Science.gov

Sample records for adult muscular dystrophy

  1. Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy; Muscular dystrophy - Duchenne type ... Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a form of muscular dystrophy . It worsens quickly. Other muscular dystrophies (including Becker's muscular dystrophy ) get ...

  2. Muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001190.htm Muscular dystrophy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited disorders that cause ...

  3. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and ... ability to walk. There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent ...

  4. Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy; Muscular Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Steinert's Disease; Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

  5. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dev. Med. Child Neurol. Mar 1995;37(3):260-269. 4. Centers for ... DM1) . The International Myotonic Dystrophy Consortium (IDMC). Neurology. Mar 28 2000;54(6):1218-1221. 5. Harper ...

  6. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be affected. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) affects boys and girls equally, weakening muscles in the shoulders and upper ... weakness and poor muscle tone. Occurring in both girls and boys, it can have different symptoms. It varies in ...

  7. Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy KidsHealth > For Kids > The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy ... you know someone who has MD. What Is Muscular Dystrophy? Muscular dystrophy (say: MUS-kyoo-lur DIS-troh- ...

  8. Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Difference How to Get Involved Donate Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) Share print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) What is myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD)? Myotonic ...

  9. Muscular dystrophy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - muscular dystrophy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on muscular dystrophy : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mdausa.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih. ...

  10. Social adjustment in adult males affected with progressive muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Eggers, S; Zatz, M

    1998-02-01

    Adult male patients affected with Becker (BMD, N = 22), limb girdle (LGMD, N = 22) and facioscapulohumeral (FSHMD, N = 18) muscular dystrophy were interviewed to assess for the first time how the disease's severity and recurrence risk (RR) magnitude alter their social adjustment. BMD (X-linked recessive) is the severest form and confers an intermediate RR because all daughters will be carriers, LGMD (autosomal-recessive) is moderately severe with a low RR in the absence of consanguineous marriage, and FSHMD (autosomal-dominant) is clinically the mildest of these three forms of MD but with the highest RR, of 50%. Results of the semistructured questionnaire [WHO (1988): Psychiatric Disability Assessment Schedule] showed no significant difference between the three clinical groups, but more severely handicapped patients as well as patients belonging to lower socioeconomic levels from all clinical groups showed poorer social adjustment. Taken together, myopathic patients displayed intermediate social dysfunction compared to controls and schizophrenics studied by Jablensky [1988: WHO Psychiatric Disability Assessment Schedule]. Since the items of major dysfunction proportion among myopathic patients concern intimate relationships (70%), interest in working among those unemployed (67%), and social isolation (53%), emotional support and social and legal assistance should concentrate on these aspects. Interestingly, the results of this study also suggest that high RRs do not affect relationships to the opposite sex.

  11. Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Statland, Jeffrey M.; Tawil, Rabi

    2014-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHSD) is one of the most common adult muscular dystrophies and is divided into types 1 and 2 based on genetic mutation. Clinically both FSHD types 1 and 2 demonstrate often asymmetric and progressive muscle weakness affecting initially the face, shoulder, and arms, followed by the distal and then proximal lower extremities later in the disease course. Approximately 95% of patients, termed FSHD1, have a deletion of a key number of repetitive elements on chromosome 4q35. The remaining 5%, termed FSHD2, have no deletion on chromosome 4q35. Nevertheless, both FSHD types 1 and 2 share a common downstream mechanism making it possible that future disease-directed therapies will be effective for both FSHD types 1 and 2. PMID:25037087

  12. Severe metabolic acidosis in adult patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lo Cascio, Christian M; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Kohler, Malcolm; Fehr, Thomas; Bloch, Konrad E

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive paresis, respiratory failure and premature death. Long-term positive pressure ventilation can improve quality of life and survival, but previously unrecognized complications may arise. We analyzed the characteristics of severe metabolic acidosis occurring in 8 of 55 DMD patients, of 20-36 years of age, observed over a 5-year period. All patients were on positive pressure ventilation and were being treated for chronic constipation. Before admission, they had had a reduced intake of fluids and food. Upon examination, they were severely ill, dyspneic and suffering from abdominal discomfort. Metabolic acidosis with a high anion gap was noted in 5 of the 8 patients and with a normal anion gap in the other 3. They all recovered after the administration of fluids and nutrition, the regulation of bowel movements and treatment with antibiotics, as appropriate. Metabolic acidosis is a life-threatening, potentially preventable complication in older DMD patients. Early recognition, subsequent administration of fluids, nutrition and antibiotics and regulation of bowel movements seem to be essential.

  13. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  14. How Is Muscular Dystrophy Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How is muscular dystrophy diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content The first step in diagnosing muscular dystrophy (MD) is a visit with a health care ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: tibial muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names for This Condition tardive tibial muscular dystrophy TMD Udd distal myopathy Udd-Markesbery muscular dystrophy Udd ... titin may cause more severe tibial muscular dystrophy (TMD). Neuromuscul Disord. 2008 Dec;18(12):922-8. ...

  16. Therapeutic advances in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Doris G; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that produce progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting. There has been rapid growth and change in our understanding of these disorders in recent years, and advances in basic science are being translated into increasing numbers of clinical trials. This review will discuss therapeutic developments in 3 of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, and myotonic dystrophy. Each of these disorders represents a different class of genetic disease (monogenic, epigenetic, and repeat expansion disorders), and the approach to therapy addresses the diverse and complex molecular mechanisms involved in these diseases. The large number of novel pharmacologic agents in development with good biologic rationale and strong proof of concept suggests there will be an improved quality of life for individuals with muscular dystrophy. PMID:23939629

  17. Sarcoglycans in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hack, A A; Groh, M E; McNally, E M

    Muscular dystrophy is a heterogeneous genetic disease that affects skeletal and cardiac muscle. The genetic defects associated with muscular dystrophy include mutations in dystrophin and its associated glycoproteins, the sarcoglycans. Furthermore, defects in dystrophin have been shown to cause a disruption of the normal expression and localization of the sarcoglycan complex. Thus, abnormalities of sarcoglycan are a common molecular feature in a number of dystrophies. By combining biochemistry, molecular cell biology, and human and mouse genetics, a growing understanding of the sarcoglycan complex is emerging. Sarcoglycan appears to be an important, independent mediator of dystrophic pathology in both skeletal muscle and heart. The absence of sarcoglycan leads to alterations of membrane permeability and apoptosis, two shared features of a number of dystrophies. beta-sarcoglycan and delta-sarcoglycan may form the core of the sarcoglycan subcomplex with alpha- and gamma-sarcoglycan less tightly associated to this core. The relationship of epsilon-sarcoglycan to the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex remains unclear. Animals lacking alpha-, gamma- and delta-sarcoglycan have been described and provide excellent opportunities for further investigation of the function of sarcoglycan. Dystrophin with dystroglycan and laminin may be a mechanical link between the actin cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. By positioning itself in close proximity to dystrophin and dystroglycan, sarcoglycan may function to couple mechanical and chemical signals in striated muscle. Sarcoglycan may be an independent signaling or regulatory module whose position in the membrane is determined by dystrophin but whose function is carried out independent of the dystrophin-dystroglycan-laminin axis.

  18. Muscle diseases: the muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Pytel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Dystrophic muscle disease can occur at any age. Early- or childhood-onset muscular dystrophies may be associated with profound loss of muscle function, affecting ambulation, posture, and cardiac and respiratory function. Late-onset muscular dystrophies or myopathies may be mild and associated with slight weakness and an inability to increase muscle mass. The phenotype of muscular dystrophy is an endpoint that arises from a diverse set of genetic pathways. Genes associated with muscular dystrophies encode proteins of the plasma membrane and extracellular matrix, and the sarcomere and Z band, as well as nuclear membrane components. Because muscle has such distinctive structural and regenerative properties, many of the genes implicated in these disorders target pathways unique to muscle or more highly expressed in muscle. This chapter reviews the basic structural properties of muscle and genetic mechanisms that lead to myopathy and muscular dystrophies that affect all age groups.

  19. Congenital myopathies and muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Heather R; Castro, Diana; Iannaccone, Susan T

    2014-08-01

    The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) and myopathies (CM) are a diverse group of diseases that share features such as early onset of symptoms (in the first year of life), genetic causes, and high risks for restrictive lung disease and orthopedic deformities. Understanding for disease mechanism is available and a fairly well-structured genotype-phenotype correlation for all the CMDs and CMs is now available. To best illustrate the clinical spectrum and diagnostic algorithm for these diseases, this article presents 5 cases, including Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, nemaline myopathy, centronuclear myopathy, merosin deficiency congenital muscular dystrophy, and core myopathy.

  20. Congenital myopathies and muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Heather R; Castro, Diana; Iannaccone, Susan T

    2014-08-01

    The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) and myopathies (CM) are a diverse group of diseases that share features such as early onset of symptoms (in the first year of life), genetic causes, and high risks for restrictive lung disease and orthopedic deformities. Understanding for disease mechanism is available and a fairly well-structured genotype-phenotype correlation for all the CMDs and CMs is now available. To best illustrate the clinical spectrum and diagnostic algorithm for these diseases, this article presents 5 cases, including Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, nemaline myopathy, centronuclear myopathy, merosin deficiency congenital muscular dystrophy, and core myopathy. PMID:25037085

  1. Alternative splicing and muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to proteomic diversity and to the control of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this reasons, alternative splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human disorders. The aim of this review is to focus on the relevance of alternative splicing for muscle function and muscle disease. We begin by giving a brief overview of alternative splicing, muscle-specific gene expression and muscular dystrophy. Next, to illustrate these concepts we focus on two muscular dystrophy, myotonic muscular dystrophy and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, both associated to disruption of splicing regulation in muscle. PMID:20603608

  2. Burden, professional support, and social network in families of children and young adults with muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Patalano, Melania; Sagliocchi, Alessandra; Scutifero, Marianna; Zaccaro, Antonella; D'angelo, Maria Grazia; Civati, Federica; Brighina, Erika; Vita, Giuseppe; Vita, Gian Luca; Messina, Sonia; Sframeli, Maria; Pane, Marika; Lombardo, Maria Elena; Scalise, Roberta; D'amico, Adele; Colia, Giulia; Catteruccia, Michela; Balottin, Umberto; Berardinelli, Angela; Chiara Motta, Maria; Angelini, Corrado; Gaiani, Alessandra; Semplicini, Claudio; Bello, Luca; Battini, Roberta; Astrea, Guja; Politano, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: This study explores burden and social and professional support in families of young patients with muscular dystrophies (MDs) in Italy. Methods: The study was carried out on 502 key relatives of 4‐ to 25‐year‐old patients suffering from Duchenne, Becker, or Limb‐Girdle MD who were living with at least 1 adult relative. Results: A total of 77.1% of relatives reported feelings of loss, 74.0% had feelings of sadness, and 59.1% had constraints in leisure activities. Burden was higher among relatives of patients with higher disability and who spent more daily hours in caregiving. Practical difficulties were higher among relatives who perceived lower help in patient emergencies and less practical support by their social network. Psychological burden was higher in those relatives who were unemployed, those with poorer support in emergencies, and those with lower social contacts. Conclusions: Caring for patients with MDs may be demanding for relatives even in the early stages of these disorders, especially when social support is poor and the patient's disability increases. Muscle Nerve 52: 13–21, 2015 PMID:25363165

  3. What Are the Treatments for Muscular Dystrophy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for muscular dystrophy? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... available to stop or reverse any form of muscular dystrophy (MD). Instead, certain therapies and medications aim to ...

  4. Muscular dystrophy in a dog resembling human becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Baroncelli, A B; Abellonio, F; Pagano, T B; Esposito, I; Peirone, B; Papparella, S; Paciello, O

    2014-05-01

    A 3-year-old, male Labrador retriever dog was presented with clinical signs of progressive exercise intolerance, bilateral elbow extension, rigidity of the forelimbs, hindlimb flexion and kyphosis. Microscopical examination of muscle tissue showed marked variability in myofibre size, replacement of muscle with mature adipose tissue and degeneration/regeneration of muscle fibres, consistent with muscular dystrophy. Immunohistochemical examination for dystrophin showed markedly reduced labelling with monoclonal antibodies specific for the rod domain and the carboxy-terminal of dystrophin, while expression of β-sarcoglycan, γ-sarcoglycan and β-dystroglycan was normal. Immunoblotting revealed a truncated dystrophin protein of approximately 135 kDa. These findings supported a diagnosis of congenital canine muscular dystrophy resembling Becker muscular dystrophy in man.

  5. NIH study shows increased risk for two types of myotonic muscular dystrophy

    Cancer.gov

    Adults with a form of muscular dystrophy called myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) may be at increased risk of developing cancer, according to a study by investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

  6. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  7. Wasting mechanisms in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-10-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is a condition that chiefly affects muscles used ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic conditions characterized by ...

  10. Safe and bodywide muscle transduction in young adult Duchenne muscular dystrophy dogs with adeno-associated virus.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yongping; Pan, Xiufang; Hakim, Chady H; Kodippili, Kasun; Zhang, Keqing; Shin, Jin-Hong; Yang, Hsiao T; McDonald, Thomas; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-10-15

    The ultimate goal of muscular dystrophy gene therapy is to treat all muscles in the body. Global gene delivery was demonstrated in dystrophic mice more than a decade ago using adeno-associated virus (AAV). However, translation to affected large mammals has been challenging. The only reported attempt was performed in newborn Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) dogs. Unfortunately, AAV injection resulted in growth delay, muscle atrophy and contracture. Here we report safe and bodywide AAV delivery in juvenile DMD dogs. Three ∼2-m-old affected dogs received intravenous injection of a tyrosine-engineered AAV-9 reporter or micro-dystrophin (μDys) vector at the doses of 1.92-6.24 × 10(14) viral genome particles/kg under transient or sustained immune suppression. DMD dogs tolerated injection well and their growth was not altered. Hematology and blood biochemistry were unremarkable. No adverse reactions were observed. Widespread muscle transduction was seen in skeletal muscle, the diaphragm and heart for at least 4 months (the end of the study). Nominal expression was detected in internal organs. Improvement in muscle histology was observed in μDys-treated dogs. In summary, systemic AAV gene transfer is safe and efficient in young adult dystrophic large mammals. This may translate to bodywide gene therapy in pediatric patients in the future. PMID:26264580

  11. Safe and bodywide muscle transduction in young adult Duchenne muscular dystrophy dogs with adeno-associated virus.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yongping; Pan, Xiufang; Hakim, Chady H; Kodippili, Kasun; Zhang, Keqing; Shin, Jin-Hong; Yang, Hsiao T; McDonald, Thomas; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-10-15

    The ultimate goal of muscular dystrophy gene therapy is to treat all muscles in the body. Global gene delivery was demonstrated in dystrophic mice more than a decade ago using adeno-associated virus (AAV). However, translation to affected large mammals has been challenging. The only reported attempt was performed in newborn Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) dogs. Unfortunately, AAV injection resulted in growth delay, muscle atrophy and contracture. Here we report safe and bodywide AAV delivery in juvenile DMD dogs. Three ∼2-m-old affected dogs received intravenous injection of a tyrosine-engineered AAV-9 reporter or micro-dystrophin (μDys) vector at the doses of 1.92-6.24 × 10(14) viral genome particles/kg under transient or sustained immune suppression. DMD dogs tolerated injection well and their growth was not altered. Hematology and blood biochemistry were unremarkable. No adverse reactions were observed. Widespread muscle transduction was seen in skeletal muscle, the diaphragm and heart for at least 4 months (the end of the study). Nominal expression was detected in internal organs. Improvement in muscle histology was observed in μDys-treated dogs. In summary, systemic AAV gene transfer is safe and efficient in young adult dystrophic large mammals. This may translate to bodywide gene therapy in pediatric patients in the future.

  12. Cardiac transplantation in Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, R M; Dubowitz, V

    1992-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy is associated with abnormal cardiac features in about 75% of cases; up to one-third will develop ventricular dilatation leading to congestive cardiac failure. As this form of muscular dystrophy is relatively benign, failure to respond to medical treatment warrants assessment for cardiac transplantation.

  13. Muscular Dystrophies at Different Ages: Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Guzmán, Oriana del Rocío; Chávez García, Ana Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela

    2012-01-01

    Common metabolic and endocrine alterations exist across a wide range of muscular dystrophies. Skeletal muscle plays an important role in glucose metabolism and is a major participant in different signaling pathways. Therefore, its damage may lead to different metabolic disruptions. Two of the most important metabolic alterations in muscular dystrophies may be insulin resistance and obesity. However, only insulin resistance has been demonstrated in myotonic dystrophy. In addition, endocrine disturbances such as hypogonadism, low levels of testosterone, and growth hormone have been reported. This eventually will result in consequences such as growth failure and delayed puberty in the case of childhood dystrophies. Other consequences may be reduced male fertility, reduced spermatogenesis, and oligospermia, both in childhood as well as in adult muscular dystrophies. These facts all suggest that there is a need for better comprehension of metabolic and endocrine implications for muscular dystrophies with the purpose of developing improved clinical treatments and/or improvements in the quality of life of patients with dystrophy. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the current knowledge about of metabolic and endocrine alterations in diverse types of dystrophinopathies, which will be divided into two groups: childhood and adult dystrophies which have different age of onset. PMID:22701119

  14. Muscular Dystrophy, incurability, eugenics

    PubMed Central

    Rideau, Y; Rideau, F

    2007-01-01

    Summary The medical entity “muscular dystrophy” has been the object of a recent opinion campaign aimed at promoting a law in favour of euthanasia. This disease has become, in the eyes of the public, a media model of a particularly severe and incurable disease. This very widespread statement does not correspond to reality as far as concerns the life of these patients, to the condition that they have benefited from a very useful and fully provided empirical treatment. As already seen, the hope for life has already doubled, without clear limits. The idea of inducing an interruption when at death’s door, as long as a systematic prevention prior to birth, does not conform with the motivated opinion of the majority of patients consulted. On the contrary, the dogma of incurability may lead to dramatic individual consequences which should be stressed, from a medical viewpoint, on account of the unacceptable risks of social injustice or eugenics that this would imply. PMID:17915566

  15. The Muscular Dystrophies: From Genes to Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Neil C; Bloch, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of many muscular disorders, including many of the more common muscular dystrophies, is now known. Clinically, the recent genetic advances have improved diagnostic capabilities, but they have not yet provided clues about treatment or management. Thanks to better management strategies and therapeutic interventions, however, many patients with a muscular dystrophy are more active and are living longer. Physical therapists, therefore, are more likely to see a patient with a muscular dystrophy, so understanding these muscle disorders and their management is essential. Physical therapy offers the most promise in caring for the majority of patients with these conditions, because it is unlikely that advances in gene therapy will significantly alter their clinical treatment in the near future. This perspective covers some of the basic molecular biological advances together with the clinical manifestations of the muscular dystrophies and the latest approaches to their management. PMID:16305275

  16. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: current cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Kawnik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetically determined X-linked disease and the most common, progressive pediatric muscle disorder. For decades, research has been conducted to find an effective therapy. This review presents current therapeutic methods for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, based on scientific articles in English published mainly in the period 2000 to 2014. We used the PubMed database to identify and review the most important studies. An analysis of contemporary studies of stem cell therapy and the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in muscular dystrophy was performed. PMID:26136844

  17. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T; Ross, Jason W; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease.

  18. Physical Therapy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    MedlinePlus

    Physical Therapy & FSHD Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy A Guide for Patients & Physical Therapists Authors: Wendy M. King, P.T., ... expertise and patient preferences. The goals of any physical therapy plan of care are to assist patients to:  ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and walking. Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy also impairs brain development. People with this condition have a brain abnormality ... cobblestones). These changes in the structure of the brain lead to significantly delayed development of speech and motor skills and moderate to ...

  20. Targeting latent TGFβ release in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ceco, Ermelinda; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon; Miller, Tamari; DeJesus, Adam; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Smith, Lucas R; Barton, Elisabeth R; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-10-22

    Latent transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) binding proteins (LTBPs) bind to inactive TGFβ in the extracellular matrix. In mice, muscular dystrophy symptoms are intensified by a genetic polymorphism that changes the hinge region of LTBP, leading to increased proteolytic susceptibility and TGFβ release. We have found that the hinge region of human LTBP4 was also readily proteolysed and that proteolysis could be blocked by an antibody to the hinge region. Transgenic mice were generated to carry a bacterial artificial chromosome encoding the human LTBP4 gene. These transgenic mice displayed larger myofibers, increased damage after muscle injury, and enhanced TGFβ signaling. In the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the human LTBP4 transgene exacerbated muscular dystrophy symptoms and resulted in weaker muscles with an increased inflammatory infiltrate and greater LTBP4 cleavage in vivo. Blocking LTBP4 cleavage may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce TGFβ release and activity and decrease inflammation and muscle damage in muscular dystrophy.

  1. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: the management of scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Adrian C.; Roper, Helen P.; Chikermane, Ashish A.; Tatman, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    This study summaries the current management of scoliosis in patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. A literature review of Medline was performed and the collected articles critically appraised. This literature is discussed to give an overview of the current management of scoliosis within Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Importantly, improvements in respiratory care, the use of steroids and improving surgical techniques have allowed patients to maintain quality of life and improved life expectancy in this patient group. PMID:27757431

  2. [Congenital muscular dystrophies in children].

    PubMed

    Scavone-Mauro, Cristina; Barros, Graciela

    2013-09-01

    From the clinical and genetic point of view, congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) are a heterogenic group of diseases within neuromuscular pathologies. The best known forms are: merosin deficiency CMD, collagen VI deficiency CMD, LMNA-related CMD, selenoprotein-related CMD (SEPN1) and alpha-dystroglycan-related CMD. They present with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Most of them are transmitted by recessive autosomal inheritance. The initial manifestations very often begin in infancy or in the neonatal period. There are clinical suspicions of the existence of hypotonia and paresis, and they are characterised by a dystrophic pattern in the muscular biopsy (muscle replaced by fibroadipose tissue, with necrosis and cell regeneration). Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CMD have made it possible to make further progress in the classification of the different subtypes. The aim of this review is to comment on the advances made in recent years as regards the classification of CMD in terms of genetics, the proteins involved and their clinical presentation.

  3. Phase 3 Study of Ataluren in Patients With Nonsense Mutation Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  4. [Muscular Dystrophies Involving the Retinal Function].

    PubMed

    Jägle, H

    2016-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are rare disorders, with an incidence of approx. 20 in 100 000. Some dystrophies also affect retinal or optic nerve function. In such cases, the ophthalmological findings may be critical for differential diagnosis or patient counseling. For example in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, where the alteration in retinal function seems to reflect cerebral involvement. Other important forms are mitochondrial and metabolic disorders, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome and the Refsum syndrome. Molecular genetic analysis has become a major tool for differential diagnosis, but may be complex and demanding. This article gives an overview of major muscular dystrophies involving retinal function and their genetic origin, in order to guide differential diagnosis.

  5. FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... html FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Exondys 51 seems to fill unmet need for ... the first drug for a rare form of muscular dystrophy. Exondys 51 (eteplirsen) was granted accelerated approval to ...

  6. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments.

  7. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  8. Dystroglycan induced muscular dystrophies - a review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q-Z

    2016-09-01

    Dystroglycanopathies are muscular dystrophies caused by mutations in genes involved the in O-linked glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. Severe forms of these conditions result in abnormalities in exhibit brain and ocular developmental too, in addition to muscular dystrophy. The full spectrum of developmental pathology is caused mainly by loss of dystroglycan from Bergmann glia. Moreover, cognitive deficits are constant features of severe forms of dystroglycanopathies. However, the precise molecular mechanism leading to neuronal dysfunction in these diseases is not fully known yet. The present review article will discuss the importance of dystroglycan in cerebellar development and associated pathological states. PMID:27649671

  9. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  10. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  11. Genetics Home Reference: facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Padberg GW, Lunt PW, van der Maarel SM. Best practice guidelines on genetic diagnostics of Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: ... Reviewed : August 2014 Published : August 30, 2016 The resources on this site should not be used as a ... of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  12. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  13. Measuring quality of life in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Abresch, Richard T.; Biesecker, Barbara; Conway, Kristin Caspers; Heatwole, Chad; Peay, Holly; Scal, Peter; Strober, Jonathan; Uzark, Karen; Wolff, Jodi; Margolis, Marjorie; Blackwell, Angela; Street, Natalie; Montesanti, Angela; Bolen, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to develop a conceptual model of quality of life (QOL) in muscular dystrophies (MDs) and review existing QOL measures for use in the MD population. Methods: Our model for QOL among individuals with MD was developed based on a modified Delphi process, literature review, and input from patients and patient advocacy organizations. Scales that have been used to measure QOL among patients with MD were identified through a literature review and evaluated using the COSMIN (Consensus-Based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments) checklist. Results: The Comprehensive Model of QOL in MD (CMQM) captures 3 broad domains of QOL (physical, psychological, and social), includes factors influencing self-reported QOL (disease-related factors, support/resources, and expectations/aspirations), and places these concepts within the context of the life course. The literature review identified 15 QOL scales (9 adult and 6 pediatric) that have been applied to patients with MD. Very few studies reported reliability data, and none included data on responsiveness of the measures to change in disease progression, a necessary psychometric property for measures included in treatment and intervention studies. No scales captured all QOL domains identified in the CMQM model. Conclusions: Additional scale development research is needed to enhance assessment of QOL for individuals with MD. Item banking and computerized adaptive assessment would be particularly beneficial by allowing the scale to be tailored to each individual, thereby minimizing respondent burden. PMID:25663223

  14. Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD): Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kalyan, Meenakshi; Gaikwad, Anu N.; Makadia, Ankit; Shah, Harshad

    2015-01-01

    We report a young male of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with positive family history presented with gradual onset proximal muscle weakness in all four limbs since eight years and thinning of shoulders, arms and thighs. Neurological examination revealed atrophy of both shoulders with wasting of both deltoids thinning of thighs and pseudo hypertrophy of both calves, hypotonia in all four limbs. Gower’s sign was positive. Winging of scapula was present. Power was 3/5 at both shoulders, 4/5 at both elbows, 5/5 at both wrists, 3/5 at both hip joints, 3/5 at both knees, 5/5 at both ankles. All deep tendon reflexes and superficial reflexes were present with plantars bilateral flexors. Electromyography (EMG) showed myopathic pattern. He had elevated creatinine phosphokinase levels and muscle biopsy findings consistent with muscular dystrophy. PMID:25738022

  15. Differential isoform expression and selective muscle involvement in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Huovinen, Sanna; Penttilä, Sini; Somervuo, Panu; Keto, Joni; Auvinen, Petri; Vihola, Anna; Huovinen, Sami; Pelin, Katarina; Raheem, Olayinka; Salenius, Juha; Suominen, Tiina; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne

    2015-10-01

    Despite the expression of the mutated gene in all muscles, selective muscles are involved in genetic muscular dystrophies. Different muscular dystrophies show characteristic patterns of fatty degenerative changes by muscle imaging, even to the extent that the patterns have been used for diagnostic purposes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms explaining the selective involvement of muscles are not known. To test the hypothesis that different muscles may express variable amounts of different isoforms of muscle genes, we applied a custom-designed exon microarray containing probes for 57 muscle-specific genes to assay the transcriptional profiles in sets of human adult lower limb skeletal muscles. Quantitative real-time PCR and whole transcriptome sequencing were used to further analyze the results. Our results demonstrate significant variations in isoform and gene expression levels in anatomically different muscles. Comparison of the known patterns of selective involvement of certain muscles in two autosomal dominant titinopathies and one autosomal dominant myosinopathy, with the isoform and gene expression results, shows a correlation between the specific muscles involved and significant differences in the level of expression of the affected gene and exons in these same muscles compared with some other selected muscles. Our results suggest that differential expression levels of muscle genes and isoforms are one determinant in the selectivity of muscle involvement in muscular dystrophies.

  16. Molecular Signatures of Membrane Protein Complexes Underlying Muscular Dystrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Rolf; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Pospisil, Tyler C.; Jones, Kayla S.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are responsible for a large number of muscular dystrophies. As such, molecular dissection of the DGC is expected to both reveal pathological mechanisms, and provides a biological framework for validating new DGC components. Establishment of the molecular composition of plasma-membrane protein complexes has been hampered by a lack of suitable biochemical approaches. Here we present an analytical workflow based upon the principles of protein correlation profiling that has enabled us to model the molecular composition of the DGC in mouse skeletal muscle. We also report our analysis of protein complexes in mice harboring mutations in DGC components. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that cell-adhesion pathways were under the transcriptional control of NFκB in DGC mutant mice, which is a finding that is supported by previous studies that showed NFκB-regulated pathways underlie the pathophysiology of DGC-related muscular dystrophies. Moreover, the bioinformatic analyses suggested that inflammatory and compensatory mechanisms were activated in skeletal muscle of DGC mutant mice. Additionally, this proteomic study provides a molecular framework to refine our understanding of the DGC, identification of protein biomarkers of neuromuscular disease, and pharmacological interrogation of the DGC in adult skeletal muscle https://www.mda.org/disease/congenital-muscular-dystrophy/research. PMID:27099343

  17. Osteoprotegerin protects against muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, Sébastien S; Dumont, Nicolas A; Bouchard, Patrice; Lavergne, Éliane; Penninger, Josef M; Frenette, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Receptor-activator of NF-κB, its ligand RANKL, and the soluble decoy receptor osteoprotegerin are the key regulators of osteoclast differentiation and bone remodeling. Although there is a strong association between osteoporosis and skeletal muscle atrophy/dysfunction, the functional relevance of a particular biological pathway that synchronously regulates bone and skeletal muscle physiopathology still is elusive. Here, we show that muscle cells can produce and secrete osteoprotegerin and pharmacologic treatment of dystrophic mdx mice with recombinant osteoprotegerin muscles. (Recombinant osteoprotegerin-Fc mitigates the loss of muscle force in a dose-dependent manner and preserves muscle integrity, particularly in fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus.) Our data identify osteoprotegerin as a novel protector of muscle integrity, and it potentially represents a new therapeutic avenue for both muscular diseases and osteoporosis.

  18. Emerging Drugs for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Vinod; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Mendell, Jerry R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common, severe childhood form of muscular dystrophy. Treatment is limited to glucocorticoids that have the benefit of prolonging ambulation by approximately 2 years and preventing scoliosis. Finding a more satisfactory treatment should focus on maintaining long-term efficacy with a minimal side effect profile. Areas covered Authors discuss different therapeutic strategies that have been used in pre-clinical and clinical settings. Expert opinion Multiple treatment approaches have emerged. Most attractive are molecular-based therapies that can express the missing dystrophin protein (exon skipping or mutation suppression) or a surrogate gene product (utrophin). Other approaches include increasing the strength of muscles (myostatin inhibitors), reducing muscle fibrosis, and decreasing oxidative stress. Additional targets include inhibiting NF-κB to reduce inflammation, or promoting skeletal muscle blood flow and muscle contractility using phosphodiesterase inhibitors or nitric oxide (NO) donors. The potential for each of these treatment strategies to enter clinical trials is a central theme of discussion. The review emphasizes that the goal of treatment should be to find a product at least as good as glucocorticoids with a lower side effect profile or with a significant glucocorticoid sparing effect. PMID:22632414

  19. Congenital muscular dystrophy with inflammation: Diagnostic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Konkay, Kaumudi; Kannan, Meena Angamuthu; Lingappa, Lokesh; Uppin, Megha S.; Challa, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Muscle biopsy features of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) vary from usual dystrophic picture to normal or nonspecific myopathic picture or prominent fibrosis or striking inflammatory infiltrate, which may lead to diagnostic errors. A series of patients of CMD with significant inflammatory infiltrates on muscle biopsy were correlated with laminin α2 deficiency on immunohistochemistry (IHC). Material and Methods: Cryostat sections of muscle biopsies from the patients diagnosed as CMD on clinical and muscle biopsy features from 1996 to 2014 were reviewed with hematoxylin and eosin(H&E), enzyme and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with laminin α2. Muscle biopsies with inflammatory infiltrate were correlated with laminin α2 deficiency. Results: There were 65 patients of CMD, with inflammation on muscle biopsy in 16. IHC with laminin α2 was available in nine patients, of which six showed complete absence along sarcolemma (five presented with floppy infant syndrome and one with delayed motor milestones) and three showed discontinuous, and less intense staining. Conclusions: CMD show variable degrees of inflammation on muscle biopsy. A diagnosis of laminin α2 deficient CMD should be considered in patients of muscular dystrophy with inflammation, in children with hypotonia/delayed motor milestones. PMID:27570388

  20. Congenital muscular dystrophy: from muscle to brain.

    PubMed

    Falsaperla, Raffaele; Praticò, Andrea D; Ruggieri, Martino; Parano, Enrico; Rizzo, Renata; Corsello, Giovanni; Vitaliti, Giovanna; Pavone, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are a wide group of muscular disorders that manifest with very early onset of muscular weakness, sometime associated to severe brain involvement.The histologic pattern of muscle anomalies is typical of dystrophic lesions but quite variable depending on the different stages and on the severity of the disorder.Recent classification of CMDs have been reported most of which based on the combination of clinical, biochemical, molecular and genetic findings, but genotype/phenotype correlation are in constant progression due to more diffuse utilization of the molecular analysis.In this article, the Authors report on CMDs belonging to the group of dystroglycanopathies and in particular on the most severe forms represented by the Fukuyama CMD, Muscle-Eye-Brain disease and Walker Walburg syndrome.Clinical diagnosis of infantile hypotonia is particularly difficult considering the different etiologic factors causing the lesions, the difficulty in localizing the involved CNS area (central vs. peripheral) and the limited role of the diagnostic procedures at this early age.The diagnostic evaluation is not easy mainly in differentiating the various types of CMDs, and represents a challenge for the neonatologists and pediatricians. Suggestions are reported on the way to reach a correct diagnosis with the appropriate use of the diagnostic means. PMID:27576556

  1. Birdshot chorioretinopathy in a male patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Papavasileiou, Evangelia; Lobo, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of birdshot chorioretinopathy (BSCR) in a patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). A 40-year-old male with history of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy with significant facial diplegia and lagophthalmos presents for an evaluation of bilateral choroiditis with vasculitis and optic disc edema. Clinical examination included fundus and autofluorescence photographs, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. To our knowledge, this patient represents the first reported case of birdshot chorioretinopathy with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Patients with FSHD can present with ocular findings and should be screened with dilated fundus examinations for retinal vascular changes and posterior uveitis. PMID:25861398

  2. Benign muscular dystrophy: risk calculation in families with consanguinity.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, G; Müller, C R; Grimm, T

    1989-01-01

    This report concerns two families in which the index patients are sporadic cases of a benign form of muscular dystrophy. In both families the sisters of the patients have married a close relative. The respective risks for a child of these consanguineous marriages being affected with either X linked Becker muscular dystrophy or autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy is calculated using pedigree information, results of serum creatine kinase determinations, and also, in one family, results of DNA typing using RFLPs from the short arm of the X chromosome. PMID:2732990

  3. Fibrogenic Cell Plasticity Blunts Tissue Regeneration and Aggravates Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pessina, Patrizia; Kharraz, Yacine; Jardí, Mercè; Fukada, So-ichiro; Serrano, Antonio L; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2015-06-01

    Preservation of cell identity is necessary for homeostasis of most adult tissues. This process is challenged every time a tissue undergoes regeneration after stress or injury. In the lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), skeletal muscle regenerative capacity declines gradually as fibrosis increases. Using genetically engineered tracing mice, we demonstrate that, in dystrophic muscle, specialized cells of muscular, endothelial, and hematopoietic origins gain plasticity toward a fibrogenic fate via a TGFβ-mediated pathway. This results in loss of cellular identity and normal function, with deleterious consequences for regeneration. Furthermore, this fibrogenic process involves acquisition of a mesenchymal progenitor multipotent status, illustrating a link between fibrogenesis and gain of progenitor cell functions. As this plasticity also was observed in DMD patients, we propose that mesenchymal transitions impair regeneration and worsen diseases with a fibrotic component. PMID:25981413

  4. Fibrogenic Cell Plasticity Blunts Tissue Regeneration and Aggravates Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pessina, Patrizia; Kharraz, Yacine; Jardí, Mercè; Fukada, So-ichiro; Serrano, Antonio L; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2015-06-01

    Preservation of cell identity is necessary for homeostasis of most adult tissues. This process is challenged every time a tissue undergoes regeneration after stress or injury. In the lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), skeletal muscle regenerative capacity declines gradually as fibrosis increases. Using genetically engineered tracing mice, we demonstrate that, in dystrophic muscle, specialized cells of muscular, endothelial, and hematopoietic origins gain plasticity toward a fibrogenic fate via a TGFβ-mediated pathway. This results in loss of cellular identity and normal function, with deleterious consequences for regeneration. Furthermore, this fibrogenic process involves acquisition of a mesenchymal progenitor multipotent status, illustrating a link between fibrogenesis and gain of progenitor cell functions. As this plasticity also was observed in DMD patients, we propose that mesenchymal transitions impair regeneration and worsen diseases with a fibrotic component.

  5. Muscular dystrophy of mink: a new animal model.

    PubMed

    Hegreberg, G A; Hamilton, M J; Padgett, G A

    1976-04-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise an important group of inherited disorders of man. Although the disease has been studied extensively, little is known about the underlying primary pathomechanisms. Consequently, treatment of patients is difficult and prognosis is poor. An animal model of muscular dystrophy is a useful research tool for approaching the basic problems of pathogenesis in muscle diseases. An inherited progressive muscular dystrophy of mink which resembles the amyotonic forms of human muscular dystrophy is currently under study. Clinically, the earliest sign is progressive muscular weakness and atrophy. Muscle enzyme activities in serum are usually elevated to pathologic levels. Urinary creatine/creatinine ratio is elevated. Pathologic changes are limited to skeletal muscle and are typical of those seen in amyotonic forms of human muscular dystrophy. These changes include variation in diameter size of muscle fibers, centralized nuclei, floccular and hyaline degeneration of scattered muscle fibers, increase in connective tissue in endomysial and perimysial areas, and regenerative attempts. Both type I and type II muscle fibers are involved in the disease process. Genetic studies indicate an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Although the primary defect in muscular dystrophy is traditionally thought to reside in skeletal muscle, recent studies have produced theories of primary involvement of other tissues and organ systems. These theories are presented and relationships to the traditional theory are discussed.

  6. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: a polyalanine myopathy.

    PubMed

    Brais, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    It has been 10 years since the identification of the first PABPN1 gene (GCN)(n)/polyalanine mutations responsible for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). These mutations have been found in most cases of OPMD diagnosed in more than 35 countries. Sequence analyses have shown that such mutations have occurred numerous times in human history. Although PABPN1 was found early on to be a component of the classic filamentous intranuclear inclusions (INIs), mRNA and other proteins also have been found to coaggregate in the INIs. It is still unclear if the INIs play a pathologic or a protective role. The generation of numerous cell and animal models of OPMD has led to greater insight into its complex molecular pathophysiology and identified the first candidate therapeutic molecules. This paper reviews basic and clinical research on OPMD, with special emphasis on recent developments in the understanding of its pathophysiology.

  7. Congenital, hypotonic-sclerotic muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, T; Toyokura, Y

    1977-01-01

    Four cases of congenital, hypotonic-sclerotic muscular dystrophy are presented. The patients showed clinically prominent features described by Ullrich, i.e. congenital muscle weakness, hypotonia, and hyperextensibility of distal joints, contractures of proximal joints, high-arched palate, hyperhidrosis, posterior protrusion of calcaneus, and no progression. Muscle biopsies revealed dystrophic changes. Ullrich suggested that this condition was a new entity, but the disease has received little attention. In the present cases superior intelligence and tendency to recurrent upper respiratory tract infections were stressed as characteristics of this disorder. Insufficient cellular immunity was suspected and this may contribute to the recurrent upper respiratory tract infections and pneumonia often observed. This disease is considered a distinct entity of multisystemic involvement inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Images PMID:604494

  8. Porcine Models of Muscular Dystrophy1

    PubMed Central

    Selsby, Joshua T.; Ross, Jason W.; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease. PMID:25991703

  9. Decreased Nocturnal Movements in Patients with Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Marca, Giacomo Della; Frusciante, Roberto; Dittoni, Serena; Vollono, Catello; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Scarano, Emanuele; Colicchio, Salvatore; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Tonali, Pietro A.; Ricci, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Reduced mobility during sleep characterizes a variety of movement disorders and neuromuscular diseases. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is the third most common form of muscular dystrophy in the general population, and people with FSHD have poor sleep quality. The aims of the present study were to evaluate nocturnal motor activity in patients with FSHD by means of videopolysomnography and to verify whether activity was associated with modifications in sleep structure. Methods: We enrolled 32 adult patients affected by genetically confirmed FSHD (18 women and 14 men, mean age 45.1 ± 13.4 years) and 32 matched control subjects, (18 women and 14 men, mean age 45.5 ± 11.4 years). Major body movements (MBM) were scored in videopolygraphic recordings in accordance with established criteria. An MBM index was calculated (number of MBM per hour of sleep). Results: The FSHD group showed a decrease in the MBM index (FSHD: 1.2 ± 1.1; control subjects: 2.3 ± 1.2, analysis of variance F = 13.672; p = 0.008). The sleep pattern of patients with FSHD, as compared with that of controls, was characterized by longer sleep latencies, shorter sleep durations, an increased percentage of wake during sleep, and a decreased percentage of rapid eye movement sleep. In the patient group, the MBM index was inversely correlated with severity of disease (Spearman test: r30 = −0.387; p < 0.05). Conclusions: The present findings suggest that patients with FSHD have a reduced number of nocturnal movements, which is related to disease severity. Reduced movement in bed may contribute to the sleep modifications observed in these patients. Citation: Marca GD; Frusciante R; Dittoni S; Vollono C; Losurdo A; Testani E; Scarano E; Colicchio S; Iannaccone E; Tonali PA; Ricci E. Decreased nocturnal movements in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(3):276-280. PMID:20572422

  10. Genetics Home Reference: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy , accounting for about 30 percent of cases. Dysferlinopathy, also ... be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of ...

  11. How the magnitude of clinical severity and recurrence risk affects reproductive decisions in adult males with different forms of progressive muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, S; Zatz, M

    1998-01-01

    The reproductive history of 177 male patients affected with Becker (BMD) (n=69), limb-girdle (LGMD) (n=54), and facioscapulohumeral (FSHMD) (n=54) muscular dystrophy (MD) was analysed according to severity of the disease (BMD>LGMD>FSHMD) and magnitude of recurrence risk (RR) (high for FSHMD, intermediate for BMD, and low for LGMD). Additionally, 62 male patients were interviewed on psychosocial issues, in order to disentangle the factors influencing reproductive decisions among patients affected with MD. Among male adults, significantly more FSHMD than LGMD or BMD patients were married and had children. Age specific reproductive outcome was 0.31-0.32 for BMD, 0.51-0.62 for LGMD, and 0.58-1.02 for FSHMD, reflecting the influence of the disease's severity. High RRs did not significantly diminish reproduction after genetic counselling or correlate with less prospective desire for children. Instead, early onset, severity of the disease, and past reproductive history were found to diminish reproductive outcome after genetic counselling, and prospective family planning was also found to be influenced by past reproductive history as well as by emotional/sexual dysfunction with the opposite sex. PMID:9541101

  12. How the magnitude of clinical severity and recurrence risk affects reproductive decisions in adult males with different forms of progressive muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Eggers, S; Zatz, M

    1998-03-01

    The reproductive history of 177 male patients affected with Becker (BMD) (n=69), limb-girdle (LGMD) (n=54), and facioscapulohumeral (FSHMD) (n=54) muscular dystrophy (MD) was analysed according to severity of the disease (BMD>LGMD>FSHMD) and magnitude of recurrence risk (RR) (high for FSHMD, intermediate for BMD, and low for LGMD). Additionally, 62 male patients were interviewed on psychosocial issues, in order to disentangle the factors influencing reproductive decisions among patients affected with MD. Among male adults, significantly more FSHMD than LGMD or BMD patients were married and had children. Age specific reproductive outcome was 0.31-0.32 for BMD, 0.51-0.62 for LGMD, and 0.58-1.02 for FSHMD, reflecting the influence of the disease's severity. High RRs did not significantly diminish reproduction after genetic counselling or correlate with less prospective desire for children. Instead, early onset, severity of the disease, and past reproductive history were found to diminish reproductive outcome after genetic counselling, and prospective family planning was also found to be influenced by past reproductive history as well as by emotional/sexual dysfunction with the opposite sex.

  13. Evidence of genetic heterogeneity in the autosomal recessive adult forms of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy following linkage analysis with 15q probes in Brazilian families.

    PubMed Central

    Passos-Bueno, M R; Richard, I; Vainzof, M; Fougerousse, F; Weissenbach, J; Broux, O; Cohen, D; Akiyama, J; Marie, S K; Carvalho, A A

    1993-01-01

    The autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) represent a heterogeneous group of diseases which may be characterised by one or more autosomal loci. A gene at 15q has recently been found to be responsible for a mild form of LGMD in a group of families from the isolated island of Réunion, now classified as LGMD2. Based on results of eight out of 11 large Brazilian LGMD families of different racial background (which were informative for the closest available probe to the LGMD2 gene), we confirmed linkage to the LGMD2 gene at 15q in two of these families and exclusion in six others. These data provide the first evidence of genetic heterogeneity for the autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. PMID:8320700

  14. Bethlem myopathy is not allelic to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Yamaoka, L.H.; Stajich, J.; Lewis, K.

    1995-08-28

    The Bethlem myopathy, an autosomal-dominant myopathy, shows a distribution of proximal muscle weakness similar to that observed in dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Yet the Bethlem myopathy differs from most limb-girdle dystrophies in two important regards. First, the Bethlem myopathy presents with joint contractures most commonly observed at the elbows, ankles, and neck. Secondly, disease onset in the Bethlem myopathy is in early childhood, while most dominant LGMDs present with adult onset. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  16. A founder mutation in Anoctamin 5 is a major cause of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Debbie; Sarkozy, A; Muelas, N; Koehler, K; Huebner, A; Hudson, G; Chinnery, P F; Barresi, R; Eagle, M; Polvikoski, T; Bailey, G; Miller, J; Radunovic, A; Hughes, P J; Roberts, R; Krause, S; Walter, M C; Laval, S H; Straub, V; Lochmüller, H; Bushby, K

    2011-01-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies are a group of disorders with wide genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Recently, mutations in the ANO5 gene, which encodes a putative calcium-activated chloride channel belonging to the Anoctamin family of proteins, were identified in five families with one of two previously identified disorders, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2L and non-dysferlin Miyoshi muscular dystrophy. We screened a candidate group of 64 patients from 59 British and German kindreds and found the truncating mutation, c.191dupA in exon 5 of ANO5 in 20 patients, homozygously in 15 and in compound heterozygosity with other ANO5 variants in the rest. An intragenic single nucleotide polymorphism and an extragenic microsatellite marker are in linkage disequilibrium with the mutation, suggesting a founder effect in the Northern European population. We have further defined the clinical phenotype of ANO5-associated muscular dystrophy. Patients show adult onset proximal lower limb weakness with highly raised serum creatine kinase values (average 4500 IU/l) and frequent muscle atrophy and asymmetry of muscle involvement. Onset varies from the early 20 s to 50 s and the weakness is generally slowly progressive, with most patients remaining ambulant for several decades. Distal presentation is much less common but a milder degree of distal lower limb weakness is often observed. Upper limb strength is only mildly affected and cardiac and respiratory function is normal. Females appear less frequently affected. In the North of England population we have identified eight patients with ANO5 mutations, suggesting a minimum prevalence of 0.27/100,000, twice as common as dysferlinopathy. We suggest that mutations in ANO5 represent a relatively common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy with high serum creatine kinase and that mutation screening, particularly of the common mutation c.191dupA, should be an early step in the diagnostic algorithm of adult limb-girdle muscular

  17. Targeting Fibrosis in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lan; Lu, Haiyan

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common genetic muscle disease affecting 1 in 3,500 live male births. It is an X-linked recessive disease caused by a defective dystrophin gene. The disease is characterized by progressive limb weakness, respiratory and cardiac failure and premature death. Fibrosis is a prominent pathological feature of muscle biopsies from patients with DMD. It directly causes muscle dysfunction and contributes to the lethal DMD phenotype. Although gene therapy and cell therapy may ultimately provide a cure for DMD, currently the disease is devastating, with no effective therapies. Recent studies have demonstrated that ameliorating muscle fibrosis may represent a viable therapeutic approach for DMD. By reducing scar formation, antifibrotic therapies may not only improve muscle function but also enhance muscle regeneration and promote gene and stem cell engraftment. Antifibrotic therapy may serve as a necessary addition to gene and cell therapies to treat DMD in the future. Therefore, understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying muscle fibrogenesis associated with dystrophin deficiency is key to the development of effective antifibrotic therapies for DMD. PMID:20613637

  18. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: consequences of chromatin relaxation

    PubMed Central

    van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Miller, Daniel G.; Tawil, Rabi; Filippova, Galina N.; Tapscott, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review In recent years we have seen remarkable progress in our understanding of the disease mechanism underlying facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of our current understanding of the disease mechanism and to discuss the observations supporting the possibility of a developmental defect in this disorder. Recent findings In the majority of cases FSHD is caused by contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array (FSHD1). This results in local chromatin relaxation and stable expression of the DUX4 retrogene in skeletal muscle, but only when a polymorphic DUX4 polyadenylation signal is present. In some cases (FSHD2), D4Z4 chromatin relaxation and stable DUX4 expression occurs in the absence of D4Z4 array contraction. DUX4 is a germline transcription factor and its expression in skeletal muscle leads to activation of early stem cell and germline programs and transcriptional activation of retroelements. Summary Recent studies have provided a plausible disease mechanism for FSHD where FSHD results from inappropriate expression of the germline transcription factor DUX4. The genes regulated by DUX4 suggest several mechanisms of muscle damage, and provide potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets that should be investigated in future studies. PMID:22892954

  19. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Jason L.; Bowden, Sasigarn A.; Mahan, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serious sequelae adversely affect quality of life and can impact survival. The current clinical issues relating to bone health and bone health screening methods in DMD are presented in this review. Diagnostic studies, including biochemical markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), as well as spinal imaging using densitometric lateral spinal imaging, and treatment to optimize bone health in patients with DMD are discussed. Treatment with bisphosphonates offers a method to increase bone mass in these children; oral and intravenous bisphosphonates have been used successfully although treatment is typically reserved for children with fractures and/or bone pain with low bone mass by DXA. PMID:26124831

  20. Molecular analysis of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, M.; Maynard, J.; Osborn, M.

    1994-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness. The disease locus maps to 4q35 and is associated with a de novo DNA rearrangement, detected by a probe p13E-11 (D4F104S1) which maps proximal to the disease locus. An informative distal flanking marker for this condition is still required. Using p13E-11, we have analyzed 35 FSHD families in which the disease is apparently associated with a new mutation. Twenty three of these cases were found to have a smaller rearranged DNA fragment which was not present in either of the parents. Pulsed-field gel analysis of 5 of these families also revealed evidence of DNA deletion. During the course of this study, we identified one case with a DNA rearrangement which was also present in the unaffected mother, but at very low intensity. This finding has been confirmed by pulsed-field gel analysis, and indicates that the mother is probably a gonosomal mosaic. In order to saturate the FSHD region with new DNA markers, a laser microdissection and microcloning technique was used to construct a genomic library from the distal end of chromosome 4. Of the 72 microclones analyzed, 42 mapped into the relevant 4q35 region. 4 sequences were conserved and may be considered potential candidate genes for FSHD. The microclones mapping to 4q35 are under study to identify additional polymorphic markers for the FSHD region.

  1. Experimental Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gets Boost from Existing Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 March 2013 (historical) Experimental Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gets Boost from Existing Medication A readily available ... effects of a promising experimental treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), according to research partially funded by the ...

  2. [Specific features of Becker Muscular Dystrophy patients and female carriers of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Magot, A; Mercier, S; Péréon, Y

    2015-12-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) was first described in 1955 and linked to the DMD gene in 1987. Compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), clinical onset of BMD usually occurs after the age of 12 and wheelchair is required after the age of 16. BMD is characterized by generalized weakness first affecting limb girdle muscles, hypertrophy of the calves and cardiomyopathy in males. Some patients have only mild symptoms such as cramps or elevated serum creatine kinases (SCK) throughout all their lives. SCK levels are usually elevated. Muscle biopsy (immunohistochemistry or immunoblotting) shows a dystrophic pattern with abnormal dystrophin staining. Diagnosis is confirmed by DMD gene sequencing. Deletions or duplications of one or several exons are identified in the majority of cases. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended for the care management of these patients with a particular attention to the cardiomyopathy, which is typically responsible for death but can be prevented by specific treatment. X-linked dilated cardiomyopathies linked to DMD gene are a phenotypic continuum of BMD. Some female carriers of DMD mutations exhibit clinical symptoms of variable severity, often milder and beginning later than in males. The cardiomyopathy is the most frequent feature that should be especially monitored in these patients. Genetic counselling should be systematically proposed. PMID:26773584

  3. Modifier Genes and their effect on Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Andy H.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Recently, genetic pathways that modify the clinical severity of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy have been identified. The pathways uncovered as modifiers are useful to predict prognosis and also elucidate molecular signatures that can be manipulated therapeutically. Recent Findings Modifiers have been identified using combinations of transcriptome and genome profiling. Osteopontin, encoded by the SPP1 gene, was found using gene expression profiling. LTBP4, encoding latent transforming growth factor β binding protein 4 was initially discovered using a genomewide screen in mice and then validated in cohorts of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy patients. These two pathways converge in that they both regulate TGFβ. A third modifier, Anxa6 that specifies annexin A6, is a calcium binding protein has been identified using mouse models, and regulates the injury pathway and sarcolemmal resealing. Summary Genetic modifiers can serve as biomarkers for outcomes in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Modifiers can alter strength and ambulation in muscular dystrophy, and these same features can be used as endpoints used in clinical trials. Moreover, because genetic modifiers can influence outcomes, these genetic markers should be considered when stratifying results in muscular dystrophy. PMID:26263473

  4. Neurocognitive Profiles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Gene Mutation Site

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Magri, Francesca; Del Bo, Roberto; Guglieri, Michela; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nonprogressive cognitive impairment is recognized as a common feature in a substantial proportion of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To investigate the possible role of mutations along the dystrophin gene affecting different brain dystrophin isoforms and specific cognitive profiles, 42 school-age children affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, subdivided according to sites of mutations along the dystrophin gene, underwent a battery of tests tapping a wide range of intellectual, linguistic, and neuropsychologic functions. Full-scale intelligence quotient was approximately 1 S.D. below the population average in the whole group of dystrophic children. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the distal portion of the dystrophin gene (involving the 140-kDa brain protein isoform, called Dp140) were generally more severely affected and expressed different patterns of strengths and impairments, compared with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the proximal portion of the dystrophin gene (not involving Dp140). Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and distal mutations demonstrated specific impairments in visuospatial functions and visual memory (which seemed intact in proximally mutated patients) and greater impairment in syntactic processing. PMID:22000308

  5. Patient Identified Disease Burden in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicholas E; Quinn, Christine; Eastwood, Eileen; Tawil, Rabi; Heatwole, Chad R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The multitude of symptoms associated with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) disease burden are of varying importance. The extent of these symptoms and their cumulative effect on the FSHD population is unknown. Methods We conducted interviews with adult FSHD patients to identify which symptoms have the greatest effect on their lives. Each interview was recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a qualitative framework technique, triangulation, and 3-investigator consensus approach. Results 1375 quotes were obtained through 20 patient interviews. 251 symptoms of importance were identified representing 14 themes of FSHD disease burden. Symptoms associated with mobility impairment, activity limitation, and social role limitation were most frequently mentioned by participants. Conclusions There are multiple themes and symptoms, some previously under-recognized, that play a key role in FSHD disease burden. PMID:23225386

  6. Cognitive and Neurobehavioral Profile in Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Rudaina; Smile, Sharon; Yoon, Grace; Dupuis, Annie; Mosleh, Maureen; Snider, Andrea; McAdam, Laura

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive neuromuscular condition that has a high rate of cognitive and learning disabilities as well as neurobehavioral disorders, some of which have been associated with disruption of dystrophin isoforms. Retrospective cohort of 59 boys investigated the cognitive and neurobehavioral profile of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Full-scale IQ of < 70 was seen in 27%; learning disability in 44%, intellectual disability in 19%; attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in 32%; autism spectrum disorders in 15%; and anxiety in 27%. Mutations affecting Dp260 isoform and 5'untranslated region of Dp140 were observed in 60% with learning disability, 50% intellectual disability, 77% with autism spectrum disorders, and 94% with anxiety. No statistically significant correlation was noted between comorbidities and dystrophin isoforms; however, there is a trend of cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms with declining full-scale IQ. Enhanced psychology testing to include both cognitive and neurobehavioral disorders is recommended for all individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  7. Gastrointestinal manifestations in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Biagi, Sonia; Stasi, Cristina; Costa, Francesco; Mumolo, Maria Gloria; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Marchi, Santino

    2006-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is characterized by myotonic phenomena and progressive muscular weakness. Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is frequent and may occur at any level. The clinical manifestations have previously been attributed to motility disorders caused by smooth muscle damage, but histologic evidence of alterations has been scarce and conflicting. A neural factor has also been hypothesized. In the upper digestive tract, dysphagia, heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia are the most common complaints, while in the lower tract, abdominal pain, bloating and changes in bowel habits are often reported. Digestive symptoms may be the first sign of dystrophic disease and may precede the musculo-skeletal features. The impairment of gastrointestinal function may be sometimes so gradual that the patients adapt to it with little awareness of symptoms. In such cases routine endoscopic and ultrasonographic evaluations are not sufficient and targeted techniques (electrogastrography, manometry, electromyography, functional ultrasonography, scintigraphy, etc.) are needed. There is a low correlation between the degree of skeletal muscle involvement and the presence and severity of gastrointestinal disturbances whereas a positive correlation with the duration of the skeletal muscle disease has been reported. The drugs recommended for treating the gastrointestinal complaints such as prokinetic, anti-dyspeptic drugs and laxatives, are mainly aimed at correcting the motility disorders. Gastrointestinal involvement in MD remains a complex and intriguing condition since many important problems are still unsolved. Further studies concentrating on genetic aspects, early diagnostic techniques and the development of new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve our management of the gastrointestinal manifestations of MD. PMID:16609987

  8. [DIAGNOSTIC VARIATIONS OF X-LINKED MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY WITH CONTRACTURES].

    PubMed

    Kvirkvelia, N; Shakarishvili, R; Gugutsidze, D; Khizanishvili, N

    2015-01-01

    Case report with review describes X-linked muscular dystrophy with contractures in 28 years old man and his cousin. The disease revealed itself in an early stage (age 5-10), the process was progressing with apparent tendons retraction and contraction, limited movement in the areas of the neck and back of spine, atrophy of shoulder and pelvic yard and back muscles. Intellect was intact. Cardyomyopathy was exhibited. CK was normal. EMG showed classic myopathic features. Muscle biopsy showed different caliber groups of muscle fibers, growth of endo-perimesial connective tissue. Clinical manifestations together with electrophysiological and histological data suggest consistency with Rotthauwe-Mortier-Bayer X-linked muscular dystrophy.

  9. Dystrophin and muscular dystrophy: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, K F; Kunkel, L M

    2001-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy was described in the medical literature in the early 1850s but the molecular basis of the disease was not determined until the late 1980s. The cloning of dystrophin led to the identification of a large complex of proteins that plays an important, although not yet well understood, role in muscle biology. Concomitant with the elucidation of the function of dystrophin and its associated proteins has been the pursuit of therapeutic options for muscular dystrophy. Although there is still no cure for this disorder, great advances are being made in the areas of gene introduction and cell transplant therapy. PMID:11592805

  10. Immobility reduces muscle fiber necrosis in dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Ikezawa, M; Nomura, K; Ito, K; Ozasa, S; Ueno, H; Yoshioka, K; Yano, S; Yamashita, T; Matuskura, M; Miike, T

    2006-08-01

    Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy is a progressive muscle disease, which is caused by the abnormality of dystrophin. Spina bifida is characterized by paralysis of the feet, with most of the upper extremities not being affected. We report here on the first case of Becker muscular dystrophy coinciding with spina bifida. The muscle biopsy specimens of the patient showed dystrophic changes in upper extremities, but clearly less in lower extremities. The results show that the restriction of excessive exercise is important for dystrophin deficiency disease. PMID:16516424

  11. Determinants of the incidence of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an X-linked disorder, is the most common muscular dystrophy with an incidence in boys of about 200 per million births. It presents in early childhood leading to death in early teens. Its relatively high incidence and severity have stimulated many studies from epidemiological to curative. Recent advances in molecular biology have opened up the possibility of carrier identification and potential reduction of the incidence of cases. This paper gives a population genetics model which can be used to predict the reduction in incidence. PMID:26697447

  12. Torn apart: membrane rupture in muscular dystrophies and associated cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Lammerding, Jan; Lee, Richard T.

    2007-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are often caused by mutations in cytoskeletal proteins that render cells more susceptible to strain-induced injury in mechanically active tissues such as skeletal or cardiac muscle. In this issue of the JCI, Han et al. report that dysferlin participates in membrane resealing in cardiomyocytes and that exercise results in increased membrane damage and disturbed cardiac function in dysferlin-deficient mice (see the related article beginning on page 1805). Thus, in addition to repetitive membrane damage, inadequate membrane repair may participate in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophies and cardiomyopathies. PMID:17607350

  13. Oxidative stress and the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Rando, Thomas A

    2002-11-01

    The muscular dystrophies represent a diverse group of diseases differing in underlying genetic basis, age of onset, mode of inheritance, and severity of progression, but they share certain common pathologic features. Most prominent among these features is the necrotic degeneration of muscle fibers. Although the genetic basis of many of the dystrophies has been known for over a decade and new disease genes continue to be discovered, the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to muscle cell death in the dystrophies remain a mystery. This review focuses on the oxidative stress theory, which states that the final common pathway of muscle cell death in these diseases involves oxidative damage.

  14. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  15. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  16. Occupational Potential in a Population with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schkade, Janette K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-five males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were tested to assess their potential for occupational activity. Tests measured possible sensory deficits, strength, endurance, and fatigue in response to sustained fine motor activity. Results indicate that, within limitations, persons with this diagnosis can engage in activity leading to skill…

  17. Poor Facial Affect Recognition among Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, V. J.; Fee, R. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Goldstein, E.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy (MD) have delayed language and poor social skills and some meet criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder, yet they are identified by molecular, rather than behavioral, characteristics. To determine whether comprehension of facial affect is compromised in boys with MD, children were given a…

  18. Dasatinib as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, Leanne; Piggott, Robert W; Emmerson, Tracy; Winder, Steve J

    2016-01-15

    Identification of a systemically acting and universal small molecule therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy would be an enormous advance for this condition. Based on evidence gained from studies on mouse genetic models, we have identified tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan as a key event in the aetiology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Thus, preventing tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan presents itself as a potential therapeutic strategy. Using the dystrophic sapje zebrafish, we have investigated the use of tyrosine kinase and other inhibitors to treat the dystrophic symptoms in this model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dasatinib, a potent and specific Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to decrease the levels of β-dystroglycan phosphorylation on tyrosine and to increase the relative levels of non-phosphorylated β-dystroglycan in sapje zebrafish. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment resulted in the improved physical appearance of the sapje zebrafish musculature and increased swimming ability as measured by both duration and distance of swimming of dasatinib-treated fish compared with control animals. These data suggest great promise for pharmacological agents that prevent the phosphorylation of β-dystroglycan on tyrosine and subsequent steps in the degradation pathway as therapeutic targets for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  19. Phosphorylation of intact erythrocytes in human muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Nigro, M.

    1986-04-01

    The uptake of exogenous /sup 32/Pi into the membrane proteins of intact erythrocytes was measured in 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. No abnormalities were noted after autoradiographic analysis. This contrasts with earlier results obtained when isolated membranes were phosphorylated with gamma-(/sup 32/P)ATP, and suggests a possible reinterpretation of those experiments.

  20. The Child with Muscular Dystrophy in School. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schock, Nancy C.

    Practical information on children with muscular dystrophy is intended to help parents and teachers facilitate their inclusion in mainstreamed classrooms. Major topics addressed include the following: transportation arrangements; providing full information to the teacher regarding the child's specific abilities and physical limitations;…

  1. Muscle Weakness and Speech in Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Amy T.; Palmer, Phyllis M.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We documented speech and voice characteristics associated with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Although it is a rare disease, OPMD offers the opportunity to study the impact of myopathic weakness on speech production in the absence of neurologic deficits in a relatively homogeneous group of speakers. Methods: Twelve individuals…

  2. The Assessment of Intelligence in Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mearig, Judith S.

    1979-01-01

    Challenges assumptions and research procedures leading to the position that below-average intellectual potential is an integral part of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A study of 58 boys (ages 5 to 18) from urban, suburban, and rural settings indicated IQ range of 59 to 131 and no evidence of significant verbal deficit (reported in earlier studies).…

  3. Phonological Awareness Skills in Young Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waring, Phoebe; Woodyatt, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Substantial research has detailed the reading deficits experienced by children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although phonological awareness (PA) is vital in reading development, little is known about PA in the DMD population. This pilot study describes the PA abilities of a group of five young children with DMD, comparing the results…

  4. Swallow Characteristics in Patients with Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Neel, Amy T.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective investigation evaluates oral weakness and its impact on swallow function, weight, and quality of life in patients with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Method: Intraoral pressure, swallow pressure, and endurance were measured using an Iowa Oral Performance Instrument in participants with OPMD and matched…

  5. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: practical recommendations to guide management

    PubMed Central

    Toussaint, Michel; Davidson, Zoe; Bouvoie, Veronique; Evenepoel, Nathalie; Haan, Jurn; Soudon, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive neuromuscular disorder causing weakness of the skeletal, respiratory, cardiac and oropharyngeal muscles with up to one third of young men reporting difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). Recent studies on dysphagia in DMD clarify the pathophysiology of swallowing disorders and offer new tools for its assessment but little guidance is available for its management. This paper aims to provide a step-by-step algorithm to facilitate clinical decisions regarding dysphagia management in this patient population. Methods: This algorithm is based on 30 years of clinical experience with DMD in a specialised Centre for Neuromuscular Disorders (Inkendaal Rehabilitation Hospital, Belgium) and is supported by literature where available. Results: Dysphagia can worsen the condition of ageing patients with DMD. Apart from the difficulties of chewing and oral fragmentation of the food bolus, dysphagia is rather a consequence of an impairment in the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. By contrast with central neurologic disorders, dysphagia in DMD accompanies solid rather than liquid intake. Symptoms of dysphagia may not be clinically evident; however laryngeal food penetration, accumulation of food residue in the pharynx and/or true laryngeal food aspiration may occur. The prevalence of these issues in DMD is likely underestimated. Conclusions: There is little guidance available for clinicians to manage dysphagia and improve feeding for young men with DMD. This report aims to provide a clinical algorithm to facilitate the diagnosis of dysphagia, to identify the symptoms and to propose practical recommendations to treat dysphagia in the adult DMD population.Implications for RehabilitationLittle guidance is available for the management of dysphagia in Duchenne dystrophy.Food can penetrate the vestibule, accumulate as residue or cause aspiration.We propose recommendations and an algorithm to guide management of

  6. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Expression in Normal and Diseased Human Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oronzi Scott, M.; Sylvester, J. E.; Heiman-Patterson, T.; Shi, Y.-J.; Fieles, W.; Stedman, H.; Burghes, A.; Ray, P.; Worton, R.; Fischbeck, K. H.

    1988-03-01

    A probe for the 5' end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene was used to study expression of the gene in normal human muscle, myogenic cell cultures, and muscle from patients with DMD. Expression was found in RNA from normal fetal muscle, adult cardiac and skeletal muscle, and cultured muscle after myoblast fusion. In DMD muscle, expression of this portion of the gene was also revealed by in situ RNA hybridization, particularly in regenerating muscle fibers.

  7. [Principles of multidisciplinary management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Chabrol, B; Mayer, M

    2015-12-01

    Given the gradual progression observed in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, organization of care in multidisciplinary consultations is essential for optimal management of the different aspects of the disease. Drawing up a care plan is always preceded by a specific consultation for the announcement of the diagnosis with both the parents and the child. Explaining to the child the origin of his problems with simple words, telling him that why he experienced a particular symptom has been understood, is a fundamental step. The child needs to receive the information at different times of the disease following the rhythms of the disease stages, with an appropriate lead time. With the progress achieved in managing this disease, more than 90% of these children now live into adulthood. The switch from pediatric consultations to adult consultations, marking the transition from childhood management at adulthood, is a major challenge in the organization of care. Although today death occurs most often in adulthood, some children die in childhood. For the majority of teams who care for children, whatever the initial pathology may be, the notion of care continuity and accompaniment from the announcement of the disease to the terminal phase is essential. Increasing numbers of therapeutic trials have been developed over the past few years aiming to investigate children with DMD. However, they must not neglect the overall management of these patients and provide the best accompaniment possible.

  8. Satellite Cells in Muscular Dystrophy - Lost in Polarity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha C; Chevalier, Fabien P; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Recent findings employing the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have revealed that muscle satellite stem cells play a direct role in contributing to disease etiology and progression of DMD, the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy. Lack of dystrophin expression in DMD has critical consequences in satellite cells including an inability to establish cell polarity, abrogation of asymmetric satellite stem-cell divisions, and failure to enter the myogenic program. Thus, muscle wasting in dystrophic mice is not only caused by myofiber fragility but is exacerbated by intrinsic satellite cell dysfunction leading to impaired regeneration. Despite intense research and clinical efforts, there is still no effective cure for DMD. In this review we highlight recent research advances in DMD and discuss the current state of treatment and, importantly, how we can incorporate satellite cell-targeted therapeutic strategies to correct satellite cell dysfunction in DMD.

  9. Bimaxillary Osteotomy for Jaw Deformity With Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takako; Ohba, Seigo; Fujimura, Yuji; Asahina, Izumi

    2016-05-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a subtype of muscular dystrophies which reduces the muscle strength, especially the regions of scapular, shoulder, and upper arms, progressively. According to progressive muscle weakness in FSHD, postoperative stability of patient with FSHD after orthognathic surgery is not reliably acquired same as healthy subjects. A 32-year-old woman with FSHD underwent orthodontic and orthognathic surgical treatment due to jaw deformity. She has been followed up more than 3 years after surgery and acquired skeletal stability. This patient is the first report that showed long-term skeletal stability after orthognathic surgery in patient with FSHD. This patient report suggests that it is possible to apply orthognathic surgical treatment to patients with FSHD. PMID:27054436

  10. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophies: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Donghoon

    2010-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are groups of inherited progressive diseases of the muscle caused by mutations of diverse genes related to normal muscle function. Although there is no current effective treatment for these devastating diseases, various molecular strategies have been developed to restore the expressions of the associated defective proteins. In preclinical animal models, both viral and nonviral vectors have been shown to deliver recombinant versions of defective genes. Antisense oligonucleotides have been shown to modify the splicing mechanism of mesenger ribonucleic acid to produce an internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin in an experimental model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In addition, chemicals can induce readthrough of the premature stop codon in nonsense mutations of the dystrophin gene. On the basis of these preclinical data, several experimental clinical trials are underway that aim to demonstrate efficacy in treating these devastating diseases. PMID:20944811

  11. A founder mutation in Anoctamin 5 is a major cause of limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Muelas, Nuria; Köehler, Katrin; Huebner, Angela; Hudson, Gavin; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Barresi, Rita; Eagle, Michelle; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Bailey, Geraldine; Miller, James; Radunovic, Aleksander; Hughes, Paul J.; Roberts, Richard; Krause, Sabine; Walter, Maggie C.; Laval, Steven H.; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) are a group of disorders with wide genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Recently, mutations in the ANO5 gene, which encodes a putative calcium-activated chloride channel belonging to the Anoctamin family of proteins, were identified in five families with one of two previously identified disorders, LGMD2L and non-dysferlin Miyoshi muscular dystrophy (MMD3). We screened a candidate group of 64 patients from 59 British and German kindreds and found the truncating mutation, c.191dupA in exon 5 of ANO5 in 20 patients, homozygously in 15 and in compound heterozygosity with other ANO5 variants in the rest. An intragenic SNP and an extragenic microsatellite marker are in linkage disequilibrium with the mutation, suggesting a founder effect in the Northern European population. We have further defined the clinical phenotype of ANO5-associated muscular dystrophy. Patients show adult onset proximal lower limb weakness with highly raised creatinine kinase (CK) values (average 4500 IU/l) and frequent muscle atrophy and asymmetry of muscle involvement. Onset varies from the early 20s to 50s and the weakness is generally slowly progressive, with most patients remaining ambulant for several decades. Distal presentation is much less common but a milder degree of distal lower limb weakness is often observed. Upper limb strength is only mildly affected and cardiac and respiratory function is normal. Females appear less frequently affected. In the North of England population we have identified eight patients with ANO5 mutations, suggesting a minimum prevalence of 0.27/100 000, twice as common as dysferlinopathy. We suggest that mutations in ANO5 represent a relatively common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy with high CK and that mutation screening, particularly of the common mutation c.191dupA, should be an early step in the diagnostic algorithm of adult LGMD patients. PMID:21186264

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital myopathies and muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Massalska, D; Zimowski, J G; Bijok, J; Kucińska-Chahwan, A; Łusakowska, A; Jakiel, G; Roszkowski, T

    2016-09-01

    Congenital myopathies and muscular dystrophies constitute a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of rare inherited diseases characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy, motor delay and respiratory insufficiency. To date, curative care is not available for these diseases, which may severely affect both life-span and quality of life. We discuss prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for families at risk, as well as diagnostic possibilities in sporadic cases. PMID:27197572

  13. Creatine monohydrate as a therapeutic aid in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, Jared P; Fielding, Roger A

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, dietary supplementation with creatine has been shown to enhance neuromuscular function in several diseases. Recent studies have suggested that creatine can be beneficial in patients with muscular dystrophy and other mitochondrial cytopathies, and may attenuate sarcopenia and facilitate rehabilitation of disuse atrophy. Though the mechanisms are still unknown, creatine has been shown to decrease cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels and increase intramuscular and cerebral phosphocreatine stores, providing potential musculoskeletal and neuroprotective effects. PMID:16536185

  14. Cognitive and Neurobehavioral Profile in Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Rudaina; Smile, Sharon; Yoon, Grace; Dupuis, Annie; Mosleh, Maureen; Snider, Andrea; McAdam, Laura

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive neuromuscular condition that has a high rate of cognitive and learning disabilities as well as neurobehavioral disorders, some of which have been associated with disruption of dystrophin isoforms. Retrospective cohort of 59 boys investigated the cognitive and neurobehavioral profile of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Full-scale IQ of < 70 was seen in 27%; learning disability in 44%, intellectual disability in 19%; attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in 32%; autism spectrum disorders in 15%; and anxiety in 27%. Mutations affecting Dp260 isoform and 5'untranslated region of Dp140 were observed in 60% with learning disability, 50% intellectual disability, 77% with autism spectrum disorders, and 94% with anxiety. No statistically significant correlation was noted between comorbidities and dystrophin isoforms; however, there is a trend of cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms with declining full-scale IQ. Enhanced psychology testing to include both cognitive and neurobehavioral disorders is recommended for all individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:25660133

  15. Lipogenesis mitigates dysregulated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Paran, Christopher W; Zou, Kai; Ferrara, Patrick J; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Muscular dystrophy is accompanied by a reduction in activity of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) that contributes to abnormal Ca(2+) homeostasis in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER). Recent findings suggest that skeletal muscle fatty acid synthase (FAS) modulates SERCA activity and muscle function via its effects on SR membrane phospholipids. In this study, we examined muscle's lipid metabolism in mdx mice, a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). De novo lipogenesis was ~50% reduced in mdx muscles compared to wildtype (WT) muscles. Gene expressions of lipogenic and other ER lipid-modifying enzymes were found to be differentially expressed between wildtype (WT) and mdx muscles. A comprehensive examination of muscles' SR phospholipidome revealed elevated phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio in mdx compared to WT mice. Studies in primary myocytes suggested that defects in key lipogenic enzymes including FAS, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), and Lipin1 are likely contributing to reduced SERCA activity in mdx mice. Triple transgenic expression of FAS, SCD1, and Lipin1 (3TG) in mdx myocytes partly rescued SERCA activity, which coincided with an increase in SR PE that normalized PC/PE ratio. These findings implicate a defect in lipogenesis to be a contributing factor for SERCA dysfunction in muscular dystrophy. Restoration of muscle's lipogenic pathway appears to mitigate SERCA function through its effects on SR membrane composition.

  16. Diffusion and ideal MRI techniques to characterize limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Salazar, G.; Hidalgo-Tobon, S.; Vargas-Cañas, S.; Marrufo-Melendez, O.; Solis-Najera, S.; Taboada-Barajas, J.; Rodríguez, A. O.; Delgado-Hernández, R.

    2012-10-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a group of autosomal dominantly or recessively inherited muscular dystrophies that also present with primary proximal (limb-girdle) muscle weakness. In the thigh, muscles at the back are affected, with a tendency to preserve the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius. The aim of this study was to compare quantitative MRI measurements from IDEAL-based imaging and DW imaging in the thigh muscles of adults with LGMDs and healthy volunteers(HC). Six women (three patients and three healthy volunteers) were examined. Imaging experiments were conducted on a 1.5T GE scanner (General Electric Medical Systems. Milwaukee). T1 IDEAL 2D images and diffusion images were acquired. Results demonstrated that the use of noninvasive MRI techniques may provide the means to characterize the muscle through quantitative methods to determine the percentage of fat and ADC values.

  17. Noncoding RNAs: Emerging Players in Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The fascinating world of noncoding RNAs has recently come to light, thanks to the development of powerful sequencing technologies, revealing a variety of RNA molecules playing important regulatory functions in most, if not all, cellular processes. Many noncoding RNAs have been implicated in regulatory networks that are determinant for skeletal muscle differentiation and disease. In this review, we outline the noncoding RNAs involved in physiological mechanisms of myogenesis and those that appear dysregulated in muscle dystrophies, also discussing their potential use as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:24729974

  18. Resveratrol ameliorates muscular pathology in the dystrophic mdx mouse, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yusuke S; Kuno, Atsushi; Hosoda, Ryusuke; Tanno, Masaya; Miura, Tetsuji; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2011-09-01

    Muscular dystrophies are inherited myogenic disorders accompanied by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and degeneration. We previously showed that resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), an antioxidant and activator of the NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1, delays the progression of heart failure and prolongs the lifespan of δ-sarcoglycan-deficient hamsters. Because a defect of dystroglycan complex causes muscular dystrophies, and δ-sarcoglycan is a component of this complex, we hypothesized that resveratrol might be a new therapeutic tool for muscular dystrophies. Here, we examined resveratrol's effect in mdx mice, an animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. mdx mice that received resveratrol in the diet for 32 weeks (4 g/kg diet) showed significantly less muscle mass loss and nonmuscle interstitial tissue in the biceps femoris compared with mdx mice fed a control diet. In the muscles of these mice, resveratrol significantly decreased oxidative damage shown by the immunostaining of nitrotyrosine and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and suppressed the up-regulation of NADPH oxidase subunits Nox4, Duox1, and p47(phox). Resveratrol also reduced the number of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)(+) myofibroblast cells and endomysial fibrosis in the biceps femoris, although the infiltration of CD45(+) inflammatory cells and increase in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were still observed. In C2C12 myoblast cells, resveratrol pretreatment suppressed the TGF-β1-induced increase in reactive oxygen species, fibronectin production, and expression of α-SMA, and SIRT1 knockdown blocked these inhibitory effects. SIRT1 small interfering RNA also increased the expression of Nox4, p47(phox), and α-SMA in C2C12 cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that SIRT1 activation may be a useful strategy for treating muscular dystrophies. PMID:21652783

  19. Sarcopenia and Sarcopenic Obesity in Patients with Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Merlini, Luciano; Vagheggini, Alessandro; Cocchi, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Aging sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy (MD) are two conditions characterized by lower skeletal muscle quantity, lower muscle strength, and lower physical performance. Aging is associated with a peculiar alteration in body composition called “sarcopenic obesity” characterized by a decrease in lean body mass and increase in fat mass. To evaluate the presence of sarcopenia and obesity in a cohort of adult patients with MD, we have used the measurement techniques considered golden standard for sarcopenia that is for muscle mass dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), for muscle strength hand-held dynamometry (HHD), and for physical performance gait speed. The study involved 14 adult patients with different types of MD. We were able to demonstrate that all patients were sarcopenic obese. We showed, in fact, that all were sarcopenic based on appendicular lean, fat and bone free, mass index (ALMI). In addition, all resulted obese according to the percentage of body fat determined by DXA in contrast to their body mass index ranging from underweight to obese. Skeletal muscle mass determined by DXA was markedly reduced in all patients and correlated with residual muscle strength determined by HHD, and physical performances determined by gait speed and respiratory function. Finally, we showed that ALMI was the best linear explicator of muscle strength and physical function. Altogether, our study suggests the relevance of a proper evaluation of body composition in MD and we propose to use, both in research and practice, the measurement techniques that has already been demonstrated effective in aging sarcopenia. PMID:25339901

  20. Rapamycin nanoparticles target defective autophagy in muscular dystrophy to enhance both strength and cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Bibee, Kristin P.; Cheng, Ya-Jian; Ching, James K.; Marsh, Jon N.; Li, Allison J.; Keeling, Richard M.; Connolly, Anne M.; Golumbek, Paul T.; Myerson, Jacob W.; Hu, Grace; Chen, Junjie; Shannon, William D.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Weihl, Conrad C.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy in boys progresses rapidly to severe impairment of muscle function and death in the second or third decade of life. Current supportive therapy with corticosteroids results in a modest increase in strength as a consequence of a general reduction in inflammation, albeit with potential untoward long-term side effects and ultimate failure of the agent to maintain strength. Here, we demonstrate that alternative approaches that rescue defective autophagy in mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, with the use of rapamycin-loaded nanoparticles induce a reproducible increase in both skeletal muscle strength and cardiac contractile performance that is not achievable with conventional oral rapamycin, even in pharmacological doses. This increase in physical performance occurs in both young and adult mice, and, surprisingly, even in aged wild-type mice, which sets the stage for consideration of systemic therapies to facilitate improved cell function by autophagic disposal of toxic byproducts of cell death and regeneration.—Bibee, K. P., Cheng, Y.-J., Ching, J. K., Marsh, J. N., Li, A. J., Keeling, R. M., Connolly, A. M., Golumbek, P. T., Myerson, J. W., Hu, G., Chen, J., Shannon, W. D., Lanza, G. M., Weihl, C. C., Wickline, S. A. Rapamycin nanoparticles target defective autophagy in muscular dystrophy to enhance both strength and cardiac function. PMID:24500923

  1. Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Latshang, Tsogyal D.; Bluemel, Sena; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Bloch, Konrad E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In adult patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) life-threatening constipation has been reported. Since gastrointestinal function in DMD has not been rigorously studied we investigated objective and subjective manifestations of gastrointestinal disturbances in DMD patients. Methods In 33 patients with DMD, age 12–41 years, eating behavior and gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated by questionnaires. Gastric emptying half time (T1/2) and oro-cecal transit time (OCTT) were evaluated by analyzing 13CO2 exhalation curves after ingestion of 13C labeled test meals. Colonic transit time (CTT) was measured by abdominal radiography following ingestion of radiopaque markers. Results The median (quartiles) T1/2 was 187 (168, 220) minutes, the OCTT was 6.3 (5.0, 7.9) hours, both substantially longer than normal data (Goetze 2005, T1/2: 107±10; Geypens 1999, OCTT 4.3±0.1 hours). The median CTT was 60 (48, 82) hours despite extensive use of laxative measures (Meier 1995, upper limit of normal: 60 hours). T1/2 and OCTT did not correlate with symptoms evaluated by the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI) (Spearman r = -0.3, p = 0.1; and r = -0.15, p = 0.4, respectively). CTT was not correlated with symptoms of constipation assessed by ROME III criteria (r = 0.12, p = 0.5). Conclusions DMD patients have a markedly disturbed gastrointestinal motor function. Since objective measures of impaired gastrointestinal transport are not correlated with symptoms of gastroparesis or constipation our findings suggest that measures assuring adequate intestinal transport should be taken independent of the patient’s perception in order to prevent potentially life threatening constipation, particularly in older DMD patients. PMID:27736891

  2. Scalpel or Straitjacket: CRISPR/Cas9 Approaches for Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Himeda, Charis L; Jones, Takako I; Jones, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    Versatility of CRISPR/Cas9-based platforms makes them promising tools for the correction of diverse genetic/epigenetic disorders. Here we contrast the use of these genome editing tools in two myopathies with very different molecular origins: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a monogenetic disease, and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, an epigenetic disorder with unique therapeutic challenges. PMID:26917062

  3. Meeting the Assistive Technology Needs of Students with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Mezei, Peter J.; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2009-01-01

    Students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a degenerative disease that requires ongoing changes in assistive technology (AT). The AT team needs to be knowledgeable about the disease and its progression in order to meet these students' changing needs in a timely manner. The unique needs of students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in…

  4. NAD+ biosynthesis ameliorates a zebrafish model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Goody, Michelle F; Kelly, Meghan W; Reynolds, Christine J; Khalil, Andre; Crawford, Bryan D; Henry, Clarissa A

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex- or integrin alpha7-deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction with integrin alpha

  5. Nanolipodendrosome-loaded glatiramer acetate and myogenic differentiation 1 as augmentation therapeutic strategy approaches in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Ehsan; Zakeri, Saba; Keyhanvar, Peyman; Bagheri, Meisam; Mahjoubi, Parvin; Asadian, Mahtab; Omoomi, Nogol; Dehqanian, Mohammad; Ghalandarlaki, Negar; Darvishmohammadi, Tahmineh; Farjadian, Fatemeh; Golvajoee, Mohammad Sadegh; Afzal, Shadi; Ghaffari, Maryam; Cohan, Reza Ahangari; Gravand, Amin; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2013-01-01

    Backgrond Muscular dystrophies consist of a number of juvenile and adult forms of complex disorders which generally cause weakness or efficiency defects affecting skeletal muscles or, in some kinds, other types of tissues in all parts of the body are vastly affected. In previous studies, it was observed that along with muscular dystrophy, immune inflammation was caused by inflammatory cells invasion – like T lymphocyte markers (CD8+/CD4+). Inflammatory processes play a major part in muscular fibrosis in muscular dystrophy patients. Additionally, a significant decrease in amounts of two myogenic recovery factors (myogenic differentation 1 [MyoD] and myogenin) in animal models was observed. The drug glatiramer acetate causes anti-inflammatory cytokines to increase and T helper (Th) cells to induce, in an as yet unknown mechanism. MyoD recovery activity in muscular cells justifies using it alongside this drug. Methods In this study, a nanolipodendrosome carrier as a drug delivery system was designed. The purpose of the system was to maximize the delivery and efficiency of the two drug factors, MyoD and myogenin, and introduce them as novel therapeutic agents in muscular dystrophy phenotypic mice. The generation of new muscular cells was analyzed in SW1 mice. Then, immune system changes and probable side effects after injecting the nanodrug formulations were investigated. Results The loaded lipodendrimer nanocarrier with the candidate drug, in comparison with the nandrolone control drug, caused a significant increase in muscular mass, a reduction in CD4+/CD8+ inflammation markers, and no significant toxicity was observed. The results support the hypothesis that the nanolipodendrimer containing the two candidate drugs will probably be an efficient means to ameliorate muscular degeneration, and warrants further investigation. PMID:23966782

  6. Trends with corticosteroid use in males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy born 1982-2001.

    PubMed

    Fox, Deborah J; Kumar, Anil; West, Nancy A; DiRienzo, A Gregory; James, Katherine A; Oleszek, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    This study examines trends in corticosteroid use for males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy by birth year, race/ethnicity, and knowledge of Duchenne muscular dystrophy family history. Firstborn males (n = 521) selected from a population-based surveillance system of Duchenne muscular dystrophy were analyzed using Kaplan Meier and regression methods. Comparing males born 1982 to 1986 with males born 1997 to 2001, steroid use increased from 54% to 72% and mean age at steroid initiation decreased from 8.2 to 7.1 years. Hispanics and non-Hispanic Black males used steroids less frequently and delayed initiation compared to white males. Compared to males without a Duchenne muscular dystrophy family history, males with known family history were half as likely to use steroids. Duration of steroid use increased over time and age at initiation decreased. Racial/ethnic disparities exist for steroid use and should be addressed to improve outcome and quality of life for boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  7. New aspects on patients affected by dysferlin deficient muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Lars; Aboumousa, Ahmed; Eagle, Michelle; Hudson, Judith; Sarkozy, Anna; Vita, Gianluca; Charlton, Richard; Roberts, Mark; Straub, Volker; Barresi, Rita; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the dysferlin gene lead to limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, Miyoshi myopathy and distal anterior compartment myopathy. A cohort of 36 patients affected by dysferlinopathy is described, in the first UK study of clinical, genetic, pathological and biochemical data. The diagnosis was established by reduction of dysferlin in the muscle biopsy and subsequent mutational analysis of the dysferlin gene. Seventeen mutations were novel; the majority of mutations were small deletions/insertions, and no mutational hotspots were identified. Sixty-one per cent of patients (22 patients) initially presented with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, 31% (11 patients) with a Miyoshi phenotype, one patient with proximodistal mode of onset, one patient with muscle stiffness after exercise and one patient as a symptomatic carrier. A wider range of age of onset was noted than previously reported, with 25% of patients having first symptoms before the age of 13 years. Independent of the initial mode of presentation, in our cohort of patients the gastrocnemius muscle was the most severely affected muscle leading to an inability to stand on tiptoes, and lower limbs were affected more severely than upper limbs. As previous anecdotal evidence on patients affected by dysferlinopathy suggests good muscle prowess before onset of symptoms, we also investigated pre-symptomatic fitness levels of the patients. Fifty-three per cent of the patients were very active and sporty before the onset of symptoms which makes the clinical course of dysferlinopathy unusual within the different forms of muscular dystrophy and provides a challenge to understanding the underlying pathomechanisms in this disease. PMID:19528035

  8. Clinical utility of serum biomarkers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hathout, Yetrib; Seol, Haeri; Han, Meng Hsuan J; Zhang, Aiping; Brown, Kristy J; Hoffman, Eric P

    2016-01-01

    Assessments of disease progression and response to therapies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients remain challenging. Current DMD patient assessments include complex physical tests and invasive procedures such as muscle biopsies, which are not suitable for young children. Defining alternative, less invasive and objective outcome measures to assess disease progression and response to therapy will aid drug development and clinical trials in DMD. In this review we highlight advances in development of non-invasive blood circulating biomarkers as a means to assess disease progression and response to therapies in DMD.

  9. Continuous infusion propofol general anesthesia for dental treatment in patients with progressive muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Kazuho; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2005-01-01

    Progressive muscular dystrophy may produce abnormal reactions to several drugs. There is no consensus of opinion regarding the continuous infusion of propofol in patients with progressive muscular dystrophy. We successfully treated 2 patients with progressive muscular dystrophy who were anesthetized with a continuous infusion of propofol. In case 1, a 19-year-old, 59-kg man with Becker muscular dystrophy and mental retardation was scheduled for dental treatment under general anesthesia. General anesthesia was maintained by a continuous infusion of 6-10 mg/kg propofol per hour and an inhalational mixture of 67% nitrous oxide and 33% oxygen. No complications were observed during or after the operation. In case 2, a 5-year-old, 11-kg boy with Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy and slight mental retardation was scheduled for dental treatment under general anesthesia. General anesthesia was maintained with a continuous infusion of 6-12 mg/kg propofol per hour and an inhalational mixture of 0.5-1.5% sevoflurane in 67% nitrous oxide and 33% oxygen. No complications were observed during or after the operation. It is speculated that a continuous infusion of propofol in progressive muscular dystrophy does not cause malignant hyperthermia because serum levels of creatine phosphokinase and myoglobin decreased after our anesthetic management. Furthermore, our observations suggest that sevoflurane may have some advantages in patients with progressive type muscular dystrophies other than Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy. In conclusion, our cases suggest that a continuous infusion of propofol for the patients with progressive muscular dystrophy is a safe component of our anesthetic strategy. PMID:15859443

  10. Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy: the most recognizable laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Madej-Pilarczyk, A; Kochański, A

    2016-01-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), a rare inherited disease, is characterized clinically by humero-peroneal muscle atrophy and weakness, multijoint contractures, spine rigidity and cardiac insufficiency with conduction defects. There are at least six types of EDMD known so far, of which five have been associated with mutations in genes encoding nuclear proteins. The majority of the EDMD cases described so far are of the emerinopathy (EDMD1) kind, with a recessive X-linked mode of inheritance, or else laminopathy (EDMD2), with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. In the work described here, the authors have sought to describe the history by which EDMD came to be distinguished as a separate entity, as well as the clinical and genetic characteristics of the disease, the pathophysiology of lamin-related muscular diseases and, finally, therapeutic issues, prevention and ethical aspects. PMID:27179216

  11. Nitric oxide synthase deficiency and the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tidball, James G; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The secondary loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) that occurs in dystrophic muscle is the basis of numerous, complex and interacting features of the dystrophic pathology that affect not only muscle itself, but also influence the interaction of muscle with other tissues. Many mechanisms through which nNOS deficiency contributes to misregulation of muscle development, blood flow, fatigue, inflammation and fibrosis in dystrophic muscle have been identified, suggesting that normalization in NO production could greatly attenuate diverse aspects of the pathology of muscular dystrophy through multiple regulatory pathways. However, the relative importance of the loss of nNOS from the sarcolemma versus the importance of loss of total nNOS from dystrophic muscle remains unknown. Although most current evidence indicates that nNOS localization at the sarcolemma is not required to achieve NO-mediated reductions of pathology in muscular dystrophy, the question remains open concerning whether membrane localization would provide a more efficient rescue from features of the dystrophic phenotype. PMID:25194047

  12. Dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy in a Norfolk terrier.

    PubMed

    Beltran, E; Shelton, G D; Guo, L T; Dennis, R; Sanchez-Masian, D; Robinson, D; De Risio, L

    2015-05-01

    A six-month-old male entire Norfolk terrier was presented with a 3-month history of poor development, reluctance to exercise and progressive and diffuse muscle atrophy. Serum creatine kinase concentration was markedly elevated. Magnetic resonance imaging of the epaxial muscles revealed asymmetrical streaky signal changes aligned within the muscle fibres (hyperintense on T2-weighted images and short-tau inversion recovery with moderate contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images). Electromyography revealed pseudomyotonic discharges and fibrillation potentials localised at the level of the supraspinatus, epaxial muscles and tibial cranialis muscles. Muscle biopsy results were consistent with dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy. The dog remained stable 7 months after diagnosis with coenzyme Q10 and l-carnitine; however after that time, there was a marked deterioration and the owners elected euthanasia. This case report describes the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging, electrodiagnostic and histopathological findings with immunohistochemical analysis in a Norfolk terrier with confirmed dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy, which has not been previously described in this breed.

  13. Dystrophin in frameshift deletion patients with Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, S.B.; Ray, P.N.; Worton, R.G.; Sherratt, T.G.; Heckmatt, J.Z.; Dubowitz, V.; Strong, P.N.; Miller, G. ); Shokeir, M. )

    1992-09-01

    In a previous study the authors identified 14 cases with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or its milder variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), with a deletion of exons 3-7, a deletion that would be expected to shift the translational reading frame of the mRNA and give a severe phenotype. They have examined dystrophin and its mRNA from muscle biopsies of seven cases with either mild or intermediate phenotypes. In all cases they detected slightly lower-molecular-weight dystrophin in 12%-15% abundance relative to the normal. By sequencing amplified mRNA they have found that exon 2 is spliced to exon 8, a splice that produces a frameshifted mRNA, and have found no evidence for alternate splicing that might be involved in restoration of dystrophin mRNA reading frame in the patients with a mild phenotype. Other transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms such as cryptic promoter, ribosomal frameshifting, and reinitiation are suggested that might play some role in restoring the reading frame. 34 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  14. Drug screening in a zebrafish model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Genri; Karpf, Jeremy A; Myers, Jennifer A; Alexander, Matthew S; Guyon, Jeffrey R; Kunkel, Louis M

    2011-03-29

    Two known zebrafish dystrophin mutants, sapje and sapje-like (sap(c/100)), represent excellent small-animal models of human muscular dystrophy. Using these dystrophin-null zebrafish, we have screened the Prestwick chemical library for small molecules that modulate the muscle phenotype in these fish. With a quick and easy birefringence assay, we have identified seven small molecules that influence muscle pathology in dystrophin-null zebrafish without restoration of dystrophin expression. Three of seven candidate chemicals restored normal birefringence and increased survival of dystrophin-null fish. One chemical, aminophylline, which is known to be a nonselective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, had the greatest ability to restore normal muscle structure and up-regulate the cAMP-dependent PKA pathway in treated dystrophin-deficient fish. Moreover, other PDE inhibitors also reduced the percentage of affected sapje fish. The identification of compounds, especially PDE inhibitors, that moderate the muscle phenotype in these dystrophin-null zebrafish validates the screening protocol described here and may lead to candidate molecules to be used as therapeutic interventions in human muscular dystrophy. PMID:21402949

  15. Immunohistochemical Characterization of Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Statland, Jeffrey M; Odrzywolski, Karen J; Shah, Bharati; Henderson, Don; Fricke, Alex F.; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Tapscott, Stephen J; Tawil, Rabi

    2015-01-01

    Background Posited pathological mechanisms in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) include activation in somatic tissue of normally silenced genes, increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, and induction of apoptosis. Objective To determine the histopathological changes in FSHD muscle biopsies and compare to possible pathological mechanisms of disease. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study on quadriceps muscle biopsies from 32 genetically confirmed FSHD participants, compared to healthy volunteers and myotonic dystrophy type 1 as disease controls. Biopsies were divided into groups to evaluate apoptosis rates, capillary density, myonuclear and satellite cell counts. Results Apoptosis rates were increased in FSHD (n=10, 0.74%) compared to myotonic dystrophy type 1 (n=10, 0.14%, P=0.003) and healthy volunteers (n=14, 0.13%, P=0.002). Apoptosis was higher in FSHD patients with the smallest residual D4Z4 fragments. Capillary density was decreased in FSHD1 (n=10, 316 capillaries/mm2) compared to healthy volunteers (n=15, 448 capillaries/mm2, P=0.001). No differences were seen in myonuclear or satellite cell counts. Conclusions Preliminary evidence for increased apoptosis rates and reduced capillary density may reflect histopathological correlates of disease activity in FSHD. The molecular-pathological correlates to these changes warrants further investigation. PMID:26345300

  16. Motor unit reorganization in progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Szmidt-Sałkowska, Elżbieta; Gaweł, Małgorzata; Lipowska, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze motor unit reorganization in different types of progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies. The study population consisted of patients with genetically verified progressive muscular dystrophies: Duchenne (DMD) (n=54), Becker (BMD) (n=30), facio-scapulo-humeral (FSHD) (n=37), and Emery-Dreifuss (E-DD) (n=26). Patients with probable limb-girdle dystrophy (L-GD) (n=58) and congenital myopathies (n=35) were also included in the study. Quantitative EMG recordings were obtained from 469 muscles. Muscle activity at rest and during slight voluntary and maximal muscle contraction was analyzed. The motor unit activity potential (MUAP) duration, amplitude, area, size index (SI), polyphasicity, and the presence of "outliers" were evaluated. Diminished values of MUAP parameters and decreased maximal amplitude of maximal muscle contraction were recorded most frequently in DMD and mainly in the biceps brachii muscles. SI was the most frequently changed EMG parameter. "Outliers" with amplitude below the normal range were recorded more frequently then a decreased mean MUAP amplitude (what could indicate a very high sensitivity of this EMG parameter). Pathological interference pattern was recorded in 34.7% of biceps brachii and in 21.2% of rectus femoris muscles. In FSHD, decreased MUAP duration and SI and pathological interference pattern with low amplitude were recorded most frequently in the tibial anterior and deltoid muscles. The presence of potentials with reduced parameters is a result of decreasing motor unit area (reduced number and size of muscle fibers), while high amplitude potentials recorded in BMD and E-DD could indicate a slow and mild course of disease and muscle regeneration.

  17. Motor unit reorganization in progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Szmidt-Sałkowska, Elżbieta; Gaweł, Małgorzata; Lipowska, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze motor unit reorganization in different types of progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies. The study population consisted of patients with genetically verified progressive muscular dystrophies: Duchenne (DMD) (n=54), Becker (BMD) (n=30), facio-scapulo-humeral (FSHD) (n=37), and Emery-Dreifuss (E-DD) (n=26). Patients with probable limb-girdle dystrophy (L-GD) (n=58) and congenital myopathies (n=35) were also included in the study. Quantitative EMG recordings were obtained from 469 muscles. Muscle activity at rest and during slight voluntary and maximal muscle contraction was analyzed. The motor unit activity potential (MUAP) duration, amplitude, area, size index (SI), polyphasicity, and the presence of "outliers" were evaluated. Diminished values of MUAP parameters and decreased maximal amplitude of maximal muscle contraction were recorded most frequently in DMD and mainly in the biceps brachii muscles. SI was the most frequently changed EMG parameter. "Outliers" with amplitude below the normal range were recorded more frequently then a decreased mean MUAP amplitude (what could indicate a very high sensitivity of this EMG parameter). Pathological interference pattern was recorded in 34.7% of biceps brachii and in 21.2% of rectus femoris muscles. In FSHD, decreased MUAP duration and SI and pathological interference pattern with low amplitude were recorded most frequently in the tibial anterior and deltoid muscles. The presence of potentials with reduced parameters is a result of decreasing motor unit area (reduced number and size of muscle fibers), while high amplitude potentials recorded in BMD and E-DD could indicate a slow and mild course of disease and muscle regeneration. PMID:26188938

  18. Emerging strategies for cell and gene therapy of the muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Lindsey A.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of over 40 disorders that are characterised by muscle weakness and wasting. The most common are Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy, which result from mutations within the gene encoding dystrophin; myotonic dystrophy type 1, which results from an expanded trinucleotide repeat in the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene; and facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, which is associated with contractions in the subtelomeric region of human chromosome 1. Currently the only treatments involve clinical management of symptoms, although several promising experimental strategies are emerging. These include gene therapy using adeno-associated viral, lentiviral and adenoviral vectors and nonviral vectors, such as plasmid DNA. Exon-skipping and cell-based therapies have also shown promise in the effective treatment and regeneration of dystrophic muscle. The availability of numerous animal models for Duchenne muscular dystrophy has enabled extensive testing of a wide range of therapeutic approaches for this type of disorder. Consequently, we focus here on the therapeutic developments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy as a model of the types of approaches being considered for various types of dystrophy. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each therapeutic strategy, as well as prospects and recent successes in the context of future clinical applications. PMID:19555515

  19. Conservation of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.P.; Monaco, A.P.; Feener, C.C.; Kunkel, L.M.

    1987-10-16

    A portion of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript from human fetal skeletal muscle and mouse adult heart was sequence, representing approximately 25 percent of the total, 14-kb DMD transcript. The nucleic acid and predicted amino acid sequences from the two species are nearly 90 percent homologous. The amino acid sequence that is predicted from this portion of the DMD gene indicates that the protein product might serve a structural role in muscle, but the abundance and tissue distribution of the messenger RNA suggest that the DMD protein is not nebulin.

  20. Muscle exercise in limb girdle muscular dystrophies: pitfall and advantages.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Gabriele; Simoncini, Costanza; Giannotti, Stefano; Zampa, Virna; Angelini, Corrado; Ricci, Giulia

    2015-05-01

    Different genetic mutations underlying distinct pathogenic mechanisms have been identified as cause of muscle fibers degeneration and strength loss in limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD). As a consequence, exercise tolerance is affected in patients with LGMD, either as a direct consequence of the loss of muscle fibers or secondary to the sedentary lifestyle due to the motor impairment. It has been debated for many years whether or not muscle exercise is beneficial or harmful for patients with myopathic disorders. In fact, muscular exercise would be considered in helping to hinder the loss of muscle tissue and strength. On the other hand, muscle structural defects in LGMD can result in instability of the sarcolemma, making it more likely to induce muscle damage as a consequence of intense muscle contraction, such as that performed during eccentric training. Several reports have suggested that supervised aerobic exercise training is safe and may be considered effective in improving oxidative capacity and muscle function in patients with LGMD, such as LGMD2I, LGMD2L, LGMD2A. More or less comfortable investigation methods applied to assess muscle function and structure can be useful to detect the beneficial effects of supervised training in LGMD. However, it is important to note that the available trials assessing muscle exercise in patients with LGMD have often involved a small number of patients, with a wide clinical heterogeneity and a different experimental design. Based on these considerations, resistance training can be considered part of the rehabilitation program for patients with a limb-girdle type of muscular dystrophy, but it should be strictly supervised to assess its effects and prevent possible development of muscle damage. PMID:26155063

  1. Common recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies differential diagnosis: why and how?

    PubMed

    Cotta, Ana; Carvalho, Elmano; da-Cunha-Júnior, Antonio Lopes; Paim, Júlia Filardi; Navarro, Monica M; Valicek, Jaquelin; Menezes, Miriam Melo; Nunes, Simone Vilela; Xavier Neto, Rafael; Takata, Reinaldo Issao; Vargas, Antonio Pedro

    2014-09-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophies are heterogeneous autosomal hereditary neuromuscular disorders. They produce dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy and they are associated with mutations in several genes involved in muscular structure and function. Detailed clinical, laboratorial, imaging, diagnostic flowchart, photographs, tables, and illustrated diagrams are presented for the differential diagnosis of common autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes diagnosed nowadays at one reference center in Brazil. Preoperative image studies guide muscle biopsy site selection. Muscle involvement image pattern differs depending on the limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtype. Muscle involvement is conspicuous at the posterior thigh in calpainopathy and fukutin-related proteinopathy; anterior thigh in sarcoglycanopathy; whole thigh in dysferlinopathy, and telethoninopathy. The precise differential diagnosis of limb girdle muscular dystrophies is important for genetic counseling, prognostic orientation, cardiac and respiratory management. Besides that, it may probably, in the future, provide specific genetic therapies for each subtype.

  2. Translating golden retriever muscular dystrophy microarray findings to novel biomarkers for cardiac/skeletal muscle function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Cristi L.; Soslow, Jonathan H.; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Gupte, Manisha; Smith, Holly M.; Sengsayadeth, Seng; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Benson, D. Woodrow; Kornegay, Joe N.; Markham, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), abnormal cardiac function is typically preceded by a decade of skeletal muscle disease. Molecular reasons for differences in onset and progression of these muscle groups are unknown. Human biomarkers are lacking. Methods We analyzed cardiac and skeletal muscle microarrays from normal and golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs (ages 6, 12, or 47+ months) to gain insight into muscle dysfunction and to identify putative DMD biomarkers. These biomarkers were then measured using human DMD blood samples. Results We identified GRMD candidate genes that might contribute to the disparity between cardiac and skeletal muscle disease, focusing on brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and osteopontin (OPN/SPP1). BDNF was elevated in cardiac muscle of younger GRMD but was unaltered in skeletal muscle, while SPP1 was increased only in GRMD skeletal muscle. In human DMD, circulating levels of BDNF were inversely correlated with ventricular function and fibrosis, while SPP1 levels correlated with skeletal muscle function. Conclusion These results highlight gene expression patterns that could account for differences in cardiac and skeletal disease in GRMD. Most notably, animal model-derived data were translated to DMD and support use of BDNF and SPP1 as biomarkers for cardiac and skeletal muscle involvement, respectively. PMID:26672735

  3. FHL1 reduces dystrophy in transgenic mice overexpressing FSHD muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1).

    PubMed

    Feeney, Sandra J; McGrath, Meagan J; Sriratana, Absorn; Gehrig, Stefan M; Lynch, Gordon S; D'Arcy, Colleen E; Price, John T; McLean, Catriona A; Tupler, Rossella; Mitchell, Christina A

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1. PMID:25695429

  4. FHL1 Reduces Dystrophy in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing FSHD Muscular Dystrophy Region Gene 1 (FRG1)

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Sandra J.; McGrath, Meagan J.; Sriratana, Absorn; Gehrig, Stefan M.; Lynch, Gordon S.; D’Arcy, Colleen E.; Price, John T.; McLean, Catriona A.; Tupler, Rossella; Mitchell, Christina A.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1. PMID:25695429

  5. Lung clearance in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy or spinal muscular atrophy with and without CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure).

    PubMed

    Klefbeck, B; Svartengren, K; Camner, P; Philipson, K; Svartengren, M; Sejersen, T; Mattsson, E

    2001-09-01

    Bronchiolar clearance was studied in 7 boys in the age range of 8 to 17 years, 6 with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and 1 with spinal muscular atrophy type II (SMA-II). These boys had healthy lungs but a severely reduced muscular strength (wheelchair dependent). In 6 of the boys, clearance was studied twice, at one occasion as a control and at the other occasion following treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). A control group of healthy adults was used. In the clearance examinations, 6-microm Teflon particles, labeled with III In was inhaled extremely slowly, 0.05 L/s. This gives a deposition mainly in the bronchioles. Lung retention was measured after 0,24,48, and 72 hours. A model for deposition of particles in the adult lung was scaled down to represent the children in this study. Deposition in various airway generations was calculated to be similar in children and adults. Also the measured retentions were similar in the boys and the adults. In the clearance experiments during CPAP treatment, there was a significantly lower retention after 72 hours (but not after 24 and 48 hours) than in the control experiments. Theresults indicate that a severe reduction of muscular strength, and thereby a reduction of mechanical movement of the lung, does not affect clearance from large and small airways. However, some effect of clearance from small airways cannot be excluded due to the short measuring period. The small but significant effect of the CPAP treatment might have potential clinical importance and suggest that bronchiolar clearance can be affected by some form of mechanical force. PMID:11558965

  6. The Intriguing Regulators of Muscle Mass in Sarcopenia and Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Kunihiro; Aoi, Wataru; Yamaguchi, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the biology of muscle have led to new interest in the pharmacological treatment of muscle wasting. Loss of muscle mass and increased intramuscular fibrosis occur in both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. Several regulators (mammalian target of rapamycin, serum response factor, atrogin-1, myostatin, etc.) seem to modulate protein synthesis and degradation or transcription of muscle-specific genes during both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. This review provides an overview of the adaptive changes in several regulators of muscle mass in both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. PMID:25221510

  7. Dexmedetomidine and fentanyl combination for procedural sedation in a case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Ashish; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Singh, Amarjit; Kapoor, Vinod

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, an X-linked disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, is the most common muscular dystrophy among children leading to death before the end of third decade. Anesthesia in such patients pose a great challenge due to various complications associated with it. The dreaded metabolic and clinical complications occur due to various inhalational anesthetics and succinylcholine in this subset of patients. We are reporting a child with diagnosed Duchenne muscular dystrophy who underwent excision of dentigerous cyst in oral cavity under procedural sedation with combination of dexmedetomidine and fentanyl and thus administration of general anesthesia was avoided. PMID:25885395

  8. Serum profiling identifies novel muscle miRNA and cardiomyopathy-related miRNA biomarkers in Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Jeanson-Leh, Laurence; Lameth, Julie; Krimi, Soraya; Buisset, Julien; Amor, Fatima; Le Guiner, Caroline; Barthélémy, Inès; Servais, Laurent; Blot, Stéphane; Voit, Thomas; Israeli, David

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal, X-linked neuromuscular disease that affects 1 boy in 3500 to 5000 boys. The golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog is the best clinically relevant DMD animal model. Here, we used a high-thoughput miRNA sequencing screening for identification of candidate serum miRNA biomarkers in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. We confirmed the dysregulation of the previously described muscle miRNAs, miR-1, miR-133, miR-206, and miR-378, and identified a new candidate muscle miRNA, miR-95. We identified two other classes of dysregulated serum miRNAs in muscular dystrophy: miRNAs belonging to the largest known miRNA cluster that resides in the imprinting DLK1-DIO3 genomic region and miRNAs associated with cardiac disease, including miR-208a, miR-208b, and miR-499. No simple correlation was identified between serum levels of cardiac miRNAs and cardiac functional parameters in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. Finally, we confirmed a dysregulation of miR-95, miR-208a, miR-208b, miR-499, and miR-539 in a small cohort of DMD patients. Given the interspecies conservation of miRNAs and preliminary data in DMD patients, these newly identified dysregulated miRNAs are strong candidate biomarkers for DMD patients.

  9. High-Pressure Transvenous Perfusion of the Upper Extremity in Human Muscular Dystrophy: A Safety Study with 0.9% Saline

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zheng; Kocis, Keith; Valley, Robert; Howard, James F.; Chopra, Manisha; Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Lin, Weili; Muenzer, Joseph; Powers, William

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated safety and feasibility of high-pressure transvenous limb perfusion in an upper extremity of adult patients with muscular dystrophy, after completing a similar study in a lower extremity. A dose escalation study of single-limb perfusion with 0.9% saline was carried out in nine adults with muscular dystrophies under intravenous analgesia. Our study demonstrates that it is feasible and definitely safe to perform high-pressure transvenous perfusion with 0.9% saline up to 35% of limb volume in the upper extremities of young adults with muscular dystrophy. Perfusion at 40% limb volume is associated with short-lived physiological changes in peripheral nerves without clinical correlates in one subject. This study provides the basis for a phase 1/2 clinical trial using pressurized transvenous delivery into upper limbs of nonambulatory patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Furthermore, our results are applicable to other conditions such as limb girdle muscular dystrophy as a method for delivering regional macromolecular therapeutics in high dose to skeletal muscles of the upper extremity. PMID:25953425

  10. High-Pressure Transvenous Perfusion of the Upper Extremity in Human Muscular Dystrophy: A Safety Study with 0.9% Saline.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zheng; Kocis, Keith; Valley, Robert; Howard, James F; Chopra, Manisha; Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Lin, Weili; Muenzer, Joseph; Powers, William

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated safety and feasibility of high-pressure transvenous limb perfusion in an upper extremity of adult patients with muscular dystrophy, after completing a similar study in a lower extremity. A dose escalation study of single-limb perfusion with 0.9% saline was carried out in nine adults with muscular dystrophies under intravenous analgesia. Our study demonstrates that it is feasible and definitely safe to perform high-pressure transvenous perfusion with 0.9% saline up to 35% of limb volume in the upper extremities of young adults with muscular dystrophy. Perfusion at 40% limb volume is associated with short-lived physiological changes in peripheral nerves without clinical correlates in one subject. This study provides the basis for a phase 1/2 clinical trial using pressurized transvenous delivery into upper limbs of nonambulatory patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Furthermore, our results are applicable to other conditions such as limb girdle muscular dystrophy as a method for delivering regional macromolecular therapeutics in high dose to skeletal muscles of the upper extremity.

  11. [Respiratory and intensive care aspects of muscular dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, X; Lamothe, L; Heming, N; Orlikowski, D

    2015-12-01

    Among the various myopathies, Duchenne muscular dystrophy represents the myopathy with the most stereotypical respiratory evolution. This progressive respiratory failure is going to develop in a parallel way of motor deficit, conducting patients to mechanical ventilation at the end of their second decade. In the absence of curative therapeutics, respiratory cares like home ventilation and prevention of respiratory complications, in a systematic and organized way, allowed to decrease the morbidity and the mortality of these patients. It is not exceptional to meet patients with life expectancy of which overtakes about forty. Besides axial stabilization, cough assistance techniques and swallowing disorders management need to be associated to mechanical ventilation. Invasive techniques of ventilation as tracheostomy keep their place in this pathology even if alternative techniques allowing full day non-invasive ventilation were generalized these last years. PMID:26773587

  12. FSHD: copy number variations on the theme of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cabianca, Daphne Selvaggia

    2010-01-01

    In humans, copy number variations (CNVs) are a common source of phenotypic diversity and disease susceptibility. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an important genetic disease caused by CNVs. It is an autosomal-dominant myopathy caused by a reduction in the copy number of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat located at chromosome 4q35. Interestingly, the reduction of D4Z4 copy number is not sufficient by itself to cause FSHD. A number of epigenetic events appear to affect the severity of the disease, its rate of progression, and the distribution of muscle weakness. Indeed, recent findings suggest that virtually all levels of epigenetic regulation, from DNA methylation to higher order chromosomal architecture, are altered at the disease locus, causing the de-regulation of 4q35 gene expression and ultimately FSHD. PMID:21149563

  13. Duchenne muscular dystrophy drugs face tough path to approval.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, L; Sorbera, L; Graul, A I

    2016-03-01

    Highly anticipated as new disease-modifying treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), therapeutics by BioMarin Pharmaceutical (Kyndrisa™; drisapersen) and Sarepta Therapeutics (eteplirsen; AVI-4658) both recently received negative FDA reviews and are now facing battles for approval in the U.S. At present, BioMarin is committed to working with the FDA to forge a pathway to approval following the failure of its NDA, while Sarepta awaits the formal decision on its NDA, which is expected by late May 2016. Despite the critical nature of both reviews, analysts consider that there is still a narrow possibility of approval of both drugs. According to Consensus forecasts from Thomson Reuters Cortellis for Competitive Intelligence, Kyndrisa is forecast to achieve sales of USD 533.71 million in 2021. PMID:27186594

  14. Gene discovery for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy by machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    González-Navarro, Félix F; Belanche-Muñoz, Lluís A; Gámez-Moreno, María G; Flores-Ríos, Brenda L; Ibarra-Esquer, Jorge E; López-Morteo, Gabriel A

    2016-04-28

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a neuromuscular disorder that shows a preference for the facial, shoulder and upper arm muscles. FSHD affects about one in 20-400,000 people, and no effective therapeutic strategies are known to halt disease progression or reverse muscle weakness or atrophy. Many genes may be incorrectly regulated in affected muscle tissue, but the mechanisms responsible for the progressive muscle weakness remain largely unknown. Although machine learning (ML) has made significant inroads in biomedical disciplines such as cancer research, no reports have yet addressed FSHD analysis using ML techniques. This study explores a specific FSHD data set from a ML perspective. We report results showing a very promising small group of genes that clearly separates FSHD samples from healthy samples. In addition to numerical prediction figures, we show data visualizations and biological evidence illustrating the potential usefulness of these results. PMID:26960968

  15. Whole-body MRI evaluation of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Doris G.; Carrino, John A.; Wagner, Kathryn R.; Jacobs, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a hereditary disorder that causes progressive muscle wasting. Increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of FSHD has stimulated interest in developing biomarkers of disease severity. Methods Two groups of MRI scans were analyzed: whole-body scans from 13 subjects with FSHD, and upper and lower extremity scans from 34 subjects with FSHD who participated in the MYO-029 clinical trial. Muscles were scored for fat infiltration and edema-like changes. Fat infiltration scores were compared to muscle strength and function. Results Our analysis reveals a distinctive pattern of both frequent muscle involvement and frequent sparing in FSHD. Averaged fat infiltration scores for muscle groups in the legs correlated with quantitative muscle strength and 10-meter walk times. Discussion Advances in MRI technology allow for the acquisition of rapid, high-quality whole-body imaging in diffuse muscle disease. This technique offers a promising disease biomarker in FSHD and other muscle diseases. PMID:25641525

  16. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy and respiratory failure; what about the diaphragm?

    PubMed Central

    Hazenberg, A.; van Alfen, N.; Voet, N.B.M.; Kerstjens, H.A.M.; Wijkstra, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We present a case of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) with a diaphragm paralysis as the primary cause of ventilatory failure. FSHD is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder with a restricted pattern of weakness. Although respiratory weakness is a relatively unknown in FSHD, it is not uncommon. Methods We report on the clinical findings of a 68-year old male who presented with severe dyspnea while supine. Results Supplementing our clinical findings with laboratory, electrophysiological and radiological performances led to the diagnosis of diaphragm paralysis. Arterial blood gas in sitting position without supplemental oxygen showed a mild hypercapnia. His sleep improved after starting non-invasive ventilation and his daytime sleepiness disappeared. Discussion We conclude that in patients with FSHD who have symptoms of nocturnal hypoventilation, an adequate assessment of the diaphragm is recommended. This is of great importance as we know that nocturnal hypoventilation can be treated effectively by non-invasive ventilation. PMID:26029575

  17. Evidence for a chronic axonal atrophy in oculopharyngeal "muscular dystrophy".

    PubMed

    Probst, A; Tackmann, W; Stoeckli, H R; Jerusalem, F; Ulrich, J

    1982-01-01

    We report on morphometric investigations of peripheral nerves in a woman, who died at the age of 69, presenting the classical symptoms of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) and a typical family history with several members (males and females) affected over three generations. Evidence for chronic axonal atrophy was found in peripheral nerves and especially in oculomotor nerves with severe axon loss in endomysial nerve twigs of extraocular, laryngeal, and tongue muscles. Whereas limb muscles presented features of neurogenic atrophy, severe changes of "myopathic" type were evident in extrinsic eye muscles, laryngeal constrictor, tongue, and diaphragma. However, we interpreted these changes as neurogenic in origin in view of the severe denervation found in those muscles. Our findings suggest that OPMD is a disease of primary neurogenic origin rather than a primary myopathic disorder. PMID:7124348

  18. Dropped-head in recessive oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Matteo; Pennisi, Elena Maria; Bruttini, Mirella; Bizzarri, Veronica; Bucci, Elisabetta; Morino, Stefania; Talerico, Caterina; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Renieri, Alessandra; Antonini, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented a dropped head, caused by severe neck extensor weakness that had started two years before. She had also developed a mild degree of dysphagia, rhinolalia, eyelid ptosis and proximal limb weakness during the last months. EMG revealed myopathic changes. Muscle MRI detected fatty infiltration in the posterior neck muscles and tongue. Muscle biopsy revealed fiber size variations, sporadic rimmed vacuoles, small scattered angulated fibers and a patchy myofibrillar network. Genetic analysis revealed homozygous (GCN)11 expansions in the PABPN1 gene that were consistent with recessive oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). There are a few reports of the recessive form, which has a later disease onset with milder symptoms and higher clinical variability than the typical dominantly inherited form. This patient, who is the first Italian and the eighth worldwide reported case of recessive OPMD, is also the first case of OPMD with dropped-head syndrome, which thus expands the clinical phenotype of recessive OPMD.

  19. [Genetic Diagnosis and Molecular Therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of inherited muscle disease and is characterized by progressive muscle wasting, ultimately resulting in the death of patients in their twenties or thirties. DMD is characterized by a deficiency of the muscle dystrophin as a result of mutations in the dystrophin gene. Currently, no effective treatment for DMD is available. Promising molecular therapies which are mutation-specific have been developed. Transformation of an out-of-frame mRNA into an in-frame dystrophin message by inducing exon skipping is considered one of the approaches most likely to lead to success. We demonstrated that the intravenous administration of the antisense oligonucleotide against the splicing enhancer sequence results in exon skipping and production of the dystrophin protein in DMD case for the first time. After extensive studies, anti-sense oligonucleotides comprising different monomers have undergone clinical trials and provided favorable results, enabling improvements in ambulation of DMD patients. Induction of the read-through of nonsense mutations is expected to produce dystrophin in DMD patients with nonsense mutations, which are detected in 19% of DMD cases. The clinical effectiveness of gentamicin and PTC124 has been reported. We have demonstrated that arbekacin-mediated read-through can markedly ameliorate muscular dystrophy in vitro. We have already begun a clinical trial of nonsense mutation read-through therapy using arbekacin. Some of these drug candidates are planned to undergo submission for approval to regulatory agencies in the US and EU. We hope that these molecular therapies will contribute towards DMD treatment. PMID:26897856

  20. Mutation in BAG3 Causes Severe Dominant Childhood Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Selcen, Duygu; Muntoni, Francesco; Burton, Barbara K.; MD, Elena Pegoraro; Sewry, Caroline; Bite, Anna V.; Engel, Andrew G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) are morphologically distinct but genetically heterogeneous muscular dystrophies in which disintegration of Z disks and then of myofibrils is followed by ectopic accumulation of multiple proteins. Cardiomyopathy, neuropathy, and dominant inheritance are frequent associated features. Mutations in αB-crystallin, desmin, myotilin, Zasp, or filamin-C can cause MFM, and were detected in 32/85 patients of the Mayo MFM cohort. Bag3, another Z-disk associated protein, has antiapoptotic properties and its targeted deletion in mice causes fulminant myopathy with early lethality. We therefore searched for mutations in BAG3 in 53 unrelated MFM patients. Methods We searched for mutations in BAG3 by direct sequencing and excluded polymorphism using allele-specific PCR in relatives and 200 control subjects. We analyzed structural changes in muscle by histochemistry, immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy, examined mobility of the mutant Bag3 by nondenaturing electrophoresis, and searched for abnormal aggregation of the mutant protein in COS-7 cells. Results We identified a heterozygous p.Pro209Leu mutation in three patients. All presented in childhood, had progressive limb and axial muscle weakness, and developed cardiomyopathy and severe respiratory insufficiency in their teens; two had rigid spines and one a peripheral neuropathy. Electron microscopy showed disintegration of Z disks, extensive accumulation of granular debris and larger inclusions, and apoptosis of 8% of the nuclei. On nondenaturing electrophoresis of muscle extracts, the Bag3 complex migrated faster in patient than control extracts, and expression of FLAG-labeled mutant and wild-type Bag3 in COS cells revealed abnormal aggregation of the mutant protein. Interpretation We conclude mutation in Bag3 defines a novel severe autosomal dominant childhood muscular dystrophy. PMID:19085932

  1. Symptom Burden in Persons with Myotonic and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amanda E.; McMullen, Kara; Jensen, Mark P.; Carter, Gregory T.; Molton, Ivan R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examines the prevalence of pain, fatigue, imbalance, memory impairment and vision loss in persons with myotonic and facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, and their association with functioning. Design A survey (n=170) included measures of severity (0–10 scales) and course of these symptoms, as well as measures of social integration, home competency, mental health and productive activity. Descriptive and regression analyses examined the associations between symptoms and functioning. Results Fatigue (91%), imbalance (82%) and pain (77%) were most commonly reported. The most severe symptom was fatigue (mean severity 5.14 ± 2.81), followed by imbalance (4.95 ± 3.25). Symptoms were most likely to stay the same or worsen since onset. Controlling for potential medical and demographic confounds, symptoms were associated with 17% of the mental health variance, 10% of home competency, 10% of social integration, 16% of productive activity for DM1 and 12% of productive activity for FSHD. Conclusions Pain, fatigue and imbalance are common in persons with muscular dystrophy. Interventions may be useful to mitigate their impact on functioning. Further research should examine these relationships to guide clinical practices. PMID:24247759

  2. Pathways Implicated in Tadalafil Amelioration of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    De Arcangelis, Valeria; Strimpakos, Georgios; Gabanella, Francesca; Corbi, Nicoletta; Luvisetto, Siro; Magrelli, Armando; Onori, Annalisa; Passananti, Claudio; Pisani, Cinzia; Rome, Sophie; Severini, Cinzia; Naro, Fabio; Mattei, Elisabetta; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Monaco, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic approaches for Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy (DMD and BMD), the most common X-linked muscle degenerative disease, have been proposed. So far, the only one showing a clear beneficial effect is the use of corticosteroids. Recent evidence indicates an improvement of dystrophic cardiac and skeletal muscles in the presence of sustained cGMP levels secondary to a blocking of their degradation by phosphodiesterase five (PDE5). Due to these data, we performed a study to investigate the effect of the specific PDE5 inhibitor, tadalafil, on dystrophic skeletal muscle function. Chronic pharmacological treatment with tadalafil has been carried out in mdx mice. Behavioral and physiological tests, as well as histological and biochemical analyses, confirmed the efficacy of the therapy. We then performed a microarray-based genomic analysis to assess the pattern of gene expression in muscle samples obtained from the different cohorts of animals treated with tadalafil. This scrutiny allowed us to identify several classes of modulated genes. Our results show that PDE5 inhibition can ameliorate dystrophy by acting at different levels. Tadalafil can lead to (1) increased lipid metabolism; (2) a switch towards slow oxidative fibers driven by the up-regulation of PGC-1α; (3) an increased protein synthesis efficiency; (4) a better actin network organization at Z-disk.

  3. Stakeholder cooperation to overcome challenges in orphan medicine development: the example of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Straub, Volker; Balabanov, Pavel; Bushby, Kate; Ensini, Monica; Goemans, Nathalie; De Luca, Annamaria; Pereda, Alejandra; Hemmings, Robert; Campion, Giles; Kaye, Edward; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Goyenvalle, Aurelie; Niks, Erik; Veldhuizen, Olav; Furlong, Pat; Stoyanova-Beninska, Violeta; Wood, Matthew J; Johnson, Alex; Mercuri, Eugenio; Muntoni, Francesco; Sepodes, Bruno; Haas, Manuel; Vroom, Elizabeth; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2016-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a rare, progressive, muscle-wasting disease leading to severe disability and premature death. Treatment is currently symptomatic, but several experimental therapies are in development. Implemented care standards, validated outcome measures correlating with clinical benefit, and comprehensive information about the natural history of the disease are essential for regulatory approval of any treatment. However, for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other rare diseases, these requirements are not always in place when potential therapies enter the clinical trial phase. A cooperative effort of stakeholders in Duchenne muscular dystrophy-including representatives from patients' groups, academia, industry, and regulatory agencies-is aimed at addressing this shortfall by identifying strategies to overcome challenges, developing the tools needed, and collecting relevant data. An open and constructive dialogue among European stakeholders has positively affected development of treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy; this approach could serve as a paradigm for development of treatments for rare diseases in general. PMID:27302365

  4. Rimmed vacuoles in Becker muscular dystrophy have similar features with inclusion myopathies.

    PubMed

    Momma, Kazunari; Noguchi, Satoru; Malicdan, May Christine V; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Minami, Narihiro; Kamakura, Keiko; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nishino, Ichizo

    2012-01-01

    Rimmed vacuoles in myofibers are thought to be due to the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, and can be characteristic in certain myopathies with protein inclusions in myofibers. In this study, we performed a detailed clinical, molecular, and pathological characterization of Becker muscular dystrophy patients who have rimmed vacuoles in muscles. Among 65 Becker muscular dystrophy patients, we identified 12 patients who have rimmed vacuoles and 11 patients who have deletions in exons 45-48 in DMD gene. All patients having rimmed vacuoles showed milder clinical features compared to those without rimmed vacuoles. Interestingly, the rimmed vacuoles in Becker muscular dystrophy muscles seem to represent autophagic vacuoles and are also associated with polyubiquitinated protein aggregates. These findings support the notion that rimmed vacuoles can appear in Becker muscular dystrophy, and may be related to the chronic changes in muscle pathology induced by certain mutations in the DMD gene.

  5. Identification of muscle-specific microRNAs in serum of muscular dystrophy animal models: promising novel blood-based markers for muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideya; Nakamura, Akinori; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Ito, Naoki; Kishi, Soichiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Hashido, Kazuo

    2011-03-30

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Creatine kinase (CK) is generally used as a blood-based biomarker for muscular disease including DMD, but it is not always reliable since it is easily affected by stress to the body, such as exercise. Therefore, more reliable biomarkers of muscular dystrophy have long been desired. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, ∼22 nucleotide, noncoding RNAs which play important roles in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, it has been reported that miRNAs exist in blood. In this study, we hypothesized that the expression levels of specific serum circulating miRNAs may be useful to monitor the pathological progression of muscular diseases, and therefore explored the possibility of these miRNAs as new biomarkers for muscular diseases. To confirm this hypothesis, we quantified the expression levels of miRNAs in serum of the dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy mouse model, mdx, and the canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan dog model (CXMD(J)), by real-time PCR. We found that the serum levels of several muscle-specific miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133a and miR-206) are increased in both mdx and CXMD(J). Interestingly, unlike CK levels, expression levels of these miRNAs in mdx serum are little influenced by exercise using treadmill. These results suggest that serum miRNAs are useful and reliable biomarkers for muscular dystrophy.

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophies: Characteristics of Users and Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong; Romitti, Paul A.; Conway, Kristin M.; Andrews, Jennifer; Liu, Ke; Meaney, F. John; Street, Natalie; Puzhankara, Soman; Druschel, Charlotte M.; Matthews, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complementary and alternative medicine is frequently used in the management of chronic pediatric diseases, but little is known about its use by those with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy. METHODS Complementary and alternative medicine use by male patients with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy and associations with characteristics of male patients and their caregivers were examined through interviews with 362 primary caregivers identified from the Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network. RESULTS Overall, 272 of the 362 (75.1%) primary caregivers reported that they had used any complementary and alternative medicine for the oldest Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network male in their family. The most commonly reported therapies were from the mind-body medicine domain (61.0%) followed by those from the biologically based practice (39.2%), manipulative and body-based practice (29.3%), and whole medical system (6.9%) domains. Aquatherapy, prayer and/or blessing, special diet, and massage were the most frequently used therapies. Compared with nonusers, male patients who used any therapy were more likely to have an early onset of symptoms and use a wheel chair; their caregivers were more likely to be non-Hispanic white. Among domains, associations were observed with caregiver education and family income (mind-body medicines [excluding prayer and/or blessing only] and whole medical systems) and Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network site (biologically based practices and mind-body medicines [excluding prayer and/or blessing only]). CONCLUSIONS Complementary and alternative medicine use was common in the management of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies among Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network males. This widespread use suggests further study to evaluate the efficacy of integrating complementary and alternative medicine into treatment regimens for

  7. Decreased Insulin Receptors but Normal Glucose Metabolism in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pirro, Roberto; Lauro, Renato; Testa, Ivano; Ferretti, Ginofabrizio; de Martinis, Carlo; Dellantonio, Renzo

    1982-04-01

    Compared to matched controls, 17 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy showed decreased insulin binding to monocytes due to decreased receptor concentration. These patients showed no signs of altered glucose metabolism and retrospective analysis of the clinical records of a further 56 such patients revealed no modification in carbohydrate metabolism. These data suggest that reduced insulin receptor number does not produce overt modifications of glucose metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  8. Developmental Defects in a Zebrafish Model for Muscular Dystrophies Associated with the Loss of Fukutin-Related Protein (FKRP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornhill, Paul; Bassett, David; Lochmuller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2008-01-01

    A number of muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of [alpha]-dystroglycan and many are now known to result from mutations in a number of genes encoding putative or known glycosyltransferases. These diseases include severe forms of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) such as Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy…

  9. Muscular dystrophy in the Japanese Spitz: an inversion disrupts the DMD and RPGR genes.

    PubMed

    Atencia-Fernandez, Sabela; Shiel, Robert E; Mooney, Carmel T; Nolan, Catherine M

    2015-04-01

    An X-linked muscular dystrophy, with deficiency of full-length dystrophin and expression of a low molecular weight dystrophin-related protein, has been described in Japanese Spitz dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutation and develop a specific test to identify affected cases and carrier animals. Gene expression studies in skeletal muscle of an affected animal indicated aberrant expression of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (dystrophin) gene and an anomaly in intron 19 of the gene. Genome-walking experiments revealed an inversion that interrupts two genes on the X chromosome, the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene and the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator gene. All clinically affected dogs and obligate carriers that were tested had the mutant chromosome, and it is concluded that the inversion is the causative mutation for X-linked muscular dystrophy in the Japanese Spitz breed. A PCR assay that amplifies mutant and wild-type alleles was developed and proved capable of identifying affected and carrier individuals. Unexpectedly, a 7-year-old male animal, which had not previously come to clinical attention, was shown to possess the mutant allele and to have a relatively mild form of the disease. This observation indicates phenotypic heterogeneity in Japanese Spitz muscular dystrophy, a feature described previously in humans and Golden Retrievers. With the availability of a simple, fast and accurate test for Japanese Spitz muscular dystrophy, detection of carrier animals and selected breeding should help eliminate the mutation from the breed.

  10. Changes in pain-related beliefs, coping, and catastrophizing predict changes in pain intensity, pain interference, and psychological functioning in individuals with Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Rubén; Raichle, Katherine A.; Jensen, Mark P.; Miró, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this study was to test hypothesized associations between changes in psychological variables (i.e., pain beliefs, catastrophizing and coping strategies) and changes in pain intensity and related adjustment (i.e., pain interference and psychological functioning) in individuals with Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD). Methods A sample of 107 adults with a diagnosis of MMD or FSHD, reporting pain in the past three months, completed assessments at two time-points, separated by about 24 months. Results Results showed that changes in pain-related psychological variables were significantly associated with changes in psychological functioning, pain intensity and pain interference. Specifically, increases in the belief that emotion influences pain, and catastrophizing were associated with decreases in psychological functioning. Increases in the coping strategies of asking for assistance and resting, and the increases of catastrophizing were associated with increases in pain intensity. Finally, increases in pain intensity and asking for assistance were associated with increases in pain interference. Discussion The results support the utility of the biopsychosocial model of pain for understanding pain and its impact in individuals with MMD or FSHD. These findings may inform the design and implementation of psychosocial pain treatments for people with muscular dystrophy and chronic pain. PMID:21642844

  11. Investigation of Poor Academic Achievement in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, V. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Fee, R.; Goldstein, E.; Stern, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder that presents with progressive muscular weakness. It is caused by a mutation in a gene that results in the absence of specific products that normally localize to muscle cells and the central nervous system (CNS). The majority of affected individuals have IQs within the…

  12. Some Dynamics of Personality Development in Boys Suffering from Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mearig, Judith S.

    1973-01-01

    Discussed are personality aspects of Duchenne or pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy, a progressive wasting of muscular tissue, which afflicts only boys, and usually has its noticeable onset before the age of 6 years; and described is the development of three male dystrophic siblings. (DB)

  13. Nutritional muscular dystrophy in a four-day-old Connemara foal.

    PubMed

    Katz, Lm; O'Dwyer, S; Pollock, Pj

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a four-day-old, full-term Connemara colt, presented for the evaluation of a progressive inability to rise unassisted. A diagnosis of nutritional muscular dystrophy was made based on muscular weakness, elevated muscle enzymes and low vitamin E, selenium and glutathione peroxidase activity. The foal was treated with intramuscular vitamin E-selenium and made a full recovery.

  14. Safety and Feasibility of High-pressure Transvenous Limb Perfusion With 0.9% Saline in Human Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zheng; Kocis, Keith; Valley, Robert; Howard, James F; Chopra, Manisha; An, Hongyu; Lin, Weili; Muenzer, Joseph; Powers, William

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated safety and feasibility of the transvenous limb perfusion gene delivery method in muscular dystrophy. A dose escalation study of single limb perfusion with 0.9% saline starting with 5% of limb volume was carried out in adults with muscular dystrophies under intravenous analgesia/anesthesia. Cardiac, vascular, renal, muscle, and nerve functions were monitored. A tourniquet was placed above the knee with inflated pressure of 310 mm Hg. Infusion was carried out with a clinically approved infuser via an intravenous catheter inserted in the saphenous vein with a goal infusion rate of 80 ml/minute. Infusion volume was escalated stepwise to 20% limb volume in seven subjects. No subject complained of any post procedure pain other than due to needle punctures. Safety warning boundaries were exceeded only for transient depression of limb tissue oximetry and transient elevation of muscle compartment pressures; these were not associated with nerve, muscle, or vascular damage. Muscle magnetic resonant imaging (MRI) demonstrated fluid accumulation in muscles of the perfused lower extremity. High-pressure retrograde transvenous limb perfusion with saline up to 20% of limb volume at above infusion parameters is safe and feasible in adult human muscular dystrophy. This study will serve as a basis for future gene transfer clinical trials. PMID:21772257

  15. The effects of myotonic dystrophy and Duchenne muscular dystrophy on the orofacial muscles and dentofacial morphology.

    PubMed

    Kiliaridis, S; Katsaros, C

    1998-12-01

    This article takes a closer view of two of the less rare myopathies, myotonic dystrophy (MyD) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A high prevalence of malocclusions was found among the patients affected by these diseases. The development of the malocclusions in MyD patients seems to be strongly related to the vertical aberration of their craniofacial growth due to the involvement of the masticator, muscles in association with the possibly less affected suprahyoid musculature. Thus, a new situation is established around the teeth transversely. The lowered tongue is not in a position to counterbalance the forces developed during the lowering of the mandible by the stretched facial musculature. This may affect the teeth transversely, decreasing the width of the palate and causing posterior crossbite. The lowered position of the mandible, in combination with the decreased biting forces, may permit an overeruption of the posterior teeth, with increased palatal vault height and development of anterior open bite. The development of the malocclusions in DMD patients also seems to be strongly related to the involvement of the orofacial muscles by the disease. However, the posterior crossbite is not developed owing to the narrow maxillary arch, as is the case in MyD patients. On the contrary, the posterior crossbite in DMD is due to the transversal expansion of the mandibular arch, possibly because of the decreased tonus of the masseter muscle near the molars, in combination with the enlarged hypotonic tongue and the predominance of the less affected orbicularis oris muscle.

  16. Connective tissue growth factor is overexpressed in muscles of human muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guilian; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Wu, Yanling; Chiba, Yoko; Nakanishi, Tohru; Onuma, Akira; Sato, Yuko; Takigawa, Masaharu; Iinuma, Kazuie; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2008-04-15

    The detailed process of how dystrophic muscles are replaced by fibrotic tissues is unknown. In the present study, the immunolocalization and mRNA expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in muscles from normal and dystrophic human muscles were examined with the goal of elucidating the pathophysiological function of CTGF in muscular dystrophy. Biopsies of frozen muscle from patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), Becker muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, congenital myopathy were analyzed using anti-CTGF polyclonal antibody. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was also performed to evaluate the expression of CTGF mRNA in dystrophic muscles. In normal muscle, neuromuscular junctions and vessels were CTGF-immunopositive, which suggests a physiological role for CTGF in these sites. In dystrophic muscle, CTGF immunoreactivity was localized to muscle fiber basal lamina, regenerating fibers, and the interstitium. Triple immunolabeling revealed that activated fibroblasts were immunopositive for CTGF and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1). RT-PCR analysis revealed increased levels of CTGF mRNA in the muscles of DMD patients. Co-localization of TGF-beta1 and CTGF in activated fibroblasts suggests that CTGF expression is regulated by TGF-beta1 through a paracrine/autocrine mechanism. In conclusion, TGF-beta1-CTGF pathway may play a role in the fibrosis that is commonly observed in muscular dystrophy.

  17. Patterns of late gadolinium enhancement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was designed to assess whether cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers (DMDc) may index any cell milieu elements of LV dysfunction and whether this cardiac phenotype may be related to genotype. The null hypothesis was that myocardial fibrosis, assessed by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), might be similarly accounted for in DMDc and gender and age-matched controls. Methods Thirty DMDc patients had CMR and genotyping with 37 gender and age-matched controls. Systolic and diastolic LV function was assessed by 2D-echocardiography. Results Absolute and percent LGE were higher in muscular symptomatic (sym) than asymptomatic (asy) DMDc (1.77 ± 0.27 vs 0.76 ± 0.17 ml; F = 19.6, p < 0.0001 and 1.86 ± 0.26% vs 0.68 ± 0.17%, F = 22.1, p < 0.0001, respectively). There was no correlation between LGE and age. LGE was seen most frequently in segments 5 and 6; segment 5 was involved in all asy-DMDc. Subepicardial LGE predominated, compared to the mid-myocardial one (11 out of 14 DMDc). LGE was absent in the subendocardium. No correlations were seen between genotyping (type of mutation, gene region and protein domain), confined to the exon’s study, and cardiac phenotype. Conclusions A typical myocardial LGE-pattern location (LV segments 5 and 6) was a common finding in DMDc. LGE was more frequently subepicardial plus midmyocardial in sym-DMDc, with normal LV systolic and diastolic function. No genotype-phenothype correlation was found. PMID:25008475

  18. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient’s tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient’s tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient’s tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies. PMID:27375477

  19. Catheter Ablation of Multiple Accessory Pathways in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Steger, Christine; Gatterer, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    A 23-year-old male with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) experienced self-limiting palpitations at age 19 years for the first time. Palpitations recurred not earlier than at age 23 years, and were attributed to narrow complex tachycardia, which could be terminated with adenosine. Since electrocardiography showed a delta-wave, Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome was diagnosed, ajmaline prescribed and radio-frequency catheter ablation of three accessory pathways carried out one week later. One day after ablation, however, a relapse of the supraventricular tachycardia occurred and was terminated with ajmaline. Re-entry tachycardia occurred a second time six days after ablation, and as before, it was stopped only with ajmaline. Despite administration of verapamil to prevent tachycardia, it occurred a third time four months after ablation. This case shows that cardiac involvement in DMD may manifest also as WPW-syndrome. In these patients, repeated radio-frequency catheter ablation of accessory pathways may be necessary to completely block the re-entry mechanism. PMID:23508228

  20. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy in the Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model. PMID:25710459

  1. Muscle Activation during Gait in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Vuillerot, Carole; Tiffreau, Vincent; Peudenier, Sylviane; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Pereon, Yann; Leboeuf, Fabien; Delporte, Ludovic; Delpierre, Yannick; Gross, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate changes in muscle activity during gait in children with Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Dynamic surface electromyography recordings (EMGs) of 16 children with DMD and pathological gait were compared with those of 15 control children. The activity of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), medial hamstrings (HS), tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius soleus (GAS) muscles was recorded and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The overall muscle activity in the children with DMD was significantly different from that of the control group. Percentage activation amplitudes of RF, HS and TA were greater throughout the gait cycle in the children with DMD and the timing of GAS activity differed from the control children. Significantly greater muscle coactivation was found in the children with DMD. There were no significant differences between sides. Since the motor command is normal in DMD, the hyper-activity and co-contractions likely compensate for gait instability and muscle weakness, however may have negative consequences on the muscles and may increase the energy cost of gait. Simple rehabilitative strategies such as targeted physical therapies may improve stability and thus the pattern of muscle activity. PMID:27622734

  2. Diffusion tensor imaging study in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ya; Dong, Yuru; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Shu; Mu, Xuetao; Wang, Hong; Xu, Weihai

    2016-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle disorder associated with an intellectual deficit which is non-progressive. The aim of this study was to investigate brain microstructural changes in DMD and to explore the relationship between such changes and cognitive impairment. Methods All participants (12 DMD patients, 14 age-matched healthy boys), intelligence quotients (IQs) [both full (FIQ) and verbal (VIQ)] were evaluated using the Wechsler intelligence scale for children China revised (WISC-CR) edition, and brain gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) changes were mapped using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with fractional anisotropy (FA). The differences between groups were analyzed using the t-test and the association of cognition with neuroimaging parameters was evaluated using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results Compared to the normal controls, the DMD group had lower FIQ (82.0±15.39 vs. 120.21±16.06) and significantly lower splenium of corpus callosum (CC) FA values (P<0.05). Splenium of CC FA was positively correlated with VIQ (r=0.588, P=0.044). Conclusions There were microstructural changes of splenium of CC in DMD patients, which was associated with cognitive impairment. PMID:27127762

  3. The immune system in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Friend or foe

    PubMed Central

    Villalta, S Armando; Rosenberg, Amy S; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the X-linked dystrophin gene, resulting in reduced or absent protein production, subsequently leading to the structural instability of the dystroglycan complex (DGC), muscle degeneration, and early death in males. Thus, current treatments have been targeting the genetic defect either by bypassing the mutation through exon skipping or replacing the defective gene through gene therapy and stem cell approaches. However, what has been an underappreciated mediator of muscle pathology and, ultimately, of muscle degeneration and fibrotic replacement, is the prominent inflammatory response. Of potentially critical importance, however, is the fact that the elements mediating the inflammatory response also play an essential role in tissue repair. In this opinion piece, we highlight the detrimental and supportive immune parameters that occur as a consequence of the genetic disorder and discuss how changes to immunity can potentially ameliorate the disease intensity and be employed in conjunction with efforts to correct the genetic disorder. PMID:26481612

  4. miRNAs as serum biomarkers for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Cacchiarelli, Davide; Legnini, Ivano; Martone, Julie; Cazzella, Valentina; D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Bozzoni, Irene

    2011-05-01

    Dystrophin absence in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) causes severe muscle degeneration. We describe that, as consequence of fibre damage, specific muscle-miRNAs are released in to the bloodstream of DMD patients and their levels correlate with the severity of the disease. The same miRNAs are abundant also in the blood of mdx mice and recover to wild-type levels in animals 'cured' through exon skipping. Even though creatine kinase (CK) blood levels have been utilized as diagnostic markers of several neuromuscular diseases, including DMD, we demonstrate that they correlate less well with the disease severity. Although the analysis of a larger number of patients should allow to obtain more refined correlations with the different stages of disease progression, we propose that miR-1, miR-133, and miR-206 are new and valuable biomarkers for the diagnosis of DMD and possibly also for monitoring the outcomes of therapeutic interventions in humans. Despite many different DMD therapeutic approaches are now entering clinical trials, a unifying method for assessing the benefit of different treatments is still lacking.

  5. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient's tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient's tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient's tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies. PMID:27375477

  6. Dropped-head in recessive oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Matteo; Pennisi, Elena Maria; Bruttini, Mirella; Bizzarri, Veronica; Bucci, Elisabetta; Morino, Stefania; Talerico, Caterina; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Renieri, Alessandra; Antonini, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented a dropped head, caused by severe neck extensor weakness that had started two years before. She had also developed a mild degree of dysphagia, rhinolalia, eyelid ptosis and proximal limb weakness during the last months. EMG revealed myopathic changes. Muscle MRI detected fatty infiltration in the posterior neck muscles and tongue. Muscle biopsy revealed fiber size variations, sporadic rimmed vacuoles, small scattered angulated fibers and a patchy myofibrillar network. Genetic analysis revealed homozygous (GCN)11 expansions in the PABPN1 gene that were consistent with recessive oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). There are a few reports of the recessive form, which has a later disease onset with milder symptoms and higher clinical variability than the typical dominantly inherited form. This patient, who is the first Italian and the eighth worldwide reported case of recessive OPMD, is also the first case of OPMD with dropped-head syndrome, which thus expands the clinical phenotype of recessive OPMD. PMID:26494409

  7. Muscle Activation during Gait in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ropars, Juliette; Lempereur, Mathieu; Vuillerot, Carole; Tiffreau, Vincent; Peudenier, Sylviane; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Pereon, Yann; Leboeuf, Fabien; Delporte, Ludovic; Delpierre, Yannick; Gross, Raphaël; Brochard, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate changes in muscle activity during gait in children with Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Dynamic surface electromyography recordings (EMGs) of 16 children with DMD and pathological gait were compared with those of 15 control children. The activity of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), medial hamstrings (HS), tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius soleus (GAS) muscles was recorded and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The overall muscle activity in the children with DMD was significantly different from that of the control group. Percentage activation amplitudes of RF, HS and TA were greater throughout the gait cycle in the children with DMD and the timing of GAS activity differed from the control children. Significantly greater muscle coactivation was found in the children with DMD. There were no significant differences between sides. Since the motor command is normal in DMD, the hyper-activity and co-contractions likely compensate for gait instability and muscle weakness, however may have negative consequences on the muscles and may increase the energy cost of gait. Simple rehabilitative strategies such as targeted physical therapies may improve stability and thus the pattern of muscle activity. PMID:27622734

  8. Reachable Workspace in Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) by Kinect

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jay J.; Kurillo, Gregorij; Abresch, Richard T.; de Bie, Evan; Nicorici, Alina; Bajcsy, Ruzena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A depth-ranging sensor (Kinect) based upper extremity motion analysis system was applied to determine the spectrum of reachable workspace encountered in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Methods Reachable workspaces were obtained from 22 individuals with FSHD and 24 age- and height-matched healthy controls. To allow comparison, total and quadrant reachable workspace relative surface areas (RSA) were obtained by normalizing the acquired reachable workspace by each individual’s arm length. Results Significantly contracted reachable workspace and reduced RSAs were noted for the FSHD cohort compared to controls (0.473±0.188 vs. 0.747±0.082; P<0.0001). With worsening upper extremity function as categorized by the FSHD evaluation subscale II+III, the upper quadrant RSAs decreased progressively, while the lower quadrant RSAs were relatively preserved. There were no side-to-side differences in reachable workspace based on hand-dominance. Discussion This study demonstrates the feasibility and potential of using an innovative Kinect-based reachable workspace outcome measure in FSHD. PMID:24828906

  9. Muscle phenotypic variability in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2 G.

    PubMed

    Paim, Julia F; Cotta, Ana; Vargas, Antonio P; Navarro, Monica M; Valicek, Jaquelin; Carvalho, Elmano; da-Cunha, Antonio L; Plentz, Estevão; Braz, Shelida V; Takata, Reinaldo I; Almeida, Camila F; Vainzof, Mariz

    2013-06-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 G (LGMD2G) is caused by mutations in the telethonin gene. Only few families were described presenting this disease, and they are mainly Brazilians. Here, we identified one additional case carrying the same common c.157C > T mutation in the telethonin gene but with an atypical histopathological muscle pattern. In a female patient with a long duration of symptoms (46 years), muscle biopsy showed, in addition to telethonin deficiency, the presence of nemaline rods, type 1 fiber predominance, nuclear internalization, lobulated fibers, and mitochondrial paracrystalline inclusions. Her first clinical signs were identified at 8 years old, which include tiptoe walking, left lower limb deformity, and frequent falls. Ambulation loss occurred at 41 years old, and now, at 54 years old, she presented pelvic girdle atrophy, winging scapula, foot deformity with incapacity to perform ankle dorsiflexion, and absent tendon reflexes. The presence of nemaline bodies could be a secondary phenomenon, possibly associated with focal Z-line abnormalities of a long-standing disease. However, these new histopathological findings, characteristic of congenital myopathies, expand muscle phenotypic variability of telethoninopathy. PMID:23479141

  10. Actin-organising properties of the muscular dystrophy protein myotilin.

    PubMed

    von Nandelstadh, Pernilla; Grönholm, Mikaela; Moza, Monica; Lamberg, Arja; Savilahti, Harri; Carpén, Olli

    2005-10-15

    Myotilin is a sarcomeric Z-disc protein that binds F-actin directly and bundles actin filaments, although it does not contain a conventional actin-binding domain. Expression of mutant myotilin leads to sarcomeric alterations in the dominantly inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1A and in myofibrillar myopathy/desmin-related myopathy. Together, with previous in vitro studies, this indicates that myotilin has an important function in the assembly and maintenance of Z-discs. This study characterises further the interaction between myotilin and actin. Functionally important regions in myotilin were identified by actin pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays and with a novel strategy that combines in vitro DNA transposition-based peptide insertion mutagenesis with phenotype analysis in yeast cells. The shortest fragment to bind actin was the second Ig domain together with a short C-terminal sequence. Concerted action of the first and second Ig domain was, however, necessary for the functional activity of myotilin, as verified by analysis of transposon mutants, actin binding and phenotypic effect in mammalian cells. Furthermore, the Ig domains flanked with N- and C-terminal regions were needed for actin-bundling, indicating that the mere actin-binding sequence was insufficient for the actin-regulating activity. None of the four known disease-associated mutations altered the actin-organising ability. These results, together with previous studies in titin and kettin, identify the Ig domain as an actin-binding unit.

  11. Reevaluating Measures of Disease Progression in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Statland, Jeffrey M.; McDermott, Michael P.; Heatwole, Chad; Martens, William B.; Pandya, Shree; van der Kooi, E.L.; Kissel, John T.; Wagner, Kathryn R.; Tawil, Rabi

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) have identified potential therapeutic targets. Consequently, an accurate understanding of disease progression in FSHD is crucial for the design of future clinical trials. Data from 228 subjects in 3 clinical trials and 1 natural history study were compared to examine disease progression in FSHD. All studies utilized the same techniques for manual muscle testing and maximum voluntary isometric contraction testing. Both techniques yield a total strength score that can be followed over time as an indicator of disease progression. Whereas natural history data showed a decrease in strength over 1 year, there was an apparent increase in strength at 6 months in 2 of the 3 clinical trials in both the placebo and treatment groups, that persisted for up to 1 year for maximum voluntary isometric contraction testing. Variability estimates from the clinical trial data were consistent with those seen in the natural history data. Patients in clinical trials in FSHD may have better outcomes than those in natural history studies, regardless of treatment assignment, emphasizing the importance of placebo groups and the need for caution when interpreting the strength results of controlled and uncontrolled trials. PMID:23406877

  12. Motor unit remodelling in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Electrophysiological assessment.

    PubMed

    Cruz Martínez, A; López-Terradas, J M

    1992-01-01

    Conventional EMG, motor and sensory conduction velocities, averaging analysis of MUPs, SFEMG, and muscle fiber conduction velocity in situ were performed in 14 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DD) aged 5 to 11 years. MUPs parameters study showed a striking increment of long duration MUPs followed by satellites and increase of polyphasic potentials of variable duration. The main findings in SFEMG examination were increment in fiber density of the motor unit, large MISI and presence of complex potentials of long duration in all patients. Muscle fiber conduction velocity in situ was significantly slower than in controls, with significant decrease in minimum conduction and increased variability (large SD) in propagation velocity values. Low conduction velocity of muscle fibers, long duration of polyphasics and MUPs followed by satellites, and large MISI were significantly related. These findings support the hypotheses which have suggested that the motor unit remodelling in DD is mainly myogenic. The abnormalities in muscle fiber conduction velocity in situ reflect an increased diameter variation of muscle fibers consistent with splitting fibers, small groups of regenerating and necrotic fibers, and fiber diameter variation found in histological studies. Thus, increased variability in fiber diameter may be the cause of complex and long duration MUPs in DD.

  13. Milder forms of muscular dystrophy associated with POMGNT2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Yukari; Dong, Mingrui; Ogawa, Megumu; Hayashi, Yukiko K.; Kuru, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Kenji; Nagai, Shigehiro; Ozasa, Shiro; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nishino, Ichizo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic variants in patients with dystroglycanopathy (DGP) and assess the pathogenicity of these variants. Methods: A total of 20 patients with DGP were identified by immunohistochemistry or Western blot analysis. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed using patient samples. The pathogenicity of the variants identified was evaluated on the basis of the phenotypic recovery in a knockout (KO) haploid human cell line by transfection with mutated POMGNT2 cDNA and on the basis of the in vitro enzymatic activity of mutated proteins. Results: WES identified homozygous and compound heterozygous missense variants in POMGNT2 in 3 patients with the milder limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and intellectual disability without brain malformation. The 2 identified variants were located in the putative glycosyltransferase domain of POMGNT2, which affected its enzymatic activity. Mutated POMGNT2 cDNAs failed to rescue the phenotype of POMGNT2-KO cells. Conclusions: Novel variants in POMGNT2 are associated with milder forms of LGMD. The findings of this study expand the clinical and pathologic spectrum of DGP associated with POMGNT2 variants from the severest Walker-Warburg syndrome to the mildest LGMD phenotypes. The simple method to verify pathogenesis of variants may allow researchers to evaluate any variants present in all of the known causative genes and the variants in novel candidate genes to detect DGPs, particularly without using patients' specimens. PMID:27066570

  14. Transcriptional profiling in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy to identify candidate biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Rahimov, Fedik; King, Oliver D.; Leung, Doris G.; Bibat, Genila M.; Emerson, Charles P.; Kunkel, Louis M.; Wagner, Kathryn R.

    2012-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a progressive neuromuscular disorder caused by contractions of repetitive elements within the macrosatellite D4Z4 on chromosome 4q35. The pathophysiology of FSHD is unknown and, as a result, there is currently no effective treatment available for this disease. To better understand the pathophysiology of FSHD and develop mRNA-based biomarkers of affected muscles, we compared global analysis of gene expression in two distinct muscles obtained from a large number of FSHD subjects and their unaffected first-degree relatives. Gene expression in two muscle types was analyzed using GeneChip Gene 1.0 ST arrays: biceps, which typically shows an early and severe disease involvement; and deltoid, which is relatively uninvolved. For both muscle types, the expression differences were mild: using relaxed cutoffs for differential expression (fold change ≥1.2; nominal P value <0.01), we identified 191 and 110 genes differentially expressed between affected and control samples of biceps and deltoid muscle tissues, respectively, with 29 genes in common. Controlling for a false-discovery rate of <0.25 reduced the number of differentially expressed genes in biceps to 188 and in deltoid to 7. Expression levels of 15 genes altered in this study were used as a “molecular signature” in a validation study of an additional 26 subjects and predicted them as FSHD or control with 90% accuracy based on biceps and 80% accuracy based on deltoids. PMID:22988124

  15. Functional muscle ischemia in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Gail D.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) comprise a spectrum of devastating X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. DMD/BMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that stabilizes the muscle membrane and also targets other proteins to the sarcolemma. Among these is the muscle-specific isoform of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ) which binds spectrin-like repeats within dystrophin's rod domain and the adaptor protein α-syntrophin. Dystrophin deficiency causes loss of sarcolemmal nNOSμ and reduces paracrine signaling of muscle-derived nitric oxide (NO) to the microvasculature, which renders the diseased muscle fibers susceptible to functional muscle ischemia during exercise. Repeated bouts of functional ischemia superimposed on muscle fibers already weakened by dystrophin deficiency result in use-dependent focal muscle injury. Genetic and pharmacologic strategies to boost nNOSμ-NO signaling in dystrophic muscle alleviate functional muscle ischemia and show promise as novel therapeutic interventions for the treatment of DMD/BMD. PMID:24391598

  16. Peripheral nerve blocks as the sole anesthetic technique in a patient with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bang, Seung Uk; Kim, Yee Suk; Kwon, Woo Jin; Lee, Sang Mook; Kim, Soo Hyang

    2016-04-01

    General anesthesia and central neuraxial blockades in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy are associated with high risks of complications, including rhabdomyolysis, malignant hyperthermia, hemodynamic instability, and postoperative mechanical ventilation. Here, we describe peripheral nerve blocks as a safe approach to anesthesia in a patient with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy who was scheduled to undergo surgery. A 22-year-old male patient was scheduled to undergo reduction and internal fixation of a left distal femur fracture. He had been diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy at 5 years of age, and had no locomotive capability except for that of the finger flexors and toe extensors. He had developed symptoms associated with dyspnea 5 years before and required intermittent ventilation. We blocked the femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and parasacral plexus under ultrasound on the left leg. The patient underwent a successful operation using peripheral nerve blocks with no complications. In conclusion general anesthesia and central neuraxial blockades in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy are unsafe approaches to anesthesia because of hemodynamic instability and respiratory depression. Peripheral nerve blocks are the best way to reduce the risks of critical complications, and are a safe and feasible approach to anesthesia in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  17. Bortezomib partially improves laminin α2 chain-deficient muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Körner, Zandra; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely C; Holmberg, Johan; Carmignac, Virginie; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2014-05-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy, caused by mutations in LAMA2 (the gene encoding laminin α2 chain), is a severe and incapacitating disease for which no therapy is yet available. We have recently demonstrated that proteasome activity is increased in laminin α2 chain-deficient muscle and that treatment with the nonpharmaceutical proteasome inhibitor MG-132 reduces muscle pathology in laminin α2 chain-deficient dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice. Here, we explore the use of the selective and therapeutic proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (currently used for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma) in dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice and in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A muscle cells. Outcome measures included quantitative muscle morphology, gene and miRNA expression analyses, proteasome activity, motor activity, and survival. Bortezomib improved several histological hallmarks of disease, partially normalized miRNA expression (miR-1 and miR-133a), and enhanced body weight, locomotion, and survival of dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice. In addition, bortezomib reduced proteasome activity in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A myoblasts and myotubes. These findings provide evidence that the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib partially reduces laminin α2 chain-deficient muscular dystrophy. Investigation of the clinical efficacy of bortezomib administration in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A clinical trials may be warranted.

  18. In vivo genome editing improves muscle function in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher E; Hakim, Chady H; Ousterout, David G; Thakore, Pratiksha I; Moreb, Eirik A; Castellanos Rivera, Ruth M; Madhavan, Sarina; Pan, Xiufang; Ran, F Ann; Yan, Winston X; Asokan, Aravind; Zhang, Feng; Duan, Dongsheng; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease affecting about 1 out of 5000 male births and caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Genome editing has the potential to restore expression of a modified dystrophin gene from the native locus to modulate disease progression. In this study, adeno-associated virus was used to deliver the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system to the mdx mouse model of DMD to remove the mutated exon 23 from the dystrophin gene. This includes local and systemic delivery to adult mice and systemic delivery to neonatal mice. Exon 23 deletion by CRISPR-Cas9 resulted in expression of the modified dystrophin gene, partial recovery of functional dystrophin protein in skeletal myofibers and cardiac muscle, improvement of muscle biochemistry, and significant enhancement of muscle force. This work establishes CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing as a potential therapy to treat DMD.

  19. In vivo genome editing improves muscle function in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher E; Hakim, Chady H; Ousterout, David G; Thakore, Pratiksha I; Moreb, Eirik A; Castellanos Rivera, Ruth M; Madhavan, Sarina; Pan, Xiufang; Ran, F Ann; Yan, Winston X; Asokan, Aravind; Zhang, Feng; Duan, Dongsheng; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease affecting about 1 out of 5000 male births and caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Genome editing has the potential to restore expression of a modified dystrophin gene from the native locus to modulate disease progression. In this study, adeno-associated virus was used to deliver the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system to the mdx mouse model of DMD to remove the mutated exon 23 from the dystrophin gene. This includes local and systemic delivery to adult mice and systemic delivery to neonatal mice. Exon 23 deletion by CRISPR-Cas9 resulted in expression of the modified dystrophin gene, partial recovery of functional dystrophin protein in skeletal myofibers and cardiac muscle, improvement of muscle biochemistry, and significant enhancement of muscle force. This work establishes CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing as a potential therapy to treat DMD. PMID:26721684

  20. [Development of an ultrasound-mediated nucleic acid delivery system for treating muscular dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Negishi, Yoichi; Hamano, Nobuhito; Shiono, Hitomi; Akiyama, Saki; Endo-Takahashi, Yoko; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Aramaki, Yukihiko

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous diseases that are characterized by progressive muscle weakness, wasting and degeneration. These muscular deficiencies are often caused by the loss of the protein dystrophin, a crucial element of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex of muscle fibers. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal, X-linked muscular disease that occurs in 1 out of every 3500 males. Therefore, feasible strategies for replacing or repairing the defective gene are required; however, to date, no effective therapeutic strategies for muscular dystrophies have been established. In this review, we first introduce gene therapies mediated by adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) including a functional dystrophin cDNA or antisense oligonucleotide (AO)-induced exon-skipping therapies, which are designed to exclude the mutated or additional exon(s) in the defective gene and thereby correct the translational reading frame. Recently, we developed "Bubble liposomes" (BLs), which are polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified liposomes entrapping echo-contrast gas that is known as ultrasound (US) imaging gas. BL application combined with US exposure can function as a novel gene delivery tool, and we demonstrate that the US-mediated eruption of BLs is a feasible and efficient technique to deliver plasmid DNA or AOs for the treatment of muscular dystrophies.

  1. Becker muscular dystrophy-like myopathy regarded as so-called "fatty muscular dystrophy" in a pig: a case report and its diagnostic method.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Aihara, Naoyuki; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Kousaka, Shinichi; Nagafuchi, Tsuneyuki; Ochiai, Mariko; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Asai, Tetsuo; Oishi, Koji

    2014-03-01

    We describe a case of human Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD)-like myopathy that was characterized by the declined stainability of dystrophin at sarcolemma in a pig and the immunostaining for dystrophin on the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. The present case was found in a meat inspection center. The pig looked appeared healthy at the ante-mortem inspection. Muscular abnormalities were detected after carcass dressing as pale, discolored skeletal muscles with prominent fat infiltrations and considered so-called "fatty muscular dystrophy". Microscopic examination revealed following characteristics: diffused fat infiltration into the skeletal muscle and degeneration and regeneration of the remaining skeletal muscle fibers. Any lesions that were suspected of neurogenic atrophy, traumatic muscular degeneration, glycogen storage disease or other porcine muscular disorders were not observed. The immunostaining for dystrophin was conducted and confirmed to be applicable on FFPE porcine muscular tissues and revealed diminished stainability of dystrophin at the sarcolemma in the present case. Based on the histological observations and immunostaining results, the present case was diagnosed with BMD-like myopathy associated with dystrophin abnormality in a pig. Although the genetic properties were not clear, the present BMD-like myopathy implied the occurrence of dystrophinopathy in pigs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a natural case of myopathy associated with dystrophin abnormalities in a pig.

  2. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jamie L; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian J; Baum, Linda G; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2013-09-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein-replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important potential therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein-replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. PMID:23601082

  3. Utility of Cystatin C for Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate in Patients With Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Koichi; Morita, Hiroyuki; Daimon, Masao; Horio, Masaru; Kawata, Takayuki; Nakao, Tomoko; Hirokawa, Megumi; Kitao, Ruriko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Komori, Tetsuo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Komaki, Hirofumi; Segawa, Kazuhiko; Nakajima, Takashi; Takenaka, Katsu; Komuro, Issei

    2016-05-25

    Emerging concerns regarding heart failure, arrhythmia, and sudden death in patients with muscular dystrophy are of significant clinical importance. On the other hand, little attention has been paid to renal dysfunction because these patients have low serum creatinine levels. Serum cystatin C, unaffected by muscle quantity, is a potentially superior marker for estimating renal function. Here, we present cases with muscular dystrophy in which estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by cystatin C (eGFRcys) provided good agreement with simultaneously measured GFR by inulin renal clearance (differences less than 20%). Sudden death with acute heart failure occurred in a patient with underlying renal dysfunction and elevated BNP. Neurologists and cardiologists should evaluate renal function using GFR with cystatin C in patients with muscular dystrophy.

  4. Enhanced autophagy as a potential mechanism for the improved physiological function by simvastatin in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Nicholas P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy has recently emerged as an important cellular process for the maintenance of skeletal muscle health and function. Excessive autophagy can trigger muscle catabolism, leading to atrophy. In contrast, reduced autophagic flux is a characteristic of several muscle diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the most common and severe inherited muscle disorder. Recent evidence demonstrates that enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by CYBB/NOX2 impairs autophagy in muscles from the dmd/mdx mouse, a genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Statins decrease CYBB/NOX2 expression and activity and stimulate autophagy in skeletal muscle. Therefore, we treated dmd/mdx mice with simvastatin and showed decreased CYBB/NOX2-mediated oxidative stress and enhanced autophagy induction. This was accompanied by reduced muscle damage, inflammation and fibrosis, and increased muscle force production. Our data suggest that increased autophagy may be a potential mechanism by which simvastatin improves skeletal muscle health and function in muscular dystrophy. PMID:26890413

  5. Temporalis muscle hypertrophy and reduced skull eccentricity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Straathof, C S M; Doorenweerd, N; Wokke, B H A; Dumas, E M; van den Bergen, J C; van Buchem, M A; Hendriksen, J G M; Verschuuren, J J G M; Kan, H E

    2014-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy and muscle weakness are well known in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Decreased muscle force can have secondary effects on skeletal growth and development such as facial and dental morphology changes. In this study, we quantified temporal muscle thickness, circumference, and eccentricity of the skull and the head on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the head of 15 Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and 15 controls. Average temporal muscle thickness was significantly increased in patients (12.9 ± 5.2 mm) compared to controls (6.8 ± 1.4 mm) (P < .0001), whereas the shape of the skull was significantly rounder compared to controls. Temporal muscle thickness and skull eccentricity were significantly negatively correlated in patients, and positively in controls. Hypertrophy of the temporal muscles and changes in skull eccentricity appear to occur early in the course of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Further studies in younger patients are needed to confirm a causal relationship.

  6. Computer method for the analysis of evoked motor unit potentials. 2. Duchenne, limb-girdle, facioscapulohumeral and myotonic muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, J P; Hansen, S

    1975-01-01

    Single motor unit potentials recorded from surface electrodes over the extensor digitorum brevis muscle and evoked by stimulation of the anterior tibial nerve at the ankle were obtained by a computer subtraction method. Their latencies, durations, amplitudes, and areas were measured in control subjects and patients with Duchenne, limb-girdle, facioscapulohumeral, and myotonic muscular dystrophy. Lateral popliteal motor nerve conduction velocities were also recorded. In the muscular dystrophies there was a significant increase in both the latencies and durations of motor unit potentials, the latter in notable contrast with the findings of conventional needle electromyography. Fastest motor conduction velocities were significantly reduced in the limb-girdle, facioscapulohumeral, and myotonic muscular dystrophy patients, while the shortest distal motor latencies were significantly prolonged in these patients and those with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The results support the presence of a definitive neurogenic influence in the muscular dystrophies. PMID:1151411

  7. Characterization of pulmonary function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, R.S.; Rummey, C.; Benton, M.J.; Glanzman, A.M.; Flickinger, J.; Lindström, B.‐M.; Meier, T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Decline in pulmonary function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) contributes to significant morbidity and reduced longevity. Spirometry is a widely used and fairly easily performed technique to assess lung function, and in particular lung volume; however, the acceptability criteria from the American Thoracic Society (ATS) may be overly restrictive and inappropriate for patients with neuromuscular disease. We examined prospective spirometry data (Forced Vital Capacity [FVC] and peak expiratory flow [PEF]) from 60 DMD patients enrolled in a natural history cohort study (median age 10.3 years, range 5–24 years). Expiratory flow‐volume curves were examined by a pulmonologist and the data were evaluated for acceptability using ATS criteria modified based on the capabilities of patients with neuromuscular disease. Data were then analyzed for change with age, ambulation status, and glucocorticoid use. At least one acceptable study was obtained in 44 subjects (73%), and 81 of the 131 studies (62%) were acceptable. The FVC and PEF showed similar relative changes in absolute values with increasing age, i.e., an increase through 10 years, relative stabilization from 10–18 years, and then a decrease at an older age. The percent predicted, FVC and PEF showed a near linear decline of approximately 5% points/year from ages 5 to 24. Surprisingly, no difference was observed in FVC or PEF by ambulation or steroid treatment. Acceptable spirometry can be performed on DMD patients over a broad range of ages. Using modified ATS criteria, curated spirometry data, excluding technically unacceptable data, may provide a more reliable means of determining change in lung function over time. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2015; 50:487–494. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25755201

  8. Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy: More Complex than it Appears

    PubMed Central

    G, Ricci; M, Zatz; R, Tupler

    2014-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) has been classified as an autosomal dominant myopathy, linked to rearrangements in an array of 3.3 kb tandemly repeated DNA elements (D4Z4) located at the 4q subtelomere (4q35). For the last 20 years, the diagnosis of FSHD has been confirmed in clinical practice by the detection of one D4Z4 allele with a reduced number (≤8) of repeats at 4q35. Although wide inter- and intra-familial clinical variability was found in subjects carrying D4Z4 alleles of reduced size, this DNA testing has been considered highly sensitive and specific. However, several exceptions to this general rule have been reported. Specifically, FSHD families with asymptomatic relatives carrying D4Z4 reduced alleles, FSHD genealogies with subjects affected with other neuromuscular disorders and FSHD affected patients carrying D4Z4 alleles of normal size have been described. In order to explain these findings, it has been proposed that the reduction of D4Z4 repeats at 4q35 could be pathogenic only in certain chromosomal backgrounds, defined as “permissive” specific haplotypes. However, our most recent studies show that the current DNA signature of FSHD is a common polymorphism and that in FSHD families the risk of developing FSHD for carriers of D4Z4 reduced alleles (DRA) depends on additional factors besides the 4q35 locus. These findings highlight the necessity to re-evaluate the significance and the predictive value of DRA, not only for research but also in clinical practice. Further clinical and genetic analysis of FSHD families will be extremely important for studies aiming at dissecting the complexity of FSHD.

  9. Growth and psychomotor development of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Elisabeth; von der Hagen, Maja; Schara, Ulrike; von Au, Katja; Kaindl, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common hereditary degenerative neuromuscular diseases and caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The objective of the retrospective study was to describe growth and psychomotor development of patients with DMD and to detect a possible genotype-phenotype correlation. Data from 263 patients with DMD (mean age 7.1 years) treated at the Departments of Pediatric Neurology in three German University Hospitals was assessed with respect to body measurements (length, weight, body mass index BMI, head circumference OFC), motor and cognitive development as well as genotype (site of mutation). Anthropometric measures and developmental data were compared to those of a reference population and deviations were analyzed for their frequency in the cohort as well as in relation to the genotypes. Corticosteroid therapy was implemented in 29 from 263 patients. Overall 30% of the patients exhibit a short statue (length < 3rd centile) with onset early in development at 2-5 years of age, and this is even more prevalent when steroid therapy is applied (45% of patients with steroid therapy). The BMI shows a rightwards shift (68% > 50th centile) and the OFC a leftwards shift (65% < 50th centile, 5% microcephaly). Gross motor development is delayed in a third of the patients (mean age at walking 18.3 months, 30% > 18 months, 8% > 24 months). Almost half of the patients show cognitive impairment (26% learning disability, 17% intellectual disability). Although there is no strict genotype-phenotype correlation, particularly mutations in the distal part of the dystrophin gene are frequently associated with short stature and a high rate of microcephaly as well as cognitive impairment.

  10. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: a late-onset polyalanine disease.

    PubMed

    Brais, B

    2003-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a muscle disease of late onset associated with progressive ptosis of the eyelids, dysphagia, and unique tubulofilamentous intranuclear inclusions (INIs). OPMD is usually transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait (OMIM 164300). A rarer allelic autosomal recessive form has also been observed (OMIM 257950). Both forms are caused by short (GCG)8-13 expansions in the polyadenylate-binding protein nuclear 1 gene (PABPN1) located on chromosome 14q11.1. The mutations cause the lengthening of an N-terminal polyalanine domain. Both slippage and unequal recombination have been proposed as the mutation mechanisms. The size of the mutation has not yet been conclusively shown to inversely correlate with the severity of the phenotype. Mutated PABPN1 proteins have been shown to be constituents of the INIs. The INIs also contain ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, HSP 40, HSP 70, SKIP, and abundant poly(A)-mRNA. The exact mechanism responsible for polyalanine toxicity in OPMD is unknown. Various intranuclear inclusion dependent and independent mechanisms have been proposed based on the major known function of PABPN1 in polyadenylation of mRNA and its shuttling from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. OPMD is one of the few triplet-repeat diseases for which the function of the mutated gene is known. Because of the increasing number of diseases caused by polyalanine expansions and the pathological overlap with CAG/polyglutamine diseases, what pathological insight is gained by the study of OPMD could lead to a better understanding of a much larger group of developmental and degenerative diseases.

  11. Evidence for heterogeneity in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, J. R.; Stajich, J. M.; Wall, S.; Carter, S. C.; Qiu, H.; Vance, J. M.; Stewart, C. S.; Speer, M. C.; Pufky, J.; Yamaoka, L. H.; Rozear, M.; Samson, F.; Fardeau, M.; Roses, A. D.; Pericak-Vance, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a slowly progressive primary disease of muscle which is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder. FSHD has been localized to the long arm of chromosome 4, specifically to the 4q3.5-qter region. Initially published linkage studies showed no evidence for heterogeneity in FSHD. In the present study we have examined individuals in seven FSHD families. Two-point lod scores show significant evidence for linkage for D4S163 (lod score 3.04 at recombination fraction .21) and D4S139 (lod score 3.84 at recombination fraction .20). D4S171 also gave a positive score (lod score 2.56 at recombination fraction .24). Significant evidence for heterogeneity was found for each of the three markers. Multipoint linkage analysis in this region resulted in a peak multipoint lod score of 6.47. The multipoint analysis supported the two-point studies with odds of 20:1 showing linkage and heterogeneity over linkage and homogeneity. Five of the seven families gave a posterior probability of >95% of being of the linked type, while two families appeared unlinked to this region of 4q (P < .01%). Individuals in the two unlinked families met the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of FSHD, including facial weakness, clavicular flattening, scapula winging, proximal muscle weakness, and myopathic changes on muscle biopsies without inflammatory or mitochondrial pathology. This study demonstrates genetic heterogeneity in FSHD and has important implications for both genetic counseling and the elucidation of the etiology of FSHD. PMID:8328457

  12. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy assessed objectively by surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Archer, Sally K; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-06-01

    Objective swallowing assessment is indicated in the management of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Surface electromyography (sEMG) provides a non-invasive, objective method of quantifying muscle activity. It was hypothesised that the measurement of sEMG activity during swallowing would distinguish between preserved and disordered swallow function in DMD. This comparative study investigated the peak, duration, and relative timing of muscle activity during swallowing of four muscle groups: orbicularis oris, masseter, submental, and infrahyoid. The study included three groups of participants: Nine DMD patients with dysphagia (mean age = 21.7 ± 4.2 years), six DMD patients with preserved swallow function (21.0 ± 3.0 years), and 12 healthy controls (24.8 ± 3.1 years). Dysphagic DMD participants produced significantly higher normalised peak amplitude measurements than the healthy control group for masseter (61.77 vs. 5.07; p ≤ 0.01) and orbicularis oris muscles (71.87 vs. 26.22; p ≤ 0.05). Intrasubject variability for masseter peak amplitude was significantly greater for dysphagic DMD participants than the other groups (16.01 vs. 5.86 vs. 2.18; p ≤ 0.05). There were no differences in timing measurements between groups. Different characteristic sEMG waveforms were observed for the three groups. sEMG provides useful physiological information for the evaluation of swallowing in DMD patients, justifying further study.

  13. Red-Green Color Vision Impairment in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marcelo Fernandes ; Oliveira, Andre Gustavo Fernandes ; Feitosa-Santana, Claudia ; Zatz, Mayana ; Ventura, Dora Fix 

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated the color vision of 44 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) (mean age 14.8 years; SD 4.9) who were submitted to a battery of four different color tests: Cambridge Colour Test (CCT), Neitz Anomaloscope, Ishihara, and American Optical Hardy-Rand-Rittler (AO H-R-R). Patients were divided into two groups according to the region of deletion in the dystrophin gene: upstream of exon 30 (n=12) and downstream of exon 30 (n=32). The control group was composed of 70 age-matched healthy male subjects with no ophthalmological complaints. Of the patients with DMD, 47% (21/44) had a red-green color vision defect in the CCT, confirmed by the Neitz Anomaloscope with statistical agreement (P<.001). The Ishihara and the AO H-R-R had a lower capacity to detect color defects—5% and 7%, respectively, with no statistical similarity between the results of these two tests nor between CCT and Anomaloscope results (P>.05). Of the patients with deletion downstream of exon 30, 66% had a red-green color defect. No color defect was found in the patients with deletion upstream of exon 30. A negative correlation between the color thresholds and age was found for the controls and patients with DMD, suggesting a nonprogressive color defect. The percentage (66%) of patients with a red-green defect was significantly higher than the expected <10% for the normal male population (P<.001). In contrast, patients with DMD with deletion upstream of exon 30 had normal color vision. This color defect might be partially explained by a retina impairment related to dystrophin isoform Dp260. PMID:17503325

  14. Immunoproteasome in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiao-Nan Joyce; Graber, Ted G; Bratten, Wendy M; Ferrington, Deborah A; Thompson, LaDora V

    2014-04-01

    Increased proteasome activity has been implicated in the atrophy and deterioration associated with dystrophic muscles of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). While proteasome inhibitors show promise in the attenuation of muscle degeneration, proteasome inhibition-induced toxicity was a major drawback of this therapeutic strategy. Inhibitors that selectively target the proteasome subtype that is responsible for the loss in muscle mass and quality would reduce side effects and be less toxic. This study examined proteasome activity and subtype populations, along with muscle function, morphology and damage in wild-type (WT) mice and two murine models of DMD, dystrophin-deficient (MDX) and dystrophin- and utrophin-double-knockout (DKO) mice. We found that immunoproteasome content was increased in dystrophic muscles while the total proteasome content was unchanged among the three genotypes of mice. Proteasome proteolytic activity was elevated in dystrophic muscles, especially in DKO mice. These mice also exhibited more severe muscle atrophy than either WT or MDX mice. Muscle damage and regeneration, characterized by the activity of muscle creatine kinase in the blood and the percentage of central nuclei were equally increased in dystrophic mice. Accordingly, the overall muscle function was similarly reduced in both dystrophic mice compared with WT. These data demonstrated that there was transformation of standard proteasomes to immunoproteasomes in dystrophic muscles. In addition, DKO that showed greatest increase in proteasome activities also demonstrated more severe atrophy compared with MDX and WT. These results suggest a putative role for the immunoproteasome in muscle deterioration associated with DMD and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Evidence for heterogeneity in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.R.; Stajich, J.M.; Wall, S.; Carter, S.C.; Qiu, H.; Vance, J.M.; Stewart, C.S.; Speer, M.C.; Pufky, J.; Yamaoka, L.H.; Rozear, M.; Roses, A.D.; Pericak-Vance, M.A. ); Samson, F.; Fardeau, M. )

    1993-08-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a slowly progressive primary disease of muscle which is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder. FSHD has been localized to the long arm of chromosome 4, specifically to the 4q3.5-qter region. Initially published linkage studies showed no evidence for heterogeneity in FSHD. In the present study the authors have examined individuals in seven FSHD families. Two-point lod scores show significant evidence for linkage for D4S163 (lod score 3.04 at recombination fraction .21) and D4S139 (lod score 3.84 at recombination fraction .20). D4S171 also gave a positive score (lod score 2.56 at recombination fraction .24). Significant evidence for heterogeneity was found for each of the three markers. Multipoint linkage analysis in this region resulted in a peak multipoint lod score of 6.47. The multipoint analysis supported the two-point studies with odds of 20:1 showing linkage and heterogeneity over linkage and homogeneity. Five of the seven families gave a posterior probability of >95% of being of the linked type, while two families appeared unlinked to this region of 4q (P<.01%). Individuals in the two unlinked families met the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of FSHD, including facial weakness, clavicular flattening, scapula winging, proximal muscle weakness, and myopathic changes on muscle biopsies without inflammatory or mitochondrial pathology. This study demonstrates genetic heterogeneity in FSHD and has important implications for both genetic counseling and the elucidation of the etiology of FSHD. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Computer task performance by subjects with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Silvia Regina Pinheiro; da Silva, Talita Dias; Favero, Francis Meire; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Fregni, Felipe; Ribeiro, Denise Cardoso; de Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira

    2016-01-01

    Aims Two specific objectives were established to quantify computer task performance among people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). First, we compared simple computational task performance between subjects with DMD and age-matched typically developing (TD) subjects. Second, we examined correlations between the ability of subjects with DMD to learn the computational task and their motor functionality, age, and initial task performance. Method The study included 84 individuals (42 with DMD, mean age of 18±5.5 years, and 42 age-matched controls). They executed a computer maze task; all participants performed the acquisition (20 attempts) and retention (five attempts) phases, repeating the same maze. A different maze was used to verify transfer performance (five attempts). The Motor Function Measure Scale was applied, and the results were compared with maze task performance. Results In the acquisition phase, a significant decrease was found in movement time (MT) between the first and last acquisition block, but only for the DMD group. For the DMD group, MT during transfer was shorter than during the first acquisition block, indicating improvement from the first acquisition block to transfer. In addition, the TD group showed shorter MT than the DMD group across the study. Conclusion DMD participants improved their performance after practicing a computational task; however, the difference in MT was present in all attempts among DMD and control subjects. Computational task improvement was positively influenced by the initial performance of individuals with DMD. In turn, the initial performance was influenced by their distal functionality but not their age or overall functionality. PMID:26766911

  17. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy as a paradigm for muscle aging.

    PubMed

    Raz, Yotam; Raz, Vered

    2014-01-01

    Symptoms in late-onset neuromuscular disorders initiate only from midlife onward and progress with age. These disorders are primarily determined by identified hereditable mutations, but their late-onset symptom manifestation is not fully understood. Here, we review recent research developments on the late-onset autosomal dominant oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). OPMD is caused by an expansion mutation in the gene encoding for poly-adenylate RNA binding protein1 (PABPN1). The molecular pathogenesis for the disease is still poorly understood. Despite a ubiquitous expression of PABPN1, symptoms in OPMD are limited to skeletal muscles. We discuss recent studies showing that PABPN1 levels in skeletal muscles are lower compared with other tissues, and specifically in skeletal muscles, PABPN1 expression declines from midlife onward. In OPMD, aggregation of expanded PABPN1 causes an additional decline in the level of the functional protein, which is associated with severe muscle weakness in OPMD. Reduced PABNPN1 expression in muscle cell culture causes myogenic defects, suggesting that PABPN1 loss-of-function causes muscle weakness in OPMD and in the elderly. Molecular signatures of OPMD muscles are similar to those of normal muscle aging, although expression trends progress faster in OPMD. We discuss a working hypothesis that aging-associated factors trigger late-onset symptoms in OPMD, and contribute to accelerated muscle weakness in OPMD. We focus on the pharyngeal and eyelid muscles, which are often affected in OPMD patients. We suggest that muscle weakness in OPMD is a paradigm for muscle aging.

  18. Haplotype-phenotype correlation in Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Osawa, M; Wang, Z P; Ikeya, K; Fukuyama, Y; Kondo-Iida, E; Toda, T; Ohashi, H; Kurosawa, K; Wakai, S; Kaneko, K

    2000-05-29

    In typical Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), peak motor function is usually only unassisted sitting or sliding on the buttocks, though a few patients are able to walk at some point. However, a few patients have a severe phenotype and never acquire head control. In addition, it is clinically difficult to differentiate this severe FCMD from Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) or from muscle-eye-brain disease (MEBD). In order to establish a genotype-phenotype correlation, we performed haplotype analysis using microsatellite markers closest to the FCMD gene (FCMD) in 56 Japanese FCMD families, including 35 families whose children were diagnosed as FCMD with the typical phenotype, 12 families with a mild phenotype, and 9 families with a severe phenotype. Of the 12 propositi with the mild phenotype, 8 could walk and the other 4 could stand with support; 10 cases were homozygous for the ancestral founder (A-F) haplotype whereas the other 2 were heterozygous for the haplotype. In the 9 severe cases, who had never acquired head control or the ability to sit without support, 3 had progressive hydrocephalus, 2 required a shunt operation, and 7 had ophthalmological abnormalities. Haplotype analysis showed that 8 of the 9 cases of the severe phenotype are heterozygous for the A-F haplotype, and the other one homozygous for the haplotype. We confirmed that at least one chromosome in each of the 56 FCMD patients has the A-F haplotype. The rate of heterozygosity for the A-F haplotypes was significantly higher in severe cases than in typical or mild cases (P < 0.005). Severe FCMD patients appeared to be compound heterozygotes for the founder mutation and another mutation. Thus, the present study yielded molecular genetic evidence of a broad clinical spectrum in FCMD.

  19. Sparing of extraocular muscle in aging and muscular dystrophies: A myogenic precursor cell hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kallestad, Kristen M.; Hebert, Sadie L.; McDonald, Abby A.; Daniel, Mark L.; Cu, Sharon R.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2011-04-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOM) are spared from pathology in aging and many forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, this sparing remains an enigma. The EOM have a distinct embryonic lineage compared to somite-derived muscles, and we have shown that they continuously remodel throughout life, maintaining a population of activated satellite cells even in aging. These data suggested the hypothesis that there is a population of myogenic precursor cells (mpcs) in EOM that is different from those in limb, with either elevated numbers of stem cells and/or mpcs with superior proliferative capacity compared to mpcs in limb. Using flow cytometry, EOM and limb muscle mononuclear cells were compared, and a number of differences were seen. Using two different cell isolation methods, EOM have significantly more mpcs per mg muscle than limb skeletal muscle. One specific subpopulation significantly increased in EOM compared to limb was positive for CD34 and negative for Sca-1, M-cadherin, CD31, and CD45. We named these the EOMCD34 cells. Similar percentages of EOMCD34 cells were present in both newborn EOM and limb muscle. They were retained in aged EOM, whereas the population decreased significantly in adult limb muscle and were extremely scarce in aged limb muscle. Most importantly, the percentage of EOMCD34 cells was elevated in the EOM from both the mdx and the mdx/utrophin{sup -/-} (DKO) mouse models of DMD and extremely scarce in the limb muscles of these mice. In vitro, the EOMCD34 cells had myogenic potential, forming myotubes in differentiation media. After determining a media better able to induce proliferation in these cells, a fusion index was calculated. The cells isolated from EOM had a 40% higher fusion index compared to the same cells isolated from limb muscle. The EOMCD34 cells were resistant to both oxidative stress and mechanical injury. These data support our hypothesis that the EOM may be spared in aging and in muscular dystrophies due to a

  20. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Brandon B.; Gao, Quan Q.; Hadhazy, Michele; Vo, Andy H.; Wren, Lisa; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs) regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression. PMID:27148972

  1. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ.

    PubMed

    Lamar, Kay-Marie; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon B; Gao, Quan Q; Miller, Tamari; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Vo, Andy H; Wren, Lisa; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2016-05-01

    Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs) regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression.

  2. [Blood myoglobin in children with progressive muscular dystrophy and in carriers].

    PubMed

    Calandi, C; Baretti, S; Pacciani, G; Bagni, P; Borsotti, M; Tozzi, P; Adami Lami, C

    1984-12-01

    We studied the behaviour of serum myoglobin in 32 children affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy, in 30 mothers (10 definite carriers and 20 possible carriers), in 5 sisters (possible carriers) and in 40 healthy women (control). The serum myoglobin was always increased in the patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy; the greatest values were in the patients who were still ambulant, with a behaviour similar to creatine kinase. In the carriers the myoglobinemia showed a significant increase in definite carriers, while there was no significant difference between the possible carriers and the controls. PMID:6537549

  3. Cytokines and Chemokines as Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Inflammation: Presenting the Case of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    De Bleecker, Jan L.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe inherited muscle disease that affects 1 in 3500 boys worldwide. Infiltration of skeletal muscle by inflammatory cells is an important facet of disease pathophysiology and is strongly associated with disease severity in the individual patient. In the chronic inflammation that characterizes Duchenne muscle, cytokines and chemokines are considered essential activators and recruiters of inflammatory cells. In addition, they provide potential beneficiary effects on muscle fiber damage control and tissue regeneration. In this review, current knowledge of cytokine and chemokine expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its relevant animal disease models is listed, and implications for future therapeutic avenues are discussed. PMID:24302815

  4. Muscular dystrophy in a patient with multiple sclerosis. Another "double-trouble"?

    PubMed

    Parissis, Dimitrios; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Bakirtzis, Christos; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Karacostas, Dimitrios

    2015-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is considered a relatively common muscular dystrophy affecting approximately 1:15,000 individuals in the general population. Single case reports have described the rare co-occurrence of FSHD with other hereditary neuromuscular disorders, leading to atypical phenotypes. We report herein the case of a 26-year-old woman with genetically proven FSHD, who additionally developed otherwise typical multiple sclerosis (MS). Although there is no direct relationship between FSHD and MS, they might, nevertheless, share some common pathophysiological mechanisms, as recent research suggests. In particular, we comment on the potential, but not yet proven, role of immunological factors in the pathogenesis of FSHD. PMID:26195054

  5. Muscular dystrophy in a patient with multiple sclerosis. Another "double-trouble"?

    PubMed

    Parissis, Dimitrios; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Bakirtzis, Christos; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Karacostas, Dimitrios

    2015-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is considered a relatively common muscular dystrophy affecting approximately 1:15,000 individuals in the general population. Single case reports have described the rare co-occurrence of FSHD with other hereditary neuromuscular disorders, leading to atypical phenotypes. We report herein the case of a 26-year-old woman with genetically proven FSHD, who additionally developed otherwise typical multiple sclerosis (MS). Although there is no direct relationship between FSHD and MS, they might, nevertheless, share some common pathophysiological mechanisms, as recent research suggests. In particular, we comment on the potential, but not yet proven, role of immunological factors in the pathogenesis of FSHD.

  6. Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy in the evaluation of decreased spinal mobility and joint contractures.

    PubMed

    Goncu, Kamil; Guzel, Rengin; Guler-Uysal, Fusun

    2003-12-01

    In this report we present three patients who had complaints primarily related to joints and flexibility. Two had no specific diagnosis and one was thought to have ankylosing spondylitis. Extensive evaluation revealed Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) in all. EDMD is a muscular dystrophy where joint contractures and spinal limitation occur before any overt muscle weakness, and the syndrome may be combined with serious cardiac pathology. We wish to call the attention of professionals involved in rheumatology and physical medicine to the existence of this syndrome, which may only present with joint contractures and spinal limitation but which may end with fatal cardiac problems if not diagnosed in time.

  7. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium in chromosome 13-linked Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Othmane, K.B.; Speer, M.C.; Stauffer, J.

    1995-09-01

    Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy (DLMD) is an autosomal recessive Limb Girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2C) characterized by late age of onset, proximal muscle weakness leading to disability, high creatine kinase values, normal intelligence and normal dystrophin in muscle biopsy. We have shown previously that three DLMD families from Tunisia are linked to chromosome 13q12. To further localize the LGMD2C gene, we have investigated seven additional families (119 individuals). Both genotyping and two-point linkage analysis were performed as described elsewhere. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Stem Cell Differentiation Toward the Myogenic Lineage for Muscle Tissue Regeneration: A Focus on Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ostrovidov, Serge; Shi, Xuetao; Sadeghian, Ramin Banan; Salehi, Sahar; Fujie, Toshinori; Bae, Hojae; Ramalingam, Murugan; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue engineering is one of the important ways for regenerating functionally defective muscles. Among the myopathies, the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive disease due to mutations of the dystrophin gene leading to progressive myofiber degeneration with severe symptoms. Although current therapies in muscular dystrophy are still very challenging, important progress has been made in materials science and in cellular technologies with the use of stem cells. It is therefore useful to review these advances and the results obtained in a clinical point of view. This article focuses on the differentiation of stem cells into myoblasts, and their application in muscular dystrophy. After an overview of the different stem cells that can be induced to differentiate into the myogenic lineage, we introduce scaffolding materials used for muscular tissue engineering. We then described some widely used methods to differentiate different types of stem cell into myoblasts. We highlight recent insights obtained in therapies for muscular dystrophy. Finally, we conclude with a discussion on stem cell technology. We discussed in parallel the benefits brought by the evolution of the materials and by the expansion of cell sources which can differentiate into myoblasts. We also discussed on future challenges for clinical applications and how to accelerate the translation from the research to the clinic in the frame of DMD.

  9. Cancer Risk among Patients with Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gadalla, Shahinaz M; Lund, Marie; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Gørtz, Sanne; Mueller, Christine M; Moxley, Richard T; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Björkholm, Magnus; Shebl, Fatma M; Hilbert, James E; Landgren, Ola; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads; Greene, Mark H

    2012-01-01

    Context Myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) is an autosomal dominant multisystem neuromuscular disorder characterized by unstable nucleotide repeat expansions. Case reports have suggested that MMD patients may be at increased risk of malignancy, putative risks which have never been quantified. Objective To quantitatively evaluate cancer risk in patients with MMD, overall, and by sex and age. Design, Setting, and Participants We identified 1,658 patients with an MMD discharge diagnosis in the Swedish Inpatient Hospital or Danish Patient Discharge Registries between 1977 and 2008. We linked these patients to their corresponding cancer registry. Patients were followed from date of first MMD-related inpatient or outpatient contact, to first cancer diagnosis, death, emigration, or completion of cancer registration. Main Outcome Measures Risks of all cancers combined, and by anatomic site, stratified by sex and age. Results 104 patients with an inpatient or outpatient discharge diagnosis of MMD developed cancer during post-discharge follow-up. This corresponds to an observed cancer rate of 73.4/10,000 person-years in MMD versus an expected rate of 36.9/10,000 in the general Swedish and Danish populations combined (SIR =2.0, 95% CI =1.6–2.4). Specifically, we observed significant excess risks of cancers of the endometrium (observed rate=16.1/10,000 person-years: SIR=7.6, 95%CI=4.0–13.2), brain (observed rate=4.9/10,000 person-years: SIR=5.3, 95%CI=2.3–10.4), ovary (observed rate=10.3/10,000 person-years: SIR=5.2, 95% CI=2.3–10.2), and colon (observed rate=7.1/10,000 person-years: SIR=2.9, 95%CI=1.5–5.1). Cancer risks were similar in females and males after excluding genital organ tumors (SIR=1.9, 95% CI=1.4–2.5 vs. 1.8, 95% CI=1.3–2.5, respectively, p-heterogeneity=0.81; observed rates=64.5 and 47.7/10,000 person-years in women and men, respectively), The same pattern of cancer excess was observed first in the Swedish, and then in the Danish cohorts, which

  10. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the Mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the diet...

  11. Zebrafish models flex their muscles to shed light on muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Berger, Joachim; Currie, Peter D

    2012-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that specifically affect skeletal muscle and are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakening. To develop therapies and treatments for these diseases, a better understanding of the molecular basis of muscular dystrophies is required. Thus, identification of causative genes mutated in specific disorders and the study of relevant animal models are imperative. Zebrafish genetic models of human muscle disorders often closely resemble disease pathogenesis, and the optical clarity of zebrafish embryos and larvae enables visualization of dynamic molecular processes in vivo. As an adjunct tool, morpholino studies provide insight into the molecular function of genes and allow rapid assessment of candidate genes for human muscular dystrophies. This unique set of attributes makes the zebrafish model system particularly valuable for the study of muscle diseases. This review discusses how recent research using zebrafish has shed light on the pathological basis of muscular dystrophies, with particular focus on the muscle cell membrane and the linkage between the myofibre cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix.

  12. Na+ Dysregulation Coupled with Ca2+ Entry through NCX1 Promotes Muscular Dystrophy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Adam R.; Millay, Douglas P.; Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A.; Park, Ki Ho; Sargent, Michelle A.; Collins, James; Altamirano, Francisco; Philipson, Kenneth D.; Allen, Paul D.; Ma, Jianjie; López, José Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Unregulated Ca2+ entry is thought to underlie muscular dystrophy. Here, we generated skeletal-muscle-specific transgenic (TG) mice expressing the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) to model its identified augmentation during muscular dystrophy. The NCX1 transgene induced dystrophy-like disease in all hind-limb musculature, as well as exacerbated the muscle disease phenotypes in δ-sarcoglycan (Sgcd−/−), Dysf−/−, and mdx mouse models of muscular dystrophy. Antithetically, muscle-specific deletion of the Slc8a1 (NCX1) gene diminished hind-limb pathology in Sgcd−/− mice. Measured increases in baseline Na+ and Ca2+ in dystrophic muscle fibers of the hind-limb musculature predicts a net Ca2+ influx state due to reverse-mode operation of NCX1, which mediates disease. However, the opposite effect is observed in the diaphragm, where NCX1 overexpression mildly protects from dystrophic disease through a predicted enhancement in forward-mode NCX1 operation that reduces Ca2+ levels. Indeed, Atp1a2+/− (encoding Na+-K+ ATPase α2) mice, which have reduced Na+ clearance rates that would favor NCX1 reverse-mode operation, showed exacerbated disease in the hind limbs of NCX1 TG mice, similar to treatment with the Na+-K+ ATPase inhibitor digoxin. Treatment of Sgcd−/− mice with ranolazine, a broadly acting Na+ channel inhibitor that should increase NCX1 forward-mode operation, reduced muscular pathology. PMID:24662047

  13. Calcium influx is sufficient to induce muscular dystrophy through a TRPC-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Millay, Douglas P.; Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A.; Sargent, Michelle A.; Maillet, Marjorie; Aronow, Bruce J.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2009-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a general term encompassing muscle disorders that cause weakness and wasting, typically leading to premature death. Membrane instability, as a result of a genetic disruption within the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), is thought to induce myofiber degeneration, although the downstream mechanism whereby membrane fragility leads to disease remains controversial. One potential mechanism that has yet to be definitively proven in vivo is that unregulated calcium influx initiates disease in dystrophic myofibers. Here we demonstrate that calcium itself is sufficient to cause a dystrophic phenotype in skeletal muscle independent of membrane fragility. For example, overexpression of transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3) and the associated increase in calcium influx resulted in a phenotype of muscular dystrophy nearly identical to that observed in DGC-lacking dystrophic disease models, including a highly similar molecular signature of gene expression changes. Furthermore, transgene-mediated inhibition of TRPC channels in mice dramatically reduced calcium influx and dystrophic disease manifestations associated with the mdx mutation (dystrophin gene) and deletion of the δ-sarcoglycan (Scgd) gene. These results demonstrate that calcium itself is sufficient to induce muscular dystrophy in vivo, and that TRPC channels are key disease initiators downstream of the unstable membrane that characterizes many types of muscular dystrophy. PMID:19864620

  14. Na+ dysregulation coupled with Ca2+ entry through NCX1 promotes muscular dystrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Burr, Adam R; Millay, Douglas P; Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A; Park, Ki Ho; Sargent, Michelle A; Collins, James; Altamirano, Francisco; Philipson, Kenneth D; Allen, Paul D; Ma, Jianjie; López, José Rafael; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2014-06-01

    Unregulated Ca(2+) entry is thought to underlie muscular dystrophy. Here, we generated skeletal-muscle-specific transgenic (TG) mice expressing the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger 1 (NCX1) to model its identified augmentation during muscular dystrophy. The NCX1 transgene induced dystrophy-like disease in all hind-limb musculature, as well as exacerbated the muscle disease phenotypes in δ-sarcoglycan (Sgcd(-/-)), Dysf(-/-), and mdx mouse models of muscular dystrophy. Antithetically, muscle-specific deletion of the Slc8a1 (NCX1) gene diminished hind-limb pathology in Sgcd(-/-) mice. Measured increases in baseline Na(+) and Ca(2+) in dystrophic muscle fibers of the hind-limb musculature predicts a net Ca(2+) influx state due to reverse-mode operation of NCX1, which mediates disease. However, the opposite effect is observed in the diaphragm, where NCX1 overexpression mildly protects from dystrophic disease through a predicted enhancement in forward-mode NCX1 operation that reduces Ca(2+) levels. Indeed, Atp1a2(+/-) (encoding Na(+)-K(+) ATPase α2) mice, which have reduced Na(+) clearance rates that would favor NCX1 reverse-mode operation, showed exacerbated disease in the hind limbs of NCX1 TG mice, similar to treatment with the Na(+)-K(+) ATPase inhibitor digoxin. Treatment of Sgcd(-/-) mice with ranolazine, a broadly acting Na(+) channel inhibitor that should increase NCX1 forward-mode operation, reduced muscular pathology. PMID:24662047

  15. SIRT1: A Novel Target for the Treatment of Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Atsushi; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are inherited myogenic disorders accompanied by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and degeneration. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy and is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. The treatment for DMD is limited to glucocorticoids, which are associated with multiple side effects. Thus, the identification of novel therapeutic targets is urgently needed. SIRT1 is an NAD+-dependent histone/protein deacetylase that plays roles in diverse cellular processes, including stress resistance and cell survival. Studies have shown that SIRT1 activation provides beneficial effects in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, a model of DMD. SIRT1 activation leads to the attenuation of oxidative stress and inflammation, a shift from the fast to slow myofiber phenotype, and the suppression of tissue fibrosis. Although further research is needed to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective role of SIRT1 in mdx mice, we propose SIRT1 as a novel therapeutic target for patients with muscular dystrophies. PMID:27073590

  16. Dystrophin insufficiency causes a Becker muscular dystrophy-like phenotype in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a dystrophin deficiency while Becker MD is caused by a dystrophin insufficiency or expression of a partially functional dystrophin protein. Deficiencies in existing mouse and dog models necessitate the development of a novel large animal model. Our pu...

  17. Cathepsin S Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Muscular Dystrophy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tjondrokoesoemo, Andoria; Schips, Tobias G; Sargent, Michelle A; Vanhoutte, Davy; Kanisicak, Onur; Prasad, Vikram; Lin, Suh-Chin J; Maillet, Marjorie; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2016-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. Loss of dystrophin protein compromises the stability of the sarcolemma membrane surrounding each muscle cell fiber, leading to membrane ruptures and leakiness that induces myofiber necrosis, a subsequent inflammatory response, and progressive tissue fibrosis with loss of functional capacity. Cathepsin S (Ctss) is a cysteine protease that is actively secreted in areas of tissue injury and ongoing inflammation, where it participates in extracellular matrix remodeling and healing. Here we show significant induction of Ctss expression and proteolytic activity following acute muscle injury or in muscle from mdx mice, a model of DMD. To examine the functional ramifications associated with greater Ctss expression, the Ctss gene was deleted in the mdx genetic background, resulting in protection from muscular dystrophy pathogenesis that included reduced myofiber turnover and histopathology, reduced fibrosis, and improved running capacity. Mechanistically, deletion of the Ctss gene in the mdx background significantly increased myofiber sarcolemmal membrane stability with greater expression and membrane localization of utrophin, integrins, and β-dystroglycan, which anchor the membrane to the basal lamina and underlying cytoskeletal proteins. Consistent with these results, skeletal muscle-specific transgenic mice overexpressing Ctss showed increased myofiber necrosis, muscle histopathology, and a functional deficit reminiscent of muscular dystrophy. Hence, Ctss induction during muscular dystrophy is a pathologic event that partially underlies disease pathogenesis, and its inhibition might serve as a new therapeutic strategy in DMD.

  18. Improving the Reading Skills of Young People with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in Preparation for Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskin, Janet; Fawcett, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive genetic condition that affects both muscle and brain. Children with DMD are at risk of psycho-social difficulties such as poor academic achievement and behavioural and socio-emotional problems. This article by Janet Hoskin and Angela Fawcett, both from the University of Swansea, describes how 34…

  19. Mild and severe muscular dystrophy caused by a single {gamma}-sarcoglycan mutation

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, E.M.; Boennemann, C.G.; Lidov, H.G.W.

    1996-11-01

    Autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy is genetically heterogeneous. One form of this disorder, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD 2C), is prevalent in northern Africa and has been shown to be associated with a single mutation in the gene encoding the dystrophin-associated protein {gamma}-sarcoglycan. The previous mutation analysis of {gamma}-sarcoglycan required the availability of muscle biopsies. To establish a mutation assay for genomic DNA, the intron-exon structure of the {gamma}-sarcoglycan gene was determined, and primers were designed to amplify each of the exons encoding {gamma}-sarcoglycan. We studied a group of Brazilian muscular dystrophy patients for mutations in the {gamma}-sarcoglycan gene. These patients were selected on the basis of autosomal inheritance and/or the presence of normal dystrophin and/or deficiency of {alpha}-sarcoglycan immunostaining. Four of 19 patients surveyed had a single, homozygous mutation in the {gamma}-sarcoglycan gene. The mutation identified in these patients, all of African-Brazilian descent, is identical to that seen in the North African population, suggesting that even patients of remote African descent may carry this mutation. The phenotype in these patients varied considerably. Of four families with an identical mutation, three have a severe Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy. However, one family has much milder symptoms, suggesting that other loci may be present that modify the severity of the clinical course resulting from {gamma}-sarcoglycan gene mutations. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Early-onset facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 with some atypical features.

    PubMed

    Dorobek, Małgorzata; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Lemmers, Richard J L F; Ryniewicz, Barbara; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Frants, Rune R; Gawel, Malgorzata; Walecki, Jerzy; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena

    2015-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy cases with facial weakness before the age of 5 and signs of shoulder weakness by the age of 10 are defined as early onset. Contraction of the D4Z4 repeat on chromosome 4q35 is causally related to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1, and the residual size of the D4Z4 repeat shows a roughly inverse correlation with the severity of the disease. Contraction of the D4Z4 repeat on chromosome 4q35 is believed to induce a local change in chromatin structure and consequent transcriptional deregulation of 4qter genes. We present early-onset cases in the Polish population that amounted to 21% of our total population with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. More than 27% of them presented with severe phenotypes (wheelchair dependency). The residual D4Z4 repeat sizes ranged from 1 to 4 units. In addition, even within early-onset facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 phenotypes, some cases had uncommon features (head drop, early disabling contractures, progressive ptosis, and respiratory insufficiency and cardiomyopathy).

  1. Parents' Perspectives on Coping with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Concomitant Specific Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Carol L.

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses parental perspectives and coping strategies related to Duchenne muscular dystrophy and specific learning disabilities. Data were collected through individual semi-structured in-depth interviews with fifteen sets of parents. Participants were selected based on variables such as age of children, number of children with both…

  2. Evaluation of Narrative Abilities in Patients Suffering from Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, A.; Lorusso, M. L.; D'Angelo, M. G.; Civati, F.; Turconi, A. C.; Fabbro, F.; Bresolin, N.

    2007-01-01

    The present work investigated cognitive, linguistic and narrative abilities in a group of children suffering from Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, an allelic X-linked recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. The patients showed mildly reduced IQ with lower Verbal than Performance Intelligence Quotient and were mildly…

  3. Muscular dystrophy in a family of Labrador Retrievers with no muscle dystrophin and a mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Natassia M; Guo, Ling T; Estrela, Elicia; Kunkel, Louis M; Zatz, Mayana; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-05-01

    Animal models of dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy, most notably canine X-linked muscular dystrophy, play an important role in developing new therapies for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Although the canine disease is a model of the human disease, the variable severity of clinical presentations in the canine may be problematic for pre-clinical trials, but also informative. Here we describe a family of Labrador Retrievers with three generations of male dogs having markedly increased serum creatine kinase activity, absence of membrane dystrophin, but with undetectable clinical signs of muscle weakness. Clinically normal young male Labrador Retriever puppies were evaluated prior to surgical neuter by screening laboratory blood work, including serum creatine kinase activity. Serum creatine kinase activities were markedly increased in the absence of clinical signs of muscle weakness. Evaluation of muscle biopsies confirmed a dystrophic phenotype with both degeneration and regeneration. Further evaluations by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed the absence of muscle dystrophin. Although dystrophin was not identified in the muscles, we did not find any detectable deletions or duplications in the dystrophin gene. Sequencing is now ongoing to search for point mutations. Our findings in this family of Labrador Retriever dogs lend support to the hypothesis that, in exceptional situations, muscle with no dystrophin may be functional. Unlocking the secrets that protect these dogs from a severe clinical myopathy is a great challenge which may have important implications for future treatment of human muscular dystrophies.

  4. Congenital muscular dystrophy with glycosylation defects of alpha-dystroglycan in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Kim, Dae-Son; Ogawa, Megumu; Murakami, Terumi; Noguchi, Satoru; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nakazawa, Tomoyuki; Matsuo, Takiko; Futagami, Satoshi; Campbell, Kevin P; Nishino, Ichizo

    2005-05-01

    Glycosylation defects of alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) cause various muscular dystrophies. We performed clinical, pathological and genetic analyses of 62 Japanese patients with congenital muscular dystrophy, whose skeletal muscle showed deficiency of glycosylated form of alpha-DG. We found, the first Japanese patient with congenital muscular dystrophy 1C with a novel compound heterozygous mutation in the fukutin-related protein gene. Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy was genetically confirmed in 54 of 62 patients. Two patients with muscle-eye-brain disease and one Walker-Warburg syndrome were also genetically confirmed. Four patients had no mutation in any known genes associated with glycosylation of alpha-DG. Interestingly, the molecular mass of alpha-DG in the skeletal muscle was similar and was reduced to approximately 90 kDa among these patients, even though the causative gene and the clinico-pathological severity were different. This result suggests that other factors can modify clinical features of the patients with glycosylation defects of alpha-DG. PMID:15833426

  5. Mild and severe muscular dystrophy caused by a single gamma-sarcoglycan mutation.

    PubMed

    McNally, E M; Passos-Bueno, M R; Bönnemann, C G; Vainzof, M; de Sá Moreira, E; Lidov, H G; Othmane, K B; Denton, P H; Vance, J M; Zatz, M; Kunkel, L M

    1996-11-01

    Autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy is genetically heterogeneous. One form of this disorder, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD 2C), is prevalent in northern Africa and has been shown to be associated with a single mutation in the gene encoding the dystrophin-associated protein gamma-sarcoglycan. The previous mutation analysis of gamma-sarcoglycan required the availability of muscle biopsies. To establish a mutation assay for genomic DNA, the intron-exon structure of the gamma-sarcoglycan gene was determined, and primers were designed to amplify each of the exons encoding gamma-sarcoglycan. We studied a group of Brazilian muscular dystrophy patients for mutations in the gamma-sarcoglycan gene. These patients were selected on the basis of autosomal inheritance and/or the presence of normal dystrophin and/or deficiency of alpha-sarcoglycan immunostaining. Four of 19 patients surveyed had a single, homozygous mutation in the gamma-sarcoglycan gene. The mutation identified in these patients, all of African-Brazilian descent, is identical to that seen in the North African population, suggesting that even patients of remote African descent may carry this mutation. The phenotype in these patients varied considerably. Of four families with an identical mutation, three have a severe Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy. However, one family has much milder symptoms, suggesting that other loci may be present that modify the severity of the clinical course resulting from gamma-sarcoglycan gene mutations. PMID:8900232

  6. DNA Damage, Somatic Aneuploidy, and Malignant Sarcoma Susceptibility in Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Wolfgang M.; Uddin, Mohammed H.; Dysek, Sandra; Moser-Thier, Karin; Pirker, Christine; Höger, Harald; Ambros, Inge M.; Ambros, Peter F.; Berger, Walter; Bittner, Reginald E.

    2011-01-01

    Albeit genetically highly heterogeneous, muscular dystrophies (MDs) share a convergent pathology leading to muscle wasting accompanied by proliferation of fibrous and fatty tissue, suggesting a common MD–pathomechanism. Here we show that mutations in muscular dystrophy genes (Dmd, Dysf, Capn3, Large) lead to the spontaneous formation of skeletal muscle-derived malignant tumors in mice, presenting as mixed rhabdomyo-, fibro-, and liposarcomas. Primary MD–gene defects and strain background strongly influence sarcoma incidence, latency, localization, and gender prevalence. Combined loss of dystrophin and dysferlin, as well as dystrophin and calpain-3, leads to accelerated tumor formation. Irrespective of the primary gene defects, all MD sarcomas share non-random genomic alterations including frequent losses of tumor suppressors (Cdkn2a, Nf1), amplification of oncogenes (Met, Jun), recurrent duplications of whole chromosomes 8 and 15, and DNA damage. Remarkably, these sarcoma-specific genetic lesions are already regularly present in skeletal muscles in aged MD mice even prior to sarcoma development. Accordingly, we show also that skeletal muscle from human muscular dystrophy patients is affected by gross genomic instability, represented by DNA double-strand breaks and age-related accumulation of aneusomies. These novel aspects of molecular pathologies common to muscular dystrophies and tumor biology will potentially influence the strategies to combat these diseases. PMID:21533183

  7. Update on neuromuscular disorders in pediatric orthopaedics: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, myelomeningocele, and cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Henry G

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this seminar was to review a large range of lower extremity and neuromuscular disorders. Because of the diversity of the topics covered, including clubfoot and vertical talus treatment, management of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, and limb lengthening in dwarfism, this review will focus on the neuromuscular subsection reviewing the current management of the muscular dystrophies, myelomeningocele, and cerebral palsy.

  8. Pregnancy and delivery in Leyden-Möbius muscular dystrophy. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vavrinkova, Blanka; Binder, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Leyden-Möbius muscular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease of unknown aetiology; it is a congenital disorder of protein metabolism primarily affecting proximal muscle groups leading to progressive muscular dystrophy. It later spreads to the muscles of the pelvic floor and lower extremities. The estimated incidence is 1:200,000. This paper describe a case of pregnancy and delivery in woman with progressive Leyden-Moebius muscular dystrophy. Cesarean section was performed due to progression of the underlying disease. First postoperative day DIC occure and surgical revision of abdominal cavity was performed. Although the uterine suture was strong, diffuse bleeding was present. Blood was not coagulating. Supravaginal amputation of the uterus was performed including left-sided adnexectomy due to bleeding from the left ovarium. Due to the severity of the condition and assumed necessity of long-term controlled ventilation, the patient was transferred to the intensive medicine department. She was dismissed home after 91 days of hospitalisation. Gravidity in advanced muscular dystrophy is rare and associated with a high risk. Due to muscle weakness, diaphragm weakness, atrophy of individual muscle groups, spine deformities and often dislocation of thoracic organs, these patients cannot avoid the caesarean section to end their pregnancy, followed by prolonged intubation and controlled ventilation. During pregnancy, the growing uterus elevates the diaphragm and impairs breathing. Therefore, pregnancies in such patients will probably always have to be ended prematurely. PMID:26313391

  9. Cerebro-oculo-muscular syndrome: a variant of Fukuyama congenital cerebromuscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Dambska, M; Wisniewski, K; Sher, J; Solish, G

    1982-01-01

    Familial occurrence of cerebral malformations with muscular dystrophy was described by Fukuyama as congenital cerebromuscular dystrophy. We have observed a new syndrome belonging to the same group in three siblings. These syndromes differ in the degree of CNS involvement and abnormalities in the eye. The main clinical characteristics of our cohort were dysmorphic face, hypotonia, areflexia, failure to thrive, corneal opacity, cataract, dysgenesis of the anterior chamber of the eye, and death within the 1st year of life. Hydrocephalus and agyria were verified by computed tomography. Neuropathologic examination demonstrated malformations of the CNS. The agyric hemispheres with polymicrogyria in several cortical segments and severe cortical disorganization in other segments represented the principal anomaly. Congenital muscular dystrophy was also found. The CNS anomalies demonstrated a long-lasting pathologic process extending to involve the eye and muscle, which is most likely an inborn error of metabolism with autosomal recessive inheritance.

  10. Model organisms in the fight against muscular dystrophy: lessons from drosophila and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Plantié, Emilie; Migocka-Patrzałek, Marta; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that cause muscle weakness, abnormal contractions and muscle wasting, often leading to premature death. More than 30 types of MD have been described so far; those most thoroughly studied are Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and congenital MDs. Structurally, physiologically and biochemically, MDs affect different types of muscles and cause individual symptoms such that genetic and molecular pathways underlying their pathogenesis thus remain poorly understood. To improve our knowledge of how MD-caused muscle defects arise and to find efficacious therapeutic treatments, different animal models have been generated and applied. Among these, simple non-mammalian Drosophila and zebrafish models have proved most useful. This review discusses how zebrafish and Drosophila MD have helped to identify genetic determinants of MDs and design innovative therapeutic strategies with a special focus on DMD, DM1 and congenital MDs. PMID:25859781

  11. Model organisms in the fight against muscular dystrophy: lessons from drosophila and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Plantié, Emilie; Migocka-Patrzałek, Marta; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-04-09

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that cause muscle weakness, abnormal contractions and muscle wasting, often leading to premature death. More than 30 types of MD have been described so far; those most thoroughly studied are Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and congenital MDs. Structurally, physiologically and biochemically, MDs affect different types of muscles and cause individual symptoms such that genetic and molecular pathways underlying their pathogenesis thus remain poorly understood. To improve our knowledge of how MD-caused muscle defects arise and to find efficacious therapeutic treatments, different animal models have been generated and applied. Among these, simple non-mammalian Drosophila and zebrafish models have proved most useful. This review discusses how zebrafish and Drosophila MD have helped to identify genetic determinants of MDs and design innovative therapeutic strategies with a special focus on DMD, DM1 and congenital MDs.

  12. Muscle-Derived Proteins as Serum Biomarkers for Monitoring Disease Progression in Three Forms of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Richard; Bennett, Donald; Guglieri, Michela; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Lochmüller, Hanns; Morris, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying translatable, non-invasive biomarkers of muscular dystrophy that better reflect the disease pathology than those currently available would aid the development of new therapies, the monitoring of disease progression and the response to therapy. Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate a panel of serum protein biomarkers with the potential to specifically detect skeletal muscle injury. Method Serum concentrations of skeletal troponin I (sTnI), myosin light chain 3 (Myl3), fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) and muscle-type creatine kinase (CKM) proteins were measured in 74 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), 38 Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and 49 Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) patients and 32 healthy controls. Results All four proteins were significantly elevated in the serum of these three muscular dystrophy patient populations when compared to healthy controls, but, interestingly, displayed different profiles depending on the type of muscular dystrophy. Additionally, the effects of patient age, ambulatory status, cardiac function and treatment status on the serum concentrations of the proteins were investigated. Statistical analysis revealed correlations between the serum concentrations and certain clinical endpoints including forced vital capacity in DMD patients and the time to walk ten meters in LGMD2B patients. Serum concentrations of these proteins were also elevated in two preclinical models of muscular dystrophy, the mdx mouse and the golden-retriever muscular dystrophy dog. Conclusions These proteins, therefore, are potential muscular dystrophy biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic response in both preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26870665

  13. Intrinsic laryngeal muscles are spared from myonecrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Marques, Maria Julia; Ferretti, Renato; Vomero, Viviane Urbini; Minatel, Elaine; Neto, Humberto Santo

    2007-03-01

    Intrinsic laryngeal muscles share many anatomical and physiological properties with extraocular muscles, which are unaffected in both Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mdx mice. We hypothesized that intrinsic laryngeal muscles are spared from myonecrosis in mdx mice and may serve as an additional tool to understand the mechanisms of muscle sparing in dystrophinopathy. Intrinsic laryngeal muscles and tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of adult and aged mdx and control C57Bl/10 mice were investigated. The percentage of central nucleated fibers, as a sign of muscle fibers that had undergone injury and regeneration, and myofiber labeling with Evans blue dye, as a marker of myofiber damage, were studied. Except for the cricothyroid muscle, none of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles from adult and old mdx mice showed signs of myofiber damage or Evans blue dye labeling, and all appeared to be normal. Central nucleation was readily visible in the TA of the same mdx mice. A significant increase in the percentage of central nucleated fibers was observed in adult cricothyroid muscle compared to the other intrinsic laryngeal muscles, which worsened with age. Thus, we have shown that the intrinsic laryngeal muscles are spared from the lack of dystrophin and may serve as a useful model to study the mechanisms of muscle sparing in dystrophinopathy.

  14. A Nonsense Variant in COL6A1 in Landseer Dogs with Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Frank; Bilzer, Thomas; Brands, Jan; Golini, Lorenzo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wiedmer, Michaela; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    A novel canine muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs was observed. We had access to five affected dogs from two litters. The clinical signs started at a few weeks of age, and the severe progressive muscle weakness led to euthanasia between 5 and 15 months of age. The pedigrees of the affected dogs suggested a monogenic autosomal-recessive inheritance of the trait. Linkage and homozygosity mapping indicated two potential genome segments for the causative variant on chromosomes 10 and 31 harboring a total of 4.8 Mb of DNA or 0.2% of the canine genome. Using the Illumina sequencing technology, we obtained a whole-genome sequence from one affected Landseer. Variants were called with respect to the dog reference genome and compared with the genetic variants of 170 control dogs from other breeds. The affected Landseer dog was homozygous for a single, private nonsynonymous variant in the critical intervals, a nonsense variant in the COL6A1 gene (Chr31:39,303,964G>T; COL6A1:c.289G>T; p.E97*). Genotypes at this variant showed perfect concordance with the muscular dystrophy phenotype in all five cases and more than 1000 control dogs. Variants in the human COL6A1 gene cause Bethlem myopathy or Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. We therefore conclude that the identified canine COL6A1 variant is most likely causative for the observed muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs. On the basis of the nature of the genetic variant in Landseer dogs and their severe clinical phenotype these dogs represent a model for human Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. PMID:26438297

  15. A Nonsense Variant in COL6A1 in Landseer Dogs with Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Frank; Bilzer, Thomas; Brands, Jan; Golini, Lorenzo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wiedmer, Michaela; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-12-01

    A novel canine muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs was observed. We had access to five affected dogs from two litters. The clinical signs started at a few weeks of age, and the severe progressive muscle weakness led to euthanasia between 5 and 15 months of age. The pedigrees of the affected dogs suggested a monogenic autosomal-recessive inheritance of the trait. Linkage and homozygosity mapping indicated two potential genome segments for the causative variant on chromosomes 10 and 31 harboring a total of 4.8 Mb of DNA or 0.2% of the canine genome. Using the Illumina sequencing technology, we obtained a whole-genome sequence from one affected Landseer. Variants were called with respect to the dog reference genome and compared with the genetic variants of 170 control dogs from other breeds. The affected Landseer dog was homozygous for a single, private nonsynonymous variant in the critical intervals, a nonsense variant in the COL6A1 gene (Chr31:39,303,964G>T; COL6A1:c.289G>T; p.E97*). Genotypes at this variant showed perfect concordance with the muscular dystrophy phenotype in all five cases and more than 1000 control dogs. Variants in the human COL6A1 gene cause Bethlem myopathy or Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. We therefore conclude that the identified canine COL6A1 variant is most likely causative for the observed muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs. On the basis of the nature of the genetic variant in Landseer dogs and their severe clinical phenotype these dogs represent a model for human Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. PMID:26438297

  16. A Nonsense Variant in COL6A1 in Landseer Dogs with Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Frank; Bilzer, Thomas; Brands, Jan; Golini, Lorenzo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wiedmer, Michaela; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-10-04

    A novel canine muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs was observed. We had access to five affected dogs from two litters. The clinical signs started at a few weeks of age, and the severe progressive muscle weakness led to euthanasia between 5 and 15 months of age. The pedigrees of the affected dogs suggested a monogenic autosomal-recessive inheritance of the trait. Linkage and homozygosity mapping indicated two potential genome segments for the causative variant on chromosomes 10 and 31 harboring a total of 4.8 Mb of DNA or 0.2% of the canine genome. Using the Illumina sequencing technology, we obtained a whole-genome sequence from one affected Landseer. Variants were called with respect to the dog reference genome and compared with the genetic variants of 170 control dogs from other breeds. The affected Landseer dog was homozygous for a single, private nonsynonymous variant in the critical intervals, a nonsense variant in the COL6A1 gene (Chr31:39,303,964G>T; COL6A1:c.289G>T; p.E97*). Genotypes at this variant showed perfect concordance with the muscular dystrophy phenotype in all five cases and more than 1000 control dogs. Variants in the human COL6A1 gene cause Bethlem myopathy or Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. We therefore conclude that the identified canine COL6A1 variant is most likely causative for the observed muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs. On the basis of the nature of the genetic variant in Landseer dogs and their severe clinical phenotype these dogs represent a model for human Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy.

  17. A comprehensive genetic diagnosis of Chinese muscular dystrophy and congenital myopathy patients by targeted next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yi; Wei, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yanhuan; Ren, Haitao; Lan, Zhangzhang; Yang, Yun; Chen, Lin; Cui, Liying

    2015-08-01

    Muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies are a large group of heterogeneous inherited muscle disorders. The spectrum of muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies extends to more than 50 diseases today, even excluding the common forms Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy. Unfortunately, even by critical clinical evaluation and muscle pathology, diagnosis is still difficult. To potentially remediate this difficulty, we applied a microarray-based targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to diagnose these patients. There were 55 consecutive unrelated patients who underwent the test, 36 of which (65%) were found to have a causative mutation. Our result shows the accuracy and efficiency of next-generation sequencing in clinical circumstances and reflects the features and relative distribution of inherited myopathies in the Chinese population.

  18. Immunological identification of a high molecular weight protein as a condidate for the product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, L.; Krstenansky, J.; Mendell, J.; Rammohan, K.W.; Gruenstein, E. )

    1988-06-01

    An oligopeptide was synthesized based on translation of the nucleotide sequence of the putative exon region of clone pERT87-25 from the gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Immunization of rabbits with this oligopeptide induced the formation of antibodies directed against a protein present in human, rat, and rabbit skeletal muscle. This protein, which is missing in the skeletal muscle of two patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, has a molecular mass of {approx}320-420 kDa and is clearly different from the putative Duchenne muscular dystrophy-related protein nebulin. The data suggest that this 320-420-kDa protein is produced by the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene.

  19. Natural History of Cardiac and Respiratory Involvement, Prognosis and Predictive Factors for Long-Term Survival in Adult Patients with Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophies Type 2C and 2D

    PubMed Central

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Ogna, Adam; Chaffaut, Cendrine; Chevret, Sylvie; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Leturcq, France; Wahbi, Karim; Prigent, Helene; Lofaso, Frederic; Nardi, Olivier; Clair, Bernard; Behin, Anthony; Stojkovic, Tanya; Laforet, Pascal; Orlikowski, David; Annane, Djillali

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2C and 2D limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a group of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies manifested by proximal myopathy, impaired respiratory muscle function and cardiomyopathy. The correlation and the prognostic impact of respiratory and heart impairment are poorly described. We aimed to describe the long-term cardiac and respiratory follow-up of these patients and to determine predictive factors of cardio-respiratory events and mortality in LGMD 2C and 2D. Methods We reviewed the charts of 34 LGMD patients, followed from 2005 to 2015, to obtain echocardiographic, respiratory function and sleep recording data. We considered respiratory events (acute respiratory failure, pulmonary sepsis, atelectasis or pneumothorax), cardiac events (acute heart failure, significant cardiac arrhythmia or conduction block, ischemic stroke) and mortality as outcomes of interest for the present analysis. Results A total of 21 patients had type 2C LGMD and 13 patients had type 2D. Median age was 30 years [IQR 24–38]. At baseline, median pulmonary vital capacity (VC) was 31% of predicted value [20–40]. Median maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) was 31 cmH2O [IQR 20.25–39.75]. Median maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) was 30 cm H2O [20–36]. Median left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 55% [45–64] with 38% of patients with LVEF <50%. Over a median follow-up of 6 years, we observed 38% respiratory events, 14% cardiac events and 20% mortality. Among baseline characteristics, LVEF and left ventricular end diastolic diameter (LVEDD) were associated with mortality, whilst respiratory parameters (VC, MIP, MEP) and the need for home mechanical ventilation (HMV) were associated with respiratory events. Conclusion In our cohort of severely respiratory impaired type 2C and 2D LGMD, respiratory morbidity was high. Cardiac dysfunction was frequent in particular in LGMD 2C and had an impact on long-term mortality. Trial Registration

  20. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: recent advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenic mechanisms and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Abu-Baker, Aida; Rouleau, Guy A

    2007-02-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disorder characterized by progressive eyelid drooping, swallowing difficulties and proximal limb weakness. OPMD is caused by a small expansion of a short polyalanine tract in the poly (A) binding protein nuclear 1 protein (PABPN1). The mechanism by which the polyalanine expansion mutation in PABPN1 causes disease is unclear. PABPN1 is a nuclear multi-functional protein which is involved in pre-mRNA polyadenylation, transcription regulation, and mRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport. The distinct pathological hallmark of OPMD is the presence of filamentous intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in patient's skeletal muscle cells. The exact relationship between mutant PABPN1 intranuclear aggregates and pathology is not clear. OPMD is a unique disease sharing common pathogenic features with other polyalanine disorders, as well as with polyglutamine and dystrophic disorders. This chapter aims to review the rapidly growing body of knowledge concerning OPMD. First, we outline the background of OPMD. Second, we compare OPMD with other trinucleotide repeat disorders. Third, we discuss the recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying OPMD pathogenesis. Finally, we review recent therapeutic strategies for OPMD.

  1. Muscle pain as a prominent feature of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD): four illustrative case reports.

    PubMed

    Bushby, K M; Pollitt, C; Johnson, M A; Rogers, M T; Chinnery, P F

    1998-12-01

    Clinical studies of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) rarely report muscle pain as a significant feature of the condition. We report four adult patients with FSHD in whom muscle pain was a presenting complaint and remains their most disabling symptom. These four patients were investigated using a pain questionnaire and diary. Inflammatory and metabolic causes of muscle pain were sought by muscle biopsy and a range of biochemical investigations. All patients reported between three and seven different pains of varying site and nature. None of the group had more than one painfree day per month and all complained of disturbed sleep. While some pains could potentially be attributed to postural problems, others were clearly myalgic in nature, though most often not specifically exercise-related. These myalgic pains could be particularly difficult to control. Results of metabolic investigations and muscle biopsy revealed no clue to the pathogenesis of these pains and there was no evidence for any exceptional inflammatory response. We believe that pain in FSHD is an under-reported but significant symptom and that further work is necessary to determine its prevalence, understand its cause and provide effective treatment. PMID:10093064

  2. Behavioral Responses in Animal Model of Congenital Muscular Dystrophy 1D.

    PubMed

    Comim, Clarissa M; Schactae, Aryadnne L; Soares, Jaime A; Ventura, Letícia; Freiberger, Viviane; Mina, Francielle; Dominguini, Diogo; Vainzof, Mariz; Quevedo, João

    2016-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies 1D (CMD1D) present a mutation on the LARGE gene and are characterized by an abnormal glycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG), strongly implicated as having a causative role in the development of central nervous system abnormalities such as cognitive impairment seen in patients. However, in the animal model of CMD1D, the brain involvement remains unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the cognitive involvement in the Large(myd) mice. To this aim, we used adult homozygous, heterozygous, and wild-type mice. The mice underwent six behavioral tasks: habituation to an open field, step-down inhibitory avoidance, continuous multiple trials step-down inhibitory avoidance task, object recognition, elevated plus-maze, and forced swimming test. It was observed that Large(myd) individuals presented deficits on the habituation to the open field, step down inhibitory avoidance, continuous multiple-trials step-down inhibitory avoidance, object recognition, and forced swimming. This study shows the first evidence that abnormal glycosylation of α-DG may be affecting memory storage and restoring process in an animal model of CMD1D.

  3. Contractile properties are disrupted in Becker muscular dystrophy, but not in limb girdle type 2I.

    PubMed

    Løkken, Nicoline; Hedermann, Gitte; Thomsen, Carsten; Vissing, John

    2016-09-01

    We investigated whether a linear relationship between muscle strength and cross-sectional area (CSA) is preserved in calf muscles of patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, n = 14) and limb-girdle type 2I muscular dystrophy (LGMD2I, n = 11), before and after correcting for muscle fat infiltration. The Dixon magnetic resonance imaging technique was used to quantify fat and calculate a fat-free contractile CSA. Strength was assessed by dynamometry. Muscle strength/CSA relationships were significantly lower in patients versus controls. The strength/contractile-CSA relationship was still severely lowered in BMD, but was almost normalized in LGMD2I. Our findings suggest close to intact contractile properties in LGMD2I, which are severely disrupted in BMD. Ann Neurol 2016;80:466-471. PMID:27463532

  4. ACTIVIN IIB RECEPTOR BLOCKADE ATTENUATES DYSTROPHIC PATHOLOGY IN A MOUSE MODEL OF DUCHENNE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    PubMed Central

    Morine, Kevin J.; Bish, Lawrence T.; Selsby, Joshua T.; Gazzara, Jeffery A.; Pendrak, Klara; Sleeper, Meg M.; Barton, Elisabeth R.; Lee, Se-Jin; Sweeney, H. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling to promote muscle growth holds tremendous promise for the muscular dystrophies and other disorders involving the loss of functional muscle mass. Previous studies have focused on the TGF-β family member myostatin and demonstrated that inhibition of myostatin leads to muscle growth in normal and dystrophic mice. We describe a unique method of systemic inhibition of activin IIB receptor signaling via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene transfer of a soluble form of the extracellular domain of the activin IIB receptor to the liver. Treatment of mdx mice with activin IIB receptor blockade led to increased skeletal muscle mass, increased force production in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and reduced serum creatine kinase. No effect on heart mass or function was observed. Our results indicate that activin IIB receptor blockade represents a novel and effective therapeutic strategy for the muscular dystrophies. PMID:20730876

  5. Peter Becker and his Nazi past: the man behind Becker muscular dystrophy and Becker myotonia.

    PubMed

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Kondziella, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Peter Becker was a German neurologist who helped classify the muscular dystrophies, and described Becker muscular dystrophy and Becker myotonia. His involvement in National Socialism began in 1933, when he was compelled by his peers to join the SA (brown shirts). He later joined the Nazi party, the Nazi Doctors Association, and the Nazi Lecturers' Association. He renewed his SA membership to maintain his position at a genetics institute. Colleagues stated postwar that he was not an active Nazi, and he was de-Nazified in 1947, able to continue his career. Later, Becker admitted to most, but not all, of his Nazi memberships in his autobiography, and wrote 2 books exploring the origins of Nazism and racial hygiene. The "neurologic court of opinion" must weigh in on how we should best remember Becker, and at the very least, we as neurologists must learn the dangers of career opportunism at any cost.

  6. Wheelchair-mounted robot manipulators. Long term use by patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bach, J R; Zeelenberg, A P; Winter, C

    1990-04-01

    This report relays practical clinical information about the modification and use of commercially available training robot manipulators. Such manipulators were used to increase independence in the activities of daily living of patients with advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The control panels of five industrial robot manipulator training devices were modified for use by advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Six patients with only residual finger movement, three of whom were dependent on respiratory support, mastered the use of these devices. The four patients with long-term access employed their manipulators for facilitation of activities of daily living an average of 8 h a day for 3 +/- 1.8 yr. There was approximately 3 h of estimated attendant care time saved per patient per day.

  7. Progress in muscular dystrophy research with special emphasis on gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    SUGITA, Hideo; TAKEDA, Shin’ichi

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked, progressive muscle-wasting disease caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Since the disease was described by physicians in the 19th century, information about the subject has been accumulated. One author (Sugita) was one of the coworkers who first reported that the serum creatine kinase (CK) level is elevated in progressive muscular dystrophy patients. Even 50 years after that first report, an elevated serum CK level is still the most useful marker in the diagnosis of DMD, a sensitive index of the state of skeletal muscle, and useful to evaluate therapeutic effects. In the latter half of this article, we describe recent progress in the therapy of DMD, with an emphasis on gene therapies, particularly exon skipping. PMID:20689232

  8. Recessive ACTA1 variant causes congenital muscular dystrophy with rigid spine.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Gina L; Best, Heather A; Oates, Emily C; Kaur, Simranpreet; Charlton, Amanda; Brammah, Susan; Punetha, Jaya; Kesari, Akanchha; North, Kathryn N; Ilkovski, Biljana; Hoffman, Eric P; Clarke, Nigel F

    2015-06-01

    Variants in ACTA1, which encodes α-skeletal actin, cause several congenital myopathies, most commonly nemaline myopathy. Autosomal recessive variants comprise approximately 10% of ACTA1 myopathy. All recessive variants reported to date have resulted in loss of skeletal α-actin expression from muscle and severe weakness from birth. Targeted next-generation sequencing in two brothers with congenital muscular dystrophy with rigid spine revealed homozygous missense variants in ACTA1. Skeletal α-actin expression was preserved in these patients. This report expands the clinical and histological phenotype of ACTA1 disease to include congenital muscular dystrophy with rigid spine and dystrophic features on muscle biopsy. This represents a new class of recessive ACTA1 variants, which do not abolish protein expression. PMID:25182138

  9. Effect of Cellular Therapy in Progression of Becker’s Muscular Dystrophy: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Alok; Sane, Hemangi; Gokulchandra, Nandini; Sharan, Rishabh; Paranjape, Amruta; Yadav, Jayanti; Badhe, Prerna

    2016-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an inherited disorder due to deletions of the dystrophin gene that leads to muscle weakness. Effects of bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMNC) transplantation in Muscular Dystrophy have shown to be safe and beneficial. We treated a 20-year-old male suffering from BMD with autologous BMMNC transplantation followed by multidisciplinary rehabilitation. He presented with muscle weakness and had difficulty in performing his activities. The BMMNCs were transplanted via intrathecal and intramuscular routes. The effects were measured on clinical and functional changes. Over 9 months, gradual improvement was noticed in muscle strength, respiratory functions and North Star Ambulatory Assessment Scale. Functional Independence Measure, Berg Balance Score, Brooke and Vignos Scale remained stable indicating halting of the progression. The case report suggests that cellular therapy combined with rehabilitation may have possibility of repairing and regenerating muscle fibers and decreasing the rate of progression of BMD. PMID:27054018

  10. Expression of the Murine Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene in Muscle and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.; Pearlman, Joel A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Ranier, Joel E.; Reeves, Alice A.; Caskey, C. Thomas

    1988-03-01

    Complementary DNA clones were isolated that represent the 5' terminal 2.5 kilobases of the murine Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Dmd) messenger RNA (mRNA). Mouse Dmd mRNA was detectable in skeletal and cardiac muscle and at a level approximately 90 percent lower in brain. Dmd mRNA is also present, but at much lower than normal levels, in both the muscle and brain of three different strains of dystrophic mdx mice. The identification of Dmd mRNA in brain raises the possibility of a relation between human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene expression and the mental retardation found in some DMD males. These results also provide evidence that the mdx mutations are allelic variants of mouse Dmd gene mutations.

  11. Relatively low proportion of dystrophin gene deletions in Israeili Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shomrat, R.; Gluck, E.; Legum, C.; Shiloh, Y.

    1994-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the X-linked dystrophin gene. The most common mutations in western populations are deletions that are spread non-randomly throughout the gene. Molecular analysis of the dystrophin gene structure by hybridization of the full length cDNA to Southern blots and by PCR in 62 unrelated Israeli male DMD/BMD patients showed deletions in 23 (37%). This proportion is significantly lower than that found in European and North American populations (55-65%). Seventy-eight percent of the deletions were confined to exons 44-52, half of these exons 44-45, and the remaining 22% to exons 1 and 19. There was no correlation between the size of the deletion and the severity of the disease. All the deletions causing frameshift resulted in the DMD phenotypes. 43 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. What do mouse models of muscular dystrophy tell us about the DAPC and its components?

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Charlotte; Morgan, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    There are over 30 mouse models with mutations or inactivations in the dystrophin-associated protein complex. This complex is thought to play a crucial role in the functioning of muscle, as both a shock absorber and signalling centre, although its role in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy is not fully understood. The first mouse model of muscular dystrophy to be identified with a mutation in a component of the dystrophin-associated complex (dystrophin) was the mdx mouse in 1984. Here, we evaluate the key characteristics of the mdx in comparison with other mouse mutants with inactivations in DAPC components, along with key modifiers of the disease phenotype. By discussing the differences between the individual phenotypes, we show that the functioning of the DAPC and consequently its role in the pathogenesis is more complicated than perhaps currently appreciated. PMID:25270874

  13. Abnormalities of dystrophin, the sarcoglycans, and laminin alpha2 in the muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K J; Kim, S S; North, K N

    1998-01-01

    Abnormalities of dystrophin, the sarcoglycans, and laminin alpha2 are responsible for a subset of the muscular dystrophies. In this study we aim to characterise the nature and frequency of abnormalities of these proteins in an Australian population and to formulate an investigative algorithm to aid in approaching the diagnosis of the muscular dystrophies. To reduce ascertainment bias, biopsies with dystrophic (n=131) and non-dystrophic myopathic (n=71) changes were studied with antibodies to dystrophin, alpha, beta, and gamma sarcoglycan, beta dystroglycan, and laminin alpha2, and results were correlated with clinical phenotype. Abnormalities of dystrophin, the sarcoglycans, or laminin alpha2 were present in 61/131 (47%) dystrophic biopsies and in 0/71 myopathic biopsies, suggesting that immunocytochemical study of dystrophin, the sarcoglycans, and laminin alpha2 may, in general, be restricted to patients with dystrophic biopsies. Two patients with mutations identified in gamma sarcoglycan had abnormal dystrophin (by immunocytochemistry and immunoblot), showing that abnormalities of dystrophin may be a secondary phenomenon. Therefore, biopsies should not be excluded from sarcoglycan analysis on the basis of abnormal dystrophin alone. The diagnostic yield was highest in those with severe, rapidly progressive limb-girdle weakness (92%). Laminin alpha2 deficiency was identified in 5/131 (4%) patients; 215 patients presented after infancy, indicating that abnormalities of laminin alpha2 are not limited to the congenital muscular dystrophy phenotype. Overall patterns of immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting provided a guide to mutation analysis and, on the basis of this study, we have formulated a diagnostic algorithm to guide the investigation of patients with muscular dystrophy. Images PMID:9610800

  14. Influence of Immune Responses in Gene/Stem Cell Therapies for Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Sitzia, Clementina; Erratico, Silvia; Torrente, Yvan

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases, caused by mutations in different components of sarcolemma, extracellular matrix, or enzymes. Inflammation and innate or adaptive immune response activation are prominent features of MDs. Various therapies under development are directed toward rescuing the dystrophic muscle damage using gene transfer or cell therapy. Here we discussed current knowledge about involvement of immune system responses to experimental therapies in MDs. PMID:24959590

  15. Homozygotes for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy have a severe form of the disease.

    PubMed

    Blumen, S C; Brais, B; Korczyn, A D; Medinsky, S; Chapman, J; Asherov, A; Nisipeanu, P; Codère, F; Bouchard, J P; Fardeau, M; Tomé, F M; Rouleau, G A

    1999-07-01

    Autosomal dominant oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) usually begins with ptosis or dysphagia during the fifth or sixth decade of life. We studied 7 patients with OPMD symptoms starting before the age of 36 years. All were found to be homozygotes for the dominant (GCG)9 OPMD mutation. On average, disease onset was 18 years earlier than in heterozygotes, and patients had a significantly larger number of muscle nuclei containing intranuclear inclusions (INIs) (9.4 vs 4.9%).

  16. Prevalence of Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophies in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Romitti, Paul A.; Zhu, Yong; Puzhankara, Soman; James, Katherine A.; Nabukera, Sarah K.; Zamba, Gideon K.D.; Ciafaloni, Emma; Cunniff, Christopher; Druschel, Charlotte M.; Mathews, Katherine D.; Matthews, Dennis J.; Meaney, F. John; Andrews, Jennifer G.; Caspers Conway, Kristin M.; Fox, Deborah J.; Street, Natalie; Adams, Melissa M.; Bolen, Julie

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate prevalence of childhood-onset Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DBMD) in 6 sites in the United States by race/ethnicity and phenotype (Duchenne muscular dystrophy [DMD] or Becker muscular dystrophy [BMD]). METHODS In 2002, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention established the Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network (MD STARnet) to conduct longitudinal, population-based surveillance and research of DBMD in the United States. Six sites conducted active, multiple-source case finding and record abstraction to identify MD STARnet cases born January 1982 to December 2011. We used cross-sectional analyses to estimate prevalence of DBMD per 10 000 boys, ages 5 to 9 years, for 4 quinquennia (1991–1995, 1996–2000, 2001–2005, and 2006–2010) and prevalence per 10 000 male individuals, ages 5 to 24 years, in 2010. Prevalence was also estimated by race/ethnicity and phenotype. RESULTS Overall, 649 cases resided in an MD STARnet site during $1 quinquennia. Prevalence estimates per 10 000 boys, ages 5 to 9 years, were 1.93, 2.05, 2.04, and 1.51, respectively, for 1991–1995, 1996–2000, 2001–2005, and 2006–2010. Prevalence tended to be higher for Hispanic individuals than non-Hispanic white or black individuals, and higher for DMD than BMD. In 2010, prevalence of DBMD was 1.38 per 10 000 male individuals, ages 5 to 24 years. CONCLUSIONS We present population-based prevalence estimates for DBMD in 6 US sites. Prevalence differed by race/ethnicity, suggesting potential cultural and socioeconomic influences in the diagnosis of DBMD. Prevalence also was higher for DMD than BMD. Continued longitudinal surveillance will permit us to examine racial/ethnic and socioeconomic differences in treatment and outcomes for MD STARnet cases. PMID:25687144

  17. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy presenting with isolated axial myopathy and bent spine syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kottlors, Michael; Kress, Wolfram; Meng, Gerhard; Glocker, Franz X

    2010-08-01

    Several subtypes of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) with atypical clinical presentation have been described. We report a new, distinct phenotype with progressive bent spine syndrome solely affecting the paraspinal muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging study of the lumbar spine revealed marked atrophy of the paraspinal muscles. The diagnosis was confirmed by DNA testing, which revealed shortened restriction fragments of the D4Z4 repeat on haplotype A in connection with a positive family history. PMID:20658601

  18. Cardioembolic stroke prompting diagnosis of LMNA-associated Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Vergé, Luis; Yaou, Rabah Ben; Fernández-Recio, María; Dinca, Luminita; Richard, Pascale; Bonne, Gisèle

    2011-10-01

    The diagnosis of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is suggested by the combination of musculoskeletal weakness and wasting, joint contractures, and cardiac disease. Herein we report a patient in whom an ischemic stroke prompted the diagnosis of EDMD. A mutation in the LMNA gene (c.266G>T, p.Arg89Leu) was found. It had been reported previously exclusively with isolated cardiac disease, thus reinforcing the high phenotypic heterogeneity of laminopathies.

  19. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy presenting as shoulder pain in a baseball player.

    PubMed

    Kaar, Scott; Hazard, Dale; Miller, Bruce S

    2005-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is a commonly occurring myopathy that affects the facial and periscapular musculature. We describe a case in a high school throwing athlete that presented as shoulder pain with throwing a baseball. The patient has begun an intensive physical therapy training program that targets his weak scapular stabilizers as well as altering his throwing mechanics. His symptoms have improved, and he is able to continue competing in throwing sports at a high level.

  20. Quantifiable diagnosis of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is strongly based on the histological characterization of muscle biopsies. However, this morphological analysis is mostly a subjective process and difficult to quantify. We have tested if network science can provide a novel framework to extract useful information from muscle biopsies, developing a novel method that analyzes muscle samples in an objective, automated, fast and precise manner. Methods Our database consisted of 102 muscle biopsy images from 70 individuals (including controls, patients with neurogenic atrophies and patients with muscular dystrophies). We used this to develop a new method, Neuromuscular DIseases Computerized Image Analysis (NDICIA), that uses network science analysis to capture the defining signature of muscle biopsy images. NDICIA characterizes muscle tissues by representing each image as a network, with fibers serving as nodes and fiber contacts as links. Results After a ‘training’ phase with control and pathological biopsies, NDICIA was able to quantify the degree of pathology of each sample. We validated our method by comparing NDICIA quantification of the severity of muscular dystrophies with a pathologist’s evaluation of the degree of pathology, resulting in a strong correlation (R = 0.900, P <0.00001). Importantly, our approach can be used to quantify new images without the need for prior ‘training’. Therefore, we show that network science analysis captures the useful information contained in muscle biopsies, helping the diagnosis of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies. Conclusions Our novel network analysis approach will serve as a valuable tool for assessing the etiology of muscular dystrophies or neurogenic atrophies, and has the potential to quantify treatment outcomes in preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:23514382

  1. Update on neuromuscular disorders in pediatric orthopaedics: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, myelomeningocele, and cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Henry G

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this seminar was to review a large range of lower extremity and neuromuscular disorders. Because of the diversity of the topics covered, including clubfoot and vertical talus treatment, management of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, and limb lengthening in dwarfism, this review will focus on the neuromuscular subsection reviewing the current management of the muscular dystrophies, myelomeningocele, and cerebral palsy. PMID:25207736

  2. Muscular Dystrophy associated with alpha-dystroglycan deficiency in Sphynx and Devon Rex cats

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Paul T; Diane Shelton, G.; Dickinson, Peter J; Sturges, Beverly K; Xu, Rui; LeCouteur, Richard A; Guo, Ling T; Grahn, Robert A; Lo, Harriet P; North, Kathryn N; Malik, Richard; Engvall, Eva; Lyons, Leslie A

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a number of forms of muscular dystrophy, termed dystroglycanopathies, which are associated with loss of natively glycosylated α–dystroglycan. Here we identify a new animal model for this class of disorders in Sphynx and Devon Rex cats. Affected cats displayed a slowly progressive myopathy with clinical and histologic hallmarks of muscular dystrophy including skeletal muscle weakness with no involvement of peripheral nerves or CNS. Skeletal muscles had myopathic features and reduced expression of α–dystroglycan, while β–dystroglycan, sarcoglycans, and dystrophin were expressed at normal levels. In the Sphynx cat, analysis of laminin and lectin binding capacity demonstrated no loss in overall glycosylation or ligand binding for the α-dystroglycan protein, only a loss of protein expression. A reduction in laminin-α2 expression in the basal lamina surrounding skeletal myofibers was also observed. Sequence analysis of translated regions of the feline dystroglycan gene (DAG1) in affected cats did not identify a causative mutation, and levels of DAG1 mRNA determined by real-time QRT-PCR did not differ significantly from normal controls. Reduction in the levels of glycosylated α–dystroglycan by immunoblot was also identified in an affected Devon Rex cat. These data suggest that muscular dystrophy in Sphynx and Devon Rex cats results from a deficiency in α-dystroglycan protein expression, and as such may represent a new type of dystroglycanopathy where expression, but not glycosylation, is affected. PMID:18990577

  3. Regulatory T cells suppress muscle inflammation and injury in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Villalta, S. Armando; Rosenthal, Wendy; Martinez, Leonel; Kaur, Amanjot; Sparwasser, Tim; Tidball, James G.; Margeta, Marta; Spencer, Melissa J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that regulatory T cells (Tregs) modulate muscle injury and inflammation in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although Tregs were largely absent in the muscle of wildtype mice and normal human muscle, they were present in necrotic lesions, displayed an activated phenotype and showed increased expression of interleukin (IL)-10 in dystrophic muscle from mdx mice. Depletion of Tregs exacerbated muscle injury and the severity of muscle inflammation, which was characterized by an enhanced interferon-gamma (IFNγ) response and activation of M1 macrophages. To test the therapeutic value of targeting Tregs in muscular dystrophy, we treated mdx mice with IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes (IL-2c), and found that Tregs and IL-10 concentrations were increased in muscle, resulting in reduced expression of cyclooygenase-2 and decreased myofiber injury. These findings suggest that Tregs modulate the progression of muscular dystrophy by suppressing type 1 inflammation in muscle associated with muscle fiber injury, and highlight the potential of Treg-modulating agents as therapeutics for DMD. PMID:25320234

  4. Molecular deletion patterns in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients from KwaZulu Natal.

    PubMed

    Hallwirth Pillay, K D; Bill, P L A; Madurai, S; Mubaiwa, L; Rapiti, P

    2007-01-15

    There exists much phenotypic heterogeneity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its allelic variant, Becker muscular dystrophy. The molecular findings on 53 patients with Duchenne and 15 patients with Becker type muscular dystrophy in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa are reported. Multiplex PCR was performed using primers targeting 18 hot-spot exons throughout the dystrophin gene. Analysis of the multiplex PCR data revealed that 39/68 (57.0%) patients included in the study showed a deletion (33 DMD and 6 BMD patients). Twenty-five patients were Black, 4 were White and 10 were Indian. Using the Chamberlain and Beggs multiplex PCR assays, the region of the genome most frequently affected by a deletion includes exons 47-51. The distal region of the dystrophin gene was most frequently affected by the deletion in both Black and Indian patients. There were too few White patients for conclusions to be drawn concerning the most frequently affected part of the gene. Although the numbers are insufficient to determine whether ethnic differences are present, the Chamberlain and Beggs multiplex PCR assays detect deletions with the same frequency in South African DMD/BMD patients as that reported in the literature. PMID:17141273

  5. Report of a patient with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, ptosis and ophthalmoparesis caused by plectinopathy.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, Zohreh; Kahrizi, Kimia; Nafissi, Shahriar; Fadaee, Mahsa; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Kariminejad, Ariana; Akbari, Mohammad R; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in plectin, a widely expressed giant cytolinker protein can lead to different diseases mostly with signs of muscular dystrophy (MD) and skin blistering. The only report of plectin-related disease without skin involvement is limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2Q (LGMD2Q) phenotype, showing early-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy symptoms with progressive manner and no cranial muscle involvement. Here, we report a non-consanguineous Iranian family with two affected sisters showing progressive limb and ocular muscle weakness. Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) led to identification of a compound heterozygous mutations, p.Gln1022Ter (c.3064C>T) and p.Gly3835Ser (c.11503G>A), in PLEC gene. To the best of our knowledge, this would be the first report of a patient with LGMD and myasthenic symptoms without any skin involvement, caused by plectinopathy. This observation extends the phenotypic spectrum of PLEC related diseases and suggests a variable expression of the PLEC- related symptoms.

  6. Affinity proteomics within rare diseases: a BIO-NMD study for blood biomarkers of muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Chaouch, Amina; Lochmüller, Hanns; Politano, Luisa; Bertini, Enrico; Spitali, Pietro; Hiller, Monika; Niks, Eric H; Gualandi, Francesca; Pontén, Fredrik; Bushby, Kate; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Schwartz, Elena; Le Priol, Yannick; Straub, Volker; Uhlén, Mathias; Cirak, Sebahattin; ‘t Hoen, Peter A C; Muntoni, Francesco; Ferlini, Alessandra; Schwenk, Jochen M; Nilsson, Peter; Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recent progress in the broad-scaled analysis of proteins in body fluids, there is still a lack in protein profiling approaches for biomarkers of rare diseases. Scarcity of samples is the main obstacle hindering attempts to apply discovery driven protein profiling in rare diseases. We addressed this challenge by combining samples collected within the BIO-NMD consortium from four geographically dispersed clinical sites to identify protein markers associated with muscular dystrophy using an antibody bead array platform with 384 antibodies. Based on concordance in statistical significance and confirmatory results obtained from analysis of both serum and plasma, we identified eleven proteins associated with muscular dystrophy, among which four proteins were elevated in blood from muscular dystrophy patients: carbonic anhydrase III (CA3) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), both specifically expressed in slow-twitch muscle fibers and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2) and electron transfer flavoprotein A (ETFA). Using age-matched sub-cohorts, 9 protein profiles correlating with disease progression and severity were identified, which hold promise for the development of new clinical tools for management of dystrophinopathies. PMID:24920607

  7. Defective Ca2+ metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: effects on cellular and viral growth.

    PubMed Central

    Fingerman, E; Campisi, J; Pardee, A B

    1984-01-01

    Normal fibroblasts in medium containing 0.02 mM CaCl2 arrested growth within 24 hr, whereas Duchenne muscular dystrophy fibroblasts continued to grow for 5 days, albeit at 40% of their rate in standard medium (1.8 mM CaCl2). Moreover, Duchenne cells in calcium-deficient medium showed an enhanced rate of protein synthesis (60% over the rate in standard medium), whereas normal cells were unaffected. Previously we described a general assay for detection of mutant cells by using herpes simplex virus I replication as a probe of cellular function. By altering the growth medium, one can elicit changes in viral DNA replication that depend upon cellular differences. Duchenne fibroblasts in calcium-deficient low-serum (0.5%) medium supported viral replication at a rate 7- to 10-fold greater than did normal cells infected under the same conditions. Using this viral assay, we have successfully identified all 10 samples of a blind coded set of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, normal, and heterozygote cells. In addition, differences of a lower magnitude were found between these cell strains as measured by cellular growth or protein synthesis. Therefore, a cell's ability to grow and support viral replication in calcium-deficient medium can be used to readily distinguish Duchenne muscular dystrophy fibroblasts from normal ones. These results suggest that the viral assay could be used as a prenatal diagnostic test. A defect related to calcium metabolism may be fundamental to this disease. PMID:6095311

  8. Regulatory T cells suppress muscle inflammation and injury in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Villalta, S Armando; Rosenthal, Wendy; Martinez, Leonel; Kaur, Amanjot; Sparwasser, Tim; Tidball, James G; Margeta, Marta; Spencer, Melissa J; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2014-10-15

    We examined the hypothesis that regulatory T cells (Tregs) modulate muscle injury and inflammation in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although Tregs were largely absent in the muscle of wild-type mice and normal human muscle, they were present in necrotic lesions, displayed an activated phenotype, and showed increased expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in dystrophic muscle from mdx mice. Depletion of Tregs exacerbated muscle injury and the severity of muscle inflammation, which was characterized by an enhanced interferon-γ (IFN-γ) response and activation of M1 macrophages. To test the therapeutic value of targeting Tregs in muscular dystrophy, we treated mdx mice with IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes and found that Tregs and IL-10 concentrations were increased in muscle, resulting in reduced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and decreased myofiber injury. These findings suggest that Tregs modulate the progression of muscular dystrophy by suppressing type 1 inflammation in muscle associated with muscle fiber injury, and highlight the potential of Treg-modulating agents as therapeutics for DMD.

  9. TNF-α-Induced microRNAs Control Dystrophin Expression in Becker Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fiorillo, Alyson A; Heier, Christopher R; Novak, James S; Tully, Christopher B; Brown, Kristy J; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Vila, Maria C; Ngheim, Peter P; Bello, Luca; Kornegay, Joe N; Angelini, Corrado; Partridge, Terence A; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Hoffman, Eric P

    2015-09-01

    The amount and distribution of dystrophin protein in myofibers and muscle is highly variable in Becker muscular dystrophy and in exon-skipping trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here, we investigate a molecular basis for this variability. In muscle from Becker patients sharing the same exon 45-47 in-frame deletion, dystrophin levels negatively correlate with microRNAs predicted to target dystrophin. Seven microRNAs inhibit dystrophin expression in vitro, and three are validated in vivo (miR-146b/miR-374a/miR-31). microRNAs are expressed in dystrophic myofibers and increase with age and disease severity. In exon-skipping-treated mdx mice, microRNAs are significantly higher in muscles with low dystrophin rescue. TNF-α increases microRNA levels in vitro whereas NFκB inhibition blocks this in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these data show that microRNAs contribute to variable dystrophin levels in muscular dystrophy. Our findings suggest a model where chronic inflammation in distinct microenvironments induces pathological microRNAs, initiating a self-sustaining feedback loop that exacerbates disease progression.

  10. Orthodontic treatment in a patient with unilateral open-bite and Becker muscular dystrophy. A 5-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Aristizabal, Juan Fernando; Smit, Rosana Martínez

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Becker muscular dystrophy is an X-chromosomal linked anomaly characterized by progressive muscle wear and weakness. This case report shows the orthodontic treatment of a Becker muscular dystrophy patient with unilateral open bite. METHODS: To correct patient's malocclusion, general anesthesia and orthognathic surgery were not considered as an option. Conventional orthodontic treatment with intermaxillary elastics and muscular functional therapy were employed instead. RESULTS: After 36 months, open bite was corrected. The case remains stable after a 5-year post-treatment retention period. PMID:25628078

  11. Cardiac involvement in myotonic muscular dystrophy (Steinert's disease): a prospective study of 25 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Perloff, J.K.; Stevenson, W.G.; Roberts, N.K.; Cabeen, W.; Weiss, J.

    1984-11-01

    The presence, degree and frequency of disorders of cardiac conduction and rhythm and of regional or global myocardial dystrophy or myotonia have not previously been studied prospectively and systematically in the same population of patients with myotonic dystrophy. Accordingly, 25 adults with classic Steinert's disease underwent electrocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, vectorcardiography, chest x-rays, echocardiography, electrophysiologic studies, and technetium-99m angiography. Clinically important cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy reside in specialized tissues rather than in myocardium. Involvement is relatively specific, primarily assigned to the His-Purkinje system. The cardiac muscle disorder takes the form of dystrophy rather than myotonia, and is not selective, appearing with approximately equal distribution in all 4 chambers. Myocardial dystrophy seldom results in clinically overt ventricular failure, but may be responsible for atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since myotonic dystrophy is genetically transmitted, a primary biochemical defect has been proposed with complete expression of the gene toward striated muscle tissue, whether skeletal or cardiac. Specialized cardiac tissue and myocardium have close, if not identical, embryologic origins, so it is not surprising that the genetic marker affects both. Cardiac involvement is therefore an integral part of myotonic dystrophy, targeting particularly the infranodal conduction system, to a lesser extent the sinus node, and still less specifically, the myocardium.

  12. [Muscular spasms associated with a reflex sympathetic dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Tola, M A; Gutiérrez, J M; Llamazares, O; Yugueros, I

    1996-10-01

    The appearance of involuntary movements in the clinical course of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (DSR) constitutes a rare clinical entity. In this context, the most frequent changes in movements are muscle spasms and focal dystonia, although postural tremor, muscle weakness and rhythmic myoclonus have also been described. The disorder is more frequent in young women and in the lower limbs. It may have a focal, segmental, multifocal, hemicorporal or symmetrical distribution. It is almost always secondary to local trauma. The pathogenesis and most effective treatment are unknown. We present the case of a 62 year old woman with muscle spasms of both legs and feet as a complication of spontaneously appearing DSR. The electromyogram showed continuous non-rhythmic discharges with morphologically normal motor unit potentials in both anterior tibial muscles. The clinical course and symptomatic improvement following treatment with benzodiazepine seems to suggest that the disorder is of central origin. PMID:8983730

  13. Exome sequencing identifies a DNAJB6 mutation in a family with dominantly-inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Couthouis, Julien; Raphael, Alya R; Siskind, Carly; Findlay, Andrew R; Buenrostro, Jason D; Greenleaf, William J; Vogel, Hannes; Day, John W; Flanigan, Kevin M; Gitler, Aaron D

    2014-05-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy primarily affects the muscles of the hips and shoulders (the "limb-girdle" muscles), although it is a heterogeneous disorder that can present with varying symptoms. There is currently no cure. We sought to identify the genetic basis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1 in an American family of Northern European descent using exome sequencing. Exome sequencing was performed on DNA samples from two affected siblings and one unaffected sibling and resulted in the identification of eleven candidate mutations that co-segregated with the disease. Notably, this list included a previously reported mutation in DNAJB6, p.Phe89Ile, which was recently identified as a cause of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1D. Additional family members were Sanger sequenced and the mutation in DNAJB6 was only found in affected individuals. Subsequent haplotype analysis indicated that this DNAJB6 p.Phe89Ile mutation likely arose independently of the previously reported mutation. Since other published mutations are located close by in the G/F domain of DNAJB6, this suggests that the area may represent a mutational hotspot. Exome sequencing provided an unbiased and effective method for identifying the genetic etiology of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1 in a previously genetically uncharacterized family. This work further confirms the causative role of DNAJB6 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1D.

  14. Preliminary diffusion tensor imaging studies in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Tobon, S.; Hernandez-Salazar, G.; Vargas-Cañas, S.; Marrufo-Melendez, O.; Solis-Najera, S.; Taboada-Barajas, J.; Rodriguez, A. O.; Delgado-Hernandez, R.

    2012-10-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a group of autosomal dominantly or recessively inherited muscular dystrophies that also present with primary proximal (limb-girdle) muscle weakness. This type of dystrophy involves the shoulder and pelvic girdles, distinct phenotypic or clinical characteristics are recognized. Imaging experiments were conducted on a 1.5T GE scanner (General Electric Medical Systems. Milwaukee. USA), using a combination of two eight-channel coil array. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data were acquired using a SE-EPI sequence, diffusion weighted gradients were applied along 30 non-collinear directions with a b-value=550 s/mm2. The connective tissue content does not appear to have a significant effect on the directionality of the diffusion, as assessed by fractional anisotropy. The fibers of the Sartorius muscle and gracilis showed decreased number of tracts, secondary to fatty infiltration and replacement of connective tissue and muscle mass loss characteristic of the underlying pathology. Our results demonstrated the utility of non-invasive MRI techniques to characterize the muscle pathology, through quantitative and qualitative methods such as the FA values and tractrography.

  15. Evaluation of 2'-Deoxy-2'-fluoro Antisense Oligonucleotides for Exon Skipping in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jirka, Silvana M G; Tanganyika-de Winter, Christa L; Boertje-van der Meulen, Joke W; van Putten, Maaike; Hiller, Monika; Vermue, Rick; de Visser, Peter C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle wasting disorder typically caused by frame-shifting mutations in the DMD gene. Restoration of the reading frame would allow the production of a shorter but partly functional dystrophin protein as seen in Becker muscular dystrophy patients. This can be achieved with antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that induce skipping of specific exons during pre-mRNA splicing. Different chemical modifications have been developed to improve AON properties. The 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2F) RNA modification is attractive for exon skipping due to its ability to recruit ILF2/3 proteins to the 2F/pre-mRNA duplex, which resulted in enhanced exon skipping in spinal muscular atrophy models. In this study, we examined the effect of two different 2'-substituted AONs (2'-F phosphorothioate (2FPS) and 2'-O-Me phosphorothioate (2OMePS)) on exon skipping in DMD cell and animal models. In human cell cultures, 2FPS AONs showed higher exon skipping levels than their isosequential 2OMePS counterparts. Interestingly, in the mdx mouse model, 2FPS was less efficient than 2OMePS and suggested safety issues as evidenced by increased spleen size and weight loss. Our results do not support a clinical application for 2FPS AON. PMID:26623937

  16. Evaluation of 2'-Deoxy-2'-fluoro Antisense Oligonucleotides for Exon Skipping in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jirka, Silvana M G; Tanganyika-de Winter, Christa L; Boertje-van der Meulen, Joke W; van Putten, Maaike; Hiller, Monika; Vermue, Rick; de Visser, Peter C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle wasting disorder typically caused by frame-shifting mutations in the DMD gene. Restoration of the reading frame would allow the production of a shorter but partly functional dystrophin protein as seen in Becker muscular dystrophy patients. This can be achieved with antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that induce skipping of specific exons during pre-mRNA splicing. Different chemical modifications have been developed to improve AON properties. The 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2F) RNA modification is attractive for exon skipping due to its ability to recruit ILF2/3 proteins to the 2F/pre-mRNA duplex, which resulted in enhanced exon skipping in spinal muscular atrophy models. In this study, we examined the effect of two different 2'-substituted AONs (2'-F phosphorothioate (2FPS) and 2'-O-Me phosphorothioate (2OMePS)) on exon skipping in DMD cell and animal models. In human cell cultures, 2FPS AONs showed higher exon skipping levels than their isosequential 2OMePS counterparts. Interestingly, in the mdx mouse model, 2FPS was less efficient than 2OMePS and suggested safety issues as evidenced by increased spleen size and weight loss. Our results do not support a clinical application for 2FPS AON. PMID:26623937

  17. Characterization of Dystrophin Deficient Rats: A New Model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Thepenier, Virginie; François, Virginie; Le Guiner, Caroline; Goubin, Helicia; Dutilleul, Maéva; Guigand, Lydie; Toumaniantz, Gilles; De Cian, Anne; Boix, Charlotte; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yan; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio; Huchet, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    A few animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are available, large ones such as pigs or dogs being expensive and difficult to handle. Mdx (X-linked muscular dystrophy) mice only partially mimic the human disease, with limited chronic muscular lesions and muscle weakness. Their small size also imposes limitations on analyses. A rat model could represent a useful alternative since rats are small animals but 10 times bigger than mice and could better reflect the lesions and functional abnormalities observed in DMD patients. Two lines of Dmd mutated-rats (Dmdmdx) were generated using TALENs targeting exon 23. Muscles of animals of both lines showed undetectable levels of dystrophin by western blot and less than 5% of dystrophin positive fibers by immunohistochemistry. At 3 months, limb and diaphragm muscles from Dmdmdx rats displayed severe necrosis and regeneration. At 7 months, these muscles also showed severe fibrosis and some adipose tissue infiltration. Dmdmdx rats showed significant reduction in muscle strength and a decrease in spontaneous motor activity. Furthermore, heart morphology was indicative of dilated cardiomyopathy associated histologically with necrotic and fibrotic changes. Echocardiography showed significant concentric remodeling and alteration of diastolic function. In conclusion, Dmdmdx rats represent a new faithful small animal model of DMD. PMID:25310701

  18. Characterization of dystrophin deficient rats: a new model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Larcher, Thibaut; Lafoux, Aude; Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Thepenier, Virginie; François, Virginie; Le Guiner, Caroline; Goubin, Helicia; Dutilleul, Maéva; Guigand, Lydie; Toumaniantz, Gilles; De Cian, Anne; Boix, Charlotte; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yan; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio; Huchet, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    A few animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are available, large ones such as pigs or dogs being expensive and difficult to handle. Mdx (X-linked muscular dystrophy) mice only partially mimic the human disease, with limited chronic muscular lesions and muscle weakness. Their small size also imposes limitations on analyses. A rat model could represent a useful alternative since rats are small animals but 10 times bigger than mice and could better reflect the lesions and functional abnormalities observed in DMD patients. Two lines of Dmd mutated-rats (Dmdmdx) were generated using TALENs targeting exon 23. Muscles of animals of both lines showed undetectable levels of dystrophin by western blot and less than 5% of dystrophin positive fibers by immunohistochemistry. At 3 months, limb and diaphragm muscles from Dmdmdx rats displayed severe necrosis and regeneration. At 7 months, these muscles also showed severe fibrosis and some adipose tissue infiltration. Dmdmdx rats showed significant reduction in muscle strength and a decrease in spontaneous motor activity. Furthermore, heart morphology was indicative of dilated cardiomyopathy associated histologically with necrotic and fibrotic changes. Echocardiography showed significant concentric remodeling and alteration of diastolic function. In conclusion, Dmdmdx rats represent a new faithful small animal model of DMD.

  19. Muscle Quantitative MR Imaging and Clustering Analysis in Patients with Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Lareau-Trudel, Emilie; Le Troter, Arnaud; Ghattas, Badih; Pouget, Jean; Attarian, Shahram; Bendahan, David; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 (FSHD1) is the third most common inherited muscular dystrophy. Considering the highly variable clinical expression and the slow disease progression, sensitive outcome measures would be of interest. Methods and Findings Using muscle MRI, we assessed muscular fatty infiltration in the lower limbs of 35 FSHD1 patients and 22 healthy volunteers by two methods: a quantitative imaging (qMRI) combined with a dedicated automated segmentation method performed on both thighs and a standard T1-weighted four-point visual scale (visual score) on thighs and legs. Each patient had a clinical evaluation including manual muscular testing, Clinical Severity Score (CSS) scale and MFM scale. The intramuscular fat fraction measured using qMRI in the thighs was significantly higher in patients (21.9 ± 20.4%) than in volunteers (3.6 ± 2.8%) (p<0.001). In patients, the intramuscular fat fraction was significantly correlated with the muscular fatty infiltration in the thighs evaluated by the mean visual score (p<0.001). However, we observed a ceiling effect of the visual score for patients with a severe fatty infiltration clearly indicating the larger accuracy of the qMRI approach. Mean intramuscular fat fraction was significantly correlated with CSS scale (p≤0.01) and was inversely correlated with MMT score, MFM subscore D1 (p≤0.01) further illustrating the sensitivity of the qMRI approach. Overall, a clustering analysis disclosed three different imaging patterns of muscle involvement for the thighs and the legs which could be related to different stages of the disease and put forth muscles which could be of interest for a subtle investigation of the disease progression and/or the efficiency of any therapeutic strategy. Conclusion The qMRI provides a sensitive measurement of fat fraction which should also be of high interest to assess disease progression and any therapeutic strategy in FSHD1 patients. PMID:26181385

  20. Activation of the wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway in Polymyositis, Dermatomyositis and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fuchen; Liang, Zonglai; Xu, Jingwen; Li, Wei; Zhao, Dandan; Zhao, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a critical role in embryonic development and adult-tissue homeostasis. Recent investigations implicate the importance of wnt/β-catenin signaling in normal wound healing and its sustained activation being associated with fibrogenesis. We investigated the immunolocalization and activation of wnt/β-catenin in polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot analysis of β-catenin were performed in muscle specimens from 6 PM, 8 DM, and 6 DMD subjects. The β-catenin/Tcf4 DNA-binding activity in muscle was studied using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), and serum wnt/β-catenin/Tcf transcriptional activity was measured using a luciferase reporter gene assay. Results Immunoreactivity for β-catenin was found in the cytoplasm and nuclei of muscle fibers in PM, DM, and DMD. The protein level of β-catenin was elevated, and EMSA analysis confirmed the activation of wnt/β-catenin signaling. The transcriptional activities of β-catenin/Tcf in the circulation were increased in patients with PM, DM, and DMD, especially in those with interstitial lung disease, and these transcriptional activities decreased when PM or DM patients exhibited obvious clinical improvements. Conclusions Our findings indicate that wnt/β-catenin signaling is activated in PM, DM, and DMD. Its activation in muscle tissue and the circulation may play a role in modulating muscle regeneration and be at least partly involved in the process of muscle and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27165423

  1. Strong correlation between the 6-minute walk test and accelerometry functional outcomes in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Zoe E; Ryan, Monique M; Kornberg, Andrew J; Walker, Karen Z; Truby, Helen

    2015-03-01

    Accelerometry provides information on habitual physical capability that may be of value in the assessment of function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This preliminary investigation describes the relationship between community ambulation measured by the StepWatch activity monitor and the current standard of functional assessment, the 6-minute walk test, in ambulatory boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (n = 16) and healthy controls (n = 13). All participants completed a 6-minute walk test and wore the StepWatch™ monitor for 5 consecutive days. Both the 6-minute walk test and StepWatch accelerometry identified a decreased capacity for ambulation in boys with Duchenne compared to healthy controls. There were strong, significant correlations between 6-minute walk distance and all StepWatch parameters in affected boys only (r = 0.701-0.804). These data proffer intriguing observations that warrant further exploration. Specifically, accelerometry outcomes may compliment the 6-minute walk test in assessment of therapeutic interventions for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  2. Reduced expression of sarcospan in muscles of Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Masahiko; Kojima, Hiroko; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Shibuya, Seiji; Jimi, Takahiro; Hara, Hajime; Matsuzaki, Yoko; Oniki, Hiroaki; Kanagawa, Motoi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Toda, Tatsushi

    2008-12-01

    Expression profiles of sarcospan in muscles with muscular dystrophies are scarcely reported. To examine this, we studied five Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) muscles, five Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) muscles, five disease control and five normal control muscles. Immunoblot showed reactions of sarcospan markedly decreased in FCMD and DMD muscle extracts. Immunohistochemistry of FCMD muscles showed that most large diameter myofibers expressed sarcospan discontinuously at their surface membranes. Immature small diameter FCMD myofibers usually did not express sarcospan. Immunoreactivity of sarcospan in DMD muscles was similarly reduced. With regard to dystroglycans and sarcoglycans, immunohistochemistry of FCMD muscles showed selective deficiency of glycosylated alpha-dystroglycan, together with reduced expression of beta-dystroglycan and alpha-, beta-, gamma-, delta-sarcoglycans. Although the expression of glycosylated alpha-dystroglycan was lost, scattered FCMD myofibers showed positive immunoreaction with an antibody against the core protein of alpha-dystroglycan. The group mean ratios of sarcospan mRNA copy number versus GAPDH mRNA copy number by real-time RT-PCR showed that the ratios between FCMD and normal control groups were not significantly different (P>0.1 by the two-tailed t test). This study implied either O-linked glycosylation defects of alpha-dystroglycan in the Golgi apparatus of FCMD muscles may lead to decreased expression of sarcoglycan and sarcospan molecules, or selective deficiency of glycosylated alpha-dystroglycan due to impaired glycosylation in FCMD muscles may affect the molecular integrity of the basal lamina of myofibers. This, in turn, leads to decreased expression of sarcoglycans, and finally of sarcospan at the FCMD myofiber surfaces.

  3. Fnip1 regulates skeletal muscle fiber type specification, fatigue resistance, and susceptibility to muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Nicholas L.; Banks, Glen B.; Tsang, Mark; Margineantu, Daciana; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Chan, Jacky; Torres, Michelle; Liggitt, H. Denny; Hirenallur-S, Dinesh K.; Hockenbery, David M.; Raftery, Daniel; Iritani, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscle is broadly characterized by the presence of two distinct categories of muscle fibers called type I “red” slow twitch and type II “white” fast twitch, which display marked differences in contraction strength, metabolic strategies, and susceptibility to fatigue. The relative representation of each fiber type can have major influences on susceptibility to obesity, diabetes, and muscular dystrophies. However, the molecular factors controlling fiber type specification remain incompletely defined. In this study, we describe the control of fiber type specification and susceptibility to metabolic disease by folliculin interacting protein-1 (Fnip1). Using Fnip1 null mice, we found that loss of Fnip1 increased the representation of type I fibers characterized by increased myoglobin, slow twitch markers [myosin heavy chain 7 (MyH7), succinate dehydrogenase, troponin I 1, troponin C1, troponin T1], capillary density, and mitochondria number. Cultured Fnip1-null muscle fibers had higher oxidative capacity, and isolated Fnip1-null skeletal muscles were more resistant to postcontraction fatigue relative to WT skeletal muscles. Biochemical analyses revealed increased activation of the metabolic sensor AMP kinase (AMPK), and increased expression of the AMPK-target and transcriptional coactivator PGC1α in Fnip1 null skeletal muscle. Genetic disruption of PGC1α rescued normal levels of type I fiber markers MyH7 and myoglobin in Fnip1-null mice. Remarkably, loss of Fnip1 profoundly mitigated muscle damage in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results indicate that Fnip1 controls skeletal muscle fiber type specification and warrant further study to determine whether inhibition of Fnip1 has therapeutic potential in muscular dystrophy diseases. PMID:25548157

  4. Fnip1 regulates skeletal muscle fiber type specification, fatigue resistance, and susceptibility to muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Nicholas L; Banks, Glen B; Tsang, Mark; Margineantu, Daciana; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Chan, Jacky; Torres, Michelle; Liggitt, H Denny; Hirenallur-S, Dinesh K; Hockenbery, David M; Raftery, Daniel; Iritani, Brian M

    2015-01-13

    Mammalian skeletal muscle is broadly characterized by the presence of two distinct categories of muscle fibers called type I "red" slow twitch and type II "white" fast twitch, which display marked differences in contraction strength, metabolic strategies, and susceptibility to fatigue. The relative representation of each fiber type can have major influences on susceptibility to obesity, diabetes, and muscular dystrophies. However, the molecular factors controlling fiber type specification remain incompletely defined. In this study, we describe the control of fiber type specification and susceptibility to metabolic disease by folliculin interacting protein-1 (Fnip1). Using Fnip1 null mice, we found that loss of Fnip1 increased the representation of type I fibers characterized by increased myoglobin, slow twitch markers [myosin heavy chain 7 (MyH7), succinate dehydrogenase, troponin I 1, troponin C1, troponin T1], capillary density, and mitochondria number. Cultured Fnip1-null muscle fibers had higher oxidative capacity, and isolated Fnip1-null skeletal muscles were more resistant to postcontraction fatigue relative to WT skeletal muscles. Biochemical analyses revealed increased activation of the metabolic sensor AMP kinase (AMPK), and increased expression of the AMPK-target and transcriptional coactivator PGC1α in Fnip1 null skeletal muscle. Genetic disruption of PGC1α rescued normal levels of type I fiber markers MyH7 and myoglobin in Fnip1-null mice. Remarkably, loss of Fnip1 profoundly mitigated muscle damage in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results indicate that Fnip1 controls skeletal muscle fiber type specification and warrant further study to determine whether inhibition of Fnip1 has therapeutic potential in muscular dystrophy diseases.

  5. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in a young patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kono, Tamami; Ogimoto, Akiyoshi; Nishimura, Kazuhisa; Yorozuya, Toshihiro; Okura, Takafumi; Higaki, Jitsuo

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old man with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was admitted to the hospital because of worsening dyspnea and general fatigue. He had received medication therapy for cardiomyopathy with heart failure and home mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure. An electrocardiogram on admission showed intermittent third-degree atrioventricular block. Echocardiography showed global mild left ventricular systolic dysfunction with dyssynchrony (ejection fraction: 45%). He underwent implantation of a cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillator. His B-type natriuretic peptide level was improved after cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillator implantation, and he remains asymptomatic. The incidence of cardiomyopathy increases with age. By adulthood, 100% of patients have cardiac involvement. PMID:26346252

  6. Scoliosis repair in a teenager with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy: who calls the shots?

    PubMed

    Miles, Fiona; Dare, Tim

    2009-10-01

    In this exchange, a clinician (the first author) presents a case scenario for comment by an ethicist (the second author). The case concerns a 15-year-old boy with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy requested palliative surgical correction of a 60 degree thoraco-lumbar scoliosis. The surgical team were initially reluctant to offer surgery given their assessment of the perioperative and postoperative risks (anesthetic review suggested an 80% chance of surviving the surgery and 50% likelihood of returning home), but the operation proceeded. The case raises issues of the rights of patients to insist on nonfutile but high risk surgery, risk perception, resource allocation, autonomy, and the integrity of clinicians.

  7. Metabogenic and Nutriceutical Approaches to Address Energy Dysregulation and Skeletal Muscle Wasting in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rybalka, Emma; Timpani, Cara A; Stathis, Christos G; Hayes, Alan; Cooke, Matthew B

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal genetic muscle wasting disease with no current cure. A prominent, yet poorly treated feature of dystrophic muscle is the dysregulation of energy homeostasis which may be associated with intrinsic defects in key energy systems and promote muscle wasting. As such, supplementative nutriceuticals that target and augment the bioenergetical expansion of the metabolic pathways involved in cellular energy production have been widely investigated for their therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of DMD. We describe the metabolic nuances of dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle and review the potential of various metabogenic and nutriceutical compounds to ameliorate the pathological and clinical progression of the disease. PMID:26703720

  8. miR-31 modulates dystrophin expression: new implications for Duchenne muscular dystrophy therapy.

    PubMed

    Cacchiarelli, Davide; Incitti, Tania; Martone, Julie; Cesana, Marcella; Cazzella, Valentina; Santini, Tiziana; Sthandier, Olga; Bozzoni, Irene

    2011-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)--which is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene-is one of the most severe myopathies. Among therapeutic strategies, exon skipping allows the rescue of dystrophin synthesis through the production of a shorter but functional messenger RNA. Here, we report the identification of a microRNA--miR-31--that represses dystrophin expression by targeting its 3' untranslated region. In human DMD myoblasts treated with exon skipping, we demonstrate that miR-31 inhibition increases dystrophin rescue. These results indicate that interfering with miR-31 activity can provide an ameliorating strategy for those DMD therapies that are aimed at efficiently recovering dystrophin synthesis.

  9. Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy: a test case for precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pillers, De-Ann M; Von Bergen, Nicholas H

    2016-01-01

    Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is characterized by the clinical triad of scapulohumeroperoneal muscle weakness, joint contractures, and cardiac defects that include arrhythmias and dilated cardiomyopathy. Although there is a defining group of clinical findings, the proteins responsible and their underlying gene defects leading to EDMD are varied. A common aspect of the gene defects is their involvement in, or with, the nuclear envelope. Treatment approaches are largely based on clinical symptoms. The genetic diversity of EDMD predicts that a cure will ultimately depend upon the individual’s defect at the gene level, making this an ideal candidate for a precision medicine approach. PMID:26966385

  10. Metabogenic and Nutriceutical Approaches to Address Energy Dysregulation and Skeletal Muscle Wasting in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rybalka, Emma; Timpani, Cara A.; Stathis, Christos G.; Hayes, Alan; Cooke, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal genetic muscle wasting disease with no current cure. A prominent, yet poorly treated feature of dystrophic muscle is the dysregulation of energy homeostasis which may be associated with intrinsic defects in key energy systems and promote muscle wasting. As such, supplementative nutriceuticals that target and augment the bioenergetical expansion of the metabolic pathways involved in cellular energy production have been widely investigated for their therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of DMD. We describe the metabolic nuances of dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle and review the potential of various metabogenic and nutriceutical compounds to ameliorate the pathological and clinical progression of the disease. PMID:26703720

  11. Discovery of 2-arylbenzoxazoles as upregulators of utrophin production for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, Daniel R; Davies, Kay E; De Moor, Olivier; Dorgan, Colin R; Johnson, Peter D; Lambert, Adam G; Lawrence, Daniel; Lecci, Cristina; Maillol, Carole; Middleton, Penny J; Nugent, Gary; Poignant, Séverine D; Potter, Allyson C; Price, Paul D; Pye, Richard J; Storer, Richard; Tinsley, Jonathon M; van Well, Renate; Vickers, Richard; Vile, Julia; Wilkes, Fraser J; Wilson, Francis X; Wren, Stephen P; Wynne, Graham M

    2011-05-12

    A series of novel 2-arylbenzoxazoles that upregulate the production of utrophin in murine H2K cells, as assessed using a luciferase reporter linked assay, have been identified. This compound class appears to hold considerable promise as a potential treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Following the delineation of structure-activity relationships in the series, a number of potent upregulators were identified, and preliminary ADME evaluation is described. These studies have resulted in the identification of 1, a compound that has been progressed to clinical trials.

  12. Rigid spinal muscular dystrophy and rigid spine syndrome: report of 7 children.

    PubMed

    Koul, Roshan; Al-Yarubi, Saif; Al-Kindy, Hussein; Al-Futaisi, Amna; Al-Thihli, Khalid; Chacko, Poovathoor Alexander; Sankhla, Dilip

    2014-11-01

    Seven children (5 male, 2 female) were seen over the last 16 years with rigid spine syndrome. Six children had rigid spinal muscular dystrophy (selenoprotein N1-related myopathy [SEPN1RM]) and 1 had myopathy associated with rigid spine. The main presenting complaint in all was difficulty in bending the spine. The diagnosis was made on clinical features and imaging of the paraspinal muscles. Muscle histopathology revealed minimal myopathic changes to severe muscle degeneration. Genetic testing, which was only available for the last case, for selenoprotein was negative.

  13. What's in a name? The clinical features of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mul, Karlien; Lassche, Saskia; Voermans, Nicol C; Padberg, George W; Horlings, Corinne Gc; van Engelen, Baziel Gm

    2016-06-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an inherited and progressive muscle disorder. Although its name suggests otherwise, it comprises weakness of the facial, shoulder and upper arm muscles, and also of the trunk and leg muscles. Its severity and disease course vary greatly and mild or early FSHD can be difficult to recognise. Knowledge of its subtle signs and symptoms can lead directly to the correct diagnosis without diagnostic delay and without needing multiple diagnostic procedures. We give an overview of the signs and symptoms of FSHD in severe as well as in mild cases, to facilitate correct and instant recognition of this relatively common muscle disorder. PMID:26862222

  14. A heterozygous 21-bp deletion in CAPN3 causes dominantly inherited limb girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Vissing, John; Barresi, Rita; Witting, Nanna; Van Ghelue, Marijke; Gammelgaard, Lise; Bindoff, Laurence A; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Hudson, Judith; Wahl, Christoph M; Arnardottir, Snjolaug; Dahlbom, Kathe; Jonsrud, Christoffer; Duno, Morten

    2016-08-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A is the most common limb girdle muscular dystrophy form worldwide. Although strict recessive inheritance is assumed, patients carrying a single mutation in the calpain 3 gene (CAPN3) are reported. Such findings are commonly attributed to incomplete mutation screening. In this investigation, we report 37 individuals (age range: 21-85 years, 21 females and 16 males) from 10 families in whom only one mutation in CAPN3 could be identified; a 21-bp, in-frame deletion (c.643_663del21). This mutation co-segregated with evidence of muscle disease and autosomal dominant transmission in several generations. Evidence of muscle disease was indicated by muscle pain, muscle weakness and wasting, significant fat replacement of muscles on imaging, myopathic changes on muscle biopsy and loss of calpain 3 protein on western blotting. Thirty-one of 34 patients had elevated creatine kinase or myoglobin. Muscle weakness was generally milder than observed in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, but affected the same muscle groups (proximal leg, lumbar paraspinal and medial gastrocnemius muscles). In some cases, the weakness was severely disabling. The 21-bp deletion did not affect mRNA maturation. Calpain 3 expression in muscle, assessed by western blot, was below 15% of normal levels in the nine mutation carriers in whom this could be tested. Haplotype analysis in four families from three different countries suggests that the 21-bp deletion is a founder mutation. This study provides strong evidence that heterozygosity for the c.643_663del21 deletion in CAPN3 results in a dominantly inherited muscle disease. The normal expression of mutated mRNA and the severe loss of calpain 3 on western blotting, suggest a dominant negative effect with a loss-of-function mechanism affecting the calpain 3 homodimer. This renders patients deficient in calpain 3 as in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, albeit in a milder form in most cases. Based on findings

  15. [Dyspnea caused by bullae in a muscular dystrophy patient on chronic intermittent ventilatory support].

    PubMed

    van Santen, G; Meuzelaar, J J; Tulleken, J E; Zijlstra, J G; Meinesz, A F; van der Werf, T S

    1999-12-11

    A 65-year-old patient, ex-smoker, with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) had been on home non invasive ventilatory support for three years when he experienced gradual increase of dyspnoea. The chest radiograph showed large bullae occupying most of the right hemithorax, with compression of lung tissue, mediastinal shift, and compression of the left lower lobe. Bullectomy resulted in rapid clinical and radiographic improvement. This is the first report of beneficial effects of emergency bullectomy in FSHD. Bullectomy has proved most successful in patients with localized bullae and compression of surrounding lung tissue. Patients with respiratory infections and bronchiectasis benefit less. PMID:10627757

  16. Therapy of Genetic Disorders—Novel Therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Seto, Jane T.; Bengtsson, Niclas E.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited, progressive muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. An increasing variety of approaches are moving towards clinical testing that all aim to restore dystrophin production and to enhance or preserve muscle mass. Gene therapy methods are being developed to replace the defective dystrophin gene or induce dystrophin production from mutant genes. Stem cell approaches are being developed to replace lost muscle cells while also bringing in new dystrophin genes. This review summarizes recent progress in the field with an emphasis on clinical applications. PMID:24883236

  17. Occurrence of two different intragenic deletions in two male relatives affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Mostacciuolo, M.L.; Miorin, M.; Vitiello, L.; Rampazzo, A.; Fanin, M.; Angelini, C.; Danieli, G.A.

    1994-03-01

    The occurrence of 2 different intragenic deletions (exons 10-44 and exon 45, respectively) is reported in 2 male relatives affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, both showing the same haplotype for DNA markers not included in the deleted segment. The 2 different deletions seem to have occurred independently in the same X chromosome. This finding, together with other reports, suggests possibly an increased predisposition to mutations within the DMD locus in some families. Therefore, when dealing with prenatal diagnosis, the investigation on fetal DNA cannot be restricted only to the region in which a mutation was previously identified in the family. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  18. The Molecular Basis of Muscular Dystrophy in the mdx Mouse: A Point Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicinski, Piotr; Geng, Yan; Ryder-Cook, Allan S.; Barnard, Eric A.; Darlison, Mark G.; Barnard, Pene J.

    1989-06-01

    The mdx mouse is an X-linked myopathic mutant, an animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In both mouse and man the mutations lie within the dystrophin gene, but the phenotypic differences of the disease in the two species confer much interest on the molecular basis of the mdx mutation. The complementary DNA for mouse dystrophin has been cloned, and the sequence has been used in the polymerase chain reaction to amplify normal and mdx dystrophin transcripts in the area of the mdx mutation. Sequence analysis of the amplification products showed that the mdx mouse has a single base substitution within an exon, which causes premature termination of the polypeptide chain.

  19. Rapid carrier and prenatal diagnosis of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.G.; Cole, C.G.; Hart, K.A.; Bobrow, M.; Bentley, D.R. )

    1989-01-25

    Carrier and prenatal diagnosis of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD and BMD) by DNA methods uses Southern blotting to detect either the informative segregation of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) or the absence of restriction fragments in affected males. Recently, the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for rapid detection of deletions in some affected males was reported eliminating the need for Southern blotting of 37% of all samples. This approach is not applicable, however, to non-deletion cases or for carrier diagnosis. The authors have used PCR for rapid analysis of intragenic RFLPs to permit both carrier and prenatal diagnosis in the majority of familial cases.

  20. [Congenital muscular dystrophy with laminin-a2 deficiency in early infancy: diagnosis and long-term follow-up].

    PubMed

    Panteliadis, C; Karatza, E; Xinias, I; Flaris, N; Tzitiridou, M; Ramantani, G

    2005-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is a heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by muscle weakness and hypotonia at birth or within the first few months of life. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. About half of the patients have a deficiency of the alpha-2-chain of laminin (merosin). We describe a case of congenital muscular dystrophy in an infant with laminin-a2-chain deficiency, which appeared hypotonia in early infancy. Diagnosis was made by clinical features and the histological and immunohistochemical studies on muscle biopsy.

  1. TOR1AIP1 as a cause of cardiac failure and recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ghaoui, Roula; Benavides, Tatiana; Lek, Monkol; Waddell, Leigh B; Kaur, Simranpreet; North, Kathryn N; MacArthur, Daniel G; Clarke, Nigel F; Cooper, Sandra T

    2016-08-01

    TorsinA-interacting protein 1 (TOR1AIP1) gene is a novel gene that has recently been described to cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with mild dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a family with mutations in TOR1AIP1 where the striking clinical feature is severe cardiac failure requiring cardiac transplant in two siblings, in addition to musculoskeletal weakness and muscular dystrophy. We demonstrate an absence of TOR1AIP1 protein expression in cardiac and skeletal muscles of affected siblings. We expand the phenotype of this gene to demonstrate the cardiac involvement and the importance of cardiac surveillance in patients with mutations in TOR1AIP1.

  2. Treatable renal failure found in non-ambulatory Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Motoki, Takahiro; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Komaki, Hirofumi; Mori-Yoshimura, Madoka; Oya, Yasushi; Takeshita, Eri; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Saito, Takashi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Murata, Miho; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscular disorder in which respiratory and heart failures are the main causes of death. Intensive intervention in respiratory and cardiac function has dramatically improved the prognosis; however, dysfunction in other multiple organs may emerge in the later stages of the disease. We report the case of four non-ambulatory DMD patients who presented with renal failure. Common findings included decreased fluid intake, use of diuretics, and presence of chronic heart failure. The levels of serum cystatin C (CysC), a marker of kidney function unaffected by reduced muscle mass, were elevated in all four patients. In two patients, renal failure improved by increasing fluid intake, and discontinuing or reducing the dose of diuretics. The findings suggest that non-ambulatory DMD patients are at a risk of reduced kidney perfusion, which potentially leads to prerenal failure. Therefore, in DMD patients, dehydration signs and CysC levels should be monitored.

  3. G-CSF supports long-term muscle regeneration in mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hayashiji, Nozomi; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Hara, Mie; Ito, Naoki; Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Seki, Tomohisa; Tohyama, Shugo; Kodaira, Masaki; Kunitomi, Akira; Kashimura, Shin; Takei, Makoto; Saito, Yuki; Okata, Shinichiro; Egashira, Toru; Endo, Jin; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-04-13

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a chronic and life-threatening disease that is initially supported by muscle regeneration but eventually shows satellite cell exhaustion and muscular dysfunction. The life-long maintenance of skeletal muscle homoeostasis requires the satellite stem cell pool to be preserved. Asymmetric cell division plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the satellite cell pool. Here we show that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) is asymmetrically expressed in activated satellite cells. G-CSF positively affects the satellite cell population during multiple stages of differentiation in ex vivo cultured fibres. G-CSF could be important in developing an effective therapy for DMD based on its potential to modulate the supply of multiple stages of regenerated myocytes. This study shows that the G-CSF-G-CSFR axis is fundamentally important for long-term muscle regeneration, functional maintenance and lifespan extension in mouse models of DMD with varying severities.

  4. Air stacking: effects on pulmonary function in patients with spinal muscular atrophy and in patients with congenital muscular dystrophy*,**

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Tanyse Bahia Carvalho; Neves, Juliana de Carvalho; Portes, Leslie Andrews; Salge, João Marcos; Zanoteli, Edmar; Reed, Umbertina Conti

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Respiratory complications are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD). The objectives of this study were to determine the effects that routine daily home air-stacking maneuvers have on pulmonary function in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and in patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD), as well as to identify associations between spinal deformities and the effects of the maneuvers. METHODS: Eighteen NMD patients (ten with CMD and eight with SMA) were submitted to routine daily air-stacking maneuvers at home with manual resuscitators for four to six months, undergoing pulmonary function tests before and after that period. The pulmonary function tests included measurements of FVC; PEF; maximum insufflation capacity (MIC); and assisted and unassisted peak cough flow (APCF and UPCF, respectively) with insufflations. RESULTS: After the use of home air-stacking maneuvers, there were improvements in the APCF and UPCF. In the patients without scoliosis, there was also a significant increase in FVC. When comparing patients with and without scoliosis, the increases in APCF and UPCF were more pronounced in those without scoliosis. CONCLUSIONS: Routine daily air-stacking maneuvers with a manual resuscitator appear to increase UPCF and APCF in patients with NMD, especially in those without scoliosis. PMID:25410841

  5. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by males with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nabukera, Sarah K; Romitti, Paul A; Campbell, Kimberly A; Meaney, F John; Caspers, Kristin M; Mathews, Katherine D; Sherlock, Stacey M Hockett; Puzhankara, Soman; Cunniff, Christopher; Druschel, Charlotte M; Pandya, Shree; Matthews, Dennis J; Ciafaloni, Emma

    2012-06-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine by males with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy was examined using interview reports from caregivers enrolled in the population-based Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network. Of the 200 caregivers interviewed, 160 (80%) reported "ever" using complementary and alternative medicine for their affected children. Mind-body medicine (61.5%) was most frequently used, followed by biologically based practices (48.0%), manipulative and body-based practices (29.0%), and whole medical systems (8.5%). Caregivers reporting use of whole medical systems had higher education and income levels compared with nonusers; affected males had shorter disease duration. Caregivers reporting use of mind-body medicine, excluding aquatherapy, had higher education level compared with nonusers. Overall, complementary and alternative medicine use was high; disease duration, education, and income levels influenced use. These findings have implications for developing clinical care protocols and monitoring possible interactions between complementary and alternative medicine and conventional medical therapies.

  6. Functional changes in Becker muscular dystrophy: implications for clinical trials in dystrophinopathies.

    PubMed

    Bello, Luca; Campadello, Paola; Barp, Andrea; Fanin, Marina; Semplicini, Claudio; Sorarù, Gianni; Caumo, Luca; Calore, Chiara; Angelini, Corrado; Pegoraro, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We performed a 1-year longitudinal study of Six Minute Walk Test (6MWT), North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA), and timed function tests in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Skeletal muscle dystrophin was quantified by immunoblot. We grouped deletions ending on exon 45 ("del 45-x", n = 28) or 51 ("del x-51", n = 10); isolated exon 48 deletion ("del 48", n = 10); and other mutations (n = 21). Only patients in the "del 45-x" or "other" groups became non-ambulatory (n = 5, log-rank p = n.s.) or unable to run (n = 22, p < 0.001). All measures correlated positively with dystrophin quantity and negatively with age, and were significantly more impaired in the "del 45-x" and "other" groups. After one year, NSAA score decreased significantly (-0.9 ± 1.6, p < 0.001); in the "del 45-x" group, both NSAA (-1.3 ± 1.7, p = 0.001) and 6MWT (-12 ± 31 m, p = 0.059) decreased. We conclude that patients with "del x-51" or "del 48" mutations have mild or asymptomatic BMD, while "del 45-x" mutations cause comparatively severe weakness, and functional deterioration in 1 year. Furthermore, exon 51 skipping could be more effective than exon 45 skipping in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:27582364

  7. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in the Agarwals: Utility of founder mutations in CAPN3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Khadilkar, Satish V.; Chaudhari, Chetan R.; Dastur, Rashna S.; Gaitonde, Pradnya S.; Yadav, Jayendra G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Diagnostic evaluation of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) involves specialized studies on muscle biopsy and mutation analysis. Mutation screening is the gold standard for diagnosis but is difficult as the gene is large and multiple mutations are known. This study evaluates the utility of two known founder mutations as a first-line diagnostic test for LGMD2A in the Agarwals. Materials and Methods: The Agarwals with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) phenotype were analyzed for two founder alleles (intron 18/exon 19 c.2051-1G>T and exon 22 c.2338G>C). Asymptomatic first-degree relatives of patients with genetically confirmed mutations and desirous of counseling were screened for founder mutations. Results: Founder alleles were detected in 26 out of 29 subjects with LGMD phenotype (89%). The most common genotype observed was homozygous for exon 22 c.2338 G>C mutation followed by compound heterozygosity. Single founder allele was identified in two. Single allele was detected in two of the five asymptomatic relatives. Conclusion: Eighty-nine percent of the Agarwals having LGMD phenotype have LGMD2A resulting from founder mutations. Founder allele analysis can be utilized as the initial noninvasive diagnostic step for index cases, carrier detection, and counseling. PMID:27011640

  8. Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Cardiac Failure in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mourkioti, Foteini; Kustan, Jackie; Kraft, Peggy; Day, John W.; Zhao, Ming-Ming; Kost-Alimova, Maria; Protopopov, Alexei; DePinho, Ronald A.; Bernstein, Daniel; Meeker, Alan K.; Blau, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), the most common inherited muscular dystrophy of childhood, leads to death due to cardiorespiratory failure. Paradoxically, mdx mice with the same genetic deficiency of dystrophin, exhibit minimal cardiac dysfunction, impeding the development of therapies. We postulated that the difference between mdx and DMD might result from differences in telomere lengths in mice and humans. We show here that, like DMD patients, mice that lack dystrophin and have shortened telomeres (mdx/mTRKO) develop severe functional cardiac deficits including ventricular dilation, contractile and conductance dysfunction, and accelerated mortality. These cardiac defects are accompanied by telomere erosion, mitochondrial fragmentation, and increased oxidative stress. Treatment with anti-oxidants significantly retards the onset of cardiac dysfunction and death of mdx/mTRKO mice. In corroboration, of four DMD patients analyzed, all had 45% shorter telomeres in their cardiomyocytes relative to age- and sex-matched controls. We propose that the demands of contraction in the absence of dystrophin coupled with increased oxidative stress conspire to accelerate telomere erosion culminating in cardiac failure and death. These findings provide strong support for a link between telomere length and dystrophin deficiency in the etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD and suggest preventive interventions. PMID:23831727

  9. Glycosaminoglycan modifications in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: specific remodeling of chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Elisa; Henault, Emilie; Chevalier, Fabien; Gilbert-Sirieix, Marie; Van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Papy-Garcia, Dulce; Uzan, Georges; Albanese, Patricia

    2014-08-01

    Widespread skeletal muscle degeneration and impaired regeneration lead to progressive muscle weakness and premature death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Dystrophic muscles are progressively replaced by nonfunctional tissue because of exhaustion of muscle precursor cells and excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM). Sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are components of the ECM and are increasingly implicated in the regulation of biologic processes, but their possible role in the progression of DMD pathology is not understood. In the present study, we performed immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses of endogenous GAGs in skeletal muscle biopsies of 10 DMD patients and 11 healthy individuals (controls). Immunostaining targeted to specific GAG species showed greater deposition of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan (DS) sulfate in DMD patient biopsies versus control biopsies. The selective accumulation of CS/DS in DMD biopsies was confirmed by biochemical quantification assay. In addition, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated a modification of the sulfation pattern of CS/DS disaccharide units in DMD muscles. In conclusion, our data open up a new path of investigation and suggest that GAGs could represent a new and original therapeutic target for improving the success of gene or cell therapy for the treatment of muscular dystrophies.

  10. Exome analysis of two limb-girdle muscular dystrophy families: mutations identified and challenges encountered.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kristin K; Stajich, Jeffrey; Blach, Colette; Ashley-Koch, Allison E; Hauser, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The molecular diagnosis of muscle disorders is challenging: genetic heterogeneity (>100 causal genes for skeletal and cardiac muscle disease) precludes exhaustive clinical testing, prioritizing sequencing of specific genes is difficult due to the similarity of clinical presentation, and the number of variants returned through exome sequencing can make the identification of the disease-causing variant difficult. We have filtered variants found through exome sequencing by prioritizing variants in genes known to be involved in muscle disease while examining the quality and depth of coverage of those genes. We ascertained two families with autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy of unknown etiology. To identify the causal mutations in these families, we performed exome sequencing on five affected individuals using the Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon 50 Mb kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 (2×100 bp). We identified causative mutations in desmin (IVS3+3A>G) and filamin C (p.W2710X), and augmented the phenotype data for individuals with muscular dystrophy due to these mutations. We also discuss challenges encountered due to depth of coverage variability at specific sites and the annotation of a functionally proven splice site variant as an intronic variant.

  11. MMP-10 is required for efficient muscle regeneration in mouse models of injury and muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, Míriam; Sáinz, Neira; Rodriguez, José Antonio; Abizanda, Gloria; Orbe, Josune; de Martino, Alba; García Verdugo, José Manuel; Páramo, José A; Prósper, Felipe; Pérez-Ruiz, Ana

    2014-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of endopeptidases that are involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix components, have been implicated in skeletal muscle regeneration. Among the MMPs, MMP-2 and MMP-9 are upregulated in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a fatal X-linked muscle disorder. However, inhibition or overexpression of specific MMPs in a mouse model of DMD (mdx) has yielded mixed results regarding disease progression, depending on the MMP studied. Here, we have examined the role of MMP-10 in muscle regeneration during injury and muscular dystrophy. We found that skeletal muscle increases MMP-10 protein expression in response to damage (notexin) or disease (mdx mice), suggesting its role in muscle regeneration. In addition, we found that MMP-10-deficient muscles displayed impaired recruitment of endothelial cells, reduced levels of extracellular matrix proteins, diminished collagen deposition, and decreased fiber size, which collectively contributed to delayed muscle regeneration after injury. Also, MMP-10 knockout in mdx mice led to a deteriorated dystrophic phenotype. Moreover, MMP-10 mRNA silencing in injured muscles (wild-type and mdx) reduced muscle regeneration, while addition of recombinant human MMP-10 accelerated muscle repair, suggesting that MMP-10 is required for efficient muscle regeneration. Furthermore, our data suggest that MMP-10-mediated muscle repair is associated with VEGF/Akt signaling. Thus, our findings indicate that MMP-10 is critical for skeletal muscle maintenance and regeneration during injury and disease. PMID:24123596

  12. Suitability of North Star Ambulatory Assessment in young boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Roberto; Pane, Marika; Sivo, Serena; Ricotti, Valeria; Baranello, Giovanni; Frosini, Silvia; Mazzone, Elena; Bianco, Flaviana; Fanelli, Lavinia; Main, Marion; Corlatti, Alice; D'Amico, Adele; Colia, Giulia; Scalise, Roberta; Palermo, Concetta; Alfonsi, Chiara; Tritto, Giovanna; Romeo, Domenico M; Graziano, Alessandra; Battini, Roberta; Morandi, Lucia; Bertini, Enrico; Muntoni, Francesco; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the suitability of the North Star Ambulatory Assessment for use in young boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We studied 147 typically developing and 144 boys affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy between the ages of 3 and 5 years. More than 85% of the typically developing boys by the age of 4 years had full scores on all the items with total scores ≥33/34. Before the age of 4 years more than 15% of the typically developing boys did not achieve full scores on all the items. Some items, such as standing on one leg, showed significant improvement with age. In contrast, other activities were rarely achieved even in the older boys. Even if there was a progressive increase in scores with age, both total and individual item scores in Duchenne were still far from those obtained in the typically developing children of the same age. Our findings suggest that the North Star Ambulatory Assessment can be reliably used at least from the age of 4 years. Longitudinal natural history data studies are needed to assess possible changes over time and the possible effect of early steroids.

  13. Progressive muscle proteome changes in a clinically relevant pig model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Thomas; Kemter, Elisabeth; Flenkenthaler, Florian; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Otte, Kathrin A; Blutke, Andreas; Krause, Sabine; Walter, Maggie C; Wanke, Rüdiger; Wolf, Eckhard; Arnold, Georg J

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by genetic deficiency of dystrophin and characterized by massive structural and functional changes of skeletal muscle tissue, leading to terminal muscle failure. We recently generated a novel genetically engineered pig model reflecting pathological hallmarks of human DMD better than the widely used mdx mouse. To get insight into the hierarchy of molecular derangements during DMD progression, we performed a proteome analysis of biceps femoris muscle samples from 2-day-old and 3-month-old DMD and wild-type (WT) pigs. The extent of proteome changes in DMD vs. WT muscle increased markedly with age, reflecting progression of the pathological changes. In 3-month-old DMD muscle, proteins related to muscle repair such as vimentin, nestin, desmin and tenascin C were found to be increased, whereas a large number of respiratory chain proteins were decreased in abundance in DMD muscle, indicating serious disturbances in aerobic energy production and a reduction of functional muscle tissue. The combination of proteome data for fiber type specific myosin heavy chain proteins and immunohistochemistry showed preferential degeneration of fast-twitch fiber types in DMD muscle. The stage-specific proteome changes detected in this large animal model of clinically severe muscular dystrophy provide novel molecular readouts for future treatment trials. PMID:27634466

  14. Reengineering a transmembrane protein to treat muscular dystrophy using exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Gao, Quan Q; Wyatt, Eugene; Goldstein, Jeff A; LoPresti, Peter; Castillo, Lisa M; Gazda, Alec; Petrossian, Natalie; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Barefield, David Y; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Bönnemann, Carsten; Wolf, Matthew; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2015-11-01

    Exon skipping uses antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for genetic diseases. The antisense oligonucleotides used for exon skipping are designed to bypass premature stop codons in the target RNA and restore reading frame disruption. Exon skipping is currently being tested in humans with dystrophin gene mutations who have Duchenne muscular dystrophy. For Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the rationale for exon skipping derived from observations in patients with naturally occurring dystrophin gene mutations that generated internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin proteins. We have now expanded the potential for exon skipping by testing whether an internal, in-frame truncation of a transmembrane protein γ-sarcoglycan is functional. We generated an internally truncated γ-sarcoglycan protein that we have termed Mini-Gamma by deleting a large portion of the extracellular domain. Mini-Gamma provided functional and pathological benefits to correct the loss of γ-sarcoglycan in a Drosophila model, in heterologous cell expression studies, and in transgenic mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan. We generated a cellular model of human muscle disease and showed that multiple exon skipping could be induced in RNA that encodes a mutant human γ-sarcoglycan. Since Mini-Gamma represents removal of 4 of the 7 coding exons in γ-sarcoglycan, this approach provides a viable strategy to treat the majority of patients with γ-sarcoglycan gene mutations.

  15. Differences in Contraction-Induced Hemodynamics and Surface EMG in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Van Ginderdeuren, Eva; Caicedo, Alexander; Taelmans, Joachim; Goemans, Nathalie; van den Hauwe, Marlen; Naulaers, Gunnar; Van Huffel, Sabine; Buyse, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and devastating type of muscular dystrophy worldwide. In this study we have investigated the potential of the combined use of non-invasive near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and surface electromyography (sEMG) to assess contraction-induced changes in oxygenation and myoelectrical activity, respectively in the biceps brachii of eight DMD patients aged 9-12 years and 11 age-matched healthy controls. Muscle tissue oxygenation index (TOI), oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), and sEMG signals were continuously measured during a sustained submaximal contraction of 60% maximal voluntary isometric contraction, and post-exercise recovery period. Compared to controls, DMD subjects showed significantly smaller changes in TOI during the contraction. In addition, during the reoxygenation phase some dynamic parameters extracted from the HbO2 measurements were significantly different between the two groups, some of which were correlated with functional performances on a 6-min walking test. In conclusion, non-invasive continuous monitoring of skeletal muscle oxygenation by NIRS is feasible in young children, and significant differences in contraction-induced deoxygenation and reoxygenation patterns were observed between healthy controls and DMD children.

  16. Electrical impedance myography for the assessment of children with muscular dystrophy: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Rutkove, S B; Darras, B T

    2013-01-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) provides a non-invasive approach for quantifying the severity of neuromuscular disease. Here we determine how well EIM data correlates to functional and ultrasound (US) measures of disease in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and healthy subjects. Thirteen healthy boys, aged 2-12 years and 14 boys with DMD aged 4-12 years underwent both EIM and US measurements of deltoid, biceps, wrist flexors, quadriceps, tibialis anterior, and medial gastrocnemius. EIM measurements were performed with a custom-designed probe using a commercial multifrequency bioimpedance device. US luminosity data were quantified using a gray-scale analysis approach. Children also underwent the 6-minute walk test, timed tests and strength measurements. EIM and US data were combined across muscles. EIM 50 kHz phase was able to discriminate DMD children from healthy subjects with 98% accuracy. In the DMD patients, average EIM phase measurements also correlated well with standard functional measures. For example the 50 kHz phase correlated with the Northstar Ambulatory Assessment test (R = 0.83, p = 0.02). EIM 50 kHz phase and US correlated as well, with R = −0.79 (p < 0.001). These results show that EIM provides valuable objective measures Duchenne muscular dystrophy severity. PMID:23894248

  17. Progressive muscle proteome changes in a clinically relevant pig model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Thomas; Kemter, Elisabeth; Flenkenthaler, Florian; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Otte, Kathrin A.; Blutke, Andreas; Krause, Sabine; Walter, Maggie C.; Wanke, Rüdiger; Wolf, Eckhard; Arnold, Georg J.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by genetic deficiency of dystrophin and characterized by massive structural and functional changes of skeletal muscle tissue, leading to terminal muscle failure. We recently generated a novel genetically engineered pig model reflecting pathological hallmarks of human DMD better than the widely used mdx mouse. To get insight into the hierarchy of molecular derangements during DMD progression, we performed a proteome analysis of biceps femoris muscle samples from 2-day-old and 3-month-old DMD and wild-type (WT) pigs. The extent of proteome changes in DMD vs. WT muscle increased markedly with age, reflecting progression of the pathological changes. In 3-month-old DMD muscle, proteins related to muscle repair such as vimentin, nestin, desmin and tenascin C were found to be increased, whereas a large number of respiratory chain proteins were decreased in abundance in DMD muscle, indicating serious disturbances in aerobic energy production and a reduction of functional muscle tissue. The combination of proteome data for fiber type specific myosin heavy chain proteins and immunohistochemistry showed preferential degeneration of fast-twitch fiber types in DMD muscle. The stage-specific proteome changes detected in this large animal model of clinically severe muscular dystrophy provide novel molecular readouts for future treatment trials. PMID:27634466

  18. Determining the role of sarcomeric proteins in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although muscle weakness is a hallmark of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), the molecular mechanisms that lead to weakness in FSHD remain largely unknown. Recent studies suggest aberrant expression of genes involved in skeletal muscle development and sarcomere contractility, and activation of pathways involved in sarcomeric protein degradation. This study will investigate the contribution of sarcomeric protein dysfunction to the pathogenesis of muscle weakness in FSHD. Methods/Design Evaluation of sarcomeric function using skinned single muscle fiber contractile studies and protein analysis in muscle biopsies (quadriceps femoris and tibialis anterior) from patients with FSHD and age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Patients with other forms of muscular dystrophy and inflammatory myopathy will be included as disease controls to assess whether results are due to changes specific for FSHD, or a consequence of muscle disease in general. A total of 56 participants will be included. Extensive clinical parameters will be measured using MRI, quantitative muscle studies and physical activity assessments. Discussion This study is the first to extensively investigate muscle fiber physiology in FSHD following an earlier pilot study suggesting sarcomeric dysfunction in FSHD. The results obtained in this study will increase the understanding of the pathophysiology of muscle weakness in FSHD, and possibly identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24119284

  19. Reengineering a transmembrane protein to treat muscular dystrophy using exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Gao, Quan Q; Wyatt, Eugene; Goldstein, Jeff A; LoPresti, Peter; Castillo, Lisa M; Gazda, Alec; Petrossian, Natalie; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Barefield, David Y; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Bönnemann, Carsten; Wolf, Matthew; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2015-11-01

    Exon skipping uses antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for genetic diseases. The antisense oligonucleotides used for exon skipping are designed to bypass premature stop codons in the target RNA and restore reading frame disruption. Exon skipping is currently being tested in humans with dystrophin gene mutations who have Duchenne muscular dystrophy. For Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the rationale for exon skipping derived from observations in patients with naturally occurring dystrophin gene mutations that generated internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin proteins. We have now expanded the potential for exon skipping by testing whether an internal, in-frame truncation of a transmembrane protein γ-sarcoglycan is functional. We generated an internally truncated γ-sarcoglycan protein that we have termed Mini-Gamma by deleting a large portion of the extracellular domain. Mini-Gamma provided functional and pathological benefits to correct the loss of γ-sarcoglycan in a Drosophila model, in heterologous cell expression studies, and in transgenic mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan. We generated a cellular model of human muscle disease and showed that multiple exon skipping could be induced in RNA that encodes a mutant human γ-sarcoglycan. Since Mini-Gamma represents removal of 4 of the 7 coding exons in γ-sarcoglycan, this approach provides a viable strategy to treat the majority of patients with γ-sarcoglycan gene mutations. PMID:26457733

  20. Electrical impedance myography for the assessment of children with muscular dystrophy: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkove, S. B.; Darras, B. T.

    2013-04-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) provides a non-invasive approach for quantifying the severity of neuromuscular disease. Here we determine how well EIM data correlates to functional and ultrasound (US) measures of disease in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and healthy subjects. Thirteen healthy boys, aged 2-12 years and 14 boys with DMD aged 4-12 years underwent both EIM and US measurements of deltoid, biceps, wrist flexors, quadriceps, tibialis anterior, and medial gastrocnemius. EIM measurements were performed with a custom-designed probe using a commercial multifrequency bioimpedance device. US luminosity data were quantified using a gray-scale analysis approach. Children also underwent the 6-minute walk test, timed tests and strength measurements. EIM and US data were combined across muscles. EIM 50 kHz phase was able to discriminate DMD children from healthy subjects with 98% accuracy. In the DMD patients, average EIM phase measurements also correlated well with standard functional measures. For example the 50 kHz phase correlated with the Northstar Ambulatory Assessment test (R = 0.83, p = 0.02). EIM 50 kHz phase and US correlated as well, with R = -0.79 (p < 0.001). These results show that EIM provides valuable objective measures Duchenne muscular dystrophy severity.

  1. Studying the role of dystrophin-associated proteins in influencing Becker muscular dystrophy disease severity.

    PubMed

    van den Bergen, J C; Wokke, B H A; Hulsker, M A; Verschuuren, J J G M; Aartsma-Rus, A M

    2015-03-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy is characterized by a variable disease course. Many factors have been implicated to contribute to this diversity, among which the expression of several components of the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex. Together with dystrophin, most of these proteins anchor the muscle fiber cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix, thus protecting the muscle from contraction induced injury, while nNOS is primarily involved in inducing vasodilation during muscle contraction, enabling adequate muscle oxygenation. In the current study, we investigated the role of three components of the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex (beta-dystroglycan, gamma-sarcoglycan and nNOS) and the dystrophin homologue utrophin on disease severity in Becker patients. Strength measurements, data about disease course and fresh muscle biopsies of the anterior tibial muscle were obtained from 24 Becker patients aged 19 to 66. The designation of Becker muscular dystrophy in this study was based on the mutation and not on the clinical severity. Contrary to previous studies, we were unable to find a relationship between expression of nNOS, beta-dystroglycan and gamma-sarcoglycan at the sarcolemma and disease severity, as measured by muscle strength in five muscle groups and age at reaching several disease milestones. Unexpectedly, we found an inverse correlation between utrophin expression at the sarcolemma and age at reaching disease milestones.

  2. Missense mutations in the adhalin gene linked to autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Roberds, S.L.; Anderson, R.D.; Lim, L.E.

    1994-09-01

    Adhalin, the 50-kDa dystrophin-associated glycoprotein, is deficient in skeletal muscle of patients having severe childhood autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy (SCARMD). In several North African families, SCARMD has been linked to markers in the pericentromeric region of chromosome l3q, but SCARMD has been excluded from linkage to this locus in other families. To determine whether the adhalin gene might be involved in SCARMD, human adhalin cDNA and large portions of the adhalin gene were cloned. Adhalin is a transmembrane glycoprotein with an extracellular domain bearing limited homology to domains of entactin and nerve growth factor receptor, suggesting that adhalin may serve as a receptor for an extracellular matrix protein. The adhalin gene was mapped to chromosome 17q12-q21.33, excluding the gene from involvement in 13q-linked SCARMD. A polymorphic microsatellite was identified within intron 6 of the adhalin gene, and one allelic variant of this marker cosegregated with the disease phenotype in a large French family with a lod score of 3.61 at 0 recombination. Adhalin is undetectable in skeletal muscle from affected members of this family. Missense mutations were identified within the adhalin gene that might cause SCARMD in this family. Thus, genetic defects in at least two components, dystrophin and adhalin, of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex can independently cause muscular dystrophies.

  3. Exacerbation of pathology by oxidative stress in respiratory and locomotor muscles with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lawler, John M

    2011-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most devastating type of muscular dystrophy, leading to progressive weakness of respiratory (e.g. diaphragm) and locomotor muscles (e.g. gastrocnemius). DMD is caused by X-linked defects in the gene that encodes for dystrophin, a key scaffolding protein of the dystroglycan complex (DCG) within the sarcolemmal cytoskeleton. As a result of a compromised dystroglycan complex, mechanical integrity is impaired and important signalling proteins (e.g. nNOS, caveolin-3) and pathways are disrupted. Disruption of the dystroglycan complex leads to high susceptibility to injury with repeated, eccentric contractions as well as inflammation, resulting in significant damage and necrosis. Chronic damage and repair cycling leads to fibrosis and weakness. While the link between inflammation with damage and weakness in the DMD diaphragm is unresolved, elevated oxidative stress may contribute to damage, weakness and possibly fibrosis. While utilization of non-specific antioxidant interventions has yielded inconsistent results, recent data suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase could play a pivotal role in elevating oxidative stress via integrated changes in caveolin-3 and stretch-activated channels (SACs). Oxidative stress may act as an amplifier, exacerbating disruption of the dystroglycan complex, upregulation of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-B, and thus functional impairment of force-generating capacity.

  4. Fluorescent multiplex linkage analysis and carrier detection for Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, L.S.; Hoffman, E.P. ); Tarleton, J. ); Popovich, B. ); Seltzer, W.K. )

    1992-10-01

    The authors have developed a fast and accurate PCR-based linkage and carrier detection protocol for families of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)/Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) patients with or without detectable deletions of the dystrophin gene, using fluorescent PCR products analyzed on an automated sequencer. When a deletion is found in the affected male DMD/BMD patient by standard multiplex PCR, fluorescently labeled primers specific for the deleted and nondeleted exon(s) are used to amplify the DNA of at-risk female relatives by using multiplex PCR at low cycle number (20 cycles). The products are then quantitatively analyzed on an automatic sequencer to determine whether they are heterozygous for the deletion and thus are carriers. As a confirmation of the deletion data, and in cases in which a deletion is not found in the proband, fluorescent multiplex PCR linkage is done by using four previously described polymorphic dinucleotide sequences. The four (CA)[sub n] repeats are located throughout the dystrophin gene, making the analysis highly informative and accurate. The authors present the successful application of this protocol in families who proved refractory to more traditional analyses. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Deficiency of merosin in dystrophic dy mouse homologue of congenital muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Sunada, Y.; Campbell, K.P.; Bernier, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Merosin (laminin M chain) is the predominant laminin isoform in the basal lamina of striated muscle and peripheral nerve and is a native ligand for {alpha}-dystroglycan, a novel laminin receptor. Merosin is linked to the subsarcolemmal actin cytoskeleton via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), which plays an important role for maintenance of normal muscle function. We have mapped the mouse merosin gene, Lamm, to the region containing the dystrophia muscularis (dy) locus on chromosome 10. This suggested the possibility that a mutation in the merosin gene could be responsible for the dy mouse, an animal model for autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy, and prompted us to test this hypothesis. We analyzed the status of merosin expression in dy mouse by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. In dy mouse skeletal and cardiac muscle and peripheral nerve, merosin was reduced greater than 90% as compared to control mice. However, the expression of laminin B1/B2 chains and collagen type IV was smaller to that in control mice. These findings strongly suggest that merosin deficiency may be the primary defect in the dy mouse. Furthermore, we have identified two patients afflicted with congenital muscular dystrophy with merosin deficiency, providing the basis for future studies of molecular pathogenesis and gene therapy.

  6. Diaphragm remodeling and compensatory respiratory mechanics in a canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mead, A F; Petrov, M; Malik, A S; Mitchell, M A; Childers, M K; Bogan, J R; Seidner, G; Kornegay, J N; Stedman, H H

    2014-04-01

    Ventilatory insufficiency remains the leading cause of death and late stage morbidity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). To address critical gaps in our knowledge of the pathobiology of respiratory functional decline, we used an integrative approach to study respiratory mechanics in a translational model of DMD. In studies of individual dogs with the Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) mutation, we found evidence of rapidly progressive loss of ventilatory capacity in association with dramatic morphometric remodeling of the diaphragm. Within the first year of life, the mechanics of breathing at rest, and especially during pharmacological stimulation of respiratory control pathways in the carotid bodies, shift such that the primary role of the diaphragm becomes the passive elastic storage of energy transferred from abdominal wall muscles, thereby permitting the expiratory musculature to share in the generation of inspiratory pressure and flow. In the diaphragm, this physiological shift is associated with the loss of sarcomeres in series (∼ 60%) and an increase in muscle stiffness (∼ 900%) compared with those of the nondystrophic diaphragm, as studied during perfusion ex vivo. In addition to providing much needed endpoint measures for assessing the efficacy of therapeutics, we expect these findings to be a starting point for a more precise understanding of respiratory failure in DMD.

  7. Contribution of oxidative stress to pathology in diaphragm and limb muscles with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hee; Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Thompson, LaDora V; Lawler, John M

    2013-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative skeletal muscle disease that makes walking and breathing difficult. DMD is caused by an X-linked (Xp21) mutation in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a scaffolding protein located in the sarcolemmal cytoskeleton, important in maintaining structural integrity and regulating muscle cell (muscle fiber) growth and repair. Dystrophin deficiency in mouse models (e.g., mdx mouse) destabilizes the interface between muscle fibers and the extracellular matrix, resulting in profound damage, inflammation, and weakness in diaphragm and limb muscles. While the link between dystrophin deficiency with inflammation and pathology is multi-factorial, elevated oxidative stress has been proposed as a central mediator. Unfortunately, the use of non-specific antioxidant scavengers in mouse and human studies has led to inconsistent results, obscuring our understanding of the importance of redox signaling in pathology of muscular dystrophy. However, recent studies with more mechanistic approaches in mdx mice suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase and nuclear factor-kappaB are important in amplifying dystrophin-deficient muscle pathology. Therefore, more targeted antioxidant therapeutics may ameliorate damage and weakness in human population, thus promoting better muscle function and quality of life. This review will focus upon the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency in diaphragm and limb muscle primarily in mouse models, with a rationale for development of targeted therapeutic antioxidants in DMD patients.

  8. Dystrophic changes in masticatory muscles related chewing problems and malocclusions in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    van den Engel-Hoek, L; de Groot, I J M; Sie, L T; van Bruggen, H W; de Groot, S A F; Erasmus, C E; van Alfen, N

    2016-06-01

    Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) worsens with age, with increasingly effortful mastication. The aims of this study were to describe mastication problems in consecutive stages in a group of patients with DMD and to determine related pathophysiological aspects of masticatory muscle structure, tongue thickness, bite force and dental characteristics. Data from 72 patients with DMD (4.3 to 28.0 years), divided into four clinical stages, were collected in a cross sectional study. Problems with mastication and the need for food adaptations, in combination with increased echogenicity of the masseter muscle, were already found in the early stages of the disease. A high percentage of open bites and cross bites were found, especially in the later stages. Tongue hypertrophy also increased over time. Increased dysfunction, reflected by increasingly abnormal echogenicity, of the masseter muscle and reduced occlusal contacts (anterior and posterior open bites) were mainly responsible for the hampered chewing. In all, this study shows the increasing involvement of various elements of the masticatory system in progressive Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To prevent choking and also nutritional deficiency, early detection of chewing problems by asking about feeding and mastication problems, as well as asking about food adaptations made, is essential and can lead to timely intervention.

  9. Atrophy, fibrosis, and increased PAX7-positive cells in pharyngeal muscles of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Gidaro, Teresa; Negroni, Elisa; Perié, Sophie; Mirabella, Massimiliano; Lainé, Jeanne; Lacau St Guily, Jean; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent; Trollet, Capucine

    2013-03-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a late-onset autosomal dominant inherited dystrophy caused by an abnormal trinucleotide repeat expansion in the poly(A)-binding-protein-nuclear 1 (PABPN1) gene. Primary muscular targets of OPMD are the eyelid elevator and pharyngeal muscles, including the cricopharyngeal muscle (CPM), the progressive involution of which leads to ptosis and dysphagia, respectively. To understand the consequences of PABPN1 polyalanine expansion in OPMD, we studied muscle biopsies from 14 OPMD patients, 3 inclusion body myositis patients, and 9 healthy controls. In OPMD patient CPM (n = 6), there were typical dystrophic features with extensive endomysial fibrosis and marked atrophy of myosin heavy-chain IIa fibers. There were more PAX7-positive cells in all CPM versus other muscles (n = 5, control; n = 3, inclusion body myositis), and they were more numerous in OPMD CPM versus control normal CPM without any sign of muscle regeneration. Intranuclear inclusions were present in all OPMD muscles but unaffected OPMD patient muscles (i.e. sternocleidomastoid, quadriceps, or deltoid; n = 14) did not show evidence of fibrosis, atrophy, or increased PAX7-positive cell numbers. These results suggest that the specific involvement of CPM in OPMD might be caused by failure of the regenerative response with dysfunction of PAX7-positive cells and exacerbated fibrosis that does not correlate with the presence of PABPN1 inclusions.

  10. Molecular genetic evidence of clinical heterogeneity in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kondo-Iida, E; Saito, K; Tanaka, H; Tsuji, S; Ishihara, T; Osawa, M; Fukuyama, Y; Toda, T

    1997-04-01

    Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is an autosomal recessive severe muscular dystrophy associated with brain malformation. The gene responsible for FCMD was mapped to chromosome 9q31, a region in which convincing evidence of strong linkage disequilibrium between FCMD and mfd220 (D9S306) was recently found. FCMD is also characterized clinically by a peak motor function which, at best, allows patients to sit unassisted or slide on the buttocks. However, a small fraction of patients acquire the capacity to walk unassisted. Whether such ambulant cases belong to the FCMD spectrum or to a different disease entity has been a topic of considerable debate. We performed linkage analysis for ten families with ambulant cases using DNA markers flanking the FCMD locus. The mfd220 locus yielded a significant lod score of 3.09 for ambulant FCMD. We also found evidence for linkage disequilibrium between ambulant FCMD and mfd220. We further conducted haplotype analysis in FCMD siblings with different phenotypes, one of whom was ambulant while the other was not. The results indicate that the FCMD siblings share exactly the same haplotype at nine marker loci spanning 23.3 cM surrounding the FCMD locus. On the basis of these results, we conclude that, genetically, ambulant cases are, in fact, part of the FCMD spectrum.

  11. Nitric oxide donors improve prednisone effects on muscular dystrophy in the mdx mouse diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Mizunoya, Wataru; Upadhaya, Ritika; Burczynski, Frank J; Wang, Guqi; Anderson, Judy E

    2011-05-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), palliative glucocorticoid therapy can produce myopathy or calcification. Since increased nitric oxide synthase activity in dystrophic mice promotes regeneration, the outcome of two nitric oxide (NO) donor drugs, MyoNovin (M) and isosorbide dinitrate (I), on the effectiveness of the anti-inflammatory drug prednisone (P) in alleviating progression of dystrophy was tested. Dystrophic mdx mice were treated (18 days) as controls or with an NO donor ± P. Fiber permeability and DNA synthesis were labeled by Evans blue dye (EBD) and bromodeoxyuridine uptake, respectively. P decreased body weight gain, M increased quadriceps mass, and I increased heart mass. P increased fiber permeability (%EBD+ fibers) and calcification in diaphragm. Treatment with NO donors + P (M+P, I+P) reduced %EBD+ fibers and calcification vs. P alone. %EBD+ fibers in M+P diaphragm did not differ from control. NO donor treatment reduced proliferation and the population of c-met+ cells and accelerated fiber regeneration. Concurrent with P, NO donor treatment suppressed two important detrimental effects of P in mice, possibly by accelerating regeneration, rebalancing satellite cell quiescence and activation in dystrophy, and/or increasing perfusion. Results suggest that NO donors could improve current therapy for DMD.

  12. [Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy: clinical, hereditary and histological features: study of a family (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pennisi, G; Russo, S; Ammatuna, A; Falsaperla, A

    1982-01-01

    The family of an "affected" subject with limb girdle dystrophy has been studied in order to assess the clinical-hereditary characteristics of the disease and to contribute to its definite genetic features (phenotypical expressiveness of the pathologic gene). The diagnosis of certitude was based on the anamnestic-clinical criteria and instrumental investigations, supported by histological and histochemical studies of the muscles. The clinical, electromyographic and biochemical data made it possible to distinguish the "affected" from the "subclinical" and the healthy subjects. The subjects that, without noticeable symptoms of neuromuscular disorders, showed a slight clinical expressiveness which didn't alter the normal social and working activities, have been defined "subclinical". The modalities of hereditary transmission of this form of muscular dystrophy are considered in the light of the genetics most present trends that are tending to overcome the dominant-recessive dualism. The possibility of a modality of transmission definable as "intermediate inheritance" is proposed. In the case of the examined family the hypothesis that a pathologic recessive autosomic gene gives rise to a clinical expressiveness in heterozygote subjects seems tenable. This situation definable as "incomplete recessive" is rarely found in the limb girdle dystrophy.

  13. Human adipose-derived stem cell transplantation as a potential therapy for collagen VI-related congenital muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by muscle weakness within the first two years of life. Collagen VI-related muscle disorders have recently emerged as one of the most common types of CMD. COL6 CMD is caused by deficiency and/or dysfunction of extracellular matrix (ECM) protein collagen VI. Currently, there is no specific treatment for this disabling and life-threatening disease. The primary cellular targets for collagen VI CMD therapy are fibroblasts in muscle, tendon and skin, as opposed to muscle cells for other types of muscular dystrophies. However, recent advances in stem cell research have raised the possibility that use of adult stem cells may provide dramatic new therapies for treatment of COL6 CMD. Methods Here, we developed a procedure for isolation of human stem cells from the adipose layer of neonatal skin. The adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) were examined for expression of ECM and related genes using gene expression array analysis. The therapeutic potential of ADSC was assessed after a single intramuscular transplantation in collagen VI-deficient mice. Results Analysis of primary cultures confirmed that established ADSC represent a morphologically homogenous population with phenotypic and functional features of adult mesenchymal stem cells. A comprehensive gene expression analysis showed that ADSC express a vast array of ECM genes. Importantly, it was observed that ADSC synthesize and secrete all three collagen VI chains, suggesting suitability of ADSC for COL6 CMD treatment. Furthermore, we have found that a single intramuscular transplantation of ADSC into Col6a1−/−Rag1−/− mice under physiological and cardiotoxin-induced injury/regeneration conditions results in efficient engraftment and migration of stem cells within the skeletal muscle. Importantly, we showed that ADSC can survive long-term and continuously secrete the

  14. Fatty liver disease and hypertransaminasemia hiding the association of clinically silent Duchenne muscular dystrophy and hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Paolella, Giulia; Pisano, Pasquale; Albano, Raffaele; Cannaviello, Lucio; Mauro, Carolina; Esposito, Gabriella; Vajro, Pietro

    2012-10-31

    We report a case with the association of well self-compensated hereditary fructose intolerance and still poorly symptomatic Duchenne type muscular dystrophy. This case illustrates the problems of a correct diagnosis in sub-clinical patients presenting with "cryptogenic" hypertransaminasemia.

  15. Functional Behavioral Assessment for a Boy with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Problem Behavior: A Case Study from Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodoridou, Zoe; Koutsoklenis, Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the application of functional behavioral assessment (FBA) to design a positive behavior intervention (PBI) for a boy with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) who encounters serious difficulties at the mainstream school because of behavioral problems and physical limitations. After the definition of problem behavior and its…

  16. Tl-201 myocardial SPECT in patients with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy: A long-term follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamachi, S.; Jinnouchi, S.; Ono, S.; Hoshi, H.; Inoue, K.; Watanabe, K. )

    1989-11-01

    Tl-201 SPECT was used to evaluate myocardial involvement in 13 patients with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. Serial studies of 9 patients were done at two-year intervals. The hypoperfused areas of the left ventricle became more prominent with age and severity.

  17. Gene Expression Profiling in Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2A

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz, Amets; Azpitarte, Margarita; Armañanzas, Rubén; Leturcq, France; Alzualde, Ainhoa; Inza, Iñaki; García-Bragado, Federico; De la Herran, Gaspar; Corcuera, Julián; Cabello, Ana; Navarro, Carmen; De la Torre, Carolina; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel; de Munain, Adolfo López

    2008-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is a recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in calpain 3 (CAPN3). Calpain 3 plays different roles in muscular cells, but little is known about its functions or in vivo substrates. The aim of this study was to identify the genes showing an altered expression in LGMD2A patients and the possible pathways they are implicated in. Ten muscle samples from LGMD2A patients with in which molecular diagnosis was ascertained were investigated using array technology to analyze gene expression profiling as compared to ten normal muscle samples. Upregulated genes were mostly those related to extracellular matrix (different collagens), cell adhesion (fibronectin), muscle development (myosins and melusin) and signal transduction. It is therefore suggested that different proteins located or participating in the costameric region are implicated in processes regulated by calpain 3 during skeletal muscle development. Genes participating in the ubiquitin proteasome degradation pathway were found to be deregulated in LGMD2A patients, suggesting that regulation of this pathway may be under the control of calpain 3 activity. As frizzled-related protein (FRZB) is upregulated in LGMD2A muscle samples, it could be hypothesized that β-catenin regulation is also altered at the Wnt signaling pathway, leading to an incorrect myogenesis. Conversely, expression of most transcription factor genes was downregulated (MYC, FOS and EGR1). Finally, the upregulation of IL-32 and immunoglobulin genes may induce the eosinophil chemoattraction explaining the inflammatory findings observed in presymptomatic stages. The obtained results try to shed some light on identification of novel therapeutic targets for limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. PMID:19015733

  18. The ubiquitin ligase tripartite-motif-protein 32 is induced in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Assereto, Stefania; Piccirillo, Rosanna; Baratto, Serena; Scudieri, Paolo; Fiorillo, Chiara; Massacesi, Manuela; Traverso, Monica; Galietta, Luis J; Bruno, Claudio; Minetti, Carlo; Zara, Federico; Gazzerro, Elisabetta

    2016-08-01

    Activation of the proteasome pathway is one of the secondary processes of cell damage, which ultimately lead to muscle degeneration and necrosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In mdx mice, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib up-regulates the membrane expression of members of the dystrophin complex and reduces the inflammatory reaction. However, chronic inhibition of the 26S proteasome may be toxic, as indicated by the systemic side-effects caused by this drug. Therefore, we sought to determine the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway that are specifically activated in human dystrophin-deficient muscles. The analysis of a cohort of patients with genetically determined DMD or Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) unveiled a selective up-regulation of the ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif-containing protein 32 (TRIM32). The induction of TRIM32 was due to a transcriptional effect and it correlated with disease severity in BMD patients. In contrast, atrogin1 and muscle RING-finger protein-1 (MuRF-1), which are strongly increased in distinct types of muscular atrophy, were not affected by the DMD dystrophic process. Knock-out models showed that TRIM32 is involved in ubiquitination of muscle cytoskeletal proteins as well as of protein inhibitor of activated STAT protein gamma (Piasγ) and N-myc downstream-regulated gene, two inhibitors of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. Accordingly, we showed that in DMD/BMD muscle tissue, TRIM32 induction was more pronounced in regenerating myofibers rather than in necrotic muscle cells, thus pointing out a role of this protein in the regulation of human myoblast cell fate. This finding highlights TRIM32 as a possible therapeutic target to favor skeletal muscle regeneration in DMD patients.

  19. Bortezomib Does Not Reduce Muscular Dystrophy in the dy2J/dy2J Mouse Model of Laminin α2 Chain-Deficient Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Körner, Zandra; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2016-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy with laminin α2 chain-deficiency, also known as MDC1A, is a severe neuromuscular disorder for which there is no cure. Patients with complete laminin α2 chain-deficiency typically have an early onset disease with a more severe muscle phenotype while patients with residual laminin α2 chain expression usually have a milder disease course. Similar genotype-phenotype correlations can be seen in the dy3K/dy3K and dy2J/dy2J mouse models of MDC1A, respectively, with dy3K/dy3K mice presenting the more severe phenotype. Recently, we demonstrated that the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib partially improves muscle morphology and increases lifespan in dy3K/dy3K mice. Here, we explore the use of bortezomib in dy2J/dy2J animals. However, bortezomib neither improved histological hallmarks of disease nor increased muscle strength and locomotive activity in dy2J/dy2J mice. Altogether our data suggest that proteasome inhibition does not mitigate muscle dysfunction caused by partial laminin α2 chain-deficiency. Still, it is possible that proteasome inhibition could be useful as a supportive therapy in patients with complete absence of laminin α2 chain.

  20. Dystromirs as serum biomarkers for monitoring the disease severity in Duchenne muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zaharieva, Irina T; Calissano, Mattia; Scoto, Mariacristina; Preston, Mark; Cirak, Sebahattin; Feng, Lucy; Collins, James; Kole, Ryszard; Guglieri, Michela; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Ferlini, Alessandra; Morgan, Jennifer E; Muntoni, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that disrupt the open reading frame, while in frame mutations result in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) is due to mutations affecting collagen VI genes. Specific muscle miRNAs (dystromirs) are potential non-invasive biomarkers for monitoring the outcome of therapeutic interventions and disease progression. We quantified miR-1, miR-133a,b, miR-206 and miR-31 in serum from patients with DMD, BMD, UCMD and healthy controls. MiR-1, miR-133a,b and miR-206 were upregulated in DMD, but unchanged in UCMD compared to controls. Milder DMD patients had higher levels of dystromirs than more severely affected patients. Patients with low forced vital capacity (FVC) values, indicating respiratory muscle weakness, had low levels of serum miR-1 and miR-133b. There was no significant difference in the level of the dystromirs in BMD compared to controls. We also assessed the effect of dystrophin restoration on the expression of the five dystromirs in serum of DMD patients treated systemically for 12 weeks with antisense oligomer eteplirsen that induces skipping of exon 51 in the dystrophin gene. The dystromirs were also analysed in muscle biopsies of DMD patients included in a single dose intramuscular eteplirsen clinical trial. Our analysis detected a trend towards normalization of these miRNA between the pre- and post-treatment samples of the systemic trial, which however failed to reach statistical significance. This could possibly be due to the small number of patients and the short duration of these clinical trials. Although longer term studies are needed to clarify the relationship between dystrophin restoration following therapeutic intervention and the level of circulating miRNAs, our results indicate that miR-1 and miR-133 can be considered as exploratory biomarkers for monitoring the progression of muscle weakness and indirectly

  1. Autonomic, locomotor and cardiac abnormalities in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy: targeting the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Chapleau, Mark W

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This symposium report summarizes autonomic, cardiac and skeletal muscle abnormalities in sarcoglycan-δ-deficient mice (Sgcd-/-), a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, with emphasis on the roles of autonomic dysregulation and activation of the renin-angiotensin system at a young age. What advances does it highlight? The contributions of the autonomic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy are highlighted. Results demonstrate that autonomic dysregulation precedes and predicts later development of cardiac dysfunction in Sgcd-/- mice and that treatment of young Sgcd-/- mice with the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist losartan or with angiotensin-(1-7) abrogates the autonomic dysregulation, attenuates skeletal muscle pathology and increases spontaneous locomotor activity. Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic muscle diseases characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy. Mutations in sarcoglycans and other subunits of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex cause muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy in animals and humans. Aberrant autonomic signalling is recognized in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. We hypothesized that activation of the renin-angiotensin system contributes to skeletal muscle and autonomic dysfunction in mice deficient in the sarcoglycan-δ (Sgcd) gene at a young age and that this early autonomic dysfunction contributes to the later development of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and increased mortality. We demonstrated that young Sgcd-/- mice exhibit histopathological features of skeletal muscle dystrophy, decreased locomotor activity and severe autonomic dysregulation, but normal LV function. Autonomic regulation continued to deteriorate in Sgcd-/- mice with age and was accompanied by LV dysfunction and dilated cardiomyopathy at older ages. Autonomic dysregulation at a young age predicted later development of

  2. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to improve mobility a ventilator to support breathing robotics to help perform routine daily tasks Physical Therapy ... to meet their needs as muscle deterioration advances. Robotic technologies also are under development to help kids ...

  3. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of a mouse model of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy reveals severe muscular atrophy restricted to fast glycolytic fibres.

    PubMed

    Trollet, Capucine; Anvar, Seyed Yahya; Venema, Andrea; Hargreaves, Iain P; Foster, Keith; Vignaud, Alban; Ferry, Arnaud; Negroni, Elisa; Hourde, Christophe; Baraibar, Martin A; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Davies, Janet E; Rubinsztein, David C; Heales, Simon J; Mouly, Vincent; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Raz, Vered; Dickson, George

    2010-06-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disorder characterized by ptosis, dysphagia and proximal limb weakness. Autosomal-dominant OPMD is caused by a short (GCG)(8-13) expansions within the first exon of the poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 gene (PABPN1), leading to an expanded polyalanine tract in the mutated protein. Expanded PABPN1 forms insoluble aggregates in the nuclei of skeletal muscle fibres. In order to gain insight into the different physiological processes affected in OPMD muscles, we have used a transgenic mouse model of OPMD (A17.1) and performed transcriptomic studies combined with a detailed phenotypic characterization of this model at three time points. The transcriptomic analysis revealed a massive gene deregulation in the A17.1 mice, among which we identified a significant deregulation of pathways associated with muscle atrophy. Using a mathematical model for progression, we have identified that one-third of the progressive genes were also associated with muscle atrophy. Functional and histological analysis of the skeletal muscle of this mouse model confirmed a severe and progressive muscular atrophy associated with a reduction in muscle strength. Moreover, muscle atrophy in the A17.1 mice was restricted to fast glycolytic fibres, containing a large number of intranuclear inclusions (INIs). The soleus muscle and, in particular, oxidative fibres were spared, even though they contained INIs albeit to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate a fibre-type specificity of muscle atrophy in this OPMD model. This study improves our understanding of the biological pathways modified in OPMD to identify potential biomarkers and new therapeutic targets.

  4. Postnatal genome editing partially restores dystrophin expression in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Long, Chengzu; Amoasii, Leonela; Mireault, Alex A.; McAnally, John R.; Li, Hui; Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Bhattacharyya, Samadrita; Shelton, John M.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing holds clinical potential for treating genetic diseases, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. To correct DMD by skipping mutant dystrophin exons in postnatal muscle tissue in vivo, we used adeno-associated virus–9 (AAV9) to deliver gene-editing components to postnatal mdx mice, a model of DMD. Different modes of AAV9 delivery were systematically tested, including intraperitoneal at postnatal day 1 (P1), intramuscular at P12, and retro-orbital at P18. Each of these methods restored dystrophin protein expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle to varying degrees, and expression increased from 3 to 12 weeks after injection. Postnatal gene editing also enhanced skeletal muscle function, as measured by grip strength tests 4 weeks after injection. This method provides a potential means of correcting mutations responsible for DMD and other monogenic disorders after birth. PMID:26721683

  5. Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to muscle fiber to model Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chal, Jérome; Oginuma, Masayuki; Al Tanoury, Ziad; Gobert, Bénédicte; Sumara, Olga; Hick, Aurore; Bousson, Fanny; Zidouni, Yasmine; Mursch, Caroline; Moncuquet, Philippe; Tassy, Olivier; Vincent, Stéphane; Miyanari, Ayako; Bera, Agata; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Guevara, Getzabel; Hestin, Marie; Kennedy, Leif; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Drayton, Bernadette; Cherrier, Thomas; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Gussoni, Emanuela; Relaix, Frédéric; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Pourquié, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    During embryonic development, skeletal muscles arise from somites, which derive from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Using PSM development as a guide, we establish conditions for the differentiation of monolayer cultures of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into PSM-like cells without the introduction of transgenes or cell sorting. We show that primary and secondary skeletal myogenesis can be recapitulated in vitro from the PSM-like cells, providing an efficient, serum-free protocol for the generation of striated, contractile fibers from mouse and human pluripotent cells. The mouse ES cells also differentiate into Pax7(+) cells with satellite cell characteristics, including the ability to form dystrophin(+) fibers when grafted into muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Fibers derived from ES cells of mdx mice exhibit an abnormal branched phenotype resembling that described in vivo, thus providing an attractive model to study the origin of the pathological defects associated with DMD. PMID:26237517

  6. Regenerative pharmacology in the treatment of genetic diseases: The paradigm of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mozzetta, Chiara; Minetti, Giulia; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    Current evidence supports the therapeutic potential of pharmacological interventions that counter the progression of genetic disorders by promoting regeneration of the affected organs or tissues. The rationale behind this concept lies on the evidence that targeting key events downstream of the genetic defect can compensate, at least partially, the pathological consequence of the related disease. In this regard, the beneficial effect exerted on animal models of muscular dystrophy by pharmacological strategies that enhance muscle regeneration provides an interesting paradigm. In this review, we describe and discuss the potential targets of pharmacological strategies that promote regeneration of dystrophic muscles and alleviate the consequence of the primary genetic defect. Regenerative pharmacology provides an immediate and suitable therapeutic opportunity to slow down the decline of muscles in the present generation of dystrophic patients, with the perspective to hold them in conditions such that they could benefit of future, more definitive, therapies. PMID:18804548

  7. Psychological aspects in children affected by duchenne de boulogne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Filippo, Teresa Di; Parisi, Lucia; Roccella, Michele

    2012-07-26

    Impairment of intelligence in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients was described by Duchenne de Boulogne himself in 1868. Further studies report intelligence disorders with mayor impairment of memory. The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of affective and personality disorders in a group of children affected by DMD. Twenty six male DMD patients, mean age eleven and four months years old, were assessed for their affective and personality disorder. Only eight subjects had a total IQ below average with major difficulties in verbal and visual-spatial memory, comprehension, arithmetic and vocabulary. All the subjects presented some disorders: tendency to marginalization and isolation, self-depreciation, sense of insecurity, hypochondriac thoughts and marked state of anxiety. These disorders are often a dynamic prolongation of a psychological process which starts when the diagnosis is made and continues, in a slow and latent fashion, throughout the evolution of the disease. PMID:25478112

  8. Extensive Functional Evaluations to Monitor Aerobic Training in Becker Muscular Dystrophy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tramonti, Caterina; Rossi, Bruno; Chisari, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    Low-intensity aerobic training seems to have positive effects on muscle strength, endurance and fatigue in Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) patients. We describe the case of a 33-year old BMD man, who performed a four-week aerobic training. Extensive functional evaluations were executed to monitor the efficacy of the rehabilitative treatment. Results evidenced an increased force exertion and an improvement in muscle contraction during sustained exercise. An improvement of walk velocity, together with agility, endurance capacity and oxygen consumption during exercise was observed. Moreover, an enhanced metabolic efficiency was evidenced, as shown by reduced lactate blood levels after training. Interestingly, CK showed higher levels after the training protocol, revealing possible muscle damage. In conclusion, aerobic training may represent an effective method improving exercise performance, functional status and metabolic efficiency. Anyway, a careful functional assessment should be taken into account as a useful approach in the management of the disease’s rehabilitative treatment. PMID:27478558

  9. CINRG Duchenne Natural History Study demonstrates insufficient diagnosis and treatment of cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spurney, Christopher; Shimizu, Reiko; Hache, Lauren P.; Kolski, Hanna; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Clemens, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy is a common cause of morbidity and death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods A cross-sectional analysis of clinical data from a multi-institutional, international CINRG DMD Natural History Study of 340 DMD patients aged 2 to 28 years. Cardiomyopathy was defined as shortening fraction (SF) <28% or ejection fraction (EF) <55%. Results 231 participants reported a prior clinical echocardiogram study, and 174 had data for SF or EF. The prevalence of cardiomyopathy was 27% (47/174), and it was significantly associated with age and clinical stage. The association of cardiomyopathy with age and clinical stage was not changed by glucocorticoid use as a covariate (P>0.68). In patients with cardiomyopathy, 57 % (27/47) reported not taking any cardiac medications. Cardiac medications were used in 12% (15/127) of patients without cardiomyopathy. Discussion Echocardiograms were underutilized, and cardiomyopathy was undertreated in this DMD natural history cohort. PMID:24395289

  10. Morpholino-mediated Knockdown of DUX4 Toward Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jennifer CJ; King, Oliver D; Zhang, Yuanfan; Clayton, Nicholas P; Spencer, Carrie; Wentworth, Bruce M; Emerson, Charles P; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2016-01-01

    Derepression of DUX4 in skeletal muscle has emerged as a likely cause of pathology in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Here we report on the use of antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides to suppress DUX4 expression and function in FSHD myotubes and xenografts. The most effective was phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide FM10, which targets the polyadenylation signal of DUX4. FM10 had no significant cell toxicity, and RNA-seq analyses of FSHD and control myotubes revealed that FM10 down-regulated many transcriptional targets of DUX4, without overt off-target effects. Electroporation of FM10 into FSHD patient muscle xenografts in mice also down-regulated DUX4 and DUX4 targets. These findings demonstrate the potential of antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides as an FSHD therapeutic option. PMID:27378237

  11. [Being a mother: encounters between mothers of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and nurses in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Lee, Shu-Li; Chou, Fan-Hao; Chin, Chi-Chun

    2013-06-01

    The role of "mother" is understood and represented differently by people from different cultures. In traditional Taiwanese society, mothers demonstrate their existence value by giving birth to and raising sons able to continue her husband's familial line. Sons bear the patriarchal name and care for their parents in old age. However, a son stricken, paralyzed and eventually killed by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) can destroy a mother's perceived value in this traditional social context. Mothers are thus soundless sufferers. Nurses have a critical role to play in giving encouragement and hope to mothers of children with DMD. Through their own difficult situation, these mothers can also highlight the value and importance of Taiwan's nurses, who work in conditions marked by overloading, high stress, and under-appreciation. Caring for women in critical need of empathy and support help nurses realize their own positive capacity to empower sufferers. PMID:23729346

  12. Simvastatin offers new prospects for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Nicholas P.; Kim, Min Jeong; Bible, Kenneth L.; Adams, Marvin E.; Froehner, Stanley C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe inherited neuromuscular disorder. DMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the dystrophin protein in muscle fibers. Dystrophin was originally proposed to be a structural protein that protected the sarcolemma from stresses produced during contractions. However, more recently, experimental evidence has revealed a far more complicated picture, with the loss of dystrophin causing dysfunction of multiple muscle signaling pathways, which all contribute to the overall disease pathophysiology. Current gene-based approaches for DMD are conceptually appealing since they offer the potential to restore dystrophin to muscles, albeit a partially functional, truncated form of the protein. However, given the cost and technical challenges facing these genetic approaches, it is important to consider if relatively inexpensive, clinically used drugs may be repurposed for treating DMD. Here, we discuss our recent findings showing the potential of simvastatin as a novel therapy for DMD. PMID:27141415

  13. Wnt signaling pathway improves central inhibitory synaptic transmission in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fuenzalida, Marco; Espinoza, Claudia; Pérez, Miguel Ángel; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Cuitino, Loreto; Brandan, Enrique; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-02-01

    The dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC) that connects the cytoskeleton, plasma membrane and the extracellular matrix has been related to the maintenance and stabilization of channels and synaptic receptors, which are both essential for synaptogenesis and synaptic transmission. The dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) exhibits a significant reduction in hippocampal GABA efficacy, which may underlie the altered synaptic function and abnormal hippocampal long-term plasticity exhibited by mdx mice. Emerging studies have implicated Wnt signaling in the modulation of synaptic efficacy, neuronal plasticity and cognitive function. We report here that the activation of the non-canonical Wnt-5a pathway and Andrographolide, improves hippocampal mdx GABAergic efficacy by increasing the number of inhibitory synapses and GABA(A) receptors or GABA release. These results indicate that Wnt signaling modulates GABA synaptic efficacy and could be a promising novel target for DMD cognitive therapy. PMID:26626079

  14. Morpholino-mediated Knockdown of DUX4 Toward Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jennifer Cj; King, Oliver D; Zhang, Yuanfan; Clayton, Nicholas P; Spencer, Carrie; Wentworth, Bruce M; Emerson, Charles P; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2016-08-01

    Derepression of DUX4 in skeletal muscle has emerged as a likely cause of pathology in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Here we report on the use of antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides to suppress DUX4 expression and function in FSHD myotubes and xenografts. The most effective was phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide FM10, which targets the polyadenylation signal of DUX4. FM10 had no significant cell toxicity, and RNA-seq analyses of FSHD and control myotubes revealed that FM10 down-regulated many transcriptional targets of DUX4, without overt off-target effects. Electroporation of FM10 into FSHD patient muscle xenografts in mice also down-regulated DUX4 and DUX4 targets. These findings demonstrate the potential of antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides as an FSHD therapeutic option. PMID:27378237

  15. Extensive Functional Evaluations to Monitor Aerobic Training in Becker Muscular Dystrophy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tramonti, Caterina; Rossi, Bruno; Chisari, Carmelo

    2016-06-13

    Low-intensity aerobic training seems to have positive effects on muscle strength, endurance and fatigue in Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) patients. We describe the case of a 33-year old BMD man, who performed a four-week aerobic training. Extensive functional evaluations were executed to monitor the efficacy of the rehabilitative treatment. Results evidenced an increased force exertion and an improvement in muscle contraction during sustained exercise. An improvement of walk velocity, together with agility, endurance capacity and oxygen consumption during exercise was observed. Moreover, an enhanced metabolic efficiency was evidenced, as shown by reduced lactate blood levels after training. Interestingly, CK showed higher levels after the training protocol, revealing possible muscle damage. In conclusion, aerobic training may represent an effective method improving exercise performance, functional status and metabolic efficiency. Anyway, a careful functional assessment should be taken into account as a useful approach in the management of the disease's rehabilitative treatment. PMID:27478558

  16. Musculoskeletal simulation can help explain selective muscle degeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Blemker, Silvia S

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease that occurs due to the deficiency of the dystrophin protein. Although dystrophin is deficient in all muscles, it is unclear why degeneration progresses differently across muscles in DMD. We hypothesized that each muscle undergoes a different degree of eccentric contraction during gait, which could contribute to the selective degeneration in lower limb muscle, as indicated by various amounts of fatty infiltration. By comparing eccentric contractions quantified from a previous multibody dynamic musculoskeletal gait simulation and fat fractions quantified in a recent imaging study, our preliminary analyses show a strong correlation between eccentric contractions during gait and lower limb muscle fat fractions, supporting our hypothesis. This knowledge is critical for developing safe exercise regimens for the DMD population. This study also provides supportive evidence for using multiscale modeling and simulation of the musculoskeletal system in future DMD research.

  17. Simvastatin offers new prospects for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Nicholas P; Kim, Min Jeong; Bible, Kenneth L; Adams, Marvin E; Froehner, Stanley C

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe inherited neuromuscular disorder. DMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the dystrophin protein in muscle fibers. Dystrophin was originally proposed to be a structural protein that protected the sarcolemma from stresses produced during contractions. However, more recently, experimental evidence has revealed a far more complicated picture, with the loss of dystrophin causing dysfunction of multiple muscle signaling pathways, which all contribute to the overall disease pathophysiology. Current gene-based approaches for DMD are conceptually appealing since they offer the potential to restore dystrophin to muscles, albeit a partially functional, truncated form of the protein. However, given the cost and technical challenges facing these genetic approaches, it is important to consider if relatively inexpensive, clinically used drugs may be repurposed for treating DMD. Here, we discuss our recent findings showing the potential of simvastatin as a novel therapy for DMD. PMID:27141415

  18. Dystrophin, utrophin and {beta}-dystroglycan expression in skeletal muscle from patients with Becker muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Kawajiri, Masakazu; Mitsui, Takao; Kawai, Hisaomi

    1996-08-01

    The precise localization and semiquantitative correlation of dystrophin, utrophin and {beta}-dystroglycan expression on the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle cells obtained from patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) was studied using three types of double immunofluorescence. Staining intensity was measured using a confocal laser microscope. Each of these proteins was identified at the same locus on the sarcolemma. The staining intensities of dystrophin and utrophin were approximately reciprocal at sarcolemmal sites where dystrophin expression was obviously observed. The staining intensity of {beta}-dystroglycan was strong in areas where dystrophin staining was also strong and utrophin expression was weak. Quantitative analysis revealed that the staining intensity of {beta}-dystroglycan minus that of dystrophin approximated the staining intensity of utrophin, indicating that the sum of dystrophin and utrophin expression corresponds to that of {beta}-dystroglycan. These results suggest that utrophin may compensate for dystrophin deficiency found in BMD by binding to {beta}-dystroglycan. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Duchenne muscular dystrophy and idiopathic hyperCKemia segregating in a family

    SciTech Connect

    Frydman, M.; Straussberg, R.; Shomrat, R.; Legum, C.

    1995-09-11

    A 7-month-old boy with gross motor delay and failure to thrive presented with rhabdomyolysis following an acute asthmatic episode. During hospitalization an electrocardiographic conversion to a Wolff-Parkinson-White type 1 (WPW) pattern took place. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was suspected based on elevated creatine kinase (CK) serum levels, muscle biopsy, and family history. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis, which documented a deletion corresponding to cDNA probe 1-2a in the dystrophin gene, in the propositus and in an affected male cousin of his mother. {open_quotes}Idiopathic{close_quotes} hyperCKemia was found in the propositus, his father, and 5 of his relatives. We suggest that the unusually early and severe manifestations of DMD in this patient may be related to the coincidental inheritance of the maternal DMD gene and of a paternal gene, causing hyperCKemia. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Molecular analysis of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in Spanish individuals: Deletion detection and familial diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Patino, A.; Garcia-Delgado, M.; Narbona, J.

    1995-11-06

    Deletion studies were performed in 26 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients through amplification of nine different exons by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA from paraffin-embedded muscle biopsies was analyzed in 12 of the 26 patients studied. Optimization of this technique is of great utility because it enables analysis of material stored in pathology archives. PCR deletion detection, useful in DMD-affected boys, is problematic in determining the carrier state in female relatives. For this reason, to perform familial linkage diagnosis, we made use of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (STRP, or short tandem repeat polymorphism) located in intron 49 of the gene. We designed a new pair of primers that enabled the detection of 22 different alleles in relatives in the 14 DMD families studied. The use of this marker allowed familial diagnosis in 11 of the 14 DMD families and detection of de novo deletions in 3 of the probands. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Positive effects of bisphosphonates on bone and muscle in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Hee; Sugamori, Kim S; Grynpas, Marc D; Mitchell, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy are at increased risk of decreased bone mineral density and bone fracture as a result of inactivity. To determine if antiresorptive bisphosphonates could improve bone quality and their effects on muscle we studied the Mdx mouse, treated with pamidronate during peak bone growth at 5 and 6 weeks of age, and examined the outcome at 13 weeks of age. Pamidronate increased cortical bone architecture and strength in femurs with increased resistance to fracture. While overall long bone growth was not affected by pamidronate, there was significant inhibition of remodeling in metaphyseal trabecular bone with evidence of residual calcified cartilage. Pamidronate treatment had positive effects on skeletal muscle in the Mdx mice with decreased serum and muscle creatine kinase and evidence of improved muscle histology and grip strength.

  2. Abnormal Collagen Metabolism in Cultured Skin Fibroblasts from Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodemann, H. Peter; Bayreuther, Klaus

    1984-08-01

    Total collagen synthesis is decreased by about 29% (P < 0.01) in skin fibroblasts established in vitro from male patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) as compared with that in normal male skin fibroblasts in vitro. The reduction in collagen synthesis is associated with an approximately 2-fold increase in collagen degradation in DMD fibroblasts. Correlated to these alterations in the metabolism of collagen, DMD fibroblasts express a significantly higher hydroxyproline/proline ratio (DMD: 1.36-1.45; P < 0.01) than do normal fibroblasts (controls: 0.86-0.89). The increased hydroxylation of proline residues of collagen (composed of type I and type III) could be the cause for the enhanced degradation of collagen in DMD fibroblasts.

  3. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Stajich, J.M.; Gaskell, P.C.

    1995-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) is a diagnostic classification encompassing a broad group of proximal myopathies. A gene for the dominant form of LGMD (LGMD1A) has recently been localized to a 7-cM region of chromosome 5q between D5S178 and IL9. We studied three additional dominant LGMD families for linkage to these two markers and excluded all from localization to this region, providing evidence for locus heterogeneity within the dominant form of LGMD. Although the patterns of muscle weakness were similar in all families studied, the majority of affected family members in the chromosome 5-linked pedigree have a dysarthric speech pattern, which is not present in any of the five unlinked families. The demonstration of heterogeneity within autosomal dominant LGMD is the first step in attempting to subclassify these families with similar clinical phenotypes on a molecular level. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Restoration of half the normal dystrophin sequence in a double-deletion Duchenne muscular dystrophy family

    SciTech Connect

    Hoop, R.C.; Schwartz, L.S.; Hoffman, E.P.; Russo, L.S.; Riconda, D.L.

    1994-02-01

    Two male cousins with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were found to have different maternal dystrophin gene haplotypes and different deletion mutations. One propositus showed two noncontiguous deletions-one in the 5{prime}, proximal deletional hotspot region, and the other in the 3{prime}, more distal deletional hotspot region. The second propositus showed only the 5{prime} deletion. Using multiple fluorescent exon dosage and fluorescent multiplex CA repeat linkage analyses, the authors show that the mother of each propositus carries both deletions on the same grandmaternal X chromosome. This paradox is explained by a single recombinational event between the 2 deleted regions of one of the carrier`s dystrophin genes, giving rise to a son with a partially {open_quotes}repaired{close_quotes} gene retaining only the 5{prime} deletion. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Muscular dystrophy in a dish: engineered human skeletal muscle mimetics for disease modeling and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alec S T; Davis, Jennifer; Lee, Gabsang; Mack, David L; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-09-01

    Engineered in vitro models using human cells, particularly patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), offer a potential solution to issues associated with the use of animals for studying disease pathology and drug efficacy. Given the prevalence of muscle diseases in human populations, an engineered tissue model of human skeletal muscle could provide a biologically accurate platform to study basic muscle physiology, disease progression, and drug efficacy and/or toxicity. Such platforms could be used as phenotypic drug screens to identify compounds capable of alleviating or reversing congenital myopathies, such as Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here, we review current skeletal muscle modeling technologies with a specific focus on efforts to generate biomimetic systems for investigating the pathophysiology of dystrophic muscle. PMID:27109386

  6. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in very young Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients precede the onset of cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    James, Jeanne; Kinnett, Kathleen; Wang, Yu; Ittenbach, Richard F; Benson, D Woodrow; Cripe, Linda

    2011-07-01

    Overt cardiac involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) typically occurs later in the disease. The primary aim was to estimate the proportion of young (<6 years of age) DMD patients with manifestations of cardiac disease by electrocardiography (ECG). Secondary aims were to assess associations between ECG abnormalities and evidence of cardiac disease by echocardiography, as well as to estimate the relationship between dystrophin mutation site and an abnormal ECG. Seventy eight steroid-naive DMD patients <6 years of age were identified. ECG abnormalities were identified in 78%, with LV pathology being the most commonly identified pattern. Only one echocardiogram was abnormal. There was no statistically significant relationship identified between ECG abnormalities and dystrophin genotype. ECG abnormalities are common in very young DMD patients, signaling cardiac involvement well before the onset of clinical symptoms.

  7. Psychological Aspects in Children Affected by Duchenne De Boulogne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Lucia; Roccella, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Impairment of intelligence in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients was described by Duchenne de Boulogne himself in 1868. Further studies report intelligence disorders with mayor impairment of memory. The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of affective and personality disorders in a group of children affected by DMD. Twenty six male DMD patients, mean age eleven and four months years old, were assessed for their affective and personality disorder. Only eight subjects had a total IQ below average with major difficulties in verbal and visual-spatial memory, comprehension, arithmetic and vocabulary. All the subjects presented some disorders: tendency to marginalization and isolation, self-depreciation, sense of insecurity, hypochondriac thoughts and marked state of anxiety. These disorders are often a dynamic prolongation of a psychological process which starts when the diagnosis is made and continues, in a slow and latent fashion, throughout the evolution of the disease. PMID:25478112

  8. From "glycosyltransferase" to "congenital muscular dystrophy": integrating knowledge from NCBI Entrez Gene and the Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Satya S; Zeng, Kelly; Bodenreider, Olivier; Sheth, Amit

    2007-01-01

    Entrez Gene (EG), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and the Gene Ontology (GO) are three complementary knowledge resources that can be used to correlate genomic data with disease information. However, bridging between genotype and phenotype through these resources currently requires manual effort or the development of customized software. In this paper, we argue that integrating EG and GO provides a robust and flexible solution to this problem. We demonstrate how the Resource Description Framework (RDF) developed for the Semantic Web can be used to represent and integrate these resources and enable seamless access to them as a unified resource. We illustrate the effectiveness of our approach by answering a real-world biomedical query linking a specific molecular function, glycosyltransferase, to the disorder congenital muscular dystrophy.

  9. Immobilization of Dystrophin and Laminin α2-Chain Deficient Zebrafish Larvae In Vivo Prevents the Development of Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Arner, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are often caused by genetic alterations in the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex or its extracellular ligands. These structures are associated with the cell membrane and provide mechanical links between the cytoskeleton and the matrix. Mechanical stress is considered a pathological mechanism and muscle immobilization has been shown to be beneficial in some mouse models of muscular dystrophy. The zebrafish enables novel and less complex models to examine the effects of extended immobilization or muscle relaxation in vivo in different dystrophy models. We have examined effects of immobilization in larvae from two zebrafish strains with muscular dystrophy, the Sapje dystrophin-deficient and the Candyfloss laminin α2-chain-deficient strains. Larvae (4 days post fertilization, dpf) of both mutants have significantly lower active force in vitro, alterations in the muscle structure with gaps between muscle fibers and altered birefringence patterns compared to their normal siblings. Complete immobilization (18 hrs to 4 dpf) was achieved using a small molecular inhibitor of actin-myosin interaction (BTS, 50 μM). This treatment resulted in a significantly weaker active contraction at 4 dpf in both mutated larvae and normal siblings, most likely reflecting a general effect of immobilization on myofibrillogenesis. The immobilization also significantly reduced the structural damage in the mutated strains, showing that muscle activity is an important pathological mechanism. Following one-day washout of BTS, muscle tension partly recovered in the Candyfloss siblings and caused structural damage in these mutants, indicating activity-induced muscle recovery and damage, respectively. PMID:26536238

  10. Immobilization of Dystrophin and Laminin α2-Chain Deficient Zebrafish Larvae In Vivo Prevents the Development of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei; Arner, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are often caused by genetic alterations in the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex or its extracellular ligands. These structures are associated with the cell membrane and provide mechanical links between the cytoskeleton and the matrix. Mechanical stress is considered a pathological mechanism and muscle immobilization has been shown to be beneficial in some mouse models of muscular dystrophy. The zebrafish enables novel and less complex models to examine the effects of extended immobilization or muscle relaxation in vivo in different dystrophy models. We have examined effects of immobilization in larvae from two zebrafish strains with muscular dystrophy, the Sapje dystrophin-deficient and the Candyfloss laminin α2-chain-deficient strains. Larvae (4 days post fertilization, dpf) of both mutants have significantly lower active force in vitro, alterations in the muscle structure with gaps between muscle fibers and altered birefringence patterns compared to their normal siblings. Complete immobilization (18 hrs to 4 dpf) was achieved using a small molecular inhibitor of actin-myosin interaction (BTS, 50 μM). This treatment resulted in a significantly weaker active contraction at 4 dpf in both mutated larvae and normal siblings, most likely reflecting a general effect of immobilization on myofibrillogenesis. The immobilization also significantly reduced the structural damage in the mutated strains, showing that muscle activity is an important pathological mechanism. Following one-day washout of BTS, muscle tension partly recovered in the Candyfloss siblings and caused structural damage in these mutants, indicating activity-induced muscle recovery and damage, respectively. PMID:26536238

  11. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J.A.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  12. Emerging gene editing strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy targeting stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The progressive loss of muscle mass characteristic of many muscular dystrophies impairs the efficacy of most of the gene and molecular therapies currently being pursued for the treatment of those disorders. It is becoming increasingly evident that a therapeutic application, to be effective, needs to target not only mature myofibers, but also muscle progenitors cells or muscle stem cells able to form new muscle tissue and to restore myofibers lost as the result of the diseases or during normal homeostasis so as to guarantee effective and lost lasting effects. Correction of the genetic defect using oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) or engineered nucleases holds great potential for the treatment of many of the musculoskeletal disorders. The encouraging results obtained by studying in vitro systems and model organisms have set the groundwork for what is likely to become an emerging field in the area of molecular and regenerative medicine. Furthermore, the ability to isolate and expand from patients various types of muscle progenitor cells capable of committing to the myogenic lineage provides the opportunity to establish cell lines that can be used for transplantation following ex vivo manipulation and expansion. The purpose of this article is to provide a perspective on approaches aimed at correcting the genetic defect using gene editing strategies and currently under development for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most sever of the neuromuscular disorders. Emphasis will be placed on describing the potential of using the patient own stem cell as source of transplantation and the challenges that gene editing technologies face in the field of regenerative biology. PMID:24795643

  13. Delayed bone regeneration is linked to chronic inflammation in murine muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Khalil, Rana; Yang, Frank; Mortreux, Marie; Lieu, Shirley; Yu, Yan-Yiu; Wurmser, Maud; Pereira, Catia; Relaix, Frédéric; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph S.; Colnot, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients exhibit skeletal muscle weakness with continuous cycles of muscle fiber degeneration/regeneration, chronic inflammation, low bone mineral density and increased risks of fracture. Fragility fractures and associated complications are considered as a consequence of the osteoporotic condition in these patients. Here, we aimed to establish the relationship between muscular dystrophy and fracture healing by assessing bone regeneration in mdx mice, a model of DMD with absence of osteoporosis. Our results illustrate that muscle defects in mdx mice impact the process of bone regeneration at various levels. In mdx fracture calluses, both cartilage and bone deposition were delayed followed by a delay in cartilage and bone remodeling. Vascularization of mdx fracture calluses was also decreased during the early stages of repair. Dystrophic muscles are known to contain elevated numbers of macrophages contributing to muscle degeneration. Accordingly, we observed increased macrophage recruitment in the mdx fracture calluses and abnormal macrophage accumulation throughout the process of bone regeneration. These changes in the inflammatory environment subsequently had an impact on the recruitment of osteoclasts and the remodeling phase of repair. Further damage to the mdx muscles, using a novel model of muscle trauma, amplified both the chronic inflammatory response and the delay in bone regeneration. In addition, PLX3397 treatment of mdx mice, a cFMS inhibitor in monocytes, partially rescued the bone repair defect through increasing cartilage deposition and decreasing macrophage number. In conclusion, chronic inflammation in mdx mice contributes to the fracture healing delay and is associated with a decrease in angiogenesis and a transient delay in osteoclast recruitment. By revealing the role of dystrophic muscle in regulating the inflammatory response during bone repair, our results emphasize the implication of muscle in the normal bone

  14. Long Term Natural History Data in Ambulant Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: 36-Month Changes

    PubMed Central

    Sormani, Maria Pia; Messina, Sonia; D′Amico, Adele; Carlesi, Adelina; Vita, Gianluca; Fanelli, Lavinia; Berardinelli, Angela; Torrente, Yvan; Lanzillotta, Valentina; Viggiano, Emanuela; D′Ambrosio, Paola; Cavallaro, Filippo; Frosini, Silvia; Barp, Andrea; Bonfiglio, Serena; Scalise, Roberta; De Sanctis, Roberto; Rolle, Enrica; Graziano, Alessandra; Magri, Francesca; Palermo, Concetta; Rossi, Francesca; Donati, Maria Alice; Sacchini, Michele; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Baranello, Giovanni; Mongini, Tiziana; Pini, Antonella; Battini, Roberta; Pegoraro, Elena; Previtali, Stefano; Bruno, Claudio; Politano, Luisa; Comi, Giacomo P.; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The 6 minute walk test has been recently chosen as the primary outcome measure in international multicenter clinical trials in Duchenne muscular dystrophy ambulant patients. The aim of the study was to assess the spectrum of changes at 3 years in the individual measures, their correlation with steroid treatment, age and 6 minute walk test values at baseline. Ninety-six patients from 11 centers were assessed at baseline and 12, 24 and 36 months after baseline using the 6 minute walk test and the North Star Ambulatory Assessment. Three boys (3%) lost the ability to perform the 6 minute walk test within 12 months, another 13 between 12 and 24 months (14%) and 11 between 24 and 36 months (12%). The 6 minute walk test showed an average overall decline of −15.8 (SD 77.3) m at 12 months, of −58.9 (SD 125.7) m at 24 months and −104.22 (SD 146.2) m at 36 months. The changes were significantly different in the two baseline age groups and according to the baseline 6 minute walk test values (below and above 350 m) (p<0.001). The changes were also significantly different according to steroid treatment (p = 0.01). Similar findings were found for the North Star Ambulatory Assessment. These are the first 36 month longitudinal data using the 6 minute walk test and North Star Ambulatory Assessment in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Our findings will help not only to have a better idea of the progression of the disorder but also provide reference data that can be used to compare with the results of the long term extension studies that are becoming available. PMID:25271887

  15. Long term natural history data in ambulant boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: 36-month changes.

    PubMed

    Pane, Marika; Mazzone, Elena Stacy; Sivo, Serena; Sormani, Maria Pia; Messina, Sonia; D'Amico, Adele; Carlesi, Adelina; Vita, Gianluca; Fanelli, Lavinia; Berardinelli, Angela; Torrente, Yvan; Lanzillotta, Valentina; Viggiano, Emanuela; D Ambrosio, Paola; Cavallaro, Filippo; Frosini, Silvia; Barp, Andrea; Bonfiglio, Serena; Scalise, Roberta; De Sanctis, Roberto; Rolle, Enrica; Graziano, Alessandra; Magri, Francesca; Palermo, Concetta; Rossi, Francesca; Donati, Maria Alice; Sacchini, Michele; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Baranello, Giovanni; Mongini, Tiziana; Pini, Antonella; Battini, Roberta; Pegoraro, Elena; Previtali, Stefano; Bruno, Claudio; Politano, Luisa; Comi, Giacomo P; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The 6 minute walk test has been recently chosen as the primary outcome measure in international multicenter clinical trials in Duchenne muscular dystrophy ambulant patients. The aim of the study was to assess the spectrum of changes at 3 years in the individual measures, their correlation with steroid treatment, age and 6 minute walk test values at baseline. Ninety-six patients from 11 centers were assessed at baseline and 12, 24 and 36 months after baseline using the 6 minute walk test and the North Star Ambulatory Assessment. Three boys (3%) lost the ability to perform the 6 minute walk test within 12 months, another 13 between 12 and 24 months (14%) and 11 between 24 and 36 months (12%). The 6 minute walk test showed an average overall decline of -15.8 (SD 77.3) m at 12 months, of -58.9 (SD 125.7) m at 24 months and -104.22 (SD 146.2) m at 36 months. The changes were significantly different in the two baseline age groups and according to the baseline 6 minute walk test values (below and above 350 m) (p<0.001). The changes were also significantly different according to steroid treatment (p = 0.01). Similar findings were found for the North Star Ambulatory Assessment. These are the first 36 month longitudinal data using the 6 minute walk test and North Star Ambulatory Assessment in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Our findings will help not only to have a better idea of the progression of the disorder but also provide reference data that can be used to compare with the results of the long term extension studies that are becoming available. PMID:25271887

  16. Canine Models of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Their Use in Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kornegay, Joe N.; Bogan, Janet R.; Bogan, Daniel J.; Childers, Martin K.; Li, Juan; Nghiem, Peter; Detwiler, David A.; Larsen, C. Aaron; Grange, Robert W.; Bhavaraju-Sanka, Ratna K.; Tou, Sandra; Keene, Bruce P.; Howard, James F.; Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Schatzberg, Scott J.; Styner, Martin A.; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Xiao, Xiao; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder in which the loss of dystrophin causes progressive degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. Potential therapies that carry substantial risk, such as gene and cell-based approaches, must first be tested in animal models, notably the mdx mouse and several dystrophin-deficient breeds of dogs, including golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD). Affected dogs have a more severe phenotype, in keeping with that of DMD, so may better predict disease pathogenesis and treatment efficacy. We and others have developed various phenotypic tests to characterize disease progression in the GRMD model. These biomarkers range from measures of strength and joint contractures to magnetic resonance imaging. Some of these tests are routinely used in clinical veterinary practice, while others require specialized equipment and expertise. By comparing serial measurements from treated and untreated groups, one can document improvement or delayed progression of disease. Potential treatments for DMD may be broadly categorized as molecular, cellular, or pharmacologic. The GRMD model has increasingly been used to assess efficacy of a range of these therapies. While some of these studies have largely provided general proof-of-concept for the treatment under study, others have demonstrated efficacy using the biomarkers discussed. Importantly, just as symptoms in DMD vary among patients, GRMD dogs display remarkable phenotypic variation. While confounding statistical analysis in preclinical trials, this variation offers insight regarding the role that modifier genes play in disease pathogenesis. By correlating functional and mRNA profiling results, gene targets for therapy development can be identified. PMID:22218699

  17. Functional changes in Becker muscular dystrophy: implications for clinical trials in dystrophinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Luca; Campadello, Paola; Barp, Andrea; Fanin, Marina; Semplicini, Claudio; Sorarù, Gianni; Caumo, Luca; Calore, Chiara; Angelini, Corrado; Pegoraro, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We performed a 1-year longitudinal study of Six Minute Walk Test (6MWT), North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA), and timed function tests in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Skeletal muscle dystrophin was quantified by immunoblot. We grouped deletions ending on exon 45 (“del 45-x”, n = 28) or 51 (“del x-51”, n = 10); isolated exon 48 deletion (“del 48”, n = 10); and other mutations (n = 21). Only patients in the “del 45-x” or “other” groups became non-ambulatory (n = 5, log-rank p = n.s.) or unable to run (n = 22, p < 0.001). All measures correlated positively with dystrophin quantity and negatively with age, and were significantly more impaired in the “del 45-x” and “other” groups. After one year, NSAA score decreased significantly (−0.9 ± 1.6, p < 0.001); in the “del 45-x” group, both NSAA (−1.3 ± 1.7, p = 0.001) and 6MWT (−12 ± 31 m, p = 0.059) decreased. We conclude that patients with “del x-51” or “del 48” mutations have mild or asymptomatic BMD, while “del 45-x” mutations cause comparatively severe weakness, and functional deterioration in 1 year. Furthermore, exon 51 skipping could be more effective than exon 45 skipping in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:27582364

  18. Circulating Muscle-specific miRNAs in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xihua; Li, Yuying; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Duo; Yao, Xuan; Zhang, Huihui; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Wang, Xin-Yi; Xia, Hongfeng; Yan, Jun; Ying, Hao

    2014-07-22

    Noninvasive biomarkers with diagnostic value and prognostic applications have long been desired to replace muscle biopsy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. Growing evidence indicates that circulating microRNAs are biomarkers to assess pathophysiological status. Here, we show that the serum levels of six muscle-specific miRNAs (miR-1/206/133/499/208a/208b, also known as myomiRs) were all elevated in DMD patients (P < 0.01). The receiver operating characteristic curves of circulating miR-206, miR-499, miR-208b, and miR-133 levels reflected strong separation between Becker's muscular dystrophy (BMD) and DMD patients (P < 0.05). miR-206, miR-499, and miR-208b levels were positively correlated with both age and type IIc muscle fiber content in DMD patients (2-6 years), indicating that they might represent the stage of disease as well as the process of regeneration. miR-499 and miR-208b levels were correlated with slow and fast fiber content and might reflect the ratio of slow to fast fibers in DMD patient (>6 years). Fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factor-β, and tumor necrosis factor-α could affect the secretion of myomiRs, suggesting that circulating myomiRs might reflect the effects of cytokines and growth factors on degenerating and regenerating muscles. Collectively, our data indicated that circulating myomiRs could serve as promising biomarkers for DMD diagnosis and disease progression.

  19. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Miskew Nichols, Bailey; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J A; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  20. A new therapeutic effect of simvastatin revealed by functional improvement in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Nicholas P.; Kim, Min Jeong; Bible, Kenneth L.; Adams, Marvin E.; Froehner, Stanley C.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, degenerative muscle disease with no effective treatment. DMD muscle pathogenesis is characterized by chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. Statins, cholesterol-lowering drugs, inhibit these deleterious processes in ischemic diseases affecting skeletal muscle, and therefore have potential to improve DMD. However, statins have not been considered for DMD, or other muscular dystrophies, principally because skeletal-muscle-related symptoms are rare, but widely publicized, side effects of these drugs. Here we show positive effects of statins in dystrophic skeletal muscle. Simvastatin dramatically reduced damage and enhanced muscle function in dystrophic (mdx) mice. Long-term simvastatin treatment vastly improved overall muscle health in mdx mice, reducing plasma creatine kinase activity, an established measure of muscle damage, to near-normal levels. This reduction was accompanied by reduced inflammation, more oxidative muscle fibers, and improved strength of the weak diaphragm muscle. Shorter-term treatment protected against muscle fatigue and increased mdx hindlimb muscle force by 40%, a value comparable to current dystrophin gene-based therapies. Increased force correlated with reduced NADPH Oxidase 2 protein expression, the major source of oxidative stress in dystrophic muscle. Finally, in old mdx mice with severe muscle degeneration, simvastatin enhanced diaphragm force and halved fibrosis, a major cause of functional decline in DMD. These improvements were accompanied by autophagy activation, a recent therapeutic target for DMD, and less oxidative stress. Together, our findings highlight that simvastatin substantially improves the overall health and function of dystrophic skeletal muscles and may provide an unexpected, novel therapy for DMD and related neuromuscular diseases. PMID:26417069

  1. Muscular Dystrophy Mutations Impair the Nuclear Envelope Emerin Self-assembly Properties.

    PubMed

    Herrada, Isaline; Samson, Camille; Velours, Christophe; Renault, Louis; Östlund, Cecilia; Chervy, Pierre; Puchkov, Dmytro; Worman, Howard J; Buendia, Brigitte; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2015-12-18

    More than 100 genetic mutations causing X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy have been identified in the gene encoding the integral inner nuclear membrane protein emerin. Most mutations are nonsense or frameshift mutations that lead to the absence of emerin in cells. Only very few cases are due to missense or short in-frame deletions. Molecular mechanisms explaining the corresponding emerin variants' loss of function are particularly difficult to identify because of the mostly intrinsically disordered state of the emerin nucleoplasmic region. We now demonstrate that this EmN region can be produced as a disordered monomer, as revealed by nuclear magnetic resonance, but rapidly self-assembles in vitro. Increases in concentration and temperature favor the formation of long curvilinear filaments with diameters of approximately 10 nm, as observed by electron microscopy. Assembly of these filaments can be followed by fluorescence through Thioflavin-T binding and by Fourier-transform Infrared spectrometry through formation of β-structures. Analysis of the assembly properties of five EmN variants reveals that del95-99 and Q133H impact filament assembly capacities. In cells, these variants are located at the nuclear envelope, but the corresponding quantities of emerin-emerin and emerin-lamin proximities are decreased compared to wild-type protein. Furthermore, variant P183H favors EmN aggregation in vitro, and variant P183T provokes emerin accumulation in cytoplasmic foci in cells. Substitution of residue Pro183 might systematically favor oligomerization, leading to emerin aggregation and mislocalization in cells. Our results suggest that emerin self-assembly is necessary for its proper function and that a loss of either the protein itself or its ability to self-assemble causes muscular dystrophy.

  2. A new therapeutic effect of simvastatin revealed by functional improvement in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Nicholas P; Kim, Min Jeong; Bible, Kenneth L; Adams, Marvin E; Froehner, Stanley C

    2015-10-13

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, degenerative muscle disease with no effective treatment. DMD muscle pathogenesis is characterized by chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. Statins, cholesterol-lowering drugs, inhibit these deleterious processes in ischemic diseases affecting skeletal muscle, and therefore have potential to improve DMD. However, statins have not been considered for DMD, or other muscular dystrophies, principally because skeletal-muscle-related symptoms are rare, but widely publicized, side effects of these drugs. Here we show positive effects of statins in dystrophic skeletal muscle. Simvastatin dramatically reduced damage and enhanced muscle function in dystrophic (mdx) mice. Long-term simvastatin treatment vastly improved overall muscle health in mdx mice, reducing plasma creatine kinase activity, an established measure of muscle damage, to near-normal levels. This reduction was accompanied by reduced inflammation, more oxidative muscle fibers, and improved strength of the weak diaphragm muscle. Shorter-term treatment protected against muscle fatigue and increased mdx hindlimb muscle force by 40%, a value comparable to current dystrophin gene-based therapies. Increased force correlated with reduced NADPH Oxidase 2 protein expression, the major source of oxidative stress in dystrophic muscle. Finally, in old mdx mice with severe muscle degeneration, simvastatin enhanced diaphragm force and halved fibrosis, a major cause of functional decline in DMD. These improvements were accompanied by autophagy activation, a recent therapeutic target for DMD, and less oxidative stress. Together, our findings highlight that simvastatin substantially improves the overall health and function of dystrophic skeletal muscles and may provide an unexpected, novel therapy for DMD and related neuromuscular diseases. PMID:26417069

  3. Intellectual ability in the duchenne muscular dystrophy and dystrophin gene mutation location.

    PubMed

    Milic Rasic, V; Vojinovic, D; Pesovic, J; Mijalkovic, G; Lukic, V; Mladenovic, J; Kosac, A; Novakovic, I; Maksimovic, N; Romac, S; Todorovic, S; Savic Pavicevic, D

    2014-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy during childhood. Mutations in dystrophin (DMD) gene are also recognized as a cause of cognitive impairment. We aimed to determine the association between intelligence level and mutation location in DMD genes in Serbian patients with DMD. Forty-one male patients with DMD, aged 3 to 16 years, were recruited at the Clinic for Neurology and Psychiatry for Children and Youth in Belgrade, Serbia. All patients had defined DMD gene deletions or duplications [multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), polymerase chain reaction (PCR)] and cognitive status assessment (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Brunet-Lezine scale, Vineland-Doll scale). In 37 patients with an estimated full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ), six (16.22%) had borderline intelligence (70

  4. A new therapeutic effect of simvastatin revealed by functional improvement in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Nicholas P; Kim, Min Jeong; Bible, Kenneth L; Adams, Marvin E; Froehner, Stanley C

    2015-10-13

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, degenerative muscle disease with no effective treatment. DMD muscle pathogenesis is characterized by chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. Statins, cholesterol-lowering drugs, inhibit these deleterious processes in ischemic diseases affecting skeletal muscle, and therefore have potential to improve DMD. However, statins have not been considered for DMD, or other muscular dystrophies, principally because skeletal-muscle-related symptoms are rare, but widely publicized, side effects of these drugs. Here we show positive effects of statins in dystrophic skeletal muscle. Simvastatin dramatically reduced damage and enhanced muscle function in dystrophic (mdx) mice. Long-term simvastatin treatment vastly improved overall muscle health in mdx mice, reducing plasma creatine kinase activity, an established measure of muscle damage, to near-normal levels. This reduction was accompanied by reduced inflammation, more oxidative muscle fibers, and improved strength of the weak diaphragm muscle. Shorter-term treatment protected against muscle fatigue and increased mdx hindlimb muscle force by 40%, a value comparable to current dystrophin gene-based therapies. Increased force correlated with reduced NADPH Oxidase 2 protein expression, the major source of oxidative stress in dystrophic muscle. Finally, in old mdx mice with severe muscle degeneration, simvastatin enhanced diaphragm force and halved fibrosis, a major cause of functional decline in DMD. These improvements were accompanied by autophagy activation, a recent therapeutic target for DMD, and less oxidative stress. Together, our findings highlight that simvastatin substantially improves the overall health and function of dystrophic skeletal muscles and may provide an unexpected, novel therapy for DMD and related neuromuscular diseases.

  5. MRI-based quantification of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Kornegay, Joe N.; Styner, Martin A.

    2011-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive and fatal X-linked disease caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown potential to provide non-invasive and objective biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic effect in DMD. In this paper, we propose a semi-automated scheme to quantify MRI features of golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD), a canine model of DMD. Our method was applied to a natural history data set and a hydrodynamic limb perfusion data set. The scheme is composed of three modules: pre-processing, muscle segmentation, and feature analysis. The pre-processing module includes: calculation of T2 maps, spatial registration of T2 weighted (T2WI) images, T2 weighted fat suppressed (T2FS) images, and T2 maps, and intensity calibration of T2WI and T2FS images. We then manually segment six pelvic limb muscles. For each of the segmented muscles, we finally automatically measure volume and intensity statistics of the T2FS images and T2 maps. For the natural history study, our results showed that four of six muscles in affected dogs had smaller volumes and all had higher mean intensities in T2 maps as compared to normal dogs. For the perfusion study, the muscle volumes and mean intensities in T2FS were increased in the post-perfusion MRI scans as compared to pre-perfusion MRI scans, as predicted. We conclude that our scheme successfully performs quantitative analysis of muscle MRI features of GRMD.

  6. Skeletal muscle imaging in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, pattern and asymmetry of individual muscle involvement.

    PubMed

    Rijken, N H M; van der Kooi, E L; Hendriks, J C M; van Asseldonk, R J G P; Padberg, G W; Geurts, A C H; van Engelen, B G M

    2014-12-01

    To better understand postural and movement disabilities, the pattern of total body muscle fat infiltration was analyzed in a large group of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Additionally, we studied whether residual D4Z4 repeat array length adjusted for age and gender could predict the degree of muscle involvement. Total body computed tomography scans of 70 patients were used to assess the degree of fat infiltration of 42 muscles from neck to ankle level on a semi-quantitative scale. Groups of muscles that highly correlated regarding fat infiltration were identified using factor analysis. Linear regression analysis was performed using muscle fat infiltration as the dependent variable and D4Z4 repeat length and age as independent variables. A pattern of muscle fat infiltration in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy could be constructed. Trunk muscles were most frequently affected. Of these, back extensors were more frequently affected than previously reported. Asymmetry in muscle involvement was seen in 45% of the muscles that were infiltrated with fat. The right-sided upper extremity showed significantly higher scores for fat infiltration compared to the left side, which could not be explained by handedness. It was possible to explain 29% of the fat infiltration based on D4Z4 repeat length, corrected for age and gender. Based on our results we conclude that frequent involvement of fat infiltration in back extensors, in addition to the abdominal muscles, emphasizes the extent of trunk involvement, which may have a profound impact on postural control even in otherwise mildly affected patients.

  7. The role of proteases in excitation-contraction coupling failure in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mázala, Davi A G; Grange, Robert W; Chin, Eva R

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most frequent types of muscular dystrophy. Alterations in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) handling are thought to contribute to the disease severity in DMD, possibly due to the activation of Ca(2+)-activated proteases. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to determine whether prolonged excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling disruption following repeated contractions is greater in animals lacking both dystrophin and utrophin (mdx/Utr(-/-)) compared with mice lacking only dystrophin (mdx); and 2) to assess whether protease inhibition can prevent E-C coupling failure following repeated tetani in these dystrophic mouse models. Excitation-contraction coupling was assessed using Fura-2 ratio, as an index of intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration, in response to electrical stimulation of single muscle fibers from the flexor digitorum brevis muscle. Resting Fura-2 ratio was higher in dystrophic compared with control (Con) fibers, but peak Fura-2 ratios during stimulation were similar in dystrophic and Con fibers. One hour after a series of repeated tetani, peak Fura-2 ratios were reduced by 30 ± 5.6%, 23 ± 2%, and 36 ± 3.1% in mdx, mdx/Utr(+/-), and mdx/Utr(-/-), respectively, with the greatest reduction in mdx/Utr(-/-) fibers (P < 0.05). Protease inhibition attenuated this decrease in peak Fura-2 ratio. These data indicate that E-C coupling impairment after repeated contractions is greatest in fibers lacking both dystrophin and utrophin and that prevention of protease activation can mitigate the prolonged E-C coupling impairment. These data further suggest that acute protease inhibition may be useful in reducing muscle weakness in DMD.

  8. Delayed bone regeneration is linked to chronic inflammation in murine muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Abou-Khalil, Rana; Yang, Frank; Mortreux, Marie; Lieu, Shirley; Yu, Yan-Yiu; Wurmser, Maud; Pereira, Catia; Relaix, Frédéric; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph S; Colnot, Céline

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients exhibit skeletal muscle weakness with continuous cycles of muscle fiber degeneration/regeneration, chronic inflammation, low bone mineral density, and increased risks of fracture. Fragility fractures and associated complications are considered as a consequence of the osteoporotic condition in these patients. Here, we aimed to establish the relationship between muscular dystrophy and fracture healing by assessing bone regeneration in mdx mice, a model of DMD with absence of osteoporosis. Our results illustrate that muscle defects in mdx mice impact the process of bone regeneration at various levels. In mdx fracture calluses, both cartilage and bone deposition were delayed followed by a delay in cartilage and bone remodeling. Vascularization of mdx fracture calluses was also decreased during the early stages of repair. Dystrophic muscles are known to contain elevated numbers of macrophages contributing to muscle degeneration. Accordingly, we observed increased macrophage recruitment in the mdx fracture calluses and abnormal macrophage accumulation throughout the process of bone regeneration. These changes in the inflammatory environment subsequently had an impact on the recruitment of osteoclasts and the remodeling phase of repair. Further damage to the mdx muscles, using a novel model of muscle trauma, amplified both the chronic inflammatory response and the delay in bone regeneration. In addition, PLX3397 treatment of mdx mice, a cFMS (colony stimulating factor receptor 1) inhibitor in monocytes, partially rescued the bone repair defect through increasing cartilage deposition and decreasing the number of macrophages. In conclusion, chronic inflammation in mdx mice contributes to the fracture healing delay and is associated with a decrease in angiogenesis and a transient delay in osteoclast recruitment. By revealing the role of dystrophic muscle in regulating the inflammatory response during bone repair, our results

  9. Pharmacologic Management of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Target Identification and Preclinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kornegay, Joe N.; Spurney, Christopher F.; Nghiem, Peter P.; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked human disorder in which absence of the protein dystrophin causes degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. For the sake of treatment development, over and above definitive genetic and cell-based therapies, there is considerable interest in drugs that target downstream disease mechanisms. Drug candidates have typically been chosen based on the nature of pathologic lesions and presumed underlying mechanisms and then tested in animal models. Mammalian dystrophinopathies have been characterized in mice (mdx mouse) and dogs (golden retriever muscular dystrophy [GRMD]). Despite promising results in the mdx mouse, some therapies have not shown efficacy in DMD. Although the GRMD model offers a higher hurdle for translation, dogs have primarily been used to test genetic and cellular therapies where there is greater risk. Failed translation of animal studies to DMD raises questions about the propriety of methods and models used to identify drug targets and test efficacy of pharmacologic intervention. The mdx mouse and GRMD dog are genetically homologous to DMD but not necessarily analogous. Subcellular species differences are undoubtedly magnified at the whole-body level in clinical trials. This problem is compounded by disparate cultures in clinical trials and preclinical studies, pointing to a need for greater rigor and transparency in animal experiments. Molecular assays such as mRNA arrays and genome-wide association studies allow identification of genetic drug targets more closely tied to disease pathogenesis. Genes in which polymorphisms have been directly linked to DMD disease progression, as with osteopontin, are particularly attractive targets. PMID:24936034

  10. The involvement of collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Spector, Itai; Zilberstein, Yael; Lavy, Adi; Genin, Olga; Barzilai-Tutsch, Hila; Bodanovsky, Ana; Halevy, Orna; Pines, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Fibrosis is the main complication of muscular dystrophies. We identified collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (Cthrc1) in skeletal and cardiac muscles of mice, representing Duchenne and congenital muscle dystrophies (DMD and CMD, respectively), and dysferlinopathy. In all of the mice, Cthrc1 was associated with high collagen type I levels; no Cthrc1 or collagen was observed in muscles of control mice. High levels of Cthrc1 were also observed in biopsy specimens from patients with DMD, in whom they were reversibly correlated with that of β-dystroglycan, whereas collagen type I levels were elevated in all patients with DMD. At the muscle sites where collagen and Cthrc1 were adjacent, collagen fibers appeared smaller, suggesting involvement of Cthrc1 in collagen turnover. Halofuginone, an inhibitor of Smad3 phosphorylation downstream of the transforming growth factor-β signaling, reduced Cthrc1 levels in skeletal and cardiac muscles of mice, representing DMD, CMD, and dysferlinopathy. The myofibroblasts infiltrating the dystrophic muscles of the murine models of DMD, CMD, and dysferlinopathy were the source of Cthrc1. Transforming growth factor-β did not affect Cthrc1 levels in the mdx fibroblasts but decreased them in the control fibroblasts, in association with increased migration of mdx fibroblasts and dystrophic muscle invasion by myofibroblasts. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of Cthrc1 as a marker of the severity of the disease progression in the dystrophic muscles, and as a possible target for therapy.

  11. Asynchronous remodeling is a driver of failed regeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Dadgar, Sherry; Wang, Zuyi; Johnston, Helen; Kesari, Akanchha; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Chen, Yi-Wen; Hill, D. Ashley; Partridge, Terence A.; Giri, Mamta; Freishtat, Robert J.; Nazarian, Javad; Xuan, Jianhua; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine the mechanisms underlying failure of muscle regeneration that is observed in dystrophic muscle through hypothesis generation using muscle profiling data (human dystrophy and murine regeneration). We found that transforming growth factor β–centered networks strongly associated with pathological fibrosis and failed regeneration were also induced during normal regeneration but at distinct time points. We hypothesized that asynchronously regenerating microenvironments are an underlying driver of fibrosis and failed regeneration. We validated this hypothesis using an experimental model of focal asynchronous bouts of muscle regeneration in wild-type (WT) mice. A chronic inflammatory state and reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity are observed in bouts separated by 4 d, whereas a chronic profibrotic state was seen in bouts separated by 10 d. Treatment of asynchronously remodeling WT muscle with either prednisone or VBP15 mitigated the molecular phenotype. Our asynchronous regeneration model for pathological fibrosis and muscle wasting in the muscular dystrophies is likely generalizable to tissue failure in chronic inflammatory states in other regenerative tissues. PMID:25313409

  12. Evaluation of myocardial involvement in muscular dystrophy with Thallium-201 emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Kawai, N.; Matsushima, H.; Okada, M.; Yamauchi, K.; Yokota, M.; Hayashi, H.; Sotobata, I.; Sakuma, S.

    1985-05-01

    The clinical usefulness of quantitative analysis of thallium-201 emission computed tomography (ECT) for evaluation of left ventricular myocardial fibrosis was assessed on 45 patients with Duchenne(D), facioscapulohumeral(FSH), limbgirdle(LG) and myotonic(M) dystrophy. Trans-,long- and short-axial images were interpreted quantitatively using circumferential profile analysis, and the fibrotic tissue size (%FIB) was estimated by integration of hypoperfused areas in 6 to 8 consecutive short-axial slices. Lung/mediastinum count ratios (L/M ratio) were also assessed. Distinct ECT defects were found in 42 patients (all cases of D, FSH and LG, and 2 of 5 MTs). ECT defects were observed specifically in the posterolateral wall (71%) and apex (58%) in D, and were scattered in all LV walls in FSHG, LG and MT. ECG and VCG underestimated the extent of myocardial fibrosis in 17 patients (40%). Percent FIBs coincided with fibrotic tissue sizes proven by autopsy. Body-surface ECG should be influenced by cardiac position and rotation in the thorax, which were often observed in these disease entities. These factors were also assessed with ECT. The authors conclude; ECT to be useful for non-invasive evaluation of myocardial fibrosis in patients with various types of muscular dystrophy.

  13. Myocardial metabolism, perfusion, wall motion and electrical activity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Perloff, J.K.; Henze, E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    The cardiomyopathy of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy originates in the posterobasal left ventricle and extends chiefly to the contiguous lateral wall. Ultrastructural abnormalities in these regions precede connective tissue replacement. We postulated that a metabolic fault coincided with or antedated the subcellular abnormality. Accordingly, regional left ventricular metabolism, perfusion and wall motion were studied using positron computed tomography and metabolic isotopes supplemented by thallium perfusion scans, equilibrium radionuclide angiography and M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography. To complete the assessment, electrocardiograms, vectorcardiograms, 24 hour taped electrocardiograms and chest x-rays were analyzed. Positron computed tomography utilizing F-18 2-fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) provided the first conclusive evidence supporting the hypothesis of a premorphologic regional metabolic fault. Thus, cardiac involvement in duchenne dystrophy emerges as a unique form of heart disease, genetically targeting specific regions of ventricular myocardium for initial metabolic and subcellular changes. Reported ultrastructural abnormalities of the impulse and conduction systems provide, at least in part, a basis for the clinically observed sinus node, intraatrial, internodal, AV nodal and infranodal disorders.

  14. Specific profiles of neurocognitive and reading functions in a sample of 42 Italian boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo; D'Angelo, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    A group of 42 Italian boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy was compared with a control group of 10 boys with Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Osteogenesis Imperfecta on tests assessing general intellectual ability, language, neuropsychological functions, and reading skills with the aim of describing a comprehensive profile of the various functions and investigating their interrelationships. The influence of general intellectual level on performance was analyzed. Further, correlations between various neuropsychological measures and language performances were computed for the group with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, as well as the correlations between reading scores and other cognitive and linguistic measures. A general lowering in VIQ, PIQ, and FSIQ scores was found to characterize the group with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Expressive language skills were within the normal range, while syntactic and grammatical comprehension were significantly impaired. The presence of below-average reading performances was further confirmed. However, unlike previous studies on irregular orthographies, the present results show that (a) the mild reading difficulties found in the sample essentially concern speed rather than accuracy; (b) they concern word rather than nonword reading; (c) lower reading performances are related to lower scores in general IQ; (d) no correlations emerge with phonological abilities, verbal short-term memory, or working memory, but rather with long-term memory and lexical skills. This may suggest that language-specific effects modulate the cognitive expressions of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and raises the possibility that the dysfunctions underlying the reading difficulties observed in affected readers of regular orthographies involve different neurocognitive systems than the cortico-cerebellar circuits usually invoked.

  15. Systemic vascular function is associated with muscular power in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-associated loss of muscular strength and muscular power are critical determinants of loss of physical function and progression to disability in older adults. In this study, we examined the association of systemic vascular function and measures of muscle strength and power in older adults. Measu...

  16. Isometric and eccentric force generation assessment of skeletal muscles isolated from murine models of muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Moorwood, Catherine; Liu, Min; Tian, Zuozhen; Barton, Elisabeth R

    2013-01-31

    Critical to the evaluation of potential therapeutics for muscular disease are sensitive and reproducible physiological assessments of muscle function. Because many pre-clinical trials rely on mouse models for these diseases, isolated muscle function has become one of the standards for Go/NoGo decisions in moving drug candidates forward into patients. We will demonstrate the preparation of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and diaphragm muscles for functional testing, which are the predominant muscles utilized for these studies. The EDL muscle geometry is ideal for isolated muscle preparations, with two easily accessible tendons, and a small size that can be supported by superfusion in a bath. The diaphragm exhibits profound progressive pathology in dystrophic animals, and can serve as a platform for evaluating many potential therapies countering fibrosis, and promoting myofiber stability. Protocols for routine testing, including isometric and eccentric contractions, will be shown. Isometric force provides assessment of strength, and eccentric contractions help to evaluate sarcolemma stability, which is disrupted in many types of muscular dystrophies. Comparisons of the expected results between muscles from wildtype and dystrophic muscles will also be provided. These measures can complement morphological and biochemical measurements of tissue homeostasis, as well as whole animal assessments of muscle function.

  17. Intra-arterial transplantation of HLA-matched donor mesoangioblasts in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Giulio; Previtali, Stefano C; Napolitano, Sara; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Nicastro, Francesca; Noviello, Maddalena; Roostalu, Urmas; Natali Sora, Maria Grazia; Scarlato, Marina; De Pellegrin, Maurizio; Godi, Claudia; Giuliani, Serena; Ciotti, Francesca; Tonlorenzi, Rossana; Lorenzetti, Isabella; Rivellini, Cristina; Benedetti, Sara; Gatti, Roberto; Marktel, Sarah; Mazzi, Benedetta; Tettamanti, Andrea; Ragazzi, Martina; Imro, Maria Adele; Marano, Giuseppina; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Fiori, Rossana; Sormani, Maria Pia; Bonini, Chiara; Venturini, Massimo; Politi, Letterio S; Torrente, Yvan; Ciceri, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    Intra-arterial transplantation of mesoangioblasts proved safe and partially efficacious in preclinical models of muscular dystrophy. We now report the first-in-human, exploratory, non-randomized open-label phase I-IIa clinical trial of intra-arterial HLA-matched donor cell transplantation in 5 Duchenne patients. We administered escalating doses of donor-derived mesoangioblasts in limb arteries under immunosuppressive therapy (tacrolimus). Four consecutive infusions were performed at 2-month intervals, preceded and followed by clinical, laboratory, and muscular MRI analyses. Two months after the last infusion, a muscle biopsy was performed. Safety was the primary endpoint. The study was relatively safe: One patient developed a thalamic stroke with no clinical consequences and whose correlation with mesoangioblast infusion remained unclear. MRI documented the progression of the disease in 4/5 patients. Functional measures were transiently stabilized in 2/3 ambulant patients, but no functional improvements were observed. Low level of donor DNA was detected in muscle biopsies of 4/5 patients and donor-derived dystrophin in 1. Intra-arterial transplantation of donor mesoangioblasts in human proved to be feasible and relatively safe. Future implementation of the protocol, together with a younger age of patients, will be needed to approach efficacy. PMID:26543057

  18. Symptomatic female carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD): genetic and clinical characterization.

    PubMed

    Giliberto, Florencia; Radic, Claudia Pamela; Luce, Leonela; Ferreiro, Verónica; de Brasi, Carlos; Szijan, Irene

    2014-01-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene and is characterized by muscle degeneration and death. DMD affects males; females being asymptomatic carriers of mutations. However, some of them manifest symptoms due to a translocation between X chromosome and an autosome or to a heterozygous mutation leading to inactivation of most of their normal X chromosome. Six symptomatic female carriers and two asymptomatic were analyzed by: I) Segregation of STRs-(CA)n and MLPA assays to detect a hemizygous alteration, and II) X chromosome inactivation pattern to uncover the reason for symptoms in these females. The symptomatic females shared mild but progressive muscular weakness and increased serum creatin kinase (CK) levels. Levels of dystrophin protein were below normal or absent in many fibers. Segregation of STRs-(CA)n revealed hemizygous patterns in three patients, which were confirmed by MLPA. In addition, this analysis showed a duplication in another patient. X chromosome inactivation assay revealed a skewed X inactivation pattern in the symptomatic females and a random inactivation pattern in the asymptomatic ones. Our results support the hypothesis that the DMD phenotype in female carriers of a dystrophin mutation has a direct correlation with a skewed X-chromosome inactivation pattern.

  19. Recent advances in innovative therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: from discovery to clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shouta; Komaki, Hirofumi; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked progressive degenerative muscle disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin. There is no curative therapy, although innovative therapeutic approaches have been aggressively investigated over recent years. Currently, the international clinical trial registry platform for this disease has been constructed and clinical trials for innovative therapeutic approaches are underway. Among these, exon skipping and read-through of nonsense mutations are in the most advanced stages, with exon skipping theoretically applicable to a larger number of patients. To date, exon skipping that targets exons 51, 44, 45, and 53 is being globally investigated including in USA, EU, and Japan. The latest announcement from Japan was made, demonstrating successful dystrophin production in muscles of patients with DMD after treating with exon 53 skipping antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). However, the innovative therapeutic approaches have demonstrated limited efficacy. To address this issue in exon skipping, studies to unveil the mechanism underlying gymnotic delivery of ASO uptake in living cells have been conducted in an effort to improve in vivo delivery. Further, establishing the infrastructures to integrate multi-institutional clinical trials are needed to facilitate the development of successful therapies for DMD, which ultimately is applicable to other myopathies and neurodegenerative diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy and motor neuron diseases. PMID:27398133

  20. Recent advances in innovative therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: from discovery to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shouta; Komaki, Hirofumi; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked progressive degenerative muscle disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin. There is no curative therapy, although innovative therapeutic approaches have been aggressively investigated over recent years. Currently, the international clinical trial registry platform for this disease has been constructed and clinical trials for innovative therapeutic approaches are underway. Among these, exon skipping and read-through of nonsense mutations are in the most advanced stages, with exon skipping theoretically applicable to a larger number of patients. To date, exon skipping that targets exons 51, 44, 45, and 53 is being globally investigated including in USA, EU, and Japan. The latest announcement from Japan was made, demonstrating successful dystrophin production in muscles of patients with DMD after treating with exon 53 skipping antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). However, the innovative therapeutic approaches have demonstrated limited efficacy. To address this issue in exon skipping, studies to unveil the mechanism underlying gymnotic delivery of ASO uptake in living cells have been conducted in an effort to improve in vivo delivery. Further, establishing the infrastructures to integrate multi-institutional clinical trials are needed to facilitate the development of successful therapies for DMD, which ultimately is applicable to other myopathies and neurodegenerative diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy and motor neuron diseases.

  1. Overexpression of LARGE suppresses muscle regeneration via down-regulation of insulin-like growth factor 1 and aggravates muscular dystrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Saito, Fumiaki; Kanagawa, Motoi; Ikeda, Miki; Hagiwara, Hiroki; Masaki, Toshihiro; Ohkuma, Hidehiko; Katanosaka, Yuki; Shimizu, Teruo; Sonoo, Masahiro; Toda, Tatsushi; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2014-09-01

    Several types of muscular dystrophy are caused by defective linkage between α-dystroglycan (α-DG) and laminin. Among these, dystroglycanopathy, including Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), results from abnormal glycosylation of α-DG. Recent studies have shown that like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (LARGE) strongly enhances the laminin-binding activity of α-DG. Therefore, restoration of the α-DG-laminin linkage by LARGE is considered one of the most promising possible therapies for muscular dystrophy. In this study, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress LARGE (LARGE Tg) and crossed them with dy(2J) mice and fukutin conditional knockout mice, a model for laminin α2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) and FCMD, respectively. Remarkably, in both the strains, the transgenic overexpression of LARGE resulted in an aggravation of muscular dystrophy. Using morphometric analyses, we found that the deterioration of muscle pathology was caused by suppression of muscle regeneration. Overexpression of LARGE in C2C12 cells further demonstrated defects in myotube formation. Interestingly, a decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) was identified in both LARGE Tg mice and LARGE-overexpressing C2C12 myotubes. Supplementing the C2C12 cells with IGF-1 restored the defective myotube formation. Taken together, our findings indicate that the overexpression of LARGE aggravates muscular dystrophy by suppressing the muscle regeneration and this adverse effect is mediated via reduced expression of IGF-1.

  2. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    PubMed

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function.

  3. A Simplified Immune Suppression Scheme Leads to Persistent Micro-dystrophin Expression in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jin-Hong; Yue, Yongping; Srivastava, Arun; Smith, Bruce; Lai, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Highly abbreviated micro-dystrophin genes have been intensively studied for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene therapy. Following adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer, robust microgene expression is achieved in murine DMD models in the absence of immune suppression. Interestingly, a recent study suggests that AAV gene transfer in dystrophic dogs may require up to 18 weeks' immune suppression using a combination of three different immune-suppressive drugs (cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and anti-dog thymocyte globulin). Continued immune suppression is not only costly but also may cause untoward reactions. Further, some of the drugs (such as anti-dog thymocyte globulin) are not readily available. To overcome these limitations, we developed a novel 5-week immune suppression scheme using only cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. AAV vectors (either AV.RSV.AP that expresses the heat-resistant human alkaline phosphatase gene, or AV.CMV.μDys that expresses the canine R16-17/H3/ΔC microgene) at 2.85×1012 vg particles were injected into adult dystrophic dog limb muscles under the new immune suppression protocol. Sustained transduction was observed for nearly half year (the end of the study). The simplified immune suppression strategy described here may facilitate preclinical studies in the dog model. PMID:21967249

  4. Beta-sarcoglycan: characterization and role in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy linked to 4q12.

    PubMed

    Lim, L E; Duclos, F; Broux, O; Bourg, N; Sunada, Y; Allamand, V; Meyer, J; Richard, I; Moomaw, C; Slaughter, C

    1995-11-01

    beta-Sarcoglycan, a 43 kDa dystrophin-associated glycoprotein, is an integral component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. We have cloned human beta-sarcoglycan cDNA and mapped the beta-sarcoglycan gene to chromosome 4q12. Pericentromeric markers and an intragenic polymorphic CA repeat cosegregated perfectly with autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in several Amish families. A Thr-to-Arg missense mutation was identified within the beta-sarcoglycan gene that leads to a dramatically reduced expression of beta-sarcoglycan in the sarcolemma and a concomitant loss of adhalin and 35 DAG, which may represent a disruption of a functional subcomplex within the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Thus, the beta-sarcoglycan gene is the fifth locus identified (LGMD2E) that is involved in autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

  5. Nonsense mutation-associated Becker muscular dystrophy: interplay between exon definition and splicing regulatory elements within the DMD gene

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, Kevin M.; Dunn, Diane M.; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Soltanzadeh, Payam; Howard, Michael T.; Sampson, Jacinda B.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Bromberg, Mark B.; Mendell, Jerry R.; Taylor, Laura; Anderson, Christine B.; Pestronk, Alan; Florence, Julaine; Connolly, Anne M.; Mathews, Katherine D.; Wong, Brenda; Finkel, Richard S.; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Day, John W.; McDonald, Craig; Weiss, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsense mutations are usually predicted to function as null alleles due to premature termination of protein translation. However, nonsense mutations in the DMD gene, encoding the dystrophin protein, have been associated with both the severe Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and milder Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) phenotypes. In a large survey, we identified 243 unique nonsense mutations in the DMD gene, and for 210 of these we could establish definitive phenotypes. We analyzed the reading frame predicted by exons flanking those in which nonsense mutations were found, and present evidence that nonsense mutations resulting in BMD likely do so by inducing exon skipping, confirming that exonic point mutations affecting exon definition have played a significant role in determining phenotype. We present a new model based on the combination of exon definition and intronic splicing regulatory elements for the selective association of BMD nonsense mutations with a subset of DMD exons prone to mutation-induced exon skipping. PMID:21972111

  6. Non-surgical prevention and management of scoliosis for children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Adrienne; Baker, Louise; Williams, Katrina

    2014-10-01

    A review was performed to examine the evidence for non-surgical interventions for preventing scoliosis and the need for scoliosis surgery in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Medline and Embase databases and reference lists from key articles were searched. After the inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, 13 studies were critically appraised independently by two reviewers. The included studies examined spinal orthoses and steroid therapy. There were no studies with high levels of evidence (randomised or other controlled trials). The studies with the highest level of evidence were non-randomised experimental trials. There is some evidence that children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who receive steroid therapy might have delayed onset of scoliosis, but more evidence is required about the long-term risks versus benefits of this intervention. There is weak evidence that spinal orthoses do not prevent and only minimally delay the onset of scoliosis.

  7. Identification of muscle necrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyen, Blake R.; Shavlakadze, Thea; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G.; Grounds, Miranda D.; Sampson, David D.

    2011-07-01

    Three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) was used to image the structure and pathology of skeletal muscle tissue from the treadmill-exercised mdx mouse model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of excised muscle samples were compared with co-registered hematoxylin and eosin-stained and Evans blue dye fluorescence histology. We show, for the first time, structural 3D-OCT images of skeletal muscle dystropathology well correlated with co-located histology. OCT could identify morphological features of interest and necrotic lesions within the muscle tissue samples based on intrinsic optical contrast. These findings demonstrate the utility of 3D-OCT for the evaluation of small-animal skeletal muscle morphology and pathology, particularly for studies of mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

  8. Nonsense mutation-associated Becker muscular dystrophy: interplay between exon definition and splicing regulatory elements within the DMD gene.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, Kevin M; Dunn, Diane M; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Soltanzadeh, Payam; Howard, Michael T; Sampson, Jacinda B; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Bromberg, Mark B; Mendell, Jerry R; Taylor, Laura E; Anderson, Christine B; Pestronk, Alan; Florence, Julaine M; Connolly, Anne M; Mathews, Katherine D; Wong, Brenda; Finkel, Richard S; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Day, John W; McDonald, Craig; Weiss, Robert B

    2011-03-01

    Nonsense mutations are usually predicted to function as null alleles due to premature termination of protein translation. However, nonsense mutations in the DMD gene, encoding the dystrophin protein, have been associated with both the severe Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and milder Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) phenotypes. In a large survey, we identified 243 unique nonsense mutations in the DMD gene, and for 210 of these we could establish definitive phenotypes. We analyzed the reading frame predicted by exons flanking those in which nonsense mutations were found, and present evidence that nonsense mutations resulting in BMD likely do so by inducing exon skipping, confirming that exonic point mutations affecting exon definition have played a significant role in determining phenotype. We present a new model based on the combination of exon definition and intronic splicing regulatory elements for the selective association of BMD nonsense mutations with a subset of DMD exons prone to mutation-induced exon skipping.

  9. A Novel Missense Mutation in POMT1 Modulates the Severe Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Phenotype Associated with POMT1 Nonsense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Stephanie E.; Conta, Jessie H.; Winder, Thomas L.; Willer, Tobias; Eskuri, Jamie M.; Haas, Richard; Patterson, Kathleen; Campbell, Kevin P.; Moore, Steven A.; Gospe, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in POMT1 lead to a group of neuromuscular conditions ranging in severity from Walker-Warburg syndrome to limb girdle muscular dystrophy. We report two male siblings, ages 19 and 14, and an unrelated 6-year old female with early onset muscular dystrophy and intellectual disability with minimal structural brain anomalies and no ocular abnormalities. Compound heterozygous mutations in POMT1 were identified including a previously reported nonsense mutation (c.2167dupG; p.Asp723Glyfs*8) associated with Walker-Warburg syndrome and a novel missense mutation in a highly conserved region of the protein O-mannosyltransferase 1 protein (c.1958C>T; p.Pro653Leu). This novel variant reduces the phenotypic severity compared to patients with homozygous c.2167dupG mutations or compound heterozygous patients with a c.2167dupG mutation and a wide range of other mutant POMT1 alleles. PMID:24491487

  10. [Characteristic of sorption properties of skeletal muscle nuclei in the normal state and with E-avitaminotic muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, T I; Silakova, A I; Tugaĭ, V A

    1979-01-01

    Sorption properties of skeletal muscles nuclei in rabbits in normal state and with E-avitaminosis were studied using organic dyes: neutral red (cationic) and turquoise direct light-fast "K" (anionic) and the influence of calcium-modified membrane of nuclei on their sorption. The nuclear surface is established to have both positive and negative charged groups sorbing turquioise direct and neutral red, respectively. The maximum volume of the dyes binding and the dissociation constants of the membrane-dye complex are estimated. It is shown that with muscular dystrophy the number of charged groups of both signs on the nuclear surface decreases. Calcium ions decrease the cationic dye sorption both in the normal state and with dystrophy and insignificantly decrease the anionic dye with dystrophy.

  11. Novel mutations in DNAJB6 gene cause a very severe early-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1D disease.

    PubMed

    Palmio, Johanna; Jonson, Per Harald; Evilä, Anni; Auranen, Mari; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Sarkozy, Anna; Kiuru-Enari, Sari; Sandell, Satu; Pihko, Helena; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne

    2015-11-01

    DNAJB6 is the causative gene for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1D (LGMD1D). Four different coding missense mutations, p.F89I, p.F93I, p.F93L, and p.P96R, have been reported in families from Europe, North America and Asia. The previously known mutations cause mainly adult-onset proximal muscle weakness with moderate progression and without respiratory involvement. A Finnish family and a British patient have been studied extensively due to a severe muscular dystrophy. The patients had childhood-onset LGMD, loss of ambulation in early adulthood and respiratory involvement; one patient died of respiratory failure aged 32. Two novel mutations, c.271T > A (p.F91I) and c.271T > C (p.F91L), in DNAJB6 were identified by whole exome sequencing as a cause of this severe form of LGMD1D. The results were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The anti-aggregation effect of the mutant DNAJB6 was investigated in a filter-trap based system using transient transfection of mammalian cell lines and polyQ-huntingtin as a model for an aggregation-prone protein. Both novel mutant proteins show a significant loss of ability to prevent aggregation.

  12. Novel mutations in DNAJB6 gene cause a very severe early-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1D disease.

    PubMed

    Palmio, Johanna; Jonson, Per Harald; Evilä, Anni; Auranen, Mari; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Sarkozy, Anna; Kiuru-Enari, Sari; Sandell, Satu; Pihko, Helena; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne

    2015-11-01

    DNAJB6 is the causative gene for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1D (LGMD1D). Four different coding missense mutations, p.F89I, p.F93I, p.F93L, and p.P96R, have been reported in families from Europe, North America and Asia. The previously known mutations cause mainly adult-onset proximal muscle weakness with moderate progression and without respiratory involvement. A Finnish family and a British patient have been studied extensively due to a severe muscular dystrophy. The patients had childhood-onset LGMD, loss of ambulation in early adulthood and respiratory involvement; one patient died of respiratory failure aged 32. Two novel mutations, c.271T > A (p.F91I) and c.271T > C (p.F91L), in DNAJB6 were identified by whole exome sequencing as a cause of this severe form of LGMD1D. The results were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The anti-aggregation effect of the mutant DNAJB6 was investigated in a filter-trap based system using transient transfection of mammalian cell lines and polyQ-huntingtin as a model for an aggregation-prone protein. Both novel mutant proteins show a significant loss of ability to prevent aggregation. PMID:26338452

  13. Profiles of Steroid Hormones in Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy via Stable Isotope Dilution LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Martins-Júnior, Helio A; Simas, Rosineide C; Brolio, Marina P; Ferreira, Christina R; Perecin, Felipe; Nogueira, Guilherme de P; Miglino, Maria A; Martins, Daniele S; Eberlin, Marcos N; Ambrósio, Carlos E

    2015-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) provides the best animal model for characterizing the disease progress of the human disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to determine steroid hormone concentration profiles in healthy golden retriever dogs (control group - CtGR) versus GRMD-gene carrier (CaGR) and affected female dogs (AfCR). Therefore, a sensitive and specific analytical method was developed and validated to determine the estradiol, progesterone, cortisol, and testosterone levels in the canine serum by isotope dilution liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To more accurately understand the dynamic nature of the serum steroid profile, the fluctuating levels of these four steroid hormones over the estrous cycle were compared across the three experimental groups using a multivariate statistical analysis. The concentration profiles of estradiol, cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone revealed a characteristic pattern for each studied group at each specific estrous phase. Additionally, several important changes in the serum concentrations of cortisol and estradiol in the CaGR and AfCR groups seem to be correlated with the status and progression of the muscular dystrophy. A comprehensive and quantitative monitoring of steroid profiles throughout the estrous cycle of normal and GRMD dogs were achieved. Significant differences in these profiles were observed between GRMD and healthy animals, most notably for estradiol. These findings contribute to a better understanding of both dog reproduction and the muscular dystrophy pathology. Our data open new venues for hormonal behavior studies in dystrophinopathies and that may affect the quality of life of DMD patients.

  14. Chronic oral administration of Ang-(1-7) improves skeletal muscle, autonomic and locomotor phenotypes in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Cicha, Michael Z; Sinisterra, Ruben D M; De Sousa, Frederico B; Santos, Robson A; Chapleau, Mark W

    2014-07-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic disorders that cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting, dilated cardiomyopathy and early mortality. There are different types of muscular dystrophies with varying aetiologies but they all have a common hallmark of myofibre degeneration, atrophy and decreased mobility. Mutation in Sgcd (sarcoglycan-δ), a subunit of dystrophin glycoprotein complex, causes LGMD2F (limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F). Previously, we have reported that Sgcd-deficient (Sgcd-/-) mice exhibit AngII (angiotensin II)-induced autonomic and skeletal muscle dysfunction at a young age, which contributes to onset of dilated cardiomyopathy and mortality at older ages. Two counter-regulatory RAS (renin-angiotensin system) pathways have been identified: deleterious actions of AngII acting on the AT1R (AngII type 1 receptor) compared with the protective actions of Ang-(1-7) [angiotensin-(1-7)] acting on the receptor Mas. We propose that the balance between the AngII/AT1R and Ang-(1-7)/Mas axes is disturbed in Sgcd-/- mice. Control C57BL/6J and Sgcd-/- mice were treated with Ang-(1-7) included in hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (in drinking water) for 8-9 weeks beginning at 3 weeks of age. Ang-(1-7) treatment restored the AngII/AT1R compared with Ang-(1-7)/Mas balance, decreased oxidative stress and fibrosis in skeletal muscle, increased locomotor activity, and prevented autonomic dysfunction without lowering blood pressure in Sgcd-/- mice. Our results suggest that correcting the early autonomic dysregulation by administering Ang-(1-7) or enhancing its endogenous production may provide a novel therapeutic approach in muscular dystrophy.

  15. Genetic and physical mapping at the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy locus (LGMD2B) on chromosome 2p

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, R.; Keers, S.; Strachan, T.

    1996-04-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, different forms of which have been mapped to at least six distinct genetic loci. We have mapped to at least six distinct genetic loci. We have mapped an autosomal recessive form of LGMD (LGMD2B) to chromosome 2p13. Two other conditions have been shown to map to this region or to the homologous region in mouse: a gene for a form of autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy, Miyoshi myopathy, shows linkage to the same markers on chromosome 2p as LGMD2B, and an autosomal recessive mouse mutation mnd2, in which there is rapidly progressive paralysis and muscle atrophy, has been mapped to mouse chromosome 6 to a region showing conserved synteny with human chromosome 2p12-p13. We have assembled a 6-cM YAC contig spanning the LGMD2B locus and have mapped seven genes and 13 anonymous polymorphic microsatellites to it. Using haplotype analysis in the linked families, we have narrowed our region of interest to a 0-cM interval between D2S2113 and D2S145, which does not overlap with the critical region for mnd2 in mouse. Use of these most closely linked markers will help to determine the relationship between LGMD2B and Miyoshi myopathy. YACs selected from our contig will be the starting point for the cloning of the LGMD2B gene and thereby establish the biological basis for this form of muscular dystrophy and its relationship with the other limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Sarcospan integration into laminin-binding adhesion complexes that ameliorate muscular dystrophy requires utrophin and α7 integrin

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Oh, Jennifer; Chou, Eric; Lee, Joy A.; Holmberg, Johan; Burkin, Dean J.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that result in loss of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex, a laminin receptor that connects the myofiber to its surrounding extracellular matrix. Utrophin, a dystrophin ortholog that is normally localized to the neuromuscular junction, is naturally upregulated in DMD muscle, which partially compensates for the loss of dystrophin. Transgenic overexpression of utrophin causes broad sarcolemma localization of utrophin, restoration of laminin binding and amelioration of disease in the mdx mouse model of DMD. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of sarcospan, a dystrophin- and utrophin-binding protein, ameliorates mdx muscular dystrophy. Sarcospan boosts levels of utrophin to therapeutic levels at the sarcolemma, where attachment to laminin is restored. However, understanding the compensatory mechanism is complicated by concomitant upregulation of α7β1 integrin, which also binds laminin. Similar to the effects of utrophin, transgenic overexpression of α7 integrin prevents DMD disease in mice and is accompanied by increased abundance of utrophin around the extra-synaptic sarcolemma. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying sarcospan ‘rescue’ of muscular dystrophy, we created double-knockout mice to test the contributions of utrophin or α7 integrin. We show that sarcospan-mediated amelioration of muscular dystrophy in DMD mice is dependent on the presence of both utrophin and α7β1 integrin, even when they are individually expressed at therapeutic levels. Furthermore, we found that association of sarcospan into laminin-binding complexes is dependent on utrophin and α7β1 integrin. PMID:25504048

  17. PAI-1-regulated miR-21 defines a novel age-associated fibrogenic pathway in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ardite, Esther; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Vidal, Berta; Gutarra, Susana; Serrano, Antonio L; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of skeletal muscle homeostasis by substitution with fibrotic tissue constitutes the principal cause of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, yet the implicated fibrogenic mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study identifies the extracellular PAI-1/urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) balance as an important regulator of microribonucleic acid (miR)-21 biogenesis, controlling age-associated muscle fibrosis and dystrophy progression. Genetic loss of PAI-1 in mdx dystrophic mice anticipated muscle fibrosis through these sequential mechanisms: the alteration of collagen metabolism by uPA-mediated proteolytic processing of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in muscle fibroblasts and the activation of miR-21 expression, which inhibited phosphatase and tensin homologue and enhanced AKT signaling, thus endowing TGF-β with a remarkable cell proliferation-promoting potential. Age-associated fibrogenesis and muscle deterioration in mdx mice, as well as exacerbated dystrophy in young PAI-1(-/-) mdx mice, could be reversed by miR-21 or uPA-selective interference, whereas forced miR-21 overexpression aggravated disease severity. The PAI-1-miR-21 fibrogenic axis also appeared dysregulated in muscle of DMD patients, providing a basis for effectively targeting fibrosis and muscular dystrophies in currently untreatable individuals.

  18. Fighting Against Disuse of the Masticatory System in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: A Pilot Study Using Chewing Gum.

    PubMed

    van Bruggen, H Willemijn; van den Engel-Hoek, Lenie; Steenks, Michel H; van der Bilt, Andries; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Creugers, Nico H J; de Groot, Imelda J M; Kalaykova, Stanimira I

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients report masticatory problems. The aim was to determine the efficacy of mastication training in Duchenne muscular dystrophy using chewing gum for 4 weeks. In all, 17 patients and 17 healthy age-matched males participated. The masticatory performance was assessed using a mixing ability test and measuring anterior bite force before, shortly after and 1 month after the training. In the patient group the masticatory performance improved and remained after 1-month follow-up, no significant changes in anterior maximum bite force was observed after mastication training. In the healthy subject the bite force increased and remained at the 1-month follow-up; no significant differences in masticatory performance were observed. Mastication training by using sugar-free chewing gum in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients improved their masticatory performance. Since bite force did not improve, the working mechanism of the improvement in chewing may relate to changes of the neuromuscular function and coordination, resulting in improvement of skills in performing mastication. PMID:25792431

  19. Retinal signal transmission in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: evidence for dysfunction in the photoreceptor/depolarizing bipolar cell pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, K M; Cibis, G W; Giambrone, S A; Harris, D J

    1994-01-01

    There have been reports of abnormal retinal neurotransmission determined by electroretinography in boys with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin may play a role in transmitting signals between photoreceptors and the excitatory synapse of the ON-bipolar cell. These electroretinographic changes appeared to be limited to the rod ON-pathway but we felt there was also similar abnormality in the cone ON-pathway. We used long-duration stimuli to separate ON-(depolarizing bipolar cell) and OFF (hyperpolarizing bipolar cell) contributions to the cone-dominated ERG to better understand how the retina functions in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We recorded the electroretinograms of 11 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and found abnormal signal transmission at the level of the photoreceptor and ON-bipolar cell in both the rod and cone generated responses. The OFF-bipolar cell that responds to the offset of the stimulus continues to function normally. The results support our hypothesis that retinal dystrophin plays a role in receptor function or controlling ion channels at the level of the photoreceptor and depolarizing bipolar cell. PMID:8200977

  20. 100-fold but not 50-fold dystrophin overexpression aggravates electrocardiographic defects in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yongping; Wasala, Nalinda B; Bostick, Brian; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin gene replacement holds the promise of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Supraphysiological expression is a concern for all gene therapy studies. In the case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Chamberlain and colleagues found that 50-fold overexpression did not cause deleterious side effect in skeletal muscle. To determine whether excessive dystrophin expression in the heart is safe, we studied two lines of transgenic mdx mice that selectively expressed a therapeutic minidystrophin gene in the heart at 50-fold and 100-fold of the normal levels. In the line with 50-fold overexpression, minidystrophin showed sarcolemmal localization and electrocardiogram abnormalities were corrected. However, in the line with 100-fold overexpression, we not only detected sarcolemmal minidystrophin expression but also observed accumulation of minidystrophin vesicles in the sarcoplasm. Excessive minidystrophin expression did not correct tachycardia, a characteristic feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Importantly, several electrocardiogram parameters (QT interval, QRS duration and the cardiomyopathy index) became worse than that of mdx mice. Our data suggests that the mouse heart can tolerate 50-fold minidystrophin overexpression, but 100-fold overexpression leads to cardiac toxicity. PMID:27419194

  1. Dysferlin Deficiency and the Development of Cardiomyopathy in a Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2B

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Thomas H.; Cox, Gregory A.; Burzenski, Lisa; Foreman, Oded; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2009-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, Miyoshi myopathy, and distal myopathy of anterior tibialis are severely debilitating muscular dystrophies caused by genetically determined dysferlin deficiency. In these muscular dystrophies, it is the repair, not the structure, of the plasma membrane that is impaired. Though much is known about the effects of dysferlin deficiency in skeletal muscle, little is known about the role of dysferlin in maintenance of cardiomyocytes. Recent evidence suggests that dysferlin deficiency affects cardiac muscle, leading to cardiomyopathy when stressed. However, neither the morphological location of dysferlin in the cardiomyocyte nor the progression of the disease with age are known. In this study, we examined a mouse model of dysferlinopathy using light and electron microscopy as well as echocardiography and conscious electrocardiography. We determined that dysferlin is normally localized to the intercalated disk and sarcoplasm of the cardiomyocytes. In the absence of dysferlin, cardiomyocyte membrane damage occurs and is localized to the intercalated disk and sarcoplasm. This damage results in transient functional deficits at 10 months of age, but, unlike in skeletal muscle, the cell injury is sublethal and causes only mild cardiomyopathy even at advanced ages. PMID:19875504

  2. Our trails and trials in the subsarcolemmal cytoskeleton network and muscular dystrophy researches in the dystrophin era

    PubMed Central

    OZAWA, Eijiro

    2010-01-01

    In 1987, about 150 years after the discovery of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), its responsible gene, the dystrophin gene, was cloned by Kunkel. This was a new substance. During these 20 odd years after the cloning, our understanding on dystrophin as a component of the subsarcolemmal cytoskeleton networks and on the pathomechanisms of and experimental therapeutics for DMD has been greatly enhanced. During this paradigm change, I was fortunately able to work as an active researcher on its frontiers for 12 years. After we discovered that dystrophin is located on the cell membrane in 1988, we studied the architecture of dystrophin and dystrophin-associated proteins (DAPs) complex in order to investigate the function of dystrophin and pathomechanism of DMD. During the conduct of these studies, we came to consider that the dystrophin–DAP complex serves to transmembranously connect the subsarcolemmal cytoskeleton networks and basal lamina to protect the lipid bilayer. It then became our working hypothesis that injury of the lipid bilayer upon muscle contraction is the cause of DMD. During this process, we predicted that subunits of the sarcoglycan (SG) complex are responsible for respective types of DMD-like muscular dystrophy with autosomal recessive inheritance. Our prediction was confirmed to be true by many researchers including ourselves. In this review, I will try to explain what we observed and how we considered concerning the architecture and function of the dystrophin–DAP complex, and the pathomechanisms of DMD and related muscular dystrophies. PMID:20948175

  3. The respiratory management of patients with duchenne muscular dystrophy: a DMD care considerations working group specialty article.

    PubMed

    Birnkrant, David J; Bushby, Katharine M D; Amin, Raouf S; Bach, John R; Benditt, Joshua O; Eagle, Michelle; Finder, Jonathan D; Kalra, Maninder S; Kissel, John T; Koumbourlis, Anastassios C; Kravitz, Richard M

    2010-08-01

    In 2001, the Muscular Dystrophy Community Assistance, Research and Education Amendments (MD-CARE Act) was enacted, which directed federal agencies to coordinate the development of treatments and cures for muscular dystrophy. As part of the mandate, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initiated surveillance and educational activities, which included supporting development of care considerations for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) utilizing the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method (RAM). This document represents the consensus recommendations of the project's 10-member Respiratory Panel and includes advice on necessary equipment, procedures and diagnostics; and a structured approach to the assessment and management of the respiratory complications of DMD via assessment of symptoms of hypoventilation and identification of specific thresholds of forced vital capacity, peak cough flow and maximum expiratory pressure. The document includes a set of Figures adaptable as "pocket guides" to aid clinicians. This article is an expansion of the respiratory component of the multi-specialty article originally appearing in Lancet Neurology, comprising respiratory recommendations from the CDC Care Considerations project. PMID:20597083

  4. Progression and variation of fatty infiltration of the thigh muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a muscle magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenzhu; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhaoxia; Xiao, Jiangxi; Yuan, Yun

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the progression and variation of fatty infiltration of the thigh muscles of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the degree of fatty infiltration of the thigh muscles of 171 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (mean age, 6.09 ± 2.30 years). Fatty infiltration was assigned using a modified Mercuri's scale 0-5 (normal-severe). The gluteus maximus and adductor magnus were affected in patients less than two years old, followed by the biceps femoris. Quadriceps and semimembranosus were first affected at the age of five to six years; the sartorius, gracilis and adductor longus remained apparently unaffected until seven years of age. Fatty infiltration of all the thigh muscles developed rapidly after seven years of age. The standard deviation of the fatty infiltration scores ranged from 2.41 to 4.87 before five years old, and from 6.84 to 11.66 between six and ten years old. This study provides evidence of highly variable degrees of fatty infiltration in children of different ages with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and indicates that fatty infiltration progresses more quickly after seven years of age. These findings may be beneficial for the selection of therapeutic regimens and the analysis of future clinical trials.

  5. Refined mapping of a gene responsible for Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy: Evidence for strong linkage disequilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Toda, Tatsushi; Ikegawa, Shiro; Okui, Keiko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Kondo, Eri; Saito, Kayoko; Fukuyama, Yukio; Yoshioka, Mieko; Kumagai, Toshiyuki

    1994-11-01

    Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), the second most common form of childhood muscular dystrophy in Japan, is an autosomal recessive severe muscular dystrophy associated with an anomaly of the brain. After our initial mapping of the FCMD locus to chromosome 9q31-33, we further defined the locus within a region of {approximately}5 cM between loci D9S127 and CA246, by homozygosity mapping in patients born to consanguineous marriages and by recombination analyses in other families. We also found evidence for strong linkage disequilibrium between FCMD and a polymorphic microsatellite marker, mfd220, which showed no recombination and a lod score of (Z) 17.49. A {open_quotes}111-bp{close_quotes} allele for the mfd220 was observed in 22 (34%) of 64 FCMD chromosomes, but it was present in only 1 of 120 normal chromosomes. This allelic association with FCMD was highly significant ({chi}{sup 2} = 50.7; P < .0001). Hence, we suspect that the FCMD gene could lie within a few hundred kilobases of the mfd220 locus. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Nuclear entrapment and extracellular depletion of PCOLCE is associated with muscle degeneration in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Muscle fibrosis characterizes degenerated muscles in muscular dystrophies and in late onset myopathies. Fibrotic muscles often exhibit thickening of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The molecular regulation of this process is not fully understood. In oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), an expansion of an alanine tract at the N-terminus of poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1) causes muscle symptoms. OPMD patient muscle degeneration initiates after midlife, while at an earlier age carriers of alanine expansion mutant PABPN1 (expPABPN1) are clinically pre-symptomatic. OPMD is characterized by fibrosis in skeletal muscles but the causative molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Methods We studied the molecular processes that are involved in OPMD pathology using cross-species mRNA expression profiles in muscles from patients and model systems. We identified significant dysregulation of the ECM functional group, among which the procollagen C-endopeptidase enhancer 1 gene (PCOLCE) was consistently down-regulated across species. We investigated PCOLCE subcellular localization in OPMD muscle samples and OPMD model systems to investigate any functional relevance of PCOLCE down-regulation in this disease. Results We found that muscle degeneration in OPMD is associated with PCOLCE down-regulation. In addition to its known presence at the ECM, we also found PCOLCE within the nucleus of muscle cells. PCOLCE sub-cellular localization changes during myoblast cell fusion and is disrupted in cells expressing mutant expPABPN1. Our results show that PCOLCE binds to soluble PABPN1 and co-localizes with aggregated PABPN1 with a preference for the mutant protein. In muscle biopsies from OPMD patients we find that extracellular PCOLCE is depleted with its concomitant enrichment within the nuclear compartment. Conclusions PCOLCE regulates collagen processing at the ECM. Depletion of extracellular PCOLCE is associated with the expression of expPABPN1 in OPMD

  7. High dose weekly oral prednisone improves strength in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Anne M; Schierbecker, Jeanine; Renna, Renee; Florence, Julaine

    2002-12-01

    Daily prednisone improves strength in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, but side effects are almost universal. We used a different dosing regimen of prednisone to determine if benefit to boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy might be maintained with fewer side effects. Twice weekly oral prednisone was given each Friday and Saturday (5mg/kg/dose). This total dose is twice as high as the daily low dosage prednisone regimen (0.75 mg/kg/day). Twenty boys (8.0+/-1.2 years) were treated. Historical control groups included 18 untreated boys (6.1+/-1.6 years) and four boys (7.3+/-0.6 years) treated with daily prednisone. Strength (using a hand-held manometer and grip meter) and timed functional testing were measured. There was an improvement in upper extremity strength for 95% of boys (n=20) at 6 months using quantitative strength testing. Improvement in lower extremity strength occurred in all boys with antigravity quadriceps strength (17/17). The improvement (P=0.001 for proximal upper extremities; P=0.002 for grip; and P<0.0001 for proximal lower extremities) was significant compared to untreated boys. Sixteen boys were treated continuously for more than 12 months (22+/-1.5 months). Of these, 15 remained significantly stronger than prior to treatment and 8/16 showed additional gains in strength after six months of treatment. Six boys were on the weekly prednisolone 2 years or longer without interruption. All six had upper and lower extremity strength at follow-up that was as good or better than at baseline. Functional testing improved in boys less than 8 years without contractures. Three boys without antigravity quadriceps strength at the start of treatment lost the ability to walk unassisted within 6 months. Eight other boys lost the ability to ambulate unassisted between 12 and 24 months of treatment. In each, progressive contractures developed. Linear growth was maintained in all boys on weekly treatment. Obesity rates did not differ from untreated boys. Twice

  8. Molecular characterization of co-occurring Duchenne muscular dystrophy and X-linked oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome in a girl.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong-hui; Fang, Ping; Adesina, Adekunle M; Furman, Patricia; Johnston, Jennifer J; Biesecker, Leslie G; Brown, Chester W

    2009-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked condition at the severe end of the spectrum of dystrophinopathies. Females with dystrophin mutations are at risk for cardiomyopathy, but are usually asymptomatic during childhood. However, some girls can exhibit features of Duchenne muscular dystrophy because of skewed X-inactivation, aneuploidy, or chromosomal rearrangement. Oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome is a rare X-linked disorder, lethal in males, that comprises microphthalmia, congenital cataracts, congenital heart defect, canine radiculomegaly, and digital anomalies. We report on a 7-year-old girl who was referred for muscular hypotonia, with clinical features of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, including elevated serum creatine phosphokinase, pseudohypertrophy of calf muscles, and muscle weakness, which became evident at 3 years of age. In addition, she had multiple congenital anomalies including atrial septal defect, cataracts, dental and digital anomalies, a constellation that suggested the diagnosis of oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome, a condition caused by mutations in BCOR. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis of muscle, and mutation analysis of DMD showed a maternally inherited deletion of exons 30-43, confirming the diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Studies of lymphocytes showed essentially complete skewing of X-inactivation. Mutation analysis of BCOR revealed a de novo frameshift mutation (c.1005delC). Thus, we report for the first time on an individual with the co-occurrence of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome. PMID:19449433

  9. POPDC1S201F causes muscular dystrophy and arrhythmia by affecting protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Roland F.R.; Scotton, Chiara; Zhang, Jianguo; Passarelli, Chiara; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; Simrick, Subreena; Schwerte, Thorsten; Poon, Kar-Lai; Fang, Mingyan; Rinné, Susanne; Froese, Alexander; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Grunert, Christiane; Müller, Thomas; Tasca, Giorgio; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Drago, Fabrizio; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Rapezzi, Claudio; Arbustini, Eloisa; Di Raimo, Francesca Romana; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Gualandi, Francesca; Fattori, Fabiana; Pietrangelo, Antonello; Li, Wenyan; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Xun; Bertini, Enrico; Decher, Niels; Wang, Jun; Brand, Thomas; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The Popeye domain–containing 1 (POPDC1) gene encodes a plasma membrane–localized cAMP-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in striated muscle. In animal models, POPDC1 is an essential regulator of structure and function of cardiac and skeletal muscle; however, POPDC1 mutations have not been associated with human cardiac and muscular diseases. Here, we have described a homozygous missense variant (c.602C>T, p.S201F) in POPDC1, identified by whole-exome sequencing, in a family of 4 with cardiac arrhythmia and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). This allele was absent in known databases and segregated with the pathological phenotype in this family. We did not find the allele in a further screen of 104 patients with a similar phenotype, suggesting this mutation to be family specific. Compared with WT protein, POPDC1S201F displayed a 50% reduction in cAMP affinity, and in skeletal muscle from patients, both POPDC1S201F and WT POPDC2 displayed impaired membrane trafficking. Forced expression of POPDC1S201F in a murine cardiac muscle cell line (HL-1) increased hyperpolarization and upstroke velocity of the action potential. In zebrafish, expression of the homologous mutation (popdc1S191F) caused heart and skeletal muscle phenotypes that resembled those observed in patients. Our study therefore identifies POPDC1 as a disease gene causing a very rare autosomal recessive cardiac arrhythmia and LGMD, expanding the genetic causes of this heterogeneous group of inherited rare diseases. PMID:26642364

  10. Mutations in COL6A3 Cause Severe and Mild Phenotypes of Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Ercan; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Allamand, Valérie; Ferreiro, Ana; Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Topaloglu, Haluk; Echenne, Bernard; Merlini, Luciano; Guicheney, Pascale

    2002-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by generalized muscular weakness, contractures of multiple joints, and distal hyperextensibility. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations of COL6A2 on chromosome 21q22 have recently been shown to cause UCMD. We performed a genomewide screening with microsatellite markers in a consanguineous family with three sibs affected with UCMD. Linkage of the disease to chromosome 2q37 was found in this family and in two others. We analyzed COL6A3, which encodes the α3 chain of collagen VI, and identified one homozygous mutation per family. In family I, the three sibs carried an A→G transition in the splice-donor site of intron 29 (6930+5A→G), leading to the skipping of exon 29, a partial reduction of collagen VI in muscle biopsy, and an intermediate phenotype. In family II, the patient had an unusual mild phenotype, despite a nonsense mutation, R465X, in exon 5. Analysis of the patient’s COL6A3 transcripts showed the presence of various mRNA species—one of which lacked several exons, including the exon containing the nonsense mutation. The deleted splice variant encodes collagen molecules that have a shorter N-terminal domain but that may assemble with other chains and retain a functional role. This could explain the mild phenotype of the patient who was still ambulant at age 18 years and who showed an unusual combination of hyperlaxity and finger contractures. In family III, the patient had a nonsense mutation, R2342X, causing absence of collagen VI in muscle and fibroblasts, and a severe phenotype, as has been described in patients with UCMD. Mutations in COL6A3 are described in UCMD for the first time and illustrate the wide spectrum of phenotypes which can be caused by collagen VI deficiency. PMID:11992252

  11. Longitudinal assessment of grip strength using bulb dynamometer in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pizzato, Tatiana M.; Baptista, Cyntia R. J. A.; Souza, Mariana A.; Benedicto, Michelle M. B.; Martinez, Edson Z.; Mattiello-Sverzut, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Grip strength is used to infer functional status in several pathological conditions, and the hand dynamometer has been used to estimate performance in other areas. However, this relationship is controversial in neuromuscular diseases and studies with the bulb dynamometer comparing healthy children and children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) are limited. OBJECTIVE: The evolution of grip strength and the magnitude of weakness were examined in boys with DMD compared to healthy boys. The functional data of the DMD boys were correlated with grip strength. METHOD: Grip strength was recorded in 18 ambulant boys with DMD (Duchenne Group, DG) aged 4 to 13 years (mean 7.4±2.1) and 150 healthy volunteers (Control Group, CG) age-matched using a bulb dynamometer (North Coast- NC70154). The follow-up of the DG was 6 to 33 months (3-12 sessions), and functional performance was verified using the Vignos scale. RESULTS: There was no difference between grip strength obtained by the dominant and non-dominant side for both groups. Grip strength increased in the CG with chronological age while the DG remained stable or decreased. The comparison between groups showed significant difference in grip strength, with CG values higher than DG values (confidence interval of 95%). In summary, there was an increment in the differences between the groups with increasing age. Participants with 24 months or more of follow-up showed a progression of weakness as well as maintained Vignos scores. CONCLUSIONS: The amplitude of weakness increased with age in the DG. The bulb dynamometer detected the progression of muscular weakness. Functional performance remained virtually unchanged in spite of the increase in weakness. PMID:25003277

  12. The effects of electrical stimulation and exercise therapy in patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kılınç, Muhammed; Yıldırım, Sibel A.; Tan, Ersin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the effects of exercise therapy and electrical stimulation on muscle strength and functional activities in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Methods: This controlled clinical trial included 24 subjects who were diagnosed with LGMD by the Neurology Department of the Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey and were referred to the Physical Therapy Department between May 2013 and December 2014. Subjects were enrolled into an electrical stimulation (11 patients) group, or an exercise therapy (13 patients) group. Results: The mean age of patients was 31.62 years in the electrical stimulation group, and 30.14 years in the exercise therapy group. The most important results in this controlled clinical study were that the muscle strength in both groups was significantly decreased and post-treatment evaluation results indicated that muscle strength of the Deltoideus was higher in the electrical stimulation group, and the difference between the groups was maintained in the follow-up period (p<0.05). However, the muscle strength of quadriceps was similar in both groups, according to the post-treatment and follow-up evaluation results (p>0.05). Additionally, the electrical stimulation group presented more obvious overall improvements than the exercise therapy group according to muscle strength, endurance, and timed performance tests. Conclusions: Since no definitive treatments currently exist for patients with LGMD, these results provide important information on the role of exercise therapy and electrical stimulation for clinicians working in rehabilitation. PMID:26166595

  13. Genetic evidence in the mouse solidifies the calcium hypothesis of myofiber death in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Burr, A R; Molkentin, J D

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of degenerative muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle wasting and often premature death. Although the primary defect underlying most forms of MD typically results from a loss of sarcolemmal integrity, the secondary molecular mechanisms leading to muscle degeneration and myofiber necrosis is debated. One hypothesis suggests that elevated or dysregulated cytosolic calcium is the common transducing event, resulting in myofiber necrosis in MD. Previous measurements of resting calcium levels in myofibers from dystrophic animal models or humans produced equivocal results. However, recent studies in genetically altered mouse models have largely solidified the calcium hypothesis of MD, such that models with artificially elevated calcium in skeletal muscle manifest fulminant dystrophic-like disease, whereas models with enhanced calcium clearance or inhibited calcium influx are resistant to myofiber death and MD. Here, we will review the field and the recent cadre of data from genetically altered mouse models, which we propose have collectively mostly proven the hypothesis that calcium is the primary effector of myofiber necrosis in MD. This new consensus on calcium should guide future selection of drugs to be evaluated in clinical trials as well as gene therapy-based approaches. PMID:26088163

  14. Structure and function of adenylate kinase isozymes in normal humans and muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Takenaka, H; Fukumoto, K; Fukamachi, S; Yamaguchi, T; Sumida, M; Shiosaka, T; Kurokawa, Y; Okuda, H; Kuby, S A

    1987-01-01

    Two isozymes of adenylate kinase from human Duchenne muscular dystrophy serum, one of which was an aberrant form specific to DMD patients, were separated by Blue Sepharose CL-6B affinity chromatography. The separated aberrant form possessed a molecular weight of 98,000 +/- 1,500, whereas the normal serum isozyme had a weight of 87,000 +/- 1,600, as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, and sedimentation equilibrium. The sedimentation coefficients were 5.8 S and 5.6 S for the aberrant form and the normal form, respectively. Both serum isozymes are tetramers. The subunit size of the aberrant isozyme (Mr = 24,700) was very similar to that of the normal human liver isozyme, and the subunit size of the normal isozyme (Mr = 21,700) was very similar to that of the normal human muscle enzyme. The amino acid composition of the normal serum isozyme was similar to that of the muscle-type enzyme, and that of the aberrant isozyme was similar to that of the liver enzyme, with some exceptions in both cases.

  15. Glucocorticoids enhance muscle endurance and ameliorate Duchenne muscular dystrophy through a defined metabolic program

    PubMed Central

    Morrison-Nozik, Alexander; Anand, Priti; Zhu, Han; Duan, Qiming; Sabeh, Mohamad; Prosdocimo, Domenick A.; Nordsborg, Nikolai; Russell, Aaron P.; MacRae, Calum A.; Gerber, Anthony N.; Jain, Mukesh K.; Haldar, Saptarsi M.

    2015-01-01

    Classic physiology studies dating to the 1930s demonstrate that moderate or transient glucocorticoid (GC) exposure improves muscle performance. The ergogenic properties of GCs are further evidenced by their surreptitious use as doping agents by endurance athletes and poorly understood efficacy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic muscle-wasting disease. A defined molecular basis underlying these performance-enhancing properties of GCs in skeletal muscle remains obscure. Here, we demonstrate that ergogenic effects of GCs are mediated by direct induction of the metabolic transcription factor KLF15, defining a downstream pathway distinct from that resulting in GC-related muscle atrophy. Furthermore, we establish that KLF15 deficiency exacerbates dystrophic severity and muscle GC–KLF15 signaling mediates salutary therapeutic effects in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Thus, although glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transactivation is often associated with muscle atrophy and other adverse effects of pharmacologic GC administration, our data define a distinct GR-induced gene regulatory pathway that contributes to therapeutic effects of GCs in DMD through proergogenic metabolic programming. PMID:26598680

  16. Targeting mRNA for the treatment of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bao, Bo; Maruyama, Rika; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-08-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder characterized clinically by progressive muscle degeneration. Currently, no curative treatment for this disorder exists. FSHD patients are managed through physiotherapy to improve function and quality of life. Over the last two decades, FSHD has been better understood as a disease genetically characterized by a pathogenic contraction of a subset of macrosatellite repeats on chromosome 4. Specifically, several studies support an FSHD pathogenesis model involving the aberrant expression of the double homeobox protein 4 (DUX4) gene. Hence, potential therapies revolving around inhibition of DUX4 have been explored. One of the potential treatment options is the use of effective antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) to knockdown expression of the myopathic DUX4 gene and its downstream molecules including paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 1 (PITX1). Success in the suppression of PITX1 expression has already been demonstrated systemically in vivo in recent studies. In this article, we will review the pathogenesis of FSHD and the latest research involving the use of antisense knockdown therapy. PMID:27672539

  17. Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy As a Model for Epigenetic Regulation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Himeda, Charis L.; Jones, Takako I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Aberrant epigenetic regulation is an integral aspect of many diseases and complex disorders. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a progressive myopathy that afflicts individuals of all ages, is caused by disrupted genetic and epigenetic regulation of a macrosatellite repeat. FSHD provides a powerful model to investigate disease-relevant epigenetic modifiers and general mechanisms of epigenetic regulation that govern gene expression. Recent Advances: In the context of a genetically permissive allele, the one aspect of FSHD that is consistent across all known cases is the aberrant epigenetic state of the disease locus. In addition, certain mutations in the chromatin regulator SMCHD1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge-domain protein 1) are sufficient to cause FSHD2 and enhance disease severity in FSHD1. Thus, there are multiple pathways to generate the epigenetic dysregulation required for FSHD. Critical Issues: Why do some individuals with the genetic requirements for FSHD develop disease pathology, while others remain asymptomatic? Similarly, disease progression is highly variable among individuals. What are the relative contributions of genetic background and environmental factors in determining disease manifestation, progression, and severity in FSHD? What is the interplay between epigenetic factors regulating the disease locus and which, if any, are viable therapeutic targets? Future Directions: Epigenetic regulation represents a potentially powerful therapeutic target for FSHD. Determining the epigenetic signatures that are predictive of disease severity and identifying the spectrum of disease modifiers in FSHD are vital to the development of effective therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1463–1482. PMID:25336259

  18. Discovery of Metabolic Biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy within a Natural History Study

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Maki; Harris, Michael; Rao, Shruti; Cheema, Amrita K.; Gill, Kirandeep; Seol, Haeri; Morgenroth, Lauren P.; Henricson, Erik; McDonald, Craig; Mah, Jean K.; Clemens, Paula R.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Hathout, Yetrib; Madhavan, Subha

    2016-01-01

    Serum metabolite profiling in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) may enable discovery of valuable molecular markers for disease progression and treatment response. Serum samples from 51 DMD patients from a natural history study and 22 age-matched healthy volunteers were profiled using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for discovery of novel circulating serum metabolites associated with DMD. Fourteen metabolites were found significantly altered (1% false discovery rate) in their levels between DMD patients and healthy controls while adjusting for age and study site and allowing for an interaction between disease status and age. Increased metabolites included arginine, creatine and unknown compounds at m/z of 357 and 312 while decreased metabolites included creatinine, androgen derivatives and other unknown yet to be identified compounds. Furthermore, the creatine to creatinine ratio is significantly associated with disease progression in DMD patients. This ratio sharply increased with age in DMD patients while it decreased with age in healthy controls. Overall, this study yielded promising metabolic signatures that could prove useful to monitor DMD disease progression and response to therapies in the future. PMID:27082433

  19. Dystrophin and the two related genetic diseases, Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Rumeur, Elisabeth Le

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the dystrophin DMD gene, essentially deletions of one or several exons, are the cause of two devastating and to date incurable diseases, Duchenne (DMD) and Becker (BMD) muscular dystrophies. Depending upon the preservation or not of the reading frame, dystrophin is completely absent in DMD, or present in either a mutated or a truncated form in BMD. DMD is a severe disease which leads to a premature death of the patients. Therapy approaches are evolving with the aim to transform the severe DMD in the BMD form of the disease by restoring the expression of a mutated or truncated dystrophin. These therapies are based on the assumption that BMD is a mild disease. However, this is not completely true as BMD patients are more or less severely affected and no molecular basis of this heterogeneity of the BMD form of the disease is yet understood. The aim of this review is to report for the correlation between dystrophin structures in BMD deletions in view of this heterogeneity and to emphasize that examining BMD patients in details is highly relevant to anticipate for DMD therapy effects. PMID:26295289

  20. Investigating Synthetic Oligonucleotide Targeting of Mir31 in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hildyard, John CW; Wells, Dominic J

    2016-01-01

    Exon-skipping via synthetic antisense oligonucleotides represents one of the most promising potential therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), yet this approach is highly sequence-specific and thus each oligonucleotide is of benefit to only a subset of patients. The discovery that dystrophin mRNA is subject to translational suppression by the microRNA miR31, and that miR31 is elevated in the muscle of DMD patients, raises the possibility that the same oligonucleotide chemistries employed for exon skipping could be directed toward relieving this translational block. This approach would act synergistically with exon skipping where possible, but by targeting the 3’UTR it would further be of benefit to the many DMD patients who express low levels of in-frame transcript. We here present investigations into the feasibility of combining exon skipping with several different strategies for miR31-modulation, using both in vitro models and the mdx mouse (the classical animal model of DMD), and monitoring effects on dystrophin at the transcriptional and translational level. We show that despite promising results from our cell culture model, our in vivo data failed to demonstrate similarly reproducible enhancement of dystrophin translation, suggesting that miR31-modulation may not be practical under current oligonucleotide approaches. Possible explanations for this disappointing outcome are discussed, along with suggestions for future investigations. PMID:27525173

  1. Targeting mRNA for the treatment of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Bo; Maruyama, Rika; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder characterized clinically by progressive muscle degeneration. Currently, no curative treatment for this disorder exists. FSHD patients are managed through physiotherapy to improve function and quality of life. Over the last two decades, FSHD has been better understood as a disease genetically characterized by a pathogenic contraction of a subset of macrosatellite repeats on chromosome 4. Specifically, several studies support an FSHD pathogenesis model involving the aberrant expression of the double homeobox protein 4 (DUX4) gene. Hence, potential therapies revolving around inhibition of DUX4 have been explored. One of the potential treatment options is the use of effective antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) to knockdown expression of the myopathic DUX4 gene and its downstream molecules including paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 1 (PITX1). Success in the suppression of PITX1 expression has already been demonstrated systemically in vivo in recent studies. In this article, we will review the pathogenesis of FSHD and the latest research involving the use of antisense knockdown therapy. PMID:27672539

  2. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: a Survey of Perspectives on Carrier Testing and Communication Within the Family.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brenna; Hassed, Susan; Chaloner, Jae Lindsay; Aston, Christopher E; Guy, Carrie

    2016-06-01

    Carrier testing is widely available for multiple genetic conditions, and several professional organizations have created practice guidelines regarding appropriate clinical application and the testing of minors. Previous research has focused on carrier screening, predictive testing, and testing for X-linked conditions. However, family perspectives on carrier testing for X-linked lethal diseases have yet to be described. In this study, we explored communication within the family about carrier testing and the perspectives of mothers of sons with an X-linked lethal disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Twenty-five mothers of sons with DMD participated in an anonymous online survey. Survey questions included multiple choice, Likert scale, and open ended, short answer questions. Analysis of the multiple choice and Likert scale questions revealed that most mothers preferred a gradual style of communication with their daughters regarding risk status. In addition, most participants reported having consulted with a genetic counselor and found it helpful. Comparisons between groups, analyzed using Fisher's exact tests, found no differences in preferred style due to mother's carrier status or having a daughter. Thematic analysis was conducted on responses to open ended questions. Themes identified included the impact of family implications, age and maturity, and a desire for autonomy regarding the decision to discuss and undergo carrier testing with at-risk daughters, particularly timing of these discussions. Implications for genetic counseling practice are discussed.

  3. Targeting mRNA for the treatment of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Bo; Maruyama, Rika; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder characterized clinically by progressive muscle degeneration. Currently, no curative treatment for this disorder exists. FSHD patients are managed through physiotherapy to improve function and quality of life. Over the last two decades, FSHD has been better understood as a disease genetically characterized by a pathogenic contraction of a subset of macrosatellite repeats on chromosome 4. Specifically, several studies support an FSHD pathogenesis model involving the aberrant expression of the double homeobox protein 4 (DUX4) gene. Hence, potential therapies revolving around inhibition of DUX4 have been explored. One of the potential treatment options is the use of effective antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) to knockdown expression of the myopathic DUX4 gene and its downstream molecules including paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 1 (PITX1). Success in the suppression of PITX1 expression has already been demonstrated systemically in vivo in recent studies. In this article, we will review the pathogenesis of FSHD and the latest research involving the use of antisense knockdown therapy.

  4. A Phase 1/2a Follistatin Gene Therapy Trial for Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mendell, Jerry R; Sahenk, Zarife; Malik, Vinod; Gomez, Ana M; Flanigan, Kevin M; Lowes, Linda P; Alfano, Lindsay N; Berry, Katherine; Meadows, Eric; Lewis, Sarah; Braun, Lyndsey; Shontz, Kim; Rouhana, Maria; Clark, Kelly Reed; Rosales, Xiomara Q; Al-Zaidy, Samiah; Govoni, Alessandra; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Hogan, Mark J; Kaspar, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a variant of dystrophin deficiency resulting from DMD gene mutations. Phenotype is variable with loss of ambulation in late teenage or late mid-life years. There is currently no treatment for this condition. In this BMD proof-of-principle clinical trial, a potent myostatin antagonist, follistatin (FS), was used to inhibit the myostatin pathway. Extensive preclinical studies, using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver follistatin, demonstrated an increase in strength. For this trial, we used the alternatively spliced FS344 to avoid potential binding to off target sites. AAV1.CMV.FS344 was delivered to six BMD patients by direct bilateral intramuscular quadriceps injections. Cohort 1 included three subjects receiving 3 × 1011 vg/kg/leg. The distance walked on the 6MWT was the primary outcome measure. Patients 01 and 02 improved 58 meters (m) and 125 m, respectively. Patient 03 showed no change. In Cohort 2, Patients 05 and 06 received 6 × 1011 vg/kg/leg with improved 6MWT by 108 m and 29 m, whereas, Patient 04 showed no improvement. No adverse effects were encountered. Histological changes corroborated benefit showing reduced endomysial fibrosis, reduced central nucleation, more normal fiber size distribution with muscle hypertrophy, especially at high dose. The results are encouraging for treatment of dystrophin-deficient muscle diseases. PMID:25322757

  5. Quantitative MR evaluation of body composition in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pichiecchio, Anna; Uggetti, Carla; Egitto, Maria Grazia; Berardinelli, Angela; Orcesi, Simona; Gorni, Ksenija Olga Tatiana; Zanardi, Cristina; Tagliabue, Anna

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a quantitative MR protocol with very short acquisition time and good reliability in volume construction, for the evaluation of body composition in patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). This MR protocol was compared with common anthropometric evaluations of the same patients. Nine boys affected by DMD, ranging in age from 6 to 12 years, were selected to undergo MR examination. Transversal T1-weighted spin-echo sequences (0.5T; TR 300 ms, TE 10 ms, slice thickness 10 mm, slice gap 1 mm) were used for all acquisitions, each consisting of 8 slices and lasting just 54 s. Whole-body examination needed an average of nine acquisitions. Afterwards, images were downloaded to an independent workstation and, through their electronic segmentation with a reference filter, total volume and adipose tissue volumes were calculated manually. This process took up to 2 h for each patient. The MR data were compared with anthropometric evaluations. Affected children have a marked increase in adipose tissue and a decrease in lean tissue compared with reference healthy controls. Mean fat mass calculated by MR is significantly higher than mean fat mass obtained using anthropometric measurements ( p<0.001). Our MR study proved to be accurate and easy to apply, although it was time-consuming. We recommend it in monitoring the progression of the disease and planning DMD patients' diet.

  6. Xp21/A translocation: a rarely considered genetic cause for manifesting carriers of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Trippe, Heike; Wieczorek, Stefan; Kötting, Judith; Kress, Wolfram; Schara, Ulrike

    2014-10-01

    Clinically manifesting carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are rare among the pediatric population. A standardized diagnostic procedure in supposed DMD carriers entails performing a Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification analysis of the DMD gene first, then taking a muscle biopsy to confirm reduced dystrophin levels and/or finally a complete sequencing of the DMD gene. We describe a girl with high-elevated creatine kinase, myalgia, and cardiomyopathy. Muscle biopsy showed a dystrophic pattern and nearly absent expression of dystrophin. Diagnosis could not be confirmed by molecular genetic procedures. Because of a mild mental retardation, a chromosome analysis and molecular karyotyping were performed, revealing a balanced translocation t(X;4)(p21;q31).arr(1-22,X)x2 dn with breakpoint on the X-chromosome within an intron of the DMD gene. The inactivation of the nonderivative X-chromosome was found to be in a nonrandom pattern, resulting in a functionally balanced karyotype and thus leading to a manifesting DMD carrier in this case. Chromosome analysis should be recommended in cases of genetically unsolved DMD carriers as a part of the standard genetic procedures.

  7. Prevention of muscular dystrophy in mice by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of germline DNA.

    PubMed

    Long, Chengzu; McAnally, John R; Shelton, John M; Mireault, Alex A; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2014-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited X-linked disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fiber integrity. DMD is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and a shortened life span, and there is no effective treatment. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9)-mediated genome editing to correct the dystrophin gene (Dmd) mutation in the germ line of mdx mice, a model for DMD, and then monitored muscle structure and function. Genome editing produced genetically mosaic animals containing 2 to 100% correction of the Dmd gene. The degree of muscle phenotypic rescue in mosaic mice exceeded the efficiency of gene correction, likely reflecting an advantage of the corrected cells and their contribution to regenerating muscle. With the anticipated technological advances that will facilitate genome editing of postnatal somatic cells, this strategy may one day allow correction of disease-causing mutations in the muscle tissue of patients with DMD.

  8. Gene therapies that restore dystrophin expression for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Robinson-Hamm, Jacqueline N; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common inherited genetic diseases and is caused by mutations to the DMD gene that encodes the dystrophin protein. Recent advances in genome editing and gene therapy offer hope for the development of potential therapeutics. Truncated versions of the DMD gene can be delivered to the affected tissues with viral vectors and show promising results in a variety of animal models. Genome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been used to restore dystrophin expression by deleting one or more exons of the DMD gene in patient cells and in a mouse model that led to functional improvement of muscle strength. Exon skipping with oligonucleotides has been successful in several animal models and evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Next-generation oligonucleotide formulations offer significant promise to build on these results. All these approaches to restoring dystrophin expression are encouraging, but many hurdles remain. This review summarizes the current state of these technologies and summarizes considerations for their future development.

  9. Clinical features and a mutation with late onset of limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Aoki, Masashi; Suzuki, Naoki; Tateyama, Maki; Yaginuma, Chikako; Sato, Hitomi; Hayasaka, Miho; Sugawara, Hitomi; Ito, Mariko; Abe-Kondo, Emi; Shimakura, Naoko; Ibi, Tohru; Kuru, Satoshi; Wakayama, Tadashi; Sobue, Gen; Fujii, Naoki; Saito, Toshio; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Funakawa, Itaru; Mukai, Eiichiro; Kawanami, Toru; Morita, Mitsuya; Yamazaki, Mineo; Hasegawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji; Kuzuhara, Shigeki; Tanaka, Hiroyasu; Yoshioka, Masaru; Konno, Hidehiko; Onodera, Hiroshi; Itoyama, Yasuto

    2013-01-01

    Objective and methods Dysferlin encoded by DYSF deficiency leads to two main phenotypes, limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2B and Miyoshi myopathy. To reveal in detail the mutational and clinical features of LGMD2B in Japan, we observed 40 Japanese patients in 36 families with LGMD2B in whom dysferlin mutations were confirmed. Results and conclusions Three mutations (c.1566C>G, c.2997G>T and c.4497delT) were relatively more prevalent. The c.2997G>T mutation was associated with late onset, proximal dominant forms of dysferlinopathy, a high probability that muscle weakness started in an upper limb and lower serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. The clinical features of LGMD2B are as follows: (1) onset in the late teens or early adulthood, except patients homozygous for the c.2997G>T mutation; (2) lower limb weakness at onset; (3) distal change of lower limbs on muscle CT at an early stage; (4) impairment of lumbar erector spinal muscles on muscle CT at an early stage; (5) predominant involvement of proximal upper limbs; (6) preservation of function of the hands at late stage; (7) preservation of strength in neck muscles at late stage; (8) lack of facial weakness or dysphagia; (9) avoidance of scoliosis; (10) hyper-Ckaemia; (11) preservation of cardiac function; and (12) a tendency for respiratory function to decline with disease duration. It is important that the late onset phenotype is found with prevalent mutations. PMID:23243261

  10. Discovery of Metabolic Biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy within a Natural History Study.

    PubMed

    Boca, Simina M; Nishida, Maki; Harris, Michael; Rao, Shruti; Cheema, Amrita K; Gill, Kirandeep; Seol, Haeri; Morgenroth, Lauren P; Henricson, Erik; McDonald, Craig; Mah, Jean K; Clemens, Paula R; Hoffman, Eric P; Hathout, Yetrib; Madhavan, Subha

    2016-01-01

    Serum metabolite profiling in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) may enable discovery of valuable molecular markers for disease progression and treatment response. Serum samples from 51 DMD patients from a natural history study and 22 age-matched healthy volunteers were profiled using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for discovery of novel circulating serum metabolites associated with DMD. Fourteen metabolites were found significantly altered (1% false discovery rate) in their levels between DMD patients and healthy controls while adjusting for age and study site and allowing for an interaction between disease status and age. Increased metabolites included arginine, creatine and unknown compounds at m/z of 357 and 312 while decreased metabolites included creatinine, androgen derivatives and other unknown yet to be identified compounds. Furthermore, the creatine to creatinine ratio is significantly associated with disease progression in DMD patients. This ratio sharply increased with age in DMD patients while it decreased with age in healthy controls. Overall, this study yielded promising metabolic signatures that could prove useful to monitor DMD disease progression and response to therapies in the future.

  11. Systemic Inflammation in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Association with Muscle Function and Nutritional Status

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Guzmán, Oriana del Rocío; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Escobar Cedillo, Rosa Elena

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation described in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) may be related to loss of muscle function or to obesity. It is unknown if circulating proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1, and TNF-α) levels are associated with muscle function. The purpose was to evaluate whether an association exists between systemic inflammation with muscle function and nutritional status in DMD patients. In 66 DMD patients without corticosteroid treatment, the following were evaluated in serum: cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α), C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, adiponectin, and creatine kinase (CK). Muscle function was evaluated using Vignos Scale. Patients with better muscle function had the highest concentration of CK, IL-1, and TNF-α compared with less muscle function. No differences in IL-6 and adiponectin concentration were identified among groups with different levels of muscle function. Also, no differences were observed in the concentration of cytokines among groups with different nutritional status levels (underweight, normal weight, and overweight/obese). However, CRP and leptin were increased in the obese group compared with normal and underweight subjects. Systemic inflammation is increased in patients with better muscle function and decreases in DMD patients with poorer muscle function; nevertheless, systemic inflammation is similar among different levels of nutritional status in DMD patients. PMID:26380303

  12. Complete restoration of multiple dystrophin isoforms in genetically corrected Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zatti, Susi; Martewicz, Sebastian; Serena, Elena; Uno, Narumi; Giobbe, Giovanni; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Elvassore, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)-associated cardiac diseases are emerging as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in DMD patients, and many therapies for treatment of skeletal muscle failed to improve cardiac function. The reprogramming of patients' somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells, combined with technologies for correcting the genetic defect, possesses great potential for the development of new treatments for genetic diseases. In this study, we obtained human cardiomyocytes from DMD patient-derived, induced pluripotent stem cells genetically corrected with a human artificial chromosome carrying the whole dystrophin genomic sequence. Stimulation by cytokines was combined with cell culturing on hydrogel with physiological stiffness, allowing an adhesion-dependent maturation and a proper dystrophin expression. The obtained cardiomyocytes showed remarkable sarcomeric organization of cardiac troponin T and α-actinin, expressed cardiac-specific markers, and displayed electrically induced calcium transients lasting less than 1 second. We demonstrated that the human artificial chromosome carrying the whole dystrophin genomic sequence is stably maintained throughout the cardiac differentiation process and that multiple promoters of the dystrophin gene are properly activated, driving expression of different isoforms. These dystrophic cardiomyocytes can be a valuable source for in vitro modeling of DMD-associated cardiac disease. Furthermore, the derivation of genetically corrected, patient-specific cardiomyocytes represents a step toward the development of innovative cell and gene therapy approaches for DMD.

  13. Complete restoration of multiple dystrophin isoforms in genetically corrected Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient–derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zatti, Susi; Martewicz, Sebastian; Serena, Elena; Uno, Narumi; Giobbe, Giovanni; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Elvassore, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)–associated cardiac diseases are emerging as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in DMD patients, and many therapies for treatment of skeletal muscle failed to improve cardiac function. The reprogramming of patients’ somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells, combined with technologies for correcting the genetic defect, possesses great potential for the development of new treatments for genetic diseases. In this study, we obtained human cardiomyocytes from DMD patient–derived, induced pluripotent stem cells genetically corrected with a human artificial chromosome carrying the whole dystrophin genomic sequence. Stimulation by cytokines was combined with cell culturing on hydrogel with physiological stiffness, allowing an adhesion-dependent maturation and a proper dystrophin expression. The obtained cardiomyocytes showed remarkable sarcomeric organization of cardiac troponin T and α-actinin, expressed cardiac-specific markers, and displayed electrically induced calcium transients lasting less than 1 second. We demonstrated that the human artificial chromosome carrying the whole dystrophin genomic sequence is stably maintained throughout the cardiac differentiation process and that multiple promoters of the dystrophin gene are properly activated, driving expression of different isoforms. These dystrophic cardiomyocytes can be a valuable source for in vitro modeling of DMD-associated cardiac disease. Furthermore, the derivation of genetically corrected, patient-specific cardiomyocytes represents a step toward the development of innovative cell and gene therapy approaches for DMD. PMID:26015941

  14. Tongue pressure during swallowing is decreased in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka-Kondoh, Sato; Kondoh, Jugo; Tamine, Ken-Ichi; Hori, Kazuhiro; Fujiwara, Shigehiro; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Yasui, Kumiko; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Sakoda, Saburo; Ono, Takahiro

    2014-06-01

    Although dysphagia is a life-threatening problem in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the pathophysiology of oral stage dysphagia is yet to be understood. The present study investigated the tongue motor deficit during swallowing in patients with DMD and its relationship with disease-specific palatal morphology. Tongue pressure during swallowing water was recorded in 11 male patients with DMD and 11 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects using an intra-oral sensor with five measuring points, and the state of tongue pressure production was compared between the groups. Palatal morphology was assessed by a non-contact three-dimensional scanner on maxillary plaster models. In patients with DMD, the normal sequential order of tongue-palate contact was lost and the maximal magnitude and integrated value of tongue pressure on the mid-anterior part of palate were smaller than those in healthy subjects. The width of the palate in patients was greater than that in healthy subjects and the depth of the palate in patients had a negative correlation with tongue pressure magnitude on the median palate. Our results suggested that the deteriorated tongue motor kinetics prevented tongue movement during swallowing that was appropriate for the depth of the palate and affects the state of tongue pressure production during swallowing.

  15. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: a Survey of Perspectives on Carrier Testing and Communication Within the Family.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brenna; Hassed, Susan; Chaloner, Jae Lindsay; Aston, Christopher E; Guy, Carrie

    2016-06-01

    Carrier testing is widely available for multiple genetic conditions, and several professional organizations have created practice guidelines regarding appropriate clinical application and the testing of minors. Previous research has focused on carrier screening, predictive testing, and testing for X-linked conditions. However, family perspectives on carrier testing for X-linked lethal diseases have yet to be described. In this study, we explored communication within the family about carrier testing and the perspectives of mothers of sons with an X-linked lethal disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Twenty-five mothers of sons with DMD participated in an anonymous online survey. Survey questions included multiple choice, Likert scale, and open ended, short answer questions. Analysis of the multiple choice and Likert scale questions revealed that most mothers preferred a gradual style of communication with their daughters regarding risk status. In addition, most participants reported having consulted with a genetic counselor and found it helpful. Comparisons between groups, analyzed using Fisher's exact tests, found no differences in preferred style due to mother's carrier status or having a daughter. Thematic analysis was conducted on responses to open ended questions. Themes identified included the impact of family implications, age and maturity, and a desire for autonomy regarding the decision to discuss and undergo carrier testing with at-risk daughters, particularly timing of these discussions. Implications for genetic counseling practice are discussed. PMID:26482744

  16. Myocardial Fibrosis and Left Ventricular Dysfunction in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Carriers Using Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sean M; Shugh, Svetlana; Mazur, Wojciech; Sticka, Joshua J; Rattan, Mantosh S; Jefferies, John L; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    The goal of our study was to characterize the degree of myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular dysfunction in our cohort of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) carriers using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Seventy percent of males with DMD have mothers who are carriers of the Xp21 mutation. Carrier phenotypic characteristics range from asymptomatic to left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and cardiomyopathy. The true prevalence of cardiac involvement in DMD carriers is unknown. We performed a retrospective observational study. All female DMD carriers who underwent clinical CMR studies at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from December 6, 2006, to August 28, 2013, were evaluated. Patients underwent standard CMR assessment with LV function assessment and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). In addition, offline feature tracking strain analysis was performed on the basal, mid, and apical short axis. Twenty-two patients were studied, of which 20 underwent adequate testing for myocardial LGE. Four of 22 patients (18 %) were found to have LV dysfunction (ejection fraction <55 %). Seven of 20 DMD carriers (35 %) were found to have LGE. The patients with evidence of LGE had an overall trend to lower absolute deformation parameters; however, this did not meet statistical significance when correcting for multiple comparisons. Our study demonstrates a high rate of LGE as well as LV dysfunction in DMD carriers. Cardiovascular and musculoskeletal symptoms were not statistically different between those with and without cardiac involvement. This study demonstrates the importance of surveillance CMR evaluation of DMD carriers. PMID:25976773

  17. Evidence of Insulin Resistance and Other Metabolic Alterations in Boys with Duchenne or Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Sanchez, Raúl; Escobar, Rosa E.; Cruz-Guzmán, Oriana del Rocío; López-Alarcón, Mardia; Bernabe García, Mariela; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón; Matute, Guadalupe; Velázquez Wong, Ana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Our aim was (1) to determine the frequency of insulin resistance (IR) in patients with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD), (2) to identify deleted exons of DMD gene associated with obesity and IR, and (3) to explore some likely molecular mechanisms leading to IR. Materials and Methods. In 66 patients with DMD/BMD without corticosteroids treatment, IR, obesity, and body fat mass were evaluated. Molecules involved in glucose metabolism were analyzed in muscle biopsies. Results show that 18.3%, 22.7%, and 68% were underweight, overweight, or obese, and with high adiposity, respectively; 48.5% and 36.4% presented hyperinsulinemia and IR, respectively. Underweight patients (27.3%) exhibited hyperinsulinemia and IR. Carriers of deletions in exons 45 (OR = 9.32; 95% CI = 1.16–74.69) and 50 (OR = 8.73; 95% CI = 1.17–65.10) from DMD gene presented higher risk for IR than noncarriers. We observed a greater staining of cytoplasmic aggregates for GLUT4 in muscle biopsies than healthy muscle tissue. Conclusion. Obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and IR were observed in DMD/BMD patients and are independent of corticosteroids treatment. Carriers of deletion in exons 45 or 50 from DMD gene are at risk for developing IR. It is suggested that alteration in GLUT4 in muscle fibers from DMD patients could be involved in IR. PMID:26089900

  18. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. PMID:27621596

  19. Animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: from basic mechanisms to gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    McGreevy, Joe W.; Hakim, Chady H.; McIntosh, Mark A.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle-wasting disorder. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the dystrophin gene. Currently, there is no cure. A highly promising therapeutic strategy is to replace or repair the defective dystrophin gene by gene therapy. Numerous animal models of DMD have been developed over the last 30 years, ranging from invertebrate to large mammalian models. mdx mice are the most commonly employed models in DMD research and have been used to lay the groundwork for DMD gene therapy. After ~30 years of development, the field has reached the stage at which the results in mdx mice can be validated and scaled-up in symptomatic large animals. The canine DMD (cDMD) model will be excellent for these studies. In this article, we review the animal models for DMD, the pros and cons of each model system, and the history and progress of preclinical DMD gene therapy research in the animal models. We also discuss the current and emerging challenges in this field and ways to address these challenges using animal models, in particular cDMD dogs. PMID:25740330

  20. The value of respiratory muscle testing in a child with congenital muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Khirani, Sonia; Dabaj, Ivana; Amaddeo, Alessandro; Ramirez, Adriana; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory muscle testing is often limited to noninvasive volitional tests such as vital capacity and maximal static pressures. We report the case of a 12-year-old boy with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) in whom invasive and non-volitional respiratory muscle tests showed an elective diaphragmatic dysfunction with the preservation of expiratory muscle strength. This finding, coupled with a clinical phenotype associating diffuse muscle atrophy with finger hyperlaxity and proximal contractures, strengthened the suspicion of Ullrich CMD. Skin-cultured fibroblasts showed intracellular retention of collagen 6 (COL6), muscle magnetic resonance imaging was typical of COL6 myopathy, and molecular studies identified a COL6 gene mutation (COL6A2 c.954+2T>C). The diagnosis of a diaphragmatic dysfunction led to a sleep study that evidenced periods of hypoxemia which justified nocturnal noninvasive ventilation. This case report highlights the benefit of assessing respiratory muscles, through invasive procedure, to assist in clinical diagnosis and to guide clinical management. PMID:25473580

  1. The mdx mouse model as a surrogate for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Terence A.

    2014-01-01

    Research into fundamental principles and the testing of therapeutic hypotheses for treatment of human disease is commonly conducted on mouse models of human diseases. Although this is often the only practicable approach, it carries a number of caveats arising from differences between the two species. This article is centred on the example of skeletal muscle disease, in particular muscular dystrophy, to identify some of the principal classes of obstacle to the translation of data from mouse to man. Of these, the difference in scale is one of the most commonly ignored and is of particular interest because it has quite major repercussions for evaluation of some classes of intervention and of assessment criteria while having comparatively little bearing on others. Likewise, interspecies differences and similarities in cell and molecular biological mechanisms underlying development, growth and response to pathological processes should be considered on an individual basis. An awareness of such distinctions is crucial if we are to avoid misjudgement of the likely efficacy in man of results obtained on mouse models. PMID:23551987

  2. X-linked markers in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene associated with oral clefts.

    PubMed

    Patel, Poorav J; Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo; Murray, Jeffrey C; Marazita, Mary L; Munger, Ronald G; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Wu, Tao; Murray, Tanda; Rose, Margaret; Redett, Richard J; Jin, Sheng C; Lie, Rolv T; Wu-Chou, Yah-Huei; Wang, Hong; Ye, Xiaoqian; Yeow, Vincent; Chong, Samuel; Jee, Sun H; Shi, Bing; Scott, Alan F

    2013-04-01

    As part of an international consortium, case-parent trios were collected for a genome-wide association study of isolated, non-syndromic oral clefts, including cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP), and cleft lip and palate (CLP). Non-syndromic oral clefts have a complex and heterogeneous etiology. Risk is influenced by genes and environmental factors, and differs markedly by gender. Family-based association tests (FBAT) were used on 14,486 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the X chromosome, stratified by type of cleft and racial group. Significant results, even after multiple-comparisons correction, were obtained for the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene, the largest single gene in the human genome, among CL/P (i.e., both CL and CLP combined) trios. When stratified into groups of European and Asian ancestry, stronger signals were obtained for Asian subjects. Although conventional sliding-window haplotype analysis showed no increase in significance, selected combinations of the 25 most significant SNPs in the DMD gene identified four SNPs together that attained genome-wide significance among Asian CL/P trios, raising the possibility of interaction between distant SNPs within the DMD gene. PMID:23489894

  3. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD.

  4. Laparoscopic suture repair of idiopathic gastric perforation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Miyano, Go; Nouso, Hiroshi; Morita, Keiichi; Nakajima, Hideaki; Koyama, Mariko; Kaneshiro, Masakatsu; Miyake, Hiromu; Yamoto, Masaya; Fukumoto, Koji; Urushihara, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    We report herein an adolescent case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) with idiopathic gastric perforation, in which emergency surgical repair was performed laparoscopically. A 14-year-old nonambulatory boy with DMD was brought to our emergency department with sudden onset of severe abdominal pain and distention. Plain radiograph and computed tomography confirmed the presence of free intraperitoneal air and intrapelvic effusion. The patient elected to undergo laparoscopic inspection with 4 trocars, revealing a focal perforation, 3-4 cm in diameter, on the upper gastric body near the diaphragm. The stomach was also found to have a thin wall without evidence of peptic ulcer disease or other abnormalities. An interrupted suture was placed using 4-0 PDS. The abdomen was extensively irrigated, and multiple J-Vac drains were left in situ. Total operation time was 90 min, and no intraoperative complications were encountered. Enteral feeding through a nasogastric tube was started on postoperative day 7. The postoperative course has been uneventful as of the 12-month follow-up. Pediatric surgeons should be aware of the increased risk of gastric perforation associated with DMD, and that laparoscopic repair can be safely performed even in emergency settings.

  5. Quantitative Muscle Ultrasound in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: A Comparison of Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Shklyar, Irina; Geisbush, Tom R.; Mijialovic, Aleksandar S.; Pasternak, Amy; Darras, Basil T.; Wu, Jim S.; Rutkove, Seward B.; Zaidman, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Muscle pathology in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) can be quantified using ultrasound by measuring either the amplitudes of sound-waves scattered back from the tissue [quantitative backscatter analysis (QBA)] or by measuring these backscattered amplitudes after compression into grayscale levels obtained from the images (GSL). Methods We measured and compared QBA and GSL from 6 muscles of 25 boys with DMD and 25 healthy subjects, aged 2–14 years, with age and, in DMD, with function (North Star Ambulatory Assessment). Results Both QBA and GSL were measured reliably (intraclass correlation ≥ 0.87) and were higher in DMD than controls (P<0.0001). In DMD, average QBA and GSL measured from superficial regions of muscle increased (rho ≥ 0.47, P < 0.05) with both higher age and worse function; in contrast, GSL measured from whole regions of muscle did not. Discussion QBA and GSL measured from superficial regions of muscle can similarly quantify muscle pathology in DMD. PMID:24862337

  6. Computational Analysis of Muscular Dystrophy Sub-types Using A Novel Integrative Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Ha, Sook; Wang, Yue; Hoffman, Eric

    2012-01-01

    To construct biologically interpretable gene sets for muscular dystrophy (MD) sub-type classification, we propose a novel computational scheme to integrate protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, functional gene set information, and mRNA profiling data. The workflow of the proposed scheme includes the following three major steps: firstly, we apply an affinity propagation clustering (APC) approach to identify gene sub-networks associated with each MD sub-type, in which a new distance metric is proposed for APC to combine PPI network information and gene-gene co-expression relationship; secondly, we further incorporate functional gene set knowledge, which complements the physical PPI information, into our scheme for biomarker identification; finally, based on the constructed sub-networks and gene set features, we apply multi-class support vector machines (MSVMs) for MD sub-type classification, with which to highlight the biomarkers contributing to sub-type prediction. The experimental results show that our scheme can help identify sub-networks and gene sets that are more relevant to MD than those constructed by other conventional approaches. Moreover, our integrative strategy improves the prediction accuracy substantially, especially for those ’hard-to-classify’ sub-types. PMID:22773895

  7. Discovery of Metabolic Biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy within a Natural History Study.

    PubMed

    Boca, Simina M; Nishida, Maki; Harris, Michael; Rao, Shruti; Cheema, Amrita K; Gill, Kirandeep; Seol, Haeri; Morgenroth, Lauren P; Henricson, Erik; McDonald, Craig; Mah, Jean K; Clemens, Paula R; Hoffman, Eric P; Hathout, Yetrib; Madhavan, Subha

    2016-01-01

    Serum metabolite profiling in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) may enable discovery of valuable molecular markers for disease progression and treatment response. Serum samples from 51 DMD patients from a natural history study and 22 age-matched healthy volunteers were profiled using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for discovery of novel circulating serum metabolites associated with DMD. Fourteen metabolites were found significantly altered (1% false discovery rate) in their levels between DMD patients and healthy controls while adjusting for age and study site and allowing for an interaction between disease status and age. Increased metabolites included arginine, creatine and unknown compounds at m/z of 357 and 312 while decreased metabolites included creatinine, androgen derivatives and other unknown yet to be identified compounds. Furthermore, the creatine to creatinine ratio is significantly associated with disease progression in DMD patients. This ratio sharply increased with age in DMD patients while it decreased with age in healthy controls. Overall, this study yielded promising metabolic signatures that could prove useful to monitor DMD disease progression and response to therapies in the future. PMID:27082433

  8. Living with severe physical impairment, Duchenne's muscular dystrophy and home mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Pia S.; Steffensen, Birgit F.; Pedersen, Birthe D.

    2010-01-01

    Aim To study life-experiences of people living with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD), home mechanical ventilation (HMV) and physical impairment. Background Since the introduction of invasive HMV in the late 1980s people with DMD in Denmark live longer and have the experience of adulthood and a high degree of physical dependency. Method Nineteen patients with DMD and invasive HMV were interviewed in 2007. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed according to a method inspired by Ricoeur's theory of interpretation. Findings HMV not only extended the participants lifespan, it also gave them the capacity to live an active life. They were totally dependent in everyday living, but in spite of this, they did not see themselves as physically impaired. They realised that there were activities that were physically impossible, but they considered themselves to be just the same person they had always been. This dependency was described as “independent dependency”. Conclusion The lived-experience of physical impairment is found to be “independent dependency” in an active life. To solve problems with loneliness, society needs to work with prejudice and misunderstanding and for better physical accessibility to enable full participation. PMID:20689774

  9. Current Challenges and Future Directions in Recombinant AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    Various characteristics of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors with long-term safe expression have made it an exciting transduction tool for clinical gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although host immune reactions against the vector as well as transgene products were detected in some instances of the clinical studies, there have been promising observations. Methods of producing AAV vectors for considerable in vivo experimentation and clinical investigations have been developed and a number of studies with AAV vector-mediated muscle transduction were attempted. Notably, an intravenous limb perfusion transduction technique enables extensive transgene expression in the skeletal muscles without noticeable adverse events. Furthermore, cardiac transduction by the rAAV9-microdystrophin would be promising to prevent development of cardiac dysfunction. Recent achievements in transduction technology suggest that long-term transgene expression with therapeutic benefits in DMD treatment would be achieved by the rAAV-mediated transduction strategy with an adequate regimen to regulate host immune response. PMID:24276316

  10. Loss of epigenetic silencing of the DUX4 transcription factor gene in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Jane E

    2015-10-15

    Current genetic and molecular evidence best supports an epigenetic mechanism for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), whereby de-repression of the D4Z4 macrosatellite array leads to aberrant expression of the DUX4 transcription factor in skeletal muscle. This de-repression is triggered by either array contraction or (more rarely) by mutation of the SMCHD1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1) gene. Activation of DUX4 targets, including germline genes and several mammalian retrotransposons, then drives pathogenesis. A direct role for DUX4 mRNA in suppression of nonsense-mediated decay pathways has recently been demonstrated and may also contribute to muscle pathology. Loss of D4Z4 repression in FSHD is observed as hypomethylation of the array accompanied by loss of repressive chromatin marks. The molecular mechanisms of D4Z4 repression are poorly understood, but recent data have identified an Argonaute (AGO)-dependent siRNA pathway. Targeting this pathway by exogenous siRNAs could be a therapeutic strategy for FSHD. PMID:26113644

  11. A cross sectional study of two independent cohorts identifies serum biomarkers for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD).

    PubMed

    Petek, Lisa M; Rickard, Amanda M; Budech, Christopher; Poliachik, Sandra L; Shaw, Dennis; Ferguson, Mark R; Tawil, Rabi; Friedman, Seth D; Miller, Daniel G

    2016-07-01

    Measuring the severity and progression of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is particularly challenging because muscle weakness progresses over long periods of time and can be sporadic. Biomarkers are essential for measuring disease burden and testing treatment strategies. We utilized the sensitive, specific, high-throughput SomaLogic proteomics platform of 1129 proteins to identify proteins with levels that correlate with FSHD severity in a cross-sectional study of two independent cohorts. We discovered biomarkers that correlate with clinical severity and disease burden measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Sixty-eight proteins in the Rochester cohort (n = 48) and 51 proteins in the Seattle cohort (n = 30) had significantly different levels in FSHD-affected individuals when compared with controls (p-value ≤ .005). A subset of these varied by at least 1.5 fold and four biomarkers were significantly elevated in both cohorts. Levels of creatine kinase MM and MB isoforms, carbonic anhydrase III, and troponin I type 2 reliably predicted the disease state and correlated with disease severity. Other novel biomarkers were also discovered that may reveal mechanisms of disease pathology. Assessing the levels of these biomarkers during clinical trials may add significance to other measures of quantifying disease progression or regression. PMID:27185459

  12. Hemizygosity for SMCHD1 in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Type 2: Consequences for 18p Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lemmers, Richard J L F; van den Boogaard, Marlinde L; van der Vliet, Patrick J; Donlin-Smith, Colleen M; Nations, Sharon P; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Heard, Patricia; Bakker, Bert; Tapscott, Stephen; Cody, Jannine D; Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2015-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is most often associated with variegated expression in somatic cells of the normally repressed DUX4 gene within the D4Z4-repeat array. The most common form, FSHD1, is caused by a D4Z4-repeat array contraction to a size of 1-10 units (normal range 10-100 units). The less common form, FSHD2, is characterized by D4Z4 CpG hypomethylation and is most often caused by loss-of-function mutations in the structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge domain 1 (SMCHD1) gene on chromosome 18p. The chromatin modifier SMCHD1 is necessary to maintain a repressed D4Z4 chromatin state. Here, we describe two FSHD2 families with a 1.2-Mb deletion encompassing the SMCHD1 gene. Numerical aberrations of chromosome 18 are relatively common and the majority of 18p deletion syndrome (18p-) cases have, such as these FSHD2 families, only one copy of SMCHD1. Our finding therefore raises the possibility that 18p- cases are at risk of developing FSHD. To address this possibility, we combined genome-wide array analysis data with D4Z4 CpG methylation and repeat array sizes in individuals with 18p- and conclude that approximately 1:8 18p- cases might be at risk of developing FSHD. PMID:25820463

  13. Impact of Biopsychosocial Factors on Chronic Pain in Persons With Myotonic and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Miró, Jordi; Raichle, Katherine A.; Carter, Gregory T.; O’Brien, Sarah A.; Abresch, Richard T.; McDonald, Craig M.; Jensen, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the role of biopsychosocial factors in patients with type 1 myotonic and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (MMD1/FSHD) with chronic pain. Associations between psychosocial factors were found to be important in other samples of persons with pain and both psychological functioning and pain interference in a sample of patients suffering from MMD/FSHD. Prospective, multiple group, survey study of 182 patients with confirmed MMD1 and FSHD. Participants completed surveys assessing pain interference and psychological functioning, as well as psychosocial, demographic, and injury-related variables. Analyses indicated that greater catastrophizing was associated with increased pain interference and poorer psychological functioning, pain attitudes were significantly related to both pain interference and psychological functioning, and coping responses were significantly related only to pain interference. In addition, greater perceived social support was associated with better psychological functioning. The results support the use of studying pain in persons with MMD/FSHD from a biopsychosocial perspective, and the importance of identifying psychosocial factors that may play a role in the adjustment to and response to pain secondary to MMD/FSHD. PMID:19414560

  14. Revised North Star Ambulatory Assessment for Young Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, Eugenio; Coratti, Giorgia; Messina, Sonia; Ricotti, Valeria; Baranello, Giovanni; D'Amico, Adele; Pera, Maria Carmela; Albamonte, Emilio; Sivo, Serena; Mazzone, Elena Stacy; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Fanelli, Lavinia; De Sanctis, Roberto; Romeo, Domenico M; Vita, Gian Luca; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Muntoni, Francesco; Pane, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The advent of therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has highlighted the need to identify reliable outcome measures for young boys with DMD. The aim of this study was to develop a revised version of the North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA) suitable for boys between the age of 3 and 5 years by identifying age appropriate items and revising the scoring system accordingly. Using the scale in 171 controls between the age of 2.9 and 4.8 years, we identified items that were appropriate at different age points. An item was defined as age appropriate if it was completed, achieving a full score, by at least 85% of the typically developing boys at that age. At 3 years (±3months) there were only 8 items that were age appropriate, at 3 years and 6 months there were 13 items while by the age of 4 years all 17 items were appropriate. A revised version of the scale was developed with items ordered according to the age when they could be reliably performed. The application of the revised version of the scale to data collected in young DMD boys showed that very few of the DMD boys were able to complete with a full score all the age appropriate items. In conclusion, our study suggests that a revised version of the NSAA can be used in boys from the age of 3 years to obtain information on how young DMD boys acquire new abilities and how this correlates with their peers.

  15. Gene therapies that restore dystrophin expression for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Robinson-Hamm, Jacqueline N; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common inherited genetic diseases and is caused by mutations to the DMD gene that encodes the dystrophin protein. Recent advances in genome editing and gene therapy offer hope for the development of potential therapeutics. Truncated versions of the DMD gene can be delivered to the affected tissues with viral vectors and show promising results in a variety of animal models. Genome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been used to restore dystrophin expression by deleting one or more exons of the DMD gene in patient cells and in a mouse model that led to functional improvement of muscle strength. Exon skipping with oligonucleotides has been successful in several animal models and evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Next-generation oligonucleotide formulations offer significant promise to build on these results. All these approaches to restoring dystrophin expression are encouraging, but many hurdles remain. This review summarizes the current state of these technologies and summarizes considerations for their future development. PMID:27542949

  16. Investigating Synthetic Oligonucleotide Targeting of Mir31 in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hildyard, John Cw; Wells, Dominic J

    2016-01-01

    Exon-skipping via synthetic antisense oligonucleotides represents one of the most promising potential therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), yet this approach is highly sequence-specific and thus each oligonucleotide is of benefit to only a subset of patients. The discovery that dystrophin mRNA is subject to translational suppression by the microRNA miR31, and that miR31 is elevated in the muscle of DMD patients, raises the possibility that the same oligonucleotide chemistries employed for exon skipping could be directed toward relieving this translational block. This approach would act synergistically with exon skipping where possible, but by targeting the 3'UTR it would further be of benefit to the many DMD patients who express low levels of in-frame transcript. We here present investigations into the feasibility of combining exon skipping with several different strategies for miR31-modulation, using both in vitro models and the mdx mouse (the classical animal model of DMD), and monitoring effects on dystrophin at the transcriptional and translational level. We show that despite promising results from our cell culture model, our in vivo data failed to demonstrate similarly reproducible enhancement of dystrophin translation, suggesting that miR31-modulation may not be practical under current oligonucleotide approaches. Possible explanations for this disappointing outcome are discussed, along with suggestions for future investigations. PMID:27525173

  17. Randomized, blinded trial of weekend vs daily prednisone in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hache, L.P.; Clemens, P.R.; Cnaan, A.; McDonald, C.M.; Viswanathan, V.; Kornberg, A.J.; Bertorini, T.E.; Nevo, Y.; Lotze, T.; Pestronk, A.; Ryan, M.M.; Monasterio, E.; Day, J.W.; Zimmerman, A.; Arrieta, A.; Henricson, E.; Mayhew, J.; Florence, J.; Hu, F.; Connolly, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To perform a double-blind, randomized study comparing efficacy and safety of daily and weekend prednisone in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods: A total of 64 boys with DMD who were between 4 and 10 years of age were randomized at 1 of 12 centers of the Cooperative International Neuromuscular Research Group. Efficacy and safety of 2 prednisone schedules (daily 0.75 mg/kg/day and weekend 10 mg/kg/wk) were evaluated over 12 months. Results: Equivalence was met for weekend and daily dosing of prednisone for the primary outcomes of quantitative muscle testing (QMT) arm score and QMT leg score. Secondary strength scores for QMT elbow flexors also showed equivalence between the 2 treatment groups. Overall side effect profiles of height and weight, bone density, cataract formation, blood pressure, and behavior, analyzed at 12 months, did not differ between weekend and daily dosing of prednisone. Conclusions: Weekend dosing of prednisone is equally beneficial to the standard daily dosing of prednisone. Analysis of side effect profiles demonstrated overall tolerability of both dosing regimens. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that weekend prednisone dosing is as safe and effective as daily prednisone in preserving muscle strength and preventing body mass index increases in boys with DMD over a 12-month period. PMID:21753160

  18. Characterization of WWP1 protein expression in skeletal muscle of muscular dystrophy chickens.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Michihiro; Nakamura, Akinori; Mannen, Hideyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2016-02-01

    A missense mutation in the gene encoding WWP1 was identified as the most promising candidate responsible for chicken muscular dystrophy (MD) by genetic linkage analysis. WWP1 is a HECT-type E3 ubiquitin protein ligase composed of 922 amino acids, which contains 4 tandem WW domains that interact with the proline-rich peptide motifs of target proteins. The missense mutation changes arginine 441 that is located in the centre of the WW domains into glutamine (R441Q), which potentially affects the function of the WWP1 protein. Here, we show that WWP1 is detected as ∼130-kDa protein that localizes to various structures, such as the plasma membrane (sarcolemma), sarcoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nucleus, in normal chicken skeletal muscle. However, in MD chickens, the mutant WWP1 protein was markedly degraded and was absent in the sarcolemma. These changes were also observed in the muscles of chickens in early pre-pathological states. Moreover, in vitro expression analysis showed significant degradation of mutant, but not wild-type WWP1, specifically in myogenic cells. Altogether, our data revealed that the R441Q missense mutation in the WWP1 protein causes degradation and loss of the sarcolemmal localization of WWP1, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of chicken MD.

  19. The first exon duplication mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A tool for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Adeline; Wein, Nicolas; Simmons, Tabatha R; Rutherford, Andrea M; Findlay, Andrew R; Yurkoski, Jacqueline A; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-11-01

    Exon duplication mutations account for up to 11% of all cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and a duplication of exon 2 is the most common duplication in patients. For use as a platform for testing of duplication-specific therapies, we developed a mouse model that carries a Dmd exon 2 duplication. By using homologous recombination we duplicated exon 2 within intron 2 at a location consistent with a human duplication hotspot. mRNA analysis confirms the inclusion of a duplicated exon 2 in mouse muscle. Dystrophin expression is essentially absent by immunofluorescent and immunoblot analysis, although some muscle specimens show very low-level trace dystrophin expression. Phenotypically, the mouse shows similarities to mdx, the standard laboratory model of DMD. In skeletal muscle, areas of necrosis and phagocytosis are seen at 3 weeks, with central nucleation prominent by four weeks, recapitulating the "crisis" period in mdx. Marked diaphragm fibrosis is noted by 6 months, and remains unchanged at 12 months. Our results show that the Dup2 mouse is both pathologically (in degree and distribution) and physiologically similar to mdx. As it recapitulates the most common single exon duplication found in DMD patients, this new model will be a useful tool to assess the potential of duplicated exon skipping.

  20. Disruption of nesprin-1 produces an Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy-like phenotype in mice

    PubMed Central

    Puckelwartz, Megan J.; Kessler, Eric; Zhang, Yuan; Hodzic, Didier; Randles, K. Natalie; Morris, Glenn; Earley, Judy U.; Hadhazy, Michele; Holaska, James M.; Mewborn, Stephanie K.; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the inner nuclear membrane proteins lamins A and C produce cardiac and skeletal muscle dysfunction referred to as Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. Lamins A and C participate in the LINC complex that, along with the nesprin and SUN proteins, LInk the Nucleoskeleton with the Cytoskeleton. Nesprins 1 and 2 are giant spectrin-repeat containing proteins that have large and small forms. The nesprins contain a transmembrane anchor that tethers to the nuclear membrane followed by a short domain that resides within the lumen between the inner and outer nuclear membrane. Nesprin’s luminal domain binds directly to SUN proteins. We generated mice where the C-terminus of nesprin-1 was deleted. This strategy produced a protein lacking the transmembrane and luminal domains that together are referred to as the KASH domain. Mice homozygous for this mutation exhibit lethality with approximately half dying at or near birth from respiratory failure. Surviving mice display hindlimb weakness and an abnormal gait. With increasing age, kyphoscoliosis, muscle pathology and cardiac conduction defects develop. The protein components of the LINC complex, including mutant nesprin-1α, lamin A/C and SUN2, are localized at the nuclear membrane in this model. However, the LINC components do not normally associate since coimmunoprecipitation experiments with SUN2 and nesprin reveal that mutant nesprin-1 protein no longer interacts with SUN2. These findings demonstrate the role of the LINC complex, and nesprin-1, in neuromuscular and cardiac disease. PMID:19008300