochemical analysis of serum LDH, CK and Real-time PCR for Bcl-2, caspase 3 and caspase 9 was measured. Skeletal muscle sections were stained with H and E, Mallory trichrome, and Immunohistochemical reaction for Bax and CD34. Improvement in the skeletal muscle histological structure was noticed in BM-MSCs treated group, however, in the recovery group, some sections showed apparent transverse striations and others still affected. Immunohistochemical reaction of Bax protein showed strong positive immunoreaction in the cytoplasm of muscle fibers in the induced atrophy group. BM-MSCs treated group showed weak positive reaction while the recovery group showed moderate reaction in the cytoplasm of muscle fibers. Immunohistochemical reaction for CD34 revealed occasional positive CD34 stained cells in the induced atrophy group. In BM-MSCs treated group, multiple positive CD34 stained cells were detected. However, recovery group showed some positive CD34 stained cells at the periphery of the muscle fibers. Marked improvement in the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscles after BM-MSCs therapy. Hence, stem cell therapy provides a new hope for patients suffering from myopathies and severe injuries.

  7. A subpopulation of adult skeletal muscle stem cells retains all template DNA strands after cell division.

    PubMed

    Rocheteau, Pierre; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Siegl-Cachedenier, Irene; Blasco, Maria A; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2012-01-20

    Satellite cells are adult skeletal muscle stem cells that are quiescent and constitute a poorly defined heterogeneous population. Using transgenic Tg:Pax7-nGFP mice, we show that Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells are less primed for commitment and have a lower metabolic status and delayed first mitosis compared to Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells. Pax7-nGFP(Hi) can give rise to Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells after serial transplantations. Proliferating Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells exhibit lower metabolic activity, and the majority performs asymmetric DNA segregation during cell division, wherein daughter cells retaining template DNA strands express stem cell markers. Using chromosome orientation-fluorescence in situ hybridization, we demonstrate that all chromatids segregate asymmetrically, whereas Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells perform random DNA segregation. Therefore, quiescent Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells represent a reversible dormant stem cell state, and during muscle regeneration, Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells generate distinct daughter cell fates by asymmetrically segregating template DNA strands to the stem cell. These findings provide major insights into the biology of stem cells that segregate DNA asymmetrically.

  8. Pten is necessary for the quiescence and maintenance of adult muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Feng; Bi, Pengpeng; Wang, Chao; Shan, Tizhong; Nie, Yaohui; Ratliff, Timothy L.; Gavin, Timothy P.; Kuang, Shihuan

    2017-01-01

    Satellite cells (SCs) are myogenic stem cells required for regeneration of adult skeletal muscles. A proper balance among quiescence, activation and differentiation is essential for long-term maintenance of SCs and their regenerative function. Here we show a function of Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue) in quiescent SCs. Deletion of Pten in quiescent SCs leads to their spontaneous activation and premature differentiation without proliferation, resulting in depletion of SC pool and regenerative failure. However, prior to depletion, Pten-null activated SCs can transiently proliferate upon injury and regenerate injured muscles, but continually decline during regeneration, suggesting an inability to return to quiescence. Mechanistically, Pten deletion increases Akt phosphorylation, which induces cytoplasmic translocation of FoxO1 and suppression of Notch signalling. Accordingly, constitutive activation of Notch1 prevents SC depletion despite Pten deletion. Our findings delineate a critical function of Pten in maintaining SC quiescence and reveal an interaction between Pten and Notch signalling. PMID:28094257

  9. A 3-D cardiac muscle construct for exploring adult marrow stem cell based myocardial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Valarmathi, Mani T; Goodwin, Richard L; Fuseler, John W; Davis, Jeffrey M; Yost, Michael J; Potts, Jay D

    2010-04-01

    Adult bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are capable of differentiating into cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro and contribute to myocardial regeneration in vivo. Consequently, BMSCs may potentially play a vital role in cardiac repair and regeneration. However, this concept has been limited by inadequate and inconsistent differentiation of BMSCs into cardiomyocytes along with poor survival and integration of neo-cardiomyocytes after implantation into ischemic myocardium. In order to overcome these barriers and to explore adult stem cell based myocardial regeneration, we have developed an in vitro model of three-dimensional (3-D) cardiac muscle using rat ventricular embryonic cardiomyocytes (ECMs) and BMSCs. When ECMs and BMSCs were seeded sequentially onto a 3-D tubular scaffold engineered from topographically aligned type I collagen-fibers and cultured in basal medium for 7, 14, 21, or 28 days, the maturation and co-differentiation into a cardiomyocyte lineage was observed. Phenotypic induction was characterized at morphological, immunological, biochemical and molecular levels. The observed expression of transcripts coding for cardiomyocyte phenotypic markers and the immunolocalization of cardiomyogenic lineage-associated proteins revealed typical expression patterns of neo-cardiomyogenesis. At the biochemical level differentiating cells exhibited appropriate metabolic activity and at the ultrastructural level myofibrillar and sarcomeric organization were indicative of an immature phenotype. Our 3-D co-culture system sustains the ECMs in vitro continuum of differentiation process and simultaneously induces the maturation and differentiation of BMSCs into cardiomyocyte-like cells. Thus, this novel 3-D co-culture system provides a useful in vitro model to investigate the functional role and interplay of developing ECMs and BMSCs during cardiomyogenic differentiation.

  10. MicroRNA-29a in Adult Muscle Stem Cells Controls Skeletal Muscle Regeneration During Injury and Exercise Downstream of Fibroblast Growth Factor-2.

    PubMed

    Galimov, Artur; Merry, Troy L; Luca, Edlira; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Mizbani, Amir; Turcekova, Katarina; Hartung, Angelika; Croce, Carlo M; Ristow, Michael; Krützfeldt, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The expansion of myogenic progenitors (MPs) in the adult muscle stem cell niche is critical for the regeneration of skeletal muscle. Activation of quiescent MPs depends on the dismantling of the basement membrane and increased access to growth factors such as fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2). Here, we demonstrate using microRNA (miRNA) profiling in mouse and human myoblasts that the capacity of FGF2 to stimulate myoblast proliferation is mediated by miR-29a. FGF2 induces miR-29a expression and inhibition of miR-29a using pharmacological or genetic deletion decreases myoblast proliferation. Next generation RNA sequencing from miR-29a knockout myoblasts (Pax7(CE/+) ; miR-29a(flox/flox) ) identified members of the basement membrane as the most abundant miR-29a targets. Using gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we confirm that miR-29a coordinately regulates Fbn1, Lamc1, Nid2, Col4a1, Hspg2 and Sparc in myoblasts in vitro and in MPs in vivo. Induction of FGF2 and miR-29a and downregulation of its target genes precedes muscle regeneration during cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury. Importantly, MP-specific tamoxifen-induced deletion of miR-29a in adult skeletal muscle decreased the proliferation and formation of newly formed myofibers during both CTX-induced muscle injury and after a single bout of eccentric exercise. Our results identify a novel miRNA-based checkpoint of the basement membrane in the adult muscle stem cell niche. Strategies targeting miR-29a might provide useful clinical approaches to maintain muscle mass in disease states such as ageing that involve aberrant FGF2 signaling.

  11. Adult vascular smooth muscle cells in culture express neural stem cell markers typical of resident multipotent vascular stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Eimear; Mooney, Ciaran J; Hakimjavadi, Roya; Fitzpatrick, Emma; Guha, Shaunta; Collins, Laura E; Loscher, Christine E; Morrow, David; Redmond, Eileen M; Cahill, Paul A

    2014-10-01

    Differentiation of resident multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) or de-differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) might be responsible for the SMC phenotype that plays a major role in vascular diseases such as arteriosclerosis and restenosis. We examined vSMCs from three different species (rat, murine and bovine) to establish whether they exhibit neural stem cell characteristics typical of MVSCs. We determined their SMC differentiation, neural stem cell marker expression and multipotency following induction in vitro by using immunocytochemistry, confocal microscopy, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. MVSCs isolated from rat aortic explants, enzymatically dispersed rat SMCs and rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells served as controls. Murine carotid artery lysates and primary rat aortic vSMCs were both myosin-heavy-chain-positive but weakly expressed the neural crest stem cell marker, Sox10. Each vSMC line examined expressed SMC differentiation markers (smooth muscle α-actin, myosin heavy chain and calponin), neural crest stem cell markers (Sox10(+), Sox17(+)) and a glia marker (S100β(+)). Serum deprivation significantly increased calponin and myosin heavy chain expression and decreased stem cell marker expression, when compared with serum-rich conditions. vSMCs did not differentiate to adipocytes or osteoblasts following adipogenic or osteogenic inductive stimulation, respectively, or respond to transforming growth factor-β1 or Notch following γ-secretase inhibition. Thus, vascular SMCs in culture express neural stem cell markers typical of MVSCs, concomitant with SMC differentiation markers, but do not retain their multipotency. The ultimate origin of these cells might have important implications for their use in investigations of vascular proliferative disease in vitro.

  12. Small Fractions of Muscular Dystrophy Embryonic Stem Cells Yield Severe Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Defects in Adult Mouse Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J Patrick; Kyrychenko, Sergii; Kyrychenko, Viktoriia; Schneider, Joel S; Granier, Celine J; Himelman, Eric; Lahey, Kevin C; Zhao, Qingshi; Yehia, Ghassan; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Bhaumik, Mantu; Shirokova, Natalia; Fraidenraich, Diego

    2017-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by the loss of the protein dystrophin, leading to muscle fragility, progressive weakening, and susceptibility to mechanical stress. Although dystrophin-negative mdx mouse models have classically been used to study DMD, phenotypes appear mild compared to patients. As a result, characterization of muscle pathology, especially in the heart, has proven difficult. We report that injection of mdx embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into Wild Type blastocysts produces adult mouse chimeras with severe DMD phenotypes in the heart and skeletal muscle. Inflammation, regeneration and fibrosis are observed at the whole organ level, both in dystrophin-negative and dystrophin-positive portions of the chimeric tissues. Skeletal and cardiac muscle function are also decreased to mdx levels. In contrast to mdx heterozygous carriers, which show no significant phenotypes, these effects are even observed in chimeras with low levels of mdx ESC incorporation (10%-30%). Chimeric mice lack typical compensatory utrophin upregulation, and show pathological remodeling of Connexin-43. In addition, dystrophin-negative and dystrophin-positive isolated cardiomyocytes show augmented calcium response to mechanical stress, similar to mdx cells. These global effects highlight a novel role of mdx ESCs in triggering muscular dystrophy even when only low amounts are present. Stem Cells 2017;35:597-610.

  13. p38α MAPK regulates adult muscle stem cell fate by restricting progenitor proliferation during postnatal growth and repair.

    PubMed

    Brien, Patrick; Pugazhendhi, Dhamayanthi; Woodhouse, Samuel; Oxley, David; Pell, Jennifer M

    2013-08-01

    Stem cell function is essential for the maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis. Controlling the balance between self-renewal and differentiation is crucial to maintain a receptive satellite cell pool capable of responding to growth and regeneration cues. The mitogen-activated protein kinase p38α has been implicated in the regulation of these processes but its influence in adult muscle remains unknown. Using conditional satellite cell p38α knockout mice we have demonstrated that p38α restricts excess proliferation in the postnatal growth phase while promoting timely myoblast differentiation. Differentiation was still able to occur in the p38α-null satellite cells, however, but was delayed. An absence of p38α resulted in a postnatal growth defect along with the persistence of an increased reservoir of satellite cells into adulthood. This population was still capable of responding to cardiotoxin-induced injury, resulting in complete, albeit delayed, regeneration, with further enhancement of the satellite cell population. Increased p38γ phosphorylation accompanied the absence of p38α, and inhibition of p38γ ex vivo substantially decreased the myogenic defect. We have used genome-wide transcriptome analysis to characterize the changes in expression that occur between resting and regenerating muscle, and the influence p38α has on these expression profiles. This study provides novel evidence for the fundamental role of p38α in adult muscle homeostasis in vivo.

  14. MicroRNA deep sequencing in two adult stem cell populations identifies miR-501 as a novel regulator of myosin heavy chain during muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mizbani, Amir; Luca, Edlira; Rushing, Elisabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of skeletal muscle regeneration, but the underlying mechanisms are still incompletely understood. Here, comparative miRNA sequencing analysis of myogenic progenitor cells (MPs) and non-myogenic fibroblast-adipocyte progenitors (FAPs) during cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury uncovered miR-501 as a novel muscle-specific miRNA. miR-501 is an intronic miRNA and its expression levels in MPs correlated with its host gene, chloride channel, voltage-sensitive 5 (Clcn5). Pharmacological inhibition of miR-501 dramatically blunted the induction of embryonic myosin heavy chain (MYH3) and, to a lesser extent, adult myosin isoforms during muscle regeneration, and promoted small-diameter neofibers. An unbiased target identification approach in primary myoblasts validated gigaxonin as a target of miR-501 that mimicked the effect of miR-501 inhibition on MYH3 expression. In the mdx mouse model, which models a pathological disease state, not only was miR-501 induced in regenerating skeletal muscle, but also its serum levels were increased, which correlated with the disease state of the animals. Our results suggest that miR-501 plays a key role in adult muscle regeneration and might serve as a novel serum biomarker for the activation of adult muscle stem cells. PMID:27707793

  15. Myogenic progenitors and imaging single-cell flow analysis: a model to study commitment of adult muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Trapecar, Martin; Kelc, Robi; Gradisnik, Lidija; Vogrin, Matjaz; Rupnik, Marjan Slak

    2014-12-01

    Research on skeletal muscles suffers from a lack of appropriate human models to study muscle formation and regeneration on the regulatory level of single cells. This hampers both basic understanding and the development of new therapeutic approaches. The use of imaging multicolour flow cytometry and myogenic stem cells can help fill this void by allowing researchers to visualize and quantify the reaction of individual cultured cells to bioactives or other physiological impulses. As proof of concept, we subjected human CD56+ satellite cells to reference bioactives follistatin and Malva sylvestris extracts and then used imaging multicolor flow cytometry to visualize the stepwise activation of myogenic factors MyoD and myogenin in individual cells. This approach enabled us to evaluate the potency of these bioactives to stimulate muscle commitment. To validate this method, we used multi-photon confocal microscopy to confirm the potential of bioactives to stimulate muscle differentiation and expression of desmin. Imaging multicolor flow cytometry revealed statistically significant differences between treated and untreated groups of myogenic progenitors and we propose the utilization of this concept as an integral part of future muscle research strategies.

  16. Highly efficient, functional engraftment of skeletal muscle stem cells in dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Cerletti, Massimiliano; Jurga, Sara; Witczak, Carol A; Hirshman, Michael F; Shadrach, Jennifer L; Goodyear, Laurie J; Wagers, Amy J

    2008-07-11

    Satellite cells reside beneath the basal lamina of skeletal muscle fibers and include cells that act as precursors for muscle growth and repair. Although they share a common anatomical localization and typically are considered a homogeneous population, satellite cells actually exhibit substantial heterogeneity. We used cell-surface marker expression to purify from the satellite cell pool a distinct population of skeletal muscle precursors (SMPs) that function as muscle stem cells. When engrafted into muscle of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, purified SMPs contributed to up to 94% of myofibers, restoring dystrophin expression and significantly improving muscle histology and contractile function. Transplanted SMPs also entered the satellite cell compartment, renewing the endogenous stem cell pool and participating in subsequent rounds of injury repair. Together, these studies indicate the presence in adult skeletal muscle of prospectively isolatable muscle-forming stem cells and directly demonstrate the efficacy of myogenic stem cell transplant for treating muscle degenerative disease.

  17. Transcriptional networks that regulate muscle stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Punch, Vincent G; Jones, Andrew E; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Muscle stem cells comprise different populations of stem and progenitor cells found in embryonic and adult tissues. A number of signaling and transcriptional networks are responsible for specification and survival of these cell populations and regulation of their behavior during growth and regeneration. Muscle progenitor cells are mostly derived from the somites of developing embryos, while satellite cells are the progenitor cells responsible for the majority of postnatal growth and adult muscle regeneration. In resting muscle, these stem cells are quiescent, but reenter the cell cycle during their activation, whereby they undergo decisions to self-renew, proliferate, or differentiate and fuse into multinucleated myofibers to repair damaged muscle. Regulation of muscle stem cell activity is under the precise control of a number of extrinsic signaling pathways and active transcriptional networks that dictate their behavior, fate, and regenerative potential. Here, we review the networks responsible for these different aspects of muscle stem cell biology and discuss prevalent parallels between mechanisms regulating the activity of embryonic muscle progenitor cells and adult satellite cells.

  18. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Matthew E; Pavlath, Grace K

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  19. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  20. Muscle niche-driven Insulin-Notch-Myc cascade reactivates dormant Adult Muscle Precursors in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Aradhya, Rajaguru; Zmojdzian, Monika; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-12-09

    How stem cells specified during development keep their non-differentiated quiescent state, and how they are reactivated, remain poorly understood. Here, we applied a Drosophila model to follow in vivo behavior of adult muscle precursors (AMPs), the transient fruit fly muscle stem cells. We report that emerging AMPs send out thin filopodia that make contact with neighboring muscles. AMPs keep their filopodia-based association with muscles throughout their dormant state but also when they start to proliferate, suggesting that muscles could play a role in AMP reactivation. Indeed, our genetic analyses indicate that muscles send inductive dIlp6 signals that switch the Insulin pathway ON in closely associated AMPs. This leads to the activation of Notch, which regulates AMP proliferation via dMyc. Altogether, we report that Drosophila AMPs display homing behavior to muscle niche and that the niche-driven Insulin-Notch-dMyc cascade plays a key role in setting the activated state of AMPs.

  1. Satellite Cells and the Muscle Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Price, Feodor

    2013-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle in mammals is a stable tissue under normal circumstances but has remarkable ability to repair after injury. Skeletal muscle regeneration is a highly orchestrated process involving the activation of various cellular and molecular responses. As skeletal muscle stem cells, satellite cells play an indispensible role in this process. The self-renewing proliferation of satellite cells not only maintains the stem cell population but also provides numerous myogenic cells, which proliferate, differentiate, fuse, and lead to new myofiber formation and reconstitution of a functional contractile apparatus. The complex behavior of satellite cells during skeletal muscle regeneration is tightly regulated through the dynamic interplay between intrinsic factors within satellite cells and extrinsic factors constituting the muscle stem cell niche/microenvironment. For the last half century, the advance of molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics has greatly improved our understanding of skeletal muscle biology. Here, we review some recent advances, with focuses on functions of satellite cells and their niche during the process of skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:23303905

  2. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Gene Therapy of Degenerative Muscle Diseases.

    PubMed

    Loperfido, Mariana; Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a unique source for cell-based therapies and regenerative medicine. The intrinsic features of these cells such as their easy accessibility and their capacity to be expanded indefinitely overcome some limitations of conventional adult stem cells. Furthermore, the possibility to derive patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in combination with the current development of gene modification methods could be used for autologous cell therapies of some genetic diseases. In particular, muscular dystrophies are considered to be a good candidate due to the lack of efficacious therapeutic treatments for patients to date, and in view of the encouraging results arising from recent preclinical studies. Some hurdles, including possible genetic instability and their efficient differentiation into muscle progenitors through vector/transgene-free methods have still to be overcome or need further optimization. Additionally, engraftment and functional contribution to muscle regeneration in pre-clinical models need to be carefully assessed before clinical translation. This review offers a summary of the advanced methods recently developed to derive muscle progenitors from pluripotent stem cells, as well as gene therapy by gene addition and gene editing methods using ZFNs, TALENs or CRISPR/Cas9. We have also discussed the main issues that need to be addressed for successful clinical translation of genetically corrected patient-specific pluripotent stem cells in autologous transplantation trials for skeletal muscle disorders.

  3. Adult stem cell therapy: dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Moraleda, Jose M; Blanquer, Miguel; Bleda, Patricia; Iniesta, Paqui; Ruiz, Francisco; Bonilla, Sonia; Cabanes, Carmen; Tabares, Lucía; Martinez, Salvador

    2006-12-01

    Adult stem cells may be an invaluable source of plastic cells for tissue regeneration. The bone marrow contains different subpopulations of adult stem cells easily accessible for transplantation. However the therapeutic value of adult stem cell is a question of debate in the scientific community. We have investigated the potential benefits of adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in animal models of demyelinating and motor neuron diseases. Our results suggest that transplantation of HSC have direct and indirect neuroregenerative and neuroprotective effects.

  4. Human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells retain stem cell properties after expansion in myosphere culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Chao; Stoelzel, Katharina; Kaufmann, Andreas M.

    2011-04-15

    Human skeletal muscle contains an accessible adult stem-cell compartment in which differentiated myofibers are maintained and replaced by a self-renewing stem cell pool. Previously, studies using mouse models have established a critical role for resident stem cells in skeletal muscle, but little is known about this paradigm in human muscle. Here, we report the reproducible isolation of a population of cells from human skeletal muscle that is able to proliferate for extended periods of time as floating clusters of rounded cells, termed 'myospheres' or myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs). The phenotypic characteristics and functional properties of these cells were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that these cells are clonogenic, express skeletal progenitor cell markers Pax7, ALDH1, Myod, and Desmin and the stem cell markers Nanog, Sox2, and Oct3/4 significantly elevated over controls. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 20 weeks and passaged at least 18 times, despite an average donor-age of 63 years. Individual clones (4.2%) derived from single cells were successfully expanded showing clonogenic potential and sustained proliferation of a subpopulation in the myospheres. Myosphere-derived cells were capable of spontaneous differentiation into myotubes in differentiation media and into other mesodermal cell lineages in induction media. We demonstrate here that direct culture and expansion of stem cells from human skeletal muscle is straightforward and reproducible with the appropriate technique. These cells may provide a viable resource of adult stem cells for future therapies of disease affecting skeletal muscle or mesenchymal lineage derived cell types.

  5. Aging, metabolism and stem cells: Spotlight on muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-04-15

    All tissues and organs undergo a progressive regenerative decline as they age. This decline has been mainly attributed to loss of stem cell number and/or function, and both stem cell-intrinsic changes and alterations in local niches and/or systemic environment over time are known to contribute to the stem cell aging phenotype. Advancing in the molecular understanding of the deterioration of stem cell cells with aging is key for targeting the specific causes of tissue regenerative dysfunction at advanced stages of life. Here, we revise exciting recent findings on why stem cells age and the consequences on tissue regeneration, with a special focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle. We also highlight newly identified common molecular pathways affecting diverse types of aging stem cells, such as altered proteostasis, metabolism, or senescence entry, and discuss the questions raised by these findings. Finally, we comment on emerging stem cell rejuvenation strategies, principally emanating from studies on muscle stem cells, which will surely burst tissue regeneration research for future benefit of the increasing human aging population.

  6. Rejuvenating stem cells to restore muscle regeneration in aging

    PubMed Central

    Bengal, Eyal; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Serrano, Antonio L.; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-01-01

    Adult muscle stem cells, originally called satellite cells, are essential for muscle repair and regeneration throughout life. Besides a gradual loss of mass and function, muscle aging is characterized by a decline in the repair capacity, which blunts muscle recovery after injury in elderly individuals. A major effort has been dedicated in recent years to deciphering the causes of satellite cell dysfunction in aging animals, with the ultimate goal of rejuvenating old satellite cells and improving muscle function in elderly people. This review focuses on the recently identified network of cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors and processes contributing to the decline of satellite cells in old animals. Some studies suggest that aging-related satellite-cell decay is mostly caused by age-associated extrinsic environmental changes that could be reversed by a “youthful environment”. Others propose a central role for cell-intrinsic mechanisms, some of which are not reversed by environmental changes. We believe that these proposals, far from being antagonistic, are complementary and that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors contribute to muscle stem cell dysfunction during aging-related regenerative decline. The low regenerative potential of old satellite cells may reflect the accumulation of deleterious changes during the life of the cell; some of these changes may be inherent (intrinsic) while others result from the systemic and local environment (extrinsic). The present challenge is to rejuvenate aged satellite cells that have undergone reversible changes to provide a possible approach to improving muscle repair in the elderly. PMID:28163911

  7. Repairing skeletal muscle: regenerative potential of skeletal muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Dellavalle, Arianna; Diaz-Manera, Jordi; Messina, Graziella; Cossu, Giulio

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle damaged by injury or by degenerative diseases such as muscular dystrophy is able to regenerate new muscle fibers. Regeneration mainly depends upon satellite cells, myogenic progenitors localized between the basal lamina and the muscle fiber membrane. However, other cell types outside the basal lamina, such as pericytes, also have myogenic potency. Here, we discuss the main properties of satellite cells and other myogenic progenitors as well as recent efforts to obtain myogenic cells from pluripotent stem cells for patient-tailored cell therapy. Clinical trials utilizing these cells to treat muscular dystrophies, heart failure, and stress urinary incontinence are also briefly outlined. PMID:20051632

  8. Adult stem cells: hopes and hypes of regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Dulak, Józef; Szade, Krzysztof; Szade, Agata; Nowak, Witold; Józkowicz, Alicja

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are self-renewing cells that can differentiate into specialized cell type(s). Pluripotent stem cells, i.e. embryonic stem cells (ESC) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) differentiate into cells of all three embryonic lineages. Multipotent stem cells, like hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), can develop into multiple specialized cells in a specific tissue. Unipotent cells differentiate only into one cell type, like e.g. satellite cells of skeletal muscle. There are many examples of successful clinical applications of stem cells. Over million patients worldwide have benefited from bone marrow transplantations performed for treatment of leukemias, anemias or immunodeficiencies. Skin stem cells are used to heal severe burns, while limbal stem cells can regenerate the damaged cornea. Pluripotent stem cells, especially the patient-specific iPSC, have a tremendous therapeutic potential, but their clinical application will require overcoming numerous drawbacks. Therefore, the use of adult stem cells, which are multipotent or unipotent, can be at present a more achievable strategy. Noteworthy, some studies ascribed particular adult stem cells as pluripotent. However, despite efforts, the postulated pluripotency of such events like "spore-like cells", "very small embryonic-like stem cells" or "multipotent adult progenitor cells" have not been confirmed in stringent independent studies. Also plasticity of the bone marrow-derived cells which were suggested to differentiate e.g. into cardiomyocytes, has not been positively verified, and their therapeutic effect, if observed, results rather from the paracrine activity. Here we discuss the examples of recent studies on adult stem cells in the light of current understanding of stem cell biology.

  9. Selective Expansion of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells From Bulk Muscle Cells in Soft Three-Dimensional Fibrin Gel.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pei; Zhou, Yalu; Wu, Furen; Hong, Yuanfan; Wang, Xin; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Mosenson, Jeffrey; Wu, Wen-Shu

    2017-02-28

    Muscle stem cells (MuSCs) exhibit robust myogenic potential in vivo, thus providing a promising curative treatment for muscle disorders. Ex vivo expansion of adult MuSCs is highly desired to achieve a therapeutic cell dose because of their scarcity in limited muscle biopsies. Sorting of pure MuSCs is generally required for all the current culture systems. Here we developed a soft three-dimensional (3D) salmon fibrin gel culture system that can selectively expand mouse MuSCs from bulk skeletal muscle preparations without cell sorting and faithfully maintain their regenerative capacity in culture. Our study established a novel platform for convenient ex vivo expansion of MuSCs, thus greatly advancing stem cell-based therapies for various muscle disorders. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017.

  10. Differentiation rather than aging of muscle stem cells abolishes their telomerase activity

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Matthew S.; Carlson, Morgan E.; Conboy, Irina M.

    2009-01-01

    A general feature of stem cells is the ability to routinely proliferate in order to build, maintain, and repair organ systems. Accordingly, embryonic and germline, as well as some adult stem cells, produce the telomerase enzyme at various levels of expression. Our results show that, while muscle is a largely post-mitotic tissue, the muscle stem cells (satellite cells) that maintain this biological system throughout adult life do indeed display robust telomerase activity. Conversely, primary myoblasts (the immediate progeny of satellite cells) quickly and dramatically down-regulate telomerase activity. This work thus suggests that satellite cells, and early transient myoblasts, may be more promising therapeutic candidates for regenerative medicine than traditionally utilized myoblast cultures. Muscle atrophy accompanies human aging, and satellite cells endogenous to aged muscle can be triggered to regenerate old tissue by exogenous molecular cues. Therefore, we also examined whether these aged muscle stem cells would produce tissue that is “young” with respect to telomere maintenance. Interestingly, this work shows that the telomerase activity in muscle stem cells is largely retained into old age wintin inbred “long” telomere mice and in wild-derived short telomere mouse strains, and that age-specific telomere shortening is undetectable in the old differentiated muscle fibers of either strain. Summarily, this work establishes that young and old muscle stem cells, but not necessarily their progeny, myoblasts, are likely to produce tissue with normal telomere maintenance when used in molecular and regenerative medicine approaches for tissue repair. PMID:19455648

  11. Requirement of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion for skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Goh, Qingnian; Millay, Douglas P

    2017-02-10

    Fusion of skeletal muscle stem/progenitor cells is required for proper development and regeneration, however the significance of this process during adult muscle hypertrophy has not been explored. In response to muscle overload after synergist ablation in mice, we show that myomaker, a muscle specific membrane protein essential for myoblast fusion, is activated mainly in muscle progenitors and not myofibers. We rendered muscle progenitors fusion-incompetent through genetic deletion of myomaker in muscle stem cells and observed a complete reduction of overload-induced hypertrophy. This blunted hypertrophic response was associated with a reduction in Akt and p70s6k signaling and protein synthesis, suggesting a link between myonuclear accretion and activation of pro-hypertrophic pathways. Furthermore, fusion-incompetent muscle exhibited increased fibrosis after muscle overload, indicating a protective role for normal stem cell activity in reducing myofiber strain associated with hypertrophy. These findings reveal an essential contribution of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion during physiological adult muscle hypertrophy.

  12. Requirement of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion for skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Qingnian; Millay, Douglas P

    2017-01-01

    Fusion of skeletal muscle stem/progenitor cells is required for proper development and regeneration, however the significance of this process during adult muscle hypertrophy has not been explored. In response to muscle overload after synergist ablation in mice, we show that myomaker, a muscle specific membrane protein essential for myoblast fusion, is activated mainly in muscle progenitors and not myofibers. We rendered muscle progenitors fusion-incompetent through genetic deletion of myomaker in muscle stem cells and observed a complete reduction of overload-induced hypertrophy. This blunted hypertrophic response was associated with a reduction in Akt and p70s6k signaling and protein synthesis, suggesting a link between myonuclear accretion and activation of pro-hypertrophic pathways. Furthermore, fusion-incompetent muscle exhibited increased fibrosis after muscle overload, indicating a protective role for normal stem cell activity in reducing myofiber strain associated with hypertrophy. These findings reveal an essential contribution of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion during physiological adult muscle hypertrophy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20007.001 PMID:28186492

  13. Generalized Potential of Adult Neural Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Diana L.; Johansson, Clas B.; Wilbertz, Johannes; Veress, Biborka; Nilsson, Erik; Karlström, Helena; Lendahl, Urban; Frisén, Jonas

    2000-06-01

    The differentiation potential of stem cells in tissues of the adult has been thought to be limited to cell lineages present in the organ from which they were derived, but there is evidence that some stem cells may have a broader differentiation repertoire. We show here that neural stem cells from the adult mouse brain can contribute to the formation of chimeric chick and mouse embryos and give rise to cells of all germ layers. This demonstrates that an adult neural stem cell has a very broad developmental capacity and may potentially be used to generate a variety of cell types for transplantation in different diseases.

  14. Molecular circuitry of stem cell fate in skeletal muscle regeneration, ageing, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Almada, Albert E.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite cells are adult myogenic stem cells that function to repair damaged muscle. The enduring capacity for muscle regeneration requires efficient satellite cell expansion after injury, differentiation to produce myoblasts that can reconstitute damaged fibers, and self-renewal to replenish the muscle stem cell pool for subsequent rounds of injury and repair. Emerging studies indicate that misregulations of satellite cell fate and function contribute to age-associated muscle dysfunction and influence the severity of muscle diseases, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). It has also become apparent that satellite cell fate during muscle regeneration, aging, and in the context of DMD is governed by an intricate network of intrinsic and extrinsic regulators. Targeted manipulation of this network may offer unique opportunities for muscle regenerative medicine. PMID:26956195

  15. The emergence of Pax7-expressing muscle stem cells during vertebrate head muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Julia Meireles; Hawrot, Katarzyna; Sharpe, Colin; Noble, Anna; Wood, William M.; Jorge, Erika C.; Goldhamer, David J.; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Pax7 expressing muscle stem cells accompany all skeletal muscles in the body and in healthy individuals, efficiently repair muscle after injury. Currently, the in vitro manipulation and culture of these cells is still in its infancy, yet muscle stem cells may be the most promising route toward the therapy of muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies. It is often overlooked that muscular dystrophies affect head and body skeletal muscle differently. Moreover, these muscles develop differently. Specifically, head muscle and its stem cells develop from the non-somitic head mesoderm which also has cardiac competence. To which extent head muscle stem cells retain properties of the early head mesoderm and might even be able to switch between a skeletal muscle and cardiac fate is not known. This is due to the fact that the timing and mechanisms underlying head muscle stem cell development are still obscure. Consequently, it is not clear at which time point one should compare the properties of head mesodermal cells and head muscle stem cells. To shed light on this, we traced the emergence of head muscle stem cells in the key vertebrate models for myogenesis, chicken, mouse, frog and zebrafish, using Pax7 as key marker. Our study reveals a common theme of head muscle stem cell development that is quite different from the trunk. Unlike trunk muscle stem cells, head muscle stem cells do not have a previous history of Pax7 expression, instead Pax7 expression emerges de-novo. The cells develop late, and well after the head mesoderm has committed to myogenesis. We propose that this unique mechanism of muscle stem cell development is a legacy of the evolutionary history of the chordate head mesoderm. PMID:26042028

  16. Chromatin signaling in muscle stem cells: interpreting the regenerative microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Brancaccio, Arianna; Palacios, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Muscle regeneration in the adult occurs in response to damage at expenses of a population of adult stem cells, the satellite cells. Upon injury, either physical or genetic, signals released within the satellite cell niche lead to the commitment, expansion and differentiation of the pool of muscle progenitors to repair damaged muscle. To achieve this goal satellite cells undergo a dramatic transcriptional reprogramming to coordinately activate and repress specific subset of genes. Although the epigenetics of muscle regeneration has been extensively discussed, less emphasis has been put on how extra-cellular cues are translated into the specific chromatin reorganization necessary for progression through the myogenic program. In this review we will focus on how satellite cells sense the regenerative microenvironment in physiological and pathological circumstances, paying particular attention to the mechanism through which the external stimuli are transduced to the nucleus to modulate chromatin structure and gene expression. We will discuss the pathways involved and how alterations in this chromatin signaling may contribute to satellite cells dysfunction during aging and disease. PMID:25904863

  17. Muscle repair and regeneration: stem cells, scaffolds, and the contributions of skeletal muscle to amphibian limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Milner, Derek J; Cameron, Jo Ann

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle possesses a robust innate capability for repair of tissue damage. Natural repair of muscle damage is a stepwise process that requires the coordinated activity of a number of cell types, including infiltrating macrophages, resident myogenic and non-myogenic stem cells, and connective tissue fibroblasts. Despite the proficiency of this intrinsic repair capability, severe injuries that result in significant loss of muscle tissue overwhelm the innate repair process and require intervention if muscle function is to be restored. Recent advances in stem cell biology, regenerative medicine, and materials science have led to attempts at developing tissue engineering-based methods for repairing severe muscle defects. Muscle tissue also plays a role in the ability of tailed amphibians to regenerate amputated limbs through epimorphic regeneration. Muscle contributes adult stem cells to the amphibian regeneration blastema, but it can also contribute blastemal cells through the dedifferentiation of multinucleate myofibers into mononuclear precursors. This fascinating plasticity and its contributions to limb regeneration have prompted researchers to investigate the potential for mammalian muscle to undergo dedifferentiation. Several works have shown that mammalian myotubes can be fragmented into mononuclear cells and induced to re-enter the cell cycle, but mature myofibers are resistant to fragmentation. However, recent works suggest that there may be a path to inducing fragmentation of mature myofibers into proliferative multipotent cells with the potential for use in muscle tissue engineering and regenerative therapies.

  18. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J.

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  19. Novel insight into stem cell trafficking in dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Farini, Andrea; Villa, Chiara; Manescu, Adrian; Fiori, Fabrizio; Giuliani, Alessandra; Razini, Paola; Sitzia, Clementina; Del Fraro, Giulia; Belicchi, Marzia; Meregalli, Mirella; Rustichelli, Franco; Torrente, Yvan

    2012-01-01

    Recently published reports have described possible cellular therapy approaches to regenerate muscle tissues using arterial route delivery. However, the kinetic of distribution of these migratory stem cells within injected animal muscular dystrophy models is unknown. Using living X-ray computed microtomography, we established that intra-arterially injected stem cells traffic to multiple muscle tissues for several hours until their migration within dystrophic muscles. Injected stem cells express multiple traffic molecules, including VLA-4, LFA-1, CD44, and the chemokine receptor CXCR4, which are likely to direct these cells into dystrophic muscles. In fact, the majority of intra-arterially injected stem cells access the muscle tissues not immediately after the injection, but after several rounds of recirculation. We set up a new, living, 3D-imaging approach, which appears to be an important way to investigate the kinetic of distribution of systemically injected stem cells within dystrophic muscle tissues, thereby providing supportive data for future clinical applications.

  20. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    SciTech Connect

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal {beta} III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  1. Differential Gene Expression Profiling of Dystrophic Dog Muscle after MuStem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Babarit, Candice; Larcher, Thibaut; Dubreil, Laurence; Leroux, Isabelle; Zuber, Céline; Ledevin, Mireille; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Fromes, Yves; Cherel, Yan; Guevel, Laetitia; Rouger, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background Several adult stem cell populations exhibit myogenic regenerative potential, thus representing attractive candidates for therapeutic approaches of neuromuscular diseases such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). We have recently shown that systemic delivery of MuStem cells, skeletal muscle-resident stem cells isolated in healthy dog, generates the remodelling of muscle tissue and gives rise to striking clinical benefits in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog. This global effect, which is observed in the clinically relevant DMD animal model, leads us to question here the molecular pathways that are impacted by MuStem cell transplantation. To address this issue, we compare the global gene expression profile between healthy, GRMD and MuStem cell treated GRMD dog muscle, four months after allogenic MuStem cell transplantation. Results In the dystrophic context of the GRMD dog, disease-related deregulation is observed in the case of 282 genes related to various processes such as inflammatory response, regeneration, calcium ion binding, extracellular matrix organization, metabolism and apoptosis regulation. Importantly, we reveal the impact of MuStem cell transplantation on several molecular and cellular pathways based on a selection of 31 genes displaying signals specifically modulated by the treatment. Concomitant with a diffuse dystrophin expression, a histological remodelling and a stabilization of GRMD dog clinical status, we show that cell delivery is associated with an up-regulation of genes reflecting a sustained enhancement of muscle regeneration. We also identify a decreased mRNA expression of a set of genes having metabolic functions associated with lipid homeostasis and energy. Interestingly, ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is highly enhanced in GRMD dog muscle after systemic delivery of MuStem cells. Conclusions Overall, our results provide the first high-throughput characterization of GRMD dog muscle and throw new light on the

  2. Adult Stem Cells and Diseases of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Boyette, Lisa B.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of adult stem cells pools is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis into old age. Exhaustion of adult stem cell pools as a result of deranged metabolic signaling, premature senescence as a response to oncogenic insults to the somatic genome, and other causes contribute to tissue degeneration with age. Both progeria, an extreme example of early-onset aging, and heritable longevity have provided avenues to study regulation of the aging program and its impact on adult stem cell compartments. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the effects of aging on stem cells, contributions of stem cells to age-related pathologies, examples of signaling pathways at work in these processes, and lessons about cellular aging gleaned from the development and refinement of cellular reprogramming technologies. We highlight emerging therapeutic approaches to manipulation of key signaling pathways corrupting or exhausting adult stem cells, as well as other approaches targeted at maintaining robust stem cell pools to extend not only lifespan but healthspan. PMID:24757526

  3. Biomechanical Origins of Muscle Stem Cell Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James B; Cheng, Richard Y; Davoudi, Sadegh; Gilbert, Penney M

    2016-04-10

    Skeletal muscle, the most abundant and widespread tissue in the human body, contracts upon receiving electrochemical signals from the nervous system to support essential functions such as thermoregulation, limb movement, blinking, swallowing and breathing. Reconstruction of adult muscle tissue relies on a pool of mononucleate, resident muscle stem cells, known as "satellite cells", expressing the paired-box transcription factor Pax7 necessary for their specification during embryonic development and long-term maintenance during adult life. Satellite cells are located around the myofibres in a niche at the interface of the basal lamina and the host fibre plasma membrane (i.e., sarcolemma), at a very low frequency. Upon damage to the myofibres, quiescent satellite cells are activated and give rise to a population of transient amplifying myogenic progenitor cells, which eventually exit the cell cycle permanently and fuse to form new myofibres and regenerate the tissue. A subpopulation of satellite cells self-renew and repopulate the niche, poised to respond to future demands. Harnessing the potential of satellite cells relies on a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms guiding their regulation in vivo. Over the past several decades, studies revealed many signal transduction pathways responsible for satellite cell fate decisions, but the niche cues driving the activation and silencing of these pathways are less clear. Here we explore the scintillating possibility that considering the dynamic changes in the biophysical properties of the skeletal muscle, namely stiffness, and the stretch and shear forces to which a myofibre can be subjected to may provide missing information necessary to gain a full understanding of satellite cell niche regulation.

  4. Imbalance between pSmad3 and Notch induces CDK inhibitors in old muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Morgan E; Hsu, Michael; Conboy, Irina M

    2008-07-24

    Adult skeletal muscle robustly regenerates throughout an organism's life, but as the muscle ages, its ability to repair diminishes and eventually fails. Previous work suggests that the regenerative potential of muscle stem cells (satellite cells) is not triggered in the old muscle because of a decline in Notch activation, and that it can be rejuvenated by forced local activation of Notch. Here we report that, in addition to the loss of Notch activation, old muscle produces excessive transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta (but not myostatin), which induces unusually high levels of TGF-beta pSmad3 in resident satellite cells and interferes with their regenerative capacity. Importantly, endogenous Notch and pSmad3 antagonize each other in the control of satellite-cell proliferation, such that activation of Notch blocks the TGF-beta-dependent upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p15, p16, p21 and p27, whereas inhibition of Notch induces them. Furthermore, in muscle stem cells, Notch activity determines the binding of pSmad3 to the promoters of these negative regulators of cell-cycle progression. Attenuation of TGF-beta/pSmad3 in old, injured muscle restores regeneration to satellite cells in vivo. Thus a balance between endogenous pSmad3 and active Notch controls the regenerative competence of muscle stem cells, and deregulation of this balance in the old muscle microniche interferes with regeneration.

  5. Advancements in stem cells treatment of skeletal muscle wasting

    PubMed Central

    Meregalli, Mirella; Farini, Andrea; Sitzia, Clementina; Torrente, Yvan

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders, in which progressive muscle wasting and weakness is often associated with exhaustion of muscle regeneration potential. Although physiological properties of skeletal muscle tissue are now well known, no treatments are effective for these diseases. Muscle regeneration was attempted by means transplantation of myogenic cells (from myoblast to embryonic stem cells) and also by interfering with the malignant processes that originate in pathological tissues, such as uncontrolled fibrosis and inflammation. Taking into account the advances in the isolation of new subpopulation of stem cells and in the creation of artificial stem cell niches, we discuss how these emerging technologies offer great promises for therapeutic approaches to muscle diseases and muscle wasting associated with aging. PMID:24575052

  6. Satellite-like cells contribute to pax7-dependent skeletal muscle repair in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Berberoglu, Michael A; Gallagher, Thomas L; Morrow, Zachary T; Talbot, Jared C; Hromowyk, Kimberly J; Tenente, Inês M; Langenau, David M; Amacher, Sharon L

    2017-04-15

    Satellite cells, also known as muscle stem cells, are responsible for skeletal muscle growth and repair in mammals. Pax7 and Pax3 transcription factors are established satellite cell markers required for muscle development and regeneration, and there is great interest in identifying additional factors that regulate satellite cell proliferation, differentiation, and/or skeletal muscle regeneration. Due to the powerful regenerative capacity of many zebrafish tissues, even in adults, we are exploring the regenerative potential of adult zebrafish skeletal muscle. Here, we show that adult zebrafish skeletal muscle contains cells similar to mammalian satellite cells. Adult zebrafish satellite-like cells have dense heterochromatin, express Pax7 and Pax3, proliferate in response to injury, and show peak myogenic responses 4-5 days post-injury (dpi). Furthermore, using a pax7a-driven GFP reporter, we present evidence implicating satellite-like cells as a possible source of new muscle. In lieu of central nucleation, which distinguishes regenerating myofibers in mammals, we describe several characteristics that robustly identify newly-forming myofibers from surrounding fibers in injured adult zebrafish muscle. These characteristics include partially overlapping expression in satellite-like cells and regenerating myofibers of two RNA-binding proteins Rbfox2 and Rbfoxl1, known to regulate embryonic muscle development and function. Finally, by analyzing pax7a; pax7b double mutant zebrafish, we show that Pax7 is required for adult skeletal muscle repair, as it is in the mouse.

  7. [Application prospect of adult stem cells in male infertility].

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui-Feng; Xiong, Cheng-Liang

    2013-05-01

    The study on stem cells is a hot field in biomedical science in recent years, and has furthered from laboratory to clinical application. Stem cells, according to their developmental stage and differential properties, can be divided into embryonic stem cells, induced PS cells and adult stem cells, among which, adult stem cells have already been applied to the clinical treatment of many systemic diseases. Currently, the study of spermatogonial stem cells and adult stem cells is in the front of the basic researches on the treatment of male infertility, but the time has not yet arrived for their clinical application. This paper outlines the application prospect of adult stem cells in male infertility.

  8. Identification of a new stem cell population that generates Drosophila flight muscles.

    PubMed

    Gunage, Rajesh D; Reichert, Heinrich; VijayRaghavan, K

    2014-08-18

    How myoblast populations are regulated for the formation of muscles of different sizes is an essentially unanswered question. The large flight muscles of Drosophila develop from adult muscle progenitor (AMP) cells set-aside embryonically. The thoracic segments are all allotted the same small AMP number, while those associated with the wing-disc proliferate extensively to give rise to over 2500 myoblasts. An initial amplification occurs through symmetric divisions and is followed by a switch to asymmetric divisions in which the AMPs self-renew and generate post-mitotic myoblasts. Notch signaling controls the initial amplification of AMPs, while the switch to asymmetric division additionally requires Wingless, which regulates Numb expression in the AMP lineage. In both cases, the epidermal tissue of the wing imaginal disc acts as a niche expressing the ligands Serrate and Wingless. The disc-associated AMPs are a novel muscle stem cell population that orchestrates the early phases of adult flight muscle development.

  9. Mature adult dystrophic mouse muscle environment does not impede efficient engrafted satellite cell regeneration and self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Boldrin, Luisa; Zammit, Peter Steven; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2009-10-01

    Changes that occur in the skeletal muscle environment with the progress of muscular dystrophies may affect stem cell function and result in impaired muscle regeneration. It has previously been suggested that the success of stem cell transplantation could therefore be dependent both on the properties of the cell itself and on the host muscle environment. Here we engrafted young and mature adult mdx-nude mice, which are the genetic homolog of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, with a small number of satellite cells freshly isolated from young, normal donor mice. We found that the donor satellite cells contributed to muscle regeneration and self-renewal as efficiently within mature adult, as in young, dystrophic host muscle. Donor-derived satellite cells also contributed to robust regeneration after further injury, showing that they were functional despite the more advanced dystrophic muscle environment. These findings provide evidence that muscle tissue in a later stage of dystrophy may be effectively treated by stem cells.

  10. The central role of muscle stem cells in regenerative failure with aging

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Helen M; Cosgrove, Benjamin D; Ho, Andrew T V

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass, function, and repair capacity all progressively decline with aging, restricting mobility, voluntary function, and quality of life. Skeletal muscle repair is facilitated by a population of dedicated muscle stem cells (MuSCs), also known as satellite cells, that reside in anatomically defined niches within muscle tissues. In adult tissues, MuSCs are retained in a quiescent state until they are primed to regenerate damaged muscle through cycles of self-renewal divisions. With aging, muscle tissue homeostasis is progressively disrupted and the ability of MuSCs to repair injured muscle markedly declines. Until recently, this decline has been largely attributed to extrinsic age-related alterations in the microenvironment to which MuSCs are exposed. However, as highlighted in this Perspective, recent reports show that MuSCs also progressively undergo cell-intrinsic alterations that profoundly affect stem cell regenerative function with aging. A more comprehensive understanding of the interplay of stem cell–intrinsic and extrinsic factors will set the stage for improving cell therapies capable of restoring tissue homeostasis and enhancing muscle repair in the aged. PMID:26248268

  11. Stem Cells and Tissue Niche: Two Faces of the Same Coin of Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scicchitano, Bianca Maria; Sica, Gigliola; Musarò, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Capacity of adult muscle to regenerate in response to injury stimuli represents an important homeostatic process. Regeneration is a highly coordinated program that partially recapitulates the embryonic developmental program. However, muscle regeneration is severely compromised in several pathological conditions. It is likely that the restricted tissue repair program under pathological conditions is due to either progressive loss of stem cell populations or to missing signals that limit the damaged tissues to efficiently activate a regenerative program. It is therefore plausible that loss of control over these cell fates might lead to a pathological cell transdifferentiation, limiting the ability of a pathological muscle to sustain an efficient regenerative process. The critical role of microenvironment on stem cells activity and muscle regeneration is discussed. PMID:28078070

  12. Changes in Communication between Muscle Stem Cells and their Environment with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Thorley, Matthew; Malatras, Apostolos; Duddy, William; Le Gall, Laura; Mouly, Vincent; Butler Browne, Gillian; Duguez, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aging is associated with both muscle weakness and a loss of muscle mass, contributing towards overall frailty in the elderly. Aging skeletal muscle is also characterised by a decreasing efficiency in repair and regeneration, together with a decline in the number of adult stem cells. Commensurate with this are general changes in whole body endocrine signalling, in local muscle secretory environment, as well as in intrinsic properties of the stem cells themselves. The present review discusses the various mechanisms that may be implicated in these age-associated changes, focusing on aspects of cell-cell communication and long-distance signalling factors, such as levels of circulating growth hormone, IL-6, IGF1, sex hormones, and inflammatory cytokines. Changes in the local environment are also discussed, implicating IL-6, IL-4, FGF-2, as well as other myokines, and processes that lead to thickening of the extra-cellular matrix. These factors, involved primarily in communication, can also modulate the intrinsic properties of muscle stem cells, including reduced DNA accessibility and repression of specific genes by methylation. Finally we discuss the decrease in the stem cell pool, particularly the failure of elderly myoblasts to re-quiesce after activation, and the consequences of all these changes on general muscle homeostasis. PMID:27858742

  13. Skeletal muscle stem cells from animals I. Basic cell biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle stem cells from food-producing animals have been of interest to agricultural life scientists seeking to develop a better understanding of the molecular regulation of lean tissue (skeletal muscle protein hypertrophy) and intramuscular fat (marbling) development. Enhanced understanding...

  14. Role of muscle stem cells during skeletal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Abou-Khalil, Rana; Yang, Frank; Lieu, Shirley; Julien, Anais; Perry, Jaselle; Pereira, Catia; Relaix, Frédéric; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph; Colnot, Céline

    2015-05-01

    Although the importance of muscle in skeletal regeneration is well recognized clinically, the mechanisms by which muscle supports bone repair have remained elusive. Muscle flaps are often used to cover the damaged bone after traumatic injury yet their contribution to bone healing is not known. Here, we show that direct bone-muscle interactions are required for periosteum activation and callus formation, and that muscle grafts provide a source of stem cells for skeletal regeneration. We investigated the role of satellite cells, the muscle stem cells. Satellite cells loss in Pax7(-/-) mice and satellite cell ablation in Pax7(Cre) (ERT) (2/) (+) ;DTA(f/f) mice impaired bone regeneration. Although satellite cells did not contribute as a large source of cells endogenously, they exhibited a potential to contribute to bone repair after transplantation. The fracture healing phenotype in Pax7(Cre) (ERT) (2/) (+) ;DTA(f/f) mice was associated with decreased bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), insulin-like growth factor 1, and fibroblast growth factor 2 expression that are normally upregulated in response to fracture in satellite cells. Exogenous rhBMP2 improved bone healing in Pax7(Cre) (ERT) (2/) (+) ;DTA(f/f) mice further supporting the role of satellite cells as a source of growth factors. These results provide the first functional evidence for a direct contribution of muscle to bone regeneration with important clinical implications as it may impact the use of muscle flaps, muscle stem cells, and growth factors in orthopedic applications.

  15. Translational research of adult stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Gen

    2015-11-26

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) secondary to chronic coronary artery disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Its prevalence is increasing despite advances in medical and device therapies. Cell based therapies generating new cardiomyocytes and vessels have emerged as a promising treatment to reverse functional deterioration and prevent the progression to CHF. Functional efficacy of progenitor cells isolated from the bone marrow and the heart have been evaluated in preclinical large animal models. Furthermore, several clinical trials using autologous and allogeneic stem cells and progenitor cells have demonstrated their safety in humans yet their clinical relevance is inconclusive. This review will discuss the clinical therapeutic applications of three specific adult stem cells that have shown particularly promising regenerative effects in preclinical studies, bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell, heart derived cardiosphere-derived cell and cardiac stem cell. We will also discuss future therapeutic approaches.

  16. Stem Cell Antigen-1 in Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Harold S.; Samad, Tahmina; Cholsiripunlert, Sompob; Khalifian, Saami; Gong, Wenhui; Ritner, Carissa; Aurigui, Julian; Ling, Vivian; Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Bennett, Stephen; Hoffman, Julien; Oishi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) is a member of the Ly-6 multigene family encoding highly homologous, glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins. Sca-1 is expressed on muscle-derived stem cells and myogenic precursors recruited to sites of muscle injury. We previously reported that inhibition of Sca-1 expression stimulated myoblast proliferation in vitro and regulated the tempo of muscle repair in vivo. Despite its function in myoblast expansion during muscle repair, a role for Sca-1 in normal, post-natal muscle has not been thoroughly investigated. We systematically compared Sca-1-/- (KO) and Sca-1+/+ (WT) mice and hindlimb muscles to elucidate the tissue, contractile, and functional effects of Sca-1 in young and aging animals. Comparison of muscle volume, fibrosis, myofiber cross-sectional area, and Pax7+ myoblast number showed little differences between ages or genotypes. Exercise protocols, however, demonstrated decreased stamina in KO versus WT mice, with young KO mice achieving results similar to aging WT animals. In addition, KO mice did not improve with practice, while WT animals demonstrated conditioning over time. Surprisingly, myomechanical analysis of isolated muscles showed that KO young muscle generated more force and experienced less fatigue. However, KO muscle also demonstrated incomplete relaxation with fatigue. These findings suggest that Sca-1 is necessary for muscle conditioning with exercise, and that deficient conditioning in Sca-1 KO animals becomes more pronounced with age. PMID:24042315

  17. Isolation of skeletal muscle stem cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Cheung, Tom H; Charville, Gregory W; Rando, Thomas A

    2015-10-01

    The prospective isolation of purified stem cell populations has dramatically altered the field of stem cell biology, and it has been a major focus of research across tissues in different organisms. Muscle stem cells (MuSCs) are now among the most intensely studied stem cell populations in mammalian systems, and the prospective isolation of these cells has allowed cellular and molecular characterizations that were not dreamed of a decade ago. In this protocol, we describe how to isolate MuSCs from limb muscles of adult mice by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We provide a detailed description of the physical and enzymatic dissociation of mononucleated cells from limb muscles, a procedure that is essential in order to maximize cell yield. We also describe a FACS-based method that is used subsequently to obtain highly pure populations of either quiescent or activated MuSCs (VCAM(+)CD31(-)CD45(-)Sca1(-)). The isolation process takes ∼5-6 h to complete. The protocol also allows for the isolation of endothelial cells, hematopoietic cells and mesenchymal stem cells from muscle tissue.

  18. Pericytes, integral components of adult hematopoietic stem cell niches.

    PubMed

    Sá da Bandeira, D; Casamitjana, J; Crisan, M

    2017-03-01

    The interest in perivascular cells as a niche for adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is significantly growing. In the adult bone marrow (BM), perivascular cells and HSCs cohabit. Among perivascular cells, pericytes are precursors of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) that are capable of differentiating into osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. In situ, pericytes are recognised by their localisation to the abluminal side of the blood vessel wall and closely associated with endothelial cells, in combination with the expression of markers such as CD146, neural glial 2 (NG2), platelet derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), nestin (Nes) and/or leptin receptor (LepR). However, not all pericytes share a common phenotype: different immunophenotypes can be associated with distinct mesenchymal features, including hematopoietic support. In adult BM, arteriolar and sinusoidal pericytes control HSC behaviour, maintenance, quiescence and trafficking through paracrine effects. Different groups identified and characterized hematopoietic supportive pericyte subpopulations using various markers and mouse models. In this review, we summarize recent work performed by others to understand the role of the perivascular niche in the biology of HSCs in adults, as well as their importance in the development of therapies.

  19. Generation of pluripotent stem cells from adult human testis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Sabine; Renninger, Markus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Wiesner, Tina; Just, Lothar; Bonin, Michael; Aicher, Wilhelm; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Mattheus, Ulrich; Mack, Andreas; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Minger, Stephen; Matzkies, Matthias; Reppel, Michael; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Stenzl, Arnulf; Skutella, Thomas

    2008-11-20

    Human primordial germ cells and mouse neonatal and adult germline stem cells are pluripotent and show similar properties to embryonic stem cells. Here we report the successful establishment of human adult germline stem cells derived from spermatogonial cells of adult human testis. Cellular and molecular characterization of these cells revealed many similarities to human embryonic stem cells, and the germline stem cells produced teratomas after transplantation into immunodeficient mice. The human adult germline stem cells differentiated into various types of somatic cells of all three germ layers when grown under conditions used to induce the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. We conclude that the generation of human adult germline stem cells from testicular biopsies may provide simple and non-controversial access to individual cell-based therapy without the ethical and immunological problems associated with human embryonic stem cells.

  20. A Twist2-dependent progenitor cell contributes to adult skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Garry, Glynnis A; Li, Stephen; Bezprozvannaya, Svetlana; Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Chen, Beibei; Shelton, John M; Jaichander, Priscilla; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle possesses remarkable regenerative potential due to satellite cells, an injury-responsive stem cell population located beneath the muscle basal lamina that expresses Pax7. By lineage tracing of progenitor cells expressing the Twist2 (Tw2) transcription factor in mice, we discovered a myogenic lineage that resides outside the basal lamina of adult skeletal muscle. Tw2(+) progenitors are molecularly and anatomically distinct from satellite cells, are highly myogenic in vitro, and can fuse with themselves and with satellite cells. Tw2(+) progenitors contribute specifically to type IIb/x myofibres during adulthood and muscle regeneration, and their genetic ablation causes wasting of type IIb myofibres. We show that Tw2 expression maintains progenitor cells in an undifferentiated state that is poised to initiate myogenesis in response to appropriate cues that extinguish Tw2 expression. Tw2-expressing myogenic progenitors represent a previously unrecognized, fibre-type-specific stem cell involved in postnatal muscle growth and regeneration.

  1. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke: Challenges and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Cha, Jae Min; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell therapies include (a) the limited source of engraftable stem cells, (b) the presence of optimal time window for stem cell therapies, (c) inherited limitation of stem cells in terms of growth, trophic support, and differentiation potential, and (d) possible transplanted cell-mediated adverse effects, such as tumor formation. Here, we discuss recent advances that overcome these hurdles in adult stem cell therapy for stroke. PMID:27733032

  2. Regenerative function of immune system: Modulation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep; McPhee, Jamie S; Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2016-05-01

    Ageing is characterised by progressive deterioration of physiological systems and the loss of skeletal muscle mass is one of the most recognisable, leading to muscle weakness and mobility impairments. This review highlights interactions between the immune system and skeletal muscle stem cells (widely termed satellite cells or myoblasts) to influence satellite cell behaviour during muscle regeneration after injury, and outlines deficits associated with ageing. Resident neutrophils and macrophages in skeletal muscle become activated when muscle fibres are damaged via stimuli (e.g. contusions, strains, avulsions, hyperextensions, ruptures) and release high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors into the microenvironment. These localised responses serve to attract additional immune cells which can reach in excess of 1×10(5) immune cell/mm(3) of skeletal muscle in order to orchestrate the repair process. T-cells have a delayed response, reaching peak activation roughly 4 days after the initial damage. The cytokines and growth factors released by activated T-cells play a key role in muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration, although the precise mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. T-cells in older people display limited ability to activate satellite cell proliferation and migration which is likely to contribute to insufficient muscle repair and, consequently, muscle wasting and weakness. If the factors released by T-cells to activate satellite cells can be identified, it may be possible to develop therapeutic agents to enhance muscle regeneration and reduce the impact of muscle wasting during ageing and disease.

  3. Muscle-derived hematopoietic stem cells are hematopoietic in origin

    PubMed Central

    McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L.; Jackson, Kathyjo A.; Camargo, Fernando D.; Ferrari, Giuliana; Mavilio, Fulvio; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2002-01-01

    It has recently been shown that mononuclear cells from murine skeletal muscle contain the potential to repopulate all major peripheral blood lineages in lethally irradiated mice, but the origin of this activity is unknown. We have fractionated muscle cells on the basis of hematopoietic markers to show that the active population exclusively expresses the hematopoietic stem cell antigens Sca-1 and CD45. Muscle cells obtained from 6- to 8-week-old C57BL/6-CD45.1 mice and enriched for cells expressing Sca-1 and CD45 were able to generate hematopoietic but not myogenic colonies in vitro and repopulated multiple hematopoietic lineages of lethally irradiated C57BL/6-CD45.2 mice. These data show that muscle-derived hematopoietic stem cells are likely derived from the hematopoietic system and are a result not of transdifferentiation of myogenic stem cells but instead of the presence of substantial numbers of hematopoietic stem cells in the muscle. Although CD45-negative cells were highly myogenic in vitro and in vivo, CD45-positive muscle-derived cells displayed only very limited myogenic activity and only in vivo. PMID:11830662

  4. Pax7-expressing satellite cells are indispensable for adult skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sambasivan, Ramkumar; Yao, Roseline; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Paldi, Andràs; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Guenou, Hind; Malissen, Bernard; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Galy, Anne

    2011-09-01

    Distinct cell populations with regenerative capacity have been reported to contribute to myofibres after skeletal muscle injury, including non-satellite cells as well as myogenic satellite cells. However, the relative contribution of these distinct cell types to skeletal muscle repair and homeostasis and the identity of adult muscle stem cells remain unknown. We generated a model for the conditional depletion of satellite cells by expressing a human diphtheria toxin receptor under control of the murine Pax7 locus. Intramuscular injection of diphtheria toxin during muscle homeostasis, or combined with muscle injury caused by myotoxins or exercise, led to a marked loss of muscle tissue and failure to regenerate skeletal muscle. Moreover, the muscle tissue became infiltrated by inflammatory cells and adipocytes. This localised loss of satellite cells was not compensated for endogenously by other cell types, but muscle regeneration was rescued after transplantation of adult Pax7(+) satellite cells alone. These findings indicate that other cell types with regenerative potential depend on the presence of the satellite cell population, and these observations have important implications for myopathic conditions and stem cell-based therapeutic approaches.

  5. Sox10(+) adult stem cells contribute to biomaterial encapsulation and microvascularization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Wang, Aijun; Wu, Fan; Qiu, Xuefeng; Li, Ye; Chu, Julia; Huang, Wen-Chin; Xu, Kang; Gong, Xiaohua; Li, Song

    2017-01-10

    Implanted biomaterials and biomedical devices generally induce foreign body reaction and end up with encapsulation by a dense avascular fibrous layer enriched in extracellular matrix. Fibroblasts/myofibroblasts are thought to be the major cell type involved in encapsulation, but it is unclear whether and how stem cells contribute to this process. Here we show, for the first time, that Sox10(+) adult stem cells contribute to both encapsulation and microvessel formation. Sox10(+) adult stem cells were found sparsely in the stroma of subcutaneous loose connective tissues. Upon subcutaneous biomaterial implantation, Sox10(+) stem cells were activated and recruited to the biomaterial scaffold, and differentiated into fibroblasts and then myofibroblasts. This differentiation process from Sox10(+) stem cells to myofibroblasts could be recapitulated in vitro. On the other hand, Sox10(+) stem cells could differentiate into perivascular cells to stabilize newly formed microvessels. Sox10(+) stem cells and endothelial cells in three-dimensional co-culture self-assembled into microvessels, and platelet-derived growth factor had chemotactic effect on Sox10(+) stem cells. Transplanted Sox10(+) stem cells differentiated into smooth muscle cells to stabilize functional microvessels. These findings demonstrate the critical role of adult stem cells in tissue remodeling and unravel the complexity of stem cell fate determination.

  6. Sox10+ adult stem cells contribute to biomaterial encapsulation and microvascularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Wang, Aijun; Wu, Fan; Qiu, Xuefeng; Li, Ye; Chu, Julia; Huang, Wen-Chin; Xu, Kang; Gong, Xiaohua; Li, Song

    2017-01-01

    Implanted biomaterials and biomedical devices generally induce foreign body reaction and end up with encapsulation by a dense avascular fibrous layer enriched in extracellular matrix. Fibroblasts/myofibroblasts are thought to be the major cell type involved in encapsulation, but it is unclear whether and how stem cells contribute to this process. Here we show, for the first time, that Sox10+ adult stem cells contribute to both encapsulation and microvessel formation. Sox10+ adult stem cells were found sparsely in the stroma of subcutaneous loose connective tissues. Upon subcutaneous biomaterial implantation, Sox10+ stem cells were activated and recruited to the biomaterial scaffold, and differentiated into fibroblasts and then myofibroblasts. This differentiation process from Sox10+ stem cells to myofibroblasts could be recapitulated in vitro. On the other hand, Sox10+ stem cells could differentiate into perivascular cells to stabilize newly formed microvessels. Sox10+ stem cells and endothelial cells in three-dimensional co-culture self-assembled into microvessels, and platelet-derived growth factor had chemotactic effect on Sox10+ stem cells. Transplanted Sox10+ stem cells differentiated into smooth muscle cells to stabilize functional microvessels. These findings demonstrate the critical role of adult stem cells in tissue remodeling and unravel the complexity of stem cell fate determination. PMID:28071739

  7. Adult Mammalian Neural Stem Cells and Neurogenesis: Five Decades Later

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Allison M.; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Adult somatic stem cells in various organs maintain homeostatic tissue regeneration and enhance plasticity. Since its initial discovery five decades ago, investigations of adult neurogenesis and neural stem cells have led to an established and expanding field that has significantly influenced many facets of neuroscience, developmental biology and regenerative medicine. Here we review recent progress and focus on questions related to adult mammalian neural stem cells that also apply to other somatic stem cells. We further discuss emerging topics that are guiding the field toward better understanding adult neural stem cells and ultimately applying these principles to improve human health. PMID:26431181

  8. Molecular aging and rejuvenation of human muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Morgan E; Suetta, Charlotte; Conboy, Michael J; Aagaard, Per; Mackey, Abigail; Kjaer, Michael; Conboy, Irina

    2009-01-01

    Very little remains known about the regulation of human organ stem cells (in general, and during the aging process), and most previous data were collected in short-lived rodents. We examined whether stem cell aging in rodents could be extrapolated to genetically and environmentally variable humans. Our findings establish key evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of human stem cell aging. We find that satellite cells are maintained in aged human skeletal muscle, but fail to activate in response to muscle attrition, due to diminished activation of Notch compounded by elevated transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)/phospho Smad3 (pSmad3). Furthermore, this work reveals that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/phosphate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) signalling declines in human muscle with age, and is important for activating Notch in human muscle stem cells. This molecular understanding, combined with data that human satellite cells remain intrinsically young, introduced novel therapeutic targets. Indeed, activation of MAPK/Notch restored ‘youthful’ myogenic responses to satellite cells from 70-year-old humans, rendering them similar to cells from 20-year-old humans. These findings strongly suggest that aging of human muscle maintenance and repair can be reversed by ‘youthful’ calibration of specific molecular pathways. PMID:20049743

  9. Optical control of muscle function by transplantation of stem cell-derived motor neurons in mice.

    PubMed

    Bryson, J Barney; Machado, Carolina Barcellos; Crossley, Martin; Stevenson, Danielle; Bros-Facer, Virginie; Burrone, Juan; Greensmith, Linda; Lieberam, Ivo

    2014-04-04

    Damage to the central nervous system caused by traumatic injury or neurological disorders can lead to permanent loss of voluntary motor function and muscle paralysis. Here, we describe an approach that circumvents central motor circuit pathology to restore specific skeletal muscle function. We generated murine embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons that express the light-sensitive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2, which we then engrafted into partially denervated branches of the sciatic nerve of adult mice. These engrafted motor neurons not only reinnervated lower hind-limb muscles but also enabled their function to be restored in a controllable manner using optogenetic stimulation. This synthesis of regenerative medicine and optogenetics may be a successful strategy to restore muscle function after traumatic injury or disease.

  10. Possible Local Stem Cells Activation by Microcurrent Application in Experimentally Injured Soleus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zickri, Maha Baligh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe injuries in skeletal muscle result in muscle weakness that delays recovery and contribute to progressive decline in muscle function. Microcurrent therapy (MCT) is a novel treatment method used in soft tissue injury and tissue regeneration therapy. The regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle tissue resides in satellite cells, the quiescent adult stem cells. Aim: The present work aimed at investigating the relation between microcurrent therapy and local stem cells in regeneration of induced skeletal muscle injury in albino rat. Materials and methods: Twenty six adult male albino rats were divided into Sham group, Injury group (I): subjected to soleus muscle injury and subdivided into subgroups I1 & I2 sacrificed 2 and 4 weeks after injury respectively. Microcurrent group (M): subjected to muscle injury and micro-current was applied. The animals were subdivided into subgroups M1 and M2 sacrificed 2 and 4 weeks after injury. Histological, immunohistochemical and morphometric studies were performed. Results: Atypical fibers widely separated by infiltrating cells and strong acidophilic sarcoplasm with focal vacuolations were found in injury group. In M1 subgroup few atypical fibers were found. In M2 subgroup multiple typical fibers were detected. A significant decrease in the mean area of atypical fibers, a significant increase in the mean area% of alpha SMA+ve cells and that of CD34+ve cells were found in microcurrent group compared to injury group. Conclusion: A definite therapeutic effect of the microcurrent was found on induced skeletal muscle injury. This effect was proved to be related to satellite cell activation. PMID:25473445

  11. Chromatin modifications as determinants of muscle stem cell quiescence and chronological aging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Cheung, Tom H; Charville, Gregory W; Hurgo, Bernadette Marie Ceniza; Leavitt, Tripp; Shih, Johnathan; Brunet, Anne; Rando, Thomas A

    2013-07-11

    The ability to maintain quiescence is critical for the long-term maintenance of a functional stem cell pool. To date, the epigenetic and transcriptional characteristics of quiescent stem cells and how they change with age remain largely unknown. In this study, we explore the chromatin features of adult skeletal muscle stem cells, or satellite cells (SCs), which reside predominantly in a quiescent state in fully developed limb muscles of both young and aged mice. Using a ChIP-seq approach to obtain global epigenetic profiles of quiescent SCs (QSCs), we show that QSCs possess a permissive chromatin state in which few genes are epigenetically repressed by Polycomb group (PcG)-mediated histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), and a large number of genes encoding regulators that specify nonmyogenic lineages are demarcated by bivalent domains at their transcription start sites (TSSs). By comparing epigenetic profiles of QSCs from young and old mice, we also provide direct evidence that, with age, epigenetic changes accumulate and may lead to a functional decline in quiescent stem cells. These findings highlight the importance of chromatin mapping in understanding unique features of stem cell identity and stem cell aging.

  12. Gene Expression Profiling of Muscle Stem Cells Identifies Novel Regulators of Postnatal Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Rochat, Anne; Mademtzoglou, Despoina; Morais, Jessica; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Auradé, Frédéric; Chang, Ted Hung-Tse; Zammit, Peter S.; Relaix, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration require a population of muscle stem cells, the satellite cells, located in close contact to the myofiber. These cells are specified during fetal and early postnatal development in mice from a Pax3/7 population of embryonic progenitor cells. As little is known about the genetic control of their formation and maintenance, we performed a genome-wide chronological expression profile identifying the dynamic transcriptomic changes involved in establishment of muscle stem cells through life, and acquisition of muscle stem cell properties. We have identified multiple genes and pathways associated with satellite cell formation, including set of genes specifically induced (EphA1, EphA2, EfnA1, EphB1, Zbtb4, Zbtb20) or inhibited (EphA3, EphA4, EphA7, EfnA2, EfnA3, EfnA4, EfnA5, EphB2, EphB3, EphB4, EfnBs, Zfp354c, Zcchc5, Hmga2) in adult stem cells. Ephrin receptors and ephrins ligands have been implicated in cell migration and guidance in many tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we show that Ephrin receptors and ephrins ligands are also involved in regulating the adult myogenic program. Strikingly, impairment of EPHB1 function in satellite cells leads to increased differentiation at the expense of self-renewal in isolated myofiber cultures. In addition, we identified new transcription factors, including several zinc finger proteins. ZFP354C and ZCCHC5 decreased self-renewal capacity when overexpressed, whereas ZBTB4 increased it, and ZBTB20 induced myogenic progression. The architectural and transcriptional regulator HMGA2 was involved in satellite cell activation. Together, our study shows that transcriptome profiling coupled with myofiber culture analysis, provides an efficient system to identify and validate candidate genes implicated in establishment/maintenance of muscle stem cells. Furthermore, tour de force transcriptomic profiling provides a wealth of data to inform for future stem cell-based muscle therapies. PMID:27446912

  13. Adult stem cell-based apexogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Shu, Li-Hong; Yan, Ming; Dai, Wen-Yong; Li, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Guang-Dong; Yu, Jin-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Generally, the dental pulp needs to be removed when it is infected, and root canal therapy (RCT) is usually required in which infected dental pulp is replaced with inorganic materials (paste and gutta percha). This treatment approach ultimately brings about a dead tooth. However, pulp vitality is extremely important to the tooth itself, since it provides nutrition and acts as a biosensor to detect the potential pathogenic stimuli. Despite the reported clinical success rate, RCT-treated teeth are destined to be devitalized, brittle and susceptible to postoperative fracture. Recently, the advances and achievements in the field of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine have inspired novel biological approaches to apexogenesis in young patients suffering from pulpitis or periapical periodontitis. This review mainly focuses on the benchtop and clinical regeneration of root apex mediated by adult stem cells. Moreover, current strategies for infected pulp therapy are also discussed here. PMID:25332909

  14. Vitamin D induces myogenic differentiation in skeletal muscle derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Braga, Melissa; Simmons, Zena; Norris, Keith C; Ferrini, Monica G; Artaza, Jorge N

    2017-04-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting is a serious disorder associated with health conditions such as aging, chronic kidney disease and AIDS. Vitamin D is most widely recognized for its regulation of calcium and phosphate homeostasis in relation to bone development and maintenance. Recently, vitamin D supplementation has been shown to improve muscle performance and reduce the risk of falls in vitamin D deficient older adults. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanism(s) or the role it plays in myogenic differentiation. We examined the effect of 1,25-D3 on myogenic cell differentiation in skeletal muscle derived stem cells. Primary cultures of skeletal muscle satellite cells were isolated from the tibialis anterior, soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of 8-week-old C57/BL6 male mice and then treated with 1,25-D3 The efficiency of satellite cells isolation determined by PAX7+ cells was 81%, and they expressed VDR. Incubation of satellite cells with 1,25-D3 induces increased expression of: (i) MYOD, (ii) MYOG, (iii) MYC2, (iv) skeletal muscle fast troponin I and T, (v) MYH1, (vi) IGF1 and 2, (vii) FGF1 and 2, (viii) BMP4, (ix) MMP9 and (x) FST. It also promotes myotube formation and decreases the expression of MSTN. In conclusion, 1,25-D3 promoted a robust myogenic effect on satellite cells responsible for the regeneration of muscle after injury or muscle waste. This study provides a mechanistic justification for vitamin D supplementation in conditions characterized by loss of muscle mass and also in vitamin D deficient older adults with reduced muscle mass and strength, and increased risk of falls.

  15. Asymmetric division of clonal muscle stem cells coordinates muscle regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, David B; Nguyen, Phong Dang; Siegel, Ashley L; Ehrlich, Ophelia V; Sonntag, Carmen; Phan, Jennifer M N; Berger, Silke; Ratnayake, Dhanushika; Hersey, Lucy; Berger, Joachim; Verkade, Heather; Hall, Thomas E; Currie, Peter D

    2016-07-08

    Skeletal muscle is an example of a tissue that deploys a self-renewing stem cell, the satellite cell, to effect regeneration. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted a role for asymmetric divisions in renewing rare "immortal" stem cells and generating a clonal population of differentiation-competent myoblasts. However, this model currently lacks in vivo validation. We define a zebrafish muscle stem cell population analogous to the mammalian satellite cell and image the entire process of muscle regeneration from injury to fiber replacement in vivo. This analysis reveals complex interactions between satellite cells and both injured and uninjured fibers and provides in vivo evidence for the asymmetric division of satellite cells driving both self-renewal and regeneration via a clonally restricted progenitor pool.

  16. Action of obestatin in skeletal muscle repair: stem cell expansion, muscle growth, and microenvironment remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Beiroa, Daniel; Moresi, Viviana; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Lin, Wei; Viñuela, Juan E; Señarís, José; García-Caballero, Tomás; Casanueva, Felipe F; Nogueiras, Rubén; Gallego, Rosalía; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Adamo, Sergio; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2015-06-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies for skeletal muscle diseases, such as physical injuries and myopathies, depends on the knowledge of regulatory signals that control the myogenic process. The obestatin/GPR39 system operates as an autocrine signal in the regulation of skeletal myogenesis. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury and several cellular strategies, we explored the potential use of obestatin as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of trauma-induced muscle injuries. Our results evidenced that the overexpression of the preproghrelin, and thus obestatin, and GPR39 in skeletal muscle increased regeneration after muscle injury. More importantly, the intramuscular injection of obestatin significantly enhanced muscle regeneration by simulating satellite stem cell expansion as well as myofiber hypertrophy through a kinase hierarchy. Added to the myogenic action, the obestatin administration resulted in an increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the consequent microvascularization, with no effect on collagen deposition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the potential inhibition of myostatin during obestatin treatment might contribute to its myogenic action improving muscle growth and regeneration. Overall, our data demonstrate successful improvement of muscle regeneration, indicating obestatin is a potential therapeutic agent for skeletal muscle injury and would benefit other myopathies related to muscle regeneration.

  17. Action of Obestatin in Skeletal Muscle Repair: Stem Cell Expansion, Muscle Growth, and Microenvironment Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Beiroa, Daniel; Moresi, Viviana; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Lin, Wei; Viñuela, Juan E; Señarís, José; García-Caballero, Tomás; Casanueva, Felipe F; Nogueiras, Rubén; Gallego, Rosalía; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Adamo, Sergio; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2015-01-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies for skeletal muscle diseases, such as physical injuries and myopathies, depends on the knowledge of regulatory signals that control the myogenic process. The obestatin/GPR39 system operates as an autocrine signal in the regulation of skeletal myogenesis. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury and several cellular strategies, we explored the potential use of obestatin as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of trauma-induced muscle injuries. Our results evidenced that the overexpression of the preproghrelin, and thus obestatin, and GPR39 in skeletal muscle increased regeneration after muscle injury. More importantly, the intramuscular injection of obestatin significantly enhanced muscle regeneration by simulating satellite stem cell expansion as well as myofiber hypertrophy through a kinase hierarchy. Added to the myogenic action, the obestatin administration resulted in an increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the consequent microvascularization, with no effect on collagen deposition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the potential inhibition of myostatin during obestatin treatment might contribute to its myogenic action improving muscle growth and regeneration. Overall, our data demonstrate successful improvement of muscle regeneration, indicating obestatin is a potential therapeutic agent for skeletal muscle injury and would benefit other myopathies related to muscle regeneration. PMID:25762009

  18. A developmentally regulated switch from stem cells to dedifferentiation for limb muscle regeneration in newts.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Ng, Nathaniel Chuen Yin; Yang Yu, Zhan; Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Maruo, Fumiaki; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-03-30

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, is able to repeatedly regenerate its limbs throughout its lifespan, whereas other amphibians deteriorate or lose their ability to regenerate limbs after metamorphosis. It remains to be determined whether such an exceptional ability of the newt is either attributed to a strategy, which controls regeneration in larvae, or on a novel one invented by the newt after metamorphosis. Here we report that the newt switches the cellular mechanism for limb regeneration from a stem/progenitor-based mechanism (larval mode) to a dedifferentiation-based one (adult mode) as it transits beyond metamorphosis. We demonstrate that larval newts use stem/progenitor cells such as satellite cells for new muscle in a regenerated limb, whereas metamorphosed newts recruit muscle fibre cells in the stump for the same purpose. We conclude that the newt has evolved novel strategies to secure its regenerative ability of the limbs after metamorphosis.

  19. From skeletal muscle to stem cells: an innovative and minimally-invasive process for multiple species.

    PubMed

    Ceusters, J; Lejeune, J-Ph; Sandersen, C; Niesten, A; Lagneaux, L; Serteyn, D

    2017-04-06

    Bone marrow and adipose tissue represent the two most commonly exploited sources of adult mesenchymal stem cells for musculoskeletal applications. Unfortunately the sampling of bone marrow and fat tissue is invasive and does not always lead to a sufficient number of cells. The present study describes a novel sampling method based on microbiopsy of skeletal muscle in man, pigs, dogs and horses. The process includes explant of the sample, Percoll density gradient for isolation and subsequent culture of the cells. We further characterized the cells and identified their clonogenic and immunomodulatory capacities, their immune-phenotyping behavior and their capability to differentiate into chondroblasts, osteoblasts and adipocytes. In conclusion, this report describes a novel and easy-to-use technique of skeletal muscle-derived mesenchymal stem cell harvest, culture, characterization. This technique is transposable to a multitude of different animal species.

  20. A developmentally regulated switch from stem cells to dedifferentiation for limb muscle regeneration in newts

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Ng, Nathaniel Chuen Yin; Yang Yu, Zhan; Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Maruo, Fumiaki; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-01-01

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, is able to repeatedly regenerate its limbs throughout its lifespan, whereas other amphibians deteriorate or lose their ability to regenerate limbs after metamorphosis. It remains to be determined whether such an exceptional ability of the newt is either attributed to a strategy, which controls regeneration in larvae, or on a novel one invented by the newt after metamorphosis. Here we report that the newt switches the cellular mechanism for limb regeneration from a stem/progenitor-based mechanism (larval mode) to a dedifferentiation-based one (adult mode) as it transits beyond metamorphosis. We demonstrate that larval newts use stem/progenitor cells such as satellite cells for new muscle in a regenerated limb, whereas metamorphosed newts recruit muscle fibre cells in the stump for the same purpose. We conclude that the newt has evolved novel strategies to secure its regenerative ability of the limbs after metamorphosis. PMID:27026263

  1. Rejuvenation of the muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D; Gilbert, Penney M; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P; Corbel, Stephane Y; Llewellyn, Michael E; Delp, Scott L; Blau, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    The elderly often suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging owing in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of MuSCs from aged mice are intrinsically defective relative to MuSCs from young mice, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation. This deficiency is correlated with a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and is due to elevated activity of the p38α and p38β mitogen-activated kinase pathway. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the MuSC population from aged mice to transient inhibition of p38α and p38β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional MuSC population from aged mice, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration and serial transplantation as well as strengthening of damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy for the elderly.

  2. Rejuvenation of the aged muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; Gilbert, Penney M.; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P.; Corbel, Stephane Y.; Llewellyn, Michael E.; Delp, Scott L.; Blau, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    The aged suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging due in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of aged MuSCs are intrinsically defective relative to young MuSCs, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation due to a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and that have elevated p38α/β MAPK activity. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the aged MuSC population to transient inhibition of p38α/β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional aged MuSC population, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration, serial transplantation, and strengthening damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy in aged individuals. PMID:24531378

  3. Potential of laryngeal muscle regeneration using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dirja, Bayu Tirta; Yoshie, Susumu; Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Nomoto, Yukio; Wada, Ikuo; Hazama, Akihiro; Omori, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells may be a new potential cell source for laryngeal muscle regeneration in the treatment of vocal fold atrophy after recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Objectives Unilateral vocal fold paralysis can lead to degeneration, atrophy, and loss of force of the thyroarytenoid muscle. At present, there are some treatments such as thyroplasty, arytenoid adduction, and vocal fold injection. However, such treatments cannot restore reduced mass of the thyroarytenoid muscle. iPS cells have been recognized as supplying a potential resource for cell transplantation. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the use of iPS cells for the regeneration of laryngeal muscle through the evaluation of both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods Skeletal muscle cells were generated from tdTomato-labeled iPS cells using embryoid body formation. Differentiation into skeletal muscle cells was analyzed by gene expression and immunocytochemistry. The tdTomato-labeled iPS cell-derived skeletal muscle cells were transplanted into the left atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle. To evaluate the engraftment of these cells after transplantation, immunohistochemistry was performed. Results The tdTomato-labeled iPS cells were successfully differentiated into skeletal muscle cells through an in vitro experiment. These cells survived in the atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle after transplantation.

  4. Arginine Methylation by PRMT1 Regulates Muscle Stem Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Roméo Sébastien; Vogel, Gillian; Li, Xing; Yu, Zhenbao; Li, Shawn; Richard, Stéphane

    2017-02-01

    Quiescent muscle stem cells (MSCs) become activated in response to skeletal muscle injury to initiate regeneration. Activated MSCs proliferate and differentiate to repair damaged fibers or self-renew to maintain the pool and ensure future regeneration. The balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation is a tightly regulated process controlled by a genetic cascade involving determinant transcription factors such as Pax7, Myf5, MyoD, and MyoG. Recently, there have been several reports about the role of arginine methylation as a requirement for epigenetically mediated control of muscle regeneration. Here we report that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is expressed in MSCs and that conditional ablation of PRMT1 in MSCs using Pax7(CreERT2) causes impairment of muscle regeneration. Importantly, PRMT1-deficient MSCs have enhanced cell proliferation after injury but are unable to terminate the myogenic differentiation program, leading to regeneration failure. We identify the coactivator of Six1, Eya1, as a substrate of PRMT1. We show that PRMT1 methylates Eya1 in vitro and that loss of PRMT1 function in vivo prevents Eya1 methylation. Moreover, we observe that PRMT1-deficient MSCs have reduced expression of Eya1/Six1 target MyoD due to disruption of Eya1 recruitment at the MyoD promoter and subsequent Eya1-mediated coactivation. These findings suggest that arginine methylation by PRMT1 regulates muscle stem cell fate through the Eya1/Six1/MyoD axis.

  5. Distinct and Overlapping Sarcoma Subtypes Initiated from Muscle Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Jordan M.; Añó, Leonor; Li, Zhizhong; Van Mater, David; Bennett, Brian D.; Sachdeva, Mohit; Lagutina, Irina; Zhang, Minsi; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Dodd, Leslie G.; Cardona, Diana M.; Dodd, Rebecca D.; Williams, Nerissa; Ma, Yan; Lepper, Christoph; Linardic, Corinne M.; Mukherjee, Sayan; Grosveld, Gerard C.; Fan, Chen-Ming; Kirsch, David G.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children, while undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS) is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas diagnosed in adults. To investigate the myogenic cell(s) of origin of these sarcomas, we used Pax7-CreER and MyoD-CreER mice to transform Pax7+ and MyoD+ myogenic progenitors by expressing oncogenic KrasG12D and deleting p53 in vivo. Pax7-CreER mice developed RMS and UPS, while MyoD-CreER mice developed UPS. Using gene set enrichment analysis, RMS and UPS each clustered specifically within their human counterparts. These results suggest that RMS and UPS have distinct and overlapping cells of origin within the muscle lineage. Taken together, we have established novel mouse models of soft tissue sarcoma from muscle stem and progenitor cells. SIGNIFICANCE Although muscle stem cells have been presumed to be a cell of origin for RMS, studies with constitutive Cre drivers expressed in Myf6-expressing cells or adipocyte P2-expressing cells suggest that cells of origin for RMS can be differentiated myofibers or adipogenic precursors, respectively. However, recent studies have demonstrated that Myf6 is expressed in muscle stem cell precursors, revealing a potential limitation of utilizing constitutive Cre drivers for cell of origin studies. Here, using inducible CreER mice, we mutate genes relevant to human RMS specifically in Pax7-expressing or MyoD-expressing cells. Our results suggest that RMS can be initiated in muscle stem cells, while UPS can be initiated in activated (Pax7+MyoD+) satellite cells. PMID:24239359

  6. Brief report: Blockade of Notch signaling in muscle stem cells causes muscular dystrophic phenotype and impaired muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuibin; Shen, Huangxuan; Jin, Baofeng; Gu, Yumei; Chen, Zirong; Cao, Chunxia; Hu, Chengbin; Keller, Charles; Pear, Warren S; Wu, Lizi

    2013-04-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of devastating diseases characterized by progressive muscle weakness and degeneration, with etiologies including muscle gene mutations and regenerative defects of muscle stem cells. Notch signaling is critical for skeletal myogenesis and has important roles in maintaining the muscle stem cell pool and preventing premature muscle differentiation. To investigate the functional impact of Notch signaling blockade in muscle stem cells, we developed a conditional knock-in mouse model in which endogenous Notch signaling is specifically blocked in muscle stem cell compartment. Mice with Notch signaling inhibition in muscle stem cells showed several muscular dystrophic features and impaired muscle regeneration. Analyses of satellite cells and isolated primary myoblasts revealed that Notch signaling blockade in muscle stem cells caused reduced activation and proliferation of satellite cells but enhanced differentiation of myoblasts. Our data thus indicate that Notch signaling controls processes that are critical to regeneration in muscular dystrophy, suggesting that Notch inhibitor therapies could have potential side effects on muscle functions.

  7. Laminin regulates PDGFRβ+ cell stemness and muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Norris, Erin H.; E. Mason, Christopher; Strickland, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Muscle-resident PDGFRβ+ cells, which include pericytes and PW1+ interstitial cells (PICs), play a dual role in muscular dystrophy. They can either undergo myogenesis to promote muscle regeneration or differentiate into adipocytes and other cells to compromise regeneration. How the differentiation and fate determination of PDGFRβ+ cells are regulated, however, remains unclear. Here, by utilizing a conditional knockout mouse line, we report that PDGFRβ+ cell-derived laminin inhibits their proliferation and adipogenesis, but is indispensable for their myogenesis. In addition, we show that laminin alone is able to partially reverse the muscle dystrophic phenotype in these mice at the molecular, structural and functional levels. Further RNAseq analysis reveals that laminin regulates PDGFRβ+ cell differentiation/fate determination via gpihbp1. These data support a critical role of laminin in the regulation of PDGFRβ+ cell stemness, identify an innovative target for future drug development and may provide an effective treatment for muscular dystrophy. PMID:27138650

  8. TAK1 modulates satellite stem cell homeostasis and skeletal muscle repair.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yuji; Hindi, Sajedah M; Sato, Shuichi; Xiong, Guangyan; Akira, Shizuo; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-12-09

    Satellite cells are resident adult stem cells that are required for regeneration of skeletal muscle. However, signalling mechanisms that regulate satellite cell function are less understood. Here we demonstrate that transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is important in satellite stem cell homeostasis and function. Inactivation of TAK1 in satellite cells inhibits muscle regeneration in adult mice. TAK1 is essential for satellite cell proliferation and its inactivation causes precocious differentiation. Moreover, TAK1-deficient satellite cells exhibit increased oxidative stress and undergo spontaneous cell death, primarily through necroptosis. TAK1 is required for the activation of NF-κB and JNK in satellite cells. Forced activation of NF-κB improves survival and proliferation of TAK1-deficient satellite cells. Furthermore, TAK1-mediated activation of JNK is essential to prevent oxidative stress and precocious differentiation of satellite cells. Collectively, our study suggests that TAK1 is required for maintaining the pool of satellite stem cells and for regenerative myogenesis.

  9. Myostatin: a modulator of skeletal-muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Walsh, F S; Celeste, A J

    2005-12-01

    Myostatin, or GDF-8 (growth and differentiation factor-8), was first identified through sequence identity with members of the BMP (bone morphogenetic protein)/TGF-beta (transforming growth factor-beta) superfamily. The skeletal-muscle-specific expression pattern of myostatin suggested a role in muscle development. Mice with a targeted deletion of the myostatin gene exhibit a hypermuscular phenotype. In addition, inactivating mutations in the myostatin gene have been identified in 'double muscled' cattle breeds, such as the Belgian Blue and Piedmontese, as well as in a hypermuscular child. These findings define myostatin as a negative regulator of skeletal-muscle development. Myostatin binds with high affinity to the receptor serine threonine kinase ActRIIB (activin type IIB receptor), which initiates signalling through a smad2/3-dependent pathway. In an effort to validate myostatin as a therapeutic target in a post-embryonic setting, a neutralizing antibody was developed by screening for inhibition of myostatin binding to ActRIIB. Administration of this antimyostatin antibody to adult mice resulted in a significant increase in both muscle mass and functional strength. Importantly, similar results were obtained in a murine model of muscular dystrophy, the mdx mouse. Unlike the myostatin-deficient animals, which exhibit both muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia, the antibody-treated mice demonstrate increased musculature through a hypertrophic mechanism. These results validate myostatin inhibition as a therapeutic approach to muscle wasting diseases such as muscular dystrophy, sarcopenic frailty of the elderly and amylotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  10. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Zhu, Kexian; Cheng, Jason K W; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Yan, Winston X; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Church, George M; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-22

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated, but still functional, protein. In this study, we developed and tested a direct gene-editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored the Dmd reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes, and muscle stem cells after local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle.

  11. Synergist Ablation as a Rodent Model to Study Satellite Cell Dynamics in Adult Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Tyler J; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    In adult skeletal muscles, satellite cells are the primary myogenic stem cells involved in myogenesis. Normally, they remain in a quiescent state until activated by a stimulus, after which they proliferate, differentiate, and fuse into an existing myofiber or form a de novo myofiber. To study satellite cell dynamics in adult murine models, most studies utilize regeneration models in which the muscle is severely damaged and requires the participation from satellite cells in order to repair. Here, we describe a model to study satellite cell behavior in muscle hypertrophy that is independent of muscle regeneration.Synergist ablation surgery involves the surgical removal of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles resulting in functional overload of the remaining plantaris muscle. This functional overload results in myofiber hypertrophy, as well as the activation, proliferation, and fusion of satellite cells into the myofibers. Within 2 weeks of functional overload, satellite cell content increases approximately 275 %, an increase that is accompanied with a ~60 % increase in the number of myonuclei. Therefore, this can be used as an alternative model to study satellite cell behavior in adulthood that is different from regeneration, and capable of revealing new satellite cell functions in regulating muscle adaptation.

  12. Muscle-derived stem/progenitor cell dysfunction limits healthspan and lifespan in a murine progeria model.

    PubMed

    Lavasani, Mitra; Robinson, Andria R; Lu, Aiping; Song, Minjung; Feduska, Joseph M; Ahani, Bahar; Tilstra, Jeremy S; Feldman, Chelsea H; Robbins, Paul D; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Huard, Johnny

    2012-01-03

    With ageing, there is a loss of adult stem cell function. However, there is no direct evidence that this has a causal role in ageing-related decline. We tested this using muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells (MDSPCs) in a murine progeria model. Here we show that MDSPCs from old and progeroid mice are defective in proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Intraperitoneal administration of MDSPCs, isolated from young wild-type mice, to progeroid mice confer significant lifespan and healthspan extension. The transplanted MDSPCs improve degenerative changes and vascularization in tissues where donor cells are not detected, suggesting that their therapeutic effect may be mediated by secreted factor(s). Indeed, young wild-type-MDSPCs rescue proliferation and differentiation defects of aged MDSPCs when co-cultured. These results establish that adult stem/progenitor cell dysfunction contributes to ageing-related degeneration and suggests a therapeutic potential of post-natal stem cells to extend health.

  13. Regulation of skeletal muscle stem cells by fibroblast growth factors.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Bradley; Vogler, Thomas Orion; Gadek, Katherine; Olwin, Bradley B

    2017-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are essential for self-renewal of skeletal muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and required for maintenance and repair of skeletal muscle. Satellite cells express high levels of FGF receptors 1 and 4, low levels of FGF receptor 3, and little or no detectable FGF receptor 2. Of the multiple FGFs that influence satellite cell function in culture, FGF2 and FGF6 are the only members that regulate satellite cell function in vivo by activating ERK MAPK, p38α/β MAPKs, PI3 kinase, PLCγ and STATs. Regulation of FGF signaling is complex in satellite cells, requiring Syndecan-4, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, as well as ß1-integrin and fibronectin. During aging, reduced responsiveness to FGF diminishes satellite cell self-renewal, leading to impaired skeletal muscle regeneration and depletion of satellite cells. Mislocalization of ß1-integrin, reductions in fibronectin, and alterations in heparan sulfate content all contribute to reduced FGF responsiveness in satellite cells. How these cell surface proteins regulate satellite cell self-renewal is incompletely understood. Here we summarize the current knowledge, highlighting the role(s) for FGF signaling in skeletal muscle regeneration, satellite cell behavior, and age-induced muscle wasting. Developmental Dynamics, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cardiac muscle plasticity in adult and embryo by heart-derived progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hidemasa; Chi, Xuan; Bradfute, Steven B; Mishina, Yuji; Pocius, Jennifer; Michael, Lloyd H; Behringer, Richard R; Schwartz, Robert J; Entman, Mark L; Schneider, Michael D

    2004-05-01

    The evidence of cardiomyocyte proliferation in damaged heart implied cardiac regeneration might occur by resident or extra cardiac stem cells. However, the specification and origin of these cells remain unknown. Here, we report using fluorescence-activated cell sorting that cardiac progenitor cells resided in adult heart and colocalized with small capillary vessels, within the stem cell antigen (Sca-1) population expressing high telomerase activity. Notably, hematopoietic stem cells capable of efflux Hoechst 33342, termed side population cells, also were identified within the heart-derived cells. The cardiac progenitor cells (CD45(-)/CD34(-)) express neither cardiac muscle nor endothelial cell markers at an undifferentiated stage. The exposure of 5-azacytidine induced cardiac differentiation, which depends, in part, on Bmpr1a, a type IA receptor for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). The capability of adult Sca1(+) cells to adopt a cardiac muscle in embryogenesis was substantiated by blastocyst injection, using progenitors from the adult hearts of transgenic mice that harbor a bacterial artificial chromosome expressing GFP via the Nkx-2.5 locus. Intravenously injected progenitors, shortly after ischemic/reperfusion, homed and functionally differentiated 3.5% of total left ventricle in the host myocardium. Differentiation included both fusion-independent and fusion-associated components, proved by the Cre/loxP donor/recipient system. Our studies suggest that endogenous cardiac progenitors reside in the adult heart, regenerate cardiomyocytes functionally, and integrate into the existing heart circuitry.

  15. Arginine Methylation by PRMT1 Regulates Muscle Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Roméo Sébastien; Vogel, Gillian; Li, Xing; Yu, Zhenbao; Li, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quiescent muscle stem cells (MSCs) become activated in response to skeletal muscle injury to initiate regeneration. Activated MSCs proliferate and differentiate to repair damaged fibers or self-renew to maintain the pool and ensure future regeneration. The balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation is a tightly regulated process controlled by a genetic cascade involving determinant transcription factors such as Pax7, Myf5, MyoD, and MyoG. Recently, there have been several reports about the role of arginine methylation as a requirement for epigenetically mediated control of muscle regeneration. Here we report that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is expressed in MSCs and that conditional ablation of PRMT1 in MSCs using Pax7CreERT2 causes impairment of muscle regeneration. Importantly, PRMT1-deficient MSCs have enhanced cell proliferation after injury but are unable to terminate the myogenic differentiation program, leading to regeneration failure. We identify the coactivator of Six1, Eya1, as a substrate of PRMT1. We show that PRMT1 methylates Eya1 in vitro and that loss of PRMT1 function in vivo prevents Eya1 methylation. Moreover, we observe that PRMT1-deficient MSCs have reduced expression of Eya1/Six1 target MyoD due to disruption of Eya1 recruitment at the MyoD promoter and subsequent Eya1-mediated coactivation. These findings suggest that arginine methylation by PRMT1 regulates muscle stem cell fate through the Eya1/Six1/MyoD axis. PMID:27849571

  16. zebraflash transgenic lines for in vivo bioluminescence imaging of stem cells and regeneration in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Hui; Durand, Ellen; Wang, Jinhu; Zon, Leonard I; Poss, Kenneth D

    2013-12-01

    The zebrafish has become a standard model system for stem cell and tissue regeneration research, based on powerful genetics, high tissue regenerative capacity and low maintenance costs. Yet, these studies can be challenged by current limitations of tissue visualization techniques in adult animals. Here we describe new imaging methodology and present several ubiquitous and tissue-specific luciferase-based transgenic lines, which we have termed zebraflash, that facilitate the assessment of regeneration and engraftment in freely moving adult zebrafish. We show that luciferase-based live imaging reliably estimates muscle quantity in an internal organ, the heart, and can longitudinally follow cardiac regeneration in individual animals after major injury. Furthermore, luciferase-based detection enables visualization and quantification of engraftment in live recipients of transplanted hematopoietic stem cell progeny, with advantages in sensitivity and gross spatial resolution over fluorescence detection. Our findings present a versatile resource for monitoring and dissecting vertebrate stem cell and regeneration biology.

  17. Muscle organizers in Drosophila: the role of persistent larval fibers in adult flight muscle development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, E. R.; Fernandes, J.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    In many organisms muscle formation depends on specialized cells that prefigure the pattern of the musculature and serve as templates for myoblast organization and fusion. These include muscle pioneers in insects and muscle organizing cells in leech. In Drosophila, muscle founder cells have been proposed to play a similar role in organizing larval muscle development during embryogenesis. During metamorphosis in Drosophila, following histolysis of most of the larval musculature, there is a second round of myogenesis that gives rise to the adult muscles. It is not known whether muscle founder cells organize the development of these muscles. However, in the thorax specific larval muscle fibers do not histolyze at the onset of metamorphosis, but instead serve as templates for the formation of a subset of adult muscles, the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs). Because these persistent larval muscle fibers appear to be functioning in many respects like muscle founder cells, we investigated whether they were necessary for DLM development by using a microbeam laser to ablate them singly and in combination. We found that, in the absence of the larval muscle fibers, DLMs nonetheless develop. Our results show that the persistent larval muscle fibers are not required to initiate myoblast fusion, to determine DLM identity, to locate the DLMs in the thorax, or to specify the total DLM fiber volume. However, they are required to regulate the number of DLM fibers generated. Thus, while the persistent larval muscle fibers are not obligatory for DLM fiber formation and differentiation, they are necessary to ensure the development of the correct number of fibers.

  18. Myocyte Dedifferentiation Drives Extraocular Muscle Regeneration in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Kasprick, Daniel S.; Junttila, Tyler L.; Grzegorski, Steven J.; Louie, Ke'ale W.; Chiari, Estelle F.; Kish, Phillip E.; Kahana, Alon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to characterize the injury response of extraocular muscles (EOMs) in adult zebrafish. Methods Adult zebrafish underwent lateral rectus (LR) muscle myectomy surgery to remove 50% of the muscle, followed by molecular and cellular characterization of the tissue response to the injury. Results Following myectomy, the LR muscle regenerated an anatomically correct and functional muscle within 7 to 10 days post injury (DPI). Following injury, the residual muscle stump was replaced by a mesenchymal cell population that lost cell polarity and expressed mesenchymal markers. Next, a robust proliferative burst repopulated the area of the regenerating muscle. Regenerating cells expressed myod, identifying them as myoblasts. However, both immunofluorescence and electron microscopy failed to identify classic Pax7-positive satellite cells in control or injured EOMs. Instead, some proliferating nuclei were noted to express mef2c at the very earliest point in the proliferative burst, suggesting myonuclear reprogramming and dedifferentiation. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling of regenerating cells followed by a second myectomy without repeat labeling resulted in a twice-regenerated muscle broadly populated by BrdU-labeled nuclei with minimal apparent dilution of the BrdU signal. A double-pulse experiment using BrdU and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) identified double-labeled nuclei, confirming the shared progenitor lineage. Rapid regeneration occurred despite a cell cycle length of 19.1 hours, whereas 72% of the regenerating muscle nuclei entered the cell cycle by 48 hours post injury (HPI). Dextran lineage tracing revealed that residual myocytes were responsible for muscle regeneration. Conclusions EOM regeneration in adult zebrafish occurs by dedifferentiation of residual myocytes involving a muscle-to-mesenchyme transition. A mechanistic understanding of myocyte reprogramming may facilitate novel approaches to the development of molecular

  19. In Vitro Differentiation of Embryonic and Adult Stem Cells into Hepatocytes: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Snykers, Sarah; De Kock, Joery; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are a unique source of self-renewing cells within the human body. Before the end of the last millennium, adult stem cells, in contrast to their embryonic counterparts, were considered to be lineage-restricted cells or incapable of crossing lineage boundaries. However, the unique breakthrough of muscle and liver regeneration by adult bone marrow stem cells at the end of the 1990s ended this long-standing paradigm. Since then, the number of articles reporting the existence of multipotent stem cells in skin, neuronal tissue, adipose tissue, and bone marrow has escalated, giving rise, both in vivo and in vitro, to cell types other than their tissue of origin. The phenomenon of fate reprogrammation and phenotypic diversification remains, though, an enigmatic and rare process. Understanding how to control both proliferation and differentiation of stem cells and their progeny is a challenge in many fields, going from preclinical drug discovery and development to clinical therapy. In this review, we focus on current strategies to differentiate embryonic, mesenchymal(-like), and liver stem/progenitor cells into hepatocytes in vitro. Special attention is paid to intracellular and extracellular signaling, genetic modification, and cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. In addition, some recommendations are proposed to standardize, optimize, and enrich the in vitro production of hepatocyte-like cells out of stem/progenitor cells. PMID:19056906

  20. Engraftment of FACS Isolated Muscle Stem Cells into Injured Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Matthew; Sacco, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cell (MuSC) isolation and transplantation are invaluable tools to assess their capacity for self-renewal and tissue repair. Significant technical advances in recent years have led to the optimization of these approaches, improving our ability to assess MuSC regenerative potential. Here, we describe the procedures for Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-based isolation of MuSC, their intramuscular transplantation, and analysis of their engraftment into host tissues.

  1. Pluripotency of adult stem cells derived from human and rat pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Birth, M.; Rohwedel, J.; Assmuth, K.; Goepel, A.; Wedel, T.

    Adult stem cells are undifferentiated cells found within fully developed tissues or organs of an adult individuum. Until recently, these cells have been considered to bear less self-renewal ability and differentiation potency compared to embryonic stem cells. In recent studies an undifferentiated cell type was found in primary cultures of isolated acini from exocrine pancreas termed pancreatic stellate cells. Here we show that pancreatic stellate-like cells have the capacity of extended self-renewal and are able to differentiate spontaneously into cell types of all three germ layers expressing markers for smooth muscle cells, neurons, glial cells, epithelial cells, chondrocytes and secretory cells (insulin, amylase). Differentiation and subsequent formation of three-dimensional cellular aggregates (organoid bodies) were induced by merely culturing pancreatic stellate-like cells in hanging drops. These cells were developed into stable, long-term, in vitro cultures of both primary undifferentiated cell lines as well as organoid cultures. Thus, evidence is given that cell lineages of endodermal, mesodermal, and ectodermal origin arise spontaneously from a single adult undifferentiated cell type. Based on the present findings it is assumed that pancreatic stellate-like cells are a new class of lineage uncommitted pluripotent adult stem cells with a remarkable self-renewal ability and differentiation potency. The data emphasize the versatility of adult stem cells and may lead to a reappraisal of their use for the treatment of inherited disorders or acquired degenerative diseases.

  2. Distinct and overlapping sarcoma subtypes initiated from muscle stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Blum, Jordan M; Añó, Leonor; Li, Zhizhong; Van Mater, David; Bennett, Brian D; Sachdeva, Mohit; Lagutina, Irina; Zhang, Minsi; Mito, Jeffrey K; Dodd, Leslie G; Cardona, Diana M; Dodd, Rebecca D; Williams, Nerissa; Ma, Yan; Lepper, Christoph; Linardic, Corinne M; Mukherjee, Sayan; Grosveld, Gerard C; Fan, Chen-Ming; Kirsch, David G

    2013-11-27

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children, whereas undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS) is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas diagnosed in adults. To investigate the myogenic cell(s) of origin of these sarcomas, we used Pax7-CreER and MyoD-CreER mice to transform Pax7(+) and MyoD(+) myogenic progenitors by expressing oncogenic Kras(G12D) and deleting Trp53 in vivo. Pax7-CreER mice developed RMS and UPS, whereas MyoD-CreER mice developed UPS. Using gene set enrichment analysis, RMS and UPS each clustered specifically within their human counterparts. These results suggest that RMS and UPS have distinct and overlapping cells of origin within the muscle lineage. Taking them together, we have established mouse models of soft tissue sarcoma from muscle stem and progenitor cells.

  3. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-06-21

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications.

  4. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications. PMID:27338364

  5. Endothelial juxtaposition of distinct adult stem cells activates angiogenesis signaling molecules in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Elham; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Siavashi, Vahid; Araghi, Atefeh

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of therapeutic angiogenesis needs a comprehensive understanding of endothelial cell (EC) function and biological factors and cells that interplay with ECs. Stem cells are considered the key components of pro- and anti-angiogenic milieu in a wide variety of physiopathological states, and interactions of EC-stem cells have been the subject of controversy in recent years. In this study, the potential effects of three tissue-specific adult stem cells, namely rat marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), rat adipose-derived stem cells (rADSCs) and rat muscle-derived satellite cells (rSCs), on the endothelial activation of key angiogenic signaling molecules, including VEGF, Ang-2, VEGFR-2, Tie-2, and Tie2-pho, were investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat lung microvascular endothelial cells (RLMECs) were cocultured with the stem cells or incubated with the stem cell-derived conditioned media on Matrigel. Following HUVEC-stem cell coculture, CD31-positive ECs were flow sorted and subjected to western blotting to analyze potential changes in the expression of the pro-angiogenic signaling molecules. Elongation and co-alignment of the stem cells were seen along the EC tubes in the EC-stem cell cocultures on Matrigel, with cell-to-cell dye communication in the EC-rBMSC cocultures. Moreover, rBMSCs and rADSCs significantly improved endothelial tubulogenesis in both juxtacrine and paracrine manners. These two latter stem cells dynamically up-regulated VEGF, Ang-2, VREGR-2, and Tie-2 but down-regulated Tie2-pho and the Tie2-pho/Tie-2 ratio in HUVECs. Induction of pro-angiogenic signaling in ECs by marrow- and adipose-derived MSCs further indicates the significance of stem cell milieu in angiogenesis dynamics.

  6. Sumoylated α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscle of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Uda, Munehiro; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Iizumi, Kyoichi; Shigenaga, Ayako; Baba, Takeshi; Naito, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Yamakura, Fumiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of two major muscle fiber types: slow-twitch oxidative fibers and fast-twitch glycolytic fibers. The proteins in these muscle fibers are known to differ in their expression, relative abundance, and post-translational modifications. In this study, we report a previously unreported post-translational modification of α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscles of adult male F344 rats in vivo. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), we first examined the differences in the protein expression profiles between the soleus and plantaris muscles. We found higher intensity protein spots at approximately 60 kDa and pH 9 on 2D-PAGE for the soleus muscle compared with the plantaris muscle. These spots were identified as α-skeletal muscle actin by liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry and western blot analyses. In addition, we found that the 60 kDa α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) 1, using 2D-PAGE and western blot analyses. Furthermore, we found that α-skeletal muscle actin with larger molecular weight was localized in the nuclear and cytosol of the skeletal muscle, but not in the myofibrillar fraction by the combination of subcellular fractionation and western blot analyses. These results suggest that α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by SUMO-1 in the skeletal muscles, localized in nuclear and cytosolic fractions, and the extent of this modification is much higher in the slow muscles than in the fast muscles. This is the first study to show the presence of SUMOylated actin in animal tissues.

  7. Muscle MRI Findings in Childhood/Adult Onset Pompe Disease Correlate with Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bonaparte, Sebastián; Segovia, Sonia; Llauger, Jaume; Belmonte, Izaskun; Pedrosa, Irene; Alejaldre, Aída; Mayos, Mercè; Suárez-Cuartín, Guillermo; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Enzyme replacement therapy has shown to be effective for childhood/adult onset Pompe disease (AOPD). The discovery of biomarkers useful for monitoring disease progression is one of the priority research topics in Pompe disease. Muscle MRI could be one possible test but the correlation between muscle MRI and muscle strength and function has been only partially addressed so far. Methods We studied 34 AOPD patients using functional scales (Manual Research Council scale, hand held myometry, 6 minutes walking test, timed to up and go test, time to climb up and down 4 steps, time to walk 10 meters and Motor Function Measure 20 Scale), respiratory tests (Forced Vital Capacity seated and lying, Maximun Inspiratory Pressure and Maximum Expiratory Pressure), daily live activities scales (Activlim) and quality of life scales (Short Form-36 and Individualized Neuromuscular Quality of Life questionnaire). We performed a whole body muscle MRI using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging centered on thighs and lower trunk region. Results T1w whole body muscle MRI showed a homogeneous pattern of muscle involvement that could also be found in pre-symptomatic individuals. We found a strong correlation between muscle strength, muscle functional scales and the degree of muscle fatty replacement in muscle MRI analyzed using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging studies. Moreover, muscle MRI detected mild degree of fatty replacement in paraspinal muscles in pre-symptomatic patients. Conclusion Based on our findings, we consider that muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic patients under treatment. Take home message Muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful to follow-up patients in daily clinic. PMID:27711114

  8. Normal and Malignant Muscle Cell Transplantation into Immune Compromised Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Moore, John C.; Langenau, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish have become a powerful tool for assessing development, regeneration, and cancer. More recently, allograft cell transplantation protocols have been developed that permit engraftment of normal and malignant cells into irradiated, syngeneic, and immune compromised adult zebrafish. These models when coupled with optimized cell transplantation protocols allow for the rapid assessment of stem cell function, regeneration following injury, and cancer. Here, we present a method for cell transplantation of zebrafish adult skeletal muscle and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS), a pediatric sarcoma that shares features with embryonic muscle, into immune compromised adult rag2E450fs homozygous mutant zebrafish. Importantly, these animals lack T cells and have reduced B cell function, facilitating engraftment of a wide range of tissues from unrelated donor animals. Our optimized protocols show that fluorescently labeled muscle cell preparations from α-actin-RFP transgenic zebrafish engraft robustly when implanted into the dorsal musculature of rag2 homozygous mutant fish. We also demonstrate engraftment of fluorescent-transgenic ERMS where fluorescence is confined to cells based on differentiation status. Specifically, ERMS were created in AB-strain myf5-GFP; mylpfa-mCherry double transgenic animals and tumors injected into the peritoneum of adult immune compromised fish. The utility of these protocols extends to engraftment of a wide range of normal and malignant donor cells that can be implanted into dorsal musculature or peritoneum of adult zebrafish. PMID:25591079

  9. REST regulation of gene networks in adult neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shradha; Brulet, Rebecca; Zhang, Ling; Hsieh, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neural stem cells generate newborn neurons throughout life due to their ability to self-renew and exist as quiescent neural progenitors (QNPs) before differentiating into transit-amplifying progenitors (TAPs) and newborn neurons. The mechanisms that control adult neural stem cell self-renewal are still largely unknown. Conditional knockout of REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) results in precocious activation of QNPs and reduced neurogenesis over time. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which REST regulates adult neural stem cells, we perform chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA-sequencing to identify direct REST target genes. We find REST regulates both QNPs and TAPs, and importantly, ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle and neuronal genes in the process. Furthermore, overexpression of individual REST target ribosome biogenesis or cell cycle genes is sufficient to induce activation of QNPs. Our data define novel REST targets to maintain the quiescent neural stem cell state. PMID:27819263

  10. REST regulation of gene networks in adult neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shradha; Brulet, Rebecca; Zhang, Ling; Hsieh, Jenny

    2016-11-07

    Adult hippocampal neural stem cells generate newborn neurons throughout life due to their ability to self-renew and exist as quiescent neural progenitors (QNPs) before differentiating into transit-amplifying progenitors (TAPs) and newborn neurons. The mechanisms that control adult neural stem cell self-renewal are still largely unknown. Conditional knockout of REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) results in precocious activation of QNPs and reduced neurogenesis over time. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which REST regulates adult neural stem cells, we perform chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA-sequencing to identify direct REST target genes. We find REST regulates both QNPs and TAPs, and importantly, ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle and neuronal genes in the process. Furthermore, overexpression of individual REST target ribosome biogenesis or cell cycle genes is sufficient to induce activation of QNPs. Our data define novel REST targets to maintain the quiescent neural stem cell state.

  11. A novel approach to collecting satellite cells from adult skeletal muscles on the basis of their stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shigemoto, Taeko; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Wakao, Shohei; Dezawa, Mari

    2013-07-01

    Stem cells are generally collected using flow cytometry, but this method is not applicable when the cell surface marker is not well determined. Satellite cells, which are skeletal muscle stem cells, have the ability to regenerate damaged muscles and are expected to be applicable for treatment of muscle degeneration. Although the transcription factor Pax7 is a known specific marker of satellite cells, it is not located on the cell surface and therefore flow cytometry is not directly applicable. In the present study, we turned our attention to the stress tolerance of adult stem cells, and we propose long-term trypsin incubation (LTT) as a novel approach to collecting satellite cells from mouse and human skeletal muscles. LTT led to a remarkable increase in the ratio of Pax7(+) cells that retain normal myogenic stem cell function. In particular, human Pax7(+) cells made up approximately 30% of primary cultured cells, whereas after LTT, the ratio of Pax7(+) cells increased up to ∼80%, and the ratio of Pax7(+) and/or MyoD(+) myogenic cells increased to ∼95%. Once transplanted, LTT-treated cells contributed to subsequent muscle regeneration following repetitive muscle damage without additional cell transplantation. The stress tolerance of Pax7(+) cells is related to heat shock protein 27 and αB-crystallin, members of the small heat shock protein family. This approach, based on the stress resistance of adult stem cells, is a safe and inexpensive method of efficiently collecting human satellite cells and may also be used for collecting other tissue stem cells whose surface marker is unknown.

  12. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  13. Regulation of Muscle Stem Cell Functions: A Focus on the p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Segalés, Jessica; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2016-01-01

    Formation of skeletal muscle fibers (myogenesis) during development and after tissue injury in the adult constitutes an excellent paradigm to investigate the mechanisms whereby environmental cues control gene expression programs in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) by acting on transcriptional and epigenetic effectors. Here we will review the molecular mechanisms implicated in the transition of satellite cells throughout the distinct myogenic stages (i.e., activation from quiescence, proliferation, differentiation, and self-renewal). We will also discuss recent findings on the causes underlying satellite cell functional decline with aging. In particular, our review will focus on the epigenetic changes underlying fate decisions and on how the p38 MAPK signaling pathway integrates the environmental signals at the chromatin to build up satellite cell adaptive responses during the process of muscle regeneration, and how these responses are altered in aging. A better comprehension of the signaling pathways connecting external and intrinsic factors will illuminate the path for improving muscle regeneration in the aged. PMID:27626031

  14. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  15. Fgf regulates dedifferentiation during skeletal muscle regeneration in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Kish, Phillip E; Kahana, Alon

    2016-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) regulate critical biological processes such as embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, wound healing, and tissue regeneration. In zebrafish, Fgf signaling plays an important role in the regeneration of the spinal cord, liver, heart, fin, and photoreceptors, although its exact mechanism of action is not fully understood. Utilizing an adult zebrafish extraocular muscle (EOM) regeneration model, we demonstrate that blocking Fgf receptor function using either a chemical inhibitor (SU5402) or a dominant-negative transgenic construct (dnFGFR1a:EGFP) impairs muscle regeneration. Adult zebrafish EOMs regenerate through a myocyte dedifferentiation process, which involves a muscle-to-mesenchyme transition and cell cycle reentry by differentiated myocytes. Blocking Fgf signaling reduced cell proliferation and active caspase 3 levels in the regenerating muscle with no detectable levels of apoptosis, supporting the hypothesis that Fgf signaling is involved in the early steps of dedifferentiation. Fgf signaling in regenerating myocytes involves the MAPK/ERK pathway: inhibition of MEK activity with U0126 mimicked the phenotype of the Fgf receptor inhibition on both muscle regeneration and cell proliferation, and activated ERK (p-ERK) was detected in injured muscles by immunofluorescence and western blot. Interestingly, following injury, ERK2 expression is specifically induced and activated by phosphorylation, suggesting a key role in muscle regeneration. We conclude that the critical early steps of myocyte dedifferentiation in EOM regeneration are dependent on Fgf signaling.

  16. Regenerative potential of human muscle stem cells in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic inflammation is a profound systemic modification of the cellular microenvironment which could affect survival, repair and maintenance of muscle stem cells. The aim of this study was to define the role of chronic inflammation on the regenerative potential of satellite cells in human muscle. Methods As a model for chronic inflammation, 11 patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were included together with 16 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) as controls. The mean age of both groups was 64 years, with more females in the RA group compared to the OA group. During elective knee replacement surgery, a muscle biopsy was taken from the distal musculus vastus medialis. Cell populations from four RA and eight OA patients were used for extensive phenotyping because these cell populations showed no spontaneous differentiation and myogenic purity greater than 75% after explantation. Results After mononuclear cell explantation, myogenic purity, viability, proliferation index, number of colonies, myogenic colonies, growth speed, maximum number of population doublings and fusion index were not different between RA and OA patients. Furthermore, the expression of proteins involved in replicative and stress-induced premature senescence and apoptosis, including p16, p21, p53, hTERT and cleaved caspase-3, was not different between RA and OA patients. Mean telomere length was shorter in the RA group compared to the OA group. Conclusions In the present study we found evidence that chronic inflammation in RA does not affect the in vitro regenerative potential of human satellite cells. Identification of mechanisms influencing muscle regeneration by modulation of its microenvironment may, therefore, be more appropriate. PMID:22171690

  17. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  18. Potential of adult neural stem cells in stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Andres, Robert H; Choi, Raymond; Steinberg, Gary K; Guzman, Raphael

    2008-11-01

    Despite state-of-the-art therapy, clinical outcome after stroke remains poor, with many patients left permanently disabled and dependent on care. Stem cell therapy has evolved as a promising new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of stroke in experimental studies, and recent clinical trials have proven its feasibility and safety in patients. Replacement of damaged cells and restoration of function can be accomplished by transplantation of different cell types, such as embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells, human fetal tissue and genetically engineered cell lines. Adult neural stem cells offer the advantage of avoiding the ethical problems associated with embryonic or fetal stem cells and can be harvested as autologous grafts from the individual patients. Furthermore, stimulation of endogenous adult stem cell-mediated repair mechanisms in the brain might offer new avenues for stroke therapy without the necessity of transplantation. However, important scientific issues need to be addressed to advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the critical steps in cell-based repair to allow the introduction of these experimental techniques into clinical practice. This review describes up-to-date experimental concepts using adult neural stem cells for the treatment of stroke.

  19. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2011-11-15

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  20. Clones of ectopic stem cells in the regeneration of muscle defects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rujing; Chen, Mo; Lee, Chang Hun; Yoon, Richard; Lal, Shan; Mao, Jeremy J

    2010-10-20

    Little is known about whether clones of ectopic, non-muscle stem cells contribute to muscle regeneration. Stem/progenitor cells that are isolated for experimental research or therapeutics are typically heterogeneous. Non-myogenic lineages in a heterogeneous population conceptually may compromise tissue repair. In this study, we discovered that clones of mononucleated stem cells of human tooth pulp fused into multinucleated myotubes that robustly expressed myosin heavy chain in vitro with or without co-culture with mouse skeletal myoblasts (C2C12 cells). Cloned cells were sustainably Oct4+, Nanog+ and Stro1+. The fusion indices of myogenic clones were approximately 16-17 folds greater than their parent, heterogeneous stem cells. Upon infusion into cardio-toxin induced tibialis anterior muscle defects, undifferentiated clonal progenies not only engrafted and colonized host muscle, but also expressed human dystrophin and myosin heavy chain more efficaciously than their parent heterogeneous stem cell populations. Strikingly, clonal progenies yielded ∼9 times more human myosin heavy chain mRNA in regenerating muscles than those infused with their parent, heterogeneous stem cells. The number of human dystrophin positive cells in regenerating muscles infused with clonal progenies was more than ∼3 times greater than muscles infused with heterogeneous stem cells from which clonal progenies were derived. These findings suggest the therapeutic potential of ectopic myogenic clones in muscle regeneration.

  1. Preparation and Culture of Myogenic Precursor Cells/Primary Myoblasts from Skeletal Muscle of Adult and Aged Humans.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Arroquia, Ana; Clegg, Peter D; Molloy, Andrew P; Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna

    2017-02-16

    Skeletal muscle homeostasis depends on muscle growth (hypertrophy), atrophy and regeneration. During ageing and in several diseases, muscle wasting occurs. Loss of muscle mass and function is associated with muscle fiber type atrophy, fiber type switching, defective muscle regeneration associated with dysfunction of satellite cells, muscle stem cells, and other pathophysiological processes. These changes are associated with changes in intracellular as well as local and systemic niches. In addition to most commonly used rodent models of muscle ageing, there is a need to study muscle homeostasis and wasting using human models, which due to ethical implications, consist predominantly of in vitro cultures. Despite the wide use of human Myogenic Progenitor Cells (MPCs) and primary myoblasts in myogenesis, there is limited data on using human primary myoblast and myotube cultures to study molecular mechanisms regulating different aspects of age-associated muscle wasting, aiding in the validation of mechanisms of ageing proposed in rodent muscle. The use of human MPCs, primary myoblasts and myotubes isolated from adult and aged people, provides a physiologically relevant model of molecular mechanisms of processes associated with muscle growth, atrophy and regeneration. Here we describe in detail a robust, inexpensive, reproducible and efficient protocol for the isolation and maintenance of human MPCs and their progeny - myoblasts and myotubes from human muscle samples using enzymatic digestion. Furthermore, we have determined the passage number at which primary myoblasts from adult and aged people undergo senescence in an in vitro culture. Finally, we show the ability to transfect these myoblasts and the ability to characterize their proliferative and differentiation capacity and propose their suitability for performing functional studies of molecular mechanisms of myogenesis and muscle wasting in vitro.

  2. A novel view of the adult bone marrow stem cell hierarchy and stem cell trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak, M Z

    2015-01-01

    This review presents a novel view and working hypothesis about the hierarchy within the adult bone marrow stem cell compartment and the still-intriguing question of whether adult bone marrow contains primitive stem cells from early embryonic development, such as cells derived from the epiblast, migrating primordial germ cells or yolk sac-derived hemangioblasts. It also presents a novel view of the mechanisms that govern stem cell mobilization and homing, with special emphasis on the role of the complement cascade as a trigger for egress of hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow into blood as well as the emerging role of novel homing factors and priming mechanisms that support stromal-derived factor 1-mediated homing of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells after transplantation. PMID:25486871

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells from the outer ear: a novel adult stem cell model system for the study of adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rim, Jong-Seop; Mynatt, Randall L; Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara

    2005-07-01

    Adipocytes arise from multipotent stem cells of mesodermal origin, which also give rise to the muscle, bone, and cartilage lineages. However, signals and early molecular events that commit multipotent stem cells into the adipocyte lineage are not well established mainly due to lack of an adequate model system. We have identified a novel source of adult stem cells from the external murine ears referred to here as an ear mesenchymal stem cells (EMSC). EMSC have been isolated from several standard and mutant strains of mice. They are self-renewing, clonogenic, and multipotent, since they give rise to osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. The in vitro characterization of EMSC indicates very facile adipogenic differentiation. Morphological, histochemical, and molecular analysis after the induction of differentiation showed that EMSC maintain adipogenic potentials up to fifth passage. A comparison of EMSC to the stromal-vascular (S-V) fraction of fat depots, under identical culture conditions (isobutyl-methylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin), revealed much more robust and consistent adipogenesis in EMSC than in the S-V fraction. In summary, we show that EMSC can provide a novel, easily obtainable, primary culture model for the study of adipogenesis.

  4. Adult stem cells underlying lung regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xian, Wa; McKeon, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Despite the massive toll in human suffering imparted by degenerative lung disease, including COPD, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and ARDS, the scientific community has been surprisingly agnostic regarding the potential of lung tissue, and in particular the alveoli, to regenerate. However, there is circumstantial evidence in humans and direct evidence in mice that ARDS triggers robust regeneration of lung tissue rather than irreversible fibrosis. The stem cells responsible for this remarkable regenerative process has garnered tremendous attention, most recently yielding a defined set of cloned human airway stem cells marked by p63 expression but with distinct commitment to differentiated cell types typical of the upper or lower airways, the latter of which include alveoli-like structures in vitro and in vivo. These recent advances in lung regeneration and distal airway stem cells and the potential of associated soluble factors in regeneration must be harnessed for therapeutic options in chronic lung disease.

  5. ErbB3 binding protein-1 (Ebp1) controls proliferation and myogenic differentiation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Figeac, Nicolas; Serralbo, Olivier; Marcelle, Christophe; Zammit, Peter S

    2014-02-01

    Satellite cells are resident stem cells of skeletal muscle, supplying myoblasts for post-natal muscle growth, hypertrophy and repair. Many regulatory networks control satellite cell function, which includes EGF signalling via the ErbB family of receptors. Here we investigated the role of ErbB3 binding protein-1 (Ebp1) in regulation of myogenic stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Ebp1 is a well-conserved DNA/RNA binding protein that is implicated in cell growth, apoptosis and differentiation in many cell types. Of the two main Ebp1 isoforms, only p48 was expressed in satellite cells and C2C12 myoblasts. Although not present in quiescent satellite cells, p48 was strongly induced during activation, remaining at high levels during proliferation and differentiation. While retroviral-mediated over-expression of Ebp1 had only minor effects, siRNA-mediated Ebp1 knockdown inhibited both proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells and C2C12 myoblasts, with a clear failure of myotube formation. Ebp1-knockdown significantly reduced ErbB3 receptor levels, yet over-expression of ErbB3 in Ebp1 knockdown cells did not rescue differentiation. Ebp1 was also expressed by muscle cells during developmental myogenesis in mouse. Since Ebp1 is well-conserved between mouse and chick, we switched to chick to examine its role in muscle formation. In chick embryo, Ebp1 was expressed in the dermomyotome, and myogenic differentiation of muscle progenitors was inhibited by specific Ebp1 down-regulation using shRNA electroporation. These observations demonstrate a conserved function of Ebp1 in the regulation of embryonic muscle progenitors and adult muscle stem cells, which likely operates independently of ErbB3 signaling.

  6. Pitx genes are redeployed in adult myogenesis where they can act to promote myogenic differentiation in muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Paul; Figeac, Nicolas; Fortier, Mathieu; Moyle, Louise; Zammit, Peter S

    2013-05-01

    Skeletal muscle retains a resident stem cell population called satellite cells. Although mitotically quiescent in mature muscle, satellite cells can be activated to produce myoblast progeny to generate myonuclei for skeletal muscle homoeostasis, hypertrophy and repair. Regulation of satellite cell function in adult requires redeployment of many of the regulatory networks fundamental to developmental myogenesis. Involved in such control of muscle stem cell fate in embryos are members of the Pitx gene family of bicoid-class homeodomain proteins. Here, we investigated the expression and function of all three Pitx genes in muscle satellite cells of adult mice. Endogenous Pitx1 was undetectable, whilst Pitx2a, Pitx2b and Pitx2c were at low levels in proliferating satellite cells, but increased during the early stages of myogenic differentiation. By contrast, proliferating satellite cells expressed robust amounts of Pitx3, with levels then decreasing as cells differentiated, although Pitx3 remained expressed in unfused myoblasts. To examine the role of Pitx genes in satellite cell function, retroviral-mediated expression of Pitx1, all Pitx2 isoforms or Pitx3, was used. Constitutive expression of any Pitx isoform suppressed satellite cell proliferation, with the cells undergoing enhanced myogenic differentiation. Conversely, myogenic differentiation into multinucleated myotubes was decreased when Pitx2 or Pitx3 levels were reduced using siRNA. Together, our results show that Pitx genes play a role in regulating satellite cell function during myogenesis in adult.

  7. Stem cell sources for clinical islet transplantation in type 1 diabetes: embryonic and adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Miszta-Lane, Helena; Mirbolooki, Mohammadreza; James Shapiro, A M; Lakey, Jonathan R T

    2006-01-01

    Lifelong immunosuppressive therapy and inadequate sources of transplantable islets have led the islet transplantation benefits to less than 0.5% of type 1 diabetics. Whereas the potential risk of infection by animal endogenous viruses limits the uses of islet xeno-transplantation, deriving islets from stem cells seems to be able to overcome the current problems of islet shortages and immune compatibility. Both embryonic (derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts) and adult stem cells (derived from adult tissues) have shown controversial results in secreting insulin in vitro and normalizing hyperglycemia in vivo. ESCs research is thought to have much greater developmental potential than adult stem cells; however it is still in the basic research phase. Existing ESC lines are not believed to be identical or ideal for generating islets or beta-cells and additional ESC lines have to be established. Research with ESCs derived from humans is controversial because it requires the destruction of a human embryo and/or therapeutic cloning, which some believe is a slippery slope to reproductive cloning. On the other hand, adult stem cells are already in some degree specialized, recipients may receive their own stem cells. They are flexible but they have shown mixed degree of availability. Adult stem cells are not pluripotent. They may not exist for all organs. They are difficult to purify and they cannot be maintained well outside the body. In order to draw the future avenues in this field, existent discrepancies between the results need to be clarified. In this study, we will review the different aspects and challenges of using embryonic or adult stem cells in clinical islet transplantation for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

  8. Time- and dose-dependent effects of total-body ionizing radiation on muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Tsubasa; Seko, Daiki; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Li, Tao-Sheng; Ono, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of genotoxic stress, such as high-dose ionizing radiation, increases both cancer and noncancer risks. However, it remains debatable whether low-dose ionizing radiation reduces cellular function, or rather induces hormetic health benefits. Here, we investigated the effects of total-body γ-ray radiation on muscle stem cells, called satellite cells. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to γ-radiation at low- to high-dose rates (low, 2 or 10 mGy/day; moderate, 50 mGy/day; high, 250 mGy/day) for 30 days. No hormetic responses in proliferation, differentiation, or self-renewal of satellite cells were observed in low-dose radiation-exposed mice at the acute phase. However, at the chronic phase, population expansion of satellite cell-derived progeny was slightly decreased in mice exposed to low-dose radiation. Taken together, low-dose ionizing irradiation may suppress satellite cell function, rather than induce hormetic health benefits, in skeletal muscle in adult mice. PMID:25869487

  9. Child—Adult Differences in Muscle Activation — A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dotan, Raffy; Mitchell, Cameron; Cohen, Rotem; Klentrou, Panagiota; Gabriel, David; Falk, Bareket

    2013-01-01

    Children differ from adults in many muscular performance attributes such as size-normalized strength and power, endurance, fatigability and the recovery from exhaustive exercise, to name just a few. Metabolic attributes, such as glycolytic capacity, substrate utilization, and VO2 kinetics also differ markedly between children and adults. Various factors, such as dimensionality, intramuscular synchronization, agonist-antagonist coactivation, level of volitional activation, or muscle composition, can explain some, but not all of the observed differences. It is hypothesized that, compared with adults, children are substantially less capable of recruiting or fully employing their higher-threshold, type-II motor units. The review presents and evaluates the wealth of information and possible alternative factors in explaining the observations. Although conclusive evidence is still lacking, only this hypothesis of differential motor-unit activation in children and adults, appears capable of accounting for all observed child—adult differences, whether on its own or in conjunction with other factors. PMID:22433260

  10. Muscle power failure in mobility-limited adults: preserved single muscle fibre function despite reduced whole muscle size, quality and neuromuscular activiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the physiological and gender determinants of the age-related loss of muscle power in 31 healthy middle-aged adults (aged 40-55 years), 28 healthy older adults (70-85 years) and 34 mobility-limited older adults (70-85 years). We hypothesized that leg extensor muscle power woul...

  11. Adult motor axons preferentially reinnervate predegenerated muscle nerve.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, M; O'Daly, A; Vyas, A; Rohde, C; Brushart, T M

    2013-11-01

    Preferential motor reinnervation (PMR) is the tendency for motor axons regenerating after repair of mixed nerve to reinnervate muscle nerve and/or muscle rather than cutaneous nerve or skin. PMR may occur in response to the peripheral nerve pathway alone in juvenile rats (Brushart, 1993; Redett et al., 2005), yet the ability to identify and respond to specific pathway markers is reportedly lost in adults (Uschold et al., 2007). The experiments reported here evaluate the relative roles of pathway and end organ in the genesis of PMR in adult rats. Fresh and 2-week predegenerated femoral nerve grafts were transferred in correct or reversed alignment to replace the femoral nerves of previously unoperated Lewis rats. After 8 weeks of regeneration the motoneurons projecting through the grafts to recipient femoral cutaneous and muscle branches and their adjacent end organs were identified by retrograde labeling. Motoneuron counts were subjected to Poisson regression analysis to determine the relative roles of pathway and end organ identity in generating PMR. Transfer of fresh grafts did not result in PMR, whereas substantial PMR was observed when predegenerated grafts were used. Similarly, the pathway through which motoneurons reached the muscle had a significant impact on PMR when grafts were predegenerated, but not when they were fresh. Comparison of the relative roles of pathway and end organ in generating PMR revealed that neither could be shown to be more important than the other. These experiments demonstrate unequivocally that adult muscle nerve and cutaneous nerve differ in qualities that can be detected by regenerating adult motoneurons and that can modify their subsequent behavior. They also reveal that two weeks of Wallerian degeneration modify the environment in the graft from one that provides no modality-specific cues for motor neurons to one that actively promotes PMR.

  12. Comparative aspects of adult neural stem cell activity in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Grandel, Heiner; Brand, Michael

    2013-03-01

    At birth or after hatching from the egg, vertebrate brains still contain neural stem cells which reside in specialized niches. In some cases, these stem cells are deployed for further postnatal development of parts of the brain until the final structure is reached. In other cases, postnatal neurogenesis continues as constitutive neurogenesis into adulthood leading to a net increase of the number of neurons with age. Yet, in other cases, stem cells fuel neuronal turnover. An example is protracted development of the cerebellar granular layer in mammals and birds, where neurogenesis continues for a few weeks postnatally until the granular layer has reached its definitive size and stem cells are used up. Cerebellar growth also provides an example of continued neurogenesis during adulthood in teleosts. Again, it is the granular layer that grows as neurogenesis continues and no definite adult cerebellar size is reached. Neuronal turnover is most clearly seen in the telencephalon of male canaries, where projection neurons are replaced in nucleus high vocal centre each year before the start of a new mating season--circuitry reconstruction to achieve changes of the song repertoire in these birds? In this review, we describe these and other examples of adult neurogenesis in different vertebrate taxa. We also compare the structure of the stem cell niches to find common themes in their organization despite different functions adult neurogenesis serves in different species. Finally, we report on regeneration of the zebrafish telencephalon after injury to highlight similarities and differences of constitutive neurogenesis and neuronal regeneration.

  13. Isolation and Culture of Individual Myofibers and their Satellite Cells from Adult Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pasut, Alessandra; Jones, Andrew E.; Rudnicki, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle regeneration in the adult is performed by resident stem cells called satellite cells. Satellite cells are defined by their position between the basal lamina and the sarcolemma of each myofiber. Current knowledge of their behavior heavily relies on the use of the single myofiber isolation protocol. In 1985, Bischoff described a protocol to isolate single live fibers from the Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) of adult rats with the goal to create an in vitro system in which the physical association between the myofiber and its stem cells is preserved 1. In 1995, Rosenblattmodified the Bischoff protocol such that myofibers are singly picked and handled separately after collagenase digestion instead of being isolated by gravity sedimentation 2, 3. The Rosenblatt or Bischoff protocol has since been adapted to different muscles, age or conditions 3-6. The single myofiber isolation technique is an indispensable tool due its unique advantages. First, in the single myofiber protocol, satellite cells are maintained beneath the basal lamina. This is a unique feature of the protocol as other techniques such as Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting require chemical and mechanical tissue dissociation 7. Although the myofiber culture system cannot substitute for in vivo studies, it does offer an excellent platform to address relevant biological properties of muscle stem cells. Single myofibers can be cultured in standard plating conditions or in floating conditions. Satellite cells on floating myofibers are subjected to virtually no other influence than the myofiber environment. Substrate stiffness and coating have been shown to influence satellite cells' ability to regenerate muscles 8, 9 so being able to control each of these factors independently allows discrimination between niche-dependent and -independent responses. Different concentrations of serum have also been shown to have an effect on the transition from quiescence to activation. To preserve the quiescence state of

  14. Adult stem cells and their ability to differentiate.

    PubMed

    Tarnowski, Maciej; Sieron, Aleksander L

    2006-08-01

    This is a review of the current status of knowledge on adult stem cells as well as the criteria and evidence for their potential to transform into different cell types and cell lineages. Reports on stem cell sources, focusing on tissues from adult subjects, were also investigated. Numerous reports have been published on the search for early markers of both stem cells and the precursors of various cell lineages. The question is still open about the characteristics of the primary stem cell. The existing proofs and hypotheses have not yielded final solutions to this problem. From a practical point of view it is also crucial to find a minimal set of markers determining the phenotypes of the precursor cells of a particular cell lineage. Several lines of evidence seem to bring closer the day when we will be able to detect the right stem cell niche and successfully isolate precursor cells that are needed for the treatment of a particular disorder. Recent reports on cases of cancer in patients subjected to stem cell therapy are yet another controversial issue looked into in this review, although the pros and cons emerging from the results of published studies still do not provide satisfying evidence to fully understand this issue.

  15. Adherent neural stem (NS) cells from fetal and adult forebrain.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Steven M; Conti, Luciano; Sun, Yirui; Goffredo, Donato; Smith, Austin

    2006-07-01

    Stable in vitro propagation of central nervous system (CNS) stem cells would offer expanded opportunities to dissect basic molecular, cellular, and developmental processes and to model neurodegenerative disease. CNS stem cells could also provide a source of material for drug discovery assays and cell replacement therapies. We have recently reported the generation of adherent, symmetrically expandable, neural stem (NS) cell lines derived both from mouse and human embryonic stem cells and from fetal forebrain (Conti L, Pollard SM, Gorba T, Reitano E, Toselli M, Biella G, Sun Y, Sanzone S, Ying QL, Cattaneo E, Smith A. 2005. Niche-independent symmetrical self-renewal of a mammalian tissue stem cell. PLoS Biol 3(9):e283). These NS cells retain neuronal and glial differentiation potential after prolonged passaging and are transplantable. NS cells are likely to comprise the resident stem cell population within heterogeneous neurosphere cultures. Here we demonstrate that similar NS cell cultures can be established from the adult mouse brain. We also characterize the growth factor requirements for NS cell derivation and self-renewal. We discuss our current understanding of the relationship of NS cell lines to physiological progenitor cells of fetal and adult CNS.

  16. A comparison of bone regeneration with human mesenchymal stem cells and muscle-derived stem cells and the critical role of BMP.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xueqin; Usas, Arvydas; Tang, Ying; Lu, Aiping; Tan, Jian; Schneppendahl, Johannes; Kozemchak, Adam M; Wang, Bing; Cummins, James H; Tuan, Rocky S; Huard, Johnny

    2014-08-01

    Adult multipotent stem cells have been isolated from a variety of human tissues including human skeletal muscle, which represent an easily accessible source of stem cells. It has been shown that human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (hMDSCs) are muscle-derived mesenchymal stem cells capable of multipotent differentiation. Although hMDSCs can undergo osteogenic differentiation and form bone when genetically modified to express BMP2; it is still unclear whether hMDSCs are as efficient as human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) for bone regeneration. The current study aimed to address this question by performing a parallel comparison between hMDSCs and hBMMSCs to evaluate their osteogenic and bone regeneration capacities. Our results demonstrated that hMDSCs and hBMMSCs had similar osteogenic-related gene expression profiles and had similar osteogenic differentiation capacities in vitro when transduced to express BMP2. Both the untransduced hMDSCs and hBMMSCs formed very negligible amounts of bone in the critical sized bone defect model when using a fibrin sealant scaffold; however, when genetically modified with lenti-BMP2, both populations successfully regenerated bone in the defect area. No significant differences were found in the newly formed bone volumes and bone defect coverage between the hMDSC and hBMMSC groups. Although both cell types formed mature bone tissue by 6 weeks post-implantation, the newly formed bone in the hMDSCs group underwent quicker remodelling than the hBMMSCs group. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that hMDSCs are as efficient as hBMMSCs in terms of their bone regeneration capacity; however, both cell types required genetic modification with BMP in order to regenerate bone in vivo.

  17. Continued Expression of Neonatal Myosin Heavy Chain in Adult Dystrophic Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandman, Everett

    1985-02-01

    The expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms was examined in normal and dystrophic chicken muscle with a monoclonal antibody specific for neonatal myosin. Adult dystrophic muscle continued to contain neonatal myosin long after it disappeared from adult normal muscle. A new technique involving western blotting and peptide mapping demonstrated that the immunoreactive myosin in adult dystrophic muscle was identical to that found in neonatal normal muscle. Immunocytochemistry revealed that all fibers in the dystrophic muscle failed to repress neonatal myosin heavy chain. These studies suggest that muscular dystrophy inhibits the myosin gene switching that normally occurs during muscle maturation.

  18. Isolation and cultivation of stem cells from adult mouse testes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Kaomei; Wolf, Frieder; Becker, Alexander; Engel, Wolfgang; Nayernia, Karim; Hasenfuss, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    The successful isolation and cultivation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) as well as induction of SSCs into pluripotent stem cells will allow us to study their biological characteristics and their applications in therapeutic approaches. Here we provide step-by-step procedures on the basis of previous work in our laboratory for: the isolation of testicular cells from adolescent mice by a modified enzymatic procedure; the enrichment of undifferentiated spermatogonia by laminin selection or genetic selection using Stra8-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) transgenic mice; the cultivation and conversion of undifferentiated spermatogonia into embryonic stem-like cells, so-called multipotent adult germline stem cells (maGSCs); and characterization of these cells. Normally, it will take about 16 weeks to obtain stable maGSC lines starting from the isolation of testicular cells.

  19. Small molecule-based approaches to adult stem cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Lairson, Luke L; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Zhu, Shoutian; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of stem cell-based strategies for the treatment of a broad range of human diseases, including neurodegenerative, autoimmune, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal diseases. To date, such regenerative approaches have focused largely on the development of cell transplantation therapies using cells derived from pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Although there have been exciting preliminary reports describing the efficacy of ESC-derived replacement therapies, approaches involving ex vivo manipulated ESCs are hindered by issues of mutation, immune rejection, and ethical controversy. An alternative approach involves direct in vivo modulation or ex vivo expansion of endogenous adult stem cell populations using drug-like small molecules. Here we describe chemical approaches to the regulation of somatic stem cell biology that are yielding new biological insights and that may ultimately lead to innovative new medicines.

  20. [Research progress of induced pluripotent stem cells in treatment of muscle atrophy].

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhongkai; Yang, Chensong; Sun, Guixin

    2016-03-01

    Muscle atrophy caused by nerve injury is a common and difficult clinical problem. The development of stem cell researches has opened up a new way for the treatment of nerve injury-induced muscle atrophy. The induced pluripotent stem cells(iPSCs)can differentiate into various types of cells and have more advantages than embryonic stem cells (ESCs). After being transplanted into the damaged area, iPSCs are guided by neurogenic signals to the lesion sites, to repair the damaged nerve, promote generation of axon myelination, rebuild neural circuits and restore physiological function. Meanwhile, iPSCs can also differentiate into muscle cells and promote muscle tissue regeneration. Therefore, it would be possible to attenuate muscle atrophy caused by nerve injury with iPSCs treatment.

  1. Slow-Adhering Stem Cells Derived from Injured Skeletal Muscle Have Improved Regenerative Capacity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    levels represent a major determi- nant in the regenerative capacity of muscle stem cells. Mol Biol Cell 2009, 20:509–520 43. Quintero AJ, Wright VJ, Fu...injury on their characteristics and engraftment potential has yet to be described. In the present study, slow-adhering stem cells (SASCs) from both...laceration-injured and control noninjured skeletal muscles in mice were iso- lated and studied. Migration and proliferation rates, multidifferentiation

  2. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion.

  3. Embryonic and embryonic-like stem cells in heart muscle engineering.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2011-02-01

    Cardiac muscle engineering is evolving rapidly and may ultimately be exploited to (1) model cardiac development, physiology, and pathology; (2) identify and validate drug targets; (3) assess drug safety and efficacy; and (4) provide therapeutic substitute myocardium. The ultimate success in any of these envisioned applications depends on the utility of human cells and their assembly into myocardial equivalents with structural and functional properties of mature heart muscle. Embryonic stem cells appear as a promising cell source in this respect, because they can be cultured reliably and differentiated robustly into cardiomyocytes. Despite their unambiguous cardiogenicity, data on advanced maturation and seamless myocardial integration of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in vivo are sparse. Additional concerns relate to the limited control over cardiomyogenic specification and cardiomyocyte maturation in vitro as well as the risk of teratocarcinoma formation and immune rejection of stem cell implants in vivo. Through the invent of embryonic-like stem cells - such as parthenogenetic stem cells, male germline stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells - some but certainly not all of these issues may be addressed, albeit at the expense of additional concerns. This review will discuss the applicability of embryonic and embryonic-like stem cells in myocardial tissue engineering and address issues that require particular attention before the potential of stem cell-based heart muscle engineering may be fully exploited. This article is part of a special issue entitled, "Cardiovascular Stem Cells Revisited".

  4. Smooth muscles and stem cells of embryonic guts express KIT, PDGFRRA, CD34 and many other stem cell antigens: suggestion that GIST arise from smooth muscles and gut stem cells.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is believed to original from interstitial cells of (ICC) present in Auerbach's nerve plexus. GIST frequently shows gain-of-function mutations of KIT and PDGFRA. In practical pathology, GIST is diagnosed by positive immunostaining or KIT and/or CD34. The author herein demonstrates that human embryonic gastrointestinal tract smooth muscles (HEGITSM) and human embryonic stem gastrointestinal cells (HEGISC) consistently express KIT, CD34, NCAM, PDGFRA and other stem cell (SC) antigens NSE, synaptophysin, chromogranin, bcl-2, ErbB, and MET throughout the embryonic development of 7-40 gestational week (GW). CK14 was negative. The author examines 42 cases (7-40 GW) of embryonic GI tract (EGI). The HEGISM, HEGIST, and gall bladder smooth muscles (SM) were consistently positive for KIT, CD34, NCAM, PDGFRA, synaptophysin, chromogranin, NSE, bcl-2, ErbB2, and MET in foregut, stomach, GB, midgut, and hindgut throughout the fetal life (7-40 GW). The stem cells (SC) were seen to create the SM, nerves, ICC, and other all structures of GI tract. In adult gastrointestinal walls (n=30), KIT, CD34, PDGFRA, and S100 proteins were expressed in Auerbach's nerve plexus and ICC. The bronchial and vascular SM of embryos did not express these molecules. In GIST, frequent expressions of KIT (100%, 30/30), CD34 (90%, 27/30), and PDGFRA (83%, 25/30) were seen. In general, characteristics of tumors recapitulate their embryonic life. Therefore, it is strongly suggested that GIST may be originated from GI SM and/or GI SC in addition to ICC.

  5. Invited review: Stem cells and muscle diseases: advances in cell therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Elisa; Gidaro, Teresa; Bigot, Anne; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Mouly, Vincent; Trollet, Capucine

    2015-04-01

    Despite considerable progress to increase our understanding of muscle genetics, pathophysiology, molecular and cellular partners involved in muscular dystrophies and muscle ageing, there is still a crucial need for effective treatments to counteract muscle degeneration and muscle wasting in such conditions. This review focuses on cell-based therapy for muscle diseases. We give an overview of the different parameters that have to be taken into account in such a therapeutic strategy, including the influence of muscle ageing, cell proliferation and migration capacities, as well as the translation of preclinical results in rodent into human clinical approaches. We describe recent advances in different types of human myogenic stem cells, with a particular emphasis on myoblasts but also on other candidate cells described so far [CD133+ cells, aldehyde dehydrogenase-positive cells (ALDH+), muscle-derived stem cells (MuStem), embryonic stem cells (ES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS)]. Finally, we provide an update of ongoing clinical trials using cell therapy strategies.

  6. Making Skeletal Muscle from Progenitor and Stem Cells: Development versus Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lydia; Rozo, Michelle E.; Lepper, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    For locomotion, vertebrate animals use the force generated by contractile skeletal muscles. These muscles form an actin/myosin-based bio-machinery that is attached to skeletal elements to effect body movement and maintain posture. The mechanics, physiology, and homeostasis of skeletal muscles in normal and disease states are of significant clinical interest. How muscles originate from progenitors during embryogenesis has attracted considerable attention from developmental biologists. How skeletal muscles regenerate and repair themselves after injury by the use of stem cells is an important process to maintain muscle homeostasis throughout lifetime. In recent years, much progress has been made towards uncovering the origins of myogenic progenitors and stem cells as well as the regulation of these cells during development and regeneration. PMID:22737183

  7. Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Parmesar, Kevon; Raj, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a well-established treatment option for both hematological malignancies and nonmalignant conditions such as aplastic anemia and haemoglobinopathies. For those patients lacking a suitable matched sibling or matched unrelated donor, haploidentical donors are an alternative expedient donor pool. Historically, haploidentical transplantation led to high rates of graft rejection and GVHD. Strategies to circumvent these issues include T cell depletion and management of complications thereof or T replete transplants with GVHD prophylaxis. This review is an overview of these strategies and contemporaneous outcomes for hematological malignancies in adult haploidentical stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:27313619

  8. Exercise-induced stem cell activation and its implication for cardiovascular and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patrick; Brixius, Klara; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    A number of publications have provided evidence that exercise and physical activity are linked to the activation, mobilization, and differentiation of various types of stem cells. Exercise may improve organ regeneration and function. This review summarizes mechanisms by which exercise contributes to stem cell-induced regeneration in the cardiovascular and the skeletal muscle system. In addition, it discusses whether exercise may improve and support stem cell transplantation in situations of cardiovascular disease or muscular dystrophy.

  9. A Wnt-TGFβ2 axis induces a fibrogenic program in muscle stem cells from dystrophic mice.

    PubMed

    Biressi, Stefano; Miyabara, Elen H; Gopinath, Suchitra D; Carlig, Poppy M M; Rando, Thomas A

    2014-12-17

    We have previously observed that Wnt signaling activates a fibrogenic program in adult muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, during aging. We genetically labeled satellite cells in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy to follow their fate during the progression of the disease. We observed that a fraction of satellite cells had a reduced myogenic potential and showed enhanced expression of profibrotic genes compared to age-matched controls. By combining in vitro and in vivo results, we found that expression of transforming growth factor-β2 (TGFβ2) was induced in response to elevated canonical Wnt signaling in dystrophic muscles and that the resulting increase in TGFβ activity affected the behavior of satellite cells in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Indeed, pharmacological inhibition of the TGFβ pathway in vivo reduced the fibrogenic characteristics of satellite cells. These studies shed new light on the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for stem cell dysfunction in dystrophic muscle and may contribute to the development of more effective and specific therapeutic approaches for the prevention of muscle fibrosis.

  10. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L; Pedersen, Roger A; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-04-15

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening.

  11. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G.; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening. PMID:25813541

  12. Skeletal muscle stem cells express anti-apoptotic ErbB receptors during activation from quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, Jon P. . E-mail: j.p.golding@open.ac.uk; Calderbank, Emma; Partridge, Terence A.; Beauchamp, Jonathan R.

    2007-01-15

    To be effective for tissue repair, satellite cells (the stem cells of adult muscle) must survive the initial activation from quiescence. Using an in vitro model of satellite cell activation, we show that erbB1, erbB2 and erbB3, members of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase family, appear on satellite cells within 6 h of activation. We show that signalling via erbB2 provides an anti-apoptotic survival mechanism for satellite cells during the first 24 h, as they progress to a proliferative state. Inhibition of erbB2 signalling with AG825 reduced satellite cell numbers, concomitant with elevated caspase-8 activation and TUNEL labelling of apoptotic satellite cells. In serum-free conditions, satellite cell apoptosis could be largely prevented by a mixture of erbB1, erbB3 and erbB4 ligand growth factors, but not by neuregulin alone (erbB3/erbB4 ligand). Furthermore, using inhibitors specific to discrete intracellular signalling pathways, we identify MEK as a pro-apoptotic mediator, and the erbB-regulated factor STAT3 as an anti-apoptotic mediator during satellite cell activation. These results implicate erbB2 signalling in the preservation of a full compliment of satellite cells as they activate in the context of a damaged muscle.

  13. Stem Cell-Mediated Regeneration of the Adult Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic injury of the adult mammalian brain is often associated with persistent functional deficits as its potential for regeneration and capacity to rebuild lost neural structures is limited. However, the discovery that neural stem cells (NSCs) persist throughout life in discrete regions of the brain, novel approaches to induce the formation of neuronal and glial cells, and recently developed strategies to generate tissue for exogenous cell replacement strategies opened novel perspectives how to regenerate the adult brain. Here, we will review recently developed approaches for brain repair and discuss future perspectives that may eventually allow for developing novel treatment strategies in acute and chronic brain injury. PMID:27781019

  14. Electrically induced muscle cramps induce hypertrophy of calf muscles in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Behringer, M.; Moser, M.; Montag, J.; McCourt, M.; Tenner, D.; Mester, J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Skeletal muscles usually cramp at short lengths, where the tension that can be exerted by muscle fibers is low. Since high tension is an important anabolic stimulus, it is questionable if cramps can induce hypertrophy and strength gains. In the present study we investigated if electrically induced cramps (EIMCs) can elicit these adaptations. Methods: 15 healthy male adults were randomly assigned to an intervention (IG; n=10) and a control group (CG; n=5). The cramp protocol (CP) applied twice a week to one leg of the IG, consisted of 3x6 EIMCs, of 5 s each. Calf muscles of the opposite leg were stimulated equally, but were hindered from cramping by fixating the ankle at 0° plantar flexion (nCP). Results: After six weeks, the cross sectional area of the triceps surae was similarly increased in both the CP (+9.0±3.4%) and the nCP (+6.8±3.7%). By contrast, force of maximal voluntary contractions, measured at 0° and 30° plantar flexion, increased significantly only in nCP (0°: +8.5±8.8%; 30°: 11.7±13.7%). Conclusion: The present data indicate that muscle cramps can induce hypertrophy in calf muscles, though lacking high tension as an important anabolic stimulus. PMID:26032216

  15. Generation of skeletal muscle from transplanted embryonic stem cells in dystrophic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagavati, Satyakam . E-mail: satyakamb@hotmail.com; Xu Weimin

    2005-07-29

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have great therapeutic potential because of their capacity to proliferate extensively and to form any fully differentiated cell of the body, including skeletal muscle cells. Successful generation of skeletal muscle in vivo, however, requires selective induction of the skeletal muscle lineage in cultures of ES cells and following transplantation, integration of appropriately differentiated skeletal muscle cells with recipient muscle. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe progressive muscle wasting disease due to a mutation in the dystrophin gene and the mdx mouse, an animal model for DMD, are characterized by the absence of the muscle membrane associated protein, dystrophin. Here, we show that co-culturing mouse ES cells with a preparation from mouse muscle enriched for myogenic stem and precursor cells, followed by injection into mdx mice, results occasionally in the formation of normal, vascularized skeletal muscle derived from the transplanted ES cells. Study of this phenomenon should provide valuable insights into skeletal muscle development in vivo from transplanted ES cells.

  16. The lumbrical muscle: a novel in situ system to evaluate adult skeletal muscle proteolysis and anticatabolic drugs for therapeutic purposes.

    PubMed

    Bergantin, Leandro Bueno; Figueiredo, Leonardo Bruno; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira

    2011-12-01

    The molecular regulation of skeletal muscle proteolysis and the pharmacological screening of anticatabolic drugs have been addressed by measuring tyrosine release from prepubertal rat skeletal muscles, which are thin enough to allow adequate in vitro diffusion of oxygen and substrates. However, the use of muscle at accelerated prepubertal growth has limited the analysis of adult muscle proteolysis or that associated with aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we established the adult rat lumbrical muscle (4/hindpaw; 8/rat) as a new in situ experimental model for dynamic measurement of skeletal muscle proteolysis. By incubating lumbrical muscles attached to their individual metatarsal bones in Tyrode solution, we showed that the muscle proteolysis rate of adult and aged rats (3-4 to 24 mo old) is 45-25% of that in prepubertal animals (1 mo old), which makes questionable the usual extrapolation of proteolysis from prepubertal to adult/senile muscles. While acute mechanical injury or 1- to 7-day denervation increased tyrosine release from adult lumbrical muscle by up to 60%, it was reduced by 20-28% after 2-h incubation with β-adrenoceptor agonists, forskolin or phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX. Using inhibitors of 26S-proteasome (MG132), lysosome (methylamine), or calpain (E64/leupeptin) systems, we showed that ubiquitin-proteasome is accountable for 40-50% of total lumbrical proteolysis of adult, middle-aged, and aged rats. In conclusion, the lumbrical model allows the analysis of muscle proteolysis rate from prepubertal to senile rats. By permitting eight simultaneous matched measurements per rat, the new model improves similar protocols performed in paired extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from prepubertal rats, optimizing the pharmacological screening of drugs for anticatabolic purposes.

  17. High Fat Diet-Induced Skeletal Muscle Wasting Is Decreased by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Administration: Implications on Oxidative Stress, Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway Activation, and Myonuclear Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Abrigo, Johanna; Rivera, Juan Carlos; Aravena, Javier; Cabrera, Daniel; Simon, Felipe; Ezquer, Fernando; Ezquer, Marcelo; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Obesity can lead to skeletal muscle atrophy, a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass. A feature of muscle atrophy is a decrease of myofibrillar proteins as a result of ubiquitin proteasome pathway overactivation, as evidenced by increased expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Additionally, other mechanisms are related to muscle wasting, including oxidative stress, myonuclear apoptosis, and autophagy. Stem cells are an emerging therapy in the treatment of chronic diseases such as high fat diet-induced obesity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a population of self-renewable and undifferentiated cells present in the bone marrow and other mesenchymal tissues of adult individuals. The present study is the first to analyze the effects of systemic MSC administration on high fat diet-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in the tibialis anterior of mice. Treatment with MSCs reduced losses of muscle strength and mass, decreases of fiber diameter and myosin heavy chain protein levels, and fiber type transitions. Underlying these antiatrophic effects, MSC administration also decreased ubiquitin proteasome pathway activation, oxidative stress, and myonuclear apoptosis. These results are the first to indicate that systemically administered MSCs could prevent muscle wasting associated with high fat diet-induced obesity and diabetes.

  18. High Fat Diet-Induced Skeletal Muscle Wasting Is Decreased by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Administration: Implications on Oxidative Stress, Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway Activation, and Myonuclear Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Aravena, Javier; Cabrera, Daniel; Simon, Felipe; Ezquer, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Obesity can lead to skeletal muscle atrophy, a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass. A feature of muscle atrophy is a decrease of myofibrillar proteins as a result of ubiquitin proteasome pathway overactivation, as evidenced by increased expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Additionally, other mechanisms are related to muscle wasting, including oxidative stress, myonuclear apoptosis, and autophagy. Stem cells are an emerging therapy in the treatment of chronic diseases such as high fat diet-induced obesity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a population of self-renewable and undifferentiated cells present in the bone marrow and other mesenchymal tissues of adult individuals. The present study is the first to analyze the effects of systemic MSC administration on high fat diet-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in the tibialis anterior of mice. Treatment with MSCs reduced losses of muscle strength and mass, decreases of fiber diameter and myosin heavy chain protein levels, and fiber type transitions. Underlying these antiatrophic effects, MSC administration also decreased ubiquitin proteasome pathway activation, oxidative stress, and myonuclear apoptosis. These results are the first to indicate that systemically administered MSCs could prevent muscle wasting associated with high fat diet-induced obesity and diabetes. PMID:27579157

  19. Isolation of pluripotent neural crest-derived stem cells from adult human tissues by connexin-43 enrichment.

    PubMed

    Pelaez, Daniel; Huang, Chun-Yuh Charles; Cheung, Herman S

    2013-11-01

    Identification and isolation of pluripotent stem cells in adult tissues represent an important advancement in the fields of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. For several years, research has been performed on the identification of biomarkers that can isolate stem cells residing in neural crest (NC)-derived adult tissues. The NC is considered a good model in stem cell biology as cells from it migrate extensively and contribute to the formation of diverse tissues in the body during organogenesis. Migration of these cells is modulated, in part, by gap junction communication among the cell sheets. Here we present a study in which, selection of connexin 43 (Cx43) expressing cells from human adult periodontal ligament yields a novel pluripotent stem cell population. Cx43⁺ periodontal ligament stem cells express pluripotency-associated transcription factors OCT4, Nanog, and Sox2, as well as NC-specific markers Sox10, p75, and Nestin. When injected in vivo into an immunodeficient mouse model, these cells were capable of generating teratomas with tissues from the three embryological germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Furthermore, the cells formed mature structures of tissues normally arising from the NC during embryogenesis such as eccrine sweat glands of the human skin, muscle, neuronal tissues, cartilage, and bone. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the human origin of the neoplastic cells as well as the ectodermal and endodermal nature of some of the structures found in the tumors. These results suggest that Cx43 may be used as a biomarker to select and isolate the remnant NC pluripotent stem cells from adult human tissues arising from this embryological structure. The isolation of these cells through routine medical procedures such as wisdom teeth extraction further enhances their applicability to the regenerative medicine field.

  20. Conditioned medium derived from umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells regenerates atrophied muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Z-Hun; Kim, Sun-Mi; Choi, Yong-Soo

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the regenerative effects and regulatory mechanisms of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs)-derived conditioned medium (CM) in atrophied muscles using an in vivo model. To determine the appropriate harvest point of UC-CM, active factor content was analyzed in the secretome over time. A muscle atrophy model was induced in rats by hindlimb suspension (HS) for 2 weeks. Next, UC-CM was injected directly into the soleus muscle of both hind legs to assess its regenerative efficacy on atrophy-related factors after 1 week of HS. During HS, muscle mass and muscle fiber size were significantly reduced by over 2-fold relative to untreated controls. Lactate accumulation within the muscles was similarly increased. By contrast, all of the above analytical factors were significantly improved in HS-induced rats by UC-CM injection compared with saline injection. Furthermore, the expression levels of desmin and skeletal muscle actin were significantly elevated by UC-CM treatment. Importantly, UC-CM effectively suppressed expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin E3-ligases, muscle ring finger 1 and muscle atrophy F-box by 2.3- and 2.1-fold, respectively. UC-CM exerted its actions by stimulating the phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling cascade. These findings suggest that UC-CM provides an effective stimulus to recover muscle status and function in atrophied muscles.

  1. Immune Influence on Adult Neural Stem Cell Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Pamela A.; Palmer, Theo D.

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) lie at the heart of central nervous system development and repair, and deficiency or dysregulation of NSCs or their progeny can have significant consequences at any stage of life. Immune signaling is emerging as one of the influential variables that define resident NSC behavior. Perturbations in local immune signaling accompany virtually every injury or disease state and signaling cascades that mediate immune activation, resolution, or chronic persistence influence resident stem and progenitor cells. Some aspects of immune signaling are beneficial, promoting intrinsic plasticity and cell replacement, while others appear to inhibit the very type of regenerative response that might restore or replace neural networks lost in injury or disease. Here we review known and speculative roles that immune signaling plays in the postnatal and adult brain, focusing on how environments encountered in disease or injury may influence the activity and fate of endogenous or transplanted NSCs. PMID:19840551

  2. Endothelial cells direct mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle cell fate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cho-Hao; Lilly, Brenda

    2014-11-01

    Under defined conditions, mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into unique cell types, making them attractive candidates for cell-based disease therapies. Ischemic diseases would greatly benefit from treatments that include the formation of new blood vessels from mesenchymal stem cells. However, blood vessels are complex structures composed of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and their assembly and function in a diseased environment is reliant upon joining with the pre-existing vasculature. Although endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell interactions are well known, how endothelial cells may influence mesenchymal stem cells and facilitate their differentiation has not been defined. Therefore, we sought to explore how endothelial cells might drive mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle fate. Our data show that cocultured endothelial cells induce smooth muscle cell differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. Endothelial cells can promote a contractile phenotype, reduce proliferation, and enhance collagen synthesis and secretion. Our data show that Notch signaling is essential for endothelial cell-dependent differentiation, and this differentiation pathway is largely independent of growth factor signaling mechanisms.

  3. Urinary bladder smooth muscle engineered from adipose stem cells and a three dimensional synthetic composite.

    PubMed

    Jack, Gregory S; Zhang, Rong; Lee, Min; Xu, Yuhan; Wu, Ben M; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2009-07-01

    Human adipose stem cells were cultured in smooth muscle inductive media and seeded into synthetic bladder composites to tissue engineer bladder smooth muscle. 85:15 Poly-lactic-glycolic acid bladder dome composites were cast using an electropulled microfiber luminal surface combined with an outer porous sponge. Cell-seeded bladders expressed smooth muscle actin, myosin heavy chain, calponinin, and caldesmon via RT-PCR and immunoflourescence. Nude rats (n=45) underwent removal of half their bladder and repair using: (i) augmentation with the adipose stem cell-seeded composites, (ii) augmentation with a matched acellular composite, or (iii) suture closure. Animals were followed for 12 weeks post-implantation and bladders were explanted serially. Results showed that bladder capacity and compliance were maintained in the cell-seeded group throughout the 12 weeks, but deteriorated in the acellular scaffold group sequentially with time. Control animals repaired with sutures regained their baseline bladder capacities by week 12, demonstrating a long-term limitation of this model. Histological analysis of explanted materials demonstrated viable adipose stem cells and increasing smooth muscle mass in the cell-seeded scaffolds with time. Tissue bath stimulation demonstrated smooth muscle contraction of the seeded implants but not the acellular implants after 12 weeks in vivo. Our study demonstrates the feasibility and short term physical properties of bladder tissue engineered from adipose stem cells.

  4. Retentive multipotency of adult dorsal root ganglia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rabindra P; Cheng, Ying-Hua; Nelson, Paul; Zhou, Feng C

    2009-01-01

    Preservation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the adult peripheral nervous system (PNS) has recently been confirmed. However, it is not clear whether peripheral NSCs possess predestined, bona fide phenotypes or a response to innate developmental cues. In this study, we first demonstrated the longevity, multipotency, and high fidelity of sensory features of postmigrating adult dorsal root ganglia (aDRG) stem cells. Derived from aDRG and after 4-5 years in culture without dissociating, the aDRG NSCs were found capable of proliferation, expressing neuroepithelial, neuronal, and glial markers. Remarkably, these aDRG NSCs expressed sensory neuronal markers vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2--glutamate terminals), transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TrpV1--capsaicin sensitive), phosphorylated 200 kDa neurofilaments (pNF200--capsaicin insensitive, myelinated), and the serotonin transporter (5-HTT), which normally is transiently expressed in developing DRG. Furthermore, in response to neurotrophins, the aDRG NSCs enhanced TrpV1 expression upon exposure to nerve growth factor (NGF), but not to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). On the contrary, BDNF increased the expression of NeuN. Third, the characterization of aDRG NSCs was demonstrated by transplantation of red fluorescent-expressing aDRG NSCs into injured spinal cord. These cells expressed nestin, Hu, and beta-III-tubulin (immature neuronal markers), GFAP (astrocyte marker) as well as sensory neural marker TrpV1 (capsaicin sensitive) and pNF200 (mature, capsaicin insensitive, myelinated). Our results demonstrated that the postmigrating neural crest adult DRG stem cells not only preserved their multipotency but also were retentive in sensory potency despite the age and long-term ex vivo status.

  5. Novel Adult Stem Cells for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Circulation 103, 882–888 (2001). 52. Biernaskie, J. et al. SKPs derive from hair follicle precursors and exhibit properties of adult dermal stem cells...3). * indicates significant difference between indicated groups using Holm’s t- test . (P < 0.01). (l–s) Immunostaining of isolated sm-mHC − cells...and the tissue from which the cells were derived using student’s t- test (P < 0.05). † indicates significant difference between inferior vena cava and

  6. Skeletal muscle perfusion and stem cell delivery in muscle disorders using intra-femoral artery canulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Matthias, Nadine; Hunt, Samuel D; Wu, Jianbo; Darabi, Radbod

    2015-11-15

    Muscular dystrophies are among major inherited muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle damage and fibrosis with no definitive cure. Recently, gene or cell based therapies have been developed to restore the missing gene expression or replace the damaged tissues. In order to test the efficiency of these therapies in mice models of muscular dystrophies, the arterial route of delivery is very advantageous as it provides uniform muscle exposure to the therapeutic agents or cells. Although there are few reports of arterial delivery of the therapeutic agents or cells in mice, there is no in-depth description and evaluation of its efficacy in perfusion of downstream muscles. This study is aimed to develop a practical method for intra-femoral artery perfusion in mice and to evaluate perfusion efficiency using near-infrared-fluorescence (NIRF) imaging as well as histology following stem cell delivery. Our results provide a practical guide to perform this delicate method in mice. By using a sensitive fluorescent dye, different muscle groups of the hindlimb have been evaluated for proper perfusion. As the final step, we have validated the efficiency of arterial cell delivery into muscles using human iPS-derived myogenic cells in an immunodeficient mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (NSG-mdx(4cv)).

  7. Aging of the skeletal muscle extracellular matrix drives a stem cell fibrogenic conversion.

    PubMed

    Stearns-Reider, Kristen M; D'Amore, Antonio; Beezhold, Kevin; Rothrauff, Benjamin; Cavalli, Loredana; Wagner, William R; Vorp, David A; Tsamis, Alkiviadis; Shinde, Sunita; Zhang, Changqing; Barchowsky, Aaron; Rando, Thomas A; Tuan, Rocky S; Ambrosio, Fabrisia

    2017-03-30

    Age-related declines in skeletal muscle regeneration have been attributed to muscle stem cell (MuSC) dysfunction. Aged MuSCs display a fibrogenic conversion, leading to fibrosis and impaired recovery after injury. Although studies have demonstrated the influence of in vitro substrate characteristics on stem cell fate, whether and how aging of the extracellular matrix (ECM) affects stem cell behavior has not been investigated. Here, we investigated the direct effect of the aged muscle ECM on MuSC lineage specification. Quantification of ECM topology and muscle mechanical properties reveals decreased collagen tortuosity and muscle stiffening with increasing age. Age-related ECM alterations directly disrupt MuSC responses, and MuSCs seeded ex vivo onto decellularized ECM constructs derived from aged muscle display increased expression of fibrogenic markers and decreased myogenicity, compared to MuSCs seeded onto young ECM. This fibrogenic conversion is recapitulated in vitro when MuSCs are seeded directly onto matrices elaborated by aged fibroblasts. When compared to young fibroblasts, fibroblasts isolated from aged muscle display increased nuclear levels of the mechanosensors, Yes-associated protein (YAP)/transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), consistent with exposure to a stiff microenvironment in vivo. Accordingly, preconditioning of young fibroblasts by seeding them onto a substrate engineered to mimic the stiffness of aged muscle increases YAP/TAZ nuclear translocation and promotes secretion of a matrix that favors MuSC fibrogenesis. The findings here suggest that an age-related increase in muscle stiffness drives YAP/TAZ-mediated pathogenic expression of matricellular proteins by fibroblasts, ultimately disrupting MuSC fate.

  8. Differentiated human stem cells resemble fetal, not adult, β cells.

    PubMed

    Hrvatin, Sinisa; O'Donnell, Charles W; Deng, Francis; Millman, Jeffrey R; Pagliuca, Felicia Walton; DiIorio, Philip; Rezania, Alireza; Gifford, David K; Melton, Douglas A

    2014-02-25

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential to generate any human cell type, and one widely recognized goal is to make pancreatic β cells. To this end, comparisons between differentiated cell types produced in vitro and their in vivo counterparts are essential to validate hPSC-derived cells. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of sorted insulin-expressing (INS(+)) cells derived from three independent hPSC lines, human fetal pancreata, and adult human islets points to two major conclusions: (i) Different hPSC lines produce highly similar INS(+) cells and (ii) hPSC-derived INS(+) (hPSC-INS(+)) cells more closely resemble human fetal β cells than adult β cells. This study provides a direct comparison of transcriptional programs between pure hPSC-INS(+) cells and true β cells and provides a catalog of genes whose manipulation may convert hPSC-INS(+) cells into functional β cells.

  9. Positional identity of adult stem cells in salamander limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anoop; Gates, Phillip B; Brockes, Jeremy P

    2007-01-01

    Limb regeneration in larval and adult salamanders proceeds from a mound of mesenchymal stem cells called the limb blastema. The blastema gives rise just to those structures distal to its level of origin, and this property of positional identity is reset to more proximal values by treatment with retinoic acid. We have identified a cell surface protein, called Prod1/CD59, which appears to be a determinant of proximodistal identity. Prod1 is expressed in an exponential gradient in an adult limb as determined by detection of both mRNA and immunoreactive protein. Prod1 protein is up-regulated after treatment of distal blastemas with RA and this is particularly marked in cells of the dermis. These cells have previously been implicated in pattern formation during limb regeneration.

  10. Adult Vascular Wall Resident Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Arterial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Bruno; Compagna, Rita; Amato, Maurizio; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; Rossi, Alessio; Naso, Agostino; Ruggiero, Michele; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Evidences have shown the presence of multipotent stem cells (SCs) at sites of arterial aneurysms: they can differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and are activated after residing in a quiescent state in the vascular wall. Recent studies have implicated the role of matrix metalloproteinases in the pathogenesis of arterial aneurysms: in fact the increased synthesis of MMPs by arterial SMCs is thought to be a pivotal mechanism in aneurysm formation. The factors and signaling pathways involved in regulating wall resident SC recruitment, survival, proliferation, growth factor production, and differentiation may be also related to selective expression of different MMPs. This review explores the relationship between adult vascular wall resident multipotent vascular SCs, MMPs, and arterial aneurysms. PMID:25866513

  11. The longest telomeres: a general signature of adult stem cell compartments

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Ignacio; Canela, Andres; Vera, Elsa; Tejera, Agueda; Cotsarelis, George; Blasco, María A.

    2008-01-01

    Identification of adult stem cells and their location (niches) is of great relevance for regenerative medicine. However, stem cell niches are still poorly defined in most adult tissues. Here, we show that the longest telomeres are a general feature of adult stem cell compartments. Using confocal telomere quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (telomapping), we find gradients of telomere length within tissues, with the longest telomeres mapping to the known stem cell compartments. In mouse hair follicles, we show that cells with the longest telomeres map to the known stem cell compartments, colocalize with stem cell markers, and behave as stem cells upon treatment with mitogenic stimuli. Using K15-EGFP reporter mice, which mark hair follicle stem cells, we show that GFP-positive cells have the longest telomeres. The stem cell compartments in small intestine, testis, cornea, and brain of the mouse are also enriched in cells with the longest telomeres. This constitutes the description of a novel general property of adult stem cell compartments. Finally, we make the novel finding that telomeres shorten with age in different mouse stem cell compartments, which parallels a decline in stem cell functionality, suggesting that telomere loss may contribute to stem cell dysfunction with age. PMID:18283121

  12. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type.

  13. From adult stem cells to cancer stem cells: Oct-4 Gene, cell-cell communication, and hormones during tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Trosko, James E

    2006-11-01

    Carcinogenesis is characterized by "initiation," "promotion," and "progression" phases. The "stem cell theory" and "de-differentiation" theories are used to explain the origin of cancer. Growth control for stem cells, which lack functional gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), involves negative soluble or niche factors, while for progenitor cells, it involves GJIC. Tumor promoters, hormones, and growth factors inhibit GJIC reversibly. Oncogenes stably inhibit GJIC. Cancer cells, which lack growth control and the ability to terminally differentiate and to apoptose, lack GJIC. The Oct3/4 gene, a POU (Pit-Oct-Unc) family of transcription factors was thought to be expressed only in embryonic stem cells and in tumor cells. With the availability of normal adult human stem cells, tests for the expression of Oct3/4 gene and the stem cell theory in human carcinogenesis became possible. Human breast, liver, pancreas, kidney, mesenchyme, and gastric stem cells, HeLa and MCF-7 cells, and canine tumors were tested with antibodies and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for Oct3/4. Adult human breast stem cells, immortalized nontumorigenic and tumor cell lines, but not the normal differentiated cells, expressed Oct3/4. Adult human differentiated cells lose their Oct-4 expression. Oct3/4 is expressed in a few cells found in the basal layer of human skin epidermis. The data demonstrate that normal adult stem cells and cancer stem cells maintain expression of Oct3/4, consistent with the stem cell hypothesis of carcinogenesis. These Oct-4 positive cells might represent the "cancer stem cells." A strategy to target "cancer stem cells" is to suppress the Oct-4 gene in order to cause the cells to differentiate.

  14. Vessel-associated stem cells from skeletal muscle: From biology to future uses in cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Sancricca, Cristina; Mirabella, Massimiliano; Gliubizzi, Carla; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Gidaro, Teresa; Morosetti, Roberta

    2010-06-26

    Over the last years, the existence of different stem cells with myogenic potential has been widely investigated. Besides the classical skeletal muscle progenitors represented by satellite cells, numerous multipotent and embryologically unrelated progenitors with a potential role in muscle differentiation and repair have been identified. In order to conceive a therapeutic approach for degenerative muscle disorders, it is of primary importance to identify an ideal stem cell endowed with all the features for a possible use in vivo. Among all emerging populations, vessel-associated stem cells are a novel and promising class of multipotent progenitors of mesodermal origin and with high myogenic potential which seem to best fit all the requirements for a possible cell therapy. In vitro and in vivostudies have already tested the effectiveness and safety of vessel-associated stem cells in animal models. This leads to the concrete possibility in the future to start pilot human clinical trials, hopefully opening the way to a turning point in the treatment of genetic and acquired muscle disorders.

  15. Clonal multipotency of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells between mesodermal and ectodermal lineage.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Okada, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Tono, Kayoko; Masuda, Maki; Wada, Mika; Hoshi, Akio; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Akatsuka, Akira

    2007-09-01

    The differentiation potential of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) after in vitro culture and in vivo transplantation has been extensively studied. However, the clonal multipotency of MDSCs has yet to be fully determined. Here, we show that single skeletal muscle-derived CD34-/CD45- (skeletal muscle-derived double negative [Sk-DN]) cells exhibit clonal multipotency that can give rise to myogenic, vasculogenic, and neural cell lineages after in vivo single cell-derived single sphere implantation and in vitro clonal single cell culture. Muscles from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice were enzymatically dissociated and sorted based on CD34 and CD45. Sk-DN cells were clone-sorted into a 96-well plate and were cultured in collagen-based medium with basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor for 14 days. Individual colony-forming units (CFUs) were then transplanted directly into severely damaged muscle together with 1 x 10(5) competitive carrier Sk-DN cells obtained from wild-type mice muscle expanded for 5 days under the same culture conditions using 35-mm culture dishes. Four weeks after transplantation, implanted GFP+ cells demonstrated differentiation into endothelial, vascular smooth muscle, skeletal muscle, and neural cell (Schwann cell) lineages. This multipotency was also confirmed by expression of mRNA markers for myogenic (MyoD, myf5), neural (Musashi-1, Nestin, neural cell adhesion molecule-1, peripheral myelin protein-22, Nucleostemin), and vascular (alpha-smooth muscle actin, smoothelin, vascular endothelial-cadherin, tyrosine kinase-endothelial) stem cells by clonal (single-cell derived) single-sphere reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Approximately 70% of clonal CFUs exhibited expression of all three cell lineages. These findings support the notion that Sk-DN cells are a useful tool for damaged muscle-related tissue reconstitution by synchronized vasculogenesis, myogenesis, and neurogenesis.

  16. Oct4 expression in adult human stem cells: evidence in support of the stem cell theory of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tai, Mei-Hui; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Kiupel, Matti; Webster, Joshua D; Olson, L Karl; Trosko, James E

    2005-02-01

    The Oct3/4 gene, a POU family transcription factor, has been noted as being specifically expressed in embryonic stem cells and in tumor cells but not in cells of differentiated tissues. With the ability to isolate adult human stem cells it became possible to test for the expression of Oct3/4 gene in adult stem cells and to test the stem cell theory of carcinogenesis. Using antibodies and PCR primers we tested human breast, liver, pancreas, kidney, mesenchyme and gastric stem cells, the cancer cell lines HeLa and MCF-7 and human, dog and rat tumors for Oct4 expression. The results indicate that adult human stem cells, immortalized non-tumorigenic cells and tumor cells and cell lines, but not differentiated cells, express Oct4. Oct4 is expressed in a few cells found in the basal layer of human skin epidermis. The data demonstrate that adult stem cells maintain expression of Oct4, consistent with the stem cell hypothesis of carcinogenesis.

  17. Muscle reorganisation through local injection of stem cells in the diaphragm of mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The diaphragm is the major respiratory muscle affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and is responsible for causing 80% of deaths. The use of mechanical forces that act on the body or intermittent pressure on the airways improves the quality of life of patients but does not prevent the progression of respiratory failure. Thus, diseases that require tissue repair, such as DMD, represent a group of pathologies that have great potential for cell therapy. The application of stem cells directly into the diaphragm instead of systemic application can reduce cell migration to other affected areas and increase the chances of muscle reorganisation. The mdx mouse is a suitable animal model for this research because its diaphragmatic phenotype is similar to human DMD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the potential cell implantation in the diaphragm muscle after the xenotransplantation of stem cells. Methods A total of 9 mice, including 3 control BALB/Cmice, 3 5-month-old mdx mice without stem cell injections and 3 mdx mice injected with stem cells, were used. The animals injected with stem cells underwent laparoscopy so that stem cells from GFP-labelled rabbit olfactory epithelium could be locally injected into the diaphragm muscle. After 8 days, all animals were euthanised, and the diaphragm muscle was dissected and subjected to histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results Both the fresh diaphragm tissue and immunohistochemical analyses showed immunopositive GFP labelling of some of the cells and immunonegativity of myoblast bundles. In the histological analysis, we observed a reduction in the inflammatory infiltrate as well as the presence of a few peripheral nuclei and myoblast bundles. Conclusion We were able to implant stem cells into the diaphragm via local injection, which promoted moderate muscle reorganisation. The presence of myoblast bundles cannot be attributed to stem cell incorporation because there was no immunopositive

  18. Myogenic regulatory factors during regeneration of skeletal muscle in young, adult, and old rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, D. R.; Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1997-01-01

    Myogenic factor mRNA expression was examined during muscle regeneration after bupivacaine injection in Fischer 344/Brown Norway F1 rats aged 3, 18, and 31 mo of age (young, adult, and old, respectively). Mass of the tibialis anterior muscle in the young rats had recovered to control values by 21 days postbupivacaine injection but in adult and old rats remained 40% less than that of contralateral controls at 21 and 28 days of recovery. During muscle regeneration, myogenin mRNA was significantly increased in muscles of young, adult, and old rats 5 days after bupivacaine injection. Subsequently, myogenin mRNA levels in young rat muscle decreased to postinjection control values by day 21 but did not return to control values in 28-day regenerating muscles of adult and old rats. The expression of MyoD mRNA was also increased in muscles at day 5 of regeneration in young, adult, and old rats, decreased to control levels by day 14 in young and adult rats, and remained elevated in the old rats for 28 days. In summary, either a diminished ability to downregulate myogenin and MyoD mRNAs in regenerating muscle occurs in old rat muscles, or the continuing myogenic effort includes elevated expression of these mRNAs.

  19. Control of abdominal muscles by brain stem respiratory neurons in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Ezure, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the control of abdominal muscles by the brain stem respiratory neurons was investigated in decerebrate unanesthetized cats. First, it was determined which of the brain stem respiratory neurons project to the lumbar cord (from which the abdominal muscles receive part of their innervation), by stimulating the neurons monopolarly. In a second part of the study, it was determined if lumbar-projecting respiratory neurons make monosynaptic connections with abdominal motoneurons; in these experiments, discriminate spontaneous spikes of antidromically acivated expiratory (E) neurons were used to trigger activity from both L1 and L2 nerves. A large projection was observed from E neurons in the caudal ventral respiratory group to the contralateral upper lumber cord. However, cross-correlation experiments found only two (out of 47 neuron pairs tested) strong monosynaptic connections between brain stem neurons and abdominal motoneurons.

  20. Human embryonic and fetal mesenchymal stem cells differentiate toward three different cardiac lineages in contrast to their adult counterparts.

    PubMed

    Ramkisoensing, Arti A; Pijnappels, Daniël A; Askar, Saïd F A; Passier, Robert; Swildens, Jim; Goumans, Marie José; Schutte, Cindy I; de Vries, Antoine A F; Scherjon, Sicco; Mummery, Christine L; Schalij, Martin J; Atsma, Douwe E

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show unexplained differences in differentiation potential. In this study, differentiation of human (h) MSCs derived from embryonic, fetal and adult sources toward cardiomyocytes, endothelial and smooth muscle cells was investigated. Labeled hMSCs derived from embryonic stem cells (hESC-MSCs), fetal umbilical cord, bone marrow, amniotic membrane and adult bone marrow and adipose tissue were co-cultured with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (nrCMCs) or cardiac fibroblasts (nrCFBs) for 10 days, and also cultured under angiogenic conditions. Cardiomyogenesis was assessed by human-specific immunocytological analysis, whole-cell current-clamp recordings, human-specific qRT-PCR and optical mapping. After co-culture with nrCMCs, significantly more hESC-MSCs than fetal hMSCs stained positive for α-actinin, whereas adult hMSCs stained negative. Furthermore, functional cardiomyogenic differentiation, based on action potential recordings, was shown to occur, but not in adult hMSCs. Of all sources, hESC-MSCs expressed most cardiac-specific genes. hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs contained significantly higher basal levels of connexin43 than adult hMSCs and co-culture with nrCMCs increased expression. After co-culture with nrCFBs, hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs did not express α-actinin and connexin43 expression was decreased. Conduction velocity (CV) in co-cultures of nrCMCs and hESC-MSCs was significantly higher than in co-cultures with fetal or adult hMSCs. In angiogenesis bioassays, only hESC-MSCs and fetal hMSCs were able to form capillary-like structures, which stained for smooth muscle and endothelial cell markers.Human embryonic and fetal MSCs differentiate toward three different cardiac lineages, in contrast to adult MSCs. Cardiomyogenesis is determined by stimuli from the cellular microenvironment, where connexin43 may play an important role.

  1. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation as a method to maximize the beneficial effects of muscle stem cells transplanted into dystrophic skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Distefano, Giovanna; Ferrari, Ricardo Jose; Weiss, Christopher; Deasy, Bridget M; Boninger, Michael L; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Huard, Johnny; Ambrosio, Fabrisia

    2013-01-01

    Cellular therapy is a potential approach to improve the regenerative capacity of damaged or diseased skeletal muscle. However, its clinical use has often been limited by impaired donor cell survival, proliferation and differentiation following transplantation. Additionally, functional improvements after transplantation are all-too-often negligible. Because the host microenvironment plays an important role in the fate of transplanted cells, methods to modulate the microenvironment and guide donor cell behavior are warranted. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) for 1 or 4 weeks following muscle-derived stem cell (MDSC) transplantation into dystrophic skeletal muscle can modulate the fate of donor cells and enhance their contribution to muscle regeneration and functional improvements. Animals submitted to 4 weeks of NMES after transplantation demonstrated a 2-fold increase in the number of dystrophin+ myofibers as compared to control transplanted muscles. These findings were concomitant with an increased vascularity in the MDSC+NMES group when compared to non-stimulated counterparts. Additionally, animals subjected to NMES (with or without MDSC transplantation) presented an increased maximal specific tetanic force when compared to controls. Although cell transplantation and/or the use of NMES resulted in no changes in fatigue resistance, the combination of both MDSC transplantation and NMES resulted in a faster recovery from fatigue, when compared to non-injected and non-stimulated counterparts. We conclude that NMES is a viable method to improve MDSC engraftment, enhance dystrophic muscle strength, and, in combination with MDSC transplantation, improve recovery from fatigue. These findings suggest that NMES may be a clinically-relevant adjunct approach for cell transplantation into skeletal muscle.

  2. Catalog of gene expression in adult neural stem cells and their in vivo microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Cecilia; Wirta, Valtteri; Meletis, Konstantinos; Wikstroem, Lilian; Carlsson, Leif; Frisen, Jonas; Lundeberg, Joakim . E-mail: joakim.lundeberg@biotech.kth.se

    2006-06-10

    Stem cells generally reside in a stem cell microenvironment, where cues for self-renewal and differentiation are present. However, the genetic program underlying stem cell proliferation and multipotency is poorly understood. Transcriptome analysis of stem cells and their in vivo microenvironment is one way of uncovering the unique stemness properties and provides a framework for the elucidation of stem cell function. Here, we characterize the gene expression profile of the in vivo neural stem cell microenvironment in the lateral ventricle wall of adult mouse brain and of in vitro proliferating neural stem cells. We have also analyzed an Lhx2-expressing hematopoietic-stem-cell-like cell line in order to define the transcriptome of a well-characterized and pure cell population with stem cell characteristics. We report the generation, assembly and annotation of 50,792 high-quality 5'-end expressed sequence tag sequences. We further describe a shared expression of 1065 transcripts by all three stem cell libraries and a large overlap with previously published gene expression signatures for neural stem/progenitor cells and other multipotent stem cells. The sequences and cDNA clones obtained within this framework provide a comprehensive resource for the analysis of genes in adult stem cells that can accelerate future stem cell research.

  3. In vivo myogenic potential of human CD133+ muscle-derived stem cells: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Elisa; Riederer, Ingo; Chaouch, Soraya; Belicchi, Marzia; Razini, Paola; Di Santo, James; Torrente, Yvan; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Mouly, Vincent

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, numerous reports have identified in mouse different sources of myogenic cells distinct from satellite cells that exhibited a variable myogenic potential in vivo. Myogenic stem cells have also been described in humans, although their regenerative potential has rarely been quantified. In this study, we have investigated the myogenic potential of human muscle-derived cells based on the expression of the stem cell marker CD133 as compared to bona fide satellite cells already used in clinical trials. The efficiency of these cells to participate in muscle regeneration and contribute to the renewal of the satellite cell pool, when injected intramuscularly, has been evaluated in the Rag2(-/-) gammaC(-/-) C5(-/-) mouse in which muscle degeneration is induced by cryoinjury. We demonstrate that human muscle-derived CD133+ cells showed a much greater regenerative capacity when compared to human myoblasts. The number of fibers expressing human proteins and the number of human cells in a satellite cell position are all dramatically increased when compared to those observed after injection of human myoblasts. In addition, CD133+/CD34+ cells exhibited a better dispersion in the host muscle when compared to human myoblasts. We propose that muscle-derived CD133+ cells could be an attractive candidate for cellular therapy.

  4. Axonal control of the adult neural stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Chen, Jiadong; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Obernier, Kirsten; Guinto, Cristina D; Tecott, Laurence H; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Kriegstein, Arnold; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-04-03

    The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) is an extensive germinal niche containing neural stem cells (NSCs) in the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult brain. How the adult brain's neural activity influences the behavior of adult NSCs remains largely unknown. We show that serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from a small group of neurons in the raphe form an extensive plexus on most of the ventricular walls. Electron microscopy revealed intimate contacts between 5HT axons and NSCs (B1) or ependymal cells (E1) and these cells were labeled by a transsynaptic viral tracer injected into the raphe. B1 cells express the 5HT receptors 2C and 5A. Electrophysiology showed that activation of these receptors in B1 cells induced small inward currents. Intraventricular infusion of 5HT2C agonist or antagonist increased or decreased V-SVZ proliferation, respectively. These results indicate that supraependymal 5HT axons directly interact with NSCs to regulate neurogenesis via 5HT2C.

  5. Live Imaging of Adult Neural Stem Cells in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Felipe; Costa, Marcos R.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of cells of the neural lineage within the brain is not restricted to early development. New neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes are produced in the adult brain throughout the entire murine life. However, despite the extensive research performed in the field of adult neurogenesis during the past years, fundamental questions regarding the cell biology of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) remain to be uncovered. For instance, it is crucial to elucidate whether a single aNSC is capable of differentiating into all three different macroglial cell types in vivo or these distinct progenies constitute entirely separate lineages. Similarly, the cell cycle length, the time and mode of division (symmetric vs. asymmetric) that these cells undergo within their lineage progression are interesting questions under current investigation. In this sense, live imaging constitutes a valuable ally in the search of reliable answers to the previous questions. In spite of the current limitations of technology new approaches are being developed and outstanding amount of knowledge is being piled up providing interesting insights in the behavior of aNSCs. Here, we will review the state of the art of live imaging as well as the alternative models that currently offer new answers to critical questions. PMID:27013941

  6. Axonal Control of the Adult Neural Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Chen, Jiadong; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Obernier, Kirsten; Guinto, Cristina D.; Tecott, Laurence H.; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Kriegstein, Arnold; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) is an extensive germinal niche containing neural stem cells (NSC) in the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult brain. How the adult brain’s neural activity influences the behavior of adult NSCs remains largely unknown. We show that serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from a small group of neurons in the raphe form an extensive plexus on most of the ventricular walls. Electron microscopy revealed intimate contacts between 5HT axons and NSCs (B1) or ependymal cells (E1) and these cells were labeled by a transsynaptic viral tracer injected into the raphe. B1 cells express the 5HT receptors 2C and 5A. Electrophysiology showed that activation of these receptors in B1 cells induced small inward currents. Intraventricular infusion of 5HT2C agonist or antagonist increased or decreased V-SVZ proliferation, respectively. These results indicate that supraependymal 5HT axons directly interact with NSCs to regulate neurogenesis via 5HT2C. PMID:24561083

  7. Evidence of progenitor cells of glandular and myoepithelial cell lineages in the human adult female breast epithelium: a new progenitor (adult stem) cell concept.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Werner; Buerger, Horst

    2003-10-01

    Although experimental data clearly confirm the existence of self-renewing mammary stem cells, the characteristics of such progenitor cells have never been satisfactorily defined. Using a double immunofluorescence technique for simultaneous detection of the basal cytokeratin 5, the glandular cytokeratins 8/18 and the myoepithelial differentiation marker smooth muscle actin (SMA), we were able to demonstrate the presence of CK5+ cells in human adult breast epithelium. These cells have the potential to differentiate to either glandular (CK8/18+) or myoepithelial cells (SMA+) through intermediary cells (CK5+ and CK8/18+ or SMA+). We therefore proceeded on the assumption that the CK5+ cells are phenotypically and behaviourally progenitor (committed adult stem) cells of human breast epithelium. Furthermore, we furnish evidence that most of these progenitor cells are located in the luminal epithelium of the ductal lobular tree. Based on data obtained in extensive analyses of proliferative breast disease lesions, we have come to regard usual ductal hyperplasia as a progenitor cell-derived lesion, whereas most breast cancers seem to evolve from differentiated glandular cells. Double immunofluorescence experiments provide a new tool to characterize phenotypically progenitor (adult stem) cells and their progenies. This model has been shown to be of great value for a better understanding not only of normal tissue regeneration but also of proliferative breast disease. Furthermore, this model provides a new tool for unravelling further the regulatory mechanisms that govern normal and pathological cell growth.

  8. RhoA mediates defective stem cell function and heterotopic ossification in dystrophic muscle of mice.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaodong; Usas, Arvydas; Tang, Ying; Lu, Aiping; Wang, Bing; Weiss, Kurt; Huard, Johnny

    2013-09-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) and fatty infiltration (FI) often occur in diseased skeletal muscle and have been previously described in various animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD); however, the pathological mechanisms remain largely unknown. Dystrophin-deficient mdx mice and dystrophin/utrophin double-knockout (dKO) mice are mouse models of DMD; however, mdx mice display a strong muscle regeneration capacity, while dKO mice exhibit a much more severe phenotype, which is similar to patients with DMD. Our results revealed that more extensive HO, but not FI, occurred in the skeletal muscle of dKO mice versus mdx mice, and RhoA activation specifically occurred at the sites of HO. Moreover, the gene expression of RhoA, BMPs, and several inflammatory factors were significantly up-regulated in muscle stem cells isolated from dKO mice; while inactivation of RhoA in the cells with RhoA/ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 led to reduced osteogenic potential and improved myogenic potential. Finally, inactivation of RhoA signaling in the dKO mice with Y-27632 improved muscle regeneration and reduced the expression of BMPs, inflammation, HO, and intramyocellular lipid accumulation in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. Our results revealed that RhoA represents a major molecular switch in the regulation of HO and muscle regeneration in dystrophic skeletal muscle of mice.

  9. Cyclin D3 critically regulates the balance between self-renewal and differentiation in skeletal muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Giulia; Ferretti, Roberta; Bruschi, Marco; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Caruso, Maurizia

    2013-11-01

    Satellite cells are mitotically quiescent myogenic stem cells resident beneath the basal lamina surrounding adult muscle myofibers. In response to injury, multiple extrinsic signals drive the entry of satellite cells into the cell cycle and then to proliferation, differentiation, and self-renewal of their downstream progeny. Because satellite cells must endure for a lifetime, their cell cycle activity must be carefully controlled to coordinate proliferative expansion and self-renewal with the onset of the differentiation program. In this study, we find that cyclin D3, a member of the family of mitogen-activated D-type cyclins, is critically required for proper developmental progression of myogenic progenitors. Using a cyclin D3-knockout mouse we determined that cyclin D3 deficiency leads to reduced myofiber size and impaired establishment of the satellite cell population within the adult muscle. Cyclin D3-null myogenic progenitors, studied ex vivo on isolated myofibers and in vitro, displayed impaired cell cycle progression, increased differentiation potential, and reduced self-renewal capability. Similarly, silencing of cyclin D3 in C2 myoblasts caused anticipated exit from the cell cycle and precocious onset of terminal differentiation. After induced muscle damage, cyclin D3-null myogenic progenitors exhibited proliferation deficits, a precocious ability to form newly generated myofibers and a reduced capability to repopulate the satellite cell niche at later stages of the regeneration process. These results indicate that cyclin D3 plays a cell-autonomous and nonredundant function in regulating the dynamic balance between proliferation, differentiation, and self-renewal that normally establishes an appropriate pool size of adult satellite cells.

  10. Visualization of adult stem cells within their niches using the Drosophila germline as a model system.

    PubMed

    König, Annekatrin; Shcherbata, Halyna R

    2013-01-01

    The germaria of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster present an excellent model to study germline stem cell-niche interactions. Two to three adult stem cells are surrounded by a number of somatic cells that form the niche. Here we describe how Drosophilae germaria can be dissected and specifically immuno-stained to allow for identification and analysis of both the adult stem cells and their somatic niche cells.

  11. Possibility of leg muscle hypertrophy by ambulation in older adults: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hayao; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Thiebaud, Robert S; Stager, Joel M; Abe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    It is known that ambulatory exercises such as brisk walking and jogging are potent stimuli for improving aerobic capacity, but it is less understood whether ambulatory exercise can increase leg muscle size and function. The purpose of this brief review is to discuss whether or not ambulatory exercise elicits leg muscle hypertrophy in older adults. Daily ambulatory activity with moderate (>3 metabolic equivalents [METs], which is defined as the ratio of the work metabolic rate to the resting metabolic rate) intensity estimated by accelerometer is positively correlated with lower body muscle size and function in older adults. Although there is conflicting data on the effects of short-term training, it is possible that relatively long periods of walking, jogging, or intermittent running for over half a year can increase leg muscle size among older adults. In addition, slow-walk training with a combination of leg muscle blood flow restriction elicits muscle hypertrophy only in the blood flow restricted leg muscles. Competitive marathon running and regular high intensity distance running in young and middle-aged adults may not produce leg muscle hypertrophy due to insufficient recovery from the damaging running bout, although there have been no studies that have investigated the effects of running on leg muscle morphology in older subjects. It is clear that skeletal muscle hypertrophy can occur independently of exercise mode and load.

  12. Muscle-Bound Primordial Stem Cells Give Rise to Myofiber-Associated Myogenic and Non-Myogenic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Chapal-Ilani, Noa; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Horovitz, Inna; Reizel, Yitzhak; Benayahu, Dafna; Shapiro, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    Myofiber cultures give rise to myogenic as well as to non-myogenic cells. Whether these myofiber-associated non-myogenic cells develop from resident stem cells that possess mesenchymal plasticity or from other stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) remain unsolved. To address this question, we applied a method for reconstructing cell lineage trees from somatic mutations to MSCs and myogenic and non-myogenic cells from individual myofibers that were cultured at clonal density. Our analyses show that (i) in addition to myogenic progenitors, myofibers also harbor non-myogenic progenitors of a distinct, yet close, lineage; (ii) myofiber-associated non-myogenic and myogenic cells share the same muscle-bound primordial stem cells of a lineage distinct from bone marrow MSCs; (iii) these muscle-bound primordial stem-cells first part to individual muscles and then differentiate into myogenic and non-myogenic stem cells. PMID:22022423

  13. Therapies for sarcopenia and regeneration of old skeletal muscles: more a case of old tissue architecture than old stem cells.

    PubMed

    Grounds, Miranda D

    2014-01-01

    Age related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function (sarcopenia) reduces independence and the quality of life for individuals, and leads to falls and fractures with escalating health costs for the rapidly aging human population. Thus there is much interest in developing interventions to reduce sarcopenia. One area that has attracted recent attention is the proposed use of myogenic stem cells to improve regeneration of old muscles. This mini-review challenges the fundamental need for myogenic stem cell therapy for sarcopenia. It presents evidence that demonstrates the excellent capacity of myogenic stem cells from very old rodent and human muscles to form new muscles after experimental myofiber necrosis. The many factors required for successful muscle regeneration are considered with a strong focus on integration of components of old muscle bioarchitecture. The fundamental role of satellite cells in homeostasis of normal aging muscles and the incidence of endogenous regeneration in old muscles is questioned. These issues, combined with problems for clinical myogenic stem cell therapies for severe muscle diseases, raise fundamental concerns about the justification for myogenic stem cell therapy for sarcopenia.

  14. Hypoxia Enhances Differentiation of Hair Follicle-Associated-Pluripotent (HAP) Stem Cells to Cardiac-Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kyoumi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Yamazaki, Aiko; Tohgi, Natsuko; Aki, Ryoichi; Mii, Sumiyuki; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2017-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the neural stem-cell marker nestin is expressed in hair-follicle stem cells located in the bulge area which are termed hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. HAP stem cells from mouse and human could form spheres in culture, termed hair spheres, which are keratin 15-negative and nestin-positive and could differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. Subsequently, we demonstrated that nestin-expressing stem cells could effect nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. Recently, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. We recently observed that isoproterenol directs HAP stem cells to differentiate to cardiac-muscle cells in large numbers in culture compared to HAP stem cells not supplemented with isoproterenol. The addition of activin A, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor, along with isoproternal, induced the cardiac muscle cells to form tissue sheets of beating heart muscle cells. In the present study, we report that, under hypoxic conditions, HAP stem cells differentiated to troponin-positive cardiac-muscle cells at a higher rate that under normoxic conditions. Hypoxia did not influence the differentiation to other cell types. For future use of HAP stem cells for cardiac muscle regeneration, hypoxia should enhance the rate of differentiation thereby providing patients more opportunities to use their own HAP stem cells which are easily accessible, for this purpose. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 554-558, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Intestinal smooth muscle cells locally enhance stem cell factor (SCF) production against gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Masahiro

    2011-06-01

    Smooth muscle cells can produce stem cell factor (SCF) in the normal state for the preservation of mast cells, but it is still unknown whether smooth muscle cells can enhance SCF production in response to the pathological stimuli. The present study showed that smooth muscle cells in mast cell-increased regions around worm cysts of intestinal nematodes significantly enhanced SCF gene expression compared with mast cell non-increased regions in same sample. SCF gene expression in mast cell non-increased regions in nematode-infected mice showed almost the same level as in non-infected control groups. These results indicate that smooth muscle cells can locally enhance SCF gene expression, and may have a role in local immunological reactions as growth factor-producing cells.

  16. [The role of the psoas muscle: apropos of the dissection of the muscles from 10 adults and 10 newborn infants].

    PubMed

    Le Floch-Prigent, P

    1983-06-01

    The action of the iliopsoas muscle (Musculus iliopsoas) on movements of the hip is studied by direct traction on fresh cadavers (10 still-born and 10 adults). The psoas muscle is a powerful flexor of the hip but also an external rotator. The action of external rotation is moderate but obvious in every position of the femur (Os femoris) and more important if previously in abduction and internal rotation.

  17. Muscle performance and physical function are associated with voluntary rate of neuromuscular activation in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Participants were recruited to three experimental groups: middle-aged healthy adults (MH), older healthy adults (OH), and older adults with mobility limitations (OML). OH and OML were primarily differentiated by performance on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Muscle performance (accele...

  18. A bioengineered niche preserves the quiescence of muscle stem cells and enhances their therapeutic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Quarta, Marco; Brett, Jamie O.; DiMarco, Rebecca; De Morree, Antoine; Boutet, Stephane C.; Chacon, Robert; Gibbons, Michael C.; Garcia, Victor A.; Su, James; Shrager, Joseph B.; Heilshorn, Sarah; Rando, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    A promising therapeutic strategy for diverse genetic disorders involves transplantation of autologous stem cells that have been genetically corrected ex vivo. A major challenge in such approaches is a loss of stem cell potency during stem cell culture. Here we describe a system for maintaining muscle stem cells (MuSCs) in vitro in a potent, quiescent state. Using a machine learning method, we identified a molecular signature of quiescence and used it to screen for factors that could maintain mouse MuSC quiescence, thus defining a quiescence medium (QM). We also designed artificial muscle fibers (AMFs) that mimic the native myofiber of the MuSC niche. Mouse MuSCs maintained in QM on AMFs showed enhanced potential for engraftment, tissue regeneration and self-renewal after transplantation in mice. An artificial niche adapted to human MuSCs showed similarly prolonged quiescence in vitro and enhanced potency in vivo. Our approach for maintaining quiescence may be applicable to stem cells from a range of other tissues. PMID:27240197

  19. Stem Cell Differentiation Toward the Myogenic Lineage for Muscle Tissue Regeneration: A Focus on Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ostrovidov, Serge; Shi, Xuetao; Sadeghian, Ramin Banan; Salehi, Sahar; Fujie, Toshinori; Bae, Hojae; Ramalingam, Murugan; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue engineering is one of the important ways for regenerating functionally defective muscles. Among the myopathies, the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive disease due to mutations of the dystrophin gene leading to progressive myofiber degeneration with severe symptoms. Although current therapies in muscular dystrophy are still very challenging, important progress has been made in materials science and in cellular technologies with the use of stem cells. It is therefore useful to review these advances and the results obtained in a clinical point of view. This article focuses on the differentiation of stem cells into myoblasts, and their application in muscular dystrophy. After an overview of the different stem cells that can be induced to differentiate into the myogenic lineage, we introduce scaffolding materials used for muscular tissue engineering. We then described some widely used methods to differentiate different types of stem cell into myoblasts. We highlight recent insights obtained in therapies for muscular dystrophy. Finally, we conclude with a discussion on stem cell technology. We discussed in parallel the benefits brought by the evolution of the materials and by the expansion of cell sources which can differentiate into myoblasts. We also discussed on future challenges for clinical applications and how to accelerate the translation from the research to the clinic in the frame of DMD.

  20. Stem cells migration during skeletal muscle regeneration - the role of Sdf-1/Cxcr4 and Sdf-1/Cxcr7 axis.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Kamil; Kołodziejczyk, Aleksandra; Sikorska, Maria; Płaczkiewicz, Jagoda; Cichosz, Paulina; Kowalewska, Magdalena; Stremińska, Władysława; Jańczyk-Ilach, Katarzyna; Koblowska, Marta; Fogtman, Anna; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Ciemerych, Maria A; Brzoska, Edyta

    2016-10-13

    The skeletal muscle regeneration occurs due to the presence of tissue specific stem cells - satellite cells. These cells, localized between sarcolemma and basal lamina, are bound to muscle fibers and remain quiescent until their activation upon muscle injury. Due to pathological conditions, such as extensive injury or dystrophy, skeletal muscle regeneration is diminished. Among the therapies aiming to ameliorate skeletal muscle diseases are transplantations of the stem cells. In our previous studies we showed that Sdf-1 (stromal derived factor -1) increased migration of stem cells and their fusion with myoblasts in vitro. Importantly, we identified that Sdf-1 caused an increase in the expression of tetraspanin CD9 - adhesion protein involved in myoblasts fusion. In the current study we aimed to uncover the details of molecular mechanism of Sdf-1 action. We focused at the Sdf-1 receptors - Cxcr4 and Cxcr7, as well as signaling pathways induced by these molecules in primary myoblasts, as well as various stem cells - mesenchymal stem cells and embryonic stem cells, i.e. the cells of different migration and myogenic potential. We showed that Sdf-1 altered actin organization via FAK (focal adhesion kinase), Cdc42 (cell division control protein 42), and Rac-1 (Ras-Related C3 Botulinum Toxin Substrate 1). Moreover, we showed that Sdf-1 modified the transcription profile of genes encoding factors engaged in cells adhesion and migration. As the result, cells such as primary myoblasts or embryonic stem cells, became characterized by more effective migration when transplanted into regenerating muscle.

  1. Fibroblast growth factor-23 induces cellular senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chisato; Iso, Yoshitaka; Mizukami, Takuya; Otabe, Koji; Sasai, Masahiro; Kurata, Masaaki; Sanbe, Takeyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro; Miyazaki, Akira; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-02-12

    Although muscle wasting and/or degeneration are prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease, it remains unknown whether FGF-23 influences muscle homeostasis and regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in skeletal muscle are distinct from satellite cells and have a known association with muscle degeneration. In this study we sought to investigate the effects of FGF-23 on MSCs isolated from human skeletal muscle in vitro. The MSCs expressed FGF receptors (1 through 4) and angiotensin-II type 1 receptor, but no traces of the Klotho gene were detected. MSCs and satellite cells were treated with FGF-23 and angiotensin-II for 48 h. Treatment with FGF-23 significantly decreased the number of MSCs compared to controls, while treatment with angiotensin-II did not. FGF-23 and angiotensin-II both left the cell counts of the satellite cells unchanged. The FGF-23-treated MSCs exhibited the senescent phenotype, as judged by senescence-associated β-galactosidase assay, cell morphology, and increased expression of p53 and p21 in western blot analysis. FGF-23 also significantly altered the gene expression of oxidative stress regulators in the cells. In conclusion, FGF-23 induced premature senescence in MSCs from skeletal muscle via the p53/p21/oxidative-stress pathway. The interaction between the MSCs and FGF-23 may play a key role in the impaired muscle reparative mechanisms of chronic kidney disease.

  2. OnabotulinumtoxinA muscle injection patterns in adult spasticity: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background OnabotulinumtoxinA has demonstrated significant benefit in adult focal spasticity. This study reviews the injection patterns (i.e., muscle distribution, dosing) of onabotulinumtoxinA for treatment of adult spasticity, as reported in published studies. Methods A systematic review of clinical trials and observational studies published between 1990 and 2011 reporting data on muscles injected with onabotulinumtoxinA in adult patients treated for any cause of spasticity. Results 28 randomized, 5 nonrandomized, and 37 single-arm studies evaluating 2,163 adult patients were included. The most frequently injected upper-limb muscles were flexor carpi radialis (64.0% of patients), flexor carpi ulnaris (59.1%), flexor digitorum superficialis (57.2%), flexor digitorum profundus (52.5%), and biceps brachii (38.8%). The most frequently injected lower-limb muscles were the gastrocnemius (66.1% of patients), soleus (54.7%), and tibialis posterior (50.5%). The overall dose range reported was 5–200 U for upper-limb muscles and 10–400 U for lower-limb muscles. Conclusions The reviewed evidence indicates that the muscles most frequently injected with onabotulinumtoxinA in adults with spasticity were the wrist, elbow, and finger flexors and the ankle plantar flexors. OnabotulinumtoxinA was injected over a broad range of doses per muscle among the studies included in this review, but individual practitioners should be mindful of local regulatory approvals and regulations. PMID:24011236

  3. Regulation of seminiferous tubule-associated stem Leydig cells in adult rat testes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoheng; Wang, Zhao; Jiang, Zhenming; Guo, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuxi; Li, Chenhao; Chung, Jinyong; Folmer, Janet; Liu, June; Lian, Qingquan; Ge, Renshan; Zirkin, Barry R; Chen, Haolin

    2016-03-08

    Testicular Leydig cells are the primary source of testosterone in males. Adult Leydig cells have been shown to arise from stem cells present in the neonatal testis. Once established, adult Leydig cells turn over only slowly during adult life, but when these cells are eliminated experimentally from the adult testis, new Leydig cells rapidly reappear. As in the neonatal testis, stem cells in the adult testis are presumed to be the source of the new Leydig cells. As yet, the mechanisms involved in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of these stem cells remain unknown. We developed a unique in vitro system of cultured seminiferous tubules to assess the ability of factors from the seminiferous tubules to regulate the proliferation of the tubule-associated stem cells, and their subsequent entry into the Leydig cell lineage. The proliferation of the stem Leydig cells was stimulated by paracrine factors including Desert hedgehog (DHH), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and activin. Suppression of proliferation occurred with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). The differentiation of the stem cells was regulated positively by DHH, lithium- induced signaling, and activin, and negatively by TGF-β, PDGFBB, and FGF2. DHH functioned as a commitment factor, inducing the transition of stem cells to the progenitor stage and thus into the Leydig cell lineage. Additionally, CD90 (Thy1) was found to be a unique stem cell surface marker that was used to obtain purified stem cells by flow cytometry.

  4. Multipotent (adult) and pluripotent stem cells for heart regeneration: what are the pros and cons?

    PubMed

    Liao, Song-Yan; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2013-12-24

    Heart failure after myocardial infarction is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Existing medical and interventional therapies can only reduce the loss of cardiomyocytes during myocardial infarction but are unable to replenish the permanent loss of cardiomyocytes after the insult, which contributes to progressive pathological left ventricular remodeling and progressive heart failure. As a result, cell-based therapies using multipotent (adult) stem cells and pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells) have been explored as potential therapeutic approaches to restore cardiac function in heart failure. Nevertheless, the optimal cell type with the best therapeutic efficacy and safety for heart regeneration is still unknown. In this review, the potential pros and cons of different types of multipotent (adult) stem cells and pluripotent stem cells that have been investigated in preclinical and clinical studies are reviewed, and the future perspective of stem cell-based therapy for heart regeneration is discussed.

  5. Neurodevelopment. Live imaging of adult neural stem cell behavior in the intact and injured zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Joana S; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Rosario; Di Giaimo, Rossella; Baumgart, Emily Violette; Theis, Fabian J; Götz, Magdalena; Ninkovic, Jovica

    2015-05-15

    Adult neural stem cells are the source for restoring injured brain tissue. We used repetitive imaging to follow single stem cells in the intact and injured adult zebrafish telencephalon in vivo and found that neurons are generated by both direct conversions of stem cells into postmitotic neurons and via intermediate progenitors amplifying the neuronal output. We observed an imbalance of direct conversion consuming the stem cells and asymmetric and symmetric self-renewing divisions, leading to depletion of stem cells over time. After brain injury, neuronal progenitors are recruited to the injury site. These progenitors are generated by symmetric divisions that deplete the pool of stem cells, a mode of neurogenesis absent in the intact telencephalon. Our analysis revealed changes in the behavior of stem cells underlying generation of additional neurons during regeneration.

  6. Transcriptional profiling of adult neural stem-like cells from the human brain.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Behnan, Jinan; Helseth, Eirik; Langmoen, Iver A

    2014-01-01

    There is a great potential for the development of new cell replacement strategies based on adult human neural stem-like cells. However, little is known about the hierarchy of cells and the unique molecular properties of stem- and progenitor cells of the nervous system. Stem cells from the adult human brain can be propagated and expanded in vitro as free floating neurospheres that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three cell types of the central nervous system. Here we report the first global gene expression study of adult human neural stem-like cells originating from five human subventricular zone biopsies (mean age 42, range 33-60). Compared to adult human brain tissue, we identified 1,189 genes that were significantly up- and down-regulated in adult human neural stem-like cells (1% false discovery rate). We found that adult human neural stem-like cells express stem cell markers and have reduced levels of markers that are typical of the mature cells in the nervous system. We report that the genes being highly expressed in adult human neural stem-like cells are associated with developmental processes and the extracellular region of the cell. The calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions are enriched among the most differentially regulated genes between adult human neural stem-like cells and adult human brain tissue. We confirmed the expression of 10 of the most up-regulated genes in adult human neural stem-like cells in an additional sample set that included adult human neural stem-like cells (n = 6), foetal human neural stem cells (n = 1) and human brain tissues (n = 12). The NGFR, SLITRK6 and KCNS3 receptors were further investigated by immunofluorescence and shown to be heterogeneously expressed in spheres. These receptors could potentially serve as new markers for the identification and characterisation of neural stem- and progenitor cells or as targets for manipulation of cellular fate.

  7. Adult stem cel diferentiation and trafficking and their implications in disease.

    PubMed

    Zhuge, Ying; Liu, Zhao-Jun; Velazquez, Omaida C

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells are unspecialized precursor cells that mainly reside in the bone marrow and have important roles in the establishment of embryonic tissue. They also have critical functions during adulthood, where they replenish short-lived mature effector cells and regeneration of injured tissue. They have three main characteristics: self-renewal, differentiation and homeostatic control. In order to maintain a pool of stem cells that support the production of blood cells, stromal elements and connective tissue, stem cells must be able to constantly replenish their own number. They must also possess the ability to differentiate and give rise to a heterogeneous group of functional cells. Finally, stem cells must possess the ability to modulate and balance differentiation and self-renewal according to environmental stimuli and whole-organ needs to prevent the production of excessive number of effector cells.(1) In addition to formation of these cells, regulated movement of stem cells is critical for organogenesis, homeostasis and repair in adulthood. Stem cells require specific inputs from particular environments in order to perform their various functions. Some similar trafficking mechanisms are shared by leukocytes, adult and fetal stem cells, as well as cancer stem cells.(1,2) Achieving proper trafficking of stem cells will allow increased efficiency of targeted cell therapy and drug delivery.(2) In addition, understanding similarities and differences in homing and migration of malignant cancer stem cells will also clarify molecular events of tumor progression and metastasis.(2) This chapter focuses on the differentiation, trafficking and homing of the major types of adult bone marrow stem cells: hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and the term"stem cell" will refer to "adult stem cells" unless otherwise specified.

  8. Influence of micropattern width on differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Tomoko; Wang, Xinlong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, various approaches have been taken to generate functional muscle tissue by tissue engineering. However, in vitro methods to generate smooth muscle with physiologically aligned structure remains limited. In order to mimic the in vivo highly organized structure of smooth muscle cells, we used micropatterning technology for engineering parallel aligned cells. In this study, a gradient micropattern of different width of cell-adhesive polystyrene stripes (5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000μm) was prepared and the effects of micropattern width on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) orientation, morphology and smooth muscle cell differentiation were investigated. The width of micropattern stripes showed obvious effect on cell orientation, morphology and smooth muscle cell differentiation. The cells showed higher degree of orientation when the micropattern stripes became narrower. Higher expression of calponin and smooth muscle actin was observed among the narrow micropatterns ranging from 200μm to 20μm, compared to the non-patterned area and wide micropattern areas which showed similar levels of expression.

  9. Cerebellar stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xin; Guan, Wuqiang; Yu, Yong-Chun; Fu, Yinghui

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • No new neurons and astrocytes are generated in adult mouse cerebellum. • Very few mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells exist, and most of them are quiescent. • Cell proliferation rate is diversified among cerebellar regions and decreases over time. - Abstract: Although previous studies implied that cerebellar stem cells exist in some adult mammals, little is known about whether these stem cells can produce new neurons and astrocytes. In this study by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, we found that there are abundant BrdU{sup +} cells in adult mouse cerebellum, and their quantity and density decreases significantly over time. We also found cell proliferation rate is diversified in different cerebellar regions. Among these BrdU{sup +} cells, very few are mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells, and the vast majority of cerebellar stem cells are quiescent. Data obtained by in vivo retrovirus injection indicate that stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse cerebellum. Instead, some cells labeled by retrovirus are Iba1{sup +} microglia. These results indicate that very few stem cells exist in adult mouse cerebellum, and none of these stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and astrogenesis under physiological condition.

  10. The role of CD44 in fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell regulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y; Williams, Brenda; Cardozo, Daniela; Nigro, Julie; Oteiza, Ana; Nilsson, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, hematopoietic stem cells migrate to specific microenvironments, where their fate is, in part, extrinsically controlled. CD44 standard as a member of the cell adhesion molecule family is extensively expressed within adult bone marrow and has been previously reported to play important roles in adult hematopoietic regulation via CD44 standard-ligand interactions. In this manuscript, CD44 expression and function are further assessed and characterized on both fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Using a CD44(-/-) mouse model, conserved functional roles of CD44 are revealed throughout development. CD44 is critical in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor pools, as well as in hematopoietic stem cell migration. CD44 expression on hematopoietic stem cells as well as other hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment is important in the homing and lodgment of adult hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone/bone marrow interface. CD44 is also involved in fetal hematopoietic stem cell migration out of the liver, via a process involving stromal cell-derived factor-1α. The absence of CD44 in neonatal bone marrow has no impact on the size of the long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell pool, but results in an enhanced long-term engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem cells.

  11. The role of CD44 in fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y.; Williams, Brenda; Cardozo, Daniela; Nigro, Julie; Oteiza, Ana; Nilsson, Susan K.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, hematopoietic stem cells migrate to specific microenvironments, where their fate is, in part, extrinsically controlled. CD44 standard as a member of the cell adhesion molecule family is extensively expressed within adult bone marrow and has been previously reported to play important roles in adult hematopoietic regulation via CD44 standard-ligand interactions. In this manuscript, CD44 expression and function are further assessed and characterized on both fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Using a CD44−/− mouse model, conserved functional roles of CD44 are revealed throughout development. CD44 is critical in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor pools, as well as in hematopoietic stem cell migration. CD44 expression on hematopoietic stem cells as well as other hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment is important in the homing and lodgment of adult hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone/bone marrow interface. CD44 is also involved in fetal hematopoietic stem cell migration out of the liver, via a process involving stromal cell-derived factor-1α. The absence of CD44 in neonatal bone marrow has no impact on the size of the long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell pool, but results in an enhanced long-term engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26546504

  12. In Vivo Myogenic Potential of Human CD133+ Muscle-derived Stem Cells: A Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Negroni, Elisa; Riederer, Ingo; Chaouch, Soraya; Belicchi, Marzia; Razini, Paola; Di Santo, James; Torrente, Yvan; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Mouly, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, numerous reports have identified in mouse different sources of myogenic cells distinct from satellite cells that exhibited a variable myogenic potential in vivo. Myogenic stem cells have also been described in humans, although their regenerative potential has rarely been quantified. In this study, we have investigated the myogenic potential of human muscle–derived cells based on the expression of the stem cell marker CD133 as compared to bona fide satellite cells already used in clinical trials. The efficiency of these cells to participate in muscle regeneration and contribute to the renewal of the satellite cell pool, when injected intramuscularly, has been evaluated in the Rag2−/− γC−/− C5−/− mouse in which muscle degeneration is induced by cryoinjury. We demonstrate that human muscle–derived CD133+ cells showed a much greater regenerative capacity when compared to human myoblasts. The number of fibers expressing human proteins and the number of human cells in a satellite cell position are all dramatically increased when compared to those observed after injection of human myoblasts. In addition, CD133+/CD34+ cells exhibited a better dispersion in the host muscle when compared to human myoblasts. We propose that muscle-derived CD133+ cells could be an attractive candidate for cellular therapy. PMID:19623164

  13. Effect of Loquat Leaf Extract on Muscle Strength, Muscle Mass, and Muscle Function in Healthy Adults: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, and Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Sangmin; Lee, Chang-Hyung; Shin, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) is the major active component of the loquat leaf extract (LLE) and several previous studies have indicated that UA may have the ability to prevent skeletal muscle atrophy. Therefore, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study to investigate the effects of the LLE on muscle strength, muscle mass, muscle function, and metabolic markers in healthy adults; the safety of the compound was also evaluated. We examined the peak torque/body weight at 60°/s knee extension, handgrip strength, skeletal muscle mass, physical performance, and metabolic parameters at baseline, as well as after 4 and 12 weeks of intervention. Either 500 mg of LLE (50.94 mg of UA) or a placebo was administered to fifty-four healthy adults each day for 12 weeks; no differences in muscle strength, muscle mass, and physical performance were observed between the two groups. However, the right-handgrip strength of female subjects in the LLE group was found to be significantly better than that of subjects in the control group (P = 0.047). Further studies are required to determine the optimal dose and duration of LLE supplementation to confirm the first-stage study results for clinical application. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier is NCT02401113. PMID:27999607

  14. The cardiac stem cell compartment is indispensable for myocardial cell homeostasis, repair and regeneration in the adult.

    PubMed

    Nadal-Ginard, Bernardo; Ellison, Georgina M; Torella, Daniele

    2014-11-01

    Resident cardiac stem cells in embryonic, neonatal and adult mammalian heart have been identified by different membrane markers and transcription factors. However, despite a flurry of publications no consensus has been reached on the identity and actual regenerative effects of the adult cardiac stem cells. Intensive research on the adult mammalian heart's capacity for self-renewal of its muscle cell mass has led to a consensus that new cardiomyocytes (CMs) are indeed formed throughout adult mammalian life albeit at a disputed frequency. The physiological significance of this renewal, the origin of the new CMs, and the rate of adult CM turnover are still highly debated. Myocyte replacement, particularly after injury, was originally attributed to differentiation of a stem cell compartment. More recently, it has been reported that CMs are mainly replaced by the division of pre-existing post-mitotic CMs. These latter results, if confirmed, would shift the target of regenerative therapy toward boosting mature CM cell-cycle re-entry. Despite this controversy, it is documented that the adult endogenous c-kit(pos) cardiac stem cells (c-kit(pos) eCSCs) participate in adaptations to myocardial stress, and, when transplanted into the myocardium, regenerate most cardiomyocytes and microvasculature lost in an infarct. Nevertheless, the in situ myogenic potential of adult c-kit(pos) cardiac cells has been questioned. To revisit the regenerative potential of c-kit(pos) eCSCs, we have recently employed experimental protocols of severe diffuse myocardial damage in combination with several genetic murine models and cell transplantation approaches showing that eCSCs are necessary and sufficient for CM regeneration, leading to complete cellular, anatomical, and functional myocardial recovery. Here we will review the available data on adult eCSC biology and their regenerative potential placing it in the context of the different claimed mechanisms of CM replacement. These data are in

  15. The effect of superficial trunk muscle exercise and deep trunk muscle exercise on the foot pressure of healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suzy; Shim, Jemyung; Kim, Sungjoong; Namkoong, Seung; Kim, Hwanhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of superficial trunk muscle exercise and deep trunk muscle exercise on the foot pressure of healthy adults. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy females and males who agreed to participate in this study. There were two groups, a superficial trunk muscle exercise group and a deep trunk muscle exercise group, with 15 participants in each. [Methods] The exercises were conducted 5 times a week for 4 weeks for both groups. A gait analyzer was used to measure foot plantar pressure while walking on a plate. Participants were measured before starting the exercise and after 4 weeks. The paired t-test was used to analyze the pre-and post-test results. [Results] There were no significant differences in foot pressure in any region in the superficial trunk muscle exercise group. In the deep trunk muscle exercise group, there were statistically significant increase in F1, F4, F5, R1 and R3. In addition, there were significant decreases in R2 and R4. [Conclusion] After the 4-week deep trunk muscle exercise group decreases in foot pressure on the inner foot and increases on the outside of the feet indicate normal and overall even distribution of body weight on the feet. PMID:25931714

  16. The Yin and Yang of chromatin dynamics in adult stem cell fate selection

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Rene C.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Adult organisms rely on tissue stem cells for maintenance and repair. During homeostasis, the concerted action of local niche signals and epigenetic regulators establish stable gene expression patterns to ensure that stem cells are not lost over time. However, stem cells also provide host tissues with a remarkable plasticity to respond to perturbations. How adult stem cells choose and acquire new fates is unknown, but the genome-wide mapping of epigenetic landscapes suggests a critical role for chromatin remodeling in these processes. Here, we explore the emerging role of chromatin modifiers and pioneer transcription factors in adult stem cell fate decisions and plasticity, which ensure that selective lineage choices are only made when environmentally cued. PMID:26689127

  17. Reconstitution of experimental neurogenic bladder dysfunction using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Masahiro; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Tono, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshinori; Masuda, Maki; Akatsuka, Akira; Hoshi, Akio; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2010-05-15

    BACKGROUND.: Postoperative neurogenic bladder dysfunction is a major complication of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer and is mainly caused by unavoidable damage to the bladder branch of the pelvic plexus (BBPP) associated with colateral blood vessels. Thus, we attempted to reconstitute disrupted BBPP and blood vessels using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells that show synchronized reconstitution capacity of vascular, muscular, and peripheral nervous systems. METHODS.: Under pentobarbital anesthesia, intravesical pressure by electrical stimulation of BBPP was measured as bladder function. The distal portion of BBPP with blood vessels was then cut unilaterally (experimental neurogenic bladder model). Measurements were performed before, immediately after, and at 4 weeks after transplantation as functional recovery. Stem cells were obtained from the right soleus and gastrocnemius muscles after enzymatic digestion and cell sorting as CD34/45 (Sk-34) and CD34/45 (Sk-DN). Suspended cells were autografted around the damaged region, whereas medium alone and CD45 cells were transplanted as control groups. To determine the morphological contribution of the transplanted cells, stem cells obtained from green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse muscles were transplanted into a nude rat model and were examined by immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy. RESULTS.: At 4 weeks after surgery, the transplantation group showed significantly higher functional recovery ( approximately 80%) than the two controls ( approximately 28% and 24%). The transplanted cells showed an incorporation into the damaged peripheral nerves and blood vessels after differentiation into Schwann cells, perineurial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and fibroblasts around the bladder. CONCLUSION.: Transplantation of multipotent Sk-34 and Sk-DN cells is potentially useful for the reconstitution of damaged BBPP.

  18. Roles of neural stem cells and adult neurogenesis in adolescent alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Kimberly; Morris, Stephanie A; Liput, Daniel J; Kelso, Matthew L

    2010-02-01

    This review discusses the contributions of a newly considered form of plasticity, the ongoing production of new neurons from neural stem cells, or adult neurogenesis, within the context of neuropathologies that occur with excessive alcohol intake in the adolescents. Neural stem cells and adult neurogenesis are now thought to contribute to the structural integrity of the hippocampus, a limbic system region involved in learning, memory, behavioral control, and mood. In adolescents with alcohol use disorders (AUDs), the hippocampus appears to be particularly vulnerable to the neurodegenerative effects of alcohol, but the role of neural stem cells and adult neurogenesis in alcoholic neuropathology has only recently been considered. This review encompasses a brief overview of neural stem cells and the processes involved in adult neurogenesis, how neural stem cells are affected by alcohol, and possible differences in the neurogenic niche between adults and adolescents. Specifically, what is known about developmental differences in adult neurogenesis between the adult and adolescent is gleaned from the literature, as well as how alcohol affects this process differently among the age groups. Finally, this review suggests differences that may exist in the neurogenic niche between adults and adolescents and how these differences may contribute to the susceptibility of the adolescent hippocampus to damage. However, many more studies are needed to discern whether these developmental differences contribute to the vulnerability of the adolescent to developing an AUD.

  19. EFFECTS OF AGE AND ACUTE MUSCLE FATIGUE ON REACTIVE POSTURAL CONTROL IN HEALTHY ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Evan V.; Foreman, K. Bo; Dibble, Lee E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Falls can cause moderate to severe injuries such as hip fractures and head trauma in older adults. While declines in muscle strength and sensory function contribute to increased falls in older adults, skeletal muscle fatigue is often overlooked as an additional contributor to fall risk. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of acute lower extremity muscle fatigue and age on reactive postural control in healthy adults. METHODS A sample of 16 individuals participated in this study (8 healthy older adults and 8 healthy young persons). Whole body kinematic and kinetic data were collected during anterior and posterior reproducible fall tests before (T0) and immediately after (T1) eccentric muscle fatiguing exercise, as well as after 15-minutes (T15) and 30-minutes (T30) of rest. FINDINGS Lower extremity joint kinematics of the stepping limb during the support (landing) phase of the anterior fall were significantly altered by the presence of acute muscle fatigue. Step velocity was significantly decreased during the anterior falls. Statistically significant main effects of age were found for step length in both fall directions. Effect sizes for all outcomes were small. No statistically significant interaction effects were found. INTERPRETATION Muscle fatigue has a measurable effect on lower extremity joint kinematics during simulated falls. These alterations appear to resolve within 15 minutes of recovery. The above deficits, coupled with a reduced step length, may help explain the increased fall risk in older adults. PMID:26351001

  20. Adult stem cells in neural repair: Current options, limitations and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Eric Domingos; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi; Lepski, Guilherme

    2015-03-26

    Stem cells represent a promising step for the future of regenerative medicine. As they are able to differentiate into any cell type, tissue or organ, these cells are great candidates for treatments against the worst diseases that defy doctors and researchers around the world. Stem cells can be divided into three main groups: (1) embryonic stem cells; (2) fetal stem cells; and (3) adult stem cells. In terms of their capacity for proliferation, stem cells are also classified as totipotent, pluripotent or multipotent. Adult stem cells, also known as somatic cells, are found in various regions of the adult organism, such as bone marrow, skin, eyes, viscera and brain. They can differentiate into unipotent cells of the residing tissue, generally for the purpose of repair. These cells represent an excellent choice in regenerative medicine, every patient can be a donor of adult stem cells to provide a more customized and efficient therapy against various diseases, in other words, they allow the opportunity of autologous transplantation. But in order to start clinical trials and achieve great results, we need to understand how these cells interact with the host tissue, how they can manipulate or be manipulated by the microenvironment where they will be transplanted and for how long they can maintain their multipotent state to provide a full regeneration.

  1. Repair of tissues by adult stem/progenitor cells (MSCs): controversies, myths, and changing paradigms.

    PubMed

    Prockop, Darwin J

    2009-06-01

    Research on stem cells has progressed at a rapid pace and, as might be anticipated, the results have generated several controversies, a few myths and a change in a major paradigm. Some of these issues will be reviewed in this study with special emphasis on how they can be applied to the adult stem/progenitor cells from bone marrow, referred to as MSCs.

  2. Epistatic adult plant resistance in wheat to stem rust cosegregates with Sr12 seedling resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat adult plant resistance (APR) to stem rust is desirable. Researchers have characterized the inheritance of APR in cultivar Thatcher as complex. In order to identify the loci providing APR in Thatcher, we evaluated 160 RILs derived from Thatcher/McNeal for stem rust reaction in the field in Keny...

  3. Lin-28 promotes symmetric stem cell division and drives adaptive growth in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Huan; Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-10-15

    Stem cells switch between asymmetric and symmetric division to expand in number as tissues grow during development and in response to environmental changes. The stem cell intrinsic proteins controlling this switch are largely unknown, but one candidate is the Lin-28 pluripotency factor. A conserved RNA-binding protein that is downregulated in most animals as they develop from embryos to adults, Lin-28 persists in populations of adult stem cells. Its function in these cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we report that Lin-28 is highly enriched in adult intestinal stem cells in the Drosophila intestine. lin-28 null mutants are homozygous viable but display defects in this population of cells, which fail to undergo a characteristic food-triggered expansion in number and have reduced rates of symmetric division as well as reduced insulin signaling. Immunoprecipitation of Lin-28-bound mRNAs identified Insulin-like Receptor (InR), forced expression of which completely rescues lin-28-associated defects in intestinal stem cell number and division pattern. Furthermore, this stem cell activity of lin-28 is independent of one well-known lin-28 target, the microRNA let-7, which has limited expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results identify Lin-28 as a stem cell intrinsic factor that boosts insulin signaling in intestinal progenitor cells and promotes their symmetric division in response to nutrients, defining a mechanism through which Lin-28 controls the adult stem cell division patterns that underlie tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  4. Do muscle mass, muscle density, strength and physical function similarly influence risk of hospitalization in older adults?

    PubMed Central

    Cawthon, Peggy Mannen; Fox, Kathleen M.; Gandra, Shravanthi. R.; Delmonico, Matthew J.; Chiou, Chiun-Fang; Anthony, Mary S.; Sewall, Ase; Goodpaster, Bret; Satterfield, Suzanne; Cummings, Steven R.; Harris, Tamara B.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between strength, function, lean mass, muscle density and risk of hospitalization. Design Prospective cohort stud Setting Two U.S. clinical centers Participants Adults aged 70 – 80 years (N=3,011) from the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. Measurements Measures included grip strength; knee extension strength; lean mass; walking speed; chair stand pace. Thigh computed tomography scans assessed muscle area and density (a proxy for muscle fat infiltration). Hospitalizations were confirmed by local review of medical records. Negative binomial regression models estimated incident rate ratios (IRRs) of hospitalization for race/sex specific quartiles of each muscle/function parameter separately. Multivariate models adjusted for age, body mass index, health status and coexisting medical conditions. Results During an average 4.7 years of follow-up, 1,678 (55.7%) participants experienced ≥1 hospitalization. Participants in the lowest quartile of muscle density were more likely to be subsequently hospitalized (multivariate IRR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.24, 1.73) compared to the highest quartile. Similarly, participants with the weakest grip strength were at increased risk of hospitalization (MIRR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.30, 1.78, Q1 vs. Q4). Comparable results were seen for knee strength, walking pace and chair stands pace. Lean mass and muscle area were not associated with risk of hospitalization. Conclusion Weak strength, poor function and low muscle density, but not muscle size or lean mass, were associated with an increased risk of hospitalization. Interventions to reduce the disease burden associated with sarcopenia should focus on increasing muscle strength and improving physical function rather than simply increasing lean mass. PMID:19682143

  5. Motor activity affects adult skeletal muscle re-innervation acting via tyrosine kinase receptors.

    PubMed

    Sartini, Stefano; Bartolini, Fanny; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Betti, Michele; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Lattanzi, Davide; Di Palma, Michael; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2013-05-01

    Recently, muscle expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein under activity control has been reported. BDNF is a neurotrophin known to be involved in axon sprouting in the CNS. Hence, we set out to study the effect of chronic treadmill mid-intensity running on adult rat muscle re-innervation, and to explore the involvement of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors. After nerve crush, muscle re-innervation was evaluated using intracellular recordings, tension recordings, immunostaining and Western blot analyses. An enhanced muscle multiple innervation was found in running rats that was fully reversed to control values blocking Trk receptors or interrupting the running activity. An increase in muscle multiple innervation was also found in sedentary rats treated with a selective TrkB receptor agonist. The expression of TrkB receptors by intramuscular axons was demonstrated, and increased muscle expression of BDNF was found in running animals. The increase in muscle multiple innervation was consistent with the faster muscle re-innervation that we found in running animals. We conclude that, when regenerating axons contact muscle cells, muscle activity progressively increases modulating BDNF and possibly other growth factors, which in turn, acting via Trk receptors, induce axon sprouting to re-innervate skeletal muscle.

  6. Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness After Inspiratory Threshold Loading in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Sunita; Sheel, A. William; Road, Jeremy D.; Reid, W. Darlene

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Skeletal muscle damage occurs following high-intensity or unaccustomed exercise; however, it is difficult to monitor damage to the respiratory muscles, particularly in humans. The aim of this study was to use clinical measures to investigate the presence of skeletal muscle damage in the inspiratory muscles. Methods: Ten healthy subjects underwent 60 minutes of voluntary inspiratory threshold loading (ITL) at 70% of maximal inspiratory pressure. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures, delayed onset muscle soreness on a visual analogue scale and plasma creatine kinase were measured prior to ITL, and at repeated time points after ITL (4, 24 and 48 hours post-ITL). Results: Delayed onset muscle soreness was present in all subjects 24 hours following ITL (intensity = 22 ± 6 mm; significantly higher than baseline p = 0.02). Muscle soreness was reported primarily in the anterior neck region, and was correlated to the amount of work done by the inspiratory muscles during ITL (r = 0.72, p = 0.02). However, no significant change was observed in maximal inspiratory or expiratory pressures or creatine kinase. Conclusions: These findings suggest that an intense bout of ITL results in muscle soreness primarily in the accessory muscles of inspiration, however, may be insufficient to cause significant muscle damage in healthy adults. PMID:20467514

  7. Relationships between metabolic rate, muscle electromyograms, and swim performance of adult chinook salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R. ); Brown, Richard S. ); Cullinan, Valerie I. ); Mesa, Matthew G.; VanderKooi, S P.; McKinstry, Craig A. )

    2003-10-01

    We measured oxygen consumption rates of adult spring Chinook salmon and compared these values to other species of Pacific salmon. Our results indicated that adult salmon achieve their maximum level of oxygen consumption at about their upper critical swim speed. It is also at this speed that the majority of the energy supplied to the swimming fish switches from red muscle (powered by aerobic metabolism) to white muscle (powered by anaerobic metabolism). Determining the swimming performance of adult salmon will assist managers in developing fishways and other means to safely pass fish over hydroelectric dams and other man-made structures.

  8. Enhanced ex vivo expansion of adult mesenchymal stem cells by fetal mesenchymal stem cell ECM.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chee Ping; Sharif, Abdul Rahim Mohamed; Heath, Daniel E; Chow, John W; Zhang, Claire B Y; Chan-Park, Mary B; Hammond, Paula T; Chan, Jerry K Y; Griffith, Linda G

    2014-04-01

    Large-scale expansion of highly functional adult human mesenchymal stem cells (aMSCs) remains technologically challenging as aMSCs lose self renewal capacity and multipotency during traditional long-term culture and their quality/quantity declines with donor age and disease. Identification of culture conditions enabling prolonged expansion and rejuvenation would have dramatic impact in regenerative medicine. aMSC-derived decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) has been shown to provide such microenvironment which promotes MSC self renewal and "stemness". Since previous studies have demonstrated superior proliferation and osteogenic potential of human fetal MSCs (fMSCs), we hypothesize that their ECM may promote expansion of clinically relevant aMSCs. We demonstrated that aMSCs were more proliferative (∼ 1.6 ×) on fMSC-derived ECM than aMSC-derived ECMs and traditional tissue culture wares (TCPS). These aMSCs were smaller and more uniform in size (median ± interquartile range: 15.5 ± 4.1 μm versus 17.2 ± 5.0 μm and 15.5 ± 4.1 μm for aMSC ECM and TCPS respectively), exhibited the necessary biomarker signatures, and stained positive for osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic expressions; indications that they maintained multipotency during culture. Furthermore, fMSC ECM improved the proliferation (∼ 2.2 ×), size (19.6 ± 11.9 μm vs 30.2 ± 14.5 μm) and differentiation potential in late-passaged aMSCs compared to TCPS. In conclusion, we have established fMSC ECM as a promising cell culture platform for ex vivo expansion of aMSCs.

  9. Muscle Derived Stem Cells Stimulate Muscle Myofiber Repair and Counteract Fat Infiltration in a Diabetic Mouse Model of Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, J; Kovanecz, I; Awadalla, N; Gelfand, R; Sinha-Hikim, I; White, RA; Gonzalez-Cadavid, NF

    2017-01-01

    Background Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) affects patients with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) and obesity, with high risk of amputation and post-surgical mortality, and no effective medical treatment. Stem cell therapy, mainly with bone marrow mesenchymal, adipose derived, endothelial, hematopoietic, and umbilical cord stem cells, is promising in CLI mouse and rat models and is in clinical trials. Their general focus is on angiogenic repair, with no reports on the alleviation of necrosis, lipofibrosis, and myofiber regeneration in the ischemic muscle, or the use of Muscle Derived Stem Cells (MDSC) alone or in combination with pharmacological adjuvants, in the context of CLI in T2D. Methods Using a T2D mouse model of CLI induced by severe unilateral femoral artery ligation, we tested: a) the repair efficacy of MDSC implanted into the ischemic muscle and the effects of concurrent intraperitoneal administration of a nitric oxide generator, molsidomine; and b) whether MDSC may partially counteract their own repair effects by stimulating the expression of myostatin, the main lipofibrotic agent in the muscle and inhibitor of muscle mass. Results MDSC: a) reduced mortality, and b) in the ischemic muscle, increased stem cell number and myofiber central nuclei, reduced fat infiltration, myofibroblast number, and myofiber apoptosis, and increased smooth muscle and endothelial cells, as well as neurotrophic factors. The content of myosin heavy chain 2 (MHC-2) myofibers was not restored and collagen was increased, in association with myostatin overexpression. Supplementation of MDSC with molsidomine failed to stimulate the beneficial effects of MDSC, except for some reduction in myostatin overexpression. Molsidomine given alone was rather ineffective, except for inhibiting apoptosis and myostatin overexpression. Conclusions MDSC improved CLI muscle repair, but molsidomine did not stimulate this process. The combination of MDSC with anti-myostatin approaches should be explored to restore

  10. Adult bone marrow-derived stem cells for organ regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Tögel, Florian; Westenfelder, Christof

    2007-12-01

    Stem cells have been recognized as a potential tool for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. There are in general two types of stem cells, embryonic and adult stem cells. While embryonic stem cell therapy has been riddled with problems of allogeneic rejection and ethical concerns, adult stem cells have long been used in the treatment of hematological malignancies. With the recognition of additional, potentially therapeutic characteristics, bone marrow-derived stem cells have become a tool in regenerative medicine. The bone marrow is an ideal source of stem cells because it is easily accessible and harbors two types of stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells give rise to all blood cell types and have been shown to exhibit plasticity, while multipotent marrow stromal cells are the source of osteocytes, chondrocytes, and fat cells and have been shown to support and generate a large number of different cell types. This review describes the general characteristics of these stem cell populations and their current and potential future applications in regenerative medicine.

  11. Polyphenolic composition of grape stem extracts affects antioxidant activity in endothelial and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Stagos, Dimitrios; Spanidis, Ypatios; Liosi, Maria; Apostolou, Anna; Priftis, Alexandros; Haroutounian, Serko; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Kouretas, Demetrios

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the antioxidant effects of polyphenolic extracts derived from the stems of three Greek grape varieties (Moshomayro, Mavrotragano and Mandilaria) in endothelial (EA.hy926) and muscle (C2C12) cells. We also investigated the effects of the polyphenolic composition on the antioxidant effects of the grape stem extracts. For this purpose, the endothelial and muscle cells were treated with low non-cytotoxic concentrations of the extracts for 24 h in order to assess the effects of the extracts on cellular redox status using oxidative stress biomarkers. The oxidative stress markers were thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl (CARB) levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and glutathione (GSH) levels. The results revealed that treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 14.8% and the CARB levels by 25.9 %, while it increased the GSH levels by 15.8% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mavrotragano extract significantly increased the GSH levels by 20.2%, while it significantly decreased the TBARS and CARB levels by 12.5% and 16.6%, respectively. Treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 47.3 %, the CARB levels by 39.0 % and the ROS levels by 21.8%, while it increased the GSH levels by 22.6% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mavrotragano significantly decreased the TBARS, CARB and ROS levels by 36.2%, 35.9% and 16.5%, respectively. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledgel, our results demonstrate for the first time that treatment with grape stem extracts at low concentrations improves the redox status of endothelial and muscle cells. Thus, grape stem extracts may be used for developing antioxidant food supplements or biofunctional foods. However, it was also found that the polyphenolic composition of grape stem

  12. Therapeutic effects of mouse adipose-derived stem cells and losartan in the skeletal muscle of injured mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Joo; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Hwang, Meeyul; Kim, Choong-Yong; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are an attractive source of cells for stem cell therapy. Losartan has been reported to improve ASC transplantation in injured mouse muscles. In the present study, we investigated whether the combined treatment of losartan and ASCs in the injured muscles of mdx mice improves regeneration. The combined treatment of ASCs and losartan remarkably improved muscle regeneration and induced muscle hypertrophy. In addition, ASCs and losartan treatment downregulated transforming growth factor-β and inhibited muscle fibrosis. We observed cells coexpressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and dystrophin in the muscle samples of mice transplanted with GFP-positive ASCs. In the coculture in vitro experiment, we also observed that the GFP ASCs differentiated into dystrophin-expressing myotubes. The present study shows that the combination of transplanted ASCs and treatment with losartan ameliorated muscle fibrosis and improved muscle regeneration in injured mdx mice. Thus, we suggest that combined treatment with losartan and ASCs could help to improve muscle regeneration in the muscles of injured patients, including DMD patients.

  13. Isolation, cultivation, and characterization of adult murine prostate stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, Rita U.; Goldstein, Andrew S.; Lawson, Devon A.; Cheng, Donghui; Witte, Owen N.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT/SUMMARY The successful isolation and cultivation of prostate stem cells will allow us to study their unique biological properties and their application in therapeutic approaches. Here we provide step-by-step procedures on the basis of previous work in our laboratory for: the harvesting of primary prostate cells from adolescent male mice by a modified enzymatic procedure; the isolation of an enriched population of prostate stem cells through cell sorting; the cultivation of prostate stem cells in vitro; and characterization of these cells and their stem-like activity, including in vivo tubule regeneration. Normally it will take approximately 8 hours to harvest prostate cells, isolate the stem cell enriched population, and set up the in vitro sphere assay. It will take up to 8 weeks to analyze the unique properties of the stem cells, including their regenerative capacity in vivo. PMID:20360765

  14. Isolation, cultivation and characterization of adult murine prostate stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, Rita U; Goldstein, Andrew S; Lawson, Devon A; Cheng, Donghui; Witte, Owen N

    2010-04-01

    The successful isolation and cultivation of prostate stem cells will allow us to study their unique biological properties and their application in therapeutic approaches. Here we describe step-by-step procedures on the basis of previous work in our laboratory for the harvesting of primary prostate cells from adolescent male mice by a modified enzymatic procedure; the isolation of an enriched population of prostate stem cells through cell sorting; and the cultivation of prostate stem cells in vitro and characterization of these cells and their stem-like activity, including in vivo tubule regeneration. Normally, it will take approximately 8 h to harvest prostate cells, isolate the stem cell-enriched population and set up the in vitro sphere assay. It will take up to 8 weeks to analyze the unique properties of the stem cells, including their regenerative capacity in vivo.

  15. Immune physiology and oogenesis in fetal and adult humans, ovarian infertility, and totipotency of adult ovarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Caudle, Michael R; Virant-Klun, Irma; Gupta, Satish K; Dominguez, Roberto; Svetlikova, Marta; Xu, Fei

    2009-03-01

    It is still widely believed that while oocytes in invertebrates and lower vertebrates are periodically renewed throughout life, oocytes in humans and higher vertebrates are formed only during the fetal/perinatal period. However, this dogma is questioned, and clashes with Darwinian evolutionary theory. Studies of oogenesis and follicular renewal from ovarian stem cells (OSCs) in adult human ovaries, and of the role of third-party bone marrow-derived cells (monocyte-derived tissue macrophages and T lymphocytes) could help provide a better understanding of the causes of ovarian infertility, its prevention, and potential treatment. We have reported differentiation of distinct cell types from OSC and the production of new eggs in cultures derived from premenopausal and postmenopausal human ovaries. OSCs are also capable of producing neural/neuronal cells in vitro after sequential stimulation with sex steroid combinations. Hence, OSC represent a unique type of totipotent adult stem cells, which could be utilized for autologous treatment of premature ovarian failure and also for autologous stem cell therapy of neurodegenerative diseases without use of allogeneic embryonic stem cells or somatic cell nuclear transfer. The in vivo application of sex steroid combinations may augment the proliferation of existing neural stem cells and their differentiation into mature neuronal cells (systemic regenerative therapy). Such treatment may also stimulate the transdifferentiation of autologous neural stem cell precursors into neural stem cells useful for topical or systemic regenerative treatment.

  16. Somatic stem cells express Piwi and Vasa genes in an adult ctenophore: ancient association of "germline genes" with stemness.

    PubMed

    Alié, Alexandre; Leclère, Lucas; Jager, Muriel; Dayraud, Cyrielle; Chang, Patrick; Le Guyader, Hervé; Quéinnec, Eric; Manuel, Michaël

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells are essential for animal development and adult tissue homeostasis, and the quest for an ancestral gene fingerprint of stemness is a major challenge for evolutionary developmental biology. Recent studies have indicated that a series of genes, including the transposon silencer Piwi and the translational activator Vasa, specifically involved in germline determination and maintenance in classical bilaterian models (e.g., vertebrates, fly, nematode), are more generally expressed in adult multipotent stem cells in other animals like flatworms and hydras. Since the progeny of these multipotent stem cells includes both somatic and germinal derivatives, it remains unclear whether Vasa, Piwi, and associated genes like Bruno and PL10 were ancestrally linked to stemness, or to germinal potential. We have investigated the expression of Vasa, two Piwi paralogues, Bruno and PL10 in Pleurobrachia pileus, a member of the early-diverging phylum Ctenophora, the probable sister group of cnidarians. These genes were all expressed in the male and female germlines, and with the exception of one of the Piwi paralogues, they showed similar expression patterns within somatic territories (tentacle root, comb rows, aboral sensory complex). Cytological observations and EdU DNA-labelling and long-term retention experiments revealed concentrations of stem cells closely matching these gene expression areas. These stem cell pools are spatially restricted, and each specialised in the production of particular types of somatic cells. These data unveil important aspects of cell renewal within the ctenophore body and suggest that Piwi, Vasa, Bruno, and PL10 belong to a gene network ancestrally acting in two distinct contexts: (i) the germline and (ii) stem cells, whatever the nature of their progeny.

  17. RNA-Seq Reveals the Angiogenesis Diversity between the Fetal and Adults Bone Mesenchyme Stem Cell.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Han, Yingmin; Liang, Yu; Nie, Chao; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to analyze 23 single cell samples and 2 bulk cells sample from human adult bone mesenchyme stem cell line and human fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell line. The results from the research demonstrated that there were big differences between two cell lines. Adult bone mesenchyme stem cell lines showed a strong trend on the blood vessel differentiation and cell motion, 48/49 vascular related differential expressed genes showed higher expression in adult bone mesenchyme stem cell lines (Abmsc) than fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell lines (Fbmsc). 96/106 cell motion related genes showed the same tendency. Further analysis showed that genes like ANGPT1, VEGFA, FGF2, PDGFB and PDGFRA showed higher expression in Abmsc. This work showed cell heterogeneity between human adult bone mesenchyme stem cell line and human fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell line. Also the work may give an indication that Abmsc had a better potency than Fbmsc in the future vascular related application.

  18. CRIPTO/GRP78 Signaling Maintains Fetal and Adult Mammary Stem Cells Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Spike, Benjamin T.; Kelber, Jonathan A.; Booker, Evan; Kalathur, Madhuri; Rodewald, Rose; Lipianskaya, Julia; La, Justin; He, Marielle; Wright, Tracy; Klemke, Richard; Wahl, Geoffrey M.; Gray, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Little is known about the extracellular signaling factors that govern mammary stem cell behavior. Here, we identify CRIPTO and its cell-surface receptor GRP78 as regulators of stem cell behavior in isolated fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells. We develop a CRIPTO antagonist that promotes differentiation and reduces self-renewal of mammary stem cell-enriched populations cultured ex vivo. By contrast, CRIPTO treatment maintains the stem cell phenotype in these cultures and yields colonies with enhanced mammary gland reconstitution capacity. Surface expression of GRP78 marks CRIPTO-responsive, stem cell-enriched fetal and adult mammary epithelial cells, and deletion of GRP78 from adult mammary epithelial cells blocks their mammary gland reconstitution potential. Together, these findings identify the CRIPTO/GRP78 pathway as a developmentally conserved regulator of fetal and adult mammary stem cell behavior ex vivo, with implications for the stem-like cells found in many cancers. PMID:24749068

  19. Adipose-derived adult stem cells: available technologies for potential clinical regenerative applications in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Enrico; Cochis, Andrea; Varoni, Elena; Rimondini, Lia; Carrassi, Antonio; Azzimonti, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis depends closely on the activity and welfare of adult stem cells. These cells represent a promising tool for biomedical research since they can aid in treatment and promote the regeneration of damaged organs in many human disorders. Adult stem cells indefinitely preserve their ability to self-renew and differentiate into various phenotypes; this capacity could be promoted in vitro by particular culture conditions (differentiation media) or spontaneously induced in vivo by exploiting the biochemical and mechanical properties of the tissue in which the stem cells are implanted. Among the different sources of adult stem cells, adipose tissue is an attractive possibility thanks to its ready availability and the standard extraction techniques at our disposal today. This review discusses the isolation, characterization, and differentiation of human adipose-derived adult stem cells, as well as regeneration strategies, therapeutic uses, and adverse effects of their delivery. In particular, since oral disorders (e.g., trauma, erosion, and chronic periodontitis) often cause the loss of dental tissue along with functional, phonetic, and aesthetic impairment, this review focuses on the application of human adipose-derived adult stem cells, alone or in combination with biomaterials, in treating oral diseases.

  20. Does the adult human ciliary body epithelium contain "true" retinal stem cells?

    PubMed

    Frøen, Rebecca; Johnsen, Erik O; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Facskó, Andrea; Petrovski, Goran; Moe, Morten C

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports of retinal stem cells being present in several locations of the adult eye have sparked great hopes that they may be used to treat the millions of people worldwide who suffer from blindness as a result of retinal disease or injury. A population of proliferative cells derived from the ciliary body epithelium (CE) has been considered one of the prime stem cell candidates, and as such they have received much attention in recent years. However, the true nature of these cells in the adult human eye has still not been fully elucidated, and the stem cell claim has become increasingly controversial in light of new and conflicting reports. In this paper, we will try to answer the question of whether the available evidence is strong enough for the research community to conclude that the adult human CE indeed harbors stem cells.

  1. Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to muscle fiber to model Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chal, Jérome; Oginuma, Masayuki; Al Tanoury, Ziad; Gobert, Bénédicte; Sumara, Olga; Hick, Aurore; Bousson, Fanny; Zidouni, Yasmine; Mursch, Caroline; Moncuquet, Philippe; Tassy, Olivier; Vincent, Stéphane; Miyanari, Ayako; Bera, Agata; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Guevara, Getzabel; Hestin, Marie; Kennedy, Leif; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Drayton, Bernadette; Cherrier, Thomas; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Gussoni, Emanuela; Relaix, Frédéric; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Pourquié, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    During embryonic development, skeletal muscles arise from somites, which derive from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Using PSM development as a guide, we establish conditions for the differentiation of monolayer cultures of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into PSM-like cells without the introduction of transgenes or cell sorting. We show that primary and secondary skeletal myogenesis can be recapitulated in vitro from the PSM-like cells, providing an efficient, serum-free protocol for the generation of striated, contractile fibers from mouse and human pluripotent cells. The mouse ES cells also differentiate into Pax7(+) cells with satellite cell characteristics, including the ability to form dystrophin(+) fibers when grafted into muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Fibers derived from ES cells of mdx mice exhibit an abnormal branched phenotype resembling that described in vivo, thus providing an attractive model to study the origin of the pathological defects associated with DMD.

  2. Pluripotent stem cell derivation and differentiation toward cardiac muscle: novel techniques and advances in patent literature.

    PubMed

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Thorrez, Lieven; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2013-04-01

    Pluripotent stem cells hold unprecedented potential for regenerative medicine, disease modeling and drug screening. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), standard model for pluripotency studies, have been recently flanked by induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs are obtained from somatic cells via epigenetic and transcriptional reprogramming, overcoming ESC-related ethical issues and enabling the possibility of donor-matching pluripotent cell lines. Since the European Court of Justice banned patents involving embryo disaggregation to generate human ESCs, iPSCs can now fuel the willingness of European companies to invest in treatments based on stem cells. Moreover, iPSCs share many unique features of ESCs, such as unlimited self-renewal potential and broad differentiation capability, even though iPSCs seem more susceptible to genomic instability and display epigenetic biases as compared to ESCs. Both ESCs and iPSCs have been intensely investigated for cardiomyocyte production and cardiac muscle regeneration, both in human and animal models. In vitro and in vivo studies are continuously expanding and refining this field via genetic manipulation and cell conditioning, trying to achieve standard and reproducible products, eligible for clinical and biopharmaceutical scopes. This review focuses on the recently growing body of patents, concerning technical advances in production, expansion and cardiac differentiation of ESCs and iPSCs.

  3. Electrically Stimulated Adipose Stem Cells on Polypyrrole-Coated Scaffolds for Smooth Muscle Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Björninen, Miina; Gilmore, Kerry; Pelto, Jani; Seppänen-Kaijansinkko, Riitta; Kellomäki, Minna; Miettinen, Susanna; Wallace, Gordon; Grijpma, Dirk; Haimi, Suvi

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the use of polypyrrole (PPy)-coated polymer scaffolds and electrical stimulation (ES) to differentiate adipose stem cells (ASCs) towards smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Since tissue engineering lacks robust and reusable 3D ES devices we developed a device that can deliver ES in a reliable, repeatable, and cost-efficient way in a 3D environment. Long pulse (1 ms) or short pulse (0.25 ms) biphasic electric current at a frequency of 10 Hz was applied to ASCs to study the effects of ES on ASC viability and differentiation towards SMCs on the PPy-coated scaffolds. PPy-coated scaffolds promoted proliferation and induced stronger calponin, myosin heavy chain (MHC) and smooth muscle actin (SMA) expression in ASCs compared to uncoated scaffolds. ES with 1 ms pulse width increased the number of viable cells by day 7 compared to controls and remained at similar levels to controls by day 14, whereas shorter pulses significantly decreased viability compared to the other groups. Both ES protocols supported smooth muscle expression markers. Our results indicate that electrical stimulation on PPy-coated scaffolds applied through the novel 3D ES device is a valid approach for vascular smooth muscle tissue engineering.

  4. Dystrophin expression in muscle stem cells regulates their polarity and asymmetric division

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Nicolas A.; Wang, Yu Xin; von Maltzahn, Julia; Pasut, Alessandra; Bentzinger, C. Florian; Brun, Caroline E.; Rudnicki, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin is expressed in differentiated myofibers where it is required for sarcolemmal integrity, and loss-of-function mutations in its gene result in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a disease characterized by progressive and severe skeletal muscle degeneration. Here we found that dystrophin is also highly expressed in activated muscle stem cells (also known as satellite cells) where it associates with the Ser/Thr kinase Mark2 (also known as Par1b), an important regulator of cell polarity. In the absence of dystrophin, expression of Mark2 protein is downregulated, resulting in the inability to polarize Pard3 to the opposite side of the cell. Consequently, the number of asymmetric divisions is strikingly reduced in dystrophin-deficient satellite cells, while also displaying a loss of polarity, abnormal division patterns including centrosome amplification, impaired mitotic spindle orientation, and prolonged cell divisions. Altogether, these intrinsic defects strongly reduce the generation of myogenic progenitors needed for proper muscle regeneration. Therefore, we conclude that dystrophin has an essential role in the regulation of satellite cell polarity and asymmetric division. Our findings indicate that muscle wasting in DMD is not only caused by myofiber fragility, but is also exacerbated by impaired regeneration due to intrinsic satellite cell dysfunction. PMID:26569381

  5. Dystrophin expression in muscle stem cells regulates their polarity and asymmetric division.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Nicolas A; Wang, Yu Xin; von Maltzahn, Julia; Pasut, Alessandra; Bentzinger, C Florian; Brun, Caroline E; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Dystrophin is expressed in differentiated myofibers, in which it is required for sarcolemmal integrity, and loss-of-function mutations in the gene that encodes it result in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a disease characterized by progressive and severe skeletal muscle degeneration. Here we found that dystrophin is also highly expressed in activated muscle stem cells (also known as satellite cells), in which it associates with the serine-threonine kinase Mark2 (also known as Par1b), an important regulator of cell polarity. In the absence of dystrophin, expression of Mark2 protein is downregulated, resulting in the inability to localize the cell polarity regulator Pard3 to the opposite side of the cell. Consequently, the number of asymmetric divisions is strikingly reduced in dystrophin-deficient satellite cells, which also display a loss of polarity, abnormal division patterns (including centrosome amplification), impaired mitotic spindle orientation and prolonged cell divisions. Altogether, these intrinsic defects strongly reduce the generation of myogenic progenitors that are needed for proper muscle regeneration. Therefore, we conclude that dystrophin has an essential role in the regulation of satellite cell polarity and asymmetric division. Our findings indicate that muscle wasting in DMD not only is caused by myofiber fragility, but also is exacerbated by impaired regeneration owing to intrinsic satellite cell dysfunction.

  6. Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  7. Age-Associated Methylation Suppresses SPRY1, Leading to a Failure of Re-quiescence and Loss of the Reserve Stem Cell Pool in Elderly Muscle.

    PubMed

    Bigot, Anne; Duddy, William J; Ouandaogo, Zamalou G; Negroni, Elisa; Mariot, Virginie; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Harmon, Brennan; Wielgosik, Aurore; Loiseau, Camille; Devaney, Joe; Dumonceaux, Julie; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent; Duguez, Stéphanie

    2015-11-10

    The molecular mechanisms by which aging affects stem cell number and function are poorly understood. Murine data have implicated cellular senescence in the loss of muscle stem cells with aging. Here, using human cells and by carrying out experiments within a strictly pre-senescent division count, we demonstrate an impaired capacity for stem cell self-renewal in elderly muscle. We link aging to an increased methylation of the SPRY1 gene, a known regulator of muscle stem cell quiescence. Replenishment of the reserve cell pool was modulated experimentally by demethylation or siRNA knockdown of SPRY1. We propose that suppression of SPRY1 by age-associated methylation in humans inhibits the replenishment of the muscle stem cell pool, contributing to a decreased regenerative response in old age. We further show that aging does not affect muscle stem cell senescence in humans.

  8. In vivo Study on Depressant Effects and Muscle Coordination Activity of Galphimia glauca Stem Methanol Extract

    PubMed Central

    Garige, Baba Shankar Rao; Keshetti, Srisailam; Vattikuti, Uma Maheshwara Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Galphimia glauca is an evergreen shrub found across peninsular India, belonging to family Malpighiaceae. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the in vivo depressant effects and muscle coordination activity of G. glauca stem methanol extract (GGSME). Materials and Methods: The stem methanol extract was administered in Swiss albino mice in 1 day to study the central nervous system (CNS) depressant and muscle coordination activity employing animal models such as sodium pentobarbital-induced sleep test, hole-board test, open field test, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions, picrotoxin-induced convulsions, grip strengthening test in mice, and Rota-rod test. Results: The LD50 of GGSME was found to be >2000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Mice treated with stem methanol extract at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, b.w. doses extended the sleeping time induced by sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg. b.w., i.p.). The stem methanol extract at 400 mg/kg dose showed a significant (P ≤ 0.001) dose-dependent decrease in the number of rears and head dipping number in the hole-board test. The extract exhibited a significant (P ≤ 0.001) effect on the ambulatory behavior of mice in the open field test and also extended the onset of seizures induced by PTZ (90 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) and picrotoxin (10 mg/kg, b.w., i.p.). The extract also exhibited significant (P ≤ 0.001) effects on muscle coordination in rota-rod and grip strengthening test in mice. Conclusion: The study results conclude that the GGSME has a potential CNS depressant and muscle relaxant effects compared to the standard drugs. SUMMARY Anxiety is implicated in the number of psychiatric disordersIn vivo depressant activity is studied employing animal models like Sodium pentobarbital-.induced sleep test, Hole-board test, Open field test, Pentylenetetrazole induced convulsions and Picrotoxin-induced convulsions tests.Muscle coordination activity is studied employing animal models like Grip strengthening

  9. Proprioceptive acuity predicts muscle co-contraction of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis in older adults' dynamic postural control.

    PubMed

    Craig, C E; Goble, D J; Doumas, M

    2016-05-13

    Older adults use a different muscle strategy to cope with postural instability, in which they 'co-contract' the muscles around the ankle joint. It has been suggested that this is a compensatory response to age-related proprioceptive decline however this view has never been assessed directly. The current study investigated the association between proprioceptive acuity and muscle co-contraction in older adults. We compared muscle activity, by recording surface electromyography (EMG) from the bilateral tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles, in young (aged 18-34) and older adults (aged 65-82) during postural assessment on a fixed and sway-referenced surface at age-equivalent levels of sway. We performed correlations between muscle activity and proprioceptive acuity, which was assessed using an active contralateral matching task. Despite successfully inducing similar levels of sway in the two age groups, older adults still showed higher muscle co-contraction. A stepwise regression analysis showed that proprioceptive acuity measured using variable error was the best predictor of muscle co-contraction in older adults. However, despite suggestions from previous research, proprioceptive error and muscle co-contraction were negatively correlated in older adults, suggesting that better proprioceptive acuity predicts more co-contraction. Overall, these results suggest that although muscle co-contraction may be an age-specific strategy used by older adults, it is not to compensate for age-related proprioceptive deficits.

  10. Characterization of muscle spindle afferents in the adult mouse using an in vitro muscle-nerve preparation.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Katherine A; Kloefkorn, Heidi E; Hochman, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    We utilized an in vitro adult mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) nerve-attached preparation to characterize the responses of muscle spindle afferents to ramp-and-hold stretch and sinusoidal vibratory stimuli. Responses were measured at both room (24°C) and muscle body temperature (34°C). Muscle spindle afferent static firing frequencies increased linearly in response to increasing stretch lengths to accurately encode the magnitude of muscle stretch (tested at 2.5%, 5% and 7.5% of resting length [Lo]). Peak firing frequency increased with ramp speeds (20% Lo/sec, 40% Lo/sec, and 60% Lo/sec). As a population, muscle spindle afferents could entrain 1:1 to sinusoidal vibrations throughout the frequency (10-100 Hz) and amplitude ranges tested (5-100 µm). Most units preferentially entrained to vibration frequencies close to their baseline steady-state firing frequencies. Cooling the muscle to 24°C decreased baseline firing frequency and units correspondingly entrained to slower frequency vibrations. The ramp component of stretch generated dynamic firing responses. These responses and related measures of dynamic sensitivity were not able to categorize units as primary (group Ia) or secondary (group II) even when tested with more extreme length changes (10% Lo). We conclude that the population of spindle afferents combines to encode stretch in a smoothly graded manner over the physiological range of lengths and speeds tested. Overall, spindle afferent response properties were comparable to those seen in other species, supporting subsequent use of the mouse genetic model system for studies on spindle function and dysfunction in an isolated muscle-nerve preparation.

  11. ADULT NEURAL STEM CELLS: RESPONSE TO STROKE INJURY AND POTENTIAL FOR THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Barkho, Basam Z.; Zhao, Xinyu

    2011-01-01

    The plasticity of neural stem/progenitor cells allows a variety of different responses to many environmental cues. In the past decade, significant research has gone into understanding the regulation of neural stem/progenitor cell properties, because of their promise for cell replacement therapies in adult neurological diseases. Both endogenous and grafted neural stem/progenitor cells are known to have the ability to migrate long distances to lesioned sites after brain injury and differentiate into new neurons. Several chemokines and growth factors, including stromal cell-derived factor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor, have been shown to stimulate the proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neural stem/progenitor cells, and investigators have now begun to identify the critical downstream effectors and signaling mechanisms that regulate these processes. Both our own lab and others have shown that the extracellular matrix and matrix remodeling factors play a critical role in directing cell differentiation and migration of adult neural stem/progenitor cells within injured sites. Identification of these and other molecular pathways involved in stem cell homing into ischemic areas is vital for the development of new treatments. To ensure the best functional recovery, regenerative therapy may require the application of a combination approach that includes cell replacement, trophic support, and neural protection. Here we review the current state of our knowledge about endogenous adult and exogenous neural stem/progenitor cells as potential therapeutic agents for central nervous system injuries. PMID:21466483

  12. The Synergistic Effect of Treadmill Running on Stem-Cell Transplantation to Heal Injured Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Ricardo J.; Distefano, Giovanna; Plassmeyer, Joshua M.; Carvell, George E.; Deasy, Bridget M.; Boninger, Michael L.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Huard, Johnny

    2010-01-01

    Muscle-derived stem-cell (MDSC) transplantation presents a promising method for the treatment of muscle injuries. This study investigated the ability of exercise to enhance MDSC transplantation into the injured muscle. Mice were divided into four groups: contusion + phosphate-buffered saline (C + PBS; n = 14 muscles), C + MDSC transplantation (n = 12 muscles), C + PBS + treadmill running (C + PBS + TM; n = 17 muscles), and C + MDSC + TM (n = 13 muscles). One day after injury, the TM groups began running for 1 or 5 weeks. Two days after injury, muscles of C + MDSC and C + MDSC + TM groups were injected with MDSCs. One or 5 weeks later, the number and differentiation of transplanted MDSCs, myofiber regeneration, collagen I formation, and vascularity were assessed histologically. In vitro, MDSCs were subjected to mechanical stimulation, and growth kinetics were quantified. In vitro, mechanical stimulation decreased the MDSC population doubling time (18.6 ± 1.6 h) and cell division time (10.9 ± 0.7 h), compared with the controls (population doubling time: 23.0 ± 3.4 h; cell division time: 13.3 ± 1.1 h) (p = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively). In vivo, 5 weeks of TM increased the myogenic contribution of transplanted MDSCs, compared with the controls (p = 0.02). C + MDSC, C + PBS + TM, and C + MDSC + TM demonstrated decreased fibrosis at 5 weeks, compared with the C + PBS controls (p = 0.00, p = 0.03, and p = 0.02, respectively). Results suggest that the mechanical stimulation favors MDSC proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo, and that exercise enhances MDSC transplantation after injury. PMID:19788347

  13. Altered activation of the antagonist muscle during practice compromises motor learning in older adults.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Kwon, MinHyuk; Fox, Emily J; Christou, Evangelos A

    2014-08-15

    Aging impairs the activation of muscle; however, it remains unclear whether it contributes to deficits in motor learning in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether altered activation of antagonistic muscles in older adults during practice inhibits their ability to transfer a motor task ipsilaterally. Twenty young (25.1 ± 3.9 yr; 10 men, 10 women) and twenty older adults (71.5 ± 4.8 yr; 10 men, 10 women) participated. Half of the subjects practiced 100 trials of a rapid goal-directed task with ankle dorsiflexion and were tested 1 day later with elbow flexion (transfer). The rest did not perform any ankle practice and only performed the task with elbow flexion. The goal-directed task consisted of rapid movement (180 ms) to match a spatiotemporal target. For each limb, we recorded the EMG burst activity of the primary agonist and antagonist muscles. The rate of improvement during task acquisition (practice) was similar for young and older adults (P > 0.3). In contrast, only young adults were able to transfer the task to the upper limb. Specifically, young adults who practiced ankle dorsiflexion exhibited ∼30% (P < 0.05) lower movement error and ∼60% (P < 0.05) lower antagonist EMG burst activity compared with older adults who received equal practice and young adults who did not receive any ankle dorsiflexion practice. These results provide novel evidence that the deficient motor learning in older adults may be related to a differential activation of the antagonist muscle, which compromises their ability to acquire the task during practice.

  14. Great promise of tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells in transplantation and cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cell research has inspired great interest because these immature cells from your own body can act as potential, easily accessible cell sources for cell transplantation in regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. The use of adult stem/progenitor cells endowed with a high self-renewal ability and multilineage differentiation potential, which are able to regenerate all the mature cells in the tissues from their origin, offers great promise in replacing non-functioning or lost cells and regenerating diseased and damaged tissues. The presence of a small subpopulation of adult stem/progenitor cells in most tissues and organs provides the possibility of stimulating their in vivo differentiation, or of using their ex vivo expanded progenies for cell-replacement and gene therapies with multiple applications in humans without a high-risk of graft rejection and major side effects. Among the diseases that could be treated by adult stem cell-based therapies are hematopoietic and immune disorders, multiple degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, Types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus as well as skin, eye, liver, lung, tooth and cardiovascular disorders. In addition, a combination of the current cancer treatments with an adjuvant treatment consisting of an autologous or allogeneic adult stem/progenitor cell transplantation also represents a promising strategy for treating and even curing diverse aggressive, metastatic, recurrent and lethal cancers. In this chapter, we reviewed the most recent advancements on the characterization of phenotypic and functional properties of adult stem/progenitor cell types found in bone marrow, heart, brain and other tissues and discussed their therapeutic implications in the stem cell-based transplantation therapy.

  15. Concise Review: Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells and Cardiac Lineage: Potential for Heart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Narmeen; Tchao, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Valuable and ample resources have been spent over the last two decades in pursuit of interventional strategies to treat the unmet demand of heart failure patients to restore myocardial structure and function. At present, it is clear that full restoration of myocardial structure and function is outside our reach from both clinical and basic research studies, but it may be achievable with a combination of ongoing research, creativity, and perseverance. Since the 1990s, skeletal myoblasts have been extensively investigated for cardiac cell therapy of congestive heart failure. Whereas the Myoblast Autologous Grafting in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy (MAGIC) trial revealed that transplanted skeletal myoblasts did not integrate into the host myocardium and also did not transdifferentiate into cardiomyocytes despite some beneficial effects on recipient myocardial function, recent studies suggest that skeletal muscle-derived stem cells have the ability to adopt a cardiomyocyte phenotype in vitro and in vivo. This brief review endeavors to summarize the importance of skeletal muscle stem cells and how they can play a key role to surpass current results in the future and enhance the efficacious implementation of regenerative cell therapy for heart failure. PMID:24371329

  16. Wildtype adult stem cells, unlike tumor cells, are resistant to cellular damages in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meifang; Zhao, Hang; Zhao, Hanfei; Binari, Richard; Perrimon, Norbert; Li, Zhouhua

    2016-03-15

    Adult stem cells or residential progenitor cells are critical to maintain the structure and function of adult tissues (homeostasis) throughout the lifetime of an individual. Mis-regulation of stem cell proliferation and differentiation often leads to diseases including cancer, however, how wildtype adult stem cells and cancer cells respond to cellular damages remains unclear. We find that in the adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs), unlike tumor intestinal cells, are resistant to various cellular damages. Tumor intestinal cells, unlike wildtype ISCs, are easily eliminated by apoptosis. Further, their proliferation is inhibited upon autophagy induction, and autophagy-mediated tumor inhibition is independent of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Interestingly, inhibition of tumorigenesis by autophagy is likely through the sequestration and degradation of mitochondria, as compromising mitochondria activity in these tumor models mimics the induction of autophagy and increasing the production of mitochondria alleviates the tumor-suppression capacity of autophagy. Together, these data demonstrate that wildtype adult stem cells and tumor cells show dramatic differences in sensitivity to cellular damages, thus providing potential therapeutic implications targeting tumorigenesis.

  17. Human oocytes reprogram adult somatic nuclei of a type 1 diabetic to diploid pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Johannesson, Bjarki; Sagi, Ido; Burnett, Lisa Cole; Kort, Daniel H; Prosser, Robert W; Paull, Daniel; Nestor, Michael W; Freeby, Matthew; Greenberg, Ellen; Goland, Robin S; Leibel, Rudolph L; Solomon, Susan L; Benvenisty, Nissim; Sauer, Mark V; Egli, Dieter

    2014-06-26

    The transfer of somatic cell nuclei into oocytes can give rise to pluripotent stem cells that are consistently equivalent to embryonic stem cells, holding promise for autologous cell replacement therapy. Although methods to induce pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells by transcription factors are widely used in basic research, numerous differences between induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells have been reported, potentially affecting their clinical use. Because of the therapeutic potential of diploid embryonic stem-cell lines derived from adult cells of diseased human subjects, we have systematically investigated the parameters affecting efficiency of blastocyst development and stem-cell derivation. Here we show that improvements to the oocyte activation protocol, including the use of both kinase and translation inhibitors, and cell culture in the presence of histone deacetylase inhibitors, promote development to the blastocyst stage. Developmental efficiency varied between oocyte donors, and was inversely related to the number of days of hormonal stimulation required for oocyte maturation, whereas the daily dose of gonadotropin or the total number of metaphase II oocytes retrieved did not affect developmental outcome. Because the use of concentrated Sendai virus for cell fusion induced an increase in intracellular calcium concentration, causing premature oocyte activation, we used diluted Sendai virus in calcium-free medium. Using this modified nuclear transfer protocol, we derived diploid pluripotent stem-cell lines from somatic cells of a newborn and, for the first time, an adult, a female with type 1 diabetes.

  18. A planarian p53 homolog regulates proliferation and self-renewal in adult stem cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Bret J; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    The functions of adult stem cells and tumor suppressor genes are known to intersect. However, when and how tumor suppressors function in the lineages produced by adult stem cells is unknown. With a large population of stem cells that can be manipulated and studied in vivo, the freshwater planarian is an ideal system with which to investigate these questions. Here, we focus on the tumor suppressor p53, homologs of which have no known role in stem cell biology in any invertebrate examined thus far. Planaria have a single p53 family member, Smed-p53, which is predominantly expressed in newly made stem cell progeny. When Smed-p53 is targeted by RNAi, the stem cell population increases at the expense of progeny, resulting in hyper-proliferation. However, ultimately the stem cell population fails to self-renew. Our results suggest that prior to the vertebrates, an ancestral p53-like molecule already had functions in stem cell proliferation control and self-renewal.

  19. INVITED REVIEW: Evolution of meat animal growth research during the past 50 years: Adipose and muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dodson, M V; Allen, R E; Du, M; Bergen, W G; Velleman, S G; Poulos, S P; Fernyhough-Culver, M; Wheeler, M B; Duckett, S K; Young, M R I; Voy, B H; Jiang, Z; Hausman, G J

    2015-02-01

    If one were to compare today's animal growth research to research from a mere 50 yr ago, one would see programs with few similarities. The evolution of this research from whole-animal through cell-based and finally molecular and genomic studies has been enhanced by the identification, isolation, and in vitro evaluation of adipose- and muscle-derived stem cells. This paper will highlight the struggles and the milestones that make this evolving area of research what it is today. The contribution of adipose and muscle stem cell research to development and growth, tissue regeneration, and final carcass composition are reviewed.

  20. Diversity of Epithelial Stem Cell Types in Adult Lung

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; He, Jinxi; Wei, Jun; Cho, William C.; Liu, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Lung is a complex organ lined with epithelial cells. In order to maintain its homeostasis and normal functions following injuries caused by varied extraneous and intraneous insults, such as inhaled environmental pollutants and overwhelming inflammatory responses, the respiratory epithelium normally undergoes regenerations by the proliferation and differentiation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells that resided in distinct niches along the airway tree. The importance of local epithelial stem cell niches in the specification of lung stem/progenitor cells has been recently identified. Studies using cell differentiating and lineage tracing assays, in vitro and/or ex vivo models, and genetically engineered mice have suggested that these local epithelial stem/progenitor cells within spatially distinct regions along the pulmonary tree contribute to the injury repair of epithelium adjacent to their respective niches. This paper reviews recent findings in the identification and isolation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells and local niches along the airway tree and the potential link of epithelial stem cells for the development of lung cancer. PMID:25810726

  1. Modulation of Stem Cell Differentiation and Myostatin as an Approach to Counteract Fibrosis in Muscle Dystrophy and Regeneration after Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    07-1-0181 TITLE: Modulation of Stem Cell Differentiation and Myostatin as an Approach to Counteract Fibrosis in Muscle Dystrophy and...views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army...Myostatin as an Approach to Counteract Fibrosis in Muscle Dystrophy and Regeneration after Injury Dr. Nestor Gonzalez-Cadavid Charles R. Drew

  2. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches.

  3. Typography manipulations can affect priming of word stem completion in older and younger adults.

    PubMed

    Gibson, J M; Brooks, J O; Friedman, L; Yesavage, J A

    1993-12-01

    The experiments reported here investigated whether changes of typography affected priming of word stem completion performance in older and younger adults. Across all experiments, the typeface in which a word appeared at presentation either did or did not match that of its 3-letter stem at test. In Experiment 1, no significant evidence of a typography effect was found when words were presented with a sentence judgment or letter judgment task. However, subsequent experiments revealed that, in both older and younger adults, only words presented with a syllable judgment task gave rise to the typography effect (Experiments 2-4). Specifically, performance was greater, when the presentation and test typeface matched than when they did not. Experiment 5, which used stem-cued recall, did not reveal a difference between syllable and letter judgment tasks. These findings highlight the complex nature of word stem completion performance.

  4. Evaluating alternative stem cell hypotheses for adult corneal epithelial maintenance

    PubMed Central

    West, John D; Dorà, Natalie J; Collinson, J Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this review we evaluate evidence for three different hypotheses that explain how the corneal epithelium is maintained. The limbal epithelial stem cell (LESC) hypothesis is most widely accepted. This proposes that stem cells in the basal layer of the limbal epithelium, at the periphery of the cornea, maintain themselves and also produce transient (or transit) amplifying cells (TACs). TACs then move centripetally to the centre of the cornea in the basal layer of the corneal epithelium and also replenish cells in the overlying suprabasal layers. The LESCs maintain the corneal epithelium during normal homeostasis and become more active to repair significant wounds. Second, the corneal epithelial stem cell (CESC) hypothesis postulates that, during normal homeostasis, stem cells distributed throughout the basal corneal epithelium, maintain the tissue. According to this hypothesis, LESCs are present in the limbus but are only active during wound healing. We also consider a third possibility, that the corneal epithelium is maintained during normal homeostasis by proliferation of basal corneal epithelial cells without any input from stem cells. After reviewing the published evidence, we conclude that the LESC and CESC hypotheses are consistent with more of the evidence than the third hypothesis, so we do not consider this further. The LESC and CESC hypotheses each have difficulty accounting for one main type of evidence so we evaluate the two key lines of evidence that discriminate between them. Finally, we discuss how lineage-tracing experiments have begun to resolve the debate in favour of the LESC hypothesis. Nevertheless, it also seems likely that some basal corneal epithelial cells can act as long-term progenitors if limbal stem cell function is compromised. Thus, this aspect of the CESC hypothesis may have a lasting impact on our understanding of corneal epithelial maintenance, even if it is eventually shown that stem cells are restricted to the limbus as proposed

  5. An essential and evolutionarily conserved role of protein arginine methyltransferase 1 for adult intestinal stem cells during postembryonic development.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroki; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2010-11-01

    Organ-specific adult stem cells are critical for the homeostasis of adult organs and organ repair and regeneration. Unfortunately, it has been difficult to investigate the origins of these stem cells and the mechanisms of their development, especially in mammals. Intestinal remodeling during frog metamorphosis offers a unique opportunity for such studies. During the transition from an herbivorous tadpole to a carnivorous frog, the intestine is completely remodeled as the larval epithelial cells undergo apoptotic degeneration and are replaced by adult epithelial cells developed de novo. The entire metamorphic process is under the control of thyroid hormone, making it possible to control the development of the adult intestinal stem cells. Here, we show that the thyroid hormone receptor-coactivator protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is upregulated in a small number of larval epithelial cells and that these cells dedifferentiate to become the adult stem cells. More importantly, transgenic overexpression of PRMT1 leads to increased adult stem cells in the intestine, and conversely, knocking down the expression of endogenous PRMT1 reduces the adult stem cell population. In addition, PRMT1 expression pattern during zebrafish and mouse development suggests that PRMT1 may play an evolutionally conserved role in the development of adult intestinal stem cells throughout vertebrates. These findings are not only important for the understanding of organ-specific adult stem cell development but also have important implications in regenerative medicine of the digestive tract.

  6. Chemokine-mobilized adult stem cells; defining a better hematopoietic graft.

    PubMed

    Pelus, L M; Fukuda, S

    2008-03-01

    Stem cell research is currently focused on totipotent stem cells and their therapeutic potential, however adult stem cells, while restricted to differentiation within their tissue or origin, also have therapeutic utility. Transplantation with bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has been used for curative therapy for decades. More recently, alternative sources of HSC, particularly those induced to exit marrow or mobilize to peripheral blood by G-CSF, have become the most widely used hematopoietic graft and show significant superiority to marrow HSC. The chemokine/chemokine receptor axis also mobilizes HSC that occurs more rapidly than with G-CSF. In mice, the HSC and progenitor cells (HPC) mobilized by the CXCR2 receptor agonist GRObeta can be harvested within minutes of administration and show significantly lower levels of apoptosis, enhanced homing to marrow, expression of more activated integrin receptors and superior repopulation kinetics and more competitive engraftment than the equivalent cells mobilized by G-CSF. These characteristics suggest that chemokine axis-mobilized HSC represent a population of adult stem cells distinct from those mobilized by G-CSF, with superior therapeutic potential. It remains to be determined if the chemokine mobilization axis can be harnessed to mobilize other populations of unique adult stem cells with clinical utility.

  7. Magnetically Responsive Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells Maintain Their Benefits to Augmenting Elastic Matrix Neoassembly.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Ganesh; Sivaraman, Balakrishnan; Moore, Lee; Zborowski, Maciej; Ramamurthi, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) represent abnormal aortal expansions that result from chronic proteolytic breakdown of elastin and collagen fibers by matrix metalloproteases. Poor elastogenesis by adult vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) limits regenerative repair of elastic fibers, critical for AAA growth arrest. Toward overcoming these limitations, we recently demonstrated significant elastogenesis by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived SMCs (BM-SMCs) and their proelastogenesis and antiproteolytic effects on rat aneurysmal SMCs (EaRASMCs). We currently investigate the effects of super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) labeling of BM-SMCs, necessary to magnetically guide them to the AAA wall, on their functional benefits. Our results indicate that SPION-labeling is noncytotoxic and does not adversely impact the phenotype and elastogenesis by BM-SMCs. In addition, SPION-BM-SMCs showed no changes in the ability of the BM-SMCs to stimulate elastin regeneration and attenuate proteolytic activity by EaRASMCs. Together, our results are promising toward the utility of SPIONs for magnetic targeting of BM-SMCs for in situ AAA regenerative repair.

  8. Isoproterenol directs hair follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells to differentiate in vitro to cardiac muscle cells which can be induced to form beating heart-muscle tissue sheets.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Aiko; Yashiro, Masateru; Mii, Sumiyuki; Aki, Ryoichi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Nestin-expressing hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells are located in the bulge area of the follicle. Previous studies have shown that HAP stem cells can differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. HAP stem cells effected nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. Recently, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. The differentiation potential to cardiac muscle cells was greatest in the upper part of the follicle. The beat rate of the cardiac muscle cells was stimulated by isoproterenol. In the present study, we observed that isoproterenol directs HAP stem cells to differentiate to cardiac muscle cells in large numbers in culture compared to HAP stem cells not supplemented with isoproterenol. The addition of activin A, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor, along with isoproternal, induced the cardiac muscle cells to form tissue sheets of beating heart muscle cells. These results demonstrate that HAP stem cells have great potential to form beating cardiac muscle cells in tissue sheets.

  9. Concise Review: Quiescence in Adult Stem Cells: Biological Significance and Relevance to Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rumman, Mohammad; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Kassem, Moustapha

    2015-10-01

    Adult stem cells (ASCs) are tissue resident stem cells responsible for tissue homeostasis and regeneration following injury. In uninjured tissues, ASCs exist in a nonproliferating, reversibly cell cycle-arrested state known as quiescence or G0. A key function of the quiescent state is to preserve stemness in ASCs by preventing precocious differentiation, and thus maintaining a pool of undifferentiated ASCs. Recent evidences suggest that quiescence is an actively maintained state and that excessive or defective quiescence may lead to compromised tissue regeneration or tumorigenesis. The aim of this review is to provide an update regarding the biological mechanisms of ASC quiescence and their role in tissue regeneration.

  10. The specific contributions of force and velocity to muscle power in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigates relative contributions of force and velocity on muscular power and function in middle-aged (MH), older healthy (OH), and older mobility-limited (OML) adults. Seventy-nine men and women underwent tests including leg muscle power at 180deg/sec (SPisok), isometric maximal torq...

  11. Iron Supplementation Effects on Redox Status following Aseptic Skeletal Muscle Trauma in Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    Tsiokanos, Athanasios; Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Zalavras, Athanasios; Avloniti, Alexandra; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced skeletal muscle microtrauma is characterized by loss of muscle cell integrity, marked aseptic inflammatory response, and oxidative stress. We examined if iron supplementation would alter redox status after eccentric exercise. In a randomized, double blind crossover study, that was conducted in two cycles, healthy adults (n = 14) and children (n = 11) received daily either 37 mg of elemental iron or placebo for 3 weeks prior to and up to 72 h after an acute eccentric exercise bout. Blood was drawn at baseline, before exercise, and 72 h after exercise for the assessment of iron status, creatine kinase activity (CK), and redox status. Iron supplementation at rest increased iron concentration and transferrin saturation (p < 0.01). In adults, CK activity increased at 72 h after exercise, while no changes occurred in children. Iron supplementation increased TBARS at 72 h after exercise in both adults and children; no changes occurred under placebo condition. Eccentric exercise decreased bilirubin concentration at 72 h in all groups. Iron supplementation can alter redox responses after muscle-damaging exercise in both adults and children. This could be of great importance not only for healthy exercising individuals, but also in clinical conditions which are characterized by skeletal muscle injury and inflammation, yet iron supplementation is crucial for maintaining iron homeostasis. This study was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02374619. PMID:28203319

  12. Phases I–III Clinical Trials Using Adult Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Gutiérrez Ibañes, Enrique; Arranz, Adolfo Villa; Fernández Santos, María Eugenia; Fernández, Pedro L. Sánchez; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    First randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that stem cell therapy can improve cardiac recovery after the acute phase of myocardial ischemia and in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. Nevertheless, some trials have shown that conflicting results and uncertainties remain in the case of mechanisms of action and possible ways to improve clinical impact of stem cells in cardiac repair. In this paper we will examine the evidence available, analyze the main phase I and II randomized clinical trials and their limitations, discuss the key points in the design of future trials, and depict new directions of research in this fascinating field. PMID:21076533

  13. The effects of age upon the expression of three miRNAs in muscle stem cells isolated from two different porcine skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, Zoe; Sweetman, Dylan; Loughna, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass and an impaired ability of this tissue to compensate for trauma. Studies in rodents and humans have also shown that resident stem cells within muscle have a reduced ability to proliferate and differentiate. In this study muscle stem cells have been isolated from two muscles, the diaphragm (DIA) and the semimembranosus (SM), from young and old pigs. The levels of three micro-RNAs (miRNAs) were measured when cells were in a proliferative phase and after 24 and 72h in differentiation medium. All three miRNAs are abundant in skeletal muscle with miR-1 and miR-206 known to regulate myogenic differentiation and miR-24 is involved in cell cycle regulation. The levels of expression of Pax7 and the myogenic regulatory factors MyoD and myogenin were also measured. There were marked differences in expression of all three miRNAs between the two age groups. Both miR-1 and miR-206 were reduced in the cells from the older animals. In contrast miR-24 expression was significantly higher in cells from older animals under differentiation conditions. There were also significant differences in the relative expression of all three miRNAs between cells from the SM and DIA in both young and old animals. The changes in miRNA expression described in this study that relate to age, may play a role in the impaired differentiation capacity of older muscle stem cells.

  14. Skeletal muscle TLR4 and TACE are associated with body fat percentage in older adults.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Kyle L; Connors, Ian D; Deal, Michael A; Mott, Rachael E

    2016-04-01

    Elevated skeletal muscle expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been linked to increased inflammation in clinical populations. TNFα converting enzyme (TACE), which cleaves membrane-bound TNFα (mTNFα) to its soluble (sTNFα) and more bioactive form, has been linked to chronic disease. In contrast, higher physical activity level is associated with decreased chronic disease risk and inflammation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between physical activity and skeletal muscle TLR4, TACE, and TNFα in older adults. In 26 older adults (age = 68 ± 4 years, body mass index = 26 ± 3 kg·m(-2)), self-reported physical activity (kcal·week(-1)), estimated maximal oxygen consumption, and body composition (air plethysmography) were measured. TLR4, TACE, mTNFα, and sTNFα were measured in skeletal muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) using western blot analyses. Pearson product-moment correlations were run between variables. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Skeletal muscle TACE was directly associated with sTNFα (r = 0.53, p < 0.01). Linear regression modeling showed that mTNFα and TACE expression were predictive of sTNFα expression. No correlations were observed between physical activity and TLR4, TACE, or sTNFα. Percent body fat was directly associated with skeletal muscle TLR4 (r = 0.52, p < 0.01) and TACE (r = 0.50, p < 0.01), whereas fasting blood glucose was directly associated with TACE and sTNFα. In conclusion, we found that percent body fat was directly associated with TLR4 and TACE expression in skeletal muscle of older adults. These findings suggest that elevated skeletal muscle expression of TLR4 and TACE may contribute to the augmented inflammation and chronic disease risk observed with increased adiposity.

  15. Empowering Adult Stem Cells for Myocardial Regeneration V2.0: Success in Small Steps

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Kathleen; Sussman, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Much has changed since our survey of the landscape for myocardial regeneration powered by adult stem cells four years ago (Mohsin et al., Empowering adult stem cells for myocardial regeneration. Circ Res. 2011; 109(12):1415–1428) [1]. The intervening years since that first review has witnessed an explosive expansion of studies that advance both understanding and implementation of adult stem cells in promoting myocardial repair. Painstaking research from innumerable laboratories throughout the world is prying open doors that may lead to restoration of myocardial structure and function in the wake of pathologic injury. This global effort has produced deeper mechanistic comprehension coupled with an evolving appreciation for the complexity of myocardial regeneration in the adult context. Undaunted by both known and (as yet) unknown challenges, pursuit of myocardial regenerative medicine mediated by adult stem cell therapy has gathered momentum fueled by tantalizing clues and visionary goals. This concise review takes a somewhat different perspective than our initial treatise, taking stock of the business sector that has become an integral part of the field while concurrently updating “state of affairs” in cutting edge research. Looking retrospectively at advancement over the years as all reviews eventually must, the fundamental lesson to be learned is best explained by Jonatan Mårtensson: “Success will never be a big step in the future. Success is a small step taken just now.” PMID:26941423

  16. Effect of seven days of spaceflight on hindlimb muscle protein, RNA and DNA in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of seven days of spaceflight on skeletal muscle (soleus, gastrocnemius, EDL) content of protein, RNA and DNA were determined in adult rats. Whereas total protein contents were reduced in parallel with muscle weights, myofibrillar protein appeared to be more affected. There were no significant changes in absolute DNA contents, but a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in DNA concentration (microgram/milligram) in soleus muscles from flight rats. Absolute RNA contents were significantly (P less than 0.025) decreased in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of flight rats, with RNA concentrations reduced 15-30 percent. These results agree with previous ground-based observations on the suspended rat with unloaded hindlimbs and support continued use of this model.

  17. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned media prevent muscle atrophy by suppressing muscle atrophy-related proteins and ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan-Mi; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Sun-Mi; Park, Jin-Ho; Kim, Z-Hun; Choi, Yong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) has been reported with various types of disease models. Here, we examine the therapeutic effect of umbilical cord MSC-CM (UCMSC-CM) on muscle-related disease, using a dexamethasone (Dex)-induced muscle atrophy in vitro model. The expressions of muscle atrophy-related proteins (MuRF-1 and MAFbx) and muscle-specific proteins (desmin and myogenin) were evaluated by Western blot analysis. The level of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using a 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) dye assay. The expression of antioxidant enzymes (copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), and catalase (CAT)) was verified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). When L6 cells were exposed to Dex, the expression of muscle atrophy-related proteins was increased by 50-70%, and the expression of muscle-specific proteins was in turn decreased by 23-40%. Conversely, when the L6 cells were co-treated with UCMSC-CM and Dex, the expression of muscle atrophy-related proteins was reduced in a UCMSC-CM dose-dependent manner and the expression of muscle-specific proteins was restored to near-normal levels. Moreover, ROS generation was effectively suppressed and the expression of antioxidant enzymes was recovered to a normal degree. These data imply that UCMSC-CM clearly has the potential to prevent muscle atrophy. Thus, our present study offers fundamental data on the potential treatment of muscle-related disease using UCMSC-CM.

  18. Longitudinal decline of lower extremity muscle power in healthy and mobility-limited older adults: influence of muscle mass, strength, composition, neuromuscular activation and single fiber contractile properties

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kieran F.; Pasha, Evan; Doros, Gheorghe; Clark, David J.; Patten, Carolynn; Phillips, Edward M.; Frontera, Walter R.; Fielding, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This longitudinal study examined the major physiological mechanisms that determine the age-related loss of lower extremity muscle power in two distinct groups of older humans. We hypothesized that after ~ 3 years of follow-up, mobility-limited older adults (mean age: 77.2 ± 4, n = 22, 12 females) would have significantly greater reductions in leg extensor muscle power compared to healthy older adults (74.1 ± 4, n = 26, 12 females). Methods Mid-thigh muscle size and composition were assessed using computed tomography. Neuromuscular activation was quantified using surface electromyography and vastus lateralis single muscle fibers were studied to evaluate intrinsic muscle contractile properties. Results At follow-up, the overall magnitude of muscle power loss was similar between groups: mobility-limited: −8.5% vs. healthy older: −8.8%, P > 0.8. Mobility-limited elders had significant reductions in muscle size (−3.8%, P< 0.01) and strength (−5.9%, P< 0.02), however, these parameters were preserved in healthy older (P ≥ 0.7). Neuromuscular activation declined significantly within healthy older but not in mobility-limited participants. Within both groups, the cross sectional areas of type I and type IIA muscle fibers were preserved while substantial increases in single fiber peak force ( > 30%), peak power (> 200%) and unloaded shortening velocity (>50%) were elicited at follow-up. Conclusion Different physiological mechanisms contribute to the loss of lower extremity muscle power in healthy older and mobility-limited older adults. Neuromuscular changes may be the critical early determinant of muscle power deficits with aging. In response to major whole muscle decrements, major compensatory mechanisms occur within the contractile properties of surviving single muscle fibers in an attempt to restore overall muscle power and function with advancing age. PMID:24122149

  19. Origins of adult pigmentation: diversity in pigment stem cell lineages and implications for pattern evolution

    PubMed Central

    Spiewak, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Teleosts comprise about half of all vertebrate species and exhibit an extraordinary diversity of adult pigment patterns that function in shoaling, camouflage and mate choice and have played important roles in speciation. Here, we review recent studies that have identified several distinct neural crest lineages, with distinct genetic requirements, that give rise to adult pigment cells in fishes. These lineages include post-embryonic, peripheral nerve associated stem cells that generate black melanophores and iridescent iridophores, cells derived directly from embryonic neural crest cells that generate yellow-orange xanthophores, and bipotent stem cells that generate both melanophores and xanthophores. This complexity in adult chromatophore lineages has implications for our understanding of adult traits, melanoma, and the evolutionary diversification of pigment cell lineages and patterns. PMID:25421288

  20. Mitochondria modify exercise-induced development of stem cell-derived neurons in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Steib, Kathrin; Schäffner, Iris; Jagasia, Ravi; Ebert, Birgit; Lie, D Chichung

    2014-05-07

    Neural stem cells in the adult mammalian hippocampus continuously generate new functional neurons, which modify the hippocampal network and significantly contribute to cognitive processes and mood regulation. Here, we show that the development of new neurons from stem cells in adult mice is paralleled by extensive changes to mitochondrial mass, distribution, and shape. Moreover, exercise-a strong modifier of adult hippocampal neurogenesis-accelerates neuronal maturation and induces a profound increase in mitochondrial content and the presence of mitochondria in dendritic segments. Genetic inhibition of the activity of the mitochondrial fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) inhibits neurogenesis under basal and exercise conditions. Conversely, enhanced Drp1 activity furthers exercise-induced acceleration of neuronal maturation. Collectively, these results indicate that adult hippocampal neurogenesis requires adaptation of the mitochondrial compartment and suggest that mitochondria are targets for enhancing neurogenesis-dependent hippocampal plasticity.

  1. Origins of adult pigmentation: diversity in pigment stem cell lineages and implications for pattern evolution.

    PubMed

    Parichy, David M; Spiewak, Jessica E

    2015-01-01

    Teleosts comprise about half of all vertebrate species and exhibit an extraordinary diversity of adult pigment patterns that function in shoaling, camouflage, and mate choice and have played important roles in speciation. Here, we review studies that have identified several distinct neural crest lineages, with distinct genetic requirements, that give rise to adult pigment cells in fishes. These lineages include post-embryonic, peripheral nerve-associated stem cells that generate black melanophores and iridescent iridophores, cells derived directly from embryonic neural crest cells that generate yellow-orange xanthophores, and bipotent stem cells that generate both melanophores and xanthophores. This complexity in adult chromatophore lineages has implications for our understanding of adult traits, melanoma, and the evolutionary diversification of pigment cell lineages and patterns.

  2. Older adults use a unique strategy to lift inertial loads with the elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Graves, A E; Kornatz, K W; Enoka, R M

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of age on the ability to exert steady forces and to perform steady flexion movements with the muscles that cross the elbow joint. An isometric task required subjects to exert a steady force to match a target force that was displayed on a monitor. An anisometric task required subjects to raise and lower inertial loads so that the angular displacement around the elbow joint matched a template displayed on a monitor. Steadiness was measured as the coefficient of variation of force and as the normalized standard deviation of wrist acceleration. For the isometric task, steadiness as a function of target force decreased similarly for old adults and young adults. For the anisometric task, steadiness increased as a function of the inertial load and there were significant differences caused by age. Old adults were less steady than young adults during both shortening and lengthening contractions with the lightest loads. Furthermore, old adults were least steady when performing lengthening contractions. These behaviors appear to be associated with the patterns of muscle activation. These results suggest that different neural strategies are used to control isometric and anisometric contractions performed with the elbow flexor muscles and that these strategies do not change in parallel with advancing age.

  3. The role of DNA damage repair in aging of adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Jonathan; Gerson, Stanton L

    2007-01-01

    DNA repair maintains genomic stability and the loss of DNA repair capacity results in genetic instability that may lead to a decline of cellular function. Adult stem cells are extremely important in the long-term maintenance of tissues throughout life. They regenerate and renew tissues in response to damage and replace senescent terminally differentiated cells that no longer function. Oxidative stress, toxic byproducts, reduced mitochondrial function and external exposures all damage DNA through base modification or mis-incorporation and result in DNA damage. As in most cells, this damage may limit the survival of the stem cell population affecting tissue regeneration and even longevity. This review examines the hypothesis that an age-related loss of DNA damage repair pathways poses a significant threat to stem cell survival and longevity. Normal stem cells appear to have strict control of gene expression and DNA replication whereas stem cells with loss of DNA repair may have altered patterns of proliferation, quiescence and differentiation. Furthermore, stem cells with loss of DNA repair may be susceptible to malignant transformation either directly or through the emergence of cancer-prone stem cells. Human diseases and animal models of loss of DNA repair provide longitudinal analysis of DNA repair processes in stem cell populations and may provide links to the physiology of aging.

  4. Protein hairy enhancer of split-1 expression during differentiation of muscle-derived stem cells into neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mina; Guo, Zhanpeng; Liu, Kun; Mei, Xifan; Fang, Shiqiang; Zeng, Jinhao; Wang, Yansong; Yuan, Yajiang

    2012-10-05

    Muscle-derived stem cells were isolated from the skeletal muscle of Sprague-Dawley neonatal rats aged 3 days old. Cells at passage 5 were incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 10% (v/v) fetal bovine serum, 20 μg/L nerve growth factor, 20 μg/L basic fibroblast growth factor and 1% (v/v) penicillin for 6 days. Cells presented with long processes, similar to nerve cells. Connections were formed between cell processes. Immunocytochemical staining with neuron specific enolase verified that cells differentiated into neuron-like cells. Immunofluorescence cytochemistry and western blot results revealed that the expression of protein hairy enhancer of split-1 was significantly reduced. These results indicate that low expression of protein hairy enhancer of split-1 participates in the differentiation of muscle-derived stem cells into neuron-like cells.

  5. Anticonvulsant and muscle relaxant activity of the ethanolic extract of stems of Dendrophthoe falcata (Linn. F.) in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sinoriya, Pooja; Irchhaiya, R.; Sharma, Bhawna; Sahu, Gayatri; Kumar, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the anticonvulsant and muscle relxant activity of ethanolic extract of stems of Dendrophthoe falcata in mice. Materials and Methods: The ethanolic extract of stems of D. falcata (100, 300 and 500 mg/kg, p.o.) was studied for its anticonvulsant effect on maximal electroshock-induced seizures and muscle relaxant activity at the same dose level using rota rod and traction test in mice. Results: Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed presence of proteins, carbohydrates, glycosides, steroids, triterpenes, flavonoids, tannins and phenolic compounds. D. falcata ethanolic extract (DFEE) (100, 300 and 500 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly (P<0.001) inhibited seizures induced by MES, reduced the duration of Hind limb tonic extensor phase (HLTE) and a decline in motor coordination. Conclusion: The ethanolic extract possesses anticonvulsant activity and muscle relaxant activity. PMID:22144780

  6. Female mice lack adult germ-line stem cells but sustain oogenesis using stable primordial follicles.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lei; Spradling, Allan C

    2013-05-21

    Whether or not mammalian females generate new oocytes during adulthood from germ-line stem cells to sustain the ovarian follicle pool has recently generated controversy. We used a sensitive lineage-labeling system to determine whether stem cells are needed in female adult mice to compensate for follicular losses and to directly identify active germ-line stem cells. Primordial follicles generated during fetal life are highly stable, with a half-life during adulthood of 10 mo, and thus are sufficient to sustain adult oogenesis without a source of renewal. Moreover, in normal mice or following germ-cell depletion with Busulfan, only stable, single oocytes are lineage-labeled, rather than cell clusters indicative of new oocyte formation. Even one germ-line stem cell division per 2 wk would have been detected by our method, based on the kinetics of fetal follicle formation. Thus, adult female mice neither require nor contain active germ-line stem cells or produce new oocytes in vivo.

  7. Increased rat neonatal activity influences adult cytokine levels and relative muscle mass

    PubMed Central

    Buchowicz, Bryce; Yu, Tiffany; Nance, Dwight M.; Zaldivar, Frank P.; Cooper, Dan M.; Adams, Gregory R.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of physical activity in early life on subsequent growth and regulation of inflammation. We previously reported that exposure of muscles in growing rats to IL-6 results in decreased muscle growth apparently due to a state of resistance to growth factors such IGF-I and that running exercise could ameliorate this growth defect. Herein we hypothesized that increased activity, for a brief period during neonatal life, would pattern the adult rat towards a less inflammatory phenotype. Neonatal rats were induced to move about their cage for brief periods from day 5 to day 15 postpartum. Additional groups were undisturbed controls (CON) and handled (HAND). Sub-groups of rats were sampled at 30 and 65 days of age. Relative to CON and HAND, neonatal exercise (EX) results in decreased circulating levels of TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β in adulthood, primarily in male rats. In addition, adult male EX rats had lower body mass and increased skeletal muscle mass suggesting a leaner phenotype. The results of this study suggest that moderate increases in activity early in life can influence the adult toward a more healthy phenotype with regard to inflammatory mediators and relative muscle mass. PMID:20657345

  8. Effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoguang; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Kim, Bokun; Katayama, Yasutomi; Wakaba, Kyousuke; Wang, Zhennan; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of increasing physical activity on foot structure and ankle muscle strength in adults with obesity and to verify whether the rate of change in foot structure is related to that in ankle muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven adults with obesity completed a 12-week program in which the intensity of physical activity performed was gradually increased. Physical activity was monitored using a three-axis accelerometer. Foot structure was assessed using a three-dimensional foot scanner, while ankle muscle strength was measured using a dynamometry. [Results] With the increasing physical activity, the participants’ feet became thinner (the rearfoot width, instep height, and girth decreased) and the arch became higher (the arch height index increased) and stiffer (the arch stiffness index increased); the ankle muscle strength also increased after the intervention. Additionally, the changes in the arch height index and arch stiffness index were not associated with changes in ankle muscle strength. [Conclusion] Increasing physical activity may be one possible approach to improve foot structure and function in individuals with obesity. PMID:27630426

  9. Neural stem cells in the adult ciliary epithelium express GFAP and are regulated by Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ani V.; Zhao Xing; James, Jackson; Kim, Min; Cowan, Kenneth H.; Ahmad, Iqbal . E-mail: iahmad@unmc.edu

    2006-01-13

    The identification of neural stem cells with retinal potential in the ciliary epithelium (CE) of the adult mammals is of considerable interest because of their potential for replacing or rescuing degenerating retinal neurons in disease or injury. The evaluation of such a potential requires characterization of these cells with regard to their phenotypic properties, potential, and regulatory mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that rat CE stem cells/progenitors in neurosphere culture display astrocytic nature in terms of expressing glial intermediate neurofilament protein, GFAP. The GFAP-expressing CE stem cells/progenitors form neurospheres in proliferating conditions and generate neurons when shifted to differentiating conditions. These cells express components of the canonical Wnt pathway and its activation promotes their proliferation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the activation of the canonical Wnt pathway influences neuronal differentiation of CE stem cells/progenitors in a context dependent manner. Our observations suggest that CE stem cells/progenitors share phenotypic properties and regulatory mechanism(s) with neural stem cells elsewhere in the adult CNS.

  10. Identification of multipotent stem cells from adult dog periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Jun; Zhao, Yu-Ming; Lin, Bi-Chen; Yang, Jie; Ge, Li-Hong

    2012-08-01

    Periodontal diseases, which are characterized by destruction of the connective tissues responsible for restraining the teeth within the jaw, are the main cause of tooth loss. Periodontal regeneration mediated by human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) may offer an alternative strategy for the treatment of periodontal disease. Dogs are a widely used large-animal model for the study of periodontal-disease progression, tissue regeneration, and dental implants, but little attention has been paid to the identification of the cells involved in this species. This study aimed to characterize stem cells isolated from canine periodontal ligament (cPDLSCs). The cPDLSCs, like hPDLSCs, showed clonogenic capability and expressed the mesenchymal stem cell markers STRO-1, CD146, and CD105, but not CD34. After induction of osteogenesis, cPDLSCs showed calcium accumulation in vitro. Moreover, cPDLSCs also showed both adipogenic and chondrogenic potential. Compared with cell-free controls, more cementum/periodontal ligament-like structures were observed in CB-17/SCID mice into which cPDLSCs had been transplanted. These results suggest that cPDLSCs are clonogenic, highly proliferative, and have multidifferentiation potential, and that they could be used as a new cellular therapeutic approach to facilitate successful and more predictable regeneration of periodontal tissue using a canine model of periodontal disease.

  11. Fast-Degradable Microbeads Encapsulating Human Umbilical Cord Stem Cells in Alginate for Muscle Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hongzhi; Weir, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) are inexhaustible and can be obtained without an invasive surgery. To date, there has been no report on seeding hUCMSCs in three-dimensional scaffolds for muscle tissue engineering. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate hUCMSC seeding in a scaffold for muscle engineering and (2) develop a novel construct consisting of hUCMSC-encapsulating and fast-degradable microbeads inside a hydrogel matrix. The rationale was that the hydrogel matrix would maintain the defect volume, while the microbeads would degrade to release the cells and concomitantly create macropores in the matrix. hUCMSCs were encapsulated in alginate-fibrin microbeads, which were packed in an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified alginate matrix (AM). This construct is referred to as hUCMSC-microbead-AM. The control consisted of the usual cell encapsulation in AM without microbeads (referred to as hUCMSC-AM). In the hUCMSC-AM construct, the hUCMSCs showed as round dots with no spreading at 1–14 days. In contrast, cells in the hUCMSC-microbead-AM construct had a healthy spreading and elongated morphology. The microbeads successfully degraded and released the cells at 8 days. Myogenic expressions for hUCMSC-microbead-AM were more than threefold those of hUCMSC-AM (p<0.05). Immunofluorescence for myogenic markers was much stronger for hUCMSC-microbead-AM than hUCMSC-AM. Muscle creatine kinase of hUCMSC-microbead-AM at 14 days was twofold that of hUCMSC-AM (p<0.05). In conclusion, hUCMSC encapsulation in novel fast-degradable microbeads inside a hydrogel matrix was investigated for muscle engineering. Compared to the usual method of seeding cells in a hydrogel matrix, hUCMSC-microbead-AM construct had greatly improved cell viability and myogenic differentiation, and hence, is promising to enhance muscle regeneration. PMID:22697426

  12. Novel Adult Stem Cells for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Symposium on Vascular Tissue Engineering. Holland, 5/2013 o The Joint British Society for Cardiovascular Research/British Atherosclerosis Society meeting... atherosclerosis , involves proliferation and migration of vascular cells1–4. Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the predominant cell type in the tunica media...osteogenic cells in diseased vessels remains to be tested using atherosclerosis models. The identification of MVSC in human arteries makes MVSC a

  13. Sarcopenia and physical independence in older adults: the independent and synergic role of muscle mass and muscle function

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Leandro; Cyrino, Edilson S.; Antunes, Melissa; Santos, Diana A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The loss of skeletal muscle mass (MM) or muscle function (MF) alone increases the risk for losing physical independence in older adults. We aimed to examine the independent and synergic associations of low MM and low MF, both criteria of sarcopenia, with the risk for losing projected physical independence in later life (+90 years old). Methods Cross‐sectional analyses were conducted in 3493 non‐institutionalized older adults (1166 males). Physical independence was assessed with a 12‐item composite physical function scale. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds‐ratio (OR) for being at risk for losing physical independence. Results Approximately 30% of the participants were at risk for losing physical independence at 90 years of age. Independent analysis demonstrated that participants with low MM had 1.65 (95%CI: 1.27–2.31) increased odds for being at risk for losing physical independence and participants with low MF had 6.19 (95%CI 5.08–7.53) increased odds for being at risk. Jointly, having a low MM and a low MF increased the risk for losing physical independence to 12.28 (95%CI 7.95 to 18.96). Conclusions Although low MM represents a risk factor for losing physical independence, low MF seems to play a more dominant role in this relationship, with the presence of both sarcopenia criteria representing a substantial risk for losing physical independence in later life. PMID:27897417

  14. Dickkopf Homolog 3 Induces Stem Cell Differentiation into Smooth Muscle Lineage via ATF6 Signalling*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaocong; Karamariti, Eirini; Simpson, Russell; Wang, Wen; Xu, Qingbo

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are a key component of healthy and tissue engineered vessels and play a crucial role in vascular development and the pathogenic events of vascular remodeling i.e. restenosis. However, the cell source from which they can be isolated is limited. Embryonic stem (ES) cells that have the remarkable capability to differentiate into vascular SMCs in response to specific stimuli provide a useful model for studying SMC differentiation. Previous studies suggested that dickkopf homolog 3 (DKK3) has a role in human partially induced pluripotent stem cell to SMC differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of DKK3 is essential for the expression of SMC markers and myocardin at both the mRNA and protein levels during mouse ES cell differentiation into SMCs (ESC-SMC differentiation). Overexpression of DKK3 leads to further up-regulation of the aforementioned markers. Further investigation indicates that DKK3 added as a cytokine activates activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), leading to the increased binding of ATF6 on the myocardin promoter and increased its expression. In addition, inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) promotes the expression of ATF6 and leads to further increase of myocardin transcription. Our findings offer a novel mechanism by which DKK3 regulates ESC-SMC differentiation by activating ATF6 and promoting myocardin expression. PMID:26105053

  15. IP3-dependent, post-tetanic calcium transients induced by electrostimulation of adult skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Mariana; Figueroa, Reinaldo; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Escobar, Matías; Molgó, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    Tetanic electrical stimulation induces two separate calcium signals in rat skeletal myotubes, a fast one, dependent on Cav 1.1 or dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors and related to contraction, and a slow signal, dependent on DHPR and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and related to transcriptional events. We searched for slow calcium signals in adult muscle fibers using isolated adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers from 5–7-wk-old mice, loaded with fluo-3. When stimulated with trains of 0.3-ms pulses at various frequencies, cells responded with a fast calcium signal associated with muscle contraction, followed by a slower signal similar to one previously described in cultured myotubes. Nifedipine inhibited the slow signal more effectively than the fast one, suggesting a role for DHPR in its onset. The IP3R inhibitors Xestospongin B or C (5 µM) also inhibited it. The amplitude of post-tetanic calcium transients depends on both tetanus frequency and duration, having a maximum at 10–20 Hz. At this stimulation frequency, an increase of the slow isoform of troponin I mRNA was detected, while the fast isoform of this gene was inhibited. All three IP3R isoforms were present in adult muscle. IP3R-1 was differentially expressed in different types of muscle fibers, being higher in a subset of fast-type fibers. Interestingly, isolated fibers from the slow soleus muscle did not reveal the slow calcium signal induced by electrical stimulus. These results support the idea that IP3R-dependent slow calcium signals may be characteristic of distinct types of muscle fibers and may participate in the activation of specific transcriptional programs of slow and fast phenotype. PMID:20837675

  16. Leg and trunk muscle coordination and postural sway during increasingly difficult standing balance tasks in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Donath, Lars; Kurz, Eduard; Roth, Ralf; Zahner, Lukas; Faude, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Ageing impairs body balance and increases older adults' fall risk. Balance training can improve intrinsic fall risk factors. However, age comparisons of muscle activity responses during balance tasks are lacking. This study investigated relative muscle activity, muscle coordination and postural sway during various recommended static balance training tasks. Muscle activity (%MVC), amplitude ratios (AR) and co-activity (CAI) were determined during standing tasks for 30s (1: double limb stance on a foam surface, eyes open; 2: double limb stance on firm ground, eyes closed; 3: double limb stance, feet in step position on a foam surface, eyes open; 4: double limb stance, feet in step position on firm ground, eyes closed; 5: single limb stance on firm ground, eyes open) in 20 healthy young adults (24±2 y) and 20 older adults (73±6 y). Surface electromyography (SEMG) was applied (SENIAM guidelines) to ankle (tibialis anterior, soleus, medial gastrocnemius, peroneus longus) and thigh (vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus) muscles (non-dominant leg). Electrodes over trunk (multifidus and internal oblique) muscles were applied bilaterally. Two- to six-fold higher levels of relative muscle activity were found in older adults for ankle (0.0002muscles. Co-activation was elevated in young adults for the trunk (0.001adults for the ankle (0.009muscle coordination patterns during all stance conditions at the ankle (0.06<ηp(2)<0.28) and the trunk (0.14<ηp(2)<0.23). Older adults had higher electrophysiological costs for all stance conditions. Muscle coordination showed inverse activity patterns at the ankle and trunk. Optimal balance and strength training programs should take into account age-specific alterations in muscle activity.

  17. Genomic selection for quantitative adult plant stem rust resistance in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative adult plant resistance (APR) to stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) is an important breeding target in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and a potential target for genomic selection (GS). To evaluate the relative importance of known APR loci in applying genomic selection, we charact...

  18. Differentiation of Human Induced-Pluripotent Stem Cells into Smooth-Muscle Cells: Two Novel Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Libang; Geng, Zhaohui; Nickel, Thomas; Johnson, Caitlin; Gao, Lin; Dutton, James; Hou, Cody; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Conventional protocols for differentiating human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can be inefficient and generally fail to yield cells with a specific SMC phenotype (i.e., contractile or synthetic SMCs). Here, we present two novel hiPSC-SMC differentiation protocols that yield SMCs with predominantly contractile or synthetic phenotypes. Flow cytometry analyses of smooth-muscle actin (SMA) expression indicated that ~45% of the cells obtained with each protocol assumed an SMC phenotype, and that the populations could be purified to ~95% via metabolic selection. Assessments of cellular mRNA and/or protein levels indicated that SMA, myosin heavy chain II, collagen 1, calponin, transgelin, connexin 43, and vimentin expression in the SMCs obtained via the Contractile SMC protocol and in SMCs differentiated via a traditional protocol were similar, while SMCs produced via the Sythetic SMC protocol expressed less calponin, more collagen 1, and more connexin 43. Differences were also observed in functional assessments of the two SMC populations: the two-dimensional surface area of Contractile SMCs declined more extensively (to 12% versus 44% of original size) in response to carbachol treatment, while quantification of cell migration and proliferation were greater in Synthetic SMCs. Collectively, these data demonstrate that our novel differentiation protocols can efficiently generate SMCs from hiPSCs. PMID:26771193

  19. The arrector pili muscle, the bridge between the follicular stem cell niche and the interfollicular epidermis.

    PubMed

    Torkamani, Niloufar; Rufaut, Nicholas; Jones, Leslie; Sinclair, Rodney

    2017-01-01

    Proximally, the arrector pili muscle (APM) attaches to the follicular stem cell niche in the bulge, but its distal properties are comparatively unclear. In this work, a novel method employing an F-actin probe, phalloidin, was employed to visualize the APM anatomy. Phalloidin staining of the APM was validated by comparison with conventional antibodies/stains and by generating three-dimensional reconstructions. The proximal attachment of the APM to the bulge in 8 patients with androgenic alopecia was studied using Masson's trichrome stain. Phalloidin visualized extensive branching of the APM. The distal end of the human APM exhibits a unique "C"-shaped structure connecting to the dermal-epidermal junction. The proximal APM attachment was observed to be lost or extremely miniaturized in androgenic alopecia. The unique shape, location, and attachment sites of the APM suggest a significant role for this muscle in maintaining follicular integrity. Proximally, the APM encircles the follicular unit and only attaches to the primary hair follicle in the bulge; this attachment is lost in irreversible hair loss. The APM exhibits an arborized morphology as it ascends toward the epidermis, and anchors to the basement membrane.

  20. Crosstalk of mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages promotes cardiac muscle repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Zhang, Guoru; Wang, Yaling; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yang; An, Yu; Li, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has potential therapeutic effects on cardiac muscle repair. However, the underlying mechanism remains not completely clarified. Here we show that transplantation of MSCs significantly increased local recruitment of macrophages to facilitate cardiac muscle repair. MSCs-induced recovery of cardiac function and attenuation of fibrosis after injury were all abolished by either impaired macrophage infiltration, or by MSCs depletion after macrophage recruitment. However, angiogenesis seemed to be only affected by depletion of macrophages, but not by depletion of MSCs, suggesting that macrophages are responsible for the augmented angiogenesis after MSCs transplantation, while MSCs do not directly contribute to angiogenesis in the functional cardiac repair. Moreover, high level of transforming growth factor β 1 (TGFβ1) was detected in macrophages and high level of BMP7 was detected in MSCs, suggesting that MSCs not only may recruit macrophages to enhance angiogenesis to promote regeneration, but also may secrete BMP7 to contradict the fibrogenic effect of TGFβ1 by macrophages. Our study thus sheds new insight on the interaction of MSCs and macrophages in a functional cardiac repair triggered by MSCs transplantation.

  1. Combined biophysical and soluble factor modulation induces cardiomyocyte differentiation from human muscle derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tchao, Jason; Han, Lu; Lin, Bo; Yang, Lei; Tobita, Kimimasa

    2014-01-01

    Cellular cardiomyoplasty has emerged as a novel therapy to restore contractile function of injured failing myocardium. Human multipotent muscle derived stem cells (MDSC) can be a potential abundant, autologous cell source for cardiac repair. However, robust conditions for cardiomyocyte (CM) differentiation are not well established for this cell type. We have developed a new method for CM differentiation from human MDSC that combines 3-dimensional artificial muscle tissue (AMT) culture with temporally controlled biophysical cell aggregation and delivery of 4 soluble factors (microRNA-206 inhibitor, IWR-1, Lithium Chloride, and BMP-4) (4F-AG-AMT). The 4F-AG-AMT displayed cardiac-like response to β-adrenergic stimulation and contractile properties. 4F-AG-AMT expressed major cardiac (NKX2-5, GATA4, TBX5, MEF2C) transcription factors and structural proteins. They also express cardiac gap-junction protein, connexin-43, similar to CMs and synchronized spontaneous calcium transients. These results highlight the importance of temporal control of biophysical and soluble factors for CM differentiation from MDSCs. PMID:25310989

  2. Strategies to enhance umbilical cord blood stem cell engraftment in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Colleen; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Laughlin, Mary J

    2010-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been used successfully as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for allogeneic transplantation in children and adults in the treatment of hematologic diseases. However, compared with marrow or mobilized peripheral blood stem cell grafts from adult donors, significant delays in the rates and kinetics of neutrophil and platelet engraftment are noted after UCB transplant. These differences relate in part to the reduced numbers of HSCs in UCB grafts. To improve the rates and kinetics of engraftment of UCB HSC, several strategies have been proposed, including ex vivo expansion of UCB HSCs, addition of third-party mesenchymal cells, intrabone delivery of HSCs, modulation of CD26 expression, and infusion of two UCB grafts. This article will focus on ex vivo expansion of UCB HSCs and strategies to enhance UCB homing as potential solutions to overcome the problem of low stem cell numbers in a UCB graft. PMID:20835351

  3. Keratose Hydrogels Promote Vascular Smooth Muscle Differentiation from C-kit Positive Human Cardiac Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Benjamin T; Simmons, Jamelle; Chen, Miao; Fan, Huimin; Barron, Catherine; Liu, Zhongmin; Van Dyke, Mark; He, Jia-Qiang

    2017-03-28

    Stem cell-based therapies have demonstrated great potential for the treatment of cardiac diseases, e.g., myocardial infarction; however, low cell viability, low retention/engraftment, and uncontrollable in vivo differentiation after transplantation are still major limitations, which lead low therapeutic efficiency. Biomaterials provide a promising solution to overcome these issues due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, low/non-immunogenicity, and low/non-cytotoxicity. The present study aims to investigate the impacts of Keratose (KOS) hydrogel biomaterial on cellular viability, proliferation, and differentiation of c-kit+ human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs). Briefly, hCSCs were cultured on both KOS hydrogel-coated dishes and regular tissue culture dishes (Blank control). Cell viability, stemness, proliferation, cellular morphology, and cardiac lineage differentiation were compared between KOS hydrogel and the Blank control at different time points. We found that KOS hydrogel is effective in maintaining hCSCs without any observable toxic effects, although cell size and proliferation rate appeared smaller on the KOS hydrogel compared to the Blank control. To our surprise, KOS hydrogel significantly promoted vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation (~72%), while on the Blank control dishes, most of the hCSCs (~78%) became cardiomyocytes. Further, we also observed "endothelial cell tube-like" microstructures formed by differentiated VSMCs only on KOS hydrogel, suggesting a potential capability of the hCSC-derived VSMCs for in vitro angiogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to discover the preferred differentiation of hCSCs toward VSMCs on KOS hydrogel. The underlying mechanism remains unknown. This innovative methodology may offer a new approach to generate a robust number of VSMCs simply by culturing hCSCs on KOS hydrogel, and the resulting VSMCs may be used in animal studies and clinical trials in

  4. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype.

  5. Fetal programming of adult Leydig cell function by androgenic effects on stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Karen R; Smith, Lee B; Atanassova, Nina; Macpherson, Sheila; McKinnell, Chris; van den Driesche, Sander; Jobling, Matthew S; Chambers, Thomas J G; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; O'Hara, Laura; Platts, Sophie; Renato de Franca, Luiz; Lara, Nathália L M; Anderson, Richard A; Sharpe, Richard M

    2014-05-06

    Fetal growth plays a role in programming of adult cardiometabolic disorders, which in men, are associated with lowered testosterone levels. Fetal growth and fetal androgen exposure can also predetermine testosterone levels in men, although how is unknown, because the adult Leydig cells (ALCs) that produce testosterone do not differentiate until puberty. To explain this conundrum, we hypothesized that stem cells for ALCs must be present in the fetal testis and might be susceptible to programming by fetal androgen exposure during masculinization. To address this hypothesis, we used ALC ablation/regeneration to identify that, in rats, ALCs derive from stem/progenitor cells that express chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II. These stem cells are abundant in the fetal testis of humans and rodents, and lineage tracing in mice shows that they develop into ALCs. The stem cells also express androgen receptors (ARs). Reduction in fetal androgen action through AR KO in mice or dibutyl phthalate (DBP) -induced reduction in intratesticular testosterone in rats reduced ALC stem cell number by ∼40% at birth to adulthood and induced compensated ALC failure (low/normal testosterone and elevated luteinizing hormone). In DBP-exposed males, this failure was probably explained by reduced testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression, which is associated with increased histone methylation (H3K27me3) in the proximal promoter. Accordingly, ALCs and ALC stem cells immunoexpressed increased H3K27me3, a change that was also evident in ALC stem cells in fetal testes. These studies highlight how a key component of male reproductive development can fundamentally reprogram adult hormone production (through an epigenetic change), which might affect lifetime disease risk.

  6. Stroke Increases Neural Stem Cells and Angiogenesis in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction. PMID:25437857

  7. The novel steroidal alkaloids dendrogenin A and B promote proliferation of adult neural stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khalifa, Shaden A.M.; Medina, Philippe de; Erlandsson, Anna; El-Seedi, Hesham R.; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Poirot, Marc

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • Dendrogenin A and B are new aminoalkyl oxysterols. • Dendrogenins stimulated neural stem cells proliferation. • Dendrogenins induce neuronal outgrowth from neurospheres. • Dendrogenins provide new therapeutic options for neurodegenerative disorders. - Abstract: Dendrogenin A (DDA) and dendrogenin B (DDB) are new aminoalkyl oxysterols which display re-differentiation of tumor cells of neuronal origin at nanomolar concentrations. We analyzed the influence of dendrogenins on adult mice neural stem cell proliferation, sphere formation and differentiation. DDA and DDB were found to have potent proliferative effects in neural stem cells. Additionally, they induce neuronal outgrowth from neurospheres during in vitro cultivation. Taken together, our results demonstrate a novel role for dendrogenins A and B in neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation which further increases their likely importance to compensate for neuronal cell loss in the brain.

  8. Nebulin deficiency in adult muscle causes sarcomere defects and muscle-type-dependent changes in trophicity: novel insights in nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Frank; Buck, Danielle; De Winter, Josine; Kolb, Justin; Meng, Hui; Birch, Camille; Slater, Rebecca; Escobar, Yael Natelie; Smith, John E; Yang, Lin; Konhilas, John; Lawlor, Michael W; Ottenheijm, Coen; Granzier, Henk L

    2015-09-15

    Nebulin is a giant filamentous protein that is coextensive with the actin filaments of the skeletal muscle sarcomere. Nebulin mutations are the main cause of nemaline myopathy (NEM), with typical adult patients having low expression of nebulin, yet the roles of nebulin in adult muscle remain poorly understood. To establish nebulin's functional roles in adult muscle, we studied a novel conditional nebulin KO (Neb cKO) mouse model in which nebulin deletion was driven by the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promotor. Neb cKO mice are born with high nebulin levels in their skeletal muscles, but within weeks after birth nebulin expression rapidly falls to barely detectable levels Surprisingly, a large fraction of the mice survive to adulthood with low nebulin levels (<5% of control), contain nemaline rods and undergo fiber-type switching toward oxidative types. Nebulin deficiency causes a large deficit in specific force, and mechanistic studies provide evidence that a reduced fraction of force-generating cross-bridges and shortened thin filaments contribute to the force deficit. Muscles rich in glycolytic fibers upregulate proteolysis pathways (MuRF-1, Fbxo30/MUSA1, Gadd45a) and undergo hypotrophy with smaller cross-sectional areas (CSAs), worsening their force deficit. Muscles rich in oxidative fibers do not have smaller weights and can even have hypertrophy, offsetting their specific-force deficit. These studies reveal nebulin as critically important for force development and trophicity in adult muscle. The Neb cKO phenocopies important aspects of NEM (muscle weakness, oxidative fiber-type predominance, variable trophicity effects, nemaline rods) and will be highly useful to test therapeutic approaches to ameliorate muscle weakness.

  9. Large-scale live imaging of adult neural stem cells in their endogenous niche.

    PubMed

    Dray, Nicolas; Bedu, Sébastien; Vuillemin, Nelly; Alunni, Alessandro; Coolen, Marion; Krecsmarik, Monika; Supatto, Willy; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Bally-Cuif, Laure

    2015-10-15

    Live imaging of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in vivo is a technical challenge in the vertebrate brain. Here, we achieve long-term imaging of the adult zebrafish telencephalic neurogenic niche and track a population of >1000 aNSCs over weeks, by taking advantage of fish transparency at near-infrared wavelengths and of intrinsic multiphoton landmarks. This methodology enables us to describe the frequency, distribution and modes of aNSCs divisions across the entire germinal zone of the adult pallium, and to highlight regional differences in these parameters.

  10. Functional redundancy and nonredundancy between two Troponin C isoforms in Drosophila adult muscles.

    PubMed

    Chechenova, Maria B; Maes, Sara; Oas, Sandy T; Nelson, Cloyce; Kiani, Kaveh G; Bryantsev, Anton L; Cripps, Richard M

    2017-03-15

    We investigated the functional overlap of two muscle Troponin C (TpnC) genes that are expressed in the adult fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster: TpnC4 is predominantly expressed in the indirect flight muscles (IFMs), whereas TpnC41C is the main isoform in the tergal depressor of the trochanter muscle (TDT; jump muscle). Using CRISPR/Cas9, we created a transgenic line with a homozygous deletion of TpnC41C and compared its phenotype to a line lacking functional TpnC4 We found that the removal of either of these genes leads to expression of the other isoform in both muscle types. The switching between isoforms occurs at the transcriptional level and involves minimal enhancers located upstream of the transcription start points of each gene. Functionally, the two TpnC isoforms were not equal. Although ectopic TpnC4 in TDT muscles was able to maintain jumping ability, TpnC41C in IFMs could not effectively support flying. Simultaneous functional disruption of both TpnC genes resulted in jump-defective and flightless phenotypes of the survivors, as well as abnormal sarcomere organization. These results indicated that TpnC is required for myofibril assembly, and that there is functional specialization among TpnC isoforms in Drosophila.

  11. Effects of bridge exercises with a sling and vibrations on abdominal muscle thickness in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Gong, Won-tae

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to examine the changes in the thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (Io) muscles using ultrasonography in adults who performed bridge exercises with the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and a sling and received micro vibrations. In total, 32 subjects were divided into a therapy (n= 16) and control (n= 16) groups. The therapy group completed nine sets, with four repetitions, of bridge exercises with the sling and received vibrations. The control group completed nine sets, with four repetitions, of bridge exercises with the sling and did not receive vibrations. The thicknesses of the TrA and Io muscles were measured in both groups using ultrasonography before and after therapy. According to the pressure applied to the biofeedback unit, both groups showed significant changes in the thicknesses of the TrA and Io muscles after therapy (P< 0.05). The change in the thickness of the TrA muscle after therapy was significantly different between the 2 groups when the pressures applied at 38, 42, and 46 mmHg (P< 0.05). Moreover, the change in the thickness of the Io muscle did not significantly different between the 2 groups at any of the pressures applied (P> 0.05). These findings indicate that approximately 15 minutes of vibrations during bridge exercises on unstable surfaces with a sling facilitates the activation of the deep trunk muscles and further enhances the activation of the TrA.

  12. How electromagnetic fields can influence adult stem cells: positive and negative impacts.

    PubMed

    Maziarz, Aleksandra; Kocan, Beata; Bester, Mariusz; Budzik, Sylwia; Cholewa, Marian; Ochiya, Takahiro; Banas, Agnieszka

    2016-04-18

    The electromagnetic field (EMF) has a great impact on our body. It has been successfully used in physiotherapy for the treatment of bone disorders and osteoarthritis, as well as for cartilage regeneration or pain reduction. Recently, EMFs have also been applied in in vitro experiments on cell/stem cell cultures. Stem cells reside in almost all tissues within the human body, where they exhibit various potential. These cells are of great importance because they control homeostasis, regeneration, and healing. Nevertheless, stem cells when become cancer stem cells, may influence the pathological condition. In this article we review the current knowledge on the effects of EMFs on human adult stem cell biology, such as proliferation, the cell cycle, or differentiation. We present the characteristics of the EMFs used in miscellaneous assays. Most research has so far been performed during osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. It has been demonstrated that the effects of EMF stimulation depend on the intensity and frequency of the EMF and the time of exposure to it. However, other factors may affect these processes, such as growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and so forth. Exploration of this research area may enhance the development of EMF-based technologies used in medical applications and thereby improve stem cell-based therapy and tissue engineering.

  13. A mystery unraveled: nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells in human adult tissues

    PubMed Central

    Simerman, Ariel A; Perone, Marcelo J; Gimeno, María L; Dumesic, Daniel A; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have emerged as the gold standard of pluripotent stem cells and the class of stem cell with the highest potential for contribution to regenerative and therapeutic application; however, their translational use is often impeded by teratoma formation, commonly associated with pluripotency. We discuss a population of nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells, termed Multilineage Differentiating Stress Enduring (Muse) cells, which offer an innovative and exciting avenue of exploration for the potential treatment of various human diseases. Areas covered: This review discusses the origin of Muse cells, describes in detail their various unique characteristics, and considers future avenues of their application and investigation with respect to what is currently known of adult pluripotent stem cells in scientific literature. We begin by defining cell potency, then discuss both mesenchymal and various reported populations of pluripotent stem cells, and finally delve into Muse cells and the characteristics that set them apart from their contemporaries. Expert opinion: Muse cells derived from adipose tissue (Muse-AT) are efficiently, routinely and painlessly isolated from human lipoaspirate material, exhibit tripoblastic differentiation both spontaneously and under media-specific induction, and do not form teratomas. We describe qualities specific to Muse-AT cells and their potential impact on the field of regenerative medicine and cell therapy. PMID:24745973

  14. Isolating intestinal stem cells from adult Drosophila midguts by FACS to study stem cell behavior during aging.

    PubMed

    Tauc, Helen M; Tasdogan, Alpaslan; Pandur, Petra

    2014-12-16

    Aging tissue is characterized by a continuous decline in functional ability. Adult stem cells are crucial in maintaining tissue homeostasis particularly in tissues that have a high turnover rate such as the intestinal epithelium. However, adult stem cells are also subject to aging processes and the concomitant decline in function. The Drosophila midgut has emerged as an ideal model system to study molecular mechanisms that interfere with the intestinal stem cells' (ISCs) ability to function in tissue homeostasis. Although adult ISCs can be easily identified and isolated from midguts of young flies, it has been a major challenge to study endogenous molecular changes of ISCs during aging. This is due to the lack of a combination of molecular markers suitable to isolate ISCs from aged intestines. Here we propose a method that allows for successful dissociation of midgut tissue into living cells that can subsequently be separated into distinct populations by FACS. By using dissociated cells from the esg-Gal4, UAS-GFP fly line, in which both ISCs and the enteroblast (EB) progenitor cells express GFP, two populations of cells are distinguished based on different GFP intensities. These differences in GFP expression correlate with differences in cell size and granularity and represent enriched populations of ISCs and EBs. Intriguingly, the two GFP-positive cell populations remain distinctly separated during aging, presenting a novel technique for identifying and isolating cell populations enriched for either ISCs or EBs at any time point during aging. The further analysis, for example transcriptome analysis, of these particular cell populations at various time points during aging is now possible and this will facilitate the examination of endogenous molecular changes that occur in these cells during aging.

  15. Constitutive properties of adult mammalian cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Koide, M.; Cowles, B. A.; Gharpuray, V.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the constitutive properties of the cardiac muscle cell play a causative role in the development of diastolic dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiocytes from normal and pressure-hypertrophied cats were embedded in an agarose gel, placed on a stretching device, and subjected to a change in stress (sigma), and resultant changes in cell strain (epsilon) were measured. These measurements were used to examine the passive elastic spring, viscous damping, and myofilament activation. The passive elastic spring was assessed in protocol A by increasing the sigma on the agarose gel at a constant rate to define the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship. Viscous damping was assessed in protocol B from the loop area between the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship during an increase and then a decrease in sigma. In both protocols, myofilament activation was minimized by a reduction in [Ca2+]i. Myofilament activation effects were assessed in protocol C by defining cardiocyte sigma versus epsilon during an increase in sigma with physiological [Ca2+]i. In protocol A, the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship was similar in normal and hypertrophied cells. In protocol B, the loop area was greater in hypertrophied than normal cardiocytes. In protocol C, the sigma-versus-epsilon relation in hypertrophied cardiocytes was shifted to the left compared with normal cells. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in viscous damping and myofilament activation in combination may cause pressure-hypertrophied cardiocytes to resist changes in shape during diastole and contribute to diastolic dysfunction.

  16. Apple ethanol extract promotes proliferation of human adult stem cells, which involves the regenerative potential of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jienny; Shin, Moon Sam; Kim, Mi Ok; Jang, Sunghee; Oh, Sae Woong; Kang, Mingyeong; Jung, Kwangseon; Park, Yong Seek; Lee, Jongsung

    2016-09-01

    Tissue regeneration using adult stem cells (ASCs) has significant potential as a novel treatment for many degenerative diseases. Previous studies have established that age negatively affects the proliferation status and differentiation potential of ASCs, suggesting a possible limitation in their potential therapeutic use. Therefore, we hypothesized that apple extract might exert beneficial effects on ASCs. The specific objectives were to investigate the proliferative effect of apple ethanol extract on human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) and human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (CB-MSCs), and identify the possible molecular mechanisms. Apple extract promoted proliferation of ADSCs and CB-MSCs as determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and Click-iT 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine flow cytometry assays. In addition, phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK (ERK), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K), S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP), eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4B and eIF4E was induced stepwise in ADSCs. Furthermore, apple extract significantly induced the production of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 in both ADSCs and CB-MSCs. Similarly, apple extract-induced phosphorylation of the mTOR/p70S6K/S6RP/eIF4B/eIF4E pathway was blocked by pretreatment with PD98059, a specific ERK inhibitor. These results indicate that apple extract-induced proliferation of ADSCs under serum-free conditions is mediated by ERK-dependent cytokine production. Moreover, the beneficial effect of apple extract on proliferation of ASCs may overcome the limitation in therapeutic use of stem cells in tissue regeneration and maintenance of stem cell homeostasis.

  17. A hypothesis for an embryonic origin of pluripotent Oct-4(+) stem cells in adult bone marrow and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, M Z; Machalinski, B; Wojakowski, W; Ratajczak, J; Kucia, M

    2007-05-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that adult tissues contain a population of stem cells that express early developmental markers such as stage-specific embryonic antigen and transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog. These are the markers characteristic for embryonic stem cells, epiblast stem cells and primordial germ cells. The presence of these stem cells in adult tissues including bone marrow, epidermis, bronchial epithelium, myocardium, pancreas and testes supports the concept that adult tissues contain some population of pluripotent stem cells that is deposited in embryogenesis during early gastrulation. In this review we will discuss these data and present a hypothesis that these cells could be direct descendants of the germ lineage. The germ lineage in order to pass genes on to the next generations creates soma and thus becomes a 'mother lineage' for all somatic cell lineages present in the adult body.

  18. Arsenic Promotes NF-Kb-Mediated Fibroblast Dysfunction and Matrix Remodeling to Impair Muscle Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Changqing; Ferrari, Ricardo; Beezhold, Kevin; Stearns-Reider, Kristen; D’Amore, Antonio; Haschak, Martin; Stolz, Donna; Robbins, Paul D.; Barchowsky, Aaron; Ambrosio, Fabrisia

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is a global health hazard that impacts over 140 million individuals worldwide. Epidemiological studies reveal prominent muscle dysfunction and mobility declines following arsenic exposure; yet, mechanisms underlying such declines are unknown. The objective of this study was to test the novel hypothesis that arsenic drives a maladaptive fibroblast phenotype to promote pathogenic myomatrix remodeling and compromise the muscle stem (satellite) cell (MuSC) niche. Mice were exposed to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic in drinking water before receiving a local muscle injury. Arsenic-exposed muscles displayed pathogenic matrix remodeling, defective myofiber regeneration and impaired functional recovery, relative to controls. When naïve human MuSCs were seeded onto three-dimensional decellularized muscle constructs derived from arsenic-exposed muscles, cells displayed an increased fibrogenic conversion and decreased myogenicity, compared with cells seeded onto control constructs. Consistent with myomatrix alterations, fibroblasts isolated from arsenic-exposed muscle displayed sustained expression of matrix remodeling genes, the majority of which were mediated by NF-κB. Inhibition of NF-κB during arsenic exposure preserved normal myofiber structure and functional recovery after injury, suggesting that NF-κB signaling serves as an important mechanism of action for the deleterious effects of arsenic on tissue healing. Taken together, the results from this study implicate myomatrix biophysical and/or biochemical characteristics as culprits in arsenic-induced MuSC dysfunction and impaired muscle regeneration. It is anticipated that these findings may aid in the development of strategies to prevent or revert the effects of arsenic on tissue healing and, more broadly, provide insight into the influence of the native myomatrix on stem cell behavior. PMID:26537186

  19. Muscle Cramps and Neuropathies in Patients with Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Peter D.; Wolff, Daniel; Grauer, Oliver; Angstwurm, Klemens; Jarius, Sven; Wandinger, Klaus P.; Holler, Ernst; Schulte-Mattler, Wilhelm; Kleiter, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is an immune-mediated multisystemic disorder and the leading cause of morbidity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Peripheral nervous system manifestations of GVHD are rare but often disabling. Whereas immune-mediated neuropathies are an established feature of GVHD, muscle cramps are not well characterized. Methods In a single-centre retrospective cohort we studied 27 patients (age 23 to 69 years) with GVHD (acute n = 6, chronic n = 21) who complained of symptoms suggestive of peripheral nervous system complications. Clinical, laboratory and neurophysiological findings were evaluated by descriptive statistics and regression analysis to detect factors associated with muscle cramps. Patient’s sera were examined for anti-neuronal antibodies. Results Nine patients had polyneuropathy, 4 had muscle cramps, and 14 had both. Median onset of polyneuropathy and muscle cramps was 6 and 9 months after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, respectively. Neurophysiology revealed a predominantly axonal polyneuropathy in 20 of 26 patients. In 4 of 19 patients electromyography showed signs of myopathy or myositis. Muscle cramps were more frequent during chronic than acute GVHD and affected muscles other than calves in 15 of 18 patients. They typically occurred daily, lasted 1 to 10 minutes with medium to severe pain intensity, compromised daily activity or sleep in 12, and were refractory to therapy in 4 patients. Muscle cramps were less likely with tacrolimus treatment and signs of severe polyneuropathy, but more likely with myopathic changes in electromyography and with incipient demyelinating polyneuropathy, shown by increased high frequency attenuation of the tibial nerve. Serological studies revealed antinuclear or antimitochondrial antibodies in a subset of patients. Two of 16 patients had a serum reactivity against peripheral nervous tissue. Conclusion Muscle cramps are associated with

  20. Regulatory Mechanism of Muscle Disuse Atrophy in Adult Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    lowered levels of spermatid formation. Hormonal changes due to testes atrophy must be considered in future experiments where related effects may modify muscle, bone or other tissue changes. Also, some new assessments of past results (published by many researchers) may warrant revised interpretations. The blood pressure studies and the testicular function results were presented and reviewed during an invited lecture at the University of Bordeaux II during the Animals in Space Symposium in March 1993. In summary, each of these three projects complied with the objectives of the proposal and serve to demonstrate the utility of animal models in preparations and interpretations of space flight results. All funding has been expended in accordance with the approved budget.

  1. Labeling and Imaging Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Quantum Dots

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, adipose and muscle cells. Adult derived MSCs are being actively investigated because of their potential to be utilized for therapeutic cell-based transplantation. Methods...

  2. Micropatterning control of tubular commitment in human adult renal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sciancalepore, Anna G; Portone, Alberto; Moffa, Maria; Persano, Luana; De Luca, Maria; Paiano, Aurora; Sallustio, Fabio; Schena, Francesco P; Bucci, Cecilia; Pisignano, Dario

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of renal injury by autologous, patient-specific adult stem cells is still an unmet need. Unsolved issues remain the spatial integration of stem cells into damaged areas of the organ, the commitment in the required cell type and the development of improved bioengineered devices. In this respect, biomaterials and architectures have to be specialized to control stem cell differentiation. Here, we perform an extensive study on micropatterned extracellular matrix proteins, which constitute a simple and non-invasive approach to drive the differentiation of adult renal progenitor/stem cells (ARPCs) from human donors. ARPCs are interfaced with fibronectin (FN) micropatterns, in the absence of exogenous chemicals or cellular reprogramming. We obtain the differentiation towards tubular cells of ARPCs cultured in basal medium conditions, the tubular commitment thus being specifically induced by micropatterned substrates. We characterize the stability of the tubular differentiation as well as the induction of a polarized phenotype in micropatterned ARPCs. Thus, the developed cues, driving the functional commitment of ARPCs, offer a route to recreate the microenvironment of the stem cell niche in vitro, that may serve, in perspective, for the development of ARPC-based bioengineered devices.

  3. Profiling of Sox4-dependent transcriptome in skin links tumour suppression and adult stem cell activation.

    PubMed

    Foronda, Miguel; Morgado-Palacin, Lucia; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Domínguez, Orlando; Pisano, David G; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-12-01

    Adult stem cells (ASCs) reside in specific niches in a quiescent state in adult mammals. Upon specific cues they become activated and respond by self-renewing and differentiating into newly generated specialised cells that ensure appropriate tissue fitness. ASC quiescence also serves as a tumour suppression mechanism by hampering cellular transformation and expansion (White AC et al., 2014). Some genes restricted to early embryonic development and adult stem cell niches are often potent modulators of stem cell quiescence, and derailed expression of these is commonly associated to cancer (Vervoort SJ et al., 2013). Among them, it has been shown that recommissioned Sox4 expression facilitates proliferation, survival and migration of malignant cells. By generating a conditional Knockout mouse model in stratified epithelia (Sox4 (cKO) mice), we demonstrated a delayed plucking-induced Anagen in the absence of Sox4. Skin global transcriptome analysis revealed a prominent defect in the induction of transcriptional networks that control hair follicle stem cell (HFSC) activation such as those regulated by Wnt/Ctnnb1, Shh, Myc or Sox9, cell cycle and DNA damage response-associated pathways. Besides, Sox4 (cKO) mice are resistant to skin carcinogenesis, thus linking Sox4 to both normal and pathological HFSC activation (Foronda M et al., 2014). Here we provide additional details on the analysis of Sox4-regulated transcriptome in Telogen and Anagen skin. The raw and processed microarray data is deposited in GEO under GSE58155.

  4. Differentiation and characteristics of undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells originating from adult premolar periodontal ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Dae-Woo; Im, Insook; Kim, Yong-Deok; Hwang, Dae-Seok; Holliday, L Shannon; Donatelli, Richard E; Son, Woo-Sung; Jun, Eun-Sook

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the isolation and characterization of multipotent human periodontal ligament (PDL) stem cells and to assess their ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and adipose tissue. Methods PDL stem cells were isolated from 7 extracted human premolar teeth. Human PDL cells were expanded in culture, stained using anti-CD29, -CD34, -CD44, and -STRO-1 antibodies, and sorted by fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS). Gingival fibroblasts (GFs) served as a positive control. PDL stem cells and GFs were cultured using standard conditions conducive for osteogenic, chondrogenic, or adipogenic differentiation. Results An average of 152.8 ± 27.6 colony-forming units was present at day 7 in cultures of PDL stem cells. At day 4, PDL stem cells exhibited a significant increase in proliferation (p < 0.05), reaching nearly double the proliferation rate of GFs. About 5.6 ± 4.5% of cells in human PDL tissues were strongly STRO-1-positive. In osteogenic cultures, calcium nodules were observed by day 21 in PDL stem cells, which showed more intense calcium staining than GF cultures. In adipogenic cultures, both cell populations showed positive Oil Red O staining by day 21. Additionally, in chondrogenic cultures, PDL stem cells expressed collagen type II by day 21. Conclusions The PDL contains multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. This adult PDL stem cell population can be utilized as potential sources of PDL in tissue engineering applications. PMID:23323245

  5. The effect of habitual exercise on respiratory- muscle function in older adults.

    PubMed

    Watsford, Mark L; Murphy, Aron J; Pine, Matthew J; Coutts, Aaron J

    2005-01-01

    Older adults' participation in habitual exercise might be affected by alterations to respiratory mechanics such as decreased respiratory-muscle strength. This reduction can cause a decrease in efficiency of the ventilatory pump, potentially compromising exercise participation. This research examined the role of habitual exercise in respiratory-muscle function and the associated implications for exercise performance. Seventy-two healthy older adults (36 men, 64.9 +/- 8.6 years, 177.2 +/- 8.4 cm, 82.5+/- 11.9 kg; 36 women, 64.9 +/- 9.5 years, 161.7+/- 6.4 cm, 61.6 +/- 9.2 kg) undertook respiratory-function and walking-performance tests. Active men and women achieved higher scores than their inactive counterparts for all tests except spirometry, where no differences were evident. The results indicate that a significant amount of the elevated fitness level might be accounted for by increased endurance capacity of the inspiratory muscles. Inactive older individuals might be at risk for inadequate respiratory-muscle strength, so interventions should be considered.

  6. MRF4 negatively regulates adult skeletal muscle growth by repressing MEF2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Irene; Ciciliot, Stefano; Dyar, Kenneth A.; Abraham, Reimar; Murgia, Marta; Agatea, Lisa; Akimoto, Takayuki; Bicciato, Silvio; Forcato, Mattia; Pierre, Philippe; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Rigby, Peter W. J.; Carvajal, Jaime J.; Blaauw, Bert; Calabria, Elisa; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factor MRF4 is highly expressed in adult skeletal muscle but its function is unknown. Here we show that Mrf4 knockdown in adult muscle induces hypertrophy and prevents denervation-induced atrophy. This effect is accompanied by increased protein synthesis and widespread activation of muscle-specific genes, many of which are targets of MEF2 transcription factors. MEF2-dependent genes represent the top-ranking gene set enriched after Mrf4 RNAi and a MEF2 reporter is inhibited by co-transfected MRF4 and activated by Mrf4 RNAi. The Mrf4 RNAi-dependent increase in fibre size is prevented by dominant negative MEF2, while constitutively active MEF2 is able to induce myofibre hypertrophy. The nuclear localization of the MEF2 corepressor HDAC4 is impaired by Mrf4 knockdown, suggesting that MRF4 acts by stabilizing a repressor complex that controls MEF2 activity. These findings open new perspectives in the search for therapeutic targets to prevent muscle wasting, in particular sarcopenia and cachexia. PMID:27484840

  7. Inflammatory cues acting on the adult intestinal stem cells and the early onset of cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DE LERMA BARBARO, A.; PERLETTI, G.; BONAPACE, I.M.; MONTI, E.

    2014-01-01

    The observation that cancer often arises at sites of chronic inflammation has prompted the idea that carcinogenesis and inflammation are deeply interwoven. In fact, the current literature highlights a role for chronic inflammation in virtually all the steps of carcinogenesis, including tumor initiation, promotion and progression. The aim of the present article is to review the current literature on the involvement of chronic inflammation in the initiation step and in the very early phases of tumorigenesis, in a type of cancer where adult stem cells are assumed to be the cells of origin of neoplasia. Since the gastrointestinal tract is regarded as the best-established model system to address the liaison between chronic inflammation and neoplasia, the focus of this article will be on intestinal cancer. In fact, the anatomy of the intestinal epithelial lining is uniquely suited to study adult stem cells in their niche, and the bowel crypt is an ideal developmental biology system, as proliferation, differentiation and cell migration are all distributed linearly along the long axis of the crypt. Moreover, crypt stem cells are regarded today as the most likely targets of neoplastic transformation in bowel cancer. More specifically, the present review addresses the molecular mechanisms whereby a state of chronic inflammation could trigger the neoplastic process in the intestine, focusing on the generation of inflammatory cues evoking enhanced proliferation in cells not initiated but at risk of neoplastic transformation because of their stemness. Novel experimental approaches, based on triggering an inflammatory stimulus in the neighbourhood of adult intestinal stem cells, are warranted to address some as yet unanswered questions. A possible approach, the targeted transgenesis of Paneth cells, may be aimed at ‘hijacking’ the crypt stem cell niche from a status characterized by the maintenance of homeostasis to local chronic inflammation, with the prospect of initiating

  8. Diminished Foot and Ankle Muscle Volumes in Young Adults With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Snell, Shannon; Handsfield, Geoffrey G.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Wombacher, Emily; Fry, Rachel; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Park, Joseph S.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI) have demonstrated altered neuromuscular function and decreased muscle strength when compared with healthy counterparts without a history of ankle sprain. Up to this point, muscle volumes have not been analyzed in patients with CAI to determine whether deficits in muscle size are present following recurrent sprain. Purpose: To analyze intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle muscle volumes and 4-way ankle strength in young adults with and without CAI. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Five patients with CAI (mean age, 23.0 ± 4 years; 1 male, 4 females) and 5 healthy controls (mean age, 23.8 ± 4.5 years; 1 male, 4 females) volunteered for this study. Novel fast-acquisition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to scan from above the femoral condyles through the foot and ankle. The perimeter of each muscle was outlined on each axial slice and then the 2-dimensional area was multiplied by the slice thickness (5 mm) to calculate the muscle volume. Plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion isometric strength were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Patients with CAI were compared with healthy controls on all measures of muscle volume and strength. Extrinsic muscle volumes of patients with CAI were also compared with a normative database of healthy controls (n = 24) by calculating z scores for each muscle individually for each CAI subject. Results: The CAI group had smaller total shank, superficial posterior compartment, soleus, adductor hallucis obliqus, and flexor hallucis brevis muscle volumes compared with healthy controls as indicated by group means and associated 90% CIs that did not overlap. Cohen d effect sizes for the significant group differences were all large and ranged from 1.46 to 3.52, with 90% CIs that did not cross zero. The CAI group had lower eversion, dorsiflexion, and 4-way composite ankle strength, all with group means and associated 90

  9. Muscle Strength, Physical Activity, and Functional Limitations in Older Adults with Central Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Cassandra M.; Batsis, John A.; Vasquez, Elizabeth; McQuoid, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity and muscle weakness are independently associated with increased risk of physical and functional impairment in older adults. It is unknown whether physical activity (PA) and muscle strength combined provide added protection against functional impairment. This study examines the association between muscle strength, PA, and functional outcomes in older adults with central obesity. Methods. Prevalence and odds of physical (PL), ADL, and IADL limitation were calculated for 6,388 community dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 with central obesity. Individuals were stratified by sex-specific hand grip tertiles and PA. Logistic models were adjusted for age, education, comorbidities, and body-mass index and weighted. Results. Overall prevalence of PL and ADL and IADL limitations were progressively lower by grip category. Within grip categories, prevalence was lower for individuals who were active than those who were inactive. Adjusted models showed significantly lower odds of PL OR 0.42 [0.31, 0.56]; ADL OR 0.60 [0.43, 0.84], and IADL OR 0.46 [0.35, 0.61] for those in the highest grip strength category as compared to those in the lowest grip category. Conclusion. Improving grip strength in obese elders who are not able to engage in traditional exercise is important for reducing odds of physical and functional impairment. PMID:27034833

  10. Muscle mechanical properties of adult and older rats submitted to exercise after immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Fábio Yoshikazu; Camargo, Regina Celi Trindade; Job, Aldo Eloizo; Ozaki, Guilherme Akio Tamura; Koike, Tatiana Emy; Camargo Filho, José Carlos Silva

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the effects of immobilization, free remobilization and remobilization by physical exercise about mechanical properties of skeletal muscle of rats of two age groups. Methods 56 Wistar rats divided into two groups according to age, an adult group (five months) and an older group (15 months). These groups were subdivided in: control, immobilized, free remobilized and remobilized by physical exercise. The pelvic limb of rats was immobilized for seven days. The exercise protocol consisted of five swimming sessions, once per day and 25 minutes per session. The gastrocnemius muscle was subjected to tensile tests, and evaluated the properties: load at the maximum limit, stretching at the maximum limit and stiffness. Results The immobilization reduced the values of load at the maximum limit and the remobilization protocols were not sufficient to restore control levels in adult group and older rats. The stretching at the maximum limit differs only in the older group. Conclusions The immobilization reduces the muscle's ability to bear loads and exercise protocol tends to restore the default at control values in adult and older rats. The age factor only interfered in the stretching at the maximum limit, inducing a reduction of this property in the post-immobilization. Level of Evidence II, Investigating the Results of Treatment. PMID:24453606

  11. Evolutionary dynamics of adult stem cells: Comparison of random and immortal-strand segregation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Sherley, James L.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2005-04-01

    This paper develops a point-mutation model describing the evolutionary dynamics of a population of adult stem cells. Such a model may prove useful for quantitative studies of tissue aging and the emergence of cancer. We consider two modes of chromosome segregation: (1) random segregation, where the daughter chromosomes of a given parent chromosome segregate randomly into the stem cell and its differentiating sister cell and (2) “immortal DNA strand” co-segregation, for which the stem cell retains the daughter chromosomes with the oldest parent strands. Immortal strand co-segregation is a mechanism, originally proposed by [Cairns Nature (London) 255, 197 (1975)], by which stem cells preserve the integrity of their genomes. For random segregation, we develop an ordered strand pair formulation of the dynamics, analogous to the ordered strand pair formalism developed for quasispecies dynamics involving semiconservative replication with imperfect lesion repair (in this context, lesion repair is taken to mean repair of postreplication base-pair mismatches). Interestingly, a similar formulation is possible with immortal strand co-segregation, despite the fact that this segregation mechanism is age dependent. From our model we are able to mathematically show that, when lesion repair is imperfect, then immortal strand co-segregation leads to better preservation of the stem cell lineage than random chromosome segregation. Furthermore, our model allows us to estimate the optimal lesion repair efficiency for preserving an adult stem cell population for a given period of time. For human stem cells, we obtain that mispaired bases still present after replication and cell division should be left untouched, to avoid potentially fixing a mutation in both DNA strands.

  12. Adult stem cell therapy and heart failure, 2000 to 2016: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Patricia K.; Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Stem cell therapy is a promising treatment strategy for patients with heart failure, which accounts for over 10% of deaths in the U.S. annually. Despite over a decade of research, further investigation is still needed to determine whether stem cell regenerative therapy is clinically effective and can be routinely implemented in clinical practice. Objective The purpose of this review is to describe the current progress in cardiac stem cell regenerative therapy using adult stem cells and highlight the merits and limitations of clinical trials performed to date. Evidence Review Information for this review was obtained through a search of PubMed and the Cochrane database for English language studies published between January 1, 2000 and April 20, 2016. Twenty-nine randomized clinical trials and 7 systematic reviews and meta-analyses were included in this review. Findings Although adult stem cells were once believed to have the ability to create new heart tissue or grow blood vessels, preclinical studies suggest instead that these cells release cardio-protective paracrine factors that activate endogenous pathways, leading to myocardial repair. Subsequent randomized controlled clinical trials, the majority of which used autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells, have found only a modest benefit in patients receiving stem cell therapy. The lack of a significant benefit may result from variations in trial methodology, discrepancies in reporting, and an over-reliance on surrogate endpoints. Conclusions and Relevance Although stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease is not yet ready for routine clinical application, significant progress continues to be made. Physicians should be aware of the current status of this treatment so that they can better inform their patients who may be in search of alternative therapies. PMID:27557438

  13. Quiescent adult neural stem cells are exceptionally sensitive to cosmic radiation

    PubMed Central

    Encinas, Juan M.; Vazquez, Marcelo E.; Switzer, Robert C.; Chamberland, Dennis W.; Nick, Harry; Levine, Howard G.; Scarpa, Philip J.; Enikolopov, Grigori; Steindler, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    Generation of new neurons in the adult brain, a process that is likely to be essential for learning, memory, and mood regulation, is impaired by radiation. Therefore, radiation exposure might have not only such previously expected consequences as increased probability of developing cancer, but might also impair cognitive function and emotional stability. Radiation exposure is encountered in settings ranging from cancer therapy to space travel; evaluating the neurogenic risks of radiation requires identifying the at-risk populations of stem and progenitor cells in the adult brain. Here we have used a novel reporter mouse line to find that early neural progenitors are selectively affected by conditions simulating the space radiation environment. This is reflected both in a decrease in the number of these progenitors in the neurogenic regions and in an increase in the number of dying cells in these regions. Unexpectedly, we found that quiescent neural stem cells, rather than their rapidly dividing progeny, are most sensitive to radiation. Since these stem cells are responsible for adult neurogenesis, their death would have a profound impact on the production of new neurons in the irradiated adult brain. Our finding raises an important concern about cognitive and emotional risks associated with radiation exposure. PMID:18076878

  14. Plastic adult stem cells: will they graduate from the school of hard knocks?

    PubMed

    Alison, Malcolm R; Poulsom, Richard; Otto, William R; Vig, Pamela; Brittan, Mairi; Direkze, Natalie C; Preston, Sean L; Wright, Nicholas A

    2003-02-15

    Notwithstanding the fact that adult bone marrow cell engraftment to epithelial organs seems a somewhat uncommon event, there is no doubt it does occur, and under appropriate conditions of a strong and positive selection pressure these cells will expand clonally and make a significant contribution to tissue replacement. Likewise, bone-marrow-derived cells can be amplified in vitro and differentiated into a multitude of tissues. These in essence are the goals of regenerative medicine using any source of stem cells, be it embryonic or adult. Despite such irrefutable evidence of what is possible, a veritable chorus of detractors of adult stem cell plasticity has emerged, some doubting its very existence, motivated perhaps by more than a little self-interest. The issues that have led to this state of affairs have included the inability to reproduce certain widely quoted data, one case where the apparent transdifferentiation was due to contamination of the donor tissue with haematopoietic cells and, most notoriously, extrapolating from the behaviour of embryonic stem cells to suggest that adult bone marrow cells simply fuse with other cells and adopt their phenotype. While these issues need resolving, slamming this whole new field because not everything is crystal clear is not good science. The fact that a phenomenon is quite rare in no way mitigates against its very existence: asteroid collisions with the Earth are rare, but try telling the dinosaurs they do not occur! When such events do occur (transdifferentiation or collision), they certainly can make an impact.

  15. Empowering Adult Stem Cells for Myocardial Regeneration V2.0: Success in Small Steps.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Kathleen M; Sussman, Mark A

    2016-03-04

    Much has changed since our survey of the landscape for myocardial regeneration powered by adult stem cells 4 years ago.(1) The intervening years since that first review has witnessed an explosive expansion of studies that advance both understanding and implementation of adult stem cells in promoting myocardial repair. Painstaking research from innumerable laboratories throughout the world is prying open doors that may lead to restoration of myocardial structure and function in the wake of pathological injury. This global effort has produced deeper mechanistic comprehension coupled with an evolving appreciation for the complexity of myocardial regeneration in the adult context. Undaunted by both known and (as yet) unknown challenges, pursuit of myocardial regenerative medicine mediated by adult stem cell therapy has gathered momentum fueled by tantalizing clues and visionary goals. This concise review takes a somewhat different perspective than our initial treatise, taking stock of the business sector that has become an integral part of the field while concurrently updating state of affairs in cutting edge research. Looking retrospectively at advancement over the years as all reviews eventually must, the fundamental lesson to be learned is best explained by Jonatan Mårtensson: "Success will never be a big step in the future. Success is a small step taken just now."

  16. The sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells controls organ size and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Bruno; Khadayate, Sanjay; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Sex differences in physiology and disease susceptibility are commonly attributed to developmental and/or hormonal factors, but there is increasing realisation that cell-intrinsic mechanisms play important and persistent roles1,2. Here we use the Drosophila melanogaster intestine to investigate the nature and significance of cellular sex in an adult somatic organ in vivo. We find that the adult intestinal epithelium is a cellular mosaic of different sex differentiation pathways, and displays extensive sex differences in expression of genes with roles in growth and metabolism. Cell-specific reversals of the sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells uncover its key roles in controlling organ size, its reproductive plasticity and its response to genetically induced tumours. Unlike previous examples of sexually dimorphic somatic stem cell activity, the sex differences in intestinal stem cell behaviour arise from intrinsic mechanisms, which control cell cycle duration and involve a new doublesex- and fruitless-independent branch of the sex differentiation pathway downstream of transformer. Together, our findings indicate that the plasticity of an adult somatic organ is reversibly controlled by its sexual identity, imparted by a new mechanism that may be active in more tissues than previously recognised. PMID:26887495

  17. Identifying endogenous neural stem cells in the adult brain in vitro and in vivo: novel approaches.

    PubMed

    Rueger, Maria Adele; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, Joseph Altman reported that the adult mammalian brain is capable of generating new neurons. Today it is understood that some of these neurons are derived from uncommitted cells in the subventricular zone lining the lateral ventricles, and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The first area generates new neuroblasts which migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas hippocampal neurogenesis seems to play roles in particular types of learning and memory. A part of these uncommitted (immature) cells is able to divide and their progeny can generate all three major cell types of the nervous system: neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes; these properties define such cells as neural stem cells. Although the roles of these cells are not yet clear, it is accepted that they affect functions including olfaction and learning/memory. Experiments with insults to the central nervous system also show that neural stem cells are quickly mobilized due to injury and in various disorders by proliferating, and migrating to injury sites. This suggests a role of endogenous neural stem cells in disease. New pools of stem cells are being discovered, suggesting an even more important role for these cells. To understand these cells and to coax them to contribute to tissue repair it would be very useful to be able to image them in the living organism. Here we discuss advances in imaging approaches as well as new concepts that emerge from stem cell biology with emphasis on the interface between imaging and stem cells.

  18. Over-expression of HSP47 augments mouse embryonic stem cell smooth muscle differentiation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Mei Mei; Yin, Xiaoke; Potter, Claire; Yu, Baoqi; Cai, Hao; Di Bernardini, Elisabetta; Xu, Qingbo

    2014-01-01

    In the recent decade, embryonic stem cells (ESC) have emerged as an attractive cell source of smooth muscle cells (SMC) for vascular tissue engineering owing to their unlimited self-renewal and differentiation capacities. Despite their promise in therapy, their efficacy is still hampered by the lack of definitive SMC differentiation mechanisms and difficulties in successful trafficking of the ESC towards a site of injury or target tissue. Heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) is a 47-kDa molecular chaperone that is required for the maturation of various types of collagen and has been shown to be a critical modulator of different pathological and physiological processes. To date, the role of HSP47 on ESC to SMC differentiation or ESC chemotaxis is not known and may represent a potential molecular approach by which ESC can be manipulated to increase their efficacy in clinic. We provide evidence that HSP47 is highly expressed during ESC differentiation into the SMC lineage and that HSP47 reduction results in an attenuation of the differentiation. Our experiments using a HSP47 plasmid transfection system show that gene over-expression is sufficient to induce ESC-SMC differentiation, even in the absence of exogenous stimuli. Furthermore, HSP47 over-expression in ESC also increases their chemotaxis and migratory responses towards a panel of chemokines, likely via the upregulation of chemokine receptors. Our findings provide direct evidence of induced ESC migration and differentiation into SMC via the over-expression of HSP47, thus identifying a novel approach of molecular manipulation that can potentially be exploited to improve stem cell therapy for vascular repair and regeneration.

  19. Improved knee extensor strength with resistance training associates with muscle specific miRNAs in older adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, María L; Marsh, Anthony P; Leng, Iris; Nicklas, Barbara J; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-02-01

    Regular exercise, particularly resistance training (RT), is the only therapy known to consistently improve muscle strength and quality (force per unit of mass) in older persons, but there is considerable variability in responsiveness to training. Identifying sensitive diagnostic biomarkers of responsiveness to RT may inform the design of a more efficient exercise regimen to improve muscle strength in older adults. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. We quantified six muscle specific miRNAs (miR-1, -133a, -133b, -206, -208b and -499) in both muscle tissue and blood plasma, and their relationship with knee extensor strength in seven older (age=70.5 ± 2.5 years) adults before and after 5 months of RT. MiRNAs differentially responded to RT; muscle miR-133b decreased, while all plasma miRNAs tended to increase. Percent changes in knee extensor strength with RT showed strong positive correlations with percent changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, and -206 and with percent changes in plasma and plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio. Baseline level of plasma or plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio further predicts muscle response to RT, while changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, and -206 may correlate with muscle TNNT1 gene alternative splicing in response to RT. Our results indicate that RT alters muscle specific miRNAs in muscle and plasma, and that these changes account for some of the variation in strength responses to RT in older adults.

  20. Improved Knee Extensor Strength with Resistance Training Associates with Muscle Specific miRNAs in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, María L.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Leng, Iris; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    Regular exercise, particularly resistance training (RT), is the only therapy known to consistently improve muscle strength and quality (force per unit of mass) in older persons, but there is considerable variability in responsiveness to training. Identifying sensitive diagnostic biomarkers of responsiveness to RT may inform the design of a more efficient exercise regimen to improve muscle strength in older adults. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. We quantified six muscle specific miRNAs (miR-1, -133a, -133b, -206, -208b and -499) in both muscle tissue and blood plasma, and their relationship with knee extensor strength in seven older (age = 70.5 ± 2.5 years) adults before and after 5 months of RT. MiRNAs differentially responded to RT; muscle miR-133b decreased, while all plasma miRNAs tended to increase. Percent changes in knee extensor strength with RT showed strong positive correlations with percent changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, -206 and with percent changes in plasma and plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio. Baseline level of plasma or plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio further predicts muscle response to RT, while changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, -206 may correlate with muscle TNNT1gene alternative splicing in response to RT. Our results indicate that RT alters muscle specific miRNAs in muscle and plasma, and that these changes account for some of the variation in strength responses to RT in older adults. PMID:25560803

  1. Skeletal fiber types and spindle distribution in limb and jaw muscles of the adult and neonatal opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Sciote, J J; Rowlerson, A

    1998-08-01

    The South American opossum, Monodelphis domestica, is very immature at birth, and we wished to assess its potential for studies of jaw muscle development. Given the lack of prior information about any Monodelphis fiber types or spindles, our study aimed to identify for the first time fiber types in both adult and neonatal muscles and the location of spindles in the jaw muscles. Fiber types were identified in frozen sections of adult and 6-day-old jaw and limb muscles by using myosin ATPase and metabolic enzyme histochemistry and by immunostaining for myosin isoforms. The distribution of fiber types and muscle spindles throughout the jaw-closer muscles was identified by immunostaining of sections of methacarnoy-fixed, wax-embedded heads. Most muscles contained one slow (type I) and two fast fiber types (equivalent to types IIA and IIX), which were similar to those in eutherian muscle, and an additional (non-IIB) fast type. In jaw-closer muscles, the main extrafusal fiber type was IIM (characteristic of these muscles in some eutherians), and almost all spindles were concentrated in four restricted areas: one in masseter and three in temporalis. Six-day neonatal muscles were very immature, but future spindle-rich areas were revealed by immunostaining and corresponded in position to the adult areas. Extrafusal and spindle fiber types in Monodelphis share many similarities with eutherian mammalian muscle. This finding, along with the immaturity of myosin isoform expression observed 6 days postnatally, indicates that Monodelphis could provide a valuable model for studying early developmental events in the jaw-closer muscles and their spindles.

  2. Human fallopian tube: a new source of multipotent adult mesenchymal stem cells discarded in surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Jazedje, Tatiana; Perin, Paulo M; Czeresnia, Carlos E; Maluf, Mariangela; Halpern, Silvio; Secco, Mariane; Bueno, Daniela F; Vieira, Natassia M; Zucconi, Eder; Zatz, Mayana

    2009-01-01

    Background The possibility of using stem cells for regenerative medicine has opened a new field of investigation. The search for sources to obtain multipotent stem cells from discarded tissues or through non-invasive procedures is of great interest. It has been shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) obtained from umbilical cords, dental pulp and adipose tissue, which are all biological discards, are able to differentiate into muscle, fat, bone and cartilage cell lineages. The aim of this study was to isolate, expand, characterize and assess the differentiation potential of MSCs from human fallopian tubes (hFTs). Methods Lineages of hFTs were expanded, had their karyotype analyzed, were characterized by flow cytometry and underwent in vitro adipogenic, chondrogenic, osteogenic, and myogenic differentiation. Results Here we show for the first time that hFTs, which are discarded after some gynecological procedures, are a rich additional source of MSCs, which we designated as human tube MSCs (htMSCs). Conclusion Human tube MSCs can be easily isolated, expanded in vitro, present a mesenchymal profile and are able to differentiate into muscle, fat, cartilage and bone in vitro. PMID:19538712

  3. Adult Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Attachment to Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, Heather L; Reichert, William M; Klitzman, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Attachment of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) to biomaterials prior to implantation is a possible strategy for mediating inflammation and wound healing. In this study, the ASC percent coverage was measured on common medical grade biosensor materials subjected to different surface treatments. Cell coverage on silicone elastomer (poly dimethylsiloxane) was below 20% for all surface treatments. Polyimide (Kapton), polyurethane (Pellethane) and tissue culture polystyrene all exhibited >50% coverage for surfaces treated with fibronectin (Fn), fibronectin plus avidin/biotin (dual ligand), and oxygen plasma plus fibronectin treatments (Fn O2). The fibronectin treatment performed as well or better on polyimide, polyurethane, and tissue culture polystyrene compared to the dual ligand and fibronectin oxygen plasma treated surfaces. Cell detachment with increasing shear stresses was <25% for each attachment method on both polyimide and polyurethane. The effects of attachment methods on the basic cell functions of proliferation, metabolism, ATP concentration, and caspase-3 activity were analyzed yielding proliferation profiles that were very similar among all of the materials. No significant differences in metabolism, intracellular ATP, or intracellular caspase-3 activity were observed for any of the attachment methods on either polyimide or polyurethane. PMID:17074385

  4. A reverse transfection technology to genetically engineer adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Arimichi; Jo, Jun-Ichiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2007-02-01

    A new non-viral method of gene transfection was designed to enhance the level of gene expression for rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Pullulan was cationized using chemical introduction of spermine to prepare cationized pullulan of non-viral carrier (spermine-pullulan). The spermine-pullulan was complexed with a plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of luciferase and coated on the surface of culture substrate together with Pronectin of artificial cell adhesion protein. MSCs were cultured and transfected on the complex-coated substrate (reverse transfection), and the level and duration of gene expression were compared with those of MSCs transfected by culturing in the medium containing the plasmid DNA-spermine-pullulan complex (conventional method). The reverse transfection method enhanced and prolonged gene expression significantly more than did the conventional method. The reverse method permitted the transfection culture of MSCs in the presence of serum, in contrast to the conventional method, which gave cells a good culture condition to lower cytotoxicity. The reverse transfection was carried out for a non-woven fabric of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) coated with the complex and Pronectin using agitation and stirring culture methods. The two methods enhanced the level and duration of gene expression for MSCs significantly more than did the static method. It is possible that medium circulation improves the culture conditions of cells in terms of oxygen and nutrition supply and waste excretion, resulting in enhanced gene expression.

  5. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in adult Brugia malayi muscle

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, A. P.; Buxton, S. K.; Martin, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a debilitating disease caused by clade III parasites like Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti. Current recommended treatment regimen for this disease relies on albendazole, ivermectin and diethylcarbamazine, none of which targets the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in these parasitic nematodes. Our aim therefore has been to develop adult B. malayi for electrophysiological recordings to aid in characterizing the ion channels in this parasite as anthelmintic target sites. In that regard, we recently demonstrated the amenability of adult B. malayi to patch-clamp recordings and presented results on the single-channel properties of nAChR in this nematode. We have built on this by recording whole-cell nAChR currents from adult B. malayi muscle. Acetylcholine, levamisole, pyrantel, bephenium and tribendimidine activated the receptors on B. malayi muscle, producing robust currents ranging from > 200 pA to ~1.5 nA. Levamisole completely inhibited motility of the adult B. malayi within 10 min and after 60 min, motility had recovered back to control values. PMID:23562945

  6. Human umbilical cord stem cell encapsulation in novel macroporous and injectable fibrin for muscle tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Xu, Hockin H.K.; Zhou, Hongzhi; Weir, Michael D.; Chen, Qianming; Trotman, Carroll Ann

    2012-01-01

    There has been little research on the seeding of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) in three-dimensional scaffolds for muscle tissue engineering. The objectives of this study were: (i) to seed hUCMSCs in a fibrin hydrogel containing fast-degradable microbeads (dMBs) to create macropores to enhance cell viability; and (ii) to investigate the encapsulated cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation for muscle tissue engineering. Mass fractions of 0–80% of dMBs were tested, and 35% of dMBs in fibrin was shown to avoid fibrin shrinkage while creating macropores and promoting cell viability. This construct was referred to as “dMB35”. Fibrin without dMBs was termed “dMB0”. Microbead degradation created macropores in fibrin and improved cell viability. The percentage of live cells in dMB35 reached 91% at 16 days, higher than the 81% in dMB0 (p < 0.05). Live cell density in dMB35 was 1.6-fold that of dMB0 (p < 0.05). The encapsulated hUCMSCs proliferated, increasing the cell density by 2.6 times in dMB35 from 1 to 16 days. MTT activity for dMB35 was substantially higher than that for dMB0 at 16 days (p < 0.05). hUCMSCs in dMB35 had high gene expressions of myotube markers of myosin heavy chain 1 (MYH1) and alpha-actinin 3 (ACTN3). Elongated, multinucleated cells were formed with positive staining of myogenic specific proteins including myogenin, MYH, ACTN and actin alpha 1. Moreover, a significant increase in cell fusion was detected with myogenic induction. In conclusion, hUCMSCs were encapsulated in fibrin with degradable microbeads for the first time, achieving greatly enhanced cell viability and successful myogenic differentiation with formation of multinucleated myotubes. The injectable and macroporous fibrin–dMB–hUCMSC construct may be promising for muscle tissue engineering applications. PMID:22902812

  7. Effects of addictive drugs on adult neural stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chi; Loh, Horace H.; Law, Ping-Yee

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) undergo a series of developmental processes before giving rise to newborn neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in adult neurogenesis. During the past decade, the role of NSPCs has been highlighted by studies on adult neurogenesis modulated by addictive drugs. It has been proven that these drugs regulate the proliferation, differentiation and survival of adult NSPCs in different manners, which results in the varying consequences of adult neurogenesis. The effects of addictive drugs on NSPCs are exerted via a variety of different mechanisms and pathways, which interact with one another and contribute to the complexity of NSPC regulation. Here, we review the effects of different addictive drugs on NSPCs, and the related experimental methods and paradigms. We also discuss the current understanding of major signaling molecules, especially the putative common mechanisms, underlying such effects. Finally, we review the future directions of research in this area. PMID:26468052

  8. Mobilized adult pituitary stem cells contribute to endocrine regeneration in response to physiological demand.

    PubMed

    Rizzoti, Karine; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Lovell-Badge, Robin

    2013-10-03

    Pituitary hormone deficiencies, with Growth Hormone deficiency being most frequent (1 in 3,500-10,000 births), cause significant morbidity. Regeneration of missing endocrine cells would be a significant improvement over hormone replacement therapies, which incur side effects and do not mimic physiological secretion patterns. Recent in vitro studies have identified a population of adult pituitary progenitors that express the HMG box transcription factors SOX2 and SOX9. Here, we apply cell-lineage tracing analysis to demonstrate that SOX2- and SOX9-expressing progenitors can self-renew and give rise to endocrine cells in vivo, suggesting that they are tissue stem cells. Moreover, we show that they can become mobilized and differentiate into the appropriate endocrine cell types in response to physiological stress. Our results highlight the pituitary as a model for exploring how physiological changes influence stem cell behavior and suggest that manipulation of endogenous pituitary stem cells is a potential therapeutic strategy for pituitary deficiencies.

  9. Clonal differentiation of skeletal muscle-derived CD34(-)/45(-) stem cells into cardiomyocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Okada, Yoshinori; Tono, Kayoko; Masuda, Maki; Nitta, Masahiro; Hoshi, Akio; Akatsuka, Akira

    2010-04-01

    The differentiation and/or therapeutic potential of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells for cardiac infarction have been studied extensively for use in cellular cardiomyoplasty, as injured cardiomyocytes exhibit limited regenerative capacity. We previously reported cardio-myogenic differentiation of skeletal muscle-derived CD34+/45(-) (Sk-34) stem cells after therapeutic transplantation. However, the clonal differentiation potential of these cells remains unknown. Here, we show that skeletal muscle-derived CD34(-)/45(-) (Sk-DN) stem cells, which are situated upstream of Sk-34 cells in the same lineage, exhibit clonal differentiation into cardiomyocytes after single cell-derived single-sphere implantation into myocardium. Sk-DN cells were enzymatically isolated from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice and purified by flow cytometry, and were then clonally cultured in collagen-based medium with bFGF and EGF after clonal cell sorting. Single cell-derived single-sphere colonies of Sk-DN cells were directly implanted into the wild-type mouse myocardium. At 4 weeks after implantation, donor cells exhibited typical cardiomyocyte structure with the formation of gap-junctions between donor and recipient cells. Expression of specific mRNAs for cardiomyocytes, such as cardiac actin and GATA-4, Nkx2-5, Isl-1, Mef2, and Hand2, were also seen in clonal cell cultures of Sk-DN cells. Cell fusion-independent differentiation was also confirmed by bulk cell transplantation using Cre- and loxP (enhanced GFP)-mice. We conclude that Sk-DN cells can give rise to cardiac muscle cells clonally, and that skeletal muscle includes a practical cell source for cellular cardiomyoplasty.

  10. Neuromuscular junction formation between human stem cell-derived motoneurons and human skeletal muscle in a defined system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiufang; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Stancescu, Maria; Vandenburgh, Herman H; Hickman, James J

    2011-12-01

    Functional in vitro models composed of human cells will constitute an important platform in the next generation of system biology and drug discovery. This study reports a novel human-based in vitro Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ) system developed in a defined serum-free medium and on a patternable non-biological surface. The motoneurons and skeletal muscles were derived from fetal spinal stem cells and skeletal muscle stem cells. The motoneurons and skeletal myotubes were completely differentiated in the co-culture based on morphological analysis and electrophysiology. NMJ formation was demonstrated by phase contrast microscopy, immunocytochemistry and the observation of motoneuron-induced muscle contractions utilizing time-lapse recordings and their subsequent quenching by d-Tubocurarine. Generally, functional human based systems would eliminate the issue of species variability during the drug development process and its derivation from stem cells bypasses the restrictions inherent with utilization of primary human tissue. This defined human-based NMJ system is one of the first steps in creating functional in vitro systems and will play an important role in understanding NMJ development, in developing high information content drug screens and as test beds in preclinical studies for spinal or muscular diseases/injuries such as muscular dystrophy, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord repair.

  11. The Par complex and integrins direct asymmetric cell division in adult intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Spyros; Conder, Ryan; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2012-10-05

    The adult Drosophila midgut is maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that generate both self-renewing and differentiating daughter cells. How this asymmetry is generated is currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that asymmetric ISC division is established by a unique combination of extracellular and intracellular polarity mechanisms. We show that Integrin-dependent adhesion to the basement membrane induces cell-intrinsic polarity and results in the asymmetric segregation of the Par proteins Par-3, Par-6, and aPKC into the apical daughter cell. Cell-specific knockdown and overexpression experiments suggest that increased activity of aPKC enhances Delta/Notch signaling in one of the two daughter cells to induce terminal differentiation. Perturbing this mechanism or altering the orientation of ISC division results in the formation of intestinal tumors. Our data indicate that mechanisms for intrinsically asymmetric cell division can be adapted to allow for the flexibility in lineage decisions that is required in adult stem cells.

  12. Embryonic origin of adult stem cells required for tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Davies, Erin L; Lei, Kai; Seidel, Christopher W; Kroesen, Amanda E; McKinney, Sean A; Guo, Longhua; Robb, Sofia Mc; Ross, Eric J; Gotting, Kirsten; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2017-01-10

    Planarian neoblasts are pluripotent, adult somatic stem cells and lineage-primed progenitors that are required for the production and maintenance of all differentiated cell types, including the germline. Neoblasts, originally defined as undifferentiated cells residing in the adult parenchyma, are frequently compared to embryonic stem cells yet their developmental origin remains obscure. We investigated the provenance of neoblasts during Schmidtea mediterranea embryogenesis, and report that neoblasts arise from an anarchic, cycling piwi-1+ population wholly responsible for production of all temporary and definitive organs during embryogenesis. Early embryonic piwi-1+ cells are molecularly and functionally distinct from neoblasts: they express unique cohorts of early embryo enriched transcripts and behave differently than neoblasts in cell transplantation assays. Neoblast lineages arise as organogenesis begins and are required for construction of all major organ systems during embryogenesis. These subpopulations are continuously generated during adulthood, where they act as agents of tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  13. CD146 expression on mesenchymal stem cells is associated with their vascular smooth muscle commitment

    PubMed Central

    Espagnolle, Nicolas; Guilloton, Fabien; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Sensébé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are plastic adherent cells that can differentiate into various tissue lineages, including osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. However, this progenitor property is not shared by all cells within the MSC population. In addition, MSCs vary in their proliferation capacity and expression of markers. Because of heterogeneity of CD146 expression in the MSC population, we compared CD146−/Low and CD146High cells under clonal conditions and after sorting of the non-clonal cell population to determine whether this expression is associated with specific functions. CD146−/Low and CD146High bone marrow MSCs did not differ in colony-forming unit-fibroblast number, osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation or in vitro haematopoietic-supportive activity. However, CD146−/Low clones proliferated slightly but significantly faster than did CD146High clones. In addition, a strong expression of CD146 molecule was associated with a commitment to a vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lineage characterized by a strong up-regulation of calponin-1 and SM22α expression and an ability to contract collagen matrix. Thus, within a bone marrow MSC population, certain subpopulations characterized by high expression of CD146, are committed towards a VSMC lineage. PMID:24188055

  14. Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and structure integrity in chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shih-Chieh; Kuo, Pei-Yin; Chang, Ching-Fang; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Ho, Larry Low-Tone

    2006-06-01

    The expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA) by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) during chondrogenesis was investigated by the use of pellet culture. Undifferentiated hMSCs expressed low but detectable amounts of SMA and the addition of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) to the culture medium increased SMA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Differentiation in pellet culture was rapidly induced in the presence of TGF-beta1 and was accompanied by the development of annular layers at the surface of the pellet. These peripheral layers lacked expression of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen during early differentiation. Progress in differentiation increased the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen and the expression of SMA in these layers. Double-staining for type II collagen and SMA by immunofluorescence demonstrated the differentiation of hMSCs into cells positive for these two proteins. The addition of cytochalasin D, a potent inhibitor of the polymerization of actin microfilaments, caused damage to the structural integrity and surface smoothness of the chondrogenic pellets. The SMA-positive cells in the peripheral layers of the chondrogenic pellets mimic those within the superficial layer of articular cartilage and are speculated to play a major role in cartilage development and maintenance.

  15. Organoids from adult liver and pancreas: Stem cell biology and biomedical utility.

    PubMed

    Hindley, Christopher J; Cordero-Espinoza, Lucía; Huch, Meritxell

    2016-12-15

    The liver and pancreas are critical organs maintaining whole body metabolism. Historically, the expansion of adult-derived cells from these organs in vitro has proven challenging and this in turn has hampered studies of liver and pancreas stem cell biology, as well as being a roadblock to disease modelling and cell replacement therapies for pathologies in these organs. Recently, defined culture conditions have been described which allow the in vitro culture and manipulation of adult-derived liver and pancreatic material. Here we review these systems and assess their physiological relevance, as well as their potential utility in biomedicine.

  16. Notch signaling induces retinal stem-like properties in perinatal neural retina progenitors and promotes symmetric divisions in adult retinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Balenci, Laurent; van der Kooy, Derek

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating retinal stem cell (RSC) activity is fundamental for future stem cell-based therapeutic purposes. By combining gain and loss of function approaches, we addressed whether Notch signaling may play a selective role in retinal stem versus retinal progenitor cells in both developing and adult eyes. Inhibition of either Notch or fibroblast growth factor signaling reduced proliferation of retinal stem and retinal progenitor cells, and inhibited RSC self-renewal. Conversely, exogenous Delta-like 3 and direct intrinsic Notch activation stimulated expansionary symmetric divisions in adult RSCs with the concomitant upregulation of Hes5. Knocking down Hes5 expression specifically decreased the numbers, but not the diameters, of adult RSC primary spheres, indicating that HES5 is the downstream effector of Notch receptor in controlling adult RSC proliferation. In addition, constitutive Notch activation induced retinal stem-like asymmetric self-renewal properties, with no expansion (no symmetrical division) in perinatal neural retina progenitor cells. These findings highlight central roles of Notch signaling activity in regulating the modes of division of retinal stem and retinal progenitor cells.

  17. Comparative transcriptome analysis of embryonic and adult stem cells with extended and limited differentiation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa-Montoya, Fernando; Kidder, Benjamin L; Pauwelyn, Karen A; Chase, Lucas G; Luttun, Aernout; Crabbe, Annelies; Geraerts, Martine; Sharov, Alexei A; Piao, Yulan; Ko, Minoru SH; Hu, Wei-Shou; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2007-01-01

    Background Recently, several populations of postnatal stem cells, such as multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs), have been described that have broader differentiation ability than classical adult stem cells. Here we compare the transcriptome of pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs), MAPCs, and lineage-restricted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to determine their relationship. Results Applying principal component analysis, non-negative matrix factorization and k-means clustering algorithms to the gene-expression data, we identified a unique gene-expression profile for MAPCs. Apart from the ESC-specific transcription factor Oct4 and other ESC transcripts, some of them associated with maintaining ESC pluripotency, MAPCs also express transcripts characteristic of early endoderm and mesoderm. MAPCs do not, however, express Nanog or Sox2, two other key transcription factors involved in maintaining ESC properties. This unique molecular signature was seen irrespective of the microarray platform used and was very similar for both mouse and rat MAPCs. As MSC-like cells isolated under MAPC conditions are virtually identical to MSCs, and MSCs cultured in MAPC conditions do not upregulate MAPC-expressed transcripts, the MAPC signature is cell-type specific and not merely the result of differing culture conditions. Conclusion Multivariate analysis techniques clustered stem cells on the basis of their expressed gene profile, and the genes determining this clustering reflected the stem cells' differentiation potential in vitro. This comparative transcriptome analysis should significantly aid the isolation and culture of MAPCs and MAPC-like cells, and form the basis for studies to gain insights into genes that confer on these cells their greater developmental potency. PMID:17683608

  18. VCAM-1 expression on dystrophic muscle vessels has a critical role in the recruitment of human blood-derived CD133+ stem cells after intra-arterial transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gavina, Manuela; Belicchi, Marzia; Rossi, Barbara; Ottoboni, Linda; Colombo, Fabio; Meregalli, Mirella; Battistelli, Maurizio; Forzenigo, Laura; Biondetti, Piero; Pisati, Federica; Parolini, Daniele; Farini, Andrea; Issekutz, Andrew C; Bresolin, Nereo; Rustichelli, Franco; Constantin, Gabriela; Torrente, Yvan

    2006-10-15

    Recently our group demonstrated the myogenic capacity of human CD133(+) cells isolated from peripheral blood when delivered in vivo through the arterial circulation into the muscle of dystrophic scid/mdx mice. CD133(+) stem cells express the adhesion molecules CD44, LFA-1, PSGL-1, alpha4-integrins, L-selectin, and chemokine receptor CCR7. Moreover these cells adhere in vitro to VCAM-1 spontaneously and after stimulation with CCL19. Importantly, after muscle exercise, we found that the expression of VCAM-1 is strongly up-regulated in dystrophic muscle vessels, whereas the number of rolling and firmly adhered CD133(+) stem cells significantly increased. Moreover, human dystrophin expression was significantly increased when muscle exercise was performed 24 hours before the intra-arterial injection of human CD133(+) cells. Finally, treatment of exercised dystrophic mice with anti-VCAM-1 antibodies led to a dramatic blockade of CD133(+) stem cell migration into the dystrophic muscle. Our results show for the first time that the expression of VCAM-1 on dystrophic muscle vessels induced by exercise controls muscle homing of human CD133(+) stem cells, opening new perspectives for a potential therapy of muscular dystrophy based on the intra-arterial delivery of CD133(+) stem cells.

  19. Adult marrow-derived very small embryonic-like stem cells and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kucia, Magda; Zuba-Surma, Ewa K; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Wu, Wan; Ratajczak, Janina; Machalinski, Boguslaw; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2007-10-01

    A population of CXCR4(+) lin(-) CD45(-) cells that express SSEA, Oct-4 and Nanog has been identified in adult bone marrow. These cells are very small and display several features typical for primary embryonic stem cells such as: i) a large nuclei surrounded by a narrow rim of cytoplasm; ii) open-type chromatin (euchromatin); and iii) high telomerase activity. These cells were named very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSEL-SC). The authors hypothesized that they are direct descendants of the germ lineage. Germ lineage, in order to pass genes on to the next generation, has to create soma and thus becomes a 'mother lineage' for all somatic cell lineages present in the adult body. Germ potential is established after conception in a totipotent zygote and retained subsequently during development in blastomers of morula, cells form the inner cell mass of blastocyst, epiblast and population of primordial germ cells. The authors envision that VSEL-SC are epiblast-derived pluripotent stem cells and could potentially become a less-controversial source of stem cells for regeneration.

  20. Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhenhua; Wang, Jiayin; Zhu, Wanwan; Guan, Yunqian; Zou, Chunlin; Chen, Zhiguo; Zhang, Y. Alex

    2011-12-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown potential clinical utility in cell therapy and tissue engineering, due to their ability to proliferate as well as to differentiate into multiple lineages, including osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic specifications. Therefore, it is crucial to assess the safety of MSCs while extensive expansion ex vivo is a prerequisite to obtain the cell numbers for cell transplantation. Here we show that MSCs derived from adult cynomolgus monkey can undergo spontaneous transformation following in vitro culture. In comparison with MSCs, the spontaneously transformed mesenchymal cells (TMCs) display significantly different growth pattern and morphology, reminiscent of the characteristics of tumor cells. Importantly, TMCs are highly tumorigenic, causing subcutaneous tumors when injected into NOD/SCID mice. Moreover, no multiple differentiation potential of TMCs is observed in vitro or in vivo, suggesting that spontaneously transformed adult stem cells may not necessarily turn into cancer stem cells. These data indicate a direct transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs into tumor cells following long-term expansion in vitro. The spontaneous transformation of the cultured cynomolgus monkey MSCs may have important implications for ongoing clinical trials and for models of oncogenesis, thus warranting a more strict assessment of MSCs prior to cell therapy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spontaneous transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells lack multipotency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells are highly tumorigenic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells do not have the characteristics of cancer stem cells.

  1. Autologous Transplantation of Bone Marrow Adult Stem Cells for the Treatment of Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Ricardo João; Bueno, Ronaldo Rocha Loures; Galvão, Paulo Bezerra de Araújo; Zanis Neto, José; Souza, Juliano Mendes; Guérios, Ênio Eduardo; Senegaglia, Alexandra Cristina; Brofman, Paulo Roberto; Pasquini, Ricardo; da Cunha, Claudio Leinig Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Background Morbimortality in patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy is high, even under optimal medical treatment. Autologous infusion of bone marrow adult stem cells has shown promising preliminary results in these patients. Objective Determine the effectiveness of autologous transplantation of bone marrow adult stem cells on systolic and diastolic left ventricular function, and on the degree of mitral regurgitation in patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy in functional classes NYHA II and III. Methods We administered 4,54 x 108 ± 0,89 x 108 bone marrow adult stem cells into the coronary arteries of 24 patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy in functional classes NYHA II and III. Changes in functional class, systolic and diastolic left ventricular function and degree of mitral regurgitation were assessed after 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Results During follow-up, six patients (25%) improved functional class and eight (33.3%) kept stable. Left ventricular ejection fraction improved 8.9%, 9.7% e 13.6%, after 3, 6 and 12 months (p = 0.024; 0.017 and 0.018), respectively. There were no significant changes neither in diastolic left ventricular function nor in mitral regurgitation degree. A combined cardiac resynchronization and implantable cardioversion defibrillation was implanted in two patients (8.3%). Four patients (16.6%) had sudden death and four patients died due to terminal cardiac failure. Average survival of these eight patients was 2.6 years. Conclusion Intracoronary infusion of bone marrow adult stem cells was associated with an improvement or stabilization of functional class and an improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction, suggesting the efficacy of this intervention. There were no significant changes neither in left ventricular diastolic function nor in the degree of mitral regurgitation. PMID:25590932

  2. Stress in the Adult Rat Exacerbates Muscle Pain Induced by Early-Life Stress

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pedro; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Early-life stress and exposure to stressful stimuli play a major role in the development of chronic widespread pain in adults. However, how they interact in chronic pain syndromes remains unclear. Methods Dams and neonatal litters were submitted to a restriction of nesting material (neonatal limited bedding, NLB) for one week. As adults, these rats were exposed to a painless sound stress protocol. The involvement of sympathoadrenal catecholamines, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα) in nociception, was evaluated through of behavioral and ELISA assays, surgical interventions and intrathecal antisense treatments. Results Adult NLB rats exhibited mild muscle hyperalgesia, which was markedly aggravated by sound stress (peaking 15 days after exposure). Adrenal medullectomy did not modify hyperalgesia in NLB rats but prevented its aggravation by sound stress. Sustained administration of epinephrine to NLB rats mimicked sound stress effect. Intrathecal treatment with antisense directed to IL-6-receptor subunit gp130, but not to TNFα type 1 receptor (TNFR1), inhibited hyperalgesia in NLB rats. However, antisense against either gp130 or TNFR1 inhibited sound stress-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia. Compared to control rats, NLB rats exhibit increased plasma levels of IL-6 but decreased levels of TNFα, whereas sound stress increases IL-6 plasma levels in control but not in NLB rats. Conclusions Early-life stress induces a persistent elevation of IL-6, hyperalgesia and susceptibility to chronic muscle pain, which is unveiled by exposure to stress in adults. This probably depends on an interaction between adrenal catecholamines and pro-inflammatory cytokines acting at muscle nociceptor level. PMID:23706525

  3. Muscle activation and energy expenditure of sedentary behavior alternatives in young and old adults.

    PubMed

    Lerma, Nicholas L; Keenan, Kevin G; Strath, Scott J; Forseth, Bethany M; Cho, Chi C; Swartz, Ann M

    2016-09-21

    The physiological mechanisms that underlie the metabolic benefits of breaking up sedentary behavior (SB) have yet to be determined. The purpose of this study is to compare energy expenditure (EE) and muscle activation (MA) responses to sitting and four SB alternatives in younger and older adults. Twenty-two adults, grouped by age (21-35 and 62-76 years), completed five randomly ordered 20 min tasks: (1) continuous sitting (Sit), (2) sitting on a stability ball (Ball), (3) continuous standing (Stand), (4) sitting interrupted by walking (S/W), and (5) sitting interrupted by standing (S/S). Muscle activation of two upper (trapezius and erector spinae) and two lower (rectus femoris and medial gastrocnemius) body muscles and total body EE were measured continuously. A linear mixed model using gender and age as a covariate with Bonferroni adjustment were used to determine significant differences between tasks. Collectively, S/W produced significantly higher MA and EE compared with Sit (p  <  0.001). Stand and Ball provided significantly greater EE, but not MA, compared to Sit (p  <  0.05), while S/S did not significantly change EE or MA compared to Sit. There were no net EE differences when comparing age groups across the tasks. Upper body MA was not consistent in both age groups across tasks. Specifically, during S/W the upper body MA of older adults (9.7  ±  1.5% MVC) was double that of young adults (4.8  ±  0.7% MVC, p  =  0.006). Lower body MA responded similarly to all tasks in both age groups. Disrupting sitting with walking produced the largest increase in EE and MA compared to other SB alternatives in both age groups. These results are important considering the wide use of SB alternatives by researchers and public health practitioners.

  4. Neuromuscular junction formation between human stem-cell-derived motoneurons and rat skeletal muscle in a defined system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiufang; Das, Mainak; Rumsey, John; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Stancescu, Maria; Hickman, James

    2010-12-01

    To date, the coculture of motoneurons (MNs) and skeletal muscle in a defined in vitro system has only been described in one study and that was between rat MNs and rat skeletal muscle. No in vitro studies have demonstrated human MN to rat muscle synapse formation, although numerous studies have attempted to implant human stem cells into rat models to determine if they could be of therapeutic use in disease or spinal injury models, although with little evidence of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation. In this report, MNs differentiated from human spinal cord stem cells, together with rat skeletal myotubes, were used to build a coculture system to demonstrate that NMJ formation between human MNs and rat skeletal muscles is possible. The culture was characterized by morphology, immunocytochemistry, and electrophysiology, while NMJ formation was demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and videography. This defined system provides a highly controlled reproducible model for studying the formation, regulation, maintenance, and repair of NMJs. The in vitro coculture system developed here will be an important model system to study NMJ development, the physiological and functional mechanism of synaptic transmission, and NMJ- or synapse-related disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as for drug screening and therapy design.

  5. Long-term engraftment of myogenic progenitors from adipose-derived stem cells and muscle regeneration in dystrophic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Yuling; Li, Yaqin; Cao, Jiqing; Zhang, Huili; Chen, Menglong; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising approach for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD); however, its application is hindered by poor cell engraftment. There have been no reports to date describing the efficient generation of myogenic progenitors from adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) that can contribute to muscle regeneration. In this study, we examined the in vivo myogenic potential of progenitors differentiated from ADSCs using forskolin, basic fibroblast growth factor, the glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibitor 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime as well as the supernatant of ADSC cultures. The results indicate that a proliferative population of myogenic progenitors can be derived from ADSCs that have characteristics similar to muscle satellite cells and are capable of terminal differentiation into multinucleated myotubes. When transplanted into DMD model mdx mice either by intramuscular injection or systemic delivery, progenitors were successfully engrafted in skeletal muscle for up to 12 weeks, and generated new muscle fibers, restored dystrophin expression and contributed to the satellite cell compartment. These findings highlight the potential application of myogenic progenitors derived from ADSCs to the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

  6. A Hyaluronic Acid-Rich Node and Duct System in Which Pluripotent Adult Stem Cells Circulate.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rajani; Chandra, Vishal; Kwon, Byoung S

    2015-10-01

    Regenerative medicine is in demand of adult pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). The "Bonghan System (BHS)" was discovered and suggested to contain cells with regenerative capacity in the early 1960s. It had been ignored for a long time due to the lack of sufficient details of experiments, but about 37 years after the initial report, the BHS was rediscovered and named as the "primo vascular system." Recently, we have discovered a similar structure, which contained a high level of hyaluronic acid, and hence, named the structure as hyaluronic acid-rich node and duct system (HAR-NDS). Here we discuss the HAR-NDS concept starting from the discovery of BHS, and findings pointing to its importance in regenerative medicine. This HAR-NDS contained adult PSCs, called node and duct stem cells (NDSCs), which appeared to circulate in it. We describe the evidence that NDSCs can differentiate into hemangioblasts that further produced differentiated blood cells. The NDSCs had a potential to differentiate into neuronal cells and hepatocytes; thus, NDSCs had a capability to become cells from all three germ layers. This system appears to be a promising alternative source of adult stem cells that can be easily delivered to their target tissues and participate in tissue regeneration.

  7. Regulatory System for Stem/Progenitor Cell Niches in the Adult Rodent Pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Saishu; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The anterior lobe of the pituitary gland is a master endocrine tissue composed of five types of endocrine cells. Although the turnover rate of pituitary endocrine cells is as low as about 1.6% per day, recent studies have demonstrated that Sex-determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2)+-cells exist as pituitary stem/progenitor cells in the adult anterior lobe and contribute to cell regeneration. Notably, SOX2+-pituitary stem/progenitor cells form two types of niches in this tissue: the marginal cell layer (MCL-niche) and the dense cell clusters scattering in the parenchyma (parenchymal-niche). However, little is known about the mechanisms and factors for regulating the pituitary stem/progenitor cell niches, as well as the functional differences between the two types of niches. Elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms in the niches might enable us to understand the cell regeneration system that acts in accordance with physiological demands in the adult pituitary. In this review, so as to reveal the regulatory mechanisms of the two types of niche, we summarize the regulatory factors and their roles in the adult rodent pituitary niches by focusing on three components: soluble factors, cell surface proteins and extracellular matrixes. PMID:26761002

  8. Adult neurogenesis, neural stem cells and Alzheimer's disease: developments, limitations, problems and promises.

    PubMed

    Taupin, Philippe

    2009-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease, leading to severe incapacity and death. It is the most common form of dementia among older people. AD is characterized in the brain by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, neuronal degeneration, aneuploidy and enhanced neurogenesis and by cognitive, behavioral and physical impairments. Inherited mutations in several genes and genetic, acquired and environmental risk factors have been reported as causes for developing the disease, for which there is currently no cure. Current treatments for AD involve drugs and occupational therapies, and future developments involve early diagnosis and stem cell therapy. In this manuscript, we will review and discuss the recent developments, limitations, problems and promises on AD, particularly related to aneuploidy, adult neurogenesis, neural stem cells (NSCs) and cellular therapy. Though adult neurogenesis may be beneficial for regeneration of the nervous system, it may underly the pathogenesis of AD. Cellular therapy is a promising strategy for AD. Limitations in protocols to establish homogeneous populations of neural progenitor and stem cells and niches for neurogenesis need to be resolved and unlocked, for the full potential of adult NSCs to be realized for therapy.

  9. Excitable properties of adult skeletal muscle fibres from the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Collet, Claude; Belzunces, Luc

    2007-02-01

    In the hive, a wide range of honeybees tasks such as cell cleaning, nursing, thermogenesis, flight, foraging and inter-individual communication (waggle dance, antennal contact and trophallaxy) depend on proper muscle activity. However, whereas extensive electrophysiological studies have been undertaken over the past ten years to characterize ionic currents underlying the physiological neuronal activity in honeybee, ionic currents underlying skeletal muscle fibre activity in this insect remain, so far, unexplored. Here, we show that, in contrast to many other insect species, action potentials in muscle fibres isolated from adult honeybee metathoracic tibia, are not graded but actual all-or-none responses. Action potentials are blocked by Cd(2+) and La(3+) but not by tetrodotoxin (TTX) in current-clamp mode of the patch-clamp technique, and as assessed under voltage-clamp, both Ca(2+) and K(+) currents are involved in shaping action potentials in single muscle fibres. The activation threshold potential for the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) current is close to -40 mV, its mean maximal amplitude is -8.5+/-1.9 A/F and the mean apparent reversal potential is near +40 mV. In honeybees, GABA does not activate any ionic membrane currents in muscle fibres from the tibia, but L-glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular synapse induces fast activation of an inward current when the membrane potential is voltage clamped close to its resting value. Instead of undergoing desensitization as is the case in many other preparations, a component of this glutamate-activated current has a sustained component, the reversal potential of which is close to 0 mV, as demonstrated with voltage ramps. Future investigations will allow extensive pharmacological characterization of membrane ionic currents and excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle from honeybee, a useful insect that became a model to study many physiological phenomena and which plays a major role in

  10. Prolongation of Relaxation Time in Extraocular Muscles With Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Adult Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Krysta R.; Stevens, Shanlee M.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that short-term treatment with brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) would alter the contractile characteristics of rabbit extraocular muscle (EOM). Methods One week after injections of BDNF in adult rabbit superior rectus muscles, twitch properties were determined in treated and control muscles in vitro. Muscles were also examined for changes in mean cross-sectional areas, neuromuscular junction size, and percent of myofibers expressing specific myosin heavy chain isoforms, and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (SERCA) 1 and 2. Results Brain derived neurotrophic factor–treated muscles had prolonged relaxation times compared with control muscles. Time to 50% relaxation, time to 100% relaxation, and maximum rate of relaxation were increased by 24%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. No significant differences were seen in time to peak force, twitch force, or maximum rate of contraction. Brain derived neurotrophic factor treatment significantly increased mean cross-sectional areas of slow twitch and tonic myofibers, with increased areas ranging from 54% to 146%. Brain derived neurotrophic factor also resulted in an increased percentage of slow twitch myofibers in the orbital layers, ranging from 54% to 77%, and slow-tonic myofibers, ranging from 44% to 62%. No significant changes were seen SERCA1 or 2 expression or in neuromuscular junction size. Conclusions Short-term treatment with BDNF significantly prolonged the duration and rate of relaxation time and increased expression of both slow-twitch and slow-tonic myosin-expressing myofibers without changes in neuromuscular junctions or SERCA expression. The changes induced by BDNF treatment might have potential therapeutic value in dampening/reducing uncontrolled eye oscillations in nystagmus. PMID:27802489

  11. Lymphatic Reprogramming of Adult Endothelial Stem Cells for a Cell-Based Therapy for Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Therapy for Lymphedema inBreast Cancer Patients PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Young Kwon Hong, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Lymphatic Reprogramming of Adult Endothelial Stem Cells for a Cell-Based Therapy for Lymphedema in... lymphedema patients. The key significance of our proposal is to utilize the elusive circulating adult stem cells to avoid the ethical and immunological

  12. Pituitary Cell Turnover: From Adult Stem Cell Recruitment through Differentiation to Death.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Diaz-Rodriguez, Esther; Bahar, Dilek; Garcia-Rendueles, Angela R; Rodrigues, Joana S; Dieguez, Carlos; Alvarez, Clara V

    2015-01-01

    The recent demonstration using genetic tracing that in the adult pituitary stem cells are normally recruited from the niche in the marginal zone and differentiate into secretory cells in the adenopituitary has elegantly confirmed the proposal made when the pituitary stem cell niche was first discovered 5 years ago. Some of the early controversies have also been resolved. However, many questions remain, such as which are the markers that make a pituitary stem cell truly unique and the exact mechanisms that trigger recruitment from the niche. Little is known about the processes of commitment and differentiation once a stem cell has left the niche. Moreover, the acceptance that pituitary cells are renewed by stem cells implies the existence of regulated mechanisms of cell death in differentiated cells which must themselves be explained. The demonstration of an apoptotic pathway mediated by RET/caspase 3/Pit-1/Arf/p53 in normal somatotrophs is therefore an important step towards understanding how pituitary cell number is regulated. Further work will elucidate how the rates of the three processes of cell renewal, differentiation and apoptosis are balanced in tissue homeostasis after birth, but altered in pituitary hyperplasia in response to physiological stimuli such as puberty and lactation. Thus, we can aim to understand the mechanisms underlying human disease due to insufficient (hypopituitarism) or excess (pituitary tumor) cell numbers.

  13. Potential for a pluripotent adult stem cell treatment for acute radiation sickness

    PubMed Central

    Rodgerson, Denis O; Reidenberg, Bruce E; Harris, Alan G; Pecora, Andrew L

    2012-01-01

    Accidental radiation exposure and the threat of deliberate radiation exposure have been in the news and are a public health concern. Experience with acute radiation sickness has been gathered from atomic blast survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and from civilian nuclear accidents as well as experience gained during the development of radiation therapy for cancer. This paper reviews the medical treatment reports relevant to acute radiation sickness among the survivors of atomic weapons at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, among the victims of Chernobyl, and the two cases described so far from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi disaster. The data supporting the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the new efforts to expand stem cell populations ex vivo for infusion to treat bone marrow failure are reviewed. Hematopoietic stem cells derived from bone marrow or blood have a broad ability to repair and replace radiation induced damaged blood and immune cell production and may promote blood vessel formation and tissue repair. Additionally, a constituent of bone marrow-derived, adult pluripotent stem cells, very small embryonic like stem cells, are highly resistant to ionizing radiation and appear capable of regenerating radiation damaged tissue including skin, gut and lung. PMID:24520532

  14. Loss of DNA mismatch repair imparts a selective advantage in planarian adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, Jessica P; Resch, Alissa M; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Graveley, Brenton R; Heinen, Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) leads to an increased risk of early-onset colorectal and other types of cancer and is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Loss of MMR function results in a mutator phenotype that likely underlies its role in tumorigenesis. However, loss of MMR also results in the elimination of a DNA damage-induced checkpoint/apoptosis activation barrier that may allow damaged cells to grow unchecked. A fundamental question is whether loss of MMR provides pre-cancerous stem cells an immediate selective advantage in addition to establishing a mutator phenotype. To test this hypothesis in an in vivo system, we utilized the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea which contains a significant population of identifiable adult stem cells. We identified a planarian homolog of human MSH2, a MMR gene which is mutated in 38% of LS cases. The planarian Smed-msh2 is expressed in stem cells and some progeny. We depleted Smed-msh2 mRNA levels by RNA-interference and found a striking survival advantage in these animals treated with a cytotoxic DNA alkylating agent compared to control animals. We demonstrated that this tolerance to DNA damage is due to the survival of mitotically active, MMR-deficient stem cells. Our results suggest that loss of MMR provides an in vivo survival advantage to the stem cell population in the presence of DNA damage that may have implications for tumorigenesis.

  15. The lipolysis pathway sustains normal and transformed stem cells in adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shree Ram; Zeng, Xiankun; Zhao, Jiangsha; Liu, Ying; Hou, Gerald; Liu, Hanhan; Hou, Steven X

    2016-10-06

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) may be responsible for tumour dormancy, relapse and the eventual death of most cancer patients. In addition, these cells are usually resistant to cytotoxic conditions. However, very little is known about the biology behind this resistance to therapeutics. Here we investigated stem-cell death in the digestive system of adult Drosophila melanogaster. We found that knockdown of the coat protein complex I (COPI)-Arf79F (also known as Arf1) complex selectively killed normal and transformed stem cells through necrosis, by attenuating the lipolysis pathway, but spared differentiated cells. The dying stem cells were engulfed by neighbouring differentiated cells through a draper-myoblast city-Rac1-basket (also known as JNK)-dependent autophagy pathway. Furthermore, Arf1 inhibitors reduced CSCs in human cancer cell lines. Thus, normal or cancer stem cells may rely primarily on lipid reserves for energy, in such a way that blocking lipolysis starves them to death. This finding may lead to new therapies that could help to eliminate CSCs in human cancers.

  16. Enhanced elastin synthesis and maturation in human vascular smooth muscle tissue derived from induced-pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eoh, Joon H; Shen, Nian; Burke, Jacqueline A; Hinderer, Svenja; Xia, Zhiyong; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Gerecht, Sharon

    2017-04-01

    Obtaining vascular smooth muscle tissue with mature, functional elastic fibers is a key obstacle in tissue-engineered blood vessels. Poor elastin secretion and organization leads to a loss of specialization in contractile smooth muscle cells, resulting in over proliferation and graft failure. In this study, human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were differentiated into early smooth muscle cells, seeded onto a hybrid poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate/poly (l-lactide) (PEGdma-PLA) scaffold and cultured in a bioreactor while exposed to pulsatile flow, towards maturation into contractile smooth muscle tissue. We evaluated the effects of pulsatile flow on cellular organization as well as elastin expression and assembly in the engineered tissue compared to a static control through immunohistochemistry, gene expression and functionality assays. We show that culturing under pulsatile flow resulted in organized and functional hiPSC derived smooth muscle tissue. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue with robust, well-organized cells and elastic fibers and the supporting microfibril proteins necessary for elastic fiber assembly. Through qRT-PCR analysis, we found significantly increased expression of elastin, fibronectin, and collagen I, indicating the synthesis of necessary extracellular matrix components. Functionality assays revealed that hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue cultured in the bioreactor had an increased calcium signaling and contraction in response to a cholinergic agonist, significantly higher mature elastin content and improved mechanical properties in comparison to the static control. The findings presented here detail an effective approach to engineering elastic human vascular smooth muscle tissue with the functionality necessary for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.

  17. Ependymal cells of chordate larvae are stem-like cells that form the adult nervous system.

    PubMed

    Horie, Takeo; Shinki, Ryoko; Ogura, Yosuke; Kusakabe, Takehiro G; Satoh, Nori; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2011-01-27

    In ascidian tunicates, the metamorphic transition from larva to adult is accompanied by dynamic changes in the body plan. For instance, the central nervous system (CNS) is subjected to extensive rearrangement because its regulating larval organs are lost and new adult organs are created. To understand how the adult CNS is reconstructed, we traced the fate of larval CNS cells during ascidian metamorphosis by using transgenic animals and imaging technologies with photoconvertible fluorescent proteins. Here we show that most parts of the ascidian larval CNS, except for the tail nerve cord, are maintained during metamorphosis and recruited to form the adult CNS. We also show that most of the larval neurons disappear and only a subset of cholinergic motor neurons and glutamatergic neurons are retained. Finally, we demonstrate that ependymal cells of the larval CNS contribute to the construction of the adult CNS and that some differentiate into neurons in the adult CNS. An unexpected role of ependymal cells highlighted by this study is that they serve as neural stem-like cells to reconstruct the adult nervous network during chordate metamorphosis. Consequently, the plasticity of non-neuronal ependymal cells and neuronal cells in chordates should be re-examined by future studies.

  18. Recruitment and derecruitment characteristics of motor units in a hand muscle of young and old adults.

    PubMed

    Jesunathadas, Mark; Marmon, Adam R; Gibb, James M; Enoka, Roger M

    2010-06-01

    The significant decline in motor neuron number after approximately 60 yr of age is accompanied by a remodeling of the neuromuscular system so that average motor unit force increases and the ability of old adults to produce an intended force declines. One possible explanation for the loss of movement precision is that the remodeling increases the difference in recruitment forces between successively recruited motor units in old adults and this augments force variability at motor unit recruitment. The purpose of the study was to compare the forces and discharge characteristics of motor units in a hand muscle of young and old adults at motor unit recruitment and derecruitment. The difference in recruitment force between pairs of motor units did not differ between young (n=54) and old adults (n=56; P=0.702). However, old adults had a greater proportion of contractions in which motor units discharged action potentials transiently before discharging continuously during the ramp increase in force (young: 0.32; old: 0.41; P=0.045). Force variability at motor unit recruitment was greater for old adults compared with young adults (Por=0.729). These results suggest that the difference in force between the recruitment of successive motor units does not differ between age groups, but that motor unit recruitment may be more transient and could contribute to the greater variability in force observed in old adults during graded ramp contractions.

  19. Adult neural stem cells: Long-term self-renewal, replenishment by the immune system, or both?

    PubMed

    Beltz, Barbara S; Cockey, Emily L; Li, Jingjing; Platto, Jody F; Ramos, Kristina A; Benton, Jeanne L

    2015-05-01

    The current model of adult neurogenesis in mammals suggests that adult-born neurons are generated by stem cells that undergo long-term self-renewal, and that a lifetime supply of stem cells resides in the brain. In contrast, it has recently been demonstrated that adult-born neurons in crayfish are generated by precursors originating in the immune system. This is particularly interesting because studies done many years ago suggest that a similar mechanism might exist in rodents and humans, with bone marrow providing stem cells that can generate neurons. However, the relevance of these findings for natural mechanisms underlying adult neurogenesis in mammals is not clear, because of uncertainties at many levels. We argue here that the recent findings in crayfish send a strong signal to re-examine existing data from rodents and humans, and to design new experiments that will directly test the contributions of the immune system to adult neurogenesis in mammals.

  20. Cellular dynamics of regeneration reveals role of two distinct Pax7 stem cell populations in larval zebrafish muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    Pipalia, Tapan G.; Koth, Jana; Roy, Shukolpa D.; Hammond, Christina L.; Kawakami, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterogeneity of stem cells or their niches is likely to influence tissue regeneration. Here we reveal stem/precursor cell diversity during wound repair in larval zebrafish somitic body muscle using time-lapse 3D confocal microscopy on reporter lines. Skeletal muscle with incision wounds rapidly regenerates both slow and fast muscle fibre types. A swift immune response is followed by an increase in cells at the wound site, many of which express the muscle stem cell marker Pax7. Pax7+ cells proliferate and then undergo terminal differentiation involving Myogenin accumulation and subsequent loss of Pax7 followed by elongation and fusion to repair fast muscle fibres. Analysis of pax7a and pax7b transgenic reporter fish reveals that cells expressing each of the duplicated pax7 genes are distinctly localised in uninjured larvae. Cells marked by pax7a only or by both pax7a and pax7b enter the wound rapidly and contribute to muscle wound repair, but each behaves differently. Low numbers of pax7a-only cells form nascent fibres. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that the more numerous pax7b-marked cells frequently fuse to pre-existing fibres, contributing more strongly than pax7a-only cells to repair of damaged fibres. pax7b-marked cells are more often present in rows of aligned cells that are observed to fuse into a single fibre, but more rarely contribute to nascent regenerated fibres. Ablation of a substantial portion of nitroreductase-expressing pax7b cells with metronidazole prior to wounding triggered rapid pax7a-only cell accumulation, but this neither inhibited nor augmented pax7a-only cell-derived myogenesis and thus altered the cellular repair dynamics during wound healing. Moreover, pax7a-only cells did not regenerate pax7b cells, suggesting a lineage distinction. We propose a modified founder cell and fusion-competent cell model in which pax7a-only cells initiate fibre formation and pax7b cells contribute to fibre growth. This newly discovered cellular

  1. Daunorubicin induces cell death via activation of apoptotic signalling pathway and inactivation of survival pathway in muscle-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Stulpinas, Aurimas; Imbrasaitė, Aušra; Kalvelytė, Audronė Valerija

    2012-04-01

    Daunorubicin (as well as other anthracyclines) is known to be toxic to heart cells and other cells in organism thus limiting its applicability in human cancer therapy. To investigate possible mechanisms of daunorubicin cytotoxicity, we used stem cell lines derived from adult rabbit skeletal muscle. Recently, we have shown that daunorubicin induces apoptotic cell death in our cell model system and distinctly influences the activity of MAP kinases. Here, we demonstrate that two widely accepted antagonistic signalling pathways namely proapoptotic JNK and prosurvival PI3K/AKT participate in apoptosis. Using the Western blot method, we observed the activation of JNK and phosphorylation of its direct target c-Jun along with inactivation of AKT and its direct target GSK in the course of programmed cell death. By means of small-molecule kinase inhibitors and transfection of cells with the genes of the components of these pathways, c-Jun and AKT, we confirm that JNK signalling pathway is proapoptotic, whereas AKT is antiapoptotic in daunorubicin-induced muscle cells. These findings could contribute to new approaches which will result in less toxicity and fewer side effects that are currently associated with the use of daunorubicin in cancer therapies.

  2. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-04-25

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2(+) and Sox9(+) adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors.

  3. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland

    PubMed Central

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2+ and Sox9+ adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors. PMID:27109116

  4. Analytes and Metabolites Associated with Muscle Quality in Young, Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    LUSTGARTEN, MICHAEL S.; PRICE, LORI LYN; FIELDING, ROGER A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Identification of mechanisms that underlie lower extremity muscle quality (leg press one repetition maximum/total lean mass; LP/Lean) may be important for individuals interested in optimizing fitness and sport performance. The purpose of the current study was to provide observational insight into mechanisms that may underlie muscle quality by characterizing the association between 286 mass spectrometry metabolites and 17 chemistry screen analytes with LP/Lean in young, healthy adults (N = 77 (49 women and 28 men); mean age, 24.4 ± 4.2 yr; BMI, 23.5 ± 2.6 kg·m−2). Methods Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the 286 metabolites into 73 metabolite-containing PCA factors. Sex-adjusted linear regression was used to examine the association between PCA factors and chemistry screen analytes with LP/Lean. Q values were computed to account for multiple comparison testing. Stepwise linear regression and leave-one-out cross validation were used to identify a predictor set representative of LP/Lean and to assess internal validity, respectively. Results Metabolites or analytes related to dietary protein intake (albumin, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA)) and excitation-contraction coupling (calcium and magnesium) were positively associated, whereas metabolites related to gut bacterial metabolism (cinnamoylglycine, hydrocinnamate, hippurate, indolepropionate) and peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) (methylglutarylcarnitine and cinnamoylglycine) activation were negatively associated with LP/Lean. Use of leave-one-out cross validation identified magnesium, sex, and the PCA factors containing BCAAs and methionine and methylglutarylcarnitine to be present in more than 90% of the stepwise regression models, thereby explaining 26.7% of the variance (adjusted R2) inherent in muscle quality. Conclusion Collectively, these data suggest that mechanisms related to dietary protein intake, excitation-contraction coupling, gut microbial

  5. Postnatal stem/progenitor cells derived from the dental pulp of adult chimpanzee

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Pei-Hsun; Snyder, Brooke; Fillos, Dimitri; Ibegbu, Chris C; Huang, Anderson Hsien-Cheng; Chan, Anthony WS

    2008-01-01

    Background Chimpanzee dental pulp stem/stromal cells (ChDPSCs) are very similar to human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hBMSCs) as demonstrated by the expression pattern of cell surface markers and their multipotent differentiation capability. Results ChDPSCs were isolated from an incisor and a canine of a forty-seven year old female chimpanzee. A homogenous population of ChDPSCs was established in early culture at a high proliferation rate and verified by the expression pattern of thirteen cell surface markers. The ChDPSCs are multipotent and were capable of differentiating into osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineages under appropriate in vitro culture conditions. ChDPSCs also express stem cell (Sox-2, Nanog, Rex-1, Oct-4) and osteogenic (Osteonectin, osteocalcin, osteopontin) markers, which is comparable to reported results of rhesus monkey BMSCs (rBMSCs), hBMSCs and hDPSCs. Although ChDPSCs vigorously proliferated during the initial phase and gradually decreased in subsequent passages, the telomere length indicated that telomerase activity was not significantly reduced. Conclusion These results demonstrate that ChDPSCs can be efficiently isolated from post-mortem teeth of adult chimpanzees and are multipotent. Due to the almost identical genome composition of humans and chimpanzees, there is an emergent need for defining the new role of chimpanzee modeling in comparative medicine. Teeth are easy to recover at necropsy and easy to preserve prior to the retrieval of dental pulp for stem/stromal cells isolation. Therefore, the establishment of ChDPSCs would preserve and maximize the applications of such a unique and invaluable animal model, and could advance the understanding of cellular functions and differentiation control of adult stem cells in higher primates. PMID:18430234

  6. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor bisperoxovanadium endows myogenic cells with enhanced muscle stem cell functions via epigenetic modulation of Sca-1 and Pw1 promoters.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Masciarelli, Silvia; Madaro, Luca; Iosue, Ilaria; Marrocco, Valeria; Relaix, Frédéric; Fazi, Francesco; Marazzi, Giovanna; Sassoon, David A; Bouché, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the regulation of the stem cell fate is fundamental for designing novel regenerative medicine strategies. Previous studies have suggested that pharmacological treatments with small molecules provide a robust and reversible regulation of the stem cell program. Previously, we showed that treatment with a vanadium compound influences muscle cell fatein vitro In this study, we demonstrate that treatment with the phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor bisperoxovanadium (BpV) drives primary muscle cells to a poised stem cell stage, with enhanced function in muscle regenerationin vivofollowing transplantation into injured muscles. Importantly, BpV-treated cells displayed increased self-renewal potentialin vivoand replenished the niche in both satellite and interstitial cell compartments. Moreover, we found that BpV treatment induces specific activating chromatin modifications at the promoter regions of genes associated with stem cell fate, includingSca-1andPw1 Thus, our findings indicate that BpV resets the cell fate program by specific epigenetic regulations, such that the committed myogenic cell fate is redirected to an earlier progenitor cell fate stage, which leads to an enhanced regenerative stem cell potential.-Smeriglio, P., Alonso-Martin, S., Masciarelli, S., Madaro, L., Iosue, I., Marrocco, V., Relaix, F., Fazi, F., Marazzi, G., Sassoon, D. A., Bouché, M. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor bisperoxovanadium endows myogenic cells with enhanced muscle stem cell functionsviaepigenetic modulation of Sca-1 and Pw1 promoters.

  7. Longitudinal decline of lower extremity muscle power in healthy and mobility-limited older adults: influence of muscle mass, strength, composition, neuromuscular activation and single fiber contractile properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This longitudinal study examined the major physiological mechanisms that determine the age related loss of lower extremity muscle power in two distinct groups of older humans. We hypothesized that after ~3 years of follow-up, mobility-limited older adults (mean age: 77.2 +/- 4, n = 22, 12 females) w...

  8. Muscle Interstitial Cells: A Brief Field Guide to Non-satellite Cell Populations in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Moyle, Louise A; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is mainly enabled by a population of adult stem cells known as satellite cells. Satellite cells have been shown to be indispensable for adult skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last two decades, other stem/progenitor cell populations resident in the skeletal muscle interstitium have been identified as "collaborators" of satellite cells during regeneration. They also appear to have a key role in replacing skeletal muscle with adipose, fibrous, or bone tissue in pathological conditions. Here, we review the role and known functions of these different interstitial skeletal muscle cell types and discuss their role in skeletal muscle tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and disease, including their therapeutic potential for cell transplantation protocols.

  9. The human desmin promoter drives robust gene expression for skeletal muscle stem cell-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jonuschies, Jacqueline; Antoniou, Michael; Waddington, Simon; Boldrin, Luisa; Muntoni, Francesco; Thrasher, Adrian; Morgan, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) represent suitable candidates to mediate gene therapy for muscular dystrophies as they infect dividing and non-dividing cells and integrate their genetic material into the host genome, thereby theoretically mediating longterm expression. We evaluated the ability of LVs where a GFP reporter gene was under the control of five different promoters, to transduce and mediate expression in myogenic and non-myogenic cells in vitro and in skeletal muscle fibres and stem (satellite) cells in vivo. We further analysed lentivirally-transduced satellite cell-derived myoblasts following their transplantation into dystrophic, immunodeficient mouse muscles. The spleen focus-forming virus promoter mediated the highest gene expression in all cell types; the CBX3-HNRPA2B1 ubiquitously-acting chromatin opening element (UCOE) promoter was also active in all cells, whereas the human desmin promoter in isolation or fused with UCOE had lower activity in non-muscle cells. Surprisingly, the human skeletal muscle actin promoter was also active in immune cells. The human desmin promoter mediated robust, persistent reporter gene expression in myogenic cells in vitro, and satellite cells and muscle fibres in vivo. The human desmin promoter combined with UCOE did not significantly increase transgene expression. Therefore, our data indicate that the desmin promoter is suitable for the development of therapeutic purposes.

  10. Smooth-muscle-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells support and augment cord-like structures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vo, Elaine; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Zha, Yuanting; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-06-01

    Engineering vascularized tissue is crucial for its successful implantation, survival, and integration with the host tissue. Vascular smooth muscle cells (v-SMCs) provide physical support to the vasculature and aid in maintaining endothelial viability. In this study, we show an efficient derivation of v-SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and demonstrate their functionality and ability to support the vasculature in vitro. Human ESCs were differentiated in monolayers and supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Human ESC-derived smooth-muscle-like cells (SMLCs) were found to highly express specific smooth muscle cell (SMC) markers--including alpha-smooth muscle actin, calponin, SM22, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain--to produce and secrete fibronectin and collagen, and to contract in response to carbachol. In vitro tubulogenesis assays revealed that these hESC-derived SMLCs interacted with human endothelial progenitor cell (EPCs) to form longer and thicker cord-like structures in vitro. We have demonstrated a simple protocol for the efficient derivation of highly purified SMLCs from hESCs. These in vitro functional SMLCs interacted with EPCs to support and augment capillary-like structures (CLSs), demonstrating the potential of hESCs as a cell source for therapeutic vascular tissue engineering.

  11. Simultaneous control of stemness and differentiation by the transcription factor Escargot in adult stem cells: How can we tease them apart?

    PubMed Central

    Loza-Coll, Mariano A.; Jones, D. Leanne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The homeostatic turnover of adult organs and their regenerative capacity following injury depend on a careful balance between stem cell self-renewal (to maintain or enlarge the stem cell pool) and differentiation (to replace lost tissue). We have recently characterized the role of the Drosophila Snail family transcription factor escargot (esg) in testis cyst stem cells (CySCs)1,2 and intestinal stem cells (ISCs). 3,4 CySCs mutant for esg are not maintained as stem cells, but they remain capable of differentiating normally along the cyst cell lineage. In contrast, esg mutant CySCs that give rise to a closely related lineage, the apical hub cells, cannot maintain hub cell identity. Similarly, Esg maintains stemness of ISCs while regulating the terminal differentiation of progenitor cells into absorptive enterocytes or secretory enteroendocrine cells. Therefore, our findings suggest that Esg may play a conserved and pivotal regulatory role in adult stem cells, controlling both their maintenance and terminal differentiation. Here we propose that this dual regulatory role is due to simultaneous control by Esg of overlapping genetic programs and discuss the exciting challenges and opportunities that lie ahead to explore the underlying mechanisms experimentally. PMID:27077690

  12. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Vascular Progenitor Cells Capable of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Katherine L; Obrtlikova, Petra; Alvarez, Diego F; King, Judy A; Keirstead, Susan A; Allred, Jeremy R; Kaufman, Dan S

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous studies have demonstrated development of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as separate cell lineages derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We demonstrate CD34+ cells isolated from differentiated hESCs function as vascular progenitor cells capable of producing both ECs and SMCs. These studies better define the developmental origin and reveal the relationship between these two cell types, as well as provide a more complete biological characterization. MATERIALS AND METHODS hESCs are co-cultured on M2-10B4 stromal cells or Wnt1 expressing M2-10B4 for 13–15 days to generate a CD34+ cell population. These cells are isolated using a magnetic antibody separation kit and cultured on fibronectin coated dishes in EC medium. To induce SMC differentiation, culture medium is changed and a morphological and phenotypic change occurs within 24–48 hours. RESULTS CD34+ vascular progenitor cells give rise to ECs and SMCs. The two populations express respective cell specific transcripts and proteins, exhibit intracellular calcium in response to various agonists, and form robust tube-like structures when co-cultured in Matrigel. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured under SMC conditions do not exhibit a change in phenotype or genotype. Wnt1 overexpressing stromal cells produced an increased number of progenitor cells. CONCLUSIONS The ability to generate large numbers of ECs and SMCs from a single vascular progenitor cell population is promising for therapeutic use to treat a variety of diseased and ischemic conditions. The step-wise differentiation outlined here is an efficient, reproducible method with potential for large scale cultures suitable for clinical applications. PMID:20067819

  13. Isolated Rat Epididymal Basal Cells Share Common Properties with Adult Stem Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Mandon, Marion; Hermo, Louis; Cyr, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    There is little information on the function of epididymal basal cells. These cells secrete prostaglandins, can metabolize radical oxygen species, and have apical projections that are components of the blood-epididymis barrier. The objective of this study was to develop a reproducible protocol to isolate rat epididymal basal cells and to characterize their function by gene expression profiling. Integrin-alpha6 was used to isolate a highly purified population of basal cells. Microarray analysis indicated that expression levels of 552 genes were enriched in basal cells relative to other cell types. Among these genes, 45 were expressed at levels of 5-fold or greater. These highly expressed genes coded for proteins implicated in cell adhesion, cytoskeletal function, ion transport, cellular signaling, and epidermal function, and included proteases and antiproteases, signal transduction, and transcription factors. Several highly expressed genes have been reported in adult stem cells, suggesting that basal cells may represent an epididymal stem cell population. A basal cell culture was established that showed that these basal cells can differentiate in vitro from keratin (KRT) 5-positive cells to cells that express KRT8 and connexin 26, a marker of columnar cells. These data provide novel information on epididymal basal cell gene expression and suggest that these cells can act as adult stem cells. PMID:26400399

  14. Short-term bed rest increases TLR4 and IL-6 expression in skeletal muscle of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Kyle L.; Markofski, Melissa M.; Walker, Dillon K.; Dickinson, Jared M.; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Brasier, Allan R.; Rasmussen, Blake B.; Volpi, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Bed rest induces significant loss of leg lean mass in older adults. Systemic and tissue inflammation also accelerates skeletal muscle loss, but it is unknown whether inflammation is associated to inactivity-induced muscle atrophy in healthy older adults. We determined if short-term bed rest increases toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling and pro-inflammatory markers in older adult skeletal muscle biopsy samples. Six healthy, older adults underwent seven consecutive days of bed rest. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were taken after an overnight fast before and at the end of bed rest. Serum cytokine expression was measured before and during bed rest. TLR4 signaling and cytokine mRNAs associated with pro- and anti-inflammation and anabolism were measured in muscle biopsy samples using Western blot analysis and qPCR. Participants lost ∼4% leg lean mass with bed rest. We found that after bed rest, muscle levels of TLR4 protein expression and interleukin-6 (IL-6), nuclear factor-κB1, interleukin-10, and 15 mRNA expression were increased after bed rest (P < 0.05). Additionally, the cytokines interferon-γ, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, were elevated in serum samples following bed rest (P < 0.05). We conclude that short-term bed rest in older adults modestly increased some pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in muscle samples while systemic changes in pro-inflammatory cytokines were mostly absent. Upregulation of TLR4 protein content suggests that bed rest in older adults increases the capacity to mount an exaggerated, and perhaps unnecessary, inflammatory response in the presence of specific TLR4 ligands, e.g., during acute illness. PMID:23761639

  15. Heterochromatin compaction is regulated by Suv4-20h1 to maintains skeletal muscle stem cells quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Léo

    2016-01-01

    In this report, Boonsanay and colleagues describe a novel mechanism of maintenance of skeletal muscle stem cells [also known as satellite cells (SCs)] quiescence via the di-methyltransferase Suv4-20h1, regulator of heterochromatin formation. Conditional ablation of Suv4-20h1 in SCs leads notably to the loss of the histone modification H4K20me2 on the distal regulatory element of Myod combined with a relocation of the Myod locus toward a central position in the nucleus. This switch in nuclear compartment is correlated with decreased facultative H3K27me3 associated heterochromatin, and an increase in spontaneously activated MYOD-expressing SCs in homeostatic muscles. Consequently, Suv4-20h1 knock-out SCs demonstrate compromised stem cell potential, as they fail to efficiently self-renew and replenish the SC pool upon muscle injury. Strikingly, restoring MYOD expression alone rescues the levels of facultative chromatin and reverses the loss-of-quiescence phenotype. PMID:27488816

  16. Functional adult acetylcholine receptor develops independently of motor innervation in Sol 8 mouse muscle cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Pinset, C; Mulle, C; Benoit, P; Changeux, J P; Chelly, J; Gros, F; Montarras, D

    1991-01-01

    We have defined culture conditions, using a feeder layer of cells from the embryonic mesenchymal cell line, 10T1/2 and a serum-free medium, which allow cells from the mouse myogenic cell line Sol 8 to form contracting myotubes for two weeks. Under these culture conditions, Sol 8 myotubes undergo a maturation process characterized by a sequential expression of two phenotypes. An early phenotype is typified by the expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) gamma-subunit transcripts and the presence of low conductance ACh-activated channels, typical of embryonic AChR. A late phenotype is characterized by the expression of AChR epsilon-subunit transcripts, the decreased accumulation of gamma-subunit transcripts and the appearance of high conductance ACh-activated channels, typical of adult AChR. These results indicate that the expression of functional adult type AChR does not require the presence of the motor nerve and therefore represents an intrinsic feature of the Sol 8 muscle cells. Chronic exposure of the cells to the voltage-sensitive Na+ channel blocking agent tetrodotoxin does not affect the appearance of the AChR epsilon-subunit transcripts but prevents the reduction of the steady-state level of the AChR gamma-subunit transcripts and yields a reduced proportion of the adult type channels. Thus, activity seems to facilitate the switch from the embryonic to the adult phenotype of the AChR protein. The Sol 8 cell system might be useful to analyse further the genetic and epigenetic regulation of muscle fibre maturation in mammals. Images PMID:1868829

  17. Relationships Between Metabolic Rate, Muscle Electromyograms and Swim Performance of Adult Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Brown, Richard S.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Mesa, Matthew G.; VanderKooi, S P.; McKinstry, Craig A.

    2003-10-01

    In 2000 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated a two-year study to investigate the metabolic rate and swimming performance and to estimate the total energy used (i.e., aerobic and anaerobic) by adult spring Chinook salmon migrating upstream through a large hydropower dam on the Columbia River. The investigation involved one year of laboratory study and one year of field study at Bonneville Dam. The objectives of the laboratory study, reported here, were to (1) measure active rates of oxygen consumption of adult spring chinook salmon at three water temperatures over a range of swimming speeds; (2) estimate the Ucrit of adult spring chinook salmon; and (3) monitor EMGs of red and white muscle in the salmon over a range of swimming speeds. Future papers will report on the results of the field study. Our results indicated that the rate of oxygen consumption and red and white muscle activity in adult spring chinook salmon were strongly correlated with swimming speed over a range of fish sizes and at three different temperatures. Active oxygen consumption increased linearly with swim speed before leveling off at speeds at or above Ucrit. This pattern was similar at each water temperature and indicated that fish were approaching their maximal aerobic oxygen consumption at higher swim speeds. Modeling showed that temperature, but not size or sex, influenced the relation between V02 and swim speed, thus a V02-swim speed model based on temperature (but independent of sex and size) should be a biologically relevant way of estimating the energy use of fish in the wild.

  18. Systemic elevation of interleukin-15 in vivo promotes apoptosis in skeletal muscles of young adult and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Alway, Stephen E

    2008-08-15

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that systemic elevation of IL-15 would attenuate apoptosis in skeletal muscles of aged rats. IL-15 was administered to young adult (n=6) and aged (n=6) rats for 14 days. Apoptosis was quantified using an ELISA assay and verified through TUNEL staining of muscle sections. As expected, apoptosis was greater in muscles from aged control rats, compared to age-matched control. Apoptosis was also greater in the muscles from young adult and aged rats treated with IL-15. These increases in apoptosis were associated with decreases in muscle mass of IL-15 treated rats. These data do not support our initial hypothesis and suggest that systemic elevation of IL-15 promotes apoptosis in skeletal muscle. The proposed anti-apoptotic property of IL-15 may be specific to cell-type and/or the degree of muscle pathology present; however, additional research is required to more clearly decipher its role in skeletal muscle.

  19. Adult stem cells in the small intestine are intrinsically programmed with their location-specific function.

    PubMed

    Middendorp, Sabine; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Wiegerinck, Caroline L; Mokry, Michal; Akkerman, Ronald D L; van Wijngaarden, Simone; Clevers, Hans; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S

    2014-05-01

    Differentiation and specialization of epithelial cells in the small intestine are regulated in two ways. First, there is differentiation along the crypt-villus axis of the intestinal stem cells into absorptive enterocytes, Paneth, goblet, tuft, enteroendocrine, or M cells, which is mainly regulated by WNT. Second, there is specialization along the cephalocaudal axis with different absorptive and digestive functions in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum that is controlled by several transcription factors such as GATA4. However, so far it is unknown whether location-specific functional properties are intrinsically programmed within stem cells or if continuous signaling from mesenchymal cells is necessary to maintain the location-specific identity of the small intestine. Using the pure epithelial organoid technique, we show that region-specific gene expression profiles are conserved throughout long-term cultures of both mouse and human intestinal stem cells and correlated with differential Gata4 expression. Furthermore, the human organoid culture system demonstrates that Gata4-regulated gene expression is only allowed in absence of WNT signaling. These data show that location-specific function is intrinsically programmed in the adult stem cells of the small intestine and that their differentiation fate is independent of location-specific extracellular signals. In light of the potential future clinical application of small intestine-derived organoids, our data imply that it is important to generate GATA4-positive and GATA4-negative cultures to regenerate all essential functions of the small intestine.

  20. Growth and differentiation of adult hippocampal arctic ground squirrel neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Drew, Kelly L; McGee, Rebecca C; Wells, Matthew S; Kelleher-Andersson, Judith A

    2011-01-07

    Arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii, AGS) are unique in their ability to hibernate with a core body temperature near or below freezing. These animals also resist ischemic injury to the brain in vivo and oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro. These unique qualities provided the impetus to isolate AGS neurons to examine inherent neuronal characteristics that could account for the capacity of AGS neurons to resist injury and cell death caused by ischemia and extremely cold temperatures. Identifying proteins or gene targets that allow for the distinctive properties of these cells could aid in the discovery of effective therapies for a number of ischemic indications and for the study of cold tolerance. Adult AGS hippocampus contains neural stem cells that continue to proliferate, allowing for easy expansion of these stem cells in culture. We describe here methods by which researchers can utilize these stem cells and differentiated neurons for any number of purposes. By closely following these steps the AGS neural stem cells can be expanded through two passages or more and then differentiated to a culture high in TUJ1-positive neurons (~50%) without utilizing toxic chemicals to minimize the number of dividing cells. Ischemia induces neurogenesis and neurogenesis which proceeds via MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt survival signaling pathways contributes to ischemia resistance in vivo and in vitro (Kelleher-Anderson, Drew et al., in preparation). Further characterization of these unique neural cells can advance on many fronts, using some or all of these methods.

  1. An RbAp48-like gene regulates adult stem cells in planarians.

    PubMed

    Bonuccelli, Lucia; Rossi, Leonardo; Lena, Annalisa; Scarcelli, Vittoria; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Evangelista, Monica; Iacopetti, Paola; Gremigni, Vittorio; Salvetti, Alessandra

    2010-03-01

    Retinoblastoma-associated proteins 46 and 48 (RbAp46 and RbAp48) are factors that are components of different chromatin-modelling complexes, such as polycomb repressive complex 2, the activity of which is related to epigenetic gene regulation in stem cells. To date, no direct findings are available on the in vivo role of RbAp48 in stem-cell biology. We recently identified DjRbAp48 - a planarian (Dugesia japonica) homologue of human RBAP48 - expression of which is restricted to the neoblasts, the adult stem cells of planarians. In vivo silencing of DjRbAp48 induces lethality and inability to regenerate, even though neoblasts proliferate and accumulate after wounding. Despite a partial reduction in neoblast number, we were always able to detect a significant number of these cells in DjRbAp48 RNAi animals. Parallel to the decrease in neoblasts, a reduction in the number of differentiated cells and the presence of apoptotic-like neoblasts were detectable in RNAi animals. These findings suggest that DjRbAp48 is not involved in neoblast maintenance, but rather in the regulation of differentiation of stem-cell progeny. We discuss our data, taking into account the possibility that DjRbAp48 might control the expression of genes necessary for cell differentiation by influencing chromatin architecture.

  2. The superior regenerative potential of muscle-derived stem cells for articular cartilage repair is attributed to high cell survival and chondrogenic potential

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongshuai; Lu, Aiping; Tang, Ying; Beckman, Sarah; Nakayama, Naoki; Poddar, Minakshi; Hogan, MaCalus V; Huard, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    Three populations of muscle-derived cells (PP1, PP3, and PP6) were isolated from mouse skeletal muscle using modified preplate technique and retrovirally transduced with BMP4/GFP.  In vitro, the PP1 cells (fibroblasts) proliferated significantly slower than the PP3 (myoblasts) and PP6 cells (muscle-derived stem cells); the PP1 and PP6 cells showed a superior rate of survival compared with PP3 cells under oxidative stress; and the PP6 cells showed significantly superior chondrogenic capabilities than PP1 and PP3 cells. In vivo, the PP6 cells promoted superior cartilage regeneration compared with the other muscle-derived cell populations. The cartilage defects in the PP6 group had significantly higher histological scores than those of the other muscle-derived cell groups, and GFP detection revealed that the transplanted PP6 cells showed superior in vivo cell survival and chondrogenic capabilities compared with the PP1 and PP3 cells. PP6 cells (muscle-derived stem cells) are superior to other primary muscle-derived cells for use as a cellular vehicle for BMP4-based ex vivo gene therapy to heal full-thickness osteo-chondral defects. The superiority of the PP6/muscle-derived stem cells appears to be attributable to a combination of increased rate of in vivo survival and superior chondrogenic differentiation capacity. PMID:27990446

  3. Immunohistochemical analysis of two stem cell markers of α-smooth muscle actin and STRO-1 during wound healing of human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Yoshiba, Nagako; Yoshiba, Kunihiko; Ohkura, Naoto; Shigetani, Yoshimi; Takei, Erika; Hosoya, Akihiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Okiji, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    Recent studies have employed two markers, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and STRO-1, to detect cells with mesenchymal stem cell properties in dental pulp. The present study aimed to explore the expression profile of α-SMA and STRO-1 in intact dental pulp as well as during wound healing in adult dental pulp tissue. Healthy pulps were mechanically exposed and capped with the clinically used materials MTA (ProRoot White MTA) or Ca(OH)₂ to induce a mineralized barrier at the exposed surface. After 7-42 days, the teeth were extracted and processed for immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against α-SMA, STRO-1 and nestin (a neurogenic cytoskeletal protein expressed in odontoblasts). In normal pulp, α-SMA was detected in vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes. Double immunofluorescent staining with STRO-1 and α-SMA showed that STRO-1 was localized in vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes and endothelial cells, in addition to nerve fibers. During the process of dental pulp healing, numerous α-SMA-positive cells emerged at the wound margin at 14 days, and the initially formed mineralized barrier was lined with α-SMA-positive cells similar in appearance to reparative odontoblasts, some of which co-expressed nestin. STRO-1 was abundant in nerve fibers. In the advanced stage of mineralized barrier formation at 42 days, cells lining the barrier were stained with nestin, and no staining of α-SMA was detected in those cells. These observations indicate that α-SMA-positive cells temporarily appear along the wound margin during the earlier phase of mineralized barrier formation and STRO-1 is confined in vascular and neuronal elements.

  4. The postnatal origin of adult neural stem cells and the effects of glucocorticoids on their genesis.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Martínez, Sylvia; Trejo, José L

    2015-02-15

    The relevance of adult neurogenesis in hippocampal function is well documented, as is the potential impact stress has on the adult neurogenic niche. Adult born neurons are generated from neural precursors in the dentate gyrus (DG), although the point in postnatal development that these cell precursors originate is not known. This is particularly relevant if we consider the effects stress may have on the development of neural precursors, and whether such effects on adult neurogenesis and behavior may persist in the long-term. We have analyzed the proportion of neural precursors in the adult murine hippocampus born on specific days during postnatal development using a dual birth-dating analysis, and we assessed their sensitivity to dexamethasone (DEX) on the peak day of cell generation. We also studied the consequences of postnatal DEX administration on adult hippocampal-dependent behavior. Postnatal day 6 (P6) is a preferred period for proliferating neural stem cells (NSCs) to become the precursors that remain in a proliferative state throughout adulthood. This window is independent of gender, the cell's location in the DG granule cell layer or their rostro-caudal position. DEX administration at P6 reduces the size of the adult NSC pool in the DG, which is correlated with poor learning/memory capacity and increased anxiety-like behavior. These results indicate that aNSCs are generated non-uniformly during postnatal development, with peak generation on day P6, and that stress receptor activation during the key period of postnatal NSC generation has a profound impact on both adult hippocampal neurogenesis and behavior.

  5. Protein Considerations for Optimising Skeletal Muscle Mass in Healthy Young and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Witard, Oliver C.; Wardle, Sophie L.; Macnaughton, Lindsay S.; Hodgson, Adrian B.; Tipton, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is critical for human health. Protein feeding, alongside resistance exercise, is a potent stimulus for muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and is a key factor that regulates skeletal muscle mass (SMM). The main purpose of this narrative review was to evaluate the latest evidence for optimising the amino acid or protein source, dose, timing, pattern and macronutrient coingestion for increasing or preserving SMM in healthy young and healthy older adults. We used a systematic search strategy of PubMed and Web of Science to retrieve all articles related to this review objective. In summary, our findings support the notion that protein guidelines for increasing or preserving SMM are more complex than simply recommending a total daily amount of protein. Instead, multifactorial interactions between protein source, dose, timing, pattern and macronutrient coingestion, alongside exercise, influence the stimulation of MPS, and thus should be considered in the context of protein recommendations for regulating SMM. To conclude, on the basis of currently available scientific literature, protein recommendations for optimising SMM should be tailored to the population or context of interest, with consideration given to age and resting/post resistance exercise conditions. PMID:27023595

  6. Effect of an Eight-Week Ballroom Dancing Program on Muscle Architecture in Older Adults Females.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, Christina C P; Lodovico, Angélica; Fowler, Neil; Rodacki, André L F

    2015-10-01

    Aging is related to a progressive remodeling of the neuromuscular system, which includes muscle mass, strength, and power reductions. This study investigated the effect of an eight-week dance program on fascicle pennation angle, fascicle length, and thickness of the vastus lateralis (VL), tibialis anterior (TA), biceps femoris (BF), and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles using ultrasound images. Thirty-four healthy older women were randomly assigned to either a dancing (DG: n = 19, 69.1 ± 6.5 years, 72.5 ± 11.7 kg) or control group (CG: n = 15, 71.5 ± 7.4 years, 70.9 ± 9.3 kg). After training, the DG showed greater (p < .05) thickness for VL (16%), TA (17%), BF (19%), and GM (15%); pennation angle for VL (21%), TA (23%), BF (21%), and GM (17%); and fascicle length for VL (11%), TA (12%), BF (10%), and GM (10%). These findings suggest that dance training was effective to change the lower limb muscle architecture in older female adults.

  7. Maternal High Fat Diet Alters Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Catalytic Activity in Adult Male Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Pileggi, Chantal A.; Hedges, Christopher P.; Segovia, Stephanie A.; Markworth, James F.; Durainayagam, Brenan R.; Gray, Clint; Zhang, Xiaoyuan D.; Barnett, Matthew P. G.; Vickers, Mark H.; Hickey, Anthony J. R.; Reynolds, Clare M.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    A maternal high-fat (HF) diet during pregnancy can lead to metabolic compromise, such as insulin resistance in adult offspring. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is one mechanism contributing to metabolic impairments in insulin resistant states. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether mitochondrial dysfunction is evident in metabolically compromised offspring born to HF-fed dams. Sprague-Dawley dams were randomly assigned to receive a purified control diet (CD; 10% kcal from fat) or a high fat diet (HFD; 45% kcal from fat) for 10 days prior to mating, throughout pregnancy and during lactation. From weaning, all male offspring received a standard chow diet and soleus muscle was collected at day 150. Expression of the mitochondrial transcription factors nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) were downregulated in HF offspring. Furthermore, genes encoding the mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) respiratory complex subunits were suppressed in HF offspring. Moreover, protein expression of the complex I subunit, NDUFB8, was downregulated in HF offspring (36%), which was paralleled by decreased maximal catalytic linked activity of complex I and III (40%). Together, these results indicate that exposure to a maternal HF diet during development may elicit lifelong mitochondrial alterations in offspring skeletal muscle. PMID:27917127

  8. Harnessing the potential of adult cardiac stem cells: lessons from haematopoiesis, the embryo and the niche.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Gemma M; Riley, Paul R

    2012-10-01

    Across biomedicine, there is a major drive to develop stem cell (SC) treatments for debilitating diseases. Most effective treatments restore an embryonic phenotype to adult SCs. This has led to two emerging paradigms in SC biology: the application of developmental biology studies and the manipulation of the SC niche. Developmental studies can reveal how SCs are orchestrated to build organs, the understanding of which is important in order to instigate tissue repair in the adult. SC niche studies can reveal cues that maintain SC 'stemness' and how SCs may be released from the constraints of the niche to differentiate and repopulate a 'failing' organ. The haematopoietic system provides an exemplar whereby characterisation of the blood lineages during development and the bone marrow niche has resulted in therapeutics now routinely used in the clinic. Ischaemic heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans and the question remains as to whether these principles can be applied to the heart, in order to exploit the potential of adult SCs for use in cardiovascular repair and regeneration.

  9. Endometrial adult/progenitor stem cells: pathogenetic theory and new antiangiogenic approach for endometriosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Pittatore, G; Moggio, A; Benedetto, C; Bussolati, B; Revelli, A

    2014-03-01

    The cyclical arrival of endometrial cells into the abdominal cavity through retrograde flux at menstruation represents the etiopathogenetic basis of endometriosis. The endometrium has peculiar regenerative properties linked to the presence of adult stem cells similar to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Once in the abdominal cavity, these MSCs could proliferate, invade, and differentiate into endometrial cells, finally generating ectopic implants. As only differentiated endometrial cells, and not endometrial MSCs, possess steroid hormone receptors, MSCs could be responsible for the high rate of persistence/recurrence of the disease after hypoestrogenism-inducing therapies. Even angiogenesis promoted by MSCs could play an important role, as survival and proliferation of endometriotic tissue depend on the formation of new blood vessels. Inhibition of angiogenesis represents, in fact, a new, promising therapeutic approach for the disease. Further, medications directly targeting endometriosis MSCs could be effective, alone or in association with hormonal treatments, in increasing the success of medical treatment.

  10. Adult stem cells, scaffolds for in vivo and in vitro myocardial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Di Felice, Valentina; De Luca, Angela; Serradifalco, Claudia; Di Marco, Patrizia; Verin, Lucia; Motta, Antonella; Guercio, Annalisa; Zummo, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    The main goal in the last few years in cardiac research has been to isolate cardiac potential stem cells from adult myocardium and to demonstrate their differentiation potential. We have previously demonstrated that c-Kit positive cardiac stem cells are able to organize themselves into a tissue-like cell mass. In this 3D mass, they can produce a high concentration of natural extracellular matrix, can create vessels, a capsule and, with the help of an Open-pore Polylactic Acid scaffold, many cells can organize an elementary myocardium. Drawing from this background, we decided to design and use poly-lactic scaffolds and the model of the athymic Nude-Foxn1(nu) mouse to evaluate the extent of the myogenic vs endothelial differentiation in vivo, and to evaluate the presence or the absence of a foreign body reaction.

  11. Inductive interactions mediated by interplay of asymmetric signalling underlie development of adult haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Souilhol, Céline; Gonneau, Christèle; Lendinez, Javier G.; Batsivari, Antoniana; Rybtsov, Stanislav; Wilson, Heather; Morgado-Palacin, Lucia; Hills, David; Taoudi, Samir; Antonchuk, Jennifer; Zhao, Suling; Medvinsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic development, adult haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge preferentially in the ventral domain of the aorta in the aorta–gonad–mesonephros (AGM) region. Several signalling pathways such as Notch, Wnt, Shh and RA are implicated in this process, yet how these interact to regulate the emergence of HSCs has not previously been described in mammals. Using a combination of ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we report here that stage-specific reciprocal dorso–ventral inductive interactions and lateral input from the urogenital ridges are required to drive HSC development in the aorta. Our study strongly suggests that these inductive interactions in the AGM region are mediated by the interplay between spatially polarized signalling pathways. Specifically, Shh produced in the dorsal region of the AGM, stem cell factor in the ventral and lateral regions, and BMP inhibitory signals in the ventral tissue are integral parts of the regulatory system involved in the development of HSCs. PMID:26952187

  12. Ratio of C-Reactive Protein to Albumin Predicts Muscle Mass in Adult Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Tong; Wu, Pei-Yu; Chen, Hsi-Hsien; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Hsu, Yung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the ratio of C-reactive protein to albumin (CRP–Alb ratio) is associated with clinical outcomes in patients with disease. We examined the predictive value of this ratio in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). In this cross-sectional study, 91 eligible adult HD patients were analyzed, and the correlation between the CRP–Alb ratio and skeletal muscle mass normalized for body weight (SMM/wt; estimated using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer) was investigated. The mean age of the study participants was 54.9 ± 6.6 years (ranging from 27 to 64 years); 43 (47.2%) were men. The mean values for the SMM/wt were 39.1% ± 5.4%. The CRP–Alb ratio was found to be negatively correlated with SMM/wt (r = −0.33, P = 0.002) and creatinine (r = −0.20, P = 0.056). All the univariate significant and nonsignificant relevant covariates were selected for multivariable stepwise regression analysis. We determined that the homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance and CRP–Alb ratio were independent risk determinants for SMM/wt (βHOMA-IR = −0.18 and βCRP–Alb ratio = −3.84, adjusted R2 = 0.32). This study indicated that the CRP–Alb ratio may help clinicians in predicting muscle mass in adult patients undergoing HD. PMID:27768746

  13. Stem cell activation in adults can reverse detrimental changes in body composition to reduce fat and increase lean mass in both sexes.

    PubMed

    Wiren, Kristine M; Hashimoto, Joel G; Zhang, Xiao-Wei

    2011-12-01

    Detrimental changes in body composition are often associated with declining levels of testosterone. Here, we evaluated the notion that multipotent mesenchymal stem cells, that give rise to both fat and muscle tissue, can play a significant role to alter existing body composition in the adult. Transgenic mice with targeted androgen receptor (AR) overexpression in stem cells were employed. Wild-type littermate and AR-transgenic male and female mice were gonadectomized and left untreated for 2 months. After the hypogonadal period, mice were then treated with 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) for 6 weeks. After orchidectomy (ORX), wild-type males have reduced lean mass and increased fat mass compared to shams. DHT treatment was beneficial to partially restore body composition. In wild-type females, ovariectomy (OVX) produced a similar change but there was no improvement with DHT. In targeted AR transgenic mice, DHT treatment increased lean and reduced fat mass to sham levels. In contrast to wild-type females, DHT treatment in female transgenic mice significantly ameliorated the increased fat and decreased lean mass changes that result after OVX. Our results show that DHT administration reduces fat mass and increases lean mass in wild-type males but not females, indicating that wild-type females are not as sensitive to androgen treatment. Because both male and female transgenic mice are more responsive than wild-type, results suggest that body composition remains linked to stem cell fate in the adult and that targeted androgen signaling in stem cells can play a significant role to reverse detrimental changes in body composition in both sexes.

  14. Fragile x mental retardation protein regulates proliferation and differentiation of adult neural stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuping; Shan, Ge; Guo, Weixiang; Smrt, Richard D; Johnson, Eric B; Li, Xuekun; Pfeiffer, Rebecca L; Szulwach, Keith E; Duan, Ranhui; Barkho, Basam Z; Li, Wendi; Liu, Changmei; Jin, Peng; Zhao, Xinyu

    2010-04-08

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited mental retardation, is caused by the loss of functional fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that can regulate the translation of specific mRNAs. Adult neurogenesis, a process considered important for neuroplasticity and memory, is regulated at multiple molecular levels. In this study, we investigated whether Fmrp deficiency affects adult neurogenesis. We show that in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome, adult neurogenesis is indeed altered. The loss of Fmrp increases the proliferation and alters the fate specification of adult neural progenitor/stem cells (aNPCs). We demonstrate that Fmrp regulates the protein expression of several components critical for aNPC function, including CDK4 and GSK3beta. Dysregulation of GSK3beta led to reduced Wnt signaling pathway activity, which altered the expression of neurogenin1 and the fate specification of aNPCs. These data unveil a novel regulatory role for Fmrp and translational regulation in adult neurogenesis.

  15. [Progress of Experimental Research on Differentiation of Muscle-Derived Stem Cells into Haematopoietic Lineages in Vitro -Review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Gao, Xiao-Ning; Chen, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Pan-Pan; Wang, Tao; Dou, Hao-Ying

    2016-12-01

    Muscle-derived stem cells (MDSC) are a population of multipotent stem cells in the muscular tissue. It provide an excellent prospect of hemopathy treatment due to their superiorities, such as rich sources, convenient material resource and a high survival rate after transplantation and so on. However, there are great differences in sampling, separation, purification, and proliferation when MDSC were cultured in vitro. In addition, the proliferation conditions of the MDSC in vitro are yet unclear. The related regulatory mechanisms, which MDSC transformed into haematopoietic cells, need to be investigated. In this article, the experimental researches on the differentiation of MDSC into haematopoietic lineages are reviewed, the concrete problems discussed in this review are culture of MDSC in vitro, identification of MDSC, proleferation of MDSC, differention of MDSC in to hematopoietic lineages and so on.

  16. A human iPSC model of Hutchinson Gilford Progeria reveals vascular smooth muscle and mesenchymal stem cell defects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinqiu; Lian, Qizhou; Zhu, Guili; Zhou, Fan; Sui, Lin; Tan, Cindy; Mutalif, Rafidah Abdul; Navasankari, Raju; Zhang, Yuelin; Tse, Hung-Fat; Stewart, Colin L; Colman, Alan

    2011-01-07

    The segmental premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a truncated and farnesylated form of Lamin A called progerin. HGPS affects mesenchymal lineages, including the skeletal system, dermis, and vascular smooth muscle (VSMC). To understand the underlying molecular pathology of HGPS, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from HGPS dermal fibroblasts. The iPSCs were differentiated into neural progenitors, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, VSMCs, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Progerin levels were highest in MSCs, VSMCs, and fibroblasts, in that order, with these lineages displaying increased DNA damage, nuclear abnormalities, and HGPS-VSMC accumulating numerous calponin-staining inclusion bodies. Both HGPS-MSC and -VSMC viability was compromised by stress and hypoxia in vitro and in vivo (MSC). Because MSCs reside in low oxygen niches in vivo, we propose that, in HGPS, this causes additional depletion of the MSC pool responsible for replacing differentiated cells lost to progerin toxicity.

  17. Multipotent stem cells isolated from the adult mouse retina are capable of producing functional photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianqing; Lewallen, Michelle; Chen, Shuyi; Yu, Wei; Zhang, Nian; Xie, Ting

    2013-06-01

    Various stem cell types have been tested for their potential application in treating photoreceptor degenerative diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Only embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have so far been shown to generate functional photoreceptor cells restoring light response of photoreceptor-deficient mice, but there is still some concern of tumor formation. In this study, we have successfully cultured Nestin(+)Sox2(+)Pax6(+) multipotent retinal stem cells (RSCs) from the adult mouse retina, which are capable of producing functional photoreceptor cells that restore the light response of photoreceptor-deficient rd1 mutant mice following transplantation. After they have been expanded for over 35 passages in the presence of FGF and EGF, the cultured RSCs still maintain stable proliferation and differentiation potential. Under proper differentiation conditions, they can differentiate into all the major retinal cell types found in the adult retina. More importantly, they can efficiently differentiate into photoreceptor cells under optimized differentiation conditions. Following transplantation into the subretinal space of slowly degenerating rd7 mutant eyes, RSC-derived photoreceptor cells integrate into the retina, morphologically resembling endogenous photoreceptors and forming synapases with resident retinal neurons. When transplanted into eyes of photoreceptor-deficient rd1 mutant mice, a RP model, RSC-derived photoreceptors can partially restore light response, indicating that those RSC-derived photoreceptors are functional. Finally, there is no evidence for tumor formation in the photoreceptor-transplanted eyes. Therefore, this study has demonstrated that RSCs isolated from the adult retina have the potential of producing functional photoreceptor cells that can potentially restore lost vision caused by loss of photoreceptor cells in RP and AMD.

  18. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for adult and adolescent hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a single center analysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; Wang, Jingshi; Wei, Na; Wu, Lin; Wang, Yini; Huang, Wenqiu; Zhang, Jia; Liu, Jinli; Wang, Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Myeloablative conditioning-based allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in the treatment of adult and adolescent hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is rarely reported. We conducted a retrospective study of 30 adult and adolescent HLH transplanted for primary HLH (n = 4), tumor-HLH (n = 8), EBV-HLH (n = 14), and underlying disease-unknown (UDU)-HLH (n = 4). Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) were the stem-cell source in all patients. Twenty-three patients were transplanted from HLA-haploidentical family donors, six from HLA-identical sibling donors, and one from a matched unrelated donor. Four patients appeared with mixed chimerism (MC), and no patient presented with graft failure. There was a high risk for EBV reactivation with an incidence of 47 %. Two patients developed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) and three were considered primary disease recurrent. With a median follow-up of 26 months, 19 patients survived and 11 patients died. The estimated 2-year overall survival (OS) was 63.3 ± 8.8 % in all patients, 100 % in primary HLH, 64.3 ± 12.8 % in EBV-HLH, 50.0 ± 17.7 % in tumor-HLH, and 50.0 ± 25.0 % in UDU-HLH. Myeloablative conditioning-based allo-HSCT is an effective treatment for adult and adolescent HLH to achieve complete remission and long-term survival.

  19. Effects of cyclic stretch on proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells and their differentiation to smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ghazanfari, Samane; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2009-10-23

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of differentiating into a variety of cell types such as vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In this study, we investigated influence of cyclic stretch on proliferation of hMSCs for different loading conditions, alignment of actin filaments, and consequent differentiation to SMCs. Isolated cells from bone marrow were exposed to cyclic stretch utilizing a customized device. Cell proliferation was examined by MTT assay, alignment of actin fibers by a designed image processing code, and cell differentiation by fluorescence staining. Results indicated promoted proliferation of hMSCs by cyclic strain, enhanced by elevated strain amplitude and number of cycles. Such loading regulated smooth muscle {alpha}-actin, and reoriented actin fibers. Cyclic stretch led to differentiation of hMSCs to SMCs without addition of growth factor. It was concluded that applying appropriate loading treatment on hMSCs could enhance proliferation capability, and produce functional SMCs for engineered tissues.

  20. Development and specification of cerebellar stem and progenitor cells in zebrafish: from embryo to adult

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Teleost fish display widespread post-embryonic neurogenesis originating from many different proliferative niches that are distributed along the brain axis. During the development of the central nervous system (CNS) different cell types are produced in a strict temporal order from increasingly committed progenitors. However, it is not known whether diverse neural stem and progenitor cell types with restricted potential or stem cells with broad potential are maintained in the teleost fish brain. Results To study the diversity and output of neural stem and progenitor cell populations in the zebrafish brain the cerebellum was used as a model brain region, because of its well-known architecture and development. Transgenic zebrafish lines, in vivo imaging and molecular markers were used to follow and quantify how the proliferative activity and output of cerebellar progenitor populations progress. This analysis revealed that the proliferative activity and progenitor marker expression declines in juvenile zebrafish before they reach sexual maturity. Furthermore, this correlated with the diminished repertoire of cell types produced in the adult. The stem and progenitor cells derived from the upper rhombic lip were maintained into adulthood and they actively produced granule cells. Ventricular zone derived progenitor cells were largely quiescent in the adult cerebellum and produced a very limited number of glia and inhibitory inter-neurons. No Purkinje or Eurydendroid cells were produced in fish older than 3 months. This suggests that cerebellar cell types are produced in a strict temporal order from distinct pools of increasingly committed stem and progenitor cells. Conclusions Our results in the zebrafish cerebellum show that neural stem and progenitor cell types are specified and they produce distinct cell lineages and sub-types of brain cells. We propose that only specific subtypes of brain cells are continuously produced throughout life in the teleost fish

  1. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo-Jiang; Li, Ping-Hua; Huang, Rui-Hua; Sun, Wen-Xing; Wang, Han; Li, Qi-Fa; Chen, Jie; Wu, Wang-Jun; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse) have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells.

  2. Leucine supplementation chronically improves muscle protein synthesis in older adults consuming the RDA for protein

    PubMed Central

    Casperson, Shanon L.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Hewlings, Susan J.; Paddon-Jones, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Background & aim Protein-energy supplementation is routinely employed to combat muscle loss. However, success is often compromised by increased satiety, poor palatability, high costs and low compliance. Methods For 2-weeks we supplemented meals of older individuals with leucine (4 g/meal; 3 meals/day; days 2–14). Metabolic studies were performed prior to (Day 1) and following (Day 15) supplementation. Leucine was not provided on metabolic study days. Venous blood and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained during a primed constant infusion of L-[ring-13C6] phenylalanine. Mixed muscle fractional synthesis rate (FSR), body composition and markers of nutrient signaling (mTOR, 4E-BP1 and p70S6K1 phosphorylation) were measured before and after a low protein/carbohydrate simulated meal. Results The meal modestly increased FSR on Day 1 (postabsorptive: 0.063 ± 0.004 vs. postprandial: 0.075 ± 0.006%/h; p = 0.03), however, two weeks of leucine supplementation increased postabsorptive FSR (p = 0.004) and the response to the meal (p = 0.01) (postabsorptive: 0.074 ± 0.007 vs. postprandial: 0.10 ± 0.007%/h). Changes in FSR were mirrored by increased phosphorylation of mTOR, 4E-BP1 and p70S6K1 (p ≤ 0.1). No change in fat free mass was observed (p > 0.05). Conclusions In older adults, leucine supplementation may improve muscle protein synthesis in response to lower protein meals. PMID:22357161

  3. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Van Spyk, Elyse Noelani; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-01-01

    Historically work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as liver, fat and muscle. In recent years, skin is emerging as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging and carcinogenesis. Morphologically skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration -- the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell-type specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of the skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar UV radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. The skin also provides opportunities to interrogate clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model for investigating the

  4. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Plikus, Maksim V; Van Spyk, Elyse N; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-06-01

    Historically, work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as the liver, fat, and muscle. In recent years, skin has emerged as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging, and carcinogenesis. Morphologically, skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable, and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration: the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell type-specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it also represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. Skin also provides opportunities to interrogate the clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model

  5. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptors as markers of adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Barker, Nick; Clevers, Hans

    2010-05-01

    Molecular markers are used to characterize and track adult stem cells. Colon cancer research has led to the identification of 2 related receptors, leucine-rich repeat-containing, G-protein-coupled receptors (Lgr)5 and Lgr6, that are expressed by small populations of cells in a variety of adult organs. Genetic mouse models have allowed the visualization, isolation, and genetic marking of Lgr5(+ve) and Lgr6(+ve) cells and provided evidence that they are stem cells. The Lgr5(+ve) cells were found to occupy locations not commonly associated with stem cells in the stomach, small intestine, colon, and hair follicles. A multipotent population of skin stem cells express Lgr6. Single Lgr5(+ve) stem cells from the small intestine and the stomach can be cultured into long-lived organoids. Further studies of these markers might reveal adult stem cell populations in additional tissues. Identification of the ligands for Lgr5 and 6 will help elucidate stem cell functions and modes of intracellular signaling.

  6. Transcriptome signature of resistance exercise adaptations: mixed muscle and fiber type specific profiles in young and old adults

    PubMed Central

    Raue, Ulrika; Trappe, Todd A.; Estrem, Shawn T.; Qian, Hui-Rong; Helvering, Leah M.; Smith, Rosamund C.

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of acute resistance exercise (RE), progressive resistance training (PRT), and age on the human skeletal muscle Transcriptome. Two cohorts of young and old adults [study A: 24 yr, 84 yr (n = 28); study B: 25 yr, 78 yr (n = 36)] were studied. Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained pre- and 4 h post-RE in conjunction with the 1st and 36th (last) training session as part of a 12-wk PRT program in study A, whereas biopsies were obtained in the basal untrained state in study B. Additionally, the muscle fiber type specific (MHC I and MHC IIa) Transcriptome response to RE was examined in a subset of young and old women from study A. Transcriptome profiling was performed using HG U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays. The main findings were 1) there were 661 genes affected by RE during the 1st and 36th training bout that correlated with gains in muscle size and strength with PRT (termed the Transcriptome signature of resistance exercise adaptations); 2) the RE gene response was most pronounced in fast-twitch (MHC IIa) muscle fibers and provided additional insight into the skeletal muscle biology affected by RE; 3) skeletal muscle of young adults is more responsive to RE at the gene level compared with old adults and age also affected basal level skeletal muscle gene expression. These skeletal muscle Transcriptome findings provide further insight into the molecular basis of sarcopenia and the impact of resistance exercise at the mixed muscle and fiber type specific level. PMID:22302958

  7. Voltage clamp methods for the study of membrane currents and SR Ca2+ release in adult skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O.; Schneider, Martin F.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (E-C)1 coupling is a process composed of multiple sequential stages, by which an action potential triggers sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)2 Ca2+ release and subsequent contractile activation. The various steps in the E-C coupling process in skeletal muscle can be studied using different techniques. The simultaneous recordings of sarcolemmal electrical signals and the accompanying elevation in myoplasmic Ca2+, due to depolarization-initiated SR Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle fibres, have been useful to obtain a better understanding of muscle function. In studying the origin and mechanism of voltage dependency of E-C coupling a variety of different techniques have been used to control the voltage in adult skeletal fibres. Pioneering work in muscles isolated from amphibians or crustaceans used microelectrodes or ‘high resistance gap’ techniques to manipulate the voltage in the muscle fibres. The development of the patch clamp technique and its variant, the whole-cell clamp configuration that facilitates the manipulation of the intracellular environment, allowed the use of the voltage clamp techniques in different cell types, including skeletal muscle fibres. The aim of this article is to present an historical perspective of the voltage clamp methods used to study skeletal muscle E-C coupling as well as to describe the current status of using the whole-cell patch clamp technique in studies in which the electrical and Ca2+ signalling properties of mouse skeletal muscle membranes are being investigated. PMID:22306655

  8. Defining a developmental path to neural fate by global expression profiling of mouse embryonic stem cells and adult neural stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Kazuhiro; Sharov, Alexei A; Carter, Mark G; Foroni, Chiara; Vescovi, Angelo L; Ko, Minoru S H

    2006-04-01

    To understand global features of gene expression changes during in vitro neural differentiation, we carried out the microarray analysis of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), embryonal carcinoma cells, and adult neural stem/progenitor (NS) cells. Expression profiling of ESCs during differentiation in monolayer culture revealed three distinct phases: undifferentiated ESCs, primitive ectoderm-like cells, and neural progenitor cells. Principal component (PC) analysis revealed that these cells were aligned on PC1 over the course of 6 days. This PC1 represents approximately 4,000 genes, the expression of which increased with neural commitment/differentiation. Furthermore, NS cells derived from adult brain and their differentiated cells were positioned along this PC axis further away from undifferentiated ESCs than embryonic stem-derived neural progenitors. We suggest that this PC1 defines a path to neural fate, providing a scale for the degree of commitment/differentiation.

  9. Naïve adult stem cells from patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome express low levels of progerin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Vera; Roedl, Daniela; Gabriel, Diana; Gordon, Leslie B; Herlyn, Meenhard; Schneider, Reinhard; Ring, Johannes; Djabali, Karima

    2012-06-15

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670) is a rare disorder characterized by segmental accelerated aging and early death from coronary artery disease or stroke. Nearly 90% of HGPS sufferers carry a G608G mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, producing a truncated form of prelamin A, referred to as "progerin". Here, we report the isolation of naïve multipotent skin-derived precursor (SKP) cells from dermal fibroblast cultures from HGPS donors. These cells form spheres and express the neural crest marker, nestin, in addition to the multipotent markers, OCT4, Sox2, Nanog and TG30; these cells can self-renew and differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and fibroblasts. The SMCs derived from the HGPS-SKPs accumulate nuclear progerin with increasing passages. A subset of the HGPS-naïve SKPs express progerin in vitro and in situ in HGPS skin sections. This is the first in vivo evidence that progerin is produced in adult stem cells, and implies that this protein could induce stem cells exhaustion as a mechanism contributing to aging. Our study provides a basis on which to explore therapeutic applications for HGPS stem cells and opens avenues for investigating the pathogenesis of other genetic diseases.

  10. Clonogenic neoblasts are pluripotent adult stem cells that underlie planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Daniel E; Wang, Irving E; Reddien, Peter W

    2011-05-13

    Pluripotent cells in the embryo can generate all cell types, but lineage-restricted cells are generally thought to replenish adult tissues. Planarians are flatworms and regenerate from tiny body fragments, a process requiring a population of proliferating cells (neoblasts). Whether regeneration is accomplished by pluripotent cells or by the collective activity of multiple lineage-restricted cell types is unknown. We used ionizing radiation and single-cell transplantation to identify neoblasts that can form large descendant-cell colonies in vivo. These clonogenic neoblasts (cNeoblasts) produce cells that differentiate into neuronal, intestinal, and other known postmitotic cell types and are distributed throughout the body. Single transplanted cNeoblasts restored regeneration in lethally irradiated hosts. We conclude that broadly distributed, adult pluripotent stem cells underlie the remarkable regenerative abilities of planarians.

  11. The ventral hippocampus is the embryonic origin for adult neural stem cells in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangnan; Fang, Li; Fernández, Gloria; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2013-05-22

    Adult neurogenesis represents a unique form of plasticity in the dentate gyrus requiring the presence of long-lived neural stem cells (LL-NSCs). However, the embryonic origin of these LL-NSCs remains unclear. The prevailing model assumes that the dentate neuroepithelium throughout the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus generates both the LL-NSCs and embryonically produced granule neurons. Here we show that the NSCs initially originate from the ventral hippocampus during late gestation and then relocate into the dorsal hippocampus. The descendants of these cells are the source for the LL-NSCs in the subgranular zone (SGZ). Furthermore, we show that the origin of these cells and their maintenance in the dentate are controlled by distinct sources of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh). The revelation of the complexity of both the embryonic origin of hippocampal LL-NSCs and the sources of Shh has important implications for the functions of LL-NSCs in the adult hippocampus.

  12. Suppression of collagen Q expression in the extrajunctional regions of rat fast muscles is encoded in their stem cells (satellite cells).

    PubMed

    Glišović, Špela; Pregelj, Peter; Dolenc, Igor; Sketelj, Janez

    2013-03-25

    In rat fast muscles, collagen Q (ColQ) expression is restricted to the neuromuscular junctions. In contrast, it is high also extrajunctionally in the slow soleus muscles. Fast muscles activated by chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation, similar to neural activation of the soleus muscles, did not increase their extrajunctional expression of ColQ. We assumed that the myogenic stem cells (satellite cells) in fast and slow muscles were intrinsically different in regard to the capacity that they convey to their respective muscle fibers to increase the extrajunctional ColQ expression upon innervation. ColQ mRNA levels were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Extensive neural suppression of the extrajunctional ColQ expression in regenerating fast muscles during maturation is a very slow process requiring 30-60 days. If the immature regenerating fast EDL muscles were indirectly or directly electrically stimulated immediately after innervation by chronic low-frequency impulse pattern for 8 days, no significant increase of the extrajunctional ColQ mRNA levels was observed in stimulated regenerates in comparison to non-stimulated ones. In contrast, the extrajunctional ColQ mRNA levels in the regenerates of the soleus muscles, trans-innervated by the EDL nerve at the time of muscle injury, increased 4- to 5-fold after 8 days of the same chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation in comparison to those in the stimulated EDL regenerates. Since both fast and slow muscles completely regenerated only from their own myogenic stem cells and were innervated by the same nerve and later activated by the same tonic pattern of impulses, these results demonstrated that the mechanism causing incapacity of regenerating fast muscles to increase their extrajunctional ColQ expression upon tonic activation is encoded in their satellite cells, which in this respect differ from those in the slow muscles.

  13. Fish oil–derived n–3 PUFA therapy increases muscle mass and function in healthy older adults1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gordon I; Julliand, Sophie; Reeds, Dominic N; Sinacore, David R; Klein, Samuel; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Age-associated declines in muscle mass and function are major risk factors for an impaired ability to carry out activities of daily living, falls, prolonged recovery time after hospitalization, and mortality in older adults. New strategies that can slow the age-related loss of muscle mass and function are needed to help older adults maintain adequate performance status to reduce these risks and maintain independence. Objective: We evaluated the efficacy of fish oil–derived n–3 (ω-3) PUFA therapy to slow the age-associated loss of muscle mass and function. Design: Sixty healthy 60–85-y-old men and women were randomly assigned to receive n–3 PUFA (n = 40) or corn oil (n = 20) therapy for 6 mo. Thigh muscle volume, handgrip strength, one-repetition maximum (1-RM) lower- and upper-body strength, and average power during isokinetic leg exercises were evaluated before and after treatment. Results: Forty-four subjects completed the study [29 subjects (73%) in the n–3 PUFA group; 15 subjects (75%) in the control group]. Compared with the control group, 6 mo of n–3 PUFA therapy increased thigh muscle volume (3.6%; 95% CI: 0.2%, 7.0%), handgrip strength (2.3 kg; 95% CI: 0.8, 3.7 kg), and 1-RM muscle strength (4.0%; 95% CI: 0.8%, 7.3%) (all P < 0.05) and tended to increase average isokinetic power (5.6%; 95% CI: −0.6%, 11.7%; P = 0.075). Conclusion: Fish oil–derived n–3 PUFA therapy slows the normal decline in muscle mass and function in older adults and should be considered a therapeutic approach for preventing sarcopenia and maintaining physical independence in older adults. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01308957. PMID:25994567

  14. Constitutive Expression of Yes-Associated Protein (Yap) in Adult Skeletal Muscle Fibres Induces Muscle Atrophy and Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Robert N.; Gray, Stuart R.; Walker, Claire; Carroll, Andrew M.; Itzstein, Cecile; Lionikas, Arimantas; Zammit, Peter S.; De Bari, Cosimo; Wackerhage, Henning

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the Hippo pathway member Yes-associated protein (Yap, gene name Yap1) in skeletal muscle fibres in vivo. Specifically we bred an inducible, skeletal muscle fibre-specific knock-in mouse model (MCK-tTA-hYAP1 S127A) to test whether the over expression of constitutively active Yap (hYAP1 S127A) is sufficient to drive muscle hypertrophy or stimulate changes in fibre type composition. Unexpectedly, after 5–7 weeks of constitutive hYAP1 S127A over expression, mice suddenly and rapidly lost 20–25% body weight and suffered from gait impairments and kyphosis. Skeletal muscles atrophied by 34–40% and the muscle fibre cross sectional area decreased by ≈40% when compared to control mice. Histological analysis revealed evidence of skeletal muscle degeneration and regeneration, necrotic fibres and a NADH-TR staining resembling centronuclear myopathy. In agreement with the histology, mRNA expression of markers of regenerative myogenesis (embryonic myosin heavy chain, Myf5, myogenin, Pax7) and muscle protein degradation (atrogin-1, MuRF1) were significantly elevated in muscles from transgenic mice versus control. No significant changes in fibre type composition were detected using ATPase staining. The phenotype was largely reversible, as a cessation of hYAP1 S127A expression rescued body and muscle weight, restored muscle morphology and prevented further pathological progression. To conclude, high Yap activity in muscle fibres does not induce fibre hypertrophy nor fibre type changes but instead results in a reversible atrophy and deterioration. PMID:23544078

  15. The Influence of Modified Silica Nanomaterials on Adult Stem Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Tarpani, Luigi; Morena, Francesco; Gambucci, Marta; Zampini, Giulia; Massaro, Giuseppina; Argentati, Chiara; Emiliani, Carla; Martino, Sabata; Latterini, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    The preparation of tailored nanomaterials able to support cell growth and viability is mandatory for tissue engineering applications. In the present work, silica nanoparticles were prepared by a sol-gel procedure and were then functionalized by condensation of amino groups and by adsorption of silver nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging was used to establish the morphology and the average dimensions of about 130 nm, which were not affected by the functionalization. The three silica samples were deposited (1 mg/mL) on cover glasses, which were used as a substrate to culture adult human bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) and human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). The good cell viability over the different silica surfaces was evaluated by monitoring the mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. The analysis of the morphological parameters (aspect ratio, cell length, and nuclear shape Index) yielded information about the interactions of stem cells with the surface of three different nanoparticles. The data are discussed in terms of chemical properties of the surface of silica nanoparticles.

  16. Effects of ECM protein micropatterns on the migration and differentiation of adult neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sunghoon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Lee, Eunsoo; Hong, Nari; Sun, Woong; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-08-12

    The migration and differentiation of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) are believed to be strongly influenced by the spatial distribution of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the stem cell niche. In vitro culture platform, which involves the specific spatial distribution of ECM protein, could offer novel tools for better understanding of aNSC behavior in the spatial pattern of ECM proteins. In this work, we applied soft-lithographic technique to design simple and reproducible laminin (LN)-polylysine cell culture substrates and investigated how aNSCs respond to the various spatial distribution of laminin, one of ECM proteins enriched in the aNSC niche. We found that aNSC preferred to migrate and attach to LN stripes, and aNSC-derived neurons and astrocytes showed significant difference in motility towards LN stripes. By changing the spacing of LN stripes, we were able to control the alignment of neurons and astrocytes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to investigate the differential cellular responses of aNSCs on ECM protein (LN) and cell adhesive synthetic polymer (PDL) using surface micropatterns. Our findings would provide a deeper understanding in astrocyte-neuron i