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Sample records for adult neurogenic regions

  1. Adult rodent neurogenic regions: the ventricular subependyma contains neural stem cells, but the dentate gyrus contains restricted progenitors.

    PubMed

    Seaberg, Raewyn M; van der Kooy, Derek

    2002-03-01

    Neurogenesis persists in two adult brain regions: the ventricular subependyma and the subgranular cell layer in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). Previous work in many laboratories has shown explicitly that multipotential, self-renewing stem cells in the subependyma are the source of newly generated migrating neurons that traverse the rostral migratory stream and incorporate into the olfactory bulb as interneurons. These stem cells have been specifically isolated from the subependyma, and their properties of self-renewal and multipotentiality have been demonstrated in vitro. In contrast, it is a widely held assumption that the "hippocampal" stem cells that can be isolated in vitro from adult hippocampus reside in the neurogenic subgranular layer and represent the source of new granule cell neurons, but this has never been tested directly. Primary cell isolates derived from the precise microdissection of adult rodent neurogenic regions were compared using two very different commonly used culture methods: a clonal colony-forming (neurosphere) assay and a monolayer culture system. Importantly, both of these culture methods generated the same conclusion: stem cells can be isolated from hippocampus-adjacent regions of subependyma, but the adult DG proper does not contain a population of resident neural stem cells. Indeed, although the lateral ventricle and other ventricular subependymal regions directly adjacent to the hippocampus contain neural stem cells that exhibit long-term self-renewal and multipotentiality, separate neuronal and glial progenitors with limited self-renewal capacity are present in the adult DG, suggesting that neuron-specific progenitors and not multipotential stem cells are the source of newly generated DG neurons throughout adulthood.

  2. Obesity-dependent cannabinoid modulation of proliferation in adult neurogenic regions.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Patricia; Romero-Zerbo, Yanina; Pavón, Francisco J; Serrano, Antonia; López-Ávalos, María-Dolores; Cifuentes, Manuel; Grondona, Jesús-Mateos; Bermúdez-Silva, Francisco-Javier; Fernández-Llebrez, Pedro; de Fonseca, Fernando R; Suárez, Juan; Pérez-Martín, Margarita

    2011-05-01

    Endocannabinoid signalling participates in the control of neurogenesis, especially after brain insults. Obesity may explain alterations in physiology affecting neurogenesis, although it is unclear whether cannabinoid signalling may modulate neural proliferation in obese animals. Here we analyse the impact of obesity by using two approaches, a high-fat diet (HFD, 60% fat) and a standard/low-fat diet (STD, 10% fat), and the response to a subchronic treatment with the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) inverse agonist AM251 (3 mg/kg) on cell proliferation of two relevant neurogenic regions, namely the subventricular zone in the striatal wall of the lateral ventricle (SVZ) and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (SGZ), and also in the hypothalamus given its role in energy metabolism. We found evidence of an interaction between diet-induced obesity and CB1 signalling in the regulation of cell proliferation. AM251 reduced caloric intake and body weight in obese rats, as well as corrected plasma levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. AM251 is shown, for the first time, to modulate cell proliferation in HFD-obese rats only. We observed an increase in the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-labelled (BrdU+) cells in the SGZ, but a decrease in the number of BrdU+ cells in the SVZ and the hypothalamus of AM251-treated HFD rats. These BrdU+ cells expressed the neuron-specific βIII-tubulin. These results suggest that obesity may impact cell proliferation in the brain selectively, and provide support for a role of CB1 signalling regulation of neurogenesis in response to obesity.

  3. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches

    PubMed Central

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Velásquez, Zahady D.; Muñoz, Rosa I.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs), which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as “neurogenic niche”. Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their

  4. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches.

    PubMed

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A; Burgos, Patricia V; Velásquez, Zahady D; Muñoz, Rosa I; Lafourcade, Carlos A; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs), which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as "neurogenic niche". Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their roles

  5. Stars from the darkest night: unlocking the neurogenic potential of astrocytes in different brain regions.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Jens P; Frisén, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    In a few regions of the adult brain, specialized astrocytes act as neural stem cells capable of sustaining life-long neurogenesis. In other, typically non-neurogenic regions, some astrocytes have an intrinsic capacity to produce neurons when provoked by particular conditions but do not use this ability to replace neurons completely after injury or disease. Why do astrocytes display regional differences and why do they not use their neurogenic capacity for brain repair to a greater extent? In this Review, we discuss the neurogenic potential of astrocytes in different brain regions and ask what stimulates this potential in some regions but not in others. We discuss the transcriptional networks and environmental cues that govern cell identity, and consider how the activation of neurogenic properties in astrocytes can be understood as the de-repression of a latent neurogenic transcriptional program. PMID:27048686

  6. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Erik N.; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from treatment of children with congenital diseases, such as myelomeningocele. Our goal, in this review, is to present some of the common surgical options for ISD [including artificial urinary sphincters, bladder slings, bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) and urethral bulking agents] and the evidence underlying these treatments in adults with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26904420

  7. Microglia from neurogenic and non-neurogenic regions display differential proliferative potential and neuroblast support.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Gregory P; Deleyrolle, Loic P; Reynolds, Brent A; Steindler, Dennis A; Laywell, Eric D

    2014-01-01

    Microglia isolated from the neurogenic subependymal zone (SEZ) and hippocampus (HC) are capable of massive in vitro population expansion that is not possible with microglia isolated from non-neurogenic regions. We asked if this regional heterogeneity in microglial proliferative capacity is cell intrinsic, or is conferred by interaction with respective neurogenic or non-neurogenic niches. By combining SEZ and cerebral cortex (CTX) primary tissue dissociates to generate heterospatial cultures, we find that exposure to the SEZ environment does not enhance CTX microglia expansion; however, the CTX environment exerts a suppressive effect on SEZ microglia expansion. Furthermore, addition of purified donor SEZ microglia to either CTX- or SEZ-derived cultures suppresses the expansion of host microglia, while the addition of donor CTX microglia enhances the over-all microglia yield. These data suggest that SEZ and CTX microglia possess intrinsic, spatially restricted characteristics that are independent of their in vitro environment, and that they represent unique and functionally distinct populations. Finally, we determined that the repeated supplementation of neurogenic SEZ cultures with expanded SEZ microglia allows for sustained levels of inducible neurogenesis, provided that the ratio of microglia to total cells remains within a fairly narrow range.

  8. Immunological regulation of neurogenic niches in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Gutierrez-Fernandez, Fernando; Lopez-Virgen, Veronica; Collas-Aguilar, Jorge; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis are germinal processes that occur in the adult brain throughout life. The subventricular (SVZ) and subgranular (SGZ) zones are the main neurogenic regions in adult brain. Therein, it resides a subpopulation of astrocytes that act as neural stem cells. Increasing evidence indicates that pro-inflammatory and other immunological mediators are important regulators of neural precursors into the SVZ and the SGZ. There are a number of inflammatory cytokines that regulate the function of neural stem cells. Some of the most studied include: interleukin-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, insulin-like growth factor-1, growth-regulated oncogene-alpha, leukemia inhibitory factor, cardiotrophin-1, ciliary neurotrophic factor, interferon-gamma, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha. This plethora of immunological mediators can control the migration, proliferation, quiescence, cell-fate choices and survival of neural stem cells and their progeny. Thus, systemic or local inflammatory processes represent important regulators of germinal niches in the adult brain. In this review, we summarized the current evidence regarding the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in the regulation of adult neural stem cells under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Additionally, we described the role of proinflammatory cytokines in neurodegenerative diseases and some therapeutical approaches for the immunomodulation of neural progenitor cells. PMID:22986164

  9. Neurogenic neuroinflammation in fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    Although fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) have distinct clinical phenotypes, they do share many other features. Pain, allodynia and dysaesthesia occur in each condition and seem to exist on a similar spectrum. Fibromyalgia and CRPS can both be triggered by specific traumatic events, although fibromyalgia is most commonly associated with psychological trauma and CRPS is most often associated with physical trauma, which is frequently deemed routine or minor by the patient. Fibromyalgia and CRPS also seem to share many pathophysiological mechanisms, among which the most important are those involving central effects. Nonetheless, peripheral effects, such as neurogenic neuroinflammation, are also important contributors to the clinical features of each of these disorders. This Review highlights the differing degrees to which neurogenic neuroinflammation might contribute to the multifactorial pathogenesis of both fibromyalgia and CRPS, and discusses the evidence suggesting that this mechanism is an important link between the two disorders, and could offer novel therapeutic targets.

  10. Cyp26b1 mediates differential neurogenicity in axial-specific populations of adult spinal cord progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Leung, Carly; Chan, Sherwin Chun Leung; Tsang, Sze Lan; Wu, Wutian; Sham, Mai Har

    2012-08-10

    Utilization of endogenous adult spinal cord progenitor cells (SCPCs) for neuronal regeneration is a promising strategy for spinal cord repair. To mobilize endogenous SCPCs for injury repair, it is necessary to understand their intrinsic properties and to identify signaling factors that can stimulate their neurogenic potential. In this study, we demonstrate that adult mouse SCPCs express distinct combinatorial Hox genes and exhibit axial-specific stem cell properties. Lumbar-derived neurospheres displayed higher primary sphere formation and greater neurogenicity compared with cervical- and thoracic-derived neurospheres. To further understand the mechanisms governing neuronal differentiation of SCPCs from specific axial regions, we examined the neurogenic responses of adult SCPCs to retinoic acid (RA), an essential factor for adult neurogenesis. Although RA is a potent inducer of neuronal differentiation, we found that RA enhanced the generation of neurons specifically in cervical- but not lumbar-derived cells. We further demonstrate that the differential RA response was mediated by the RA-degrading enzyme cytochrome P450 oxidase b1 Cyp26b1. Lumbar cells express high levels of Cyp26b1 and low levels of the RA-synthesizing enzyme retinaldehyde dehydrogenase Raldh2, resulting in limited activation of the RA signaling pathway in these cells. In contrast, low Cyp26b1 expression in cervical spinal cord progenitor cells allows RA signaling to be readily activated upon RA treatment. The intrinsic heterogeneity and signaling factor regulation among adult SCPCs suggest that different niche factor regimens are required for site-specific mobilization of endogenous SCPCs from distinct spatial regions of the spinal cord for injury repair.

  11. Exposure to N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea in Adult Mice Alters Structural and Functional Integrity of Neurogenic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Gil-Perotin, Sara; Ferragud, Antonio; Bonet-Ponce, Luis; Canales, Juan Jose; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that prenatal exposure to the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), a N-nitroso compound (NOC) found in the environment, disrupts developmental neurogenesis and alters memory formation. Previously, we showed that postnatal ENU treatment induced lasting deficits in proliferation of neural progenitors in the subventricular zone (SVZ), the main neurogenic region in the adult mouse brain. The present study is aimed to examine, in mice exposed to ENU, both the structural features of adult neurogenic sites, incorporating the dentate gyrus (DG), and the behavioral performance in tasks sensitive to manipulations of adult neurogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings 2-month old mice received 5 doses of ENU and were sacrificed 45 days after treatment. Then, an ultrastructural analysis of the SVZ and DG was performed to determine cellular composition in these regions, confirming a significant alteration. After bromodeoxyuridine injections, an S-phase exogenous marker, the immunohistochemical analysis revealed a deficit in proliferation and a decreased recruitment of newly generated cells in neurogenic areas of ENU-treated animals. Behavioral effects were also detected after ENU-exposure, observing impairment in odor discrimination task (habituation-dishabituation test) and a deficit in spatial memory (Barnes maze performance), two functions primarily related to the SVZ and the DG regions, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrate that postnatal exposure to ENU produces severe disruption of adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and DG, as well as strong behavioral impairments. These findings highlight the potential risk of environmental NOC-exposure for the development of neural and behavioral deficits. PMID:22238669

  12. A simple assessment model to quantifying the dynamic hippocampal neurogenic process in the adult mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minee L; Begeti, Faye; Barker, Roger A; Kim, Namho

    2016-04-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a highly dynamic process in which new cells are born, but only some of which survive. Of late it has become clear that these surviving newborn neurons have functional roles, most notably in certain forms of memory. Conventional methods to look at adult neurogenesis are based on the quantification of the number of newly born neurons using a simple cell counting methodology. However, this type of approach fails to capture the dynamic aspects of the neurogenic process, where neural proliferation, death and differentiation take place continuously and simultaneously. In this paper, we propose a simple mathematical approach to better understand the adult neurogenic process in the hippocampus which in turn will allow for a better analysis of this process in disease states and following drug therapies. PMID:26443687

  13. Congenital causes of neurogenic bladder and the transition to adult care

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The population of patients with congenital genitourinary disorders has unique healthcare demands that require an additional interpersonal and medical skillset. Adults with congenital neurogenic bladder may have complex urinary anatomy, abnormal bladder function and atypical voiding mechanisms. While initial surgery and care of these patients is typically managed by a pediatric urologist, growth and development into adulthood necessitates transition of care to an adult care team. Failure of transition to adult care has been demonstrated to result in lower quality healthcare and increased risk of developing preventable complications. PMID:26904411

  14. Regionally-specified second trimester fetal neural stem cells reveals differential neurogenic programming.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yiping; Marcy, Guillaume; Lee, Eddy S M; Rozen, Steve; Mattar, Citra N Z; Waddington, Simon N; Goh, Eyleen L K; Choolani, Mahesh; Chan, Jerry K Y

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC) have the potential for treatment of a wide range of neurological diseases such as Parkinson Disease and multiple sclerosis. Currently, NSC have been isolated only from hippocampus and subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult brain. It is not known whether NSC can be found in all parts of the developing mid-trimester central nervous system (CNS) when the brain undergoes massive transformation and growth. Multipotent NSC from the mid-trimester cerebra, thalamus, SVZ, hippocampus, thalamus, cerebellum, brain stem and spinal cord can be derived and propagated as clonal neurospheres with increasing frequencies with increasing gestations. These NSC can undergo multi-lineage differentiation both in vitro and in vivo, and engraft in a developmental murine model. Regionally-derived NSC are phenotypically distinct, with hippocampal NSC having a significantly higher neurogenic potential (53.6%) over other sources (range of 0%-27.5%, p<0.004). Whole genome expression analysis showed differential gene expression between these regionally-derived NSC, which involved the Notch, epidermal growth factor as well as interleukin pathways. We have shown the presence of phenotypically-distinct regionally-derived NSC from the mid-trimester CNS, which may reflect the ontological differences occurring within the CNS. Aside from informing on the role of such cells during fetal growth, they may be useful for different cellular therapy applications.

  15. Influences of prenatal and postnatal stress on adult hippocampal neurogenesis: the double neurogenic niche hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Martínez, Sylvia

    2015-03-15

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) is involved in learning, memory, and stress, and plays a significant role in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. As an age-dependent process, AHN is largely influenced by changes that occur during the pre- and postnatal stages of brain development, and constitutes an important field of research. This review examines the current knowledge regarding the regulators of AHN and the influence of prenatal and postnatal stress on later AHN. In addition, a hypothesis is presented suggesting that each kind of stress influences a specific neurogenic pool, developmental or postnatal, that later becomes a precursor with important repercussions for AHN. This hypothesis is referred to as "the double neurogenic niche hypothesis." Discovering what receptors, transcription factors, or genes are specifically activated by different stressors is proposed as an essential line of future research in the field. Such knowledge shall constitute an important starting point toward the goal of modifying AHN in neurodegenerative or psychiatric diseases.

  16. Neurotoxic Methamphetamine Doses Increase LINE-1 Expression in the Neurogenic Zones of the Adult Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Moszczynska, Anna; Flack, Amanda; Qiu, Ping; Muotri, Alysson R.; Killinger, Bryan A.

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused psychostimulant with the potential to cause neurotoxicity in the striatum and hippocampus. Several epigenetic changes have been described after administration of METH; however, there are no data regarding the effects of METH on the activity of transposable elements in the adult brain. The present study demonstrates that systemic administration of neurotoxic METH doses increases the activity of Long INterspersed Element (LINE-1) in two neurogenic niches in the adult rat brain in a promoter hypomethylation-independent manner. Our study also demonstrates that neurotoxic METH triggers persistent decreases in LINE-1 expression and increases the LINE-1 levels within genomic DNA in the striatum and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, and that METH triggers LINE-1 retrotransposition in vitro. We also present indirect evidence for the involvement of glutamate (GLU) in LINE-1 activation. The results suggest that LINE-1 activation might occur in neurogenic areas in human METH users and might contribute to METH abuse-induced hippocampus-dependent memory deficits and impaired performance on several cognitive tasks mediated by the striatum. PMID:26463126

  17. Neurotoxic Methamphetamine Doses Increase LINE-1 Expression in the Neurogenic Zones of the Adult Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Moszczynska, Anna; Flack, Amanda; Qiu, Ping; Muotri, Alysson R; Killinger, Bryan A

    2015-10-14

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused psychostimulant with the potential to cause neurotoxicity in the striatum and hippocampus. Several epigenetic changes have been described after administration of METH; however, there are no data regarding the effects of METH on the activity of transposable elements in the adult brain. The present study demonstrates that systemic administration of neurotoxic METH doses increases the activity of Long INterspersed Element (LINE-1) in two neurogenic niches in the adult rat brain in a promoter hypomethylation-independent manner. Our study also demonstrates that neurotoxic METH triggers persistent decreases in LINE-1 expression and increases the LINE-1 levels within genomic DNA in the striatum and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, and that METH triggers LINE-1 retrotransposition in vitro. We also present indirect evidence for the involvement of glutamate (GLU) in LINE-1 activation. The results suggest that LINE-1 activation might occur in neurogenic areas in human METH users and might contribute to METH abuse-induced hippocampus-dependent memory deficits and impaired performance on several cognitive tasks mediated by the striatum.

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury Activation of the Adult Subventricular Zone Neurogenic Niche.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eun Hyuk; Adorjan, Istvan; Mundim, Mayara V; Sun, Bin; Dizon, Maria L V; Szele, Francis G

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in both civilian and military life, placing a large burden on survivors and society. However, with the recognition of neural stem cells in adult mammals, including humans, came the possibility to harness these cells for repair of damaged brain, whereas previously this was thought to be impossible. In this review, we focus on the rodent adult subventricular zone (SVZ), an important neurogenic niche within the mature brain in which neural stem cells continue to reside. We review how the SVZ is perturbed following various animal TBI models with regards to cell proliferation, emigration, survival, and differentiation, and we review specific molecules involved in these processes. Together, this information suggests next steps in attempting to translate knowledge from TBI animal models into human therapies for TBI. PMID:27531972

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury Activation of the Adult Subventricular Zone Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eun Hyuk; Adorjan, Istvan; Mundim, Mayara V.; Sun, Bin; Dizon, Maria L. V.; Szele, Francis G.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in both civilian and military life, placing a large burden on survivors and society. However, with the recognition of neural stem cells in adult mammals, including humans, came the possibility to harness these cells for repair of damaged brain, whereas previously this was thought to be impossible. In this review, we focus on the rodent adult subventricular zone (SVZ), an important neurogenic niche within the mature brain in which neural stem cells continue to reside. We review how the SVZ is perturbed following various animal TBI models with regards to cell proliferation, emigration, survival, and differentiation, and we review specific molecules involved in these processes. Together, this information suggests next steps in attempting to translate knowledge from TBI animal models into human therapies for TBI. PMID:27531972

  20. Stroke Increases Neural Stem Cells and Angiogenesis in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction. PMID:25437857

  1. The Nuclear Receptor TLX Is Required for Gliomagenesis within the Adult Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yuhua; Niu, Wenze; Qin, Song; Downes, Michael; Burns, Dennis K.

    2012-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) continually generate functional neurons in the adult brain. Due to their ability to proliferate, deregulated NSCs or their progenitors have been proposed as the cells of origin for a number of primary central nervous system neoplasms, including infiltrating gliomas. The orphan nuclear receptor TLX is required for proliferation of adult NSCs, and its upregulation promotes brain tumor formation. However, it is unknown whether TLX is required for gliomagenesis. We examined the genetic interactions between TLX and several tumor suppressors, as well as the role of TLX-dependent NSCs during gliomagenesis, using mouse models. Here, we show that TLX is essential for the proliferation of adult NSCs with a single deletion of p21, p53, or Pten or combined deletion of Pten and p53. While brain tumors still form in Tlx mutant mice, these tumors are less infiltrative and rarely associate with the adult neurogenic niches, suggesting a non-stem-cell origin. Taken together, these results indicate a critical role for TLX in NSC-dependent gliomagenesis and implicate TLX as a therapeutic target to inhibit the development of NSC-derived brain tumors. PMID:23028043

  2. Premature aging of the hippocampal neurogenic niche in adult Bmal1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amira A H; Schwarz-Herzke, Beryl; Stahr, Anna; Prozorovski, Timour; Aktas, Orhan; von Gall, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis undergoes dramatic age-related changes. Mice with targeted deletion of the clock geneBmal1 (Bmal1(-/-)) show disrupted regulation of reactive oxygen species homeostasis, accelerated aging, neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits. As proliferation of neuronal progenitor/precursor cells (NPCs) is enhanced in young Bmal1(-/-) mice, we tested the hypothesis that this results in premature aging of hippocampal neurogenic niche in adult Bmal1(-/-) mice as compared to wildtype littermates. We found significantly reduced pool of hippocampal NPCs, scattered distribution, enhanced survival of NPCs and an increased differentiation of NPCs into the astroglial lineage at the expense of the neuronal lineage. Immunoreaction of the redox sensitive histone deacetylase Sirtuine 1, peroxisomal membrane protein at 70 kDa and expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Waf1/CIP1) were increased in adult Bmal1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, genetic disruption of the molecular clockwork leads to accelerated age-dependent decline in adult neurogenesis presumably as a consequence of oxidative stress.

  3. Identification of a Sustained Neurogenic Zone at the Dorsal Surface of the Adult Mouse Hippocampus and Its Regulation by the Chemokine SDF-1

    PubMed Central

    Belmadani, Abdelhak; Ren, Dongjun; Bhattacharyya, Bula J.; Rothwangl, Katharina B.; Hope, Thomas J.; Perlman, Harris; Miller, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We identified a previously unknown neurogenic region at the dorsal surface of the hippocampus; (the “subhippocampal zone,” SHZ) in the adult brain. Using a reporter mouse in which SHZ cells and their progeny could be traced through the expression of EGFP under the control of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor promoter we observed the presence of a pool of EGFP expressing cells migrating in direction of the dentate gyrus (DG), which is maintained throughout adulthood. This population appeared to originate from the SHZ where cells entered a caudal migratory stream (aCMS) that included the fimbria, the meninges and the DG. Deletion of CXCR4 from neural stem cells (NSCs) or neuroinflammation resulted in the appearance of neurons in the DG, which were the result of migration of NSCs from the SHZ. Some of these neurons were ectopically placed. Our observations indicate that the SHZ is a neurogenic zone in the adult brain through migration of NSCs in the aCMS. Regulation of CXCR4 signaling in these cells may be involved in repair of the DG and may also give rise to ectopic granule cells in the DG in the context of neuropathology. PMID:25656357

  4. Identification of a sustained neurogenic zone at the dorsal surface of the adult mouse hippocampus and its regulation by the chemokine SDF-1.

    PubMed

    Belmadani, Abdelhak; Ren, Dongjun; Bhattacharyya, Bula J; Rothwangl, Katharina B; Hope, Thomas J; Perlman, Harris; Miller, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    We identified a previously unknown neurogenic region at the dorsal surface of the hippocampus; (the "subhippocampal zone," SHZ) in the adult brain. Using a reporter mouse in which SHZ cells and their progeny could be traced through the expression of EGFP under the control of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor promoter we observed the presence of a pool of EGFP expressing cells migrating in direction of the dentate gyrus (DG), which is maintained throughout adulthood. This population appeared to originate from the SHZ where cells entered a caudal migratory stream (aCMS) that included the fimbria, the meninges and the DG. Deletion of CXCR4 from neural stem cells (NSCs) or neuroinflammation resulted in the appearance of neurons in the DG, which were the result of migration of NSCs from the SHZ. Some of these neurons were ectopically placed. Our observations indicate that the SHZ is a neurogenic zone in the adult brain through migration of NSCs in the aCMS. Regulation of CXCR4 signaling in these cells may be involved in repair of the DG and may also give rise to ectopic granule cells in the DG in the context of neuropathology.

  5. Urodynamic and physiologic patterns associated with the common causes of neurogenic bladder in adults

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Andrew Charles

    2016-01-01

    The clinical presentation of the neurogenic bladder can be as vast as the pathologic causes however urodynamics (UDS) can help guide clinical decision-making and help simplify a complex disease state. UDS may be considered as the gold standard in helping to break down complex and multifactorial voiding dysfunction into manageable goals; these include protecting the upper tracts, limiting urinary tract infections (UTI) via avoiding urinary stasis, and maintaining quality of life. Included within are examples of normal to pathologic tracings including normal filling and voiding, detrusor sphincteric coordination, changes in compliance, etc. Additionally we have provided expected UDS findings based on neurogenic disease process, including but not limited to, Parkinson’s, dementia, multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury based on lesion location. Pattern recognition and understanding of UDS can help lead to quality of life improvements and optimal management for the patient with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. PMID:26904410

  6. Urodynamic and physiologic patterns associated with the common causes of neurogenic bladder in adults.

    PubMed

    Allio, Bryce Andrew; Peterson, Andrew Charles

    2016-02-01

    The clinical presentation of the neurogenic bladder can be as vast as the pathologic causes however urodynamics (UDS) can help guide clinical decision-making and help simplify a complex disease state. UDS may be considered as the gold standard in helping to break down complex and multifactorial voiding dysfunction into manageable goals; these include protecting the upper tracts, limiting urinary tract infections (UTI) via avoiding urinary stasis, and maintaining quality of life. Included within are examples of normal to pathologic tracings including normal filling and voiding, detrusor sphincteric coordination, changes in compliance, etc. Additionally we have provided expected UDS findings based on neurogenic disease process, including but not limited to, Parkinson's, dementia, multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury based on lesion location. Pattern recognition and understanding of UDS can help lead to quality of life improvements and optimal management for the patient with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. PMID:26904410

  7. Sustained phosphorylation of MARCKS in differentiating neurogenic regions during chick embryo development.

    PubMed

    Zolessi, F R; Arruti, C

    2001-10-24

    MARCKS, a substrate for several kinases, has critical functions in morphogenetic processes involved in the development of the nervous system. We previously described the purification of MARCKS from chick embryo brain, using a monoclonal antibody (mAb 3C3), raised against embryonic neural retina. Here we show that mAb 3C3 is an antibody sensitive to phosphorylation state. We used it to explore the appearance and developmental progression of phospho-MARCKS (ph-MARCKS) during initial stages of neurogenesis in retina and spinal cord, and compared its distribution with total MARCKS. Before the onset of neural differentiation, MARCKS protein was already accumulated in neural and non-neural embryonic tissues, while ph-MARCKS immunoreactivity was weak, although ubiquitous too. A sudden increase of ph-MARCKS, paralleling a total MARCKS augmentation, was particularly noticeable in the earliest differentiating neurons in the neural retina. Ganglion cells displayed a high ph-MARCKS signal in the soma, as well as in the growing axon. A short time thereafter, a similar increase of ph-MARCKS was present across the entire width of the neural retina, where the differentiation of other neurons and photoreceptors occurs. The increase of ph-MARCKS in cells took place before the detection of the transcription factor Islet-1/2, an early neuronal differentiation molecular marker, in cells of the same region. Analogous phenomena were observed in cervical regions of the spinal cord, where motor neurons were differentiating. Neurogenic regions in the spinal cord contained higher amounts of ph-MARCKS than the floor plate. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the appearance and relatively long-lasting presence of ph-MARCKS polypeptides are related to specific signaling pathways active during neurogenesis.

  8. Sustained phosphorylation of MARCKS in differentiating neurogenic regions during chick embryo development.

    PubMed

    Zolessi, F R; Arruti, C

    2001-10-24

    MARCKS, a substrate for several kinases, has critical functions in morphogenetic processes involved in the development of the nervous system. We previously described the purification of MARCKS from chick embryo brain, using a monoclonal antibody (mAb 3C3), raised against embryonic neural retina. Here we show that mAb 3C3 is an antibody sensitive to phosphorylation state. We used it to explore the appearance and developmental progression of phospho-MARCKS (ph-MARCKS) during initial stages of neurogenesis in retina and spinal cord, and compared its distribution with total MARCKS. Before the onset of neural differentiation, MARCKS protein was already accumulated in neural and non-neural embryonic tissues, while ph-MARCKS immunoreactivity was weak, although ubiquitous too. A sudden increase of ph-MARCKS, paralleling a total MARCKS augmentation, was particularly noticeable in the earliest differentiating neurons in the neural retina. Ganglion cells displayed a high ph-MARCKS signal in the soma, as well as in the growing axon. A short time thereafter, a similar increase of ph-MARCKS was present across the entire width of the neural retina, where the differentiation of other neurons and photoreceptors occurs. The increase of ph-MARCKS in cells took place before the detection of the transcription factor Islet-1/2, an early neuronal differentiation molecular marker, in cells of the same region. Analogous phenomena were observed in cervical regions of the spinal cord, where motor neurons were differentiating. Neurogenic regions in the spinal cord contained higher amounts of ph-MARCKS than the floor plate. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the appearance and relatively long-lasting presence of ph-MARCKS polypeptides are related to specific signaling pathways active during neurogenesis. PMID:11675128

  9. Dural neurogenic inflammation induced by neuropathic pain is specific to cranial region.

    PubMed

    Filipović, B; Matak, I; Lacković, Z

    2014-05-01

    Up to now, dural neurogenic inflammation (DNI) has been studied primarily as a part of migraine pain pathophysiology. A recent study from our laboratory demonstrated the occurrence of DNI in response to peripheral trigeminal nerve injury. In this report, we characterize the occurrence of DNI after different peripheral nerve injuries in and outside of the trigeminal region. We have used the infraorbital nerve constriction injury model (IoNC) as a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Greater occipital nerve constriction injury (GoNC), partial transection of the sciatic nerve (ScNT) and sciatic nerve constriction injury (SCI) were employed to characterize the occurrence of DNI in response to nerve injury outside of the trigeminal region. DNI was measured as colorimetric absorbance of Evans blue plasma protein complexes. In addition, cellular inflammatory response in dural tissue was histologically examined in IoNC and SCI models. In comparison to the strong DNI evoked by IoNC, a smaller but significant DNI has been observed following the GoNC. However, DNI has not been observed either in cranial or in lumbar dura following ScNT and SCI. Histological evidence has demonstrated a dural proinflammatory cell infiltration in the IoNC model, which is in contrast to the SCI model. Inflammatory cell types (lymphocytes, plasma cells, and monocytes) have indicated the presence of sterile cellular inflammatory response in the IoNC model. To our knowledge, this is the first observation that the DNI evoked by peripheral neuropathic pain is specific to the trigeminal area and the adjacent occipital area. DNI after peripheral nerve injury consists of both plasma protein extravasation and proinflammatory cell infiltration.

  10. Laparoscopic excision of mesenteric duplication enteric cyst embedded in sigmoid mesocolon mimicking retroperitoneal neurogenic tumor in adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jui-Ho; Lin, Jen-Tai; Hsu, Chao-Wen

    2012-10-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare abdominal tumors with an incidence of 1/105,000 to 250,000 hospitalized adult surgical patients. These cysts may occur in every part of the mesentery, from duodenum to rectum. Most frequently, cysts are localized in small bowel mesentery. They usually present during the first decade of life, mostly occurring in pediatric patients. These lesions characteristically arise from the mesenteric border of the bowel. The majority are asymptomatic and, if found, are discovered incidentally during abdominal exploration or radiologic examination. Traditionally, the treatment of mesenteric cyst is surgical excision by laparotomy. However, in 1993, Mackenzie described the first laparoscopic excision of a mesenteric cyst. Since then, several cases have been reported but mainly in small intestine. Here, we reported an adult patient of a mesenteric duplication enteric cyst embedded in sigmoid mesocolon mimicking retroperitoneal neurogenic tumor, which was completely excised using the laparoscopic approach (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/SLE/A73).

  11. Stem cells expanded from the human embryonic hindbrain stably retain regional specification and high neurogenic potency.

    PubMed

    Tailor, Jignesh; Kittappa, Raja; Leto, Ketty; Gates, Monte; Borel, Melodie; Paulsen, Ole; Spitzer, Sonia; Karadottir, Ragnhildur Thora; Rossi, Ferdinando; Falk, Anna; Smith, Austin

    2013-07-24

    Stem cell lines that faithfully maintain the regional identity and developmental potency of progenitors in the human brain would create new opportunities in developmental neurobiology and provide a resource for generating specialized human neurons. However, to date, neural progenitor cultures derived from the human brain have either been short-lived or exhibit restricted, predominantly glial, differentiation capacity. Pluripotent stem cells are an alternative source, but to ascertain definitively the identity and fidelity of cell types generated solely in vitro is problematic. Here, we show that hindbrain neuroepithelial stem (hbNES) cells can be derived and massively expanded from early human embryos (week 5-7, Carnegie stage 15-17). These cell lines are propagated in adherent culture in the presence of EGF and FGF2 and retain progenitor characteristics, including SOX1 expression, formation of rosette-like structures, and high neurogenic capacity. They generate GABAergic, glutamatergic and, at lower frequency, serotonergic neurons. Importantly, hbNES cells stably maintain hindbrain specification and generate upper rhombic lip derivatives on exposure to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). When grafted into neonatal rat brain, they show potential for integration into cerebellar development and produce cerebellar granule-like cells, albeit at low frequency. hbNES cells offer a new system to study human cerebellar specification and development and to model diseases of the hindbrain. They also provide a benchmark for the production of similar long-term neuroepithelial-like stem cells (lt-NES) from pluripotent cell lines. To our knowledge, hbNES cells are the first demonstration of highly expandable neuroepithelial stem cells derived from the human embryo without genetic immortalization.

  12. The master negative regulator REST/NRSF controls adult neurogenesis by restraining the neurogenic program in quiescent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhengliang; Ure, Kerstin; Ding, Peiguo; Nashaat, Mostafa; Yuan, Laura; Ma, Jing; Hammer, Robert E; Hsieh, Jenny

    2011-06-29

    Transcriptional regulation is a critical mechanism in the birth, specification, and differentiation of granule neurons in the adult hippocampus. One of the first negative-acting transcriptional regulators implicated in vertebrate development is repressor element 1-silencing transcription/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF)--thought to regulate hundreds of neuron-specific genes--yet its function in the adult brain remains elusive. Here we report that REST/NRSF is required to maintain the adult neural stem cell (NSC) pool and orchestrate stage-specific differentiation. REST/NRSF recruits CoREST and mSin3A corepressors to stem cell chromatin for the regulation of pro-neuronal target genes to prevent precocious neuronal differentiation in cultured adult NSCs. Moreover, mice lacking REST/NRSF specifically in NSCs display a transient increase in adult neurogenesis that leads to a loss in the neurogenic capacity of NSCs and eventually diminished granule neurons. Our work identifies REST/NRSF as a master negative regulator of adult NSC differentiation and offers a potential molecular target for neuroregenerative approaches. PMID:21715642

  13. Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dorsher, Peter T.; McIntosh, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented. PMID:22400020

  14. Technological applications in the assessment of acquired neurogenic communication and swallowing disorders in adults.

    PubMed

    Hallowell, B; Katz, R C

    1999-01-01

    The role of technology is expanding rapidly in many aspects of the diagnostic process with patients who have neurogenic communication and swallowing disorders. In this article we discuss a broad selection of technological tools that enhance a wide range of diagnostic tasks, such as taking case histories, administering and scoring tests, performing acoustic, physiologic, cognitive, and linguistic analyses, making normative comparisons, profiling diagnostic results, and making diagnostic decisions. Clinicians are encouraged to scrutinize the relative value of all diagnostic tools to maintaining the quality of service. An appendix includes information for contacting vendors and manufacturers of the products discussed.

  15. Neurogenic cough.

    PubMed

    Altman, Kenneth W; Noordzij, J Pieter; Rosen, Clark A; Cohen, Seth; Sulica, Lucian

    2015-07-01

    We review contemporary concepts of the pathophysiology of neurogenic cough, and its evaluation and treatment based on scientific publications addressing neurogenic cough. Neurogenic cough is thought to be the result of sensory neuropathy, most commonly idiopathic. Because it is principally a sensory phenomenon, clinical evaluation is challenging, the diagnosis most often being made by exclusion. Identification of motor paresis, either by laryngoscopy or laryngeal electromyography, may suggest the presence of sensory neuropathy. The utility of amitriptyline and gabapentin has been demonstrated in randomized clinical trials, and retrospective series and case reports have suggested efficacy of pregabalin, baclofen, and botulinum toxin. Sensory neuropathy appears to be an important cause of chronic refractory cough, and appears amenable to treatment with a variety of pharmacologic agents.

  16. Molecular targets of chromatin repressive mark H3K9me3 in primate progenitor cells within adult neurogenic niches

    PubMed Central

    Foret, Michael R.; Sandstrom, Richard S.; Rhodes, Christopher T.; Wang, Yufeng; Berger, Mitchel S.; Lin, Chin-Hsing Annie

    2014-01-01

    Histone 3 Lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation is known to be associated with pericentric heterochromatin and important in genomic stability. In this study, we show that trimethylation at H3K9 (H3K9me3) is enriched in an adult neural stem cell niche- the subventricular zone (SVZ) on the walls of the lateral ventricle in both rodent and non-human primate baboon brain. Previous studies have shown that there is significant correlation between baboon and human regarding genomic similarity and brain structure, suggesting that findings in baboon are relevant to human. To understand the function of H3K9me3 in this adult neurogenic niche, we performed genome-wide analyses using ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep-sequencing) and RNA-Seq for in vivo SVZ cells purified from baboon brain. Through integrated analyses of ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq, we found that H3K9me3-enriched genes associated with cellular maintenance, post-transcriptional and translational modifications, signaling pathways, and DNA replication are expressed, while genes involved in axon/neuron, hepatic stellate cell, or immune-response activation are not expressed. As neurogenesis progresses in the adult SVZ, cell fate restriction is essential to direct proper lineage commitment. Our findings highlight that H3K9me3 repression in undifferentiated SVZ cells is engaged in the maintenance of cell type integrity, implicating a role for H3K9me3 as an epigenetic mechanism to control cell fate transition within this adult germinal niche. PMID:25126093

  17. The Effect of Pro-Neurogenic Gene Expression on Adult Subventricular Zone Precursor Cell Recruitment and Fate Determination After Excitotoxic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kathryn S; Connor, Bronwen J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of on-going neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain, neurons are generally not replaced after injury. Using a rodent model of excitotoxic cell loss and retroviral (RV) lineage tracing, we previously demonstrated transient recruitment of precursor cells from the subventricular zone (SVZ) into the lesioned striatum. In the current study we determined that these cells included migratory neuroblasts and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC), with the predominant response from glial cells. We attempted to override this glial response by ectopic expression of the pro-neurogenic genes Pax6 or Dlx2 in the adult rat SVZ following quinolinic acid lesioning. RV-Dlx2 over-expression stimulated repair at a previously non-neurogenic time point by enhancing neuroblast recruitment and the percentage of cells that retained a neuronal fate within the lesioned area, compared to RV-GFP controls. RV-Pax6 expression was unsuccessful at inhibiting glial fate and intriguingly, increased OPC cell numbers with no change in neuronal recruitment. These findings suggest that gene choice is important when attempting to augment endogenous repair as the lesioned environment can overcome pro-neurogenic gene expression. Dlx2 over-expression however was able to partially overcome an anti-neuronal environment and therefore is a promising candidate for further study of striatal regeneration. PMID:27397999

  18. Layer I as a putative neurogenic niche in young adult guinea pig cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Kun; Cai, Yan; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Huang, Ju-Fang; Liu, Zhong-Yu; Fu, Guang-Ming; Feng, Jia-Chun; Clough, Richard W; Patrylo, Peter R; Luo, Xue-Gang; Hu, Chun-Hong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2010-10-01

    A considerable number of cells expressing typical immature neuronal markers including doublecortin (DCX+) are present around layer II in the cerebral cortex of young and adult guinea pigs and other larger mammals, and their origin and biological implication await further characterization. We show here in young adult guinea pigs that these DCX+ cells are accompanied by in situ cell division around the superficial cortical layers mostly in layer I, but they co-express proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and an early neuronal fate determining factor, PAX6. A small number of these DCX+ cells also colocalize with BrdU following administration of this mitotic indicator. Cranial X-ray irradiation causes a decline of DCX+ cells around layer II, and novel environmental exploration induces c-Fos expression among these cells in several neocortical areas. Together, these data are compatible with a notion that DCX+ cortical neurons around layer II might derive from proliferable neuronal precursors around layer I in young adult guinea pig cerebrum, and that these cells might be modulated by experience under physiological conditions.

  19. Adult Education Regional Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2015

    2015-01-01

    For more than one hundred and fifty years, until 2008, California was an undisputed national leader in its commitment to adult education. The state's investment in adult learners topped $750 million, a sum greater than the combined total of every other state in the nation. However, for the past several years recession and fiscal crisis have left…

  20. Pharmacotherapy for neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, Michael B; Anderson, Rodney U; Boone, Timothy B

    2006-06-01

    Chancellor MB, Anderson RU, Boone TB: Pharmacotherapy for neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2006;85:536-545. Patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity are a heterogeneous group with voiding dysfunction secondary to neurologic injury or disease. The neurogenic detrusor overactivity syndrome, which may include urinary frequency, urgency, and incontinence, frequently contributes to a loss of independence, or even institutionalization. Urodynamic assessment provides the best method of quantifying and classifying neurogenic detrusor overactivity dysfunction in patients with primary diagnoses as diverse as Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, and spina bifida. For many patients, management of urinary symptoms includes pharmacotherapy with an anticholinergic agent. Several novel approaches to managing neurogenic detrusor overactivity, including intravesical instillation of anticholinergic agents, vanilloids, and neurotoxins, are being investigated. For most patients, however, flexible dosing with an anticholinergic agent, with clean intermittent catheterization when indicated, has been shown to reduce the risks of urologic complications, improve levels of continence, and enhance patient quality of life in both children and adults.

  1. Ventricular zone gene-1 (vzg-1) encodes a lysophosphatidic acid receptor expressed in neurogenic regions of the developing cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Neocortical neuroblast cell lines were used to clone G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes to study signaling mechanisms regulating cortical neurogenesis. One putative GPCR gene displayed an in situ expression pattern enriched in cortical neurogenic regions and was therefore named ventricular zone gene-1 (vzg-1). The vzg-1 cDNA hybridized to a 3.8-kb mRNA transcript and encoded a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 41-42 kD, confirmed by Western blot analysis. To assess its function, vzg-1 was overexpressed in a cell line from which it was cloned, inducing serum-dependent "cell rounding." Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lipid present in high concentrations in serum, reproduced the effect seen with serum alone. Morphological responses to other related phospholipids or to thrombin, another agent that induces cell rounding through a GPCR, were not observed in vzg-1 overexpressing cells. Vzg-1 overexpression decreased the EC50 of both cell rounding and Gi activation in response to LPA. Pertussis toxin treatment inhibited vzg-1-dependent LPA-mediated Gi activation, but had no effect on cell rounding. Membrane binding studies indicated that vzg-1 overexpression increased specific LPA binding. These analyses identify the vzg-1 gene product as a receptor for LPA, suggesting the operation of LPA signaling mechanisms in cortical neurogenesis. Vzg-1 therefore provides a link between extracellular LPA and the activation of LPA- mediated signaling pathways through a single receptor and will allow new investigations into LPA signaling both in neural and nonneural systems. PMID:8922387

  2. Neurogenic Hyperadrenergic Orthostatic Hypotension – A Newly-recognized Variant of Orthostatic Hypotension in Older Adults with Elevated Norepinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Mar, Philip L; Shibao, Cyndya A.; Garland, Emily M; Black, Bonnie K; Biaggioni, Italo; Diedrich, André; Paranjape, Sachin Y; Robertson, David; Raj, Satish R

    2015-01-01

    Patients with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (OH) typically have impaired sympathetic nervous system tone and therefore low levels of upright plasma norepinephrine. We report a subset of patients who clinically have typical neurogenic OH but who paradoxically have elevated upright levels of plasma norepinephrine. We retrospectively studied 83 OH patients evaluated at the Vanderbilt Autonomic Dysfunction Center between August 2007 and May 2013. Based upon standing norepinephrine, patients were dichotomized into a hyperadrenergic orthostatic hypotension group (hyperOH: upright NE ≥3.55 nmol/L [600 pg/mL], n=19) or a non-hyperadrenergic orthostatic hypotension group (nOH: upright NE < 3.55 nmol/L [600 pg/mL], n=64). Medical history and data from autonomic testing, including the Valsalva maneuver (VM), were analyzed. HyperOH patients had profound orthostatic falls in blood pressure, but less severe than in nOH (change in SBP: −53±31 mmHg vs. −68±33 mmHg, P=0.050; change in DBP: −18±23 mmHg vs. −30±17 mmHg, P=0.01). The expected compensatory increase in standing heart rate was similarly blunted in both hyperOH and nOH groups (84±15 bpm vs. 82±14 bpm; P=0.6). HyperOH patients had less severe sympathetic failure as evidenced by smaller falls in DBP during phase 2 of VM, and a shorter VM phase 4 blood pressure recovery time (16.5±8.9 sec vs. 31.6±16.6 sec; P<0.001) than nOH patients. Neurogenic hyperOH patients have severe neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, but have less severe adrenergic dysfunction than nOH patients. Further work is required to understand if hyperOH patients will progress to nOH or if this represents a different disorder. PMID:25706983

  3. The Nuclear Protein Encoded by the Drosophila Neurogenic Gene Mastermind Is Widely Expressed and Associates with Specific Chromosomal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Bettler, D.; Pearson, S.; Yedvobnick, B.

    1996-01-01

    The Drosophila neurogenic loci encode a diverse group of proteins that comprise an inhibitory signal transduction pathway. The pathway is used throughout development in numerous contexts. We have examined the distribution of the neurogenic locus mastermind protein (Mam). Mam is expressed through all germlayers during early embryogenesis, including ectodermal precursors to both neuroblasts and epidermoblasts. Mam is subsequently down-regulated within the nervous system and then reexpressed. It persists in the nervous system through late embryogenesis and postembryonically. Mam is ubiquitously expressed in wing and leg imaginal discs and is not down-regulated in sensory organ precursor cells of the wing margin or notum. In the eye disc, Mam shows most prominent expression posterior to the morphogenetic furrow. Expression of the protein during oogenesis appears limited to follicle cells. Immunohistochemical detection of Mam on polytene chromosomes revealed binding at >100 sites. Chromosome colocalization studies with RNA polymerase and the groucho corepressor protein implicate Mam in transcriptional regulation. PMID:8725234

  4. Neuromodulation in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Melissa T.

    2016-01-01

    While neuromodulation is a well-established treatment option for patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder and urinary retention, its applicability to the neurogenic bladder population has only recently been examined more in depth. In this article we will discuss the outcomes, contraindications, and special considerations of sacral and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26904417

  5. The nuclear protein encoded by the Drosophila neurogenic gene mastermind is widely expressed and associates with specific chromosomal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Bettler, D.; Pearson, S.; Yedvobnick, B.

    1996-06-01

    The Drosophila neurogenic loci encode a diverse group of proteins that comprise an inhibitory signal transduction pathway. The pathway is used throughout development in numerous contexts. We have examined the distribution of the neurogenic locus mastermind protein (Mam). Mam is expressed through all germlayers during early embryogenesis, including ectodermal precursors to both neuroblasts and epidermoblasts. Mam is subsequently down-regulated within the nervous system and then reexpressed. It persists in the nervous system through late embryogenesis and postembryonically. Mam is ubiquitously expressed in wing and leg imaginal discs and is not down-regulated in sensory organ precursor cells of the wing margin or notum. In the eye disc, Mam shows most prominent expression posterior to the morphogenetic furrow. Expression of the protein during oogenesis appears limited to follicle cells. Immunohistochemical detection of Mam on polytene chromosomes revealed binding at >100 sites. Chromosome colocalization studies with RNA polymerase and the groucho corepressor protein implicate Mam in transcriptional regulation. 94 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Wnt Regulates Proliferation and Neurogenic Potential of Müller Glial Cells via a Lin28/let-7 miRNA-Dependent Pathway in Adult Mammalian Retinas.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kai; Qiu, Suo; Tian, Lin; Snider, William D; Flannery, John G; Schaffer, David V; Chen, Bo

    2016-09-27

    In cold-blooded vertebrates such as zebrafish, Müller glial cells (MGs) readily proliferate to replenish lost retinal neurons. In mammals, however, MGs lack regenerative capability as they do not spontaneously re-enter the cell cycle unless the retina is injured. Here, we show that gene transfer of β-catenin in adult mouse retinas activates Wnt signaling and MG proliferation without retinal injury. Upstream of Wnt, deletion of GSK3β stabilizes β-catenin and activates MG proliferation. Downstream of Wnt, β-catenin binds to the Lin28 promoter and activates transcription. Deletion of Lin28 abolishes β-catenin-mediated effects on MG proliferation, and Lin28 gene transfer stimulates MG proliferation. We further demonstrate that let-7 miRNAs are critically involved in Wnt/Lin28-regulated MG proliferation. Intriguingly, a subset of cell-cycle-reactivated MGs express markers for amacrine cells. Together, these results reveal a key role of Wnt-Lin28-let7 miRNA signaling in regulating proliferation and neurogenic potential of MGs in the adult mammalian retina. PMID:27681429

  7. Pharmacological activation of CB2 receptors counteracts the deleterious effect of ethanol on cell proliferation in the main neurogenic zones of the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Bindila, Laura; Alen, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Rubio, Leticia; Pavón, Francisco J; Serrano, Antonia; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure reduces endocannabinoid activity and disrupts adult neurogenesis in rodents, which results in structural and functional alterations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists promote adult neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation. We evaluated the protective effects of the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 and the fatty-acid amide-hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which enhances endocannabinoid receptor activity, on NPC proliferation in rats with forced consumption of ethanol (10%) or sucrose liquid diets for 2 weeks. We performed immunohistochemical and stereological analyses of cells expressing the mitotic phosphorylation of histone-3 (phospho-H3+) and the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) in the main neurogenic zones of adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ) and hypothalamus. Animals were allowed ad libitum ethanol intake (7.3 ± 1.1 g/kg/day) after a controlled isocaloric pair-feeding period of sucrose and alcoholic diets. Alcohol intake reduced the number of BrdU+ cells in SGZ, SVZ, and hypothalamus. The treatments (URB597, ACEA, JWH133) exerted a differential increase in alcohol consumption over time, but JWH133 specifically counteracted the deleterious effect of ethanol on NPC proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ, and ACEA reversed this effect in the SGZ only. JWH133 also induced an increased number of BrdU+ cells expressing neuron-specific β3-tubulin in the SVZ and SGZ. These results indicated that the specific activation of CB2 receptors rescued alcohol-induced impaired NPC proliferation, which is a potential clinical interest for the risk of neural damage in alcohol dependence.

  8. Pharmacological activation of CB2 receptors counteracts the deleterious effect of ethanol on cell proliferation in the main neurogenic zones of the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Bindila, Laura; Alen, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Rubio, Leticia; Pavón, Francisco J; Serrano, Antonia; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure reduces endocannabinoid activity and disrupts adult neurogenesis in rodents, which results in structural and functional alterations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists promote adult neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation. We evaluated the protective effects of the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 and the fatty-acid amide-hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which enhances endocannabinoid receptor activity, on NPC proliferation in rats with forced consumption of ethanol (10%) or sucrose liquid diets for 2 weeks. We performed immunohistochemical and stereological analyses of cells expressing the mitotic phosphorylation of histone-3 (phospho-H3+) and the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) in the main neurogenic zones of adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ) and hypothalamus. Animals were allowed ad libitum ethanol intake (7.3 ± 1.1 g/kg/day) after a controlled isocaloric pair-feeding period of sucrose and alcoholic diets. Alcohol intake reduced the number of BrdU+ cells in SGZ, SVZ, and hypothalamus. The treatments (URB597, ACEA, JWH133) exerted a differential increase in alcohol consumption over time, but JWH133 specifically counteracted the deleterious effect of ethanol on NPC proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ, and ACEA reversed this effect in the SGZ only. JWH133 also induced an increased number of BrdU+ cells expressing neuron-specific β3-tubulin in the SVZ and SGZ. These results indicated that the specific activation of CB2 receptors rescued alcohol-induced impaired NPC proliferation, which is a potential clinical interest for the risk of neural damage in alcohol dependence. PMID:26483633

  9. Pharmacological activation of CB2 receptors counteracts the deleterious effect of ethanol on cell proliferation in the main neurogenic zones of the adult rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Bindila, Laura; Alen, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Rubio, Leticia; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure reduces endocannabinoid activity and disrupts adult neurogenesis in rodents, which results in structural and functional alterations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists promote adult neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation. We evaluated the protective effects of the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 and the fatty-acid amide-hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which enhances endocannabinoid receptor activity, on NPC proliferation in rats with forced consumption of ethanol (10%) or sucrose liquid diets for 2 weeks. We performed immunohistochemical and stereological analyses of cells expressing the mitotic phosphorylation of histone-3 (phospho-H3+) and the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) in the main neurogenic zones of adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ) and hypothalamus. Animals were allowed ad libitum ethanol intake (7.3 ± 1.1 g/kg/day) after a controlled isocaloric pair-feeding period of sucrose and alcoholic diets. Alcohol intake reduced the number of BrdU+ cells in SGZ, SVZ, and hypothalamus. The treatments (URB597, ACEA, JWH133) exerted a differential increase in alcohol consumption over time, but JWH133 specifically counteracted the deleterious effect of ethanol on NPC proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ, and ACEA reversed this effect in the SGZ only. JWH133 also induced an increased number of BrdU+ cells expressing neuron-specific β3-tubulin in the SVZ and SGZ. These results indicated that the specific activation of CB2 receptors rescued alcohol-induced impaired NPC proliferation, which is a potential clinical interest for the risk of neural damage in alcohol dependence. PMID:26483633

  10. Ephrins as negative regulators of adult neurogenesis in diverse regions of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jian-wei; Feldheim, David A.; Chen, Dong Feng

    2008-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS) of adult mammals, neurogenesis occurs in only two restricted areas, the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from other CNS regions suggests that their neurogenic potential is dictated by local environmental cues. Here, we report that astrocytes in areas outside of the SGZ and SVZ of adult mice express high levels of ephrin-A2 and -A3, which present an inhibitory niche, negatively regulating neural progenitor cell growth. Adult mice lacking both ephrin-A2 and -A3 display active ongoing neurogenesis throughout the CNS. These findings suggest that neural cell replacement therapies for neurodegeneration or injury in the adult CNS may be achieved by manipulating ephrin signaling pathways. PMID:18562299

  11. Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookshire, Robert H.

    This book provides an overview of the causes and symptoms, and the typical courses, treatments, and outcomes of neurogenic communication disorders. Chapter 1 reviews the human nervous system and neurologic causes of adult communication disorders. Chapter 2 discusses the neurologic assessment and arriving at a diagnosis, including the neurologist's…

  12. Thyroid hormone signaling acts as a neurogenic switch by repressing Sox2 in the adult neural stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    López-Juárez, Alejandra; Remaud, Sylvie; Hassani, Zahra; Jolivet, Pascale; Pierre Simons, Jacqueline; Sontag, Thomas; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Price, Jack; Morvan-Dubois, Ghislaine; Demeneix, Barbara A

    2012-05-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) neural stem cell niche contains mixed populations of stem cells, transit-amplifying cells, and migrating neuroblasts. Deciphering how endogenous signals, such as hormones, affect the balance between these cell types is essential for understanding the physiology of niche plasticity and homeostasis. We show that Thyroid Hormone (T(3)) and its receptor, TRα1, are directly involved in maintaining this balance. TRα1 is expressed in amplifying and migrating cells. In vivo gain- and loss-of-function experiments demonstrate first, that T(3)/TRα1 directly repress Sox2 expression, and second, that TRα1 overexpression in the niche favors the appearance of DCX+ migrating neuroblasts. Lack of TRα increases numbers of SOX2+ cells in the SVZ. Hypothyroidism increases proportions of cells in interphase. Thus, in the adult SVZ, T(3)/TRα1 together favor neural stem cell commitment and progression toward a migrating neuroblast phenotype; this transition correlates with T(3)/TRα1-dependent transcriptional repression of Sox2.

  13. Neurogenic and non-neurogenic functions of endogenous neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Butti, Erica; Cusimano, Melania; Bacigaluppi, Marco; Martino, Gianvito

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is a lifelong process that occurs in two main neurogenic niches of the brain, namely in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles and in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus. In the 1960s, studies on adult neurogenesis have been hampered by the lack of established phenotypic markers. The precise tracing of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) was therefore, not properly feasible. After the (partial) identification of those markers, it was the lack of specific tools that hindered a proper experimental elimination and tracing of those cells to demonstrate their terminal fate and commitment. Nowadays, irradiation, cytotoxic drugs as well as genetic tracing/ablation procedures have moved the field forward and increased our understanding of neurogenesis processes in both physiological and pathological conditions. Newly formed NPC progeny from the SVZ can replace granule cells in the olfactory bulbs of rodents, thus contributing to orchestrate sophisticated odor behavior. SGZ-derived new granule cells, instead, integrate within the DG where they play an essential role in memory functions. Furthermore, converging evidence claim that endogenous NPCs not only exert neurogenic functions, but might also have non-neurogenic homeostatic functions by the release of different types of neuroprotective molecules. Remarkably, these non-neurogenic homeostatic functions seem to be necessary, both in healthy and diseased conditions, for example for preventing or limiting tissue damage. In this review, we will discuss the neurogenic and the non-neurogenic functions of adult NPCs both in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:24808821

  14. Efficacy and Tolerability of Propiverine Hydrochloride in Patients With Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-09

    Neurogenic Urinary Bladder Disorder; Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic; Bladder Disorder, Neurogenic; Urinary Bladder Disorder, Neurogenic; Neurogenic Bladder Disorder; Urinary Bladder Neurogenic Dysfunction; Urologic Diseases; Overactive Detrusor Function; Urinary Incontinence

  15. Neurogenic facial pain.

    PubMed

    Schott, G D

    1980-07-01

    Neurogenic facial pain can be classified as either paroxysmal or persistent. Trigeminal neuralgia is the commonest example of the former, and postherpetic neuralgia, atypical facial pain, and tension head and facial pains are examples of the latter. The cause of many of these pains is poorly understood, the complex neuroanatomy of the head and neck being a contributory factor. Even when the aetiology is known, the mechanism whereby pain is produced is usually obscure. While treatment with drugs and surgical measures for trigeminal neuralgia are often satisfactory, and acupuncture for pain due to "muscle tension" may be beneficial, there is often little effective treatment for a considerable proportion of patients with neurogenic facial pain. PMID:6943844

  16. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment. PMID:25673127

  17. Retroperitoneal neurogenous choristoma.

    PubMed

    Wan, J; Ritchey, M L; Muraszko, K; Bloom, D A

    1992-12-01

    A 6-year-old girl with urinary complaints underwent ultrasonography, which revealed a retroperitoneal cystic mass adjacent to the left kidney. Computerized tomography did not demonstrate whether the mass was an adrenal cyst or a duplicated upper pole segment. Exploration revealed a neurogenous choristoma, which is a collection of histologically normal tissue that is ectopically situated. We believe that this is the first report of this rare entity occurring in the retroperitoneum.

  18. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  19. The Neurogenic Factor NeuroD1 Is Expressed in Post-Mitotic Cells during Juvenile and Adult Xenopus Neurogenesis and Not in Progenitor or Radial Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Laure Anne; Boujard, Daniel; Coumailleau, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to mammals that have limited proliferation and neurogenesis capacities, the Xenopus frog exhibit a great potential regarding proliferation and production of new cells in the adult brain. This ability makes Xenopus a useful model for understanding the molecular programs required for adult neurogenesis. Transcriptional factors that control adult neurogenesis in vertebrate species undergoing widespread neurogenesis are unknown. NeuroD1 is a member of the family of proneural genes, which function during embryonic neurogenesis as a potent neuronal differentiation factor. Here, we study in detail the expression of NeuroD1 gene in the juvenile and adult Xenopus brains by in situ hybridization combined with immunodetections for proliferation markers (PCNA, BrdU) or in situ hybridizations for cell type markers (Vimentin, Sox2). We found NeuroD1 gene activity in many brain regions, including olfactory bulbs, pallial regions of cerebral hemispheres, preoptic area, habenula, hypothalamus, cerebellum and medulla oblongata. We also demonstrated by double staining NeuroD1/BrdU experiments, after long post-BrdU administration survival times, that NeuroD1 gene activity was turned on in new born neurons during post-metamorphic neurogenesis. Importantly, we provided evidence that NeuroD1-expressing cells at this brain developmental stage were post-mitotic (PCNA-) cells and not radial glial (Vimentin+) or progenitors (Sox2+) cells. PMID:23799108

  20. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-12-04

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1(HIGH) cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1(HIGH) cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions.

  1. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1HIGH cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1HIGH cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions. PMID:26634814

  2. Regional and Stage-Specific Effects of Prospectively Purified Vascular Cells on the Adult V-SVZ Neural Stem Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Elizabeth E.; Liu, Chang; Silva-Vargas, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Adult neural stem cells reside in specialized niches. In the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), quiescent neural stem cells (qNSCs) become activated (aNSCs), and generate transit amplifying cells (TACs), which give rise to neuroblasts that migrate to the olfactory bulb. The vasculature is an important component of the adult neural stem cell niche, but whether vascular cells in neurogenic areas are intrinsically different from those elsewhere in the brain is unknown. Moreover, the contribution of pericytes to the neural stem cell niche has not been defined. Here, we describe a rapid FACS purification strategy to simultaneously isolate primary endothelial cells and pericytes from brain microregions of nontransgenic mice using CD31 and CD13 as surface markers. We compared the effect of purified vascular cells from a neurogenic (V-SVZ) and non-neurogenic brain region (cortex) on the V-SVZ stem cell lineage in vitro. Endothelial and pericyte diffusible signals from both regions differentially promote the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of qNSCs, aNSCs, and TACs. Unexpectedly, diffusible cortical signals had the most potent effects on V-SVZ proliferation and neurogenesis, highlighting the intrinsic capacity of non-neurogenic vasculature to support stem cell behavior. Finally, we identify PlGF-2 as an endothelial-derived mitogen that promotes V-SVZ cell proliferation. This purification strategy provides a platform to define the functional and molecular contribution of vascular cells to stem cell niches and other brain regions under different physiological and pathological states. PMID:25788671

  3. GABAergic signalling in a neurogenic niche of the turtle spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Reali, Cecilia; Fernández, Anabel; Radmilovich, Milka; Trujillo-Cenóz, Omar; Russo, Raúl E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The region that surrounds the central canal (CC) in the turtle spinal cord is a neurogenic niche immersed within already functional circuits, where radial glia expressing brain lipid binding protein (BLBP) behave as progenitors. The behaviour of both progenitors and neuroblasts within adult neurogenic niches must be regulated to maintain the functional stability of the host circuit. In the brain, GABA plays a major role in this kind of regulation but little is known about GABAergic signalling in neurogenic niches of the postnatal spinal cord. Here we explored the action of GABA around the CC of the turtle spinal cord by combining patch-clamp recordings of CC-contacting cells, immunohistochemistry for key components of GABAergic signalling and Ca2+ imaging. Two potential sources of GABA appeared around the CC: GABAergic terminals and CC-contacting neurones. GABA depolarized BLBP+ progenitors via GABA transporter-3 (GAT3) and/or GABAA receptors. In CC-contacting neurones, GABAA receptor activation generated responses ranging from excitation to inhibition. This functional heterogeneity appeared to originate from different ratios of activity of the Na+–K+–2Cl− co-transporter (NKCC1) and the K+–Cl− co-transporter (KCC2). In both progenitors and immature neurones, GABA induced an increase in intracellular Ca2+ that required extracellular Ca2+ and was blocked by the selective GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine. Our study shows that GABAergic signalling around the CC shares fundamental properties with those in the embryo and adult neurogenic niches, suggesting that GABA may be part of the mechanisms regulating the production and integration of neurones within operational spinal circuits in the turtle. PMID:21911613

  4. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Çetinel, Bülent; Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  5. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  6. The neurogenic competence of progenitors from the postnatal rat retina in vitro.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Maren; Wachs, Frank-Peter; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Aigner, Ludwig

    2004-05-01

    The mammalian retina develops from stem or progenitor cells that are of neuroectodermal origin and derive from bilateral invaginations of the neuroepithelium, the optic vesicles. Shortly after birth, around 12 days postnatal in rats, the retina is fully developed in its cellular parts. Even though different cell types in the adult might be potential sources for retinal stem cells or progenitor cells, the retina is a non-neurogenic region and the diseased retina is devoid of any spontaneous regeneration. In an attempt to link late developmental processes to the adult situation, we analyzed the presence and the neurogenic potential of retinal progenitors during the postnatal period and compared it to adult ciliary body (CB) derived retinal progenitors and subventricular zone (SVZ) derived neural stem cells. Retinal progenitor properties were identified by the capacity to proliferate and by the expression of the progenitor markers Nestin, Flk-1, Chx10, Pax6 and the radial glia marker BLBP. The neurogenic potential was assayed by the expression of the neuronal markers doublecortin, betaIII Tubulin, Map2 and NSE, the glial makers A2B5, NG2, GalC and GFAP, and by incorporation of BrdU. The number of Flk-1 positive cells and concomitantly the number of newly born betaIII Tubulin-positive cells decreased within the first postnatal week in retinal progenitor cultures and no newly generated betaIII Tubulin, but GFAP positive cells were detected thereafter. In contrast to neural stem cells derived from the adult SVZ, postnatal and adult CB derived progenitors had a lower and a restricted proliferation potential and did not generate oligodendrocytes. The work demonstrates, however, that the existence of retinal progenitor cells is not restricted to embryonic development. In the sensory retina the differentiation potential of late retinal progenitors becomes restricted to the glial lineage, whereas neurogenic progenitor cells are still present in the CB. In addition, major

  7. Neurogenic scapuloperoneal syndrome in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Mercelis, R; Demeester, J; Martin, J J

    1980-01-01

    Two brothers presented with a slowly progressive scapuloperoneal syndrome starting in early childhood. Initially there were myopathic EMG changes, but these changed to those of denervation. Neuromuscular biopsies at an interval of five years confirmed the neurogenic character of the muscle atrophy. Images PMID:7441268

  8. Neurogenic dysphagia resulting from Chiari malformations.

    PubMed

    Pollack, I F; Pang, D; Kocoshis, S; Putnam, P

    1992-05-01

    Between 1980 and 1989, 15 of 46 patients (11 children, 4 adults) who underwent suboccipital craniectomy and cervical laminectomy for symptomatic Chiari malformations presented with manifestations of neurogenic dysphagia. Each of these patients had normal swallowing function before the development of dysphagic symptoms. Dysphagia was progressive in all 15 and, in most cases, preceded the onset of other severe brain stem signs. The rate of symptom progression varied depending on the age of the patient. Whereas the six infants (all Chiari II) deteriorated rapidly after the onset of initial symptoms, the five older children (two Chiari I, three Chiari II) and four adults (all Chiari I) showed a more gradual deterioration. In 11 patients with severe dysphagia, barium video esophagograms, pharyngoesophageal motility studies, continuous esophageal pH monitoring, and appropriate scintigraphic studies were useful in defining the scope of the swallowing impairment and determining whether perioperative nasogastric or gastrostomy feedings, gastric fundoplication, and/or tracheostomy were needed to maintain adequate nutrition and avoid aspiration. These patients all had widespread dysfunction of the swallowing mechanism, with a combination of diffuse pharyngoesophageal dysmotility, cricopharyngeal achalasia, nasal regurgitation, tracheal aspiration, and gastroesophageal reflux. The pathophysiology of these swallowing impairments and their relation to the hindbrain malformation is discussed. Postoperative outcome with regard to swallowing function correlated with the severity of preoperative symptoms. The four patients with mild dysphagia showed rapid improvement in swallowing function after surgery. Seven patients with more severe impairment but without other signs of severe brain stem compromise, such as central apnea or complete bilateral vocal cord paralysis, also improved, albeit more slowly. In contrast, the outcome in the four patients who developed other signs of severe

  9. A Telephone Based Regional Adult Education Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyler, David R.

    This report describes a cooperative project designed to inform area residents of available adult education opportunities and to establish a central information contact point. The regional Adult Education Coordinating Committee compiled a list of adult education courses and services offered by member institutions, devised newspaper and radio…

  10. Discerning Neurogenic vs. Non-Neurogenic Postnatal Lateral Ventricular Astrocytes via Activity-Dependent Input

    PubMed Central

    Adlaf, Elena W.; Mitchell-Dick, Aaron; Kuo, Chay T.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, neural stem cells (NSCs) give rise to differentiated neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes which together modulate perception, memory, and behavior in the adult nervous system. To understand how NSCs contribute to postnatal/adult brain remodeling and repair after injury, the lateral ventricular (LV) neurogenic niche in the rodent postnatal brain serves as an excellent model system. It is a specialized area containing self-renewing GFAP+ astrocytes functioning as NSCs generating new neurons throughout life. In addition to this now well-studied regenerative process, the LV niche also generates differentiated astrocytes, playing an important role for glial scar formation after cortical injury. While LV NSCs can be clearly distinguished from their neuroblast and oligodendrocyte progeny via molecular markers, the astrocytic identity of NSCs has complicated their distinction from terminally-differentiated astrocytes in the niche. Our current models of postnatal/adult LV neurogenesis do not take into account local astrogenesis, or the possibility that cellular markers may be similar between non-dividing GFAP+ NSCs and their differentiated astrocyte daughters. Postnatal LV neurogenesis is regulated by NSC-intrinsic mechanisms interacting with extracellular/niche-driven cues. It is generally believed that these local effects are responsible for sustaining neurogenesis, though behavioral paradigms and disease states have suggested possibilities for neural circuit-level modulation. With recent experimental findings that neuronal stimulation can directly evoke responses in LV NSCs, it is possible that this exciting property will add a new dimension to identifying postnatal/adult NSCs. Here, we put forth a notion that neural circuit-level input can be a distinct characteristic defining postnatal/adult NSCs from non-neurogenic astroglia. PMID:27047330

  11. The ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord differs from other species and shows ependymoma-like features.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Florensa-Vila, José; Ferrer, Isidro; Grassner, Lukas; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    Several laboratories have described the existence of undifferentiated precursor cells that may act like stem cells in the ependyma of the rodent spinal cord. However, there are reports showing that this region is occluded and disassembled in humans after the second decade of life, although this has been largely ignored or interpreted as a post-mortem artefact. To gain insight into the patency, actual structure, and molecular properties of the adult human spinal cord ependymal region, we followed three approaches: (i) with MRI, we estimated the central canal patency in 59 control subjects, 99 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, and 26 patients with non-traumatic spinal cord injuries. We observed that the central canal is absent from the vast majority of individuals beyond the age of 18 years, gender-independently, throughout the entire length of the spinal cord, both in healthy controls and after injury; (ii) with histology and immunohistochemistry, we describe morphological properties of the non-lesioned ependymal region, which showed the presence of perivascular pseudorosettes, a common feature of ependymoma; and (iii) with laser capture microdissection, followed by TaqMan® low density arrays, we studied the gene expression profile of the ependymal region and found that it is mainly enriched in genes compatible with a low grade or quiescent ependymoma (53 genes); this region is enriched only in 14 genes related to neurogenic niches. In summary, we demonstrate here that the central canal is mainly absent in the adult human spinal cord and is replaced by a structure morphologically and molecularly different from that described for rodents and other primates. The presented data suggest that the ependymal region is more likely to be reminiscent of a low-grade ependymoma. Therefore, a direct translation to adult human patients of an eventual therapeutic potential of this region based on animal models should be approached with caution. PMID:25882650

  12. The ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord differs from other species and shows ependymoma-like features.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Florensa-Vila, José; Ferrer, Isidro; Grassner, Lukas; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    Several laboratories have described the existence of undifferentiated precursor cells that may act like stem cells in the ependyma of the rodent spinal cord. However, there are reports showing that this region is occluded and disassembled in humans after the second decade of life, although this has been largely ignored or interpreted as a post-mortem artefact. To gain insight into the patency, actual structure, and molecular properties of the adult human spinal cord ependymal region, we followed three approaches: (i) with MRI, we estimated the central canal patency in 59 control subjects, 99 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, and 26 patients with non-traumatic spinal cord injuries. We observed that the central canal is absent from the vast majority of individuals beyond the age of 18 years, gender-independently, throughout the entire length of the spinal cord, both in healthy controls and after injury; (ii) with histology and immunohistochemistry, we describe morphological properties of the non-lesioned ependymal region, which showed the presence of perivascular pseudorosettes, a common feature of ependymoma; and (iii) with laser capture microdissection, followed by TaqMan® low density arrays, we studied the gene expression profile of the ependymal region and found that it is mainly enriched in genes compatible with a low grade or quiescent ependymoma (53 genes); this region is enriched only in 14 genes related to neurogenic niches. In summary, we demonstrate here that the central canal is mainly absent in the adult human spinal cord and is replaced by a structure morphologically and molecularly different from that described for rodents and other primates. The presented data suggest that the ependymal region is more likely to be reminiscent of a low-grade ependymoma. Therefore, a direct translation to adult human patients of an eventual therapeutic potential of this region based on animal models should be approached with caution.

  13. Preemptive analgesia: the prevention of neurogenous orofacial pain.

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Chronic neurogenous pain is often an extremely difficult condition to manage. In the orofacial region, trauma from injury or dental procedures may lead to the development of severe neuralgic pains and major distress to the patient. Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that the use of adequate preemptive regional anesthesia, systemic analgesia, and the avoidance of repeated, painful stimuli may reduce the incidence of this problem. PMID:8934952

  14. Adult Community Education: A Model for Regional Policy Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The adult community education (ACE) sector in the state of Victoria provides an example of best practice in regional rural policy in Australia that may serve as a model for other areas of government effort. In 1997, 309,000 Victorians enrolled in adult and community education courses, such as business and technical skills development, literacy and…

  15. Adult Education, Social Inclusion and Cultural Diversity in Regional Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Rob

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the outcomes of recent research into adult education programs and experiences in the Shire of Campaspe, a region in northern Victoria. Research data of people from diverse cultural backgrounds reveal how individuals can utilize adult education as a space to explore their own social and cultural isolation in a regional…

  16. The 'ventral organs' of Pycnogonida (Arthropoda) are neurogenic niches of late embryonic and post-embryonic nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Brenneis, Georg; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Early neurogenesis in arthropods has been in the focus of numerous studies, its cellular basis, spatio-temporal dynamics and underlying genetic network being by now comparably well characterized for representatives of chelicerates, myriapods, hexapods and crustaceans. By contrast, neurogenesis during late embryonic and/or post-embryonic development has received less attention, especially in myriapods and chelicerates. Here, we apply (i) immunolabeling, (ii) histology and (iii) scanning electron microscopy to study post-embryonic ventral nerve cord development in Pseudopallene sp., a representative of the sea spiders (Pycnogonida), the presumable sister group of the remaining chelicerates. During early post-embryonic development, large neural stem cells give rise to additional ganglion cell material in segmentally paired invaginations in the ventral ectoderm. These ectodermal cell regions - traditionally designated as 'ventral organs' - detach from the surface into the interior and persist as apical cell clusters on the ventral ganglion side. Each cluster is a post-embryonic neurogenic niche that features a tiny central cavity and initially still houses larger neural stem cells. The cluster stays connected to the underlying ganglionic somata cortex via an anterior and a posterior cell stream. Cell proliferation remains restricted to the cluster and streams, and migration of newly produced cells along the streams seems to account for increasing ganglion cell numbers in the cortex. The pycnogonid cluster-stream-systems show striking similarities to the life-long neurogenic system of decapod crustaceans, and due to their close vicinity to glomerulus-like neuropils, we consider their possible involvement in post-embryonic (perhaps even adult) replenishment of olfactory neurons - as in decapods. An instance of a potentially similar post-embryonic/adult neurogenic system in the arthropod outgroup Onychophora is discussed. Additionally, we document two transient posterior

  17. The 'ventral organs' of Pycnogonida (Arthropoda) are neurogenic niches of late embryonic and post-embryonic nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Brenneis, Georg; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Early neurogenesis in arthropods has been in the focus of numerous studies, its cellular basis, spatio-temporal dynamics and underlying genetic network being by now comparably well characterized for representatives of chelicerates, myriapods, hexapods and crustaceans. By contrast, neurogenesis during late embryonic and/or post-embryonic development has received less attention, especially in myriapods and chelicerates. Here, we apply (i) immunolabeling, (ii) histology and (iii) scanning electron microscopy to study post-embryonic ventral nerve cord development in Pseudopallene sp., a representative of the sea spiders (Pycnogonida), the presumable sister group of the remaining chelicerates. During early post-embryonic development, large neural stem cells give rise to additional ganglion cell material in segmentally paired invaginations in the ventral ectoderm. These ectodermal cell regions - traditionally designated as 'ventral organs' - detach from the surface into the interior and persist as apical cell clusters on the ventral ganglion side. Each cluster is a post-embryonic neurogenic niche that features a tiny central cavity and initially still houses larger neural stem cells. The cluster stays connected to the underlying ganglionic somata cortex via an anterior and a posterior cell stream. Cell proliferation remains restricted to the cluster and streams, and migration of newly produced cells along the streams seems to account for increasing ganglion cell numbers in the cortex. The pycnogonid cluster-stream-systems show striking similarities to the life-long neurogenic system of decapod crustaceans, and due to their close vicinity to glomerulus-like neuropils, we consider their possible involvement in post-embryonic (perhaps even adult) replenishment of olfactory neurons - as in decapods. An instance of a potentially similar post-embryonic/adult neurogenic system in the arthropod outgroup Onychophora is discussed. Additionally, we document two transient posterior

  18. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment

  19. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment

  20. Droxidopa in neurogenic orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Horacio; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Palma, Jose-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH) is a fall in blood pressure (BP) on standing due to reduced norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve terminals. nOH is a feature of several neurological disorders that affect the autonomic nervous system, most notably Parkinson disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA), pure autonomic failure (PAF), and other autonomic neuropathies. Droxidopa, an orally active synthetic amino acid that is converted to norepinephrine by the enzyme aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (dopa-decarboxylase), was recently approved by the FDA for the short-term treatment of nOH. It is presumed to raise BP by acting at the neurovascular junction to increase vascular tone. This article summarizes the pharmacological properties of droxidopa, its mechanism of action, and the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials. PMID:26092297

  1. Droxidopa in neurogenic orthostatic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Horacio; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Palma, Jose-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH) is a fall in blood pressure on standing due to reduced norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve terminals. nOH is a feature of several neurological disorders that affect the autonomic nervous system, most notably Parkinson disease (PD), multiple system atrophy, pure autonomic failure and other autonomic neuropathies. Droxidopa, an orally active synthetic amino acid that is converted to norepinephrine by the enzyme aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (dopa-decarboxylase), was recently approved by the FDA for the short-term treatment of nOH. It is presumed to raise blood pressure by acting at the neurovascular junction to increase vascular tone. This review summarizes the pharmacological properties of droxidopa, its mechanism of action, and the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials. PMID:26092297

  2. Management of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Arbique, Debbie; Cheek, Dennis; Welliver, Mark; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2014-04-01

    The burden of orthostatic hypotension (OH) on public health is a universally recognized enigmatic clinical condition that is associated with significant increases on morbidity and mortality rates, and can take a major toll on one's quality of life. Orthostatic hypotension is predictive of vascular deaths from acute myocardial infarction, strokes in the middle aged population, and increases mortality rates when associated with diabetes, hypertension, Parkinson's disease, and patients receiving renal dialysis. The consensus definition for OH is a fall in systolic blood pressure of at least 20 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure of at least 10 mm Hg within 3 minutes of quiet standing. Because neurogenic OH is often accompanied by supine hypertension, the treatment program should aim toward minimizing OH and the potential fall injuries related to cerebral hypoperfusion without exacerbating nocturnal hypertension that may lead to excessive cardiovascular complications.

  3. Botulinum Toxin in Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rúiter Silva; Rassi, Mauricio Carneiro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin on urodynamic parameters and quality of life in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Methods Thirty four adult patients with spinal cord injury and detrusor overactivity were selected. The patients received 300 units of botulinum toxin type A. The endpoints evaluated with the episodes of urinary incontinence and measured the maximum cystometric capacity, maximum amplitude of detrusor pressure and bladder compliance at the beginning and end of the study (24 weeks) and evaluated the quality of life by applying the Qualiveen questionnaire. Results A significant decrease in the episodes of urinary incontinence was observed. All urodynamic parameters presented a significant improvement. The same was observed in the quality of life index and the specific impact of urinary problems scores from the Qualiveen questionnaire. Six patients did not complete the study, two due to incomplete follow-up, and four violated protocol and were excluded from the analyses. No systemic adverse events of botulinum toxin type A were reported. Conclusions A botulinum toxin type A showed a significantly improved response in urodynamics parameters and specific and general quality of life. PMID:23094220

  4. Neurogenic differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rosner, M; Mikula, M; Preitschopf, A; Feichtinger, M; Schipany, K; Hengstschläger, M

    2012-05-01

    In 2003, human amniotic fluid has been shown to contain stem cells expressing Oct-4, a marker for pluripotency. This finding initiated a rapidly growing and very promising new stem cell research field. Since then, amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells have been demonstrated to harbour the potential to differentiate into any of the three germ layers and to form three-dimensional aggregates, so-called embryoid bodies, known as the principal step in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Marker selection and minimal dilution approaches allow the establishment of monoclonal AFS cell lineages with high proliferation potential. AFS cells have a lower risk for tumour development and do not raise the ethical issues of embryonic stem cells. Compared to induced pluripotent stem cells, AFS cells do not need exogenic treatment to induce pluripotency, are chromosomal stable and do not harbour the epigenetic memory and accumulated somatic mutations of specific differentiated source cells. Compared to adult stem cells, AFS can be grown in larger quantities and show higher differentiation potential. Accordingly, in the recent past, AFS became increasingly accepted as an optimal tool for basic research and probably also for specific cell-based therapies. Here, we review the current knowledge on the neurogenic differentiation potential of AFS cells.

  5. Neurogenic inflammation and sensitivity to environmental chemicals.

    PubMed

    Meggs, W J

    1993-08-01

    Neurogenic inflammation as a pathway distinct from antigen-driven, immune-mediated inflammation may play a pivotal role in understanding a broad class of environmental health problems resulting from chemical exposures. Recent progress in understanding the mediators, triggers, and regulation of neurogenic inflammation is reviewed. Evidence for and speculations about a role for neurogenic inflammation in established disorders such as asthma, rhinitis, contact dermatitis, migraine headache, and rheumatoid arthritis are presented. The sick building syndrome and multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome have been defined as clinical entities in which exposure to chemical inhalants gives rise to disease. Current data on the existence of chemical irritant receptors in the airway and skin are discussed; neurogenic inflammation arising from stimulation of chemical irritant receptors is a possible model to explain many of the aspects of chemical sensitivities.

  6. The "bends" and neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Elliott, D S; Mutchnik, S; Boone, T B

    2001-02-01

    Decompression sickness (the "bends") is a well-known risk of scuba diving. The pathophysiology and treatment is well documented. In the urologic data, no reference to the development of a neurogenic bladder as a result of an episode of the bends was found. We present the evaluation and management of a previously asymptomatic man who developed detrusor hyperreflexia after an episode of decompression sickness. Urologists in coastal communities should be aware of the potential risk of the development of neurogenic bladder.

  7. Characterization of multiciliated ependymal cells that emerge in the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Takashi; Sawada, Masato; Takase, Hiroshi; Nakai, Chiemi; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Kaneko, Naoko; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2016-10-15

    In mammals, ventricular walls of the developing brain maintain a neurogenic niche, in which radial glial cells act as neural stem cells (NSCs) and generate new neurons in the embryo. In the adult brain, the neurogenic niche is maintained in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the lateral wall of lateral ventricles and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the neonatal V-SVZ, radial glial cells transform into astrocytic postnatal NSCs and multiciliated ependymal cells. On the other hand, in zebrafish, radial glial cells continue to cover the surface of the adult telencephalic ventricle and maintain a higher neurogenic potential in the adult brain. However, the cell composition of the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish brain has not been investigated. Here we show that multiciliated ependymal cells emerge in the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish telencephalon. These multiciliated cells appear predominantly in the dorsal part of the ventral telencephalic ventricular zone, which also contains clusters of migrating new neurons. Scanning electron microscopy and live imaging analyses indicated that these multiple cilia beat coordinately and generate constant fluid flow within the ventral telencephalic ventricle. Analysis of the cell composition by transmission electron microscopy revealed that the neurogenic niche in the aged zebrafish contains different types of cells, with ultrastructures similar to those of ependymal cells, transit-amplifying cells, and migrating new neurons in postnatal mice. These data suggest that the transformation capacity of radial glial cells is conserved but that its timing is different between fish and mice. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2982-2992, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991819

  8. Peripheral tumor and tumor-like neurogenic lesions.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Evandro; Aubert, Sébastien; Wavreille, Guillaume; Gheno, Ramon; Canella, Clarissa; Cotten, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Neoplasms of neurogenic origin account for about 12% of all benign and 8% of all malignant soft tissue neoplasms. Traumatic neuroma, Morton neuroma, lipomatosis of a nerve, nerve sheath ganglion, perineurioma, benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) are included in this group of pathologies. Clinical and radiologic evaluation of patients with neurogenic tumors and pseudotumors often reveals distinctive features. In this context, advanced imaging techniques, especially ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) play an important role in the characterization of these lesions. Imaging findings such as location of a soft tissue mass in the region of a major nerve, nerve entering or exiting the mass, fusiform shape, abnormalities of the muscle supplied by the nerve, split-fat sign, target sign and fascicular appearance should always evoke a peripheric nerve sheath neoplasm. Although no single imaging finding or combination of findings allows definitive differentiation between benign from malign peripheric neurogenic tumors, both US and MR imaging may show useful features that can lead us to a correct diagnosis and improve patient treatment. Traumatic neuromas and Morton neuromas are commonly associated to an amputation stump or are located in the intermetatarsal space. Lipomatosis of a nerve usually appears as a nerve enlargement, with thickened nerve fascicles, embedded in evenly distributed fat. Nerve sheath ganglion has a cystic appearance and commonly occurs at the level of the knee. Intraneural perineuroma usually affects young people and manifests as a focal and fusiform nerve enlargement. In this article, we review clinical characteristics and radiologic appearances of these neurogenic lesions, observing pathologic correlation, when possible.

  9. Neurogenic Fever after Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Qualitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Katherine E.; Oleson, Christina V.; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Sidhu, Gursukhman S.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To determine the incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcomes related to neurogenic fevers following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods  A systematic review of the literature was performed on thermodysregulation secondary to acute traumatic SCI in adult patients. A literature search was performed using PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus. Using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven relevant articles were obtained. Results  The incidence of fever of all origins (both known and unknown) after SCI ranged from 22.5 to 71.7% with a mean incidence of 50.6% and a median incidence of 50.0%. The incidence of fever of unknown origin (neurogenic fever) ranged from 2.6 to 27.8% with a mean incidence of 8.0% and a median incidence of 4.7%. Cervical and thoracic spinal injuries were more commonly associated with fever than lumbar injuries. In addition, complete injuries had a higher incidence of fever than incomplete injuries. The pathogenesis of neurogenic fever after acute SCI is not thoroughly understood. Conclusion  Neurogenic fevers are relatively common following an acute SCI; however, there is little in the scientific literature to help physicians prevent or treat this condition. The paucity of research underscored by this review demonstrates the need for further studies with larger sample sizes, focusing on incidence rate, clinical outcomes, and pathogenesis of neurogenic fever following acute traumatic SCI. PMID:27556002

  10. Neurogenic inflammation in lung disease: burnt out?

    PubMed

    Rogers, D F

    1997-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation results from activation of sensory nerves which, acting in an 'efferent' manner, release sensory neuropeptides to induce a wide variety of physiological and immunological responses. This process is easy to demonstrate experimentally in the airways of small laboratory animal species but in human airways is equivocal and, at best, minor compared with cholinergic neural control. Nevertheless, sensory neuropeptides (calcitonin gene-related peptide and the tachykinins, substance P and neurokinin A) induce airway responses in both laboratory animals and humans which suggest a potential for sensory-efferent control of human airways. In addition, there is indirect evidence for an increased 'expression' of sensory nerves and tachykinin receptors in asthma and bronchitis, which indicates that neurogenic inflammation contributes to pathophysiology of these airway conditions. In contrast, clinical trials using different classes of drugs to inhibit sensory nerve responses have failed to resolve whether neurogenic inflammation is involved in asthma, although there are concerns about the relevance of some of these studies. In contrast to their involvement in airway neurogenic inflammation, sensory nerves may be important in initiating protective reflexes, including coughing and sneezing, acting via their afferent pathways. Thus, although flickering, the concept of neurogenic inflammation in lung disease is not yet burnt out. However, it needs the rekindling of interest which re-evaluation as a protective process may bring, together with data from more appropriate clinical studies in asthma and chronic bronchitis. PMID:17657611

  11. Neurogenic Niche Microglia Undergo Positional Remodeling and Progressive Activation Contributing to Age-Associated Reductions in Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Solano Fonseca, Rene; Mahesula, Swetha; Apple, Deana M; Raghunathan, Rekha; Dugan, Allison; Cardona, Astrid; O'Connor, Jason; Kokovay, Erzsebet

    2016-04-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) exist throughout life in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the mammalian forebrain. During aging NSC function is diminished through an unclear mechanism. In this study, we establish microglia, the immune cells of the brain, as integral niche cells within the V-SVZ that undergo age-associated repositioning in the V-SVZ. Microglia become activated early before NSC deficits during aging resulting in an antineurogenic microenvironment due to increased inflammatory cytokine secretion. These age-associated changes were not observed in non-neurogenic brain regions, suggesting V-SVZ microglia are specialized. Using a sustained inflammatory model in young adult mice, we induced microglia activation and inflammation that was accompanied by reduced NSC proliferation in the V-SVZ. Furthermore, in vitro studies revealed secreted factors from activated microglia reduced proliferation and neuron production compared to secreted factors from resting microglia. Our results suggest that age-associated chronic inflammation contributes to declines in NSC function within the aging neurogenic niche. PMID:26857912

  12. Neurogenic muscle hypertrophy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun Ho; Jeon, Young Hoon; Jang, Seung Won

    2016-01-01

    Muscular hypertrophy is caused mainly due to myopathic disorder. But, it is also rarely produced by neurogenic disorder. A 74-year-old woman complained of right calf pain with hypertrophy for several years. Recent lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed central and lateral canal narrowing at the L4-L5 intervertebral space. Lower extremity MRI revealed fatty change of right medial head of the gastrocnemius and soleus, causing right calf hypertrophy. Electrodiagnostic examinations including electromyography and nerve conduction velocity testing demonstrated 5th lumbar and 1st sacral polyradiculopathy. Integrating all the results, the diagnosis was neurogenic muscle hypertrophy. Neurogenic muscle hypertrophy is very rare, but we recommend that clinicians consider this problem when a patient complains of lower limb hypertrophy and pain. PMID:27738507

  13. Neurogenic vascular headaches, food and chemical triggers.

    PubMed

    Trotsky, M B

    1994-04-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that neurogenic vascular headaches are a combination of neurological primary events and secondary vasomotor changes. The neurological events involve the hypothalamus and sensory cortex with sympathetic hypofunction and noradrenergic abnormalities. A platelet theory has been proposed but has not really been confirmed as a legitimate cause of the neurogenic vascular headaches. Food and chemicals in foods can act as a precipitating factor in the food-sensitive neurogenic vascular headache patient. In these patients evidence is now being demonstrated to confirm this, but larger patient studies are needed. The food-sensitive migraine patient and cluster headache patient must give a good history and food diary to go along with active challenges and provocative testing in order to determine the causative foods. Any concomitant allergies of inhalants or environmentals must also be treated. The treatment modalities of elimination and rotation diets or provocation neutralization may successfully control the headaches without the need for continuous medications.

  14. Prolonged Cardiac Dysfunction After Intraparenchymal Hemorrhage and Neurogenic Stunned Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Wilson, Thomas; Sharma, Deepak; Vavilala, Monica S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction occurring secondary to neurologic disease, termed neurogenic stunned myocardium, is an incompletely understood phenomenon that has been described after several distinct neurologic processes. We present a case of neurogenic stunned myocardium, discovered intraoperatively after anesthetic induction, in a patient who presented to our operating room with a recent intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We discuss the longitudinal cardiac functional course after neurogenic stunned myocardium. Finally, we discuss the pathophysiology of neurogenic stunned myocardium, as well as its implications for anesthesiologists caring for neurosurgical patients.

  15. Infantile amnesia: a neurogenic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Josselyn, Sheena A; Frankland, Paul W

    2012-08-16

    In the late 19th Century, Sigmund Freud described the phenomenon in which people are unable to recall events from early childhood as infantile amnesia. Although universally observed, infantile amnesia is a paradox; adults have surprisingly few memories of early childhood despite the seemingly exuberant learning capacity of young children. How can these findings be reconciled? The mechanisms underlying this form of amnesia are the subject of much debate. Psychological/cognitive theories assert that the ability to maintain detailed, declarative-like memories in the long term correlates with the development of language, theory of mind, and/or sense of "self." However, the finding that experimental animals also show infantile amnesia suggests that this phenomenon cannot be explained fully in purely human terms. Biological explanations of infantile amnesia suggest that protracted postnatal development of key brain regions important for memory interferes with stable long-term memory storage, yet they do not clearly specify which particular aspects of brain maturation are causally related to infantile amnesia. Here, we propose a hypothesis of infantile amnesia that focuses on one specific aspect of postnatal brain development--the continued addition of new neurons to the hippocampus. Infants (humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents) exhibit high levels of hippocampal neurogenesis and an inability to form lasting memories. Interestingly, the decline of postnatal neurogenesis levels corresponds to the emergence of the ability to form stable long-term memory. We propose that high neurogenesis levels negatively regulate the ability to form enduring memories, most likely by replacing synaptic connections in preexisting hippocampal memory circuits.

  16. Analysis of carbonated thin liquids in pediatric neurogenic dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Lundine, Jennifer P.; Bates, David G.; Yin, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspiration of liquids is a serious complication of neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury or stroke. Carbonated liquids have been examined as a possible alternative to thickened liquids to help reduce aspiration in cases of dysphagia in adults, but no published literature to the best of our knowledge has evaluated this technique in children. If carbonated liquids result in safer swallowing in children, they could provide a preferred alternative to thickened liquids. Objective This pilot study examined whether carbonated thin liquids (CARB) improved swallowing compared to noncarbonated thin liquids (NOCARB) for children with neurogenic dysphagia. Materials and methods Twenty-four children admitted to a level I trauma center for acute neurological injury/disease were evaluated via videofluoroscopic swallow studies. Four descriptive outcome measures were contrasted. Results CARB significantly decreased pooling (P=0.0006), laryngeal penetration/aspiration (P=0.0044) and Penetration-Aspiration Scale scores (P=0.0127) when compared to NOCARB. On average, CARB improved scores on the Penetration-Aspiration Scale by 3.7 points for participants who aspirated NOCARB. There was no significant difference in pharyngeal residue noted between CARB and NOCARB (P=0.0625). Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that carbonated thin liquids may provide an alternative to thickened liquids for children with neurogenic dysphagia. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed. PMID:25758792

  17. Epigenetic regulation of stemness maintenance in the neurogenic niches

    PubMed Central

    Montalbán-Loro, Raquel; Domingo-Muelas, Ana; Bizy, Alexandra; Ferrón, Sacri R

    2015-01-01

    In the adult mouse brain, the subventricular zone lining the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are two zones that contain neural stem cells (NSCs) with the capacity to give rise to neurons and glia during the entire life of the animal. Spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression in the NSCs population is established and maintained by the coordinated interaction between transcription factors and epigenetic regulators which control stem cell fate. Epigenetic mechanisms are heritable alterations in genome function that do not involve changes in DNA sequence itself but that modulate gene expression, acting as mediators between the environment and the genome. At the molecular level, those epigenetic mechanisms comprise chemical modifications of DNA such as methylation, hydroxymethylation and histone modifications needed for the maintenance of NSC identity. Genomic imprinting is another normal epigenetic process leading to parental-specific expression of a gene, known to be implicated in the control of gene dosage in the neurogenic niches. The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from NSCs by expression of defined transcription factors, provide key insights into fundamental principles of stem cell biology. Epigenetic modifications can also occur during reprogramming of NSCs to pluripotency and a better understanding of this process will help to elucidate the mechanisms required for stem cell maintenance. This review takes advantage of recent studies from the epigenetic field to report knowledge regarding the mechanisms of stemness maintenance of neural stem cells in the neurogenic niches. PMID:26029342

  18. The ‘Ventral Organs’ of Pycnogonida (Arthropoda) Are Neurogenic Niches of Late Embryonic and Post-Embryonic Nervous System Development

    PubMed Central

    Brenneis, Georg; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Early neurogenesis in arthropods has been in the focus of numerous studies, its cellular basis, spatio-temporal dynamics and underlying genetic network being by now comparably well characterized for representatives of chelicerates, myriapods, hexapods and crustaceans. By contrast, neurogenesis during late embryonic and/or post-embryonic development has received less attention, especially in myriapods and chelicerates. Here, we apply (i) immunolabeling, (ii) histology and (iii) scanning electron microscopy to study post-embryonic ventral nerve cord development in Pseudopallene sp., a representative of the sea spiders (Pycnogonida), the presumable sister group of the remaining chelicerates. During early post-embryonic development, large neural stem cells give rise to additional ganglion cell material in segmentally paired invaginations in the ventral ectoderm. These ectodermal cell regions – traditionally designated as ‘ventral organs’ – detach from the surface into the interior and persist as apical cell clusters on the ventral ganglion side. Each cluster is a post-embryonic neurogenic niche that features a tiny central cavity and initially still houses larger neural stem cells. The cluster stays connected to the underlying ganglionic somata cortex via an anterior and a posterior cell stream. Cell proliferation remains restricted to the cluster and streams, and migration of newly produced cells along the streams seems to account for increasing ganglion cell numbers in the cortex. The pycnogonid cluster-stream-systems show striking similarities to the life-long neurogenic system of decapod crustaceans, and due to their close vicinity to glomerulus-like neuropils, we consider their possible involvement in post-embryonic (perhaps even adult) replenishment of olfactory neurons – as in decapods. An instance of a potentially similar post-embryonic/adult neurogenic system in the arthropod outgroup Onychophora is discussed. Additionally, we document two transient

  19. The neurogenic bladder: introducing four contributions.

    PubMed

    Proesmans, Willem

    2008-04-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction in children is frequently seen in patients with meningomyelocele (MMC). The disorder carries a high risk for all kinds of complications, with renal damage being the most important. More than 95% of MMC patients have a neurogenic bladder, the paramount manifestation of which is a disturbed coordination between detrusor and sphincter muscles. This vesicourethral dysfunction leads to defective filling and emptying of the urinary bladder. Voiding at will is almost never possible. According to the location and extent of the neural tube lesion, patients have either an atonic or a hypertonic pelvic floor and either an atonic or a hypertonic detrusor, leading to four classic combinations. Hypertonic sphincter and detrusor hyperactivity lead to the most dangerous form of neurogenic bladder, referred to as the "unsafe" bladder. The presence of residual urine in a high-pressure container causes either decompensation of the detrusor with vesicoureteral reflux or deterioration of the bladder wall with hypertrophy and stiffness resulting in uterovesical obstruction. The subsequent insufficient drainage of the upper urinary tract leads to decompensation of the ureters and finally to chronic renal disease, the process being accelerated by urinary tract infections. The aim of treatment is to restore as much as possible both essential functions: urine storage and timely emptying of the reservoir. What should and can be achieved is a more or less adequate, low-pressure, functional capacity of the bladder that is emptied as completely as possible by clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). MMC leads to the prototype of neurogenic bladder in childhood. What we know and what we do for MMC patients can roughly be applied to all other forms of neurogenic bladder, either congenital or acquired.

  20. Neurogenic muscle involvement in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Oosterhuis, Hans; Bethlem, Jaap

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was made into the occurrence of muscular atrophy and muscular pathology in a series of 170 patients with myasthenia gravis. The results can be summarized as follows: (1) Of the 148 patients with generalized myasthenia gravis, 14 showed local muscular atrophies. Of 10 biopsies from atrophic muscles, eight showed neurogenic changes, with or without lymphocytic infiltrations. One biopsy showed lymphocytic infiltrations only, and one showed type II-fibre atrophy (Table 1). No relationship was demonstrable between the presence of clilnical muscular atrophy and age, sex, duration of the disease, severity of the disease, presence of a thymoma, or drug resistant ophthalmoplegia. (2) In this group of patients 61 biopsies were examined from 46 individuals; 40 of these biopsies were taken from the quadriceps muscle. A thymoma was present in 17 patients. Examination disclosed neurogenic changes in 17 biopsies, lymphocytic infiltrates in 21, and myositis in one biopsy (Table 2). A distinct correlation was established between the presence of a thymoma and lymphocytic infiltrates, but none was demonstrable between thymoma and neurogenic changes (Table 3). (3) An enzyme-histochemical study was carried out in 35 cases, including 12 with neurogenic changes. A normal differentiation of type I- and type II-fibres was observed in eight instances, type grouping of type II-fibres in three, and type II-fibre atrophy in two cases. (4) In 21 patients and 19 controls, the smallest mean diameter was determined in the quadriceps muscle. Both type I- and type II-fibres proved to have a smaller mean diameter in the female patients than in the controls. In the male patients this could not be proven. (5) Of the eight patients who had died without disorders of ventilation, 90 muscle specimens were examined postmortem. Four of these patients had a thymoma. Lymphocytic infiltrations, found in 32 biopsy specimens, were mostly observed in the presence of a thymoma. Neurogenic changes

  1. Botulinum Toxin to Treat Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher P; Chancellor, Michael B

    2016-02-01

    Alteration in neural control from suprapontine areas to the nerves innervating the bladder can lead to bladder dysfunction and the development of a neurogenic bladder (NGB). Patients with NGB often suffer from urinary incontinence, which can lead to adverse events such as urinary tract infections and decubiti, in addition to creating a large care burden for family members or healthcare providers and significantly impairing patient quality of life. The common failure of anticholinergic medications has spurned the development of second-line treatments, including the use of botulinum toxin. OnabotulinumtoxinA (onaBoNT-A; BOTOX, Allergan, Inc.) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2011 to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with urinary incontinence resulting from a NGB. In this review the authors summarize pertinent results from key trials leading to FDA approval of onaBoNT-A as well as more recent long-term data.

  2. UTIs in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Mona S; Mure, Amanda; Gomez, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) remain one of the most prevalent and frustrating morbidities for neurogenic bladder patients, and death attributed to urosepsis in the spinal cord injury (SCI) patient is higher when compared to the general population. Risk factors include urinary stasis, high bladder pressures, bladder stones, and catheter use. While classic symptoms of UTI include dysuria, increased frequency and urgency, neurogenic bladder patients present differently with increased spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary incontinence, and vague pains. Multiple modalities have been assessed for prevention including catheter type, oral supplements, bladder irrigation, detrusor injections and prophylactic antimicrobials. Of these, bladder inoculation with E. coli HU2117, irrigation with iAluRil(®), detrusor injections, and weekly prophylaxis with alternating antibiotics appear to have a positive reduction in UTI but require further study. Ultimately, treatment for symptomatic UTI should account for the varied flora and possible antibiotic resistances including relying on urine cultures to guide antibiotic therapy. PMID:25113150

  3. Project ACT (Adult Competency Training): Region VIII Adult Education Staff Development: Second-Year Report: FY '74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins. Dept. of Education.

    The second-year report describes Project ACT (Adult Competency Training) efforts from July 1, 1973 to June 30, 1974 to develop a regional staff development system. Three elements were perceived to be essential: a regional consortium organization to effectively implement ACT programs, State-by-State and region-wide; a multi-dimensional trainer…

  4. Effects of neuregulin-1 administration on neurogenesis in the adult mouse hippocampus, and characterization of immature neurons along the septotemporal axis

    PubMed Central

    Mahar, Ian; MacIsaac, Angus; Kim, John Junghan; Qiang, Calvin; Davoli, Maria Antonietta; Turecki, Gustavo; Mechawar, Naguib

    2016-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is associated with learning and affective behavioural regulation. Its diverse functionality is segregated along the septotemporal axis from the dorsal to ventral hippocampus. However, features distinguishing immature neurons in these regions have yet to be characterized. Additionally, although we have shown that administration of the neurotrophic factor neuregulin-1 (NRG1) selectively increases proliferation and overall neurogenesis in the mouse ventral dentate gyrus (DG), likely through ErbB3, NRG1’s effects on intermediate neurogenic stages in immature neurons are unknown. We examined whether NRG1 administration increases DG ErbB3 phosphorylation. We labeled adultborn cells using BrdU, then administered NRG1 to examine in vivo neurogenic effects on immature neurons with respect to cell survival, morphology, and synaptogenesis. We also characterized features of immature neurons along the septotemporal axis. We found that neurogenic effects of NRG1 are temporally and subregionally specific to proliferation in the ventral DG. Particular morphological features differentiate immature neurons in the dorsal and ventral DG, and cytogenesis differed between these regions. Finally, we identified synaptic heterogeneity surrounding the granule cell layer. These results indicate neurogenic involvement of NRG1-induced antidepressant-like behaviour is particularly associated with increased ventral DG cell proliferation, and identify novel distinctions between dorsal and ventral hippocampal neurogenic development. PMID:27469430

  5. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. PMID:26475949

  6. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  7. Project ACT (Adult Competency Training): Region VIII Adult Education Staff Development: Mid-Year Report: FY '75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins. Dept. of Education.

    The third-year report of the regional staff development system of the Adult Competency Training Project (Project ACT) examines and evaluates the events, activities, and accomplishments of Individualized Training Programs (ITP), regional policy board meetings, staff and participant travel, and planning during FY 1974. Present and anticipated…

  8. Effect of sertraline on proliferation and neurogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Jahromi, Maliheh; Amirpour, Nushin; Khosravizadeh, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antidepressant drugs are commonly employed for anxiety and mood disorders. Sertraline is extensively used as antidepressant in clinic. In addition, adipose tissue represents an abundant and accessible source of adult stem cells with the ability to differentiate in to multiple lineages. Therefore, human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) may be useful for autologous transplantation. Materials and Methods: In the present study, we assessed the effect of antidepressant drug Sertraline on the proliferation and neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs using MTT assay and immunofluorescence technique respectively. Results: MTT assay analysis showed that 0.5 μM Sertraline significantly increased the proliferation rate of hADSCs induced cells (P < 0.05), while immunofluorescent staining indicated that Sertraline treatment during neurogenic differentiation could be decreased the percentage of glial fibrillary acidic protein and Nestin-positive cells, but did not significantly effect on the percentage of MAP2 positive cells. Conclusion: Overall, our data show that Sertraline can be promoting proliferation rate during neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs after 6 days post-induction, while Sertraline inhibits gliogenesis of induced hADSCs. PMID:24800186

  9. Dynamic changes of the neurogenic potential in the rat cochlear nucleus during post-natal development.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Völker, Johannes; Frenz, Silke; Scherzed, Agmal; Radeloff, Andreas; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2013-05-01

    Neuronal stem cells have been described in the post-natal cochlear nucleus recently. The aim of the study was to analyse the neurogenic potential in the cochlear nucleus from the early post-natal days until adulthood. Cochlear nuclei from Sprague-Dawley rats from post-natal day P3 up to P40 were examined. Neurosphere assays showed persistent neurosphere formation from the early post-natal days until adulthood. The numbers of generated neurospheres were fewer in older ages. Neurospheres were smaller, but displayed the same pattern of neuronal stem cell markers. The markers GFAP, MBP and ß-III Tubulin showed differentiation of dissociated cells from the neurospheres in all cells of the neuronal lineage. BrdU incorporation could be detected, in an age-dependent decrease, in whole-mount experiments of the cochlear nucleus on all examined days. BrdU co-labelled with Atoh1 and ß-III Tubulin. In addition, gene expression and cellular distribution studies of the neuronal stem cell markers displayed an age-dependent reduction in both quantity and numbers. The presented results display a possible neurogenic potential until adulthood in the cochlear nucleus by in vitro and in vivo experiments. The fact that this potential is highest at a critical period of development reveals possible functional importance for the development of the cochlear nucleus and the auditory function. The persistent neurogenic potential displayed until adulthood could be a neurogenic niche in the adult cochlear nucleus, which might be used for potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:23455726

  10. Droxidopa and Reduced Falls in a Trial of Parkinson Disease Patients With Neurogenic Orthostatic Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Robert A.; Heritier, Stephane; Rowse, Gerald J.; Hewitt, L. Arthur; Isaacson, Stuart H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Droxidopa is a prodrug of norepinephrine indicated for the treatment of orthostatic dizziness, lightheadedness, or the “feeling that you are about to black out” in adult patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension caused by primary autonomic failure including Parkinson disease (PD). The objective of this study was to compare fall rates in PD patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension randomized to droxidopa or placebo. Methods Study NOH306 was a 10-week, phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of droxidopa in PD patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension that included assessments of falls as a key secondary end point. In this report, the principal analysis consisted of a comparison of the rate of patient-reported falls from randomization to end of study in droxidopa versus placebo groups. Results A total of 225 patients were randomized; 222 patients were included in the safety analyses, and 197 patients provided efficacy data and were included in the falls analyses. The 92 droxidopa patients reported 308 falls, and the 105 placebo patients reported 908 falls. In the droxidopa group, the fall rate was 0.4 falls per patient-week; in the placebo group, the rate was 1.05 falls per patient-week (prespecified Wilcoxon rank sum P = 0.704; post hoc Poisson-inverse Gaussian test P = 0.014), yielding a relative risk reduction of 77% using the Poisson-inverse Gaussian model. Fall-related injuries occurred in 16.7% of droxidopa-treated patients and 26.9% of placebo-treated patients. Conclusions Treatment with droxidopa appears to reduce falls in PD patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, but this finding must be confirmed. PMID:27332626

  11. A neurogenic basis for acute altitude illness.

    PubMed

    Krasney, J A

    1994-02-01

    Acute altitude illnesses include acute mountain sickness (AMS), a benign condition involving headache, nausea, vomiting, irritability, insomnia, dizziness, lethargy, and peripheral edema, and potentially lethal high-altitude cerebral edema and pulmonary edema (HAPE). Recent evidence is summarized that AMS is related to cerebral edema secondary at least in part to hypoxic cerebral vasodilation and elevated cerebral capillary hydrostatic pressure. This results in reduced brain compliance with compression of intracranial structures in the absence of altered global brain metabolism. It is postulated that these primary intracranial events elevate peripheral sympathetic activity that acts neurogenically in the lung possibly in concert with pulmonary capillary stress failure to cause HAPE and in the kidney to promote salt and water retention. The adrenergic responses are likely modulated by striking increases of aldosterone, vasopressin and atrial natriuretic peptide. The effects of exercise on altitude-induced illness and various therapeutic regimens (acetazolamide, CO2 breathing, dexamethasone, and alpha adrenergic inhibitors) are discussed in light of this hypothesis.

  12. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  13. Photosensitive neurogenic heart of the isopod crustacean Ligia exotica

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hariyama, Takahiko; Takano, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    The heart of animals is regulated through the central nervous system in response to external sensory stimuli. We found, however, that the adult neurogenic heart of the isopod crustacean Ligia exotica has photosensitivity. The beat frequency of the isolated heart decreased in response to a light stimulus. Magnitude of the response was stimulus intensity dependent and the heartbeat frequency decreased to less than 80% of the dark value during illumination of the white light with an intensity of 6.0 mW cm−2. The spectral sensitivity curve of the heart photoresponse peaked at a wavelength around 520 nm. In response to 530 nm monochromatic light, the relationship between light intensity and response magnitude was linear and the threshold intensity was 7.26×1012 quanta cm−2 s−1. Bursting activity of the cardiac ganglion, which is located in the heart and acts as the cardiac pacemaker deceased in frequency in response to illumination by white light. This fact suggests that the heart photoresponse of L. exotica results from the photosensitivity of the cardiac ganglion neurons. The photoresponse of the heart therefore contributes to regulation of cardiac output in addition to other regulatory systems. PMID:16959646

  14. Environmental Enrichment, Age, and PPARα Interact to Regulate Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Lorefice, Clara; Decara, Juan; Pavón, Francisco J; Serrano, Antonia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligands have been shown to modulate recovery after brain insults such as ischemia and irradiation by enhancing neurogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of PPARα receptors on the proliferative rate of neural precursor cells (NPC) in the adult brain. The study was performed in aged Pparα(-/-) mice exposed to nutritional (treats) and environmental (games) enrichments for 20 days. We performed immunohistochemical analyses of cells containing the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) and the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (Dcx+) in the main neurogenic zones of the adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ), and/or hypothalamus. Results indicated a reduction in the number of BrdU+ cells in the neurogenic zones analyzed as well as Dcx+ cells in the SGZ during aging (2, 6, and 18 months). Pparα deficiency alleviated the age-related reduction of NPC proliferation (BrdU+ cells) in the SVZ of the 18-months-old mice. While no genotype effect on NPC proliferation was detected in the SGZ during aging, an accentuated reduction in the number of Dcx+ cells was observed in the SGZ of the 6-months-old Pparα(-/-) mice. Exposing the 18-months-old mice to nutritional and environmental enrichments reversed the Pparα(-/-)-induced impairment of NPC proliferation in the neurogenic zones analyzed. The enriched environment did not modify the number of SGZ Dcx+ cells in the 18 months old Pparα(-/-) mice. These results identify PPARα receptors as a potential target to counteract the naturally observed decline in adult NPC proliferation associated with aging and impoverished environments.

  15. Environmental Enrichment, Age, and PPARα Interact to Regulate Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Lorefice, Clara; Decara, Juan; Pavón, Francisco J; Serrano, Antonia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligands have been shown to modulate recovery after brain insults such as ischemia and irradiation by enhancing neurogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of PPARα receptors on the proliferative rate of neural precursor cells (NPC) in the adult brain. The study was performed in aged Pparα(-/-) mice exposed to nutritional (treats) and environmental (games) enrichments for 20 days. We performed immunohistochemical analyses of cells containing the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) and the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (Dcx+) in the main neurogenic zones of the adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ), and/or hypothalamus. Results indicated a reduction in the number of BrdU+ cells in the neurogenic zones analyzed as well as Dcx+ cells in the SGZ during aging (2, 6, and 18 months). Pparα deficiency alleviated the age-related reduction of NPC proliferation (BrdU+ cells) in the SVZ of the 18-months-old mice. While no genotype effect on NPC proliferation was detected in the SGZ during aging, an accentuated reduction in the number of Dcx+ cells was observed in the SGZ of the 6-months-old Pparα(-/-) mice. Exposing the 18-months-old mice to nutritional and environmental enrichments reversed the Pparα(-/-)-induced impairment of NPC proliferation in the neurogenic zones analyzed. The enriched environment did not modify the number of SGZ Dcx+ cells in the 18 months old Pparα(-/-) mice. These results identify PPARα receptors as a potential target to counteract the naturally observed decline in adult NPC proliferation associated with aging and impoverished environments. PMID:27013951

  16. Environmental Enrichment, Age, and PPARα Interact to Regulate Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Lorefice, Clara; Decara, Juan; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligands have been shown to modulate recovery after brain insults such as ischemia and irradiation by enhancing neurogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of PPARα receptors on the proliferative rate of neural precursor cells (NPC) in the adult brain. The study was performed in aged Pparα−/− mice exposed to nutritional (treats) and environmental (games) enrichments for 20 days. We performed immunohistochemical analyses of cells containing the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) and the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (Dcx+) in the main neurogenic zones of the adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ), and/or hypothalamus. Results indicated a reduction in the number of BrdU+ cells in the neurogenic zones analyzed as well as Dcx+ cells in the SGZ during aging (2, 6, and 18 months). Pparα deficiency alleviated the age-related reduction of NPC proliferation (BrdU+ cells) in the SVZ of the 18-months-old mice. While no genotype effect on NPC proliferation was detected in the SGZ during aging, an accentuated reduction in the number of Dcx+ cells was observed in the SGZ of the 6-months-old Pparα−/− mice. Exposing the 18-months-old mice to nutritional and environmental enrichments reversed the Pparα−/−-induced impairment of NPC proliferation in the neurogenic zones analyzed. The enriched environment did not modify the number of SGZ Dcx+ cells in the 18 months old Pparα−/− mice. These results identify PPARα receptors as a potential target to counteract the naturally observed decline in adult NPC proliferation associated with aging and impoverished environments. PMID:27013951

  17. Large-scale live imaging of adult neural stem cells in their endogenous niche

    PubMed Central

    Dray, Nicolas; Bedu, Sébastien; Vuillemin, Nelly; Alunni, Alessandro; Coolen, Marion; Krecsmarik, Monika; Supatto, Willy; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Bally-Cuif, Laure

    2015-01-01

    Live imaging of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in vivo is a technical challenge in the vertebrate brain. Here, we achieve long-term imaging of the adult zebrafish telencephalic neurogenic niche and track a population of >1000 aNSCs over weeks, by taking advantage of fish transparency at near-infrared wavelengths and of intrinsic multiphoton landmarks. This methodology enables us to describe the frequency, distribution and modes of aNSCs divisions across the entire germinal zone of the adult pallium, and to highlight regional differences in these parameters. PMID:26395477

  18. Maintaining appearances-The role of p53 in adult neurogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Medrano, Silvia; Scrable, Heidi . E-mail: hs2n@virginia.edu

    2005-06-10

    In the adult mammalian brain, neuronal turnover continues to replenish cells in existing neuronal circuits, such as those involved either in odor discrimination or in learning and memory, throughout life. With age, however, the capacity for neurogenesis diminishes and these functions become impaired. Neuronal turnover is a two-step process, which first generates excess neuronal progenitors and then eliminates all but the few that differentiate into fully functional neurons. This process requires a fine balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Altered activity of the tumor suppressor p53 can upset this balance by affecting the rate of cell proliferation, but not the rate of cell death, in neurogenic regions of the adult brain. Genetically engineered mice in which p53 activity is increased demonstrate that premature loss of neurogenic capacity is linked to accelerated organismal aging.

  19. Immunological control of adult neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis occurs only in discrete regions of adult central nervous system: the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone. These areas are populated by adult neural stem cells (aNSC) that are regulated by a number of molecules and signaling pathways, which control their cell fate choices, survival and proliferation rates. For a long time, it was believed that the immune system did not exert any control on neural proliferative niches. However, it has been observed that many pathological and inflammatory conditions significantly affect NSC niches. Even more, increasing evidence indicates that chemokines and cytokines play an important role in regulating proliferation, cell fate choices, migration and survival of NSCs under physiological conditions. Hence, the immune system is emerging is an important regulator of neurogenic niches in the adult brain, which may have clinical relevance in several brain diseases. PMID:20861925

  20. Bilateral Brain Regions Associated with Naming in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obler, Loraine K.; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Schnyer, David; Clark-Cotton, Manuella R.; Spiro, Avron, III; Hyun, JungMoon; Kim, Dae-Shik; Goral, Mira; Albert, Martin L.

    2010-01-01

    To determine structural brain correlates of naming abilities in older adults, we tested 24 individuals aged 56-79 on two confrontation-naming tests (the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and the Action Naming Test (ANT)), then collected from these individuals structural Magnetic-Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data. Overall,…

  1. Neurogenic pruritus: an unrecognised problem? A retrospective case series of treatment by acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Stellon, Anthony

    2002-12-01

    Intractable localised segmental pruritus without a rash has been reported over the years under various titles depending on the area of the body affected. Notalgia paresthetica and brachioradial pruritus are the two terms used for what is believed to be a form of neuropathy. The clinical observations reported here suggest that other localised cases of pruritus exist that share common clinical features, and the term neurogenic pruritus is suggested to encompass these under one clinical condition. Acupuncture has been used to treat skin conditions, of which pruritus is one symptom. This retrospective study looked at the symptomatic relief of neurogenic pruritus in 16 patients using acupuncture. In 12 cases the affected dermatomes of the body were innervated by cervical spinal nerves, seven innervated by dorsal spinal nerves and four innervated by the lumbar spinal nerves. Seven patients had areas affected by two different regions of the spine. Restricted neck or back movements were noted in patients as were areas of paravertebral spasm or tenderness of the muscles. Total resolution of symptoms as judged by VAS occurred in 75% of patients. Relapse occurred in 37% of patients within 1-12 months following treatment. Acupuncture appeared to be effective in alleviating the distressing symptom of itching in patients presenting with neurogenic pruritus. PMID:12512793

  2. Inhibition by ketamine and amphetamine analogs of the neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations in porcine basilar arteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Lai, Su-Yu; Kung, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yo-Cheng; Yang, Hui-I; Chen, Po-Yi; Liu, Ingrid Y; Lua, Ahai Chang; Lee, Tony Jer-Fu

    2016-08-15

    The abuse of ketamine and amphetamine analogs is associated with incidence of hypertension and strokes involving activation of sympathetic activities. Large cerebral arteries at the base of the brain from several species receive dense sympathetic innervation which upon activation causes parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation with increased regional blood flow via axo-axonal interaction mechanism, serving as a protective mechanism to meet O2 demand in an acutely stressful situation. The present study was designed to examine effects of ketamine and amphetamine analogs on axo-axonal interaction-mediated neurogenic nitrergic vasodilation in porcine basilar arteries using techniques of blood-vessel myography, patch clamp and two-electrode voltage clamp, and calcium imaging. In U46619-contracted basilar arterial rings, nicotine (100μM) and electrical depolarization of nitrergic nerves by transmural nerve stimulation (TNS, 8Hz) elicited neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs concentration-dependently inhibited nicotine-induced parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation without affecting that induced by TNS, nitroprusside or isoproterenol. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs also concentration-dependently blocked nicotine-induced inward currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing α3β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and nicotine-induced inward currents as well as calcium influxes in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons. The potency in inhibiting both inward-currents and calcium influxes is ketamine>methamphetamine>hydroxyamphetamine. These results indicate that ketamine and amphetamine analogs, by blocking nAChRs located on cerebral perivascular sympathetic nerves, reduce nicotine-induced, axo-axonal interaction mechanism-mediated neurogenic dilation of the basilar arteries. Chronic abuse of these drugs, therefore, may interfere with normal sympathetic-parasympathetic interaction mechanism resulting in diminished neurogenic vasodilation

  3. The Molecular Profiles of Neural Stem Cell Niche in the Adult Subventricular Zone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheol; Hu, Jingqiong; Ralls, Sherry; Kitamura, Toshio; Loh, Y. Peng; Yang, Yanqin; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke; Ahn, Sohyun

    2012-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in a unique microenvironment called the neurogenic niche and generate functional new neurons. The neurogenic niche contains several distinct types of cells and interacts with the NSCs in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle. While several molecules produced by the niche cells have been identified to regulate adult neurogenesis, a systematic profiling of autocrine/paracrine signaling molecules in the neurogenic regions involved in maintenance, self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation of NSCs has not been done. We took advantage of the genetic inducible fate mapping system (GIFM) and transgenic mice to isolate the SVZ niche cells including NSCs, transit-amplifying progenitors (TAPs), astrocytes, ependymal cells, and vascular endothelial cells. From the isolated cells and microdissected choroid plexus, we obtained the secretory molecule expression profiling (SMEP) of each cell type using the Signal Sequence Trap method. We identified a total of 151 genes encoding secretory or membrane proteins. In addition, we obtained the potential SMEP of NSCs using cDNA microarray technology. Through the combination of multiple screening approaches, we identified a number of candidate genes with a potential relevance for regulating the NSC behaviors, which provide new insight into the nature of neurogenic niche signals. PMID:23209762

  4. Tree Changes or Wholesale Changes: The Role of Adult Education in Transitions in Regional Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Robert; Delves, Melinda

    2009-01-01

    Regional adult education and training providers have been required in recent decades to adapt to funding structures rather than engage with their local communities. This has meant providing education programs that are funded based on national or State and Territory based policy frameworks, often linked to human capital development. Adult education…

  5. Coronavirus-induced demyelination of neural pathways triggers neurogenic bladder overactivity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Matthew T.; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Smith, Ariana L.; Newman, Diane K.; Weiss, Susan R.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine whether mice with coronavirus-induced encephalomyelitis (CIE) develop neurogenic bladder dysfunction that is comparable with the neurogenic detrusor overactivity observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. Adult mice (C57BL/6J, 8 wk of age, n = 146) were inoculated with a neurotropic strain of mouse hepatitis virus (A59 strain) and followed for 4 wk. Inoculation with the virus caused a significant neural deficit in mice with an average clinical symptom score of 2.6 ± 0.5 at 2 wk. These changes were accompanied by 25 ± 5% weight loss at 1 and 2 wk postinoculation (P ≤ 0.001 vs. baseline) followed by a recovery phase. Histological analysis of spinal cord sections revealed multifocal sites of demyelinated lesions. Assessment of micturition patterns by filter paper assay determined an increase in the number of small and large urine spots in CIE mice starting from the second week after inoculation. Cystometric recordings in unrestrained awake animals confirmed neurogenic bladder overactivity at 4 wk postinoculation. One week after inoculation with the A59 strain of mouse hepatitis virus, mice became increasingly sensitive to von Frey filament testing with responses enhanced by 45% (n = 8, P ≤ 0.05 vs. baseline at 4 g); however, this initial increase in sensitivity was followed by gradual and significant diminution of abdominal sensitivity to mechanical stimulation by 4 wk postinoculation. Our results provide direct evidence showing that coronavirus-induced demyelination of the central nervous system causes the development of a neurogenic bladder that is comparable with neurogenic detrusor overactivity observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:25007876

  6. Etiology of Childhood Infectious Diarrhea in a Developed Region of China: Compared to Childhood Diarrhea in a Developing Region and Adult Diarrhea in a Developed Region

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Jing; Sun, Hao; Xia, Shengli; Duan, Ran; Liang, Junrong; Xiao, Yuchun; Qiu, Haiyan; Shan, Guangliang; Jing, Huaiqi

    2015-01-01

    In China, great differences in economy, social characteristics and hygiene exist between developing and developed regions. A comparative study of infectious diarrhea between two regions was needed. Three groups of diarrheal patients were collected: children ≤5 year-olds from Beijing (developed region) and Henan Province (developing region), and adults over 18 year-olds from Beijing. A questionnaire was used to survey and feces samples were examined for 16 enteropathogens. We enrolled 1422 children and 1047 adults from developed region and 755 children from developing region. Virus positive rates were 32.98% for children and 23.67% for adults in developed region. The most prevalent pathogen for children was rotavirus whereas for adults was norovirus. Bacterial isolation rates were 13.92% for children from developed region, while 29.14% for children from the developing regions. For the greatest difference, Shigella accounted for 50.79% and was the dominant pathogen in the developing region, whereas in the developed region it was only 1.45%. There was no significant relationship between the local levels of development with diarrheogenic Escherichia coli (DEC) categories. But it was seen the notable differences between the population with different age: enteropathogenic E.coli (EPEC) and enteroaggregative E.coli (EAggEC) were the primary classes of DEC in children from both regions, whereas it was enterotoxigenic E.coli (ETEC) in adults. The symptoms of Shigella and Salmonella infection, such as bloody stools, white blood cells (WBC) and red blood cells (RBC) positivity and fever were similar in children, which may lead to the misidentification. Yersinia enterocolitica and shiga toxin-producing E.coli (STEC) infections were firstly reported in Beijing. There was a large difference in etiology of bacterial diarrhea between children in developing and developed regions of China. PMID:26528820

  7. Microglia participate in neurogenic regulation of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao Z; Li, You; Li, Liang; Shah, Kandarp H; Bernstein, Kenneth E; Lyden, Patrick; Shi, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension is associated with neuroinflammation and increased sympathetic tone. Interference with neuroinflammation by an anti-inflammatory reagent or overexpression of interleukin-10 in the brain was found to attenuate hypertension. However, the cellular mechanism of neuroinflammation, as well as its impact on neurogenic regulation of blood pressure, is unclear. Here, we found that hypertension, induced by either angiotensin II or l-N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, is accompanied by microglial activation as manifested by microgliosis and proinflammatory cytokine upregulation. Targeted depletion of microglia significantly attenuated neuroinflammation, glutamate receptor expression in the paraventricular nucleus, plasma vasopressin level, kidney norepinephrine concentration, and blood pressure. Furthermore, when microglia were preactivated and transferred into the brains of normotensive mice, there was a significantly prolonged pressor response to intracerebroventricular injection of angiotensin II, and inactivation of microglia eliminated these effects. These data demonstrate that microglia, the resident immune cells in the brain, are the major cellular factors in mediating neuroinflammation and modulating neuronal excitation, which contributes to the elevated blood pressure.

  8. Adult neurogenesis and cellular brain repair with neural progenitors, precursors and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Shivraj Sohur, U; Emsley, Jason G; Mitchell, Bartley D; Macklis, Jeffrey D

    2006-01-01

    Recent work in neuroscience has shown that the adult central nervous system (CNS) contains neural progenitors, precursors and stem cells that are capable of generating new neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. While challenging the previous dogma that no new neurons are born in the adult mammalian CNS, these findings bring with them the future possibilities for development of novel neural repair strategies. The purpose of this review is to present the current knowledge about constitutively occurring adult mammalian neurogenesis, highlight the critical differences between ‘neurogenic’ and ‘non-neurogenic’ regions in the adult brain, and describe the cardinal features of two well-described neurogenic regions—the subventricular zone/olfactory bulb system and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. We also provide an overview of presently used models for studying neural precursors in vitro, mention some precursor transplantation models and emphasize that, in this rapidly growing field of neuroscience, one must be cautious with respect to a variety of methodological considerations for studying neural precursor cells both in vitro and in vivo. The possibility of repairing neural circuitry by manipulating neurogenesis is an intriguing one, and, therefore, we also review recent efforts to understand the conditions under which neurogenesis can be induced in non-neurogenic regions of the adult CNS. This work aims towards molecular and cellular manipulation of endogenous neural precursors in situ, without transplantation. We conclude this review with a discussion of what might be the function of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and provide a summary of present thinking about the consequences of disturbed adult neurogenesis and the reaction of neurogenic regions to disease. PMID:16939970

  9. Genetic activation of ERK5 MAP kinase enhances adult neurogenesis and extends hippocampus-dependent long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenbin; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Li, Tan; Abel, Glen M; Palmiter, Richard D; Storm, Daniel R; Xia, Zhengui

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that inhibition of adult neurogenesis impairs the formation of hippocampus-dependent memory. However, it is not known whether increasing adult neurogenesis affects the persistence of hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. Furthermore, signaling mechanisms that regulate adult neurogenesis are not fully defined. We recently reported that the conditional and targeted knock-out of ERK5 MAP kinase in adult neurogenic regions of the mouse brain attenuates adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and disrupts several forms of hippocampus-dependent memory. Here, we developed a gain-of-function knock-in mouse model to specifically activate endogenous ERK5 in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain. We report that the selective and targeted activation of ERK5 increases adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus by enhancing cell survival, neuronal differentiation, and dendritic complexity. Conditional ERK5 activation also improves the performance of challenging forms of spatial learning and memory and extends hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. We conclude that enhancing signal transduction of a single signaling pathway within adult neural stem/progenitor cells is sufficient to increase adult neurogenesis and improve the persistence of hippocampus-dependent memory. Furthermore, activation of ERK5 may provide a novel therapeutic target to improve long-term memory.

  10. Does Race/Ethnicity Really Matter in Adult Neurogenics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Recent evidence suggests that race/ethnicity is a variable that is critical to outcomes in neurological disorders. The purpose of this article was to examine the proportion of studies published in the "American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology (AJSLP)" and the "Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research (JSLHR)" that were…

  11. Neuronal fate determinants of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hack, Michael A; Saghatelyan, Armen; de Chevigny, Antoine; Pfeifer, Alexander; Ashery-Padan, Ruth; Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Götz, Magdalena

    2005-07-01

    Adult neurogenesis in mammals is restricted to two small regions, including the olfactory bulb, where GABAergic and dopaminergic interneurons are newly generated throughout the entire lifespan. However, the mechanisms directing them towards a specific neuronal phenotype are not yet understood. Here, we demonstrate the dual role of the transcription factor Pax6 in generating neuronal progenitors and also in directing them towards a dopaminergic periglomerular phenotype in adult mice. We present further evidence that dopaminergic periglomerular neurons originate in a distinct niche, the rostral migratory stream, and are fewer derived from precursors in the zone lining the ventricle. This regionalization of the adult precursor cells is further supported by the restricted expression of the transcription factor Olig2, which specifies transit-amplifying precursor fate and opposes the neurogenic role of Pax6. Together, these data explain both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms controlling neuronal identity in adult neurogenesis.

  12. Electrical management of neurogenic lower urinary tract disorders.

    PubMed

    Joussain, C; Denys, P

    2015-09-01

    Management of lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) in neurological diseases remains a priority because it leads to many complications such as incontinence, renal failure and decreased quality of life. A pharmacological approach remains the first-line treatment for patients with neurogenic LUTD, but electrical stimulation is a well-validated and recommended second-line treatment. However, clinicians must be aware of the indications, advantages and side effects of the therapy. This report provides an update on the 2 main electrical stimulation therapies for neurogenic LUTD - inducing direct bladder contraction with the Brindley procedure and modulating LUT physiology (sacral neuromodulation, tibial posterior nerve stimulation or pudendal nerve stimulation). We also describe the indications of these therapies for neurogenic LUTD, following international guidelines, as illustrated by their efficacy in patients with neurologic disorders. Electrical stimulation could be proposed for neurogenic LUTD as second-line treatment after failure of oral pharmacologic approaches. Nevertheless, further investigations are needed for a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of these techniques and to confirm their efficacy. Other electrical investigations, such as deep-brain stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, or improved sacral anterior root stimulation, which could be associated with non-invasive and highly specific deafferentation of posterior roots, may open new fields in the management of neurogenic LUTD. PMID:26321622

  13. Asia-Pacific Regional Consultation on Adult Education (Jomtien, Thailand, September 16-18, 1996). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, Bangkok (Thailand).

    The Asia-Pacific Regional Consultation on Adult Education was held for the following purposes: review progress and trends in adult education policies and programs since 1995; identify issues, problems, and constraints facing adult and nonformal education; and identify emerging priorities and future trends for effective promotion of adult and…

  14. Regional distribution of neuropeptide processing endopeptidases in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Berman, Y L; Rattan, A K; Carr, K; Devi, L

    1994-01-01

    Many peptide hormone and neuropeptide precursors undergo post-translational processing at mono- and/or dibasic residues. An enzymatic activity capable of processing prodynorphin at a monobasic processing site designated 'dynorphin converting enzyme' has been previously reported in rat rain and bovine pituitary. In this study the distribution of dynorphin converting enzyme activity in ten regions of rat brain has been compared with the distribution of subtilisin-like processing enzymes and with the immuno-reactive dynorphin peptides. The distribution of dynorphin converting enzyme activity generally matches the distribution of immuno-reactive dynorphin B-13 in most but not all brain regions. The regions that are known to have a relatively large number of immuno-reactive dynorphin-neurons also contain high levels of dynorphin converting enzyme activity. The distribution of dynorphin converting enzyme activity does not match the distribution of subtilisin-like processing enzyme or carboxypeptidase E activities. Taken together the data support the possibility that the dynorphin converting enzyme is involved in the maturation of dynorphin, as well as other neuropeptides, and peptide hormones.

  15. Neurogenic Bladder Repair Using Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Pradeep V; Subramanian, Swetha; Danke, Amit; Kumar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    The normal function of the urinary bladder is to store and expel urine in a coordinated, controlled fashion, the activity of which is regulated by the central and peripheral nervous systems. Neurogenic bladder is a term applied to a malfunctioning urinary bladder due to neurologic dysfunction or insult emanating from internal or external trauma, disease, or injury. This report describes a case of neurogenic bladder following laminectomy procedure and long-standing diabetes mellitus with neuropathy treated with autologous cellular therapy. The differentiation potential and paracrine effects of mesenchymal stem cells on bladder function have been highlighted. PMID:27656308

  16. Neurogenic Bladder Repair Using Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    The normal function of the urinary bladder is to store and expel urine in a coordinated, controlled fashion, the activity of which is regulated by the central and peripheral nervous systems. Neurogenic bladder is a term applied to a malfunctioning urinary bladder due to neurologic dysfunction or insult emanating from internal or external trauma, disease, or injury. This report describes a case of neurogenic bladder following laminectomy procedure and long-standing diabetes mellitus with neuropathy treated with autologous cellular therapy. The differentiation potential and paracrine effects of mesenchymal stem cells on bladder function have been highlighted.

  17. Neurogenic Bladder Repair Using Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    The normal function of the urinary bladder is to store and expel urine in a coordinated, controlled fashion, the activity of which is regulated by the central and peripheral nervous systems. Neurogenic bladder is a term applied to a malfunctioning urinary bladder due to neurologic dysfunction or insult emanating from internal or external trauma, disease, or injury. This report describes a case of neurogenic bladder following laminectomy procedure and long-standing diabetes mellitus with neuropathy treated with autologous cellular therapy. The differentiation potential and paracrine effects of mesenchymal stem cells on bladder function have been highlighted. PMID:27656308

  18. Brain metabolite concentrations across cortical regions in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Bethany K.; Jensen, J. Eric; Prescot, Andrew P.; Cohen, Bruce M.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Öngür, Dost

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can provide in vivo information about metabolite levels across multiple brain regions. This study used MRS to examine concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), a marker of neuronal integrity and function, and choline (Cho) which is related to the amount of cell membrane per unit volume, in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and parieto-occipital cortex (POC) in healthy individuals. Data were drawn from two experiments which examined glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. After controlling for gray matter percentages, NAA/Creatine (Cr) was 18% higher in POC than in ACC (p<0.001); Cho/Cr was 46% lower in POC than in ACC (p<0.001). There was an effect of study (p<0.001 for both metabolites), but no region by study interaction (NAA p=0.101, Cho p=0.850). Since NAA is localized to the intracellular space, these data suggest that ACC neuronal compartment is reduced as compared with POC, or that there is a lower concentration of NAA per cell in the ACC than POC, or both. Since elevated Cho suggests more cell membrane per unit volume, reduced NAA in ACC appears to be coupled with increases in overall cell membrane compartment. These findings are consistent with a number of previous studies using proton MRS which found increasing NAA and decreasing Cho moving caudally, and with post mortem anatomical studies which found neurons in more widely spaced bundles in ACC when compared to parietal and occipital cortices. MRS may be a useful tool for studying physical properties of the living human brain. PMID:21081116

  19. Regulation of stroke-induced neurogenesis in adult brain--recent scientific progress.

    PubMed

    Kokaia, Zaal; Thored, Pär; Arvidsson, Andreas; Lindvall, Olle

    2006-07-01

    Stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in adult rodents induces the formation of new neurons in the damaged striatum, a region that normally does not show neurogenesis. Here we describe recent findings on the regulation of neurogenesis after stroke, in particular regarding the duration of the neurogenic response and the influence of age, as well as the molecular mechanisms influencing migration and survival of the new neurons. We also discuss some crucial issues that need to be addressed in the further exploration of this potential self-repair mechanism after damage to the adult brain. PMID:16766702

  20. [Regional characteristics of arterial hypertension in adult population of Croatia].

    PubMed

    Erceg, Marijan; Hrabak-Zerjavić, Vlasta; Ivicević Uhernik, Ana

    2007-06-01

    Data collected in the Croatian Health Survey launched in 2003 by the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare were analyzed. The survey included a regionally stratified random sample. Using the method of structured questionnaire and anthropometric measurements (blood pressure, height and weight), data were collected on 9,070 subjects aged >18. The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure was calculated from two measurements. Inclusion criteria in the group of subjects with elevated blood pressure were the subject's reporting taking antihypertensive medication and/or mean systolic blood pressure > or =140 mm Hg, and/or mean diastolic blood pressure > or =90 mm Hg. Descriptive analysis was done on figures yielded by use of the SPSS software. Subjects with elevated blood pressure accounted for 44.2% (95%CI=42.61-45.85) of study population, with a h gher rate in male (45.6%; 95%= 43.14-48.06) and lower in female subjects (43.0%; 95%CI=41.46-44.55). Croatia was estimated to have 1,538,982 inhabitants with high blood pressure (748,072 males and 790,910 females). The proportion of individuals with elevated blood pressure was highest (78.9%; 95%CI=76.9-81.0; CV=1.32) in the 65 age group, followed by 35-64 age group 46.9% (95% CI=44.8-41.0; CV=2.3), and lowest rate (13.8%; 95%CI=11.1-16.6; CV=10.2) in the 18-34 age group. Regional distribution of high blood pressure was as follows: central Croatia 46.4% (95%CI=42.9-49.9; CV= 3.8), south 45.3% (95%CI= 40.9-49.7; CV=. 5.0), City of Zagreb 44.7% (95%CI= 40.9-48.5; CV= 4.3), east 44.2% (95%CI=40.5-47.8; CV=4.2), north 43.0% (95%CI=40.9-49.7; CV= 5.0), and west 40.5% (95%CI= 36.0-45.0; CV= 5.7). In the female group aged 35-64, regional distribution was as follows: east 52.3% (95%CI=46.0-58.7; CV=6.2), central Croatia 45.4% (95%CI=40.3-50.5; CV=5.7), City of Zagreb 43.5 (95%CI=38.1-48.9; CV=6.4), south 40.7% (95%CI=37.4-44, 0; CV=4.1), north 39.3% (95% CI=33.7-44.8; CV=7.2), and west 35.1% (95%CI=26.1-44.2; CV= 13.1). Differences

  1. Recent Advances in Neurogenic Small Molecules as Innovative Treatments for Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Arozamena, Clara; Martí-Marí, Olaia; Estrada, Martín; de la Fuente Revenga, Mario; Rodríguez-Franco, María Isabel

    2016-09-01

    The central nervous system of adult mammals has long been considered as a complex static structure unable to undergo any regenerative process to refurbish its dead nodes. This dogma was challenged by Altman in the 1960s and neuron self-renewal has been demonstrated ever since in many species, including humans. Aging, neurodegenerative, and some mental diseases are associated with an exponential decrease in brain neurogenesis. Therefore, the controlled pharmacological stimulation of the endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs) niches might counteract the neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other pathologies, opening an exciting new therapeutic avenue. In the last years, druggable molecular targets and signalling pathways involved in neurogenic processes have been identified, and as a consequence, different drug types have been developed and tested in neuronal plasticity. This review focuses on recent advances in neurogenic agents acting at serotonin and/or melatonin systems, Wnt/β-catenin pathway, sigma receptors, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2).

  2. Recent Advances in Neurogenic Small Molecules as Innovative Treatments for Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Arozamena, Clara; Martí-Marí, Olaia; Estrada, Martín; de la Fuente Revenga, Mario; Rodríguez-Franco, María Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system of adult mammals has long been considered as a complex static structure unable to undergo any regenerative process to refurbish its dead nodes. This dogma was challenged by Altman in the 1960s and neuron self-renewal has been demonstrated ever since in many species, including humans. Aging, neurodegenerative, and some mental diseases are associated with an exponential decrease in brain neurogenesis. Therefore, the controlled pharmacological stimulation of the endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs) niches might counteract the neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other pathologies, opening an exciting new therapeutic avenue. In the last years, druggable molecular targets and signalling pathways involved in neurogenic processes have been identified, and as a consequence, different drug types have been developed and tested in neuronal plasticity. This review focuses on recent advances in neurogenic agents acting at serotonin and/or melatonin systems, Wnt/β-catenin pathway, sigma receptors, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). PMID:27598108

  3. Boundary Caps Give Rise to Neurogenic Stem Cells and Terminal Glia in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Gresset, Aurélie; Coulpier, Fanny; Gerschenfeld, Gaspard; Jourdon, Alexandre; Matesic, Graziella; Richard, Laurence; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Charnay, Patrick; Topilko, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Summary While neurogenic stem cells have been identified in rodent and human skin, their manipulation and further characterization are hampered by a lack of specific markers. Here, we perform genetic tracing of the progeny of boundary cap (BC) cells, a neural-crest-derived cell population localized at peripheral nerve entry/exit points. We show that BC derivatives migrate along peripheral nerves to reach the skin, where they give rise to terminal glia associated with dermal nerve endings. Dermal BC derivatives also include cells that self-renew in sphere culture and have broad in vitro differentiation potential. Upon transplantation into adult mouse dorsal root ganglia, skin BC derivatives efficiently differentiate into various types of mature sensory neurons. Together, this work establishes the embryonic origin, pathway of migration, and in vivo neurogenic potential of a major component of skin stem-like cells. It provides genetic tools to study and manipulate this population of high interest for medical applications. PMID:26212662

  4. Adolescent binge ethanol treatment alters adult brain regional volumes, cortical extracellular matrix protein and behavioral flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Leon Garland; Liu, Wen; Oguz, Ipek; Styner, Martin; Crews, Fulton T.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents binge drink more than any other age group, increasing risk of disrupting the development of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that adolescent binge drinking would lead to persistent alterations in adulthood. In this study, we modeled adolescent weekend underage binge-drinking, using adolescent mice (post-natal days [P] 28–37). The adolescent intermittent binge ethanol (AIE) treatment includes 6 binge intragastric doses of ethanol in an intermittent pattern across adolescence. Assessments were conducted in adulthood following extended abstinence to determine if there were persistent changes in adults. Reversal learning, open field and other behavioral assessments as well as brain structure using magnetic imaging and immunohistochemistry were determined. We found AIE did not impact adult Barnes Maze learning. However, AIE did cause reversal learning deficits in adults. AIE also caused structural changes in the adult brain. AIE was associated with adulthood volume enlargements in specific brain regions without changes in total brain volume. Enlarged regions included the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, 4%), cerebellum (4.5%), thalamus (2%), internal capsule (10%) and genu of the corpus callosum (7%). The enlarged OFC volume in adults after AIE is consistent with previous imaging studies in human adolescents. AIE treatment was associated with significant increases in the expression of several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the adult OFC including WFA (55%), Brevican (32%), Neurocan (105%), Tenacin-C (25%), and HABP (5%). These findings are consistent with AIE causing persistent changes in brain structure that could contribute to a lack of behavioral flexibility. PMID:24275185

  5. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Causes Proliferation of Sensory C-Fibers and Subsequent Enhancement of Neurogenic Inflammation in Rat Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Mihoko; Miyake, Mio; Takeda, Masanori; Kamijima, Michihiro

    2011-01-01

    Background. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) may be associated with the exacerbation of atopic dermatitis. We investigated whether SEB causes proliferation of sensory C-fibers and subsequent enhancement of plasma leakage induced by sensorineural stimulation in rat skin. Methods. SEB was applied intracutaneously to the abdomen of preweaning and adult rats. Evans blue dye leakage into the skin induced by topical 10% formalin was measured as an index of neurogenic skin vascular permeability. Local expression of substance P, tachykinin NK1 receptors, and nerve growth factor was assessed immunohistochemically. In addition, we assessed the effects of topical tacrolimus on these skin responses induced by SEB. Results. Increased neurogenic skin plasma leakage was seen 7 days after SEB treatment in 2 different age groups. Innervation of substance P-immunoreactive nerves and expression of tachykinin NK1 receptors and nerve growth factor were also promoted by SEB, peaking at 7 days, 7 days, and 56 h after SEB treatment, respectively. Tacrolimus markedly inhibited these skin changes. Conclusions. SEB increased the innervation of sensory C-fibers and tachykinin NK1 receptors in rat skin, probably because of upregulated production of neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor, leading to enhancement of neurogenic skin inflammation. T cell activation induced by SEB may initiate these changes. PMID:21252260

  6. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO POLLUTANT-INDUCED AIRWAY INFLAMMATION IS NEUROGENICALLY MEDIATED.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurogenic inflammation in the airways involves the activation of sensory irritant receptors (capsaicin, VR1) by noxious stimuli and the subsequent release of neuropeptides (e.g., SP, CGRP, NKA) from these fibers. Once released, these peptides initiate and sustain symptoms of ...

  7. A 3D anthropometric analysis of the orolabial region in Chinese young adults.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, Yasas S N; Deutsch, Curtis K; Zwahlen, Roger A

    2013-12-01

    The orolabial region undergoes considerable changes after orthognathic surgery or orthodontic treatment. Ethnicity, age, and sex-specific norms are needed during the planning of interventions in this region. In 2008 the Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg published anthropometric measurements of the lips of Chinese children, but to our knowledge such reference data for young Chinese adults are not currently available. We therefore used digital anthropometry on 3-dimensional craniofacial images acquired from 103 healthy young Chinese adults with Class I skeletal pattern. Anthropometric landmarks were identified, which provided linear and angular measurements. All orolabial measurements were significantly larger in men than women, with the exception of the labiomental angle. In contrast, there were no sex differences in the anthropometric proportions. We therefore provide what we think are the first cross-sectional norms available for young Chinese adults. These norms can be used to evaluate the morphology of the lips objectively for preoperative diagnosis, planning of treatment, and assessment of postoperative outcomes.

  8. Adult education and the challenges of regional development: Policy and sustainability in North Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Palle; Staugaard, Hans Jørgen

    2016-10-01

    Adult education is governed at many levels - internationally, nationally and locally. The authors of this paper look at the challenges, structures and practices of adult education policy at the local level, more specifically in North Denmark (Northern Jutland), one of the five administrative regions of the Danish nation-state. In many ways, the current educational challenges in this remote region of Europe are similar to what can be observed worldwide and especially in countries which are generally considered welfare states. The authors see the growing social and educational divide between the region's peripheral areas and its largest city centre as a major challenge - for society as a whole and for adult education in particular. It is from this perspective that the authors describe the present structures of adult education in the region and the strategies employed by local authorities and educational institutions. This is followed by an evaluation of both structures and efforts in terms of their ability to cope with the challenges.

  9. Global, Regional and Local Influences on Adult Literacy Policy in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between global, regional and local influences on adult literacy policy and practice in the UK through a discourse analysis of policy-related texts. The analysis is framed by theoretical perspectives from literacy studies and socio-material theory. The paper identifies a number of specific features in the UK…

  10. Adult education and the challenges of regional development: Policy and sustainability in North Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Palle; Staugaard, Hans Jørgen

    2016-09-01

    Adult education is governed at many levels - internationally, nationally and locally. The authors of this paper look at the challenges, structures and practices of adult education policy at the local level, more specifically in North Denmark (Northern Jutland), one of the five administrative regions of the Danish nation-state. In many ways, the current educational challenges in this remote region of Europe are similar to what can be observed worldwide and especially in countries which are generally considered welfare states. The authors see the growing social and educational divide between the region's peripheral areas and its largest city centre as a major challenge - for society as a whole and for adult education in particular. It is from this perspective that the authors describe the present structures of adult education in the region and the strategies employed by local authorities and educational institutions. This is followed by an evaluation of both structures and efforts in terms of their ability to cope with the challenges.

  11. Hypothalamic subependymal niche: a novel site of the adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rojczyk-Gołębiewska, Ewa; Pałasz, Artur; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2014-07-01

    The discovery of undifferentiated, actively proliferating neural stem cells (NSCs) in the mature brain opened a brand new chapter in the contemporary neuroscience. Adult neurogenesis appears to occur in specific brain regions (including hypothalamus) throughout vertebrates' life, being considered an important player in the processes of memory, learning, and neural plasticity. In the adult mammalian brain, NSCs are located mainly in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle ependymal wall. Besides these classical regions, hypothalamic neurogenesis occurring mainly along and beneath the third ventricle wall seems to be especially well documented. Neurogenic zones in SGZ, SVZ, and in the hypothalamus share some particular common features like similar cellular cytoarchitecture, vascularization pattern, and extracellular matrix properties. Hypothalamic neurogenic niche is formed mainly by four special types of radial glia-like tanycytes. They are characterized by distinct expression of some neural progenitor and stem cell markers. Moreover, there are numerous suggestions that newborn hypothalamic neurons have a significant ability to integrate into the local neural pathways and to play important physiological roles, especially in the energy balance regulation. Newly formed neurons in the hypothalamus can synthesize and release food intake regulating neuropeptides and they are sensitive to the leptin. On the other hand, high-fat diet positively influences hypothalamic neurogenesis in rodents. The nature of this intriguing new site of adult neurogenesis is still so far poorly studied and requires further investigations.

  12. Cerebral cortical neurons with activity linked to central neurogenic spontaneous and evoked elevations in cerebral blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golanov, E. V.; Reis, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We recorded neurons in rat cerebral cortex with activity relating to the neurogenic elevations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) coupled to stereotyped bursts of EEG activity, burst-cerebrovascular wave complexes, appearing spontaneously or evoked by electrical stimulation of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVL) or fastigial nucleus (FN). Of 333 spontaneously active neurons only 15 (5%), in layers 5-6, consistently (P < 0.05, chi-square) increased their activity during the earliest potential of the complex, approximately 1.3 s before the rise of rCBF, and during the minutes-long elevation of rCBF elicited by 10 s of stimulation of RVL or FN. The results indicate the presence of a small population of neurons in deep cortical laminae whose activity correlates with neurogenic elevations of rCBF. These neurons may function to transduce afferent neuronal signals into vasodilation.

  13. Zebrafish adult-derived hypothalamic neurospheres generate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Campos, Christian; Letelier, Joaquín; Ceriani, Ricardo; Whitlock, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide essential for fertility in vertebrates. Human male patients lacking GnRH and treated with hormone therapy can remain fertile after cessation of treatment suggesting that new GnRH neurons can be generated during adult life. We used zebrafish to investigate the neurogenic potential of the adult hypothalamus. Previously we have characterized the development of GnRH cells in the zebrafish linking genetic pathways to the differentiation of neuromodulatory and endocrine GnRH cells in specific regions of the brain. Here, we developed a new method to obtain neural progenitors from the adult hypothalamus in vitro. Using this system, we show that neurospheres derived from the adult hypothalamus can be maintained in culture and subsequently differentiate glia and neurons. Importantly, the adult derived progenitors differentiate into neurons containing GnRH and the number of cells is increased through exposure to either testosterone or GnRH, hormones used in therapeutic treatment in humans. Finally, we show in vivo that a neurogenic niche in the hypothalamus contains GnRH positive neurons. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that neurospheres can be derived from the hypothalamus of the adult zebrafish and that these neural progenitors are capable of producing GnRH containing neurons. PMID:26209533

  14. Not all neurogenic bladders are the same: a proposal for a new neurogenic bladder classification system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder (NGB) has long been defined as a clinical entity that describes a heterogeneous collection of syndromes. The common theme is a bladder disorder concomitant with a neurologic disorder. This definition does not give the clinician much information about the bladder disorder, nor how to treat it, or even what the natural history of the disorder is likely to be. It may be time for a new classification scheme to better define the bladder defect and prognosis, as well as inform treatment. We propose a classification system based on seven categories, each having a neurologic defect in a distinct anatomic location. This is termed SALE (Stratify by Anatomic Location and Etiology). In addition, the presence or absence of bowel dysfunction and autonomic dysreflexia will be reported. In the future, as more definite prognostic information can be gleaned from biomarkers, we anticipate adding urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) and urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels to the definition. We expect the SALE system to efficiently describe a patient suffering from NGB and simultaneously inform the most appropriate treatment, follow-up regimen, and long-term prognosis. PMID:26904408

  15. Programmed hyperphagia in offspring of obese dams: Altered expression of hypothalamic nutrient sensors, neurogenic factors and epigenetic modulators.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mina; Han, Guang; Ross, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Maternal overnutrition results in programmed offspring obesity, mediated in part, by hyperphagia. This is remarkably similar to the effects of maternal undernutrition on offspring hyperphagia and obesity. In view of the marked differences in the energy environment of the over and under-nutrition exposures, we studied the expression of select epigenetic modifiers associated with energy imbalance including neurogenic factors and appetite/satiety neuropeptides which are indicative of neurogenic differentiation. HF offspring were exposed to maternal overnutrition (high fat diet; HF) during pregnancy and lactation. We determined the protein expression of energy sensors (mTOR, pAMPK), epigenetic factors (DNA methylase, DNMT1; histone deacetylase, SIRT1/HDAC1), neurogenic factors (Hes1, Mash1, Ngn3) and appetite/satiety neuropeptides (AgRP/POMC) in newborn hypothalamus and adult arcuate nucleus (ARC). Despite maternal obesity, male offspring born to obese dams had similar body weight at birth as Controls. However, when nursed by the same dams, male offspring of obese dams exhibited marked adiposity. At 1 day of age, HF newborn males had significantly decreased energy sensors, DNMT1 including Hes1 and Mash1, which may impact neuroprogenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. This is consistent with increased AgRP in HF newborns. At 6 months of age, HF adult males had significantly increased energy sensors and decreased histone deactylases. In addition, the persistent decreased Hes1, Mash1 as well as Ngn3 are consistent with increased AgRP and decreased POMC. Thus, altered energy sensors and epigenetic responses which modulate gene expression and adult neuronal differentiation may contribute to hyperphagia and obesity in HF male offspring. PMID:26785315

  16. Programmed hyperphagia in offspring of obese dams: Altered expression of hypothalamic nutrient sensors, neurogenic factors and epigenetic modulators.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mina; Han, Guang; Ross, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Maternal overnutrition results in programmed offspring obesity, mediated in part, by hyperphagia. This is remarkably similar to the effects of maternal undernutrition on offspring hyperphagia and obesity. In view of the marked differences in the energy environment of the over and under-nutrition exposures, we studied the expression of select epigenetic modifiers associated with energy imbalance including neurogenic factors and appetite/satiety neuropeptides which are indicative of neurogenic differentiation. HF offspring were exposed to maternal overnutrition (high fat diet; HF) during pregnancy and lactation. We determined the protein expression of energy sensors (mTOR, pAMPK), epigenetic factors (DNA methylase, DNMT1; histone deacetylase, SIRT1/HDAC1), neurogenic factors (Hes1, Mash1, Ngn3) and appetite/satiety neuropeptides (AgRP/POMC) in newborn hypothalamus and adult arcuate nucleus (ARC). Despite maternal obesity, male offspring born to obese dams had similar body weight at birth as Controls. However, when nursed by the same dams, male offspring of obese dams exhibited marked adiposity. At 1 day of age, HF newborn males had significantly decreased energy sensors, DNMT1 including Hes1 and Mash1, which may impact neuroprogenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. This is consistent with increased AgRP in HF newborns. At 6 months of age, HF adult males had significantly increased energy sensors and decreased histone deactylases. In addition, the persistent decreased Hes1, Mash1 as well as Ngn3 are consistent with increased AgRP and decreased POMC. Thus, altered energy sensors and epigenetic responses which modulate gene expression and adult neuronal differentiation may contribute to hyperphagia and obesity in HF male offspring.

  17. Engaging with Adults: The Case for Increased Support to Adult Basic Education in Sub-Saharan Africa. Africa Region Human Development Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauglo, Jon

    The impacts and cost-effectiveness of adult basic education (ABE) in Sub-Saharan Africa were examined in a review of the new generation of ABE programs in the region. African experts and other international resource persons examined documentation from recent adult literacy, numeracy, and other educational programs targeted toward individuals over…

  18. NFIX Regulates Proliferation and Migration Within the Murine SVZ Neurogenic Niche.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yee Hsieh Evelyn; Zhou, Bo; Harris, Lachlan; Harvey, Tracey; Smith, Aaron; Horne, Elise; Martynoga, Ben; Andersen, Jimena; Achimastou, Angeliki; Cato, Kathleen; Richards, Linda J; Gronostajski, Richard M; Yeo, Giles S; Guillemot, François; Bailey, Timothy L; Piper, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factors of the nuclear factor one (NFI) family play a pivotal role in the development of the nervous system. One member, NFIX, regulates the development of the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Postnatal Nfix(-/-) mice also display abnormalities within the subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the lateral ventricles, a region of the brain comprising a neurogenic niche that provides ongoing neurogenesis throughout life. Specifically, Nfix(-/-) mice exhibit more PAX6-expressing progenitor cells within the SVZ. However, the mechanism underlying the development of this phenotype remains undefined. Here, we reveal that NFIX contributes to multiple facets of SVZ development. Postnatal Nfix(-/-) mice exhibit increased levels of proliferation within the SVZ, both in vivo and in vitro as assessed by a neurosphere assay. Furthermore, we show that the migration of SVZ-derived neuroblasts to the olfactory bulb is impaired, and that the olfactory bulbs of postnatal Nfix(-/-) mice are smaller. We also demonstrate that gliogenesis within the rostral migratory stream is delayed in the absence of Nfix, and reveal that Gdnf (glial-derived neurotrophic factor), a known attractant for SVZ-derived neuroblasts, is a target for transcriptional activation by NFIX. Collectively, these findings suggest that NFIX regulates both proliferation and migration during the development of the SVZ neurogenic niche.

  19. [Neurogenic communication disorders: how effective are relaxation therapy and acupuncture?].

    PubMed

    Ptok, M

    2008-12-01

    Not only neurologists but also ENT-physicians and phoniatricians have to prescribe speech and language therapy for patients with communication disorders. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has gained increasing popularity among patients. Many studies have investigated these procedures and positive effects on certain physical e. g., chronic pain and anxiety disorders could be validated. Unfortunately only few empirical investigations have targeted the use of CAM to treat neurogenic disorders of communication or cognition. In this review we provide an overview over general therapeutical principals of two widely used approaches, relaxation therapy and acupuncture. Then we survey the literature and summarize existent research literature regarding the effects of the treatment of neurogenic disorders including dementia.

  20. The treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with neurogenic disease

    PubMed Central

    Brant, William O.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) related to compromise of the nervous system is an increasingly common occurrence. This may be due to the multifactorial nature of ED, the myriad of disorders affecting the neurotransmission of erectogenic signals, and improved awareness and diagnosis of ED. Nevertheless, neurogenic ED remains poorly understood and characterized. Disease related factors such as depression, decreased physical and mental function, the burden of chronic illness, and loss of independence may preclude sexual intimacy and lead to ED as well. The amount of data regarding treatment options in subpopulations of differing neurologic disorders remains scarce except for men with spinal cord injury. The treatment options including phosphodiesterase inhibitors, intracavernosal or intraurethral vasoactive agents, vacuum erection devices (VED) and penile prosthetic implantation remain constant. This review discusses the options in specific neurologic conditions, and briefly provides insight into new and future developments that may reshape the management of neurogenic ED. PMID:26904415

  1. Postural sway and regional cerebellar volume in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hove, Michael J.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Biederman, Joseph; Li, Zhi; Schmahmann, Jeremy; Valera, Eve M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Motor abnormalities, including impaired balance and increased postural sway, are commonly reported in children with ADHD, but have yet to be investigated in adults with ADHD. Furthermore, although these abnormalities are thought to stem from cerebellar deficits, evidence for an association between the cerebellum and these motor deficits has yet to be provided for either adults or children with ADHD. Method In this study, we measured postural sway in adults with ADHD and controls, examining the relationship between sway and regional cerebellar gray matter volume. Thirty-two ADHD and 28 control participants completed various standing-posture tasks on a Wii balance board. Results Postural sway was significantly higher for the ADHD group compared to the healthy controls. Higher sway was positively associated with regional gray matter volume in the right posterior cerebellum (lobule VIII/IX). Conclusion These findings show that sway abnormalities commonly reported in children with ADHD are also present in adults, and for the first time show a relationship between postural control atypicalities and the cerebellum in this group. Our findings extend the literature on motor abnormalities in ADHD and contribute to our knowledge of their neural substrate. PMID:26106567

  2. Center of pressure progression characteristics under the plantar region for elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Min-Chi; Wu, Hsin-Chieh; Chang, Li-Yu; Wu, Min-Huan

    2013-03-01

    This investigation identifies the center of pressure (COP) progression characteristics under the plantar region for elderly adults during barefoot walking. A total of 60 healthy adults (30 young and 30 old) were recruited. The young and elderly participants had average ages of 23.6 (SD=2.7) and 70.8 (SD=4.1) years old, respectively. All subjects had normal foot arch and no relevant musculoskeletal disease in the lower extremities. The foot pressure measurement system (RS-scan(®) system) was used to measure the center of pressure coordinates (COP), progression angle and COP velocity. Four sub-phases of the stance phase were calculated. The initial contact (ICP) and forefoot contact phase (FFCP) corresponded to the loading response. The foot flat phase (FFP) coincided with the mid-stance. The forefoot push-off phase (FFPOP) corresponded to the terminal stance and pre-swing phases. The analytical results revealed that age effects were found in the relative time percentages for the initial contact, foot flat and forefoot push-off phases during foot movement. The elderly subjects exhibited significant medial COP curve and faster COP velocity during the initial contact phase and more pronated mid-foot posture and slower COP velocity during the mid-stance. The older adults tended to have a more pronated foot and displayed a significant medial COP curve compared to young adults. These COP progression characteristics can provide further insight into relevant foot function and gait performance evaluations for older adults.

  3. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series. PMID:26904412

  4. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Anne P

    2016-02-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series.

  5. Are Global and Regional Improvements in Life Expectancy and in Child, Adult and Senior Survival Slowing?

    PubMed Central

    Hum, Ryan J.; Verguet, Stéphane; Cheng, Yu-Ling; McGahan, Anita M.; Jha, Prabhat

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in life expectancy have been considerable over the past hundred years. Forecasters have taken to applying historical trends under an assumption of continuing improvements in life expectancy in the future. A linear mixed effects model was used to estimate the trends in global and regional rates of improvements in life expectancy, child, adult, and senior survival, in 166 countries between 1950 and 2010. Global improvements in life expectancy, including both child and adult survival rates, decelerated significantly over the study period. Overall life expectancy gains were estimated to have declined from 5.9 to 4.0 months per year for a mean deceleration of -0.07 months/year2; annual child survival gains declined from 4.4 to 1.6 deaths averted per 1000 for a mean deceleration of -0.06 deaths/1000/year2; adult survival gains were estimated to decline from 4.8 to 3.7 deaths averted per 1000 per year for a mean deceleration of -0.08 deaths/1000/year2. Senior survival gains however increased from 2.4 to 4.2 deaths averted per 1000 per year for an acceleration of 0.03 deaths/1000/year2. Regional variation in the four measures was substantial. The rates of global improvements in life expectancy, child survival, and adult survival have declined since 1950 despite an increase in the rate of improvements among seniors. We postulate that low-cost innovation, related to the last half-century progress in health–primarily devoted to children and middle age, is reaping diminishing returns on its investments. Trends are uneven across regions and measures, which may be due in part to the state of epidemiological transition between countries and regions and disparities in the diffusion of innovation, accessible only in high-income countries where life expectancy is already highest. PMID:25992949

  6. Increased reports of measles in a low endemic region during a rubella outbreak in adult populations.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Takako; Kanbayashi, Daiki; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Komano, Jun; Kase, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    In 2013, a rubella outbreak was observed in Japan, Romania, and Poland. The outbreak in Japan was accompanied by an increase of measles reports, especially from a region where measles is highly controlled. This was attributed to the adult populations affected by this rubella outbreak, similarity of clinical signs between rubella and measles, sufficiently small impact of measles outbreaks from neighboring nations, and elimination levels of measles endemicity. Current and future concerns for measles control are discussed.

  7. Quantitative Expression Profile of Distinct Functional Regions in the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Mamoru; Uno, Kenichiro D.; Tsujino, Kaori; Hanashima, Carina; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2011-01-01

    The adult mammalian brain is composed of distinct regions with specialized roles including regulation of circadian clocks, feeding, sleep/awake, and seasonal rhythms. To find quantitative differences of expression among such various brain regions, we conducted the BrainStars (B*) project, in which we profiled the genome-wide expression of ∼50 small brain regions, including sensory centers, and centers for motion, time, memory, fear, and feeding. To avoid confounds from temporal differences in gene expression, we sampled each region every 4 hours for 24 hours, and pooled the samples for DNA-microarray assays. Therefore, we focused on spatial differences in gene expression. We used informatics to identify candidate genes with expression changes showing high or low expression in specific regions. We also identified candidate genes with stable expression across brain regions that can be used as new internal control genes, and ligand-receptor interactions of neurohormones and neurotransmitters. Through these analyses, we found 8,159 multi-state genes, 2,212 regional marker gene candidates for 44 small brain regions, 915 internal control gene candidates, and 23,864 inferred ligand-receptor interactions. We also found that these sets include well-known genes as well as novel candidate genes that might be related to specific functions in brain regions. We used our findings to develop an integrated database (http://brainstars.org/) for exploring genome-wide expression in the adult mouse brain, and have made this database openly accessible. These new resources will help accelerate the functional analysis of the mammalian brain and the elucidation of its regulatory network systems. PMID:21858037

  8. Standing worsens cognitive functions in patients with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Poda, R; Guaraldi, P; Solieri, L; Calandra-Buonaura, G; Marano, G; Gallassi, R; Cortelli, P

    2012-04-01

    In previous studies, addressing the association between orthostatic hypotension and cognitive decline, patients underwent neuropsychological evaluation in sitting position, and blood pressure values and cognition were not measured concurrently. Furthermore, no studies assessed the acute effects of orthostatic hypotension on cognitive performances. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of a documented fall in systolic blood pressure (SBP) of at least 20 mmHg on a battery of cognitive tests in patients with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension. Ten consecutive patients with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, normal brain imaging, and a normal Mini Mental State Examination in supine position were enrolled in the study. Patients underwent a detailed neuropsychological assessment (Brief Mental Deterioration battery and computerized tests) over two test sessions: the first while tilted to an angle able to cause a fall of at least 20 mmHg in SBP; the second while supine, after 30 min of rest. Parallel forms of the tests were presented on each testing session. Patients scored significantly worse in the visual search test, analogies test, immediate visual memory, and the measure of global cognitive functioning of Brief Mental Deterioration battery during the orthostatic challenge compared to the supine position. Orthostatic hypotension was associated with a significant worsening of cognitive performances, affecting both global cognitive functioning and specific tasks, mainly exploring executive functions. The assessment of cognitive function in patients with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension should be performed considering the body's position of the subject.

  9. The pre-vertebrate origins of neurogenic placodes.

    PubMed

    Abitua, Philip Barron; Gainous, T Blair; Kaczmarczyk, Angela N; Winchell, Christopher J; Hudson, Clare; Kamata, Kaori; Nakagawa, Masashi; Tsuda, Motoyuki; Kusakabe, Takehiro G; Levine, Michael

    2015-08-27

    The sudden appearance of the neural crest and neurogenic placodes in early branching vertebrates has puzzled biologists for over a century. These embryonic tissues contribute to the development of the cranium and associated sensory organs, which were crucial for the evolution of the vertebrate "new head". A previous study suggests that rudimentary neural crest cells existed in ancestral chordates. However, the evolutionary origins of neurogenic placodes have remained obscure owing to a paucity of embryonic data from tunicates, the closest living relatives to those early vertebrates. Here we show that the tunicate Ciona intestinalis exhibits a proto-placodal ectoderm (PPE) that requires inhibition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and expresses the key regulatory determinant Six1/2 and its co-factor Eya, a developmental process conserved across vertebrates. The Ciona PPE is shown to produce ciliated neurons that express genes for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a G-protein-coupled receptor for relaxin-3 (RXFP3) and a functional cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGA), which suggests dual chemosensory and neurosecretory activities. These observations provide evidence that Ciona has a neurogenic proto-placode, which forms neurons that appear to be related to those derived from the olfactory placode and hypothalamic neurons of vertebrates. We discuss the possibility that the PPE-derived GnRH neurons of Ciona resemble an ancestral cell type, a progenitor to the complex neuronal circuit that integrates sensory information and neuroendocrine functions in vertebrates. PMID:26258298

  10. In silico Therapeutics for Neurogenic Hypertension and Vasovagal Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Bojić, Tijana; Perović, Vladimir R.; Glišić, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Neurocardiovascular diseases (NCVD) are the leading cause of death in the developed world and will remain so till 2020. In these diseases the pathologically changed nervous control of cardiovascular system has the central role. The actual NCV syndromes are neurogenic hypertension, representing the sympathetically mediated disorder, and vasovagal syncope, which is the vagally mediated disorders. Vasovagal syncope, the disease far from its etiological treatment, could benefit from recruiting and application of antimuscarinic drugs used in other parasympathetic disorders. The informational spectrum method (ISM), a method widely applied for the characterization of protein-protein interactions in the field of immunology, endocrinology and anti HIV drug discovery, was applied for the first time in the analysis of neurogenic hypertension and vasovagal syncope therapeutic targets. In silico analysis revealed the potential involvement of apelin in neurogenic hypertension. Applying the EIIP/ISM bioinformatics concept in investigation of drugs for treatment of vasovagal syncope suggests that 78% of tested antimuscarinic drugs could have anti vasovagal syncope effect. The presented results confirm that ISM is a promissing method for investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying pathophysiological proceses of NCV syndromes and discovery of therapeutics targets for their treatment. PMID:26834545

  11. Radial glial cell-specific ablation in the adult Zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yuki; Ito, Yoko; Tanaka, Hideomi; Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-07-01

    The zebrafish brain can continue to produce new neurons in widespread neurogenic brain regions throughout life. In contrast, neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain is restricted to the subventricular zone (SVZ) and dentate gyrus (DG). In neurogenic regions in the adult brain, radial glial cells (RGCs) are considered to function as neural stem cells (NSCs). We generated a Tg(gfap:Gal4FF) transgenic zebrafish line, which enabled us to express specific genes in RGCs. To study the function of RGCs in neurogenesis in the adult zebrafish brain, we also generated a Tg(gfap: Gal4FF; UAS:nfsB-mcherry) transgenic zebrafish line, which allowed us to induce cell death exclusively within RGCs upon addition of metronidazole (Mtz) to the media. RGCs expressing nitroreductase were specifically ablated by the Mtz treatment, decreasing the number of proliferative RGCs. Using the Tg(gfap:Gal4FF; UAS:nfsB-mcherry) transgenic zebrafish line, we found that RGCs were specifically ablated in the adult zebrafish telencephalon. The Tg(gfap:Gal4FF) line could be useful to study the function of RGCs.

  12. Quiescent adult neural stem cells are exceptionally sensitive to cosmic radiation.

    PubMed

    Encinas, Juan M; Vazquez, Marcelo E; Switzer, Robert C; Chamberland, Dennis W; Nick, Harry; Levine, Howard G; Scarpa, Philip J; Enikolopov, Grigori; Steindler, Dennis A

    2008-03-01

    Generation of new neurons in the adult brain, a process that is likely to be essential for learning, memory, and mood regulation, is impaired by radiation. Therefore, radiation exposure might have not only such previously expected consequences as increased probability of developing cancer, but might also impair cognitive function and emotional stability. Radiation exposure is encountered in settings ranging from cancer therapy to space travel; evaluating the neurogenic risks of radiation requires identifying the at-risk populations of stem and progenitor cells in the adult brain. Here we have used a novel reporter mouse line to find that early neural progenitors are selectively affected by conditions simulating the space radiation environment. This is reflected both in a decrease in the number of these progenitors in the neurogenic regions and in an increase in the number of dying cells in these regions. Unexpectedly, we found that quiescent neural stem cells, rather than their rapidly dividing progeny, are most sensitive to radiation. Since these stem cells are responsible for adult neurogenesis, their death would have a profound impact on the production of new neurons in the irradiated adult brain. Our finding raises an important concern about cognitive and emotional risks associated with radiation exposure.

  13. A review of prospective Clinical Trials for neurogenic bladder: The place of surgery, experimental techniques and devices

    PubMed Central

    Braschi, Emmanuel; Lavelle, John

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The neurogenic urinary bladder has been known for at least 30 years now and the concepts behind it are continuously evolving, but there is actually not much work that has been done to accumulate solid clinical evidence in this field. We review the surgical and experimental techniques used in the management of this condition. Material and methods To achieve our goal, we performed Internet searches using the same search string: Urinary bladder, neurogenic. In each case, the search was limited to clinical trial, subjects were human and the language was English. After duplicate removal, we obtained a final number of 580 papers. Data was extracted from each paper into a database file and was analyzed separately for adult and pediatric populations. Results A total of 70 full text papers were reviewed and analyzed according to the previously mentioned algorithm. The first prospective, randomized surgical trials were published less than 20 years ago, starting with 1994, and the number of papers published each year since then has remained in the range of 1–3. The oldest prospective clinical trial for this indication dates back to 1975. The total number of patients included in surgical trials is 3453, out of which 59% are males. The papers include a total of 369 children (21.2%), essentially looking at all the techniques that are also used in adults. Conclusions There is still a lot of work to be done in order to obtain a significant level of evidence in the field of surgical procedures used in neurogenic bladder patients. PMID:25247086

  14. Hippocampal sub-regional shape and physical activity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Varma, Vijay R; Tang, Xiaoying; Carlson, Michelle C

    2016-08-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease pathology, and a target biomarker region for testing intervention efficacy. Over the last few decades, a growing body of evidence from animal and human models suggests that physical activity (PA) is associated with structural benefits to the hippocampus in older adults. Very few human studies, however have explored hippocampal sub-regional specificity of PA; this is significant considering that sub-regions of the hippocampus are associated with distinct cognitive tasks and are differentially affected by disease pathology. This study used objective and self-reported measures of daily walking activity and exercise, and surface-based regional shape analysis using high-field hippocampal sub-regional partitions to explore sub-region specific hippocampal associations in a sample of nondemented, community-dwelling older adults at elevated sociodemographic risk for cognitive decline. Vertex-wise surface areas, which may be more sensitive than global volume measures, were calculated using shape diffeomorphometry, and PA was assessed using step activity monitors and PA questionnaires. We found that daily walking activity in a participant's environment was associated in cross-section mainly with larger surface areas of the subiculum in women. Associations remained significant when controlling for self-reported exercise. Prior studies have found that PA related to exercise and aerobic fitness may be most closely associated with the anterior hippocampus, particularly the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. These novel findings are the first, to our knowledge, in human models to suggest that PA related to navigation that may not reach the level of moderate-intensity exercise may be associated with specific sub-regions of the hippocampus. These findings underscore the importance of better understanding the independent and related biological mechanisms and pathways by which increasing exercise as well as non

  15. Regional Differences in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake among US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sohyun; McGuire, Lisa C.; Galuska, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes, and the prevalence of obesity varies by geographic region. Although information on whether SSB intake differs geographically could be valuable for designing targeted interventions, this information is limited. Objective This cross-sectional study examined associations between living in specific census regions and frequency of SSB consumption among US adults using 2010 National Health Interview Survey data (n = 25,431). Methods SSB consumption was defined as the consumption of four types of beverages (regular sugar-sweetened carbonated beverages, fruit drinks, sports/energy drinks, and sweetened coffee/tea drinks). The exposure variable was census region of residence (Northeast, Midwest, South, and West). We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% CIs for drinking SSBs after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. Results Approximately 64% of adults consumed SSBs ≥1 time/day. The odds of drinking SSBs ≥1 time/day were significantly higher among adults living in the Northeast (aOR = 1.13; 95% CI = 1.01, 1.26) but lower among adults living in the Midwest (aOR = 0.70; 95% CI = 0.64, 0.78) or West (aOR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.71, 0.87) compared with those living in the South. By type of SSB, the odds of drinking regular soda ≥1 time/day was significantly lower among adults living in the Northeast (aOR = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.45, 0.57), Midwest (aOR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.78, 0.96), or West (aOR = 0.56; 95% CI = 0.51, 0.62) than those living in the South. The odds of drinking sports/energy drinks ≥1 time/day were significantly lower among adults living in the West (aOR = 0.77; 95% CI = 0.64, 0.93) than those living in the South. The odds of drinking a sweetened coffee/tea drink ≥1 time/day were significantly higher among adults living in the Northeast (aOR = 1.60; 95% CI = 1.43, 1.78) but lower among adults

  16. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury, myelomeningocele, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Awad, Richard A

    2011-12-14

    Exciting new features have been described concerning neurogenic bowel dysfunction, including interactions between the central nervous system, the enteric nervous system, axonal injury, neuronal loss, neurotransmission of noxious and non-noxious stimuli, and the fields of gastroenterology and neurology. Patients with spinal cord injury, myelomeningocele, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease present with serious upper and lower bowel dysfunctions characterized by constipation, incontinence, gastrointestinal motor dysfunction and altered visceral sensitivity. Spinal cord injury is associated with severe autonomic dysfunction, and bowel dysfunction is a major physical and psychological burden for these patients. An adult myelomeningocele patient commonly has multiple problems reflecting the multisystemic nature of the disease. Multiple sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disorder in which axonal injury, neuronal loss, and atrophy of the central nervous system can lead to permanent neurological damage and clinical disability. Parkinson's disease is a multisystem disorder involving dopaminergic, noradrenergic, serotoninergic and cholinergic systems, characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease affects several neuronal structures outside the substantia nigra, among which is the enteric nervous system. Recent reports have shown that the lesions in the enteric nervous system occur in very early stages of the disease, even before the involvement of the central nervous system. This has led to the postulation that the enteric nervous system could be critical in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, as it could represent the point of entry for a putative environmental factor to initiate the pathological process. This review covers the data related to the etiology, epidemiology, clinical expression, pathophysiology, genetic aspects, gastrointestinal motor dysfunction, visceral sensitivity, management, prevention and prognosis of neurogenic bowel

  17. Functional Connectivity Abnormalities of Brain Regions with Structural Deficits in Young Adult Male Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Limei; Yu, Dahua; Su, Shaoping; Ma, Yao; von Deneen, Karen M.; Luo, Lin; Zhai, Jinquan; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Jiadong; Guan, Yanyan; Li, Yangding; Bi, Yanzhi; Xue, Ting; Lu, Xiaoqi; Yuan, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is one of the most prevalent dependence disorders. Previous studies have detected structural and functional deficits in smokers. However, few studies focused on the changes of resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) of the brain regions with structural deficits in young adult smokers. Twenty-six young adult smokers and 26 well-matched healthy non-smokers participated in our study. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and RSFC were employed to investigate the structural and functional changes in young adult smokers. Compared with healthy non-smokers, young smokers showed increased gray matter (GM) volume in the left putamen and decreased GM volume in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Moreover, GM volume in the left ACC has a negative correlation trend with pack-years and GM volume in the left putamen was positively correlated with pack-years. The left ACC and putamen with abnormal volumes were chosen as the regions of interest (ROIs) for the RSFC analysis. We found that smokers showed increased RSFC between the left ACC and right amygdala and between the left putamen and right anterior insula. We revealed structural and functional deficits within the frontostriatal circuits in young smokers, which may shed new insights into the neural mechanisms of smoking. PMID:27757078

  18. Dpp signaling determines regional stem cell identity in the regenerating adult Drosophila gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2013-07-11

    The gastrointestinal tract is lined by a series of epithelia that share functional requirements but also have distinct, highly specialized roles. Distinct populations of somatic stem cells (SCs) regenerate these epithelia, yet the mechanisms that maintain regional identities of these SCs are not well understood. Here, we identify a role for the BMP-like Dpp signaling pathway in diversifying regenerative processes in the adult gastrointestinal tract of Drosophila. Dpp secreted from enterocytes at the boundary between the posterior midgut and the middle midgut (MM) sets up a morphogen gradient that selectively directs copper cell (CC) regeneration from gastric SCs in the MM and thus determines the size of the CC region. In vertebrates, deregulation of BMP signaling has been associated with Barrett's metaplasia, wherein the squamous esophageal epithelium is replaced by a columnar epithelium, suggesting that the maintenance of regional SC identities by BMP is conserved.

  19. Effects of alcohol consumption on cognition and regional brain volumes among older adults.

    PubMed

    Downer, Brian; Jiang, Yang; Zanjani, Faika; Fardo, David

    2015-06-01

    This study utilized data from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort to examine the relationship between midlife and late-life alcohol consumption, cognitive functioning, and regional brain volumes among older adults without dementia or a history of abusing alcohol. The results from multiple linear regression models indicate that late life, but not midlife, alcohol consumption status is associated with episodic memory and hippocampal volume. Compared to late life abstainers, moderate consumers had larger hippocampal volume, and light consumers had higher episodic memory. The differences in episodic memory according to late life alcohol consumption status were no longer significant when hippocampal volume was included in the regression model. The findings from this study provide new evidence that hippocampal volume may contribute to the observed differences in episodic memory among older adults and late life alcohol consumption status.

  20. Adult activity and temperature preference drives region-wide damselfly (Zygoptera) distributions under a warming climate

    PubMed Central

    Corser, Jeffrey D.; White, Erin L.; Schlesinger, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    We analysed a recently completed statewide odonate Atlas using multivariate linear models. Within a phylogenetically explicit framework, we developed a suite of data-derived traits to assess the mechanistic distributional drivers of 59 species of damselflies in New York State (NYS). We found that length of the flight season (adult breeding activity period) mediated by thermal preference drives regional distributions at broad (105 km2) scales. Species that had longer adult flight periods, in conjunction with longer growing seasons, had significantly wider distributions. These intrinsic traits shape species' responses to changing climates and the mechanisms behind such range shifts are fitness-based metapopulation processes that adjust phenology to the prevailing habitat and climate regime through a photoperiod filter. PMID:25878048

  1. Regional variations in and correlates of disability-free life expectancy among older adults in China

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Considerable socioeconomic and health inequalities have been reported in China. However, because of a lack of appropriate data, limited research has been conducted on variations in disability-free life expectancy (DFLE) among older adults. This study aimed to use the most up-to-date disability survey data to explore geographical variations in DFLE at age 60 in China and to identify the socioeconomic and health care factors that partially account for these variations. Methods This study used 2006 mortality data extrapolated from the 1990 and 2000 Census and disability data from a national disability survey conducted in 2006. Disability was performance based and was diagnosed by trained physicians. DFLE was calculated by region using the Sullivan method. Multiple linear regression models by gender were conducted to explore correlates of DFLE. Results DFLE at age 60 varied widely by region, from 11.2 to 20.8 years in 2006. Per capita gross domestic product, proportion of urban residents, and access to health care were the primary factors associated with geographical variations in DFLE. Conclusion The pattern of differences in DFLE by region mirrors the pattern of regional economic development in China. Countermeasures to decrease regional differences in DFLE include accelerating regional economic development and improving health care distribution. PMID:20670431

  2. Analysis of Adult Neurogenesis: Evidence for a Prominent “Non-Neurogenic” DCX-Protein Pool in Rodent Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Thomas; Jagasia, Ravi; Herrmann, Annika; Matile, Hugues; Borroni, Edilio; Francis, Fiona; Kuhn, Hans Georg; Czech, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Here, we have developed a highly sensitive immunoassay for Dcx to characterize expression in brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of rodents. We demonstrate that Dcx is widely expressed during development in various brain regions and as well can be detected in cerebrospinal fluid of rats (up to 30 days postnatal). While Dcx protein level decline in adulthood and were detectable in neurogenic regions of the adult rodent brain, similar levels were also detectable in brain regions expected to bear no neurogenesis including the cerebral cortex and CA1/CA3 enriched hippocampus. We monitored DCX protein levels after paradigms to increase or severely decrease adult hippocampal neurogenesis, namely physical activity and cranial radiation, respectively. In both paradigms, Dcx protein- and mRNA-levels clearly reflected changes in neurogenesis in the hippocampus. However, basal Dcx-levels are unaffected in non-neurogenic regions (e.g. CA1/CA3 enriched hippocampus, cortex). These data suggest that there is a substantial “non-neurogenic” pool of Dcx- protein, whose regulation can be uncoupled from adult neurogenesis suggesting caution for the interpretation of such studies. PMID:23690918

  3. Normative data for subcortical regional volumes over the lifetime of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Olivier; Mouiha, Abderazzak; Dieumegarde, Louis; Duchesne, Simon

    2016-08-15

    Normative data for volumetric estimates of brain structures are necessary to adequately assess brain volume alterations in individuals with suspected neurological or psychiatric conditions. Although many studies have described age and sex effects in healthy individuals for brain morphometry assessed via magnetic resonance imaging, proper normative values allowing to quantify potential brain abnormalities are needed. We developed norms for volumetric estimates of subcortical brain regions based on cross-sectional magnetic resonance scans from 2790 healthy individuals aged 18 to 94years using 23 samples provided by 21 independent research groups. The segmentation was conducted using FreeSurfer, a widely used and freely available automated segmentation software. Models predicting subcortical regional volumes of each hemisphere were produced including age, sex, estimated total intracranial volume (eTIV), scanner manufacturer, magnetic field strength, and interactions as predictors. The mean explained variance by the models was 48%. For most regions, age, sex and eTIV predicted most of the explained variance while manufacturer, magnetic field strength and interactions predicted a limited amount. Estimates of the expected volumes of an individual based on its characteristics and the scanner characteristics can be obtained using derived formulas. For a new individual, significance test for volume abnormality, effect size and estimated percentage of the normative population with a smaller volume can be obtained. Normative values were validated in independent samples of healthy adults and in adults with Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. PMID:27165761

  4. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly with neurogenic muscular atrophy: case report.

    PubMed

    Scola, R H; Werneck, L C; Iwamoto, F M; Ribas, L C; Raskin, S; Correa Neto, Y

    2001-06-01

    We report the case of a 3-(1/2)-year-old girl with hypotonia, multiple joint contractures, hip luxation, arachnodactyly, adducted thumbs, dolichostenomelia, and abnormal external ears suggesting the diagnosis of congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA). The serum muscle enzymes were normal and the needle electromyography showed active and chronic denervation. The muscle biopsy demonstrated active and chronic denervation compatible with spinal muscular atrophy. Analysis of exons 7 and 8 of survival motor neuron gene through polymerase chain reaction did not show deletions. Neurogenic muscular atrophy is a new abnormality associated with CCA, suggesting that CCA is clinically heterogeneous.

  5. A One Year Prospective Study of Neurogenic Stuttering Following Stroke: Incidence and Co-Occurring Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theys, C.; van Wieringen, A.; Sunaert, S.; Thijs, V.; De Nil, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    In this prospective study, data on incidence, stuttering characteristics, co-occurring speech disorders, and recovery of neurogenic stuttering in a large sample of stroke participants were assessed. Following stroke onset, 17 of 319 participants (5.3%; 95% CI, 3.2-8.3) met the criteria for neurogenic stuttering. Stuttering persisted in at least…

  6. Carotid body overactivity induces respiratory neurone channelopathy contributing to neurogenic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-01-01

    Why sympathetic activity rises in neurogenic hypertension remains unknown. It has been postulated that changes in the electrical excitability of medullary pre-sympathetic neurones are the main causal mechanism for the development of sympathetic overactivity in experimental hypertension. Here we review recent data suggesting that enhanced sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension is, at least in part, dependent on alterations in the electrical excitability of medullary respiratory neurones and their central modulation of sympatho-excitatory networks. We also present results showing a critical role for carotid body tonicity in the aetiology of enhanced central respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension. We propose a novel hypothesis of respiratory neurone channelopathy induced by carotid body overactivity in neurogenic hypertension that may contribute to sympathetic excess. Moreover, our data support the notion of targeting the carotid body as a potential novel therapeutic approach for reducing sympathetic vasomotor tone in neurogenic hypertension. PMID:25900825

  7. Carotid body overactivity induces respiratory neurone channelopathy contributing to neurogenic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-07-15

    Why sympathetic activity rises in neurogenic hypertension remains unknown. It has been postulated that changes in the electrical excitability of medullary pre-sympathetic neurones are the main causal mechanism for the development of sympathetic overactivity in experimental hypertension. Here we review recent data suggesting that enhanced sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension is, at least in part, dependent on alterations in the electrical excitability of medullary respiratory neurones and their central modulation of sympatho-excitatory networks. We also present results showing a critical role for carotid body tonicity in the aetiology of enhanced central respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension. We propose a novel hypothesis of respiratory neurone channelopathy induced by carotid body overactivity in neurogenic hypertension that may contribute to sympathetic excess. Moreover, our data support the notion of targeting the carotid body as a potential novel therapeutic approach for reducing sympathetic vasomotor tone in neurogenic hypertension. PMID:25900825

  8. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche.

    PubMed

    Luarte, Alejandro; Bátiz, Luis Federico; Wyneken, Ursula; Lafourcade, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future.

  9. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Luarte, Alejandro; Bátiz, Luis Federico; Wyneken, Ursula; Lafourcade, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future. PMID:27195011

  10. Effects of Aging and Adult-Onset Hearing Loss on Cortical Auditory Regions

    PubMed Central

    Cardin, Velia

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common feature in human aging. It has been argued that dysfunctions in central processing are important contributing factors to hearing loss during older age. Aging also has well documented consequences for neural structure and function, but it is not clear how these effects interact with those that arise as a consequence of hearing loss. This paper reviews the effects of aging and adult-onset hearing loss in the structure and function of cortical auditory regions. The evidence reviewed suggests that aging and hearing loss result in atrophy of cortical auditory regions and stronger engagement of networks involved in the detection of salient events, adaptive control and re-allocation of attention. These cortical mechanisms are engaged during listening in effortful conditions in normal hearing individuals. Therefore, as a consequence of aging and hearing loss, all listening becomes effortful and cognitive load is constantly high, reducing the amount of available cognitive resources. This constant effortful listening and reduced cognitive spare capacity could be what accelerates cognitive decline in older adults with hearing loss. PMID:27242405

  11. [Neurological Signs and Symptoms of True Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Higashihara, Mana; Konoeda, Fumie; Sonoo, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a well-known disorder, but many aspects of its pathology, including its definition, has been disputed. True neurogenic TOS (TN-TOS) is a rare but well-defined clinical condition. TN-TOS results from the compression of the C8/T1 roots (dominant for the T1 root) or the proximal lower trunk of the brachial plexus by a fibrous band. The band extends from the first rib to either the tip of an elongated C7 transverse process or a rudimentary cervical rib. The most common presenting symptoms of TN-TOS are insidious-onset atrophy and weakness of the intrinsic hand muscles, predominantly in the thenar eminence and radial digit flexors. Nerve conduction studies demonstrate pathognomonic findings: severely attenuated compound muscle action potential of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, and usually, loss of the sensory nerve action potential of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. Numbness and sensory loss are typically observed, mainly in the medial forearm, although they are usually mild, and may be absent in some patients. Severe pain or paresthesia proximal to the elbow is not observed. The classical concept of TOS underlie nonspecific neurogenic TOS. It has been primarily diagnosed using provocative maneuvers. However, there is controversy regarding its pathological conceptualization and existence, as objective evidence of the disease is still lacking. PMID:27156505

  12. Neurogenic gene regulatory pathways in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zheng; Angerer, Lynne M; Angerer, Robert C

    2016-01-15

    During embryogenesis the sea urchin early pluteus larva differentiates 40-50 neurons marked by expression of the pan-neural marker synaptotagmin B (SynB) that are distributed along the ciliary band, in the apical plate and pharyngeal endoderm, and 4-6 serotonergic neurons that are confined to the apical plate. Development of all neurons has been shown to depend on the function of Six3. Using a combination of molecular screens and tests of gene function by morpholino-mediated knockdown, we identified SoxC and Brn1/2/4, which function sequentially in the neurogenic regulatory pathway and are also required for the differentiation of all neurons. Misexpression of Brn1/2/4 at low dose caused an increase in the number of serotonin-expressing cells and at higher dose converted most of the embryo to a neurogenic epithelial sphere expressing the Hnf6 ciliary band marker. A third factor, Z167, was shown to work downstream of the Six3 and SoxC core factors and to define a branch specific for the differentiation of serotonergic neurons. These results provide a framework for building a gene regulatory network for neurogenesis in the sea urchin embryo.

  13. Neurogenic gene regulatory pathways in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zheng; Angerer, Lynne M; Angerer, Robert C

    2016-01-15

    During embryogenesis the sea urchin early pluteus larva differentiates 40-50 neurons marked by expression of the pan-neural marker synaptotagmin B (SynB) that are distributed along the ciliary band, in the apical plate and pharyngeal endoderm, and 4-6 serotonergic neurons that are confined to the apical plate. Development of all neurons has been shown to depend on the function of Six3. Using a combination of molecular screens and tests of gene function by morpholino-mediated knockdown, we identified SoxC and Brn1/2/4, which function sequentially in the neurogenic regulatory pathway and are also required for the differentiation of all neurons. Misexpression of Brn1/2/4 at low dose caused an increase in the number of serotonin-expressing cells and at higher dose converted most of the embryo to a neurogenic epithelial sphere expressing the Hnf6 ciliary band marker. A third factor, Z167, was shown to work downstream of the Six3 and SoxC core factors and to define a branch specific for the differentiation of serotonergic neurons. These results provide a framework for building a gene regulatory network for neurogenesis in the sea urchin embryo. PMID:26657764

  14. Cancer stem cells from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis posits that deregulated neural stem cells (NSCs) form the basis of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM, however, usually forms in the cerebral white matter while normal NSCs reside in subventricular and hippocampal regions. We attempted to characterize CSCs from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall. Methods We described isolating CSCs from a GBM involving the lateral ventricles and characterized these cells with in vitro molecular biomarker profiling, cellular behavior, ex vivo and in vivo techniques. Results The patient’s MRI revealed a heterogeneous mass with associated edema, involving the left subventricular zone. Histological examination of the tumor established it as being a high-grade glial neoplasm, characterized by polygonal and fusiform cells with marked nuclear atypia, amphophilic cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, frequent mitotic figures, irregular zones of necrosis and vascular hyperplasia. Recurrence of the tumor occurred shortly after the surgical resection. CD133-positive cells, isolated from the tumor, expressed stem cell markers including nestin, CD133, Ki67, Sox2, EFNB1, EFNB2, EFNB3, Cav-1, Musashi, Nucleostemin, Notch 2, Notch 4, and Pax6. Biomarkers expressed in differentiated cells included Cathepsin L, Cathepsin B, Mucin18, Mucin24, c-Myc, NSE, and TIMP1. Expression of unique cancer-related transcripts in these CD133-positive cells, such as caveolin-1 and −2, do not appear to have been previously reported in the literature. Ex vivo organotypic brain slice co-culture showed that the CD133+ cells behaved like tumor cells. The CD133-positive cells also induced tumor formation when they were stereotactically transplanted into the brains of the immune-deficient NOD/SCID mice. Conclusions This brain tumor involving the neurogenic lateral ventricular wall was comprised of tumor-forming, CD133-positive cancer stem cells, which are likely

  15. Environmental Impact on Direct Neuronal Reprogramming In Vivo in the Adult Brain

    PubMed Central

    López-Juárez, Alejandro; Howard, Jennifer; Sakthivel, Bhuvaneswari; Aronow, Bruce; Campbell, Kenneth; Nakafuku, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of non-neuronal cells to generate new neurons is a promising approach to repair damaged brains. Impact of the in vivo environment on neuronal reprogramming, however, is poorly understood. Here we show that regional differences and injury conditions have significant influence on the efficacy of reprogramming and subsequent survival of newly generated neurons in the adult rodent brain. A combination of local exposure to growth factors and retrovirus-mediated overexpression of the neurogenic transcription factor Neurogenin2 (Neurog2) can induce new neurons from non-neuronal cells in the adult neocortex and striatum where neuronal turnover is otherwise very limited. These two regions respond to growth factors and Neurog2 differently and instruct new neurons to exhibit distinct molecular phenotypes. Moreover, ischemic insult differentially affects differentiation of new neurons in these regions. These results demonstrate strong environmental impact on direct neuronal reprogramming in vivo. PMID:23974433

  16. Environmental impact on direct neuronal reprogramming in vivo in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Grande, Andrew; Sumiyoshi, Kyoko; López-Juárez, Alejandro; Howard, Jennifer; Sakthivel, Bhuvaneswari; Aronow, Bruce; Campbell, Kenneth; Nakafuku, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of non-neuronal cells to generate new neurons is a promising approach to repair damaged brains. Impact of the in vivo environment on neuronal reprogramming, however, is poorly understood. Here we show that regional differences and injury conditions have significant influence on the efficacy of reprogramming and subsequent survival of the newly generated neurons in the adult rodent brain. A combination of local exposure to growth factors and retrovirus-mediated overexpression of the neurogenic transcription factor Neurogenin2 can induce new neurons from non-neuronal cells in the adult neocortex and striatum where neuronal turnover is otherwise very limited. These two regions respond to growth factors and Neurogenin2 differently and instruct new neurons to exhibit distinct molecular phenotypes. Moreover, ischaemic insult differentially affects differentiation of new neurons in these regions. These results demonstrate strong environmental impact on direct neuronal reprogramming in vivo.

  17. Neurogenic inflammation in the upper digestive tract of the mule duck: effect of a chemical algogen and force-feeding.

    PubMed

    Servière, J; Carriere, M; Duvaux-Ponter, C; Guy, G; Roussel, S

    2011-12-01

    1.The objectives were to quantify the presence of neurogenic inflammation in 4 regions of the upper digestive tract of anaesthetised ducks (post-pharynx, pseudo-crop, transition between the pseudo-crop and the proventriculus, and proventriculus) after application of HCl stimulation of up to 4 M in the pseudo-crop. 2.The second objective was to quantify the presence of neurogenic inflammation in the same digestive tract regions as mentioned above during 4 feeding periods of foie gras production (rearing, preparation to force-feeding, and second and last meals of the force-feeding period). 3. Extravasation increased above a HCl stimulation threshold of 2 M. Furthermore, more extravasation was observed in the proventriculus compared to the other regions (P < 0·001). 4.Highest extravasation responses were observed in the proventriculus and the pseudo-crop at the end of the preparation period, and in the proventriculus after the second forced meal, compared with the rearing period (P < 0·01), with a return to rearing level at the end of force-feeding. 5.Such a kinetic could be indicative of a relative mildness of the irritant components associated with this feeding practice.

  18. In Vivo Targeting of Adult Neural Stem Cells in the Dentate Gyrus by a Split-Cre Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beckervordersandforth, Ruth; Deshpande, Aditi; Schäffner, Iris; Huttner, Hagen B.; Lepier, Alexandra; Lie, Dieter Chichung; Götz, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe the labeling of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in the mouse and human dentate gyrus (DG) by the combinatorial expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Prominin1, as revealed by immunohistochemistry. Split-Cre-based genetic fate mapping of these double-positive cells in the adult murine DG reveals their NSC identity, as they are self-renewing and contribute to neurogenesis over several months. Their progeny reacts to stimuli such as voluntary exercise with increased neurogenesis. Prominin1+/GFAP+ cells also exist in the adult human DG, the only region in the human brain for which adult neurogenesis has been consistently reported. Our data, together with previous evidence of such double-positive NSCs in the developing murine brain and in neurogenic regions of vertebrates with widespread neurogenesis, suggest that Prominin1- and GFAP-expressing cells are NSCs in a wide range of species in development and adulthood. PMID:24527389

  19. Valproic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, decreases proliferation of and induces specific neurogenic differentiation of canine adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takehito; Sakaue, Motoharu; Murayama, Ohoshi; Miyazaki, Yoko; Onuki, Atsushi; Aoki, Takuma; Saito, Miyoko; Fujii, Yoko; Hisasue, Masaharu; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Takizawa, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) isolated from adult tissue have pluripotent differentiation and self-renewal capability. The tissue source of ADSCs can be obtained in large quantities and with low risks, thus highlighting the advantages of ADSCs in clinical applications. Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely used antiepileptic drug, which has recently been reported to affect ADSC differentiation in mice and rats; however, few studies have been performed on dogs. We aimed to examine the in vitro effect of VPA on canine ADSCs. Three days of pretreatment with VPA decreased the proliferation of ADSCs in a dose-dependent manner; VPA concentrations of 4 mM and above inhibited the proliferation of ADSCs. In parallel, VPA increased p16 and p21 mRNA expression, suggesting that VPA attenuated the proliferative activity of ADSCs by activating p16 and p21. Furthermore, the effects of VPA on adipogenic, osteogenic or neurogenic differentiation were investigated morphologically. VPA pretreatment markedly promoted neurogenic differentiation, but suppressed the accumulation of lipid droplets and calcium depositions. These modifications of ADSCs by VPA were associated with a particular gene expression profile, viz., an increase in neuronal markers, that is, NSE, TUBB3 and MAP2, a decrease in the adipogenic marker, LPL, but no changes in osteogenic markers, as estimated by reverse transcription-PCR analysis. These results suggested that VPA is a specific inducer of neurogenic differentiation of canine ADSCs and is a useful tool for studying the interaction between chromatin structure and cell fate determination.

  20. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism is normal in young adults with Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.L.; Kumar, A.; Herscovitch, P.; Haxby, J.V.; Moore, A.M.; White, B.; Friedland, R.P.; Rapoport, S.I. )

    1990-03-01

    Regional CMRglc (rCMRglc) values were measured with ({sup 18}F)2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET), using a Scanditronix PC-1024-7B scanner, in 14 healthy, noninstitutionalized subjects with trisomy 21 (Down syndrome; DS) (mean age 30.0 years, range 25-38 years) and in 13 sex-matched, healthy volunteers (mean age 29.5 years, range 22-38 years). In the DS group, mean mental age on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test was 7.8 years and dementia was not present. Resting rCMRglc was determined with eyes covered and ears occluded in a quiet, darkened room. Global gray CMRglc equaled 8.76 +/- 0.76 mg/100 g/min (mean +/- SD) in the DS group as compared with 8.74 +/- 1.19 mg/100 g/min in the control group (p greater than 0.05). Gray matter regional measurements also did not differ between groups. The ratio of rCMRglc to global CMRglc, calculated to reduce the variance associated with absolute rCMRglc, and right/left ratios did not show any consistent differences. These results show that healthy young DS adults do not have alterations in regional or global brain glucose metabolism, as measured with 18FDG and PET, prior to an age at which the neuropathological changes in Alzheimer disease are reported to occur.

  1. RESEARCH STUDIES WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR ADULT EDUCATION, MOUNTAIN-PLAINS REGION, 1945-1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BURRICHTER, ARTHUR; JENSEN, GLENN

    THIS COMPILATION OF ABSTRACTS OF ADULT EDUCATION RESEARCH STUDIES CONDUCTED IN NEW MEXICO, ARIZONA, NEVADA, UTAH, IDAHO, WYOMING, AND COLORADO COVERS COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY ADULT EDUCATION, PUBLIC SCHOOL ADULT PROGRAMS (MAINLY SECONDARY AND ADULT BASIC EDUCATION), VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL TRAINING (INCLUDING INDUSTRIAL INSERVICE TRAINING), ADULT…

  2. Neurogenic effect of VEGF is related to increase of astrocytes transdifferentiation into new mature neurons in rat brains after stroke.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shu-Wen; Duan, Chun-Ling; Chen, Xian-Hua; Wang, Yong-Quan; Sun, Xiao; Zhang, Qiu-Wan; Cui, Hui-Ru; Sun, Feng-Yan

    2016-09-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-enhanced neurogenesis in ischemic brain injury, we used middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model to induce transient focal ischemic brain injury. The results showed that ischemic injury significantly increased glial fibrillary acidic protein immunopositive (GFAP(+)) and nestin(+) cells in ipsilateral striatum 3 days following MCAO. Most GFAP(+) cells colocalized with nestin (GFAP(+)-nestin(+)), Pax6 (GFAP(+)-Pax6(+)), or Olig2 (GFAP(+)-Olig2(+)). VEGF further increased GFAP(+)-nestin(+) and GFAP(+)-Pax6(+) cells, and decreased GFAP(+)-Olig2(+) cells. We used striatal injection of GFAP targeted enhanced green fluorescence protein (pGfa2-EGFP) vectors combined with multiple immunofluorescent staining to trace the neural fates of EGFP-expressing (GFP(+)) reactive astrocytes. The results showed that MCAO-induced striatal reactive astrocytes differentiated into neural stem cells (GFP(+)-nestin(+) cells) at 3 days after MCAO, immature (GFP(+)-Tuj-1(+) cells) at 1 week and mature neurons (GFP(+)-MAP-2(+) or GFP(+)-NeuN(+) cells) at 2 weeks. VEGF increased GFP(+)-NeuN(+) and BrdU(+)-MAP-2(+) newborn neurons after MCAO. Fluorocitrate, an astrocytic inhibitor, significantly decreased GFAP and nestin expression in ischemic brains, and also reduced VEGF-enhanced neurogenic effects. This study is the first time to report that VEGF-mediated increase of newly generated neurons is dependent on the presence of reactive astrocytes. The results also illustrate cellular mechanism of VEGF-enhanced neural repair and functional plasticity in the brains after ischemic injury. We concluded that neurogenic effect of VEGF is related to increase of striatal astrocytes transdifferentiation into new mature neurons, which should be very important for the reconstruction of neurovascular units/networks in non-neurogenic regions of the mammalian brain. PMID:26603138

  3. The Role of Astrocytes in the Generation, Migration, and Integration of New Neurons in the Adult Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Gengatharan, Archana; Bammann, Rodrigo R.; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, new neurons in the adult olfactory bulb originate from a pool of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Adult-born cells play an important role in odor information processing by adjusting the neuronal network to changing environmental conditions. Olfactory bulb neurogenesis is supported by several non-neuronal cells. In this review, we focus on the role of astroglial cells in the generation, migration, integration, and survival of new neurons in the adult forebrain. In the subventricular zone, neural stem cells with astrocytic properties display regional and temporal specificity when generating different neuronal subtypes. Non-neurogenic astrocytes contribute to the establishment and maintenance of the neurogenic niche. Neuroblast chains migrate through the rostral migratory stream ensheathed by astrocytic processes. Astrocytes play an important regulatory role in neuroblast migration and also assist in the development of a vasculature scaffold in the migratory stream that is essential for neuroblast migration in the postnatal brain. In the olfactory bulb, astrocytes help to modulate the network through a complex release of cytokines, regulate blood flow, and provide metabolic support, which may promote the integration and survival of new neurons. Astrocytes thus play a pivotal role in various processes of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis, and it is likely that many other functions of these glial cells will emerge in the near future. PMID:27092050

  4. Regional Differences in Correlates of Daily Walking among Middle Age and Older Australian Rural Adults: Implications for Health Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Dollman, James; Hull, Melissa; Lewis, Nicole; Carroll, Suzanne; Zarnowiecki, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Rural Australians are less physically active than their metropolitan counterparts, and yet very little is known of the candidate intervention targets for promoting physical activity in rural populations. As rural regions are economically, socially and environmentally diverse, drivers of regular physical activity are likely to vary between regions. This study explored the region-specific correlates of daily walking among middle age and older adults in rural regions with contrasting dominant primary industries. Participants were recruited through print and electronic media, primary care settings and community organisations. Pedometers were worn by 153 adults for at least four days, including a weekend day. A questionnaire identified potential intra-personal, social and environmental correlates of physical activity, according to a social ecological framework. Regression modelling identified independent correlates of daily walking separately in the two study regions. In one region, there were independent correlates of walking from all levels of the social ecological framework. In the other region, significant correlates of daily walking were almost all demographic (age, education and marital status). Participants living alone were less likely to be physically active regardless of region. This study highlights the importance of considering region-specific factors when designing strategies for promoting regular walking among rural adults. PMID:26761020

  5. Persistent neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to infantile botulism.

    PubMed

    Breinbjerg, Anders; Rittig, Søren; Kamperis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-13

    We present a child, 5 months of age, diagnosed with infantile botulism, showing the signs of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The patient presented with progressive muscle weakness, hypotonia, suckling and swallowing problems and absent peripheral reflexes at clinical examination. Botulinum neurotoxin type A was detected in her serum, confirming the diagnosis. Starting at day 6, the girl presented with a urinary retention initially necessitating free bladder drainage and subsequently intermittent catheterisation. After 6 weeks in intensive care, the patient recovered but the bladder underactivity persisted. Four months following recovery, a urodynamic evaluation was performed, showing a near normal detrusor activity and normal bladder emptying, and the catheterisation was ceased. At 6 months, the girl was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and bladder emptying problems, which persisted, and clean intermittent catheterisation was started. The final urodynamic evaluation, a year and a half after her initial presentation, revealed a normal detrusor activity and an adequate bladder emptying.

  6. Neurogenic cardiomyopathy in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies.

    PubMed

    Kesdangsakonwut, S; Sunden, Y; Yamada, K; Nishizono, A; Sawa, H; Umemura, T

    2015-05-01

    Cardiomyopathies have been rarely described in rabbits. Here we report myocardial necrosis of the ventricular wall in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies. Myocardial lesions were found only in rabbits with brain lesions, and the severity of the cardiac lesions was proportional to that of the brain lesions. Neither the frequency nor the cumulative dose of anesthesia was related to the incidence or the severity of the myocardial lesions. The myocardial lesions were characterized by degeneration and/or necrosis of myocardial cells and were accompanied by contraction band necrosis, interstitial fibrosis, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. The brain lesions due to rabies virus infection were most prominent in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, brainstem, and medulla. Rabies virus antigen was not found in the hearts of any rabbits. Based on these findings, the myocardial lesions were classified as neurogenic cardiomyopathy.

  7. Midlife measurements of white matter microstructure predict subsequent regional white matter atrophy in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Martina; Canu, Elisa; Xu, Guofan; Oh, Jennifer; McLaren, Donald G; Dowling, N. Maritza; Alexander, Andrew L; Sager, Mark A; Johnson, Sterling C; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2013-01-01

    Objectives While age-related brain changes are becoming better understood, midlife patterns of change are still in need of characterization, and longitudinal studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine if baseline fractional anisotropy (FA), obtained from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) predicts volume change over a four-year interval. Experimental design Forty-four cognitively healthy middle-age adults underwent baseline DTI and longitudinal T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Tensor Based Morphometry methods were used to evaluate volume change over time. FA values were extracted from regions of interest that included the cingulum, entorhinal white matter, and the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Baseline FA was used as a predictor variable, while gray and white matter atrophy rates as indexed by Tensor Based Morphometry were the dependent variables. Principal observations Over a four-year period, participants showed significant contraction of white matter, especially in frontal, temporal, and cerebellar regions (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). Baseline FA in entorhinal white matter, genu, and splenium, was associated with longitudinal rates of atrophy in regions that included the superior longitudinal fasciculus, anterior corona radiata, temporal stem, and white matter of the inferior temporal gyrus (p<0.001, uncorrected for multiple comparisons). Conclusions Brain change with aging is characterized by extensive shrinkage of white matter. Baseline white matter microstructure as indexed by DTI was associated with some of the observed regional volume loss. The findings suggest that both white matter volume loss and microstructural alterations should be considered more prominently in models of aging and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23861348

  8. Neurogenic plasticity of mesenchymal stem cell, an alluring cellular replacement for traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Pati, Soumya; Muthuraju, Sangu; Hadi, Raisah Ab; Huat, Tee Jong; Singh, Shailja; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Jaafar, Hasnan

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) imposes horrendous neurophysiological alterations leading to most devastating forms of neuro-disability. Which includes impaired cognition, distorted locomotors activity and psychosomatic disability in both youths and adults. Emerging evidence from recent studies has identified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as one of the promising category of stem cells having excellent neuroregenerative capability in TBI victims. Some of the clinical and animal studies reported that MSCs transplantation could cure neuronal damage as well as improve cognitive and locomotors behaviors in TBI. However, mechanism behind their broad spectrum neuroregenerative potential in TBI has not been reviewed yet. Therefore, in the present article, we present a comprehensive data on the important attributes of MSCs, such as neurotransdifferentiation, neuroprotection, axonal repair and plasticity, maintenance of blood-brain integrity, reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and immunomodulation. We have reviewed in detail the crucial neurogenic capabilities of MSCs in vivo and provided consolidated knowledge regarding their cellular remodeling in TBI for future therapeutic implications. PMID:26763886

  9. Osteogenic and Neurogenic Stem Cells in Their Own Place: Unraveling Differences and Similarities Between Niches

    PubMed Central

    Lattanzi, Wanda; Parolisi, Roberta; Barba, Marta; Bonfanti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Although therapeutic use of stem cells (SCs) is already available in some tissues (cornea, blood, and skin), in most organs we are far from reaching the translational goal of regenerative medicine. In the nervous system, due to intrinsic features which make it refractory to regeneration/repair, it is very hard to obtain functionally integrated regenerative outcomes, even starting from its own SCs (the neural stem cells; NSCs). Besides NSCs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have also been proposed for therapeutic purposes in neurological diseases. Yet, direct (regenerative) and indirect (bystander) effects are often confused, as are MSCs and bone marrow-derived (stromal, osteogenic) stem cells (BMSCs), whose plasticity is actually overestimated (i.e., trans-differentiation along non-mesodermal lineages, including neural fates). In order to better understand failure in the “regenerative” use of SCs for neurological disorders, it could be helpful to understand how NSCs and BMSCs have adapted to their respective organ niches. In this perspective, here the adult osteogenic and neurogenic niches are considered and compared within their in vivo environment. PMID:26635534

  10. Comparison of neurogenic effects of fluoxetine, duloxetine and running in mice

    PubMed Central

    Marlatt, Michael W.; Lucassen, Paul J.; van Praag, Henriette

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis can be regulated by extrinsic factors, such as exercise and antidepressants. While there is evidence that the serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (Prozac) enhances neurogenesis, the new dual serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine has not been evaluated in this context. In addition, it is unclear whether effects of antidepressants and running on cell genesis and behavior are of similar magnitude in mice. Here,we assessed neurogenesis and open field behavior in 2 month old female C57Bl/6 mice after 28 days of treatment with either fluoxetine (18 mg/kg), duloxetine (2, 6 or 18 mg/kg) or exercise. New cell survival, as measured by 5-bromo-2´-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeled cells, was enhanced by 200% in the running group only. Both running and fluoxetine, but not duloxetine, increased the percentage of new cells that became neurons. In the open field test, animals treated with either drug spent less time in the center than controls and runners. In addition, fluoxetine treatment resulted in reduced locomotor activity. Together, these data not only show that the neurogenic response to exercise is much stronger than to antidepressants, but also imply a low likelihood that reported effects of these two drugs on anxiety are mediated by adult neurogenesis in C57Bl/6 mice. PMID:20381469

  11. Heated indoor swimming pools, infants, and the pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a neurogenic hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a case-control study a statistically significant association was recorded between the introduction of infants to heated indoor swimming pools and the development of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). In this paper, a neurogenic hypothesis is formulated to explain how toxins produced by chlorine in such pools may act deleteriously on the infant's immature central nervous system, comprising brain and spinal cord, to produce the deformity of AIS. Presentation of the hypothesis Through vulnerability of the developing central nervous system to circulating toxins, and because of delayed epigenetic effects, the trunk deformity of AIS does not become evident until adolescence. In mature healthy swimmers using such pools, the circulating neurotoxins detected are chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform. Cyanogen chloride and dichloroacetonitrile have also been detected. Testing the hypothesis In infants, the putative portals of entry to the blood could be dermal, oral, or respiratory; and entry of such circulating small molecules to the brain are via the blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and circumventricular organs. Barrier mechanisms of the developing brain differ from those of adult brain and have been linked to brain development. During the first 6 months of life cerebrospinal fluid contains higher concentrations of specific proteins relative to plasma, attributed to mechanisms continued from fetal brain development rather than immaturity. Implications of the hypothesis The hypothesis can be tested. If confirmed, there is potential to prevent some children from developing AIS. PMID:21975145

  12. Facilitation of learning after lesions of the tuberomammillary nucleus region in adult and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Frisch, C; Hasenöhrl, R U; Haas, H L; Weiler, H T; Steinbusch, H W; Huston, J P

    1998-02-01

    The tuberomammillary nucleus (TM) located in the posterior part of the hypothalamus is the main source of neuronal histamine in the central nervous system. Recent work from our laboratories has indicated an involvement of the TM region in neuronal plasticity and reinforcement processes. In the present study, we investigated the effects of TM lesions on the performance of adult and aged Wistar rats in a set of learning tasks, which differed in terms of complexity and reward contingencies (habituation learning, inhibitory avoidance, discrimination learning, Morris water maze). An improvement was found in every test applied, indicating that TM lesions seem to generally enhance learning and memory capacities independent of the special demands of a given task. Age-related learning deficits were strongly diminished. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the excitotoxic lesions used to destroy the TM region led to a marked decrease in the number of histamine-positive neurons in the vicinity of the injection site, indicating an involvement of the brain histaminergic system in the observed behavioral changes.

  13. Light scattering properties vary across different regions of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Al-Juboori, Saif I; Dondzillo, Anna; Stubblefield, Elizabeth A; Felsen, Gidon; Lei, Tim C; Klug, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue.

  14. Light Scattering Properties Vary across Different Regions of the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, Elizabeth A.; Felsen, Gidon

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue. PMID:23874433

  15. Light scattering properties vary across different regions of the adult mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Juboori, Saif I.

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue.

  16. Human dental pulp stem cells with highly angiogenic and neurogenic potential for possible use in pulp regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Misako; Iohara, Koichiro; Sugiyama, Masahiko

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries is a common public health problem, causing early loss of dental pulp and resultant tooth loss. Dental pulp has important functions to sustain teeth providing nutrient and oxygen supply, innervation, reactionary/reparative dentin formation and immune response. Regeneration of pulp is an unmet need in endodontic therapy, and angiogenesis/vasculogenesis and neurogenesis are critical for pulp regeneration. Permanent and deciduous pulp tissue is easily available from teeth after extraction without ethical issues and has potential for clinical use. In this review, we introduce some stem cell subfractions, CD31(-)/CD146(-) SP cells and CD105(+) cells with high angiogenic and neurogenic potential, derived from human adult dental pulp tissue. Potential utility of these cells is addressed as a source of cells for treatment of cerebral and limb ischemia and pulp inflammation complete with angiogenesis and vasculogenesis.

  17. Influence of early linguistic experience on regional dialect categorization by an adult cochlear implant user: a case study.

    PubMed

    Tamati, Terrin N; Gilbert, Jaimie L; Pisoni, David B

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the ability of a cochlear implant user to categorize talkers by region of origin and examine the influence of prior linguistic experience on the perception of regional dialect variation. A postlingually deafened adult cochlear implant user from the Southern region of the United States completed a six-alternative forced-choice dialect categorization task. The cochlear implant user was most accurate at categorizing unfamiliar talkers from his own region and another familiar dialect region, and least accurate at categorizing talkers from less familiar regions. Although the dialect-specific information made available by a cochlear implant may be degraded compared with information available to normal-hearing listeners, this experienced cochlear implant user was able to reliably categorize unfamiliar talkers by region of origin. The participant made use of dialect-specific acoustic-phonetic information in the speech signal and previously stored knowledge of regional dialect differences from early exposure before implantation despite an early hearing loss.

  18. Fluoride excretion of adults living in border regions with either water or salt fluoridation.

    PubMed

    Guindy, Joseph S; Gysin, Ralph; Kränzlin, Marius; Gasser, Thomas C; Hauck, Kirsten; Meyer, Jürg

    2006-01-01

    The canton of Basel-Stadt was the only canton in Switzerland which introduced drinking water fluoridation (DWF) at 1 ppm (mg/l). All other cantons have relied on fluoridated domestic salt at 250 ppm F as the main vehicle for basic fluoride exposure. It has been suggested that persons living and working in the DWF areas or persons commuting to the DWF areas may be exposed to higher than optimal doses of fluoride. The objective of this present study was to determine the urinary fluoride excretion of adults living and or working in neighboring areas of either salt or water fluoridation. In this study, 24-hour urine was collected from 69 healthy subjects and tested for fluoride concentration. The mean fluoride concentration for all participants was 0.55 +/- 0.25 ppm (mg/l) ranging from 1.14 to 0.09 ppm. The mean fluoride excretion was 0.95 +/- 0.47 mg F/d ranging from 0.18 to 2.12 mg F/d. The 33 subjects living in a DWF region showed a mean urine fluoride concentration of 0.64 +/- 0.24 ppm (mg/l) and a mean fluoride excretion of 1.14 +/- 0.48 mg F/d. Those 36 subjects living in a region without DWF showed a mean urine fluoride concentration of 0.47 +/- 0.24 ppm (mg/l) and a mean fluoride excretion of 0.78 +/- 0.40 mg F/d. A significant difference between the two means of the groups living in regions with or without DWF was detected when the Mann-Whitney statistical test was applied (p < 0.005). The combined intake of fluoridated drinking water and fluoridated table salt in the sub-group of 11 subjects who commuted showed an overall increase in fluoride urine concentration. The measured values, however, were not significantly different from the other sub-groups.

  19. Place of birth and adult cardiovascular disease: the British Regional Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Shaper, A G; Elford, J

    1991-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is almost certainly a nutritional disorder related to the quality and quantity of dietary fats and mediated by blood and tissue lipid concentrations. There is current controversy as to when the underlying process of atherosclerosis is initiated and whether the critical susceptibility to CHD may be established in utero or infancy. Blood pressure and hypertension may also be nutritionally based, and the age at which the rate of rise in blood pressure with age is determined is also controversial. The British Regional Heart Study (BRHS) involves 7,735 middle-aged men from 24 towns in England, Wales and Scotland and reveals that average blood cholesterol levels in these towns show no relationship to CHD mortality but all are high by international standards. Blood pressure levels vary markedly between the 24 towns and relate strongly to CHD mortality patterns, which are highest in Scotland and lowest in the South of England. The hypothesis relating adult blood pressures and CHD mortality to foetal and infant life circumstances has been examined using the data on birthplace and place of examination of the BRHS men. Regardless of where they were born, men living and examined in the South had lower mean blood pressures than men living in Scotland. The highest mean blood pressures were observed in Scotland, irrespective of where the men had been born. For CHD, regardless of their place of birth, men living in the South had a lower risk of CHD than men living elsewhere. The geographic zone of examination appeared to be more important than the zone of birth in determining the risk of CHD and the level of blood pressure. While patterns of nutrition during pregnancy, in infancy and childhood may be of importance for some outcomes, such as height, it seems that exposure to risk factors during adult life predominantly determine the outcome in cardiovascular disease.

  20. A novel natural product inspired scaffold with robust neurotrophic, neurogenic and neuroprotective action

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Sumana; Maitra, Swati; Reddy, R Gajendra; Das, Tapatee; Jhelum, Priya; Kootar, Scherazad; Rajan, Wenson D.; Samanta, Anumita; Samineni, Ramesh; Pabbaraja, Srihari; Kernie, Steven G.; Mehta, Goverdhan; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    In search for drugs to treat neuropsychiatric disorders wherein neurotrophic and neurogenic properties are affected, two neurotrophically active small molecules specially crafted following natural product leads based on 2-oxa-spiro[5.5]-undecane scaffold, have been thoroughly evaluated for their neurotrophic, neurogenic and neuroprotective potential in ex vivo primary culture and in vivo zebrafish and mouse models. The outcome of in vivo investigations suggest that one of these molecules is more neurotrophic than neurogenic while the other one is more neurogenic than neurotrophic and the former exhibits remarkable neuroprotection in a mouse acute ischemic stroke model. The molecular mechanisms of action of these compounds appear to be through the TrkB-MEK-ERK-CREB-BDNF pathway as pre-treatment with neurotrophin receptor TrkB inhibitor ANA-12 and MEK inhibitor PD98059 attenuates the neurotrophic action of compounds. PMID:26388493

  1. Clinical and economic burden of community-acquired pneumonia amongst adults in the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Hoon; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2011-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity amongst adults in the Asia-Pacific region. Literature published between 1990 and May 2010 on the clinical and economic burden of CAP amongst adults in this region was reviewed. CAP is a significant health burden with significant economic impact in this region. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and advanced age were risk factors for CAP. Aetiological agents included Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Gram-negative bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Staphylococcus aureus and atypical pathogens (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella spp.), with important differences in the prevalence of these pathogens within the region. Antibiotic resistance was significant but was not linked to excess mortality. Aetiological pathogens remained susceptible to newer antimicrobial agents. Rational antibiotic use is essential for preventing resistance, and increased surveillance is required to identify future trends in incidence and aetiology and to drive treatment and prevention strategies.

  2. Neurotrophic Properties, Chemosensory Responses and Neurogenic Niche of the Human Carotid Body.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; Villadiego, Javier; Pardal, Ricardo; Toledo-Aral, Juan José; López-Barneo, José

    2015-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) is a polymodal chemoreceptor that triggers the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia necessary for the maintenance of O(2) homeostasis essential for the survival of organs such as the brain or heart. Glomus cells, the sensory elements in the CB, are also sensitive to hypercapnia, acidosis and, although less generally accepted, hypoglycemia. Current knowledge on CB function is mainly based on studies performed on lower mammals, but the information on the human CB is scant. Here we describe the structure, neurotrophic properties, and cellular responses to hypoxia and hypoglycemia of CBs dissected from human cadavers. The adult CB parenchyma contains clusters of chemosensitive glomus (type I) and sustentacular (type II) cells as well as nestin-positive progenitor cells. This organ also expresses high levels of the dopaminotrophic glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). GDNF production and the number of progenitor and glomus cells were preserved in the CBs of human subjects of advanced age. As reported for other mammalian species, glomus cells responded to hypoxia by external Ca(2+)-dependent increase of cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and quantal catecholamine release. Human glomus cells are also responsive to hypoglycemia and together the two stimuli, hypoxia and hypoglycemia, can potentiate each other's effects. The chemo-sensory responses of glomus cells are also preserved at an advanced age. Interestingly, a neurogenic niche similar to that recently described in rodents is also preserved in the adult human CB. These new data on the cellular and molecular physiology of the CB pave the way for future pathophysiological studies involving this organ in humans.

  3. Autistic Traits, ADHD Symptoms, Neurological Soft Signs and Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manouilenko, Irina; Pagani, Marco; Stone-Elander, Sharon; Odh, Richard; Brolin, Fredrik; Hatherly, Robert; Jacobsson, Hans; Larsson, Stig A.; Bejerot, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The resting regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) patterns related to co-occurring symptoms such as inattention, hyperactivity, neurological soft signs and motor problems have not yet been disclosed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this study thirteen adults with ASD and ten matched neurotypical controls underwent PET. The scores of rating…

  4. Cataloging Adult Education Programs in Region VIII and In-Depth Study of Selected Exemplar Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjogren, Douglas; Jacobson, Larry

    The final report of a project that developed a catalog of all 4,783 adult education programs in Region 8 (Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming) is presented. The document discusses two aspects of the project: (1) the development and implementation of the catalog and (2) the identification and in-depth study of nine…

  5. Regional gray matter volume is associated with empathizing and systemizing in young adults.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Fukushima, Ai; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-01-01

    Empathizing is defined as the drive to identify the mental states of others for predicting their behavior and responding with an appropriate emotion. Systemizing is defined as the drive to analyze a system in terms of the rules that govern the system in order to predict its behavior. Using voxel-based morphometry and questionnaires in a large sample of normal, right-handed young adults, we investigated the regional gray matter volume (rGMV) correlates of empathizing and systemizing and additionally those of the D score, which is the difference between systemizing and empathizing, to reveal the comprehensive picture of those correlates. Negative rGMV correlates of empathizing and positive rGMV correlates of the D score (formed by the negative correlation between rGMV and empathizing), were found primarily in nodes in the default mode network, mirror neuron system, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and the lateral part of the prefrontal cortex together with other areas. Positive rGMV correlates of systemizing and of the D score (formed by the positive correlation between rGMV and systemizing) were found primarily in nodes in the external attention system, middle cingulate cortex, and other regions. Negative rGMV correlates of systemizing were found in an area close to the left posterior insula and putamen. These findings reconcile some previously inconsistent findings, provide other new findings and suggest that these areas contribute to empathizing-systemizing. Furthermore, the negative/positive rGMV correlates of empathizing and positive/negative rGMV correlates of systemizing overlapped substantially. This may be in line with the notion that empathizing and systemizing compete neurally in the brain. PMID:24409308

  6. Regional Gray Matter Volume Is Associated with Empathizing and Systemizing in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Fukushima, Ai; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-01-01

    Empathizing is defined as the drive to identify the mental states of others for predicting their behavior and responding with an appropriate emotion. Systemizing is defined as the drive to analyze a system in terms of the rules that govern the system in order to predict its behavior. Using voxel-based morphometry and questionnaires in a large sample of normal, right-handed young adults, we investigated the regional gray matter volume (rGMV) correlates of empathizing and systemizing and additionally those of the D score, which is the difference between systemizing and empathizing, to reveal the comprehensive picture of those correlates. Negative rGMV correlates of empathizing and positive rGMV correlates of the D score (formed by the negative correlation between rGMV and empathizing), were found primarily in nodes in the default mode network, mirror neuron system, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and the lateral part of the prefrontal cortex together with other areas. Positive rGMV correlates of systemizing and of the D score (formed by the positive correlation between rGMV and systemizing) were found primarily in nodes in the external attention system, middle cingulate cortex, and other regions. Negative rGMV correlates of systemizing were found in an area close to the left posterior insula and putamen. These findings reconcile some previously inconsistent findings, provide other new findings and suggest that these areas contribute to empathizing–systemizing. Furthermore, the negative/positive rGMV correlates of empathizing and positive/negative rGMV correlates of systemizing overlapped substantially. This may be in line with the notion that empathizing and systemizing compete neurally in the brain. PMID:24409308

  7. Altered adult hippocampal neuronal maturation in a rat model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gil-Mohapel, Joana; Boehme, Fanny; Patten, Anna; Cox, Adrian; Kainer, Leah; Giles, Erica; Brocardo, Patricia S; Christie, Brian R

    2011-04-12

    Exposure to ethanol during pregnancy can be devastating to the developing nervous system, leading to significant central nervous system dysfunction. The hippocampus, one of the two brain regions where neurogenesis persists into adulthood, is particularly sensitive to the teratogenic effects of ethanol. In the present study, we tested a rat model of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) with ethanol administered via gavage throughout all three trimester equivalents. Subsequently, we assessed cell proliferation, as well as neuronal survival, and differentiation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of adolescent (35 days old), young adult (60 days old) and adult (90 days old) Sprague-Dawley rats. Using both extrinsic (bromodeoxyuridine) and intrinsic (Ki-67) markers, we observed no significant alterations in cell proliferation and survival in ethanol-exposed animals when compared with their pair-fed and ad libitum controls. However, we detected a significant increase in the number of new immature neurons in animals that were exposed to ethanol throughout all three trimester equivalents. This result might reflect a compensatory mechanism to counteract the deleterious effects of prenatal ethanol exposure or an ethanol-induced arrest of the neurogenic process at the early neuronal maturation stages. Taken together these results indicate that exposure to ethanol during the period of brain development causes a long-lasting dysregulation of the neurogenic process, a mechanism that might contribute, at least in part, to the hippocampal deficits that have been reported in rodent models of FAS.

  8. Use of Anthropometry for the Prediction of Regional Body Tissue Distribution in Adults: Benefits and Limitations in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Scafoglieri, Aldo; Clarys, Jan Pieter; Cattrysse, Erik; Bautmans, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Regional body composition changes with aging. Some of the changes in composition are considered major risk factors for developing obesity related chronic diseases which in turn may lead to increased mortality in adults. The role of anthropometry is well recognized in the screening, diagnosis and follow-up of adults for risk classification, regardless of age. Regional body composition is influenced by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Therapeutic measures recommended to lower cardiovascular disease risk include lifestyle changes. The aim of this review is to systematically summarize studies that assessed the relationships between anthropometry and regional body composition. The potential benefits and limitations of anthropometry for use in clinical practice are presented and suggestions for future research given. PMID:25489489

  9. Inducible activation of ERK5 MAP kinase enhances adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb and improves olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenbin; Lu, Song; Li, Tan; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Abel, Glen M; Xu, Lihong; Storm, Daniel R; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-05-20

    Recent discoveries have suggested that adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and olfactory bulb (OB) may be required for at least some forms of olfactory behavior in mice. However, it is unclear whether conditional and selective enhancement of adult neurogenesis by genetic approaches is sufficient to improve olfactory function under physiological conditions or after injury. Furthermore, specific signaling mechanisms regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB are not fully defined. We previously reported that ERK5, a MAP kinase selectively expressed in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain, plays a critical role in adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB. Using a site-specific knock-in mouse model, we report here that inducible and targeted activation of the endogenous ERK5 in adult neural stem/progenitor cells enhances adult neurogenesis in the OB by increasing cell survival and neuronal differentiation. This conditional ERK5 activation also improves short-term olfactory memory and odor-cued associative olfactory learning under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these mice show enhanced recovery of olfactory function and have more adult-born neurons after a zinc sulfate-induced lesion of the main olfactory epithelium. We conclude that ERK5 MAP kinase is an important endogenous signaling pathway regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB, and that conditional activation of endogenous ERK5 is sufficient to enhance adult neurogenesis in the OB thereby improving olfactory function both under normal conditions and after injury.

  10. Inducible Activation of ERK5 MAP Kinase Enhances Adult Neurogenesis in the Olfactory Bulb and Improves Olfactory Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenbin; Lu, Song; Li, Tan; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Abel, Glen M.; Xu, Lihong; Storm, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries have suggested that adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and olfactory bulb (OB) may be required for at least some forms of olfactory behavior in mice. However, it is unclear whether conditional and selective enhancement of adult neurogenesis by genetic approaches is sufficient to improve olfactory function under physiological conditions or after injury. Furthermore, specific signaling mechanisms regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB are not fully defined. We previously reported that ERK5, a MAP kinase selectively expressed in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain, plays a critical role in adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB. Using a site-specific knock-in mouse model, we report here that inducible and targeted activation of the endogenous ERK5 in adult neural stem/progenitor cells enhances adult neurogenesis in the OB by increasing cell survival and neuronal differentiation. This conditional ERK5 activation also improves short-term olfactory memory and odor-cued associative olfactory learning under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these mice show enhanced recovery of olfactory function and have more adult-born neurons after a zinc sulfate-induced lesion of the main olfactory epithelium. We conclude that ERK5 MAP kinase is an important endogenous signaling pathway regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB, and that conditional activation of endogenous ERK5 is sufficient to enhance adult neurogenesis in the OB thereby improving olfactory function both under normal conditions and after injury. PMID:25995470

  11. The role of botulinum toxin A in treating neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Weckx, Filip; Tutolo, Manuela; De Ridder, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) can result in lower and upper urinary tract complications and eventually even in end-stage kidney failure. Since the driving force of this clinical cascade is high bladder pressure, controlling intravesical pressure in NDO patients improves both quality of life and life-expectancy in these patients. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) has proven its efficacy in reducing intravesical pressure and in reducing incontinence episodes. BTX-A also improves quality of life in patients with NDO. Both onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox®, Allergan, Irvine, USA) and abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport®, Ipsen, Paris, France) have a level A recommendation for NDO-treatment. The recommended dose for intradetrusor injections in NDO patients is 200 U of onabotulinumtoxinA or 500 U of abobotulinumtoxinA. The drug is generally administered extratrigonal in the detrusor muscle, via cystoscopic guided injection at 20 sites in 1 mL injections. Intradetrusor BTX-A injections are safe, with mostly local complications such as urinary tract infection and high post-void residual or retention. The effect of the toxin lasts for approximately 9 months. Repeat injections can be performed without loss of efficacy. Different injection techniques, novel ways of BTX-A administration, eliminating the need for injection or new BTX-A types with better/longer response rates could change the field in the future. PMID:26904413

  12. Preventing Kidney Injury in Children with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Larijani, Faezeh Javadi; Moghtaderi, Mastaneh; Hajizadeh, Nilofar; Assadi, Farahnak

    2013-01-01

    The most common cause of neurogenic bladder dysfunction (NBD) in newborn infants is myelomeningocele. The pathophysiology almost always involves the bladder detrusor sphincter dyssynergy (DSD), which if untreated can cause severe and irreversible damage to the upper and lower urinary tracts. Early diagnosis and adequate management of NBD is critical to prevent both renal damage and bladder dysfunction and to reduce chances for the future surgeries. Initial investigation of the affected newborn infant includes a renal and bladder ultrasound, measurement of urine residual, determination of serum creatinine level, and urodynamics study. Voiding cystogram is indicated when either hydronephrosis or DSD is present. The main goal of treatment is prevention of urinary tract deterioration and achievement of continuance at an appropriate age. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) in combination with anticholinergic (oxybutynin) and antibiotics are instituted in those with high filling and voiding pressures, DSD and/or high grade reflux immediately after the myelomeningocele is repaired. Botulium toxin-A injection into detrusor is a safe alternative in patients with insufficient response or significant side effects to anticholinergic (oral or intravesical instillation) therapy. Surgery is an effective alternative in patients with persistent detrusor hyperactivity and/or dyssynergic detrusor sphincter despites of the CIC and maximum dosage of anticholinergic therapy. Children with NBD require care from a multidisciplinary team approach consisting of pediatricians, neurosurgeon, urologist, nephrologists, orthopedic surgeon, and other allied medical specialists. PMID:24498490

  13. Neurogenic regulation of proximal bicarbonate and chloride reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Cogan, M G

    1986-01-01

    Although a change in renal nerve activity is known to alter proximal reabsorption, it is unclear whether reabsorption of NaHCO3 or NaCl or both are affected. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10) were studied using free-flow micropuncture techniques during euvolemia and following acute ipsilateral denervation. Glomerular filtration rate and single nephron glomerular filtration rate were stable. Absolute proximal bicarbonate reabsorption fell following denervation (933 +/- 40 to 817 +/- 30 pmol/min) with a parallel reduction in chloride reabsorption (1,643 +/- 116 to 1,341 +/- 129 peq/min). Urinary sodium, potassium, bicarbonate, and chloride excretion all increased significantly. To further assess the physiological significance of neurogenic modulation of proximal transport, other rats (n = 6) were subjected to acute unilateral nephrectomy (AUN). There is evidence that AUN induces a contralateral natriuresis (renorenal reflex) at least partially by causing inhibition of efferent renal nerve traffic. AUN caused significant changes in proximal NaHCO3 and NaCl reabsorption as well as in whole kidney electrolyte excretion in the same pattern as had denervation. Prior denervation of the remaining kidney prevented the proximal and whole kidney response to AUN (n = 6). In conclusion, depression of renal nerve activity inhibits both NaHCO3 and NaCl reabsorption in the rat superficial proximal convoluted tubule. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in renal nerve activity modify whole kidney electrolyte excretion under physiological conditions at least partially by regulating proximal transport.

  14. CIT, a gene involved in neurogenic cytokinesis, is mutated in human primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Basit, Sulman; Al-Harbi, Khalid M; Alhijji, Sabri A M; Albalawi, Alia M; Alharby, Essa; Eldardear, Amr; Samman, Mohammed I

    2016-10-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a static neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by congenital small head circumference and non-progressive intellectual disability without additional severe brain malformations. MCPH is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. Sixteen genes (MCPH1-MCPH16) have been discovered so far, mutations thereof lead to autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. In a family, segregating MCPH in an autosomal recessive manner, genome-wide homozygosity mapping mapped a disease locus to 16.9-Mb region on chromosome 12q24.11-q24.32. Following this, exome sequencing in three affected individuals of the family discovered a splice site variant (c.753+3A>T) in citron kinase (CIT) gene, segregating with the disorder in the family. CIT co-localizes to the midbody ring during cytokinesis, and its loss of expression results in defects in neurogenic cytokinesis in both humans and mice. Splice site variant in CIT, identified in this study, is predicted to abolish splice donor site. cDNA sequence of an affected individual showed retention of an intron next to the splice donor site. The study, presented here, revealed the first variant in the CIT causing MCPH in the family. PMID:27519304

  15. Adult Literacy Policies and Performance in the SADCC Region (Southern Africa).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhola, H. S.

    While the implementation of adult literacy promotion can best be handled at the national level, some important things can be done at the Southern African Development Co-ordination Conference (SADCC) level. A persuasive argument can be made on behalf of adult literacy in the SADCC development strategy. The people need to be educated in the…

  16. Role of astrocytes as neural stem cells in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, bona fide neural stem cells were discovered in the subventricular zone (SVZ), the largest neurogenic niche lining the striatal wall of the lateral ventricles of the brain. In this region resides a subpopulation of astrocytes that express the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), nestin and LeX. Astonishingly, these GFAP-expressing progenitors display stem-cell-like features both in vivo and in vitro. Throughout life SVZ astrocytes give rise to interneurons and oligodendrocyte precursors, which populate the olfactory bulb and the white matter, respectively. The role of the progenies of SVZ astrocytes has not been fully elucidated, but some evidence indicates that the new neurons play a role in olfactory discrimination, whereas oligodendrocytes contribute to myelinate white matter tracts. In this chapter, we describe the astrocytic nature of adult neural stem cells, their organization into the SVZ and some of their molecular and genetic characteristics. PMID:23619383

  17. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury, myelomeningocele, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Richard A

    2011-01-01

    Exciting new features have been described concerning neurogenic bowel dysfunction, including interactions between the central nervous system, the enteric nervous system, axonal injury, neuronal loss, neurotransmission of noxious and non-noxious stimuli, and the fields of gastroenterology and neurology. Patients with spinal cord injury, myelomeningocele, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease present with serious upper and lower bowel dysfunctions characterized by constipation, incontinence, gastrointestinal motor dysfunction and altered visceral sensitivity. Spinal cord injury is associated with severe autonomic dysfunction, and bowel dysfunction is a major physical and psychological burden for these patients. An adult myelomeningocele patient commonly has multiple problems reflecting the multisystemic nature of the disease. Multiple sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disorder in which axonal injury, neuronal loss, and atrophy of the central nervous system can lead to permanent neurological damage and clinical disability. Parkinson's disease is a multisystem disorder involving dopaminergic, noradrenergic, serotoninergic and cholinergic systems, characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease affects several neuronal structures outside the substantia nigra, among which is the enteric nervous system. Recent reports have shown that the lesions in the enteric nervous system occur in very early stages of the disease, even before the involvement of the central nervous system. This has led to the postulation that the enteric nervous system could be critical in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, as it could represent the point of entry for a putative environmental factor to initiate the pathological process. This review covers the data related to the etiology, epidemiology, clinical expression, pathophysiology, genetic aspects, gastrointestinal motor dysfunction, visceral sensitivity, management, prevention and prognosis of neurogenic bowel

  18. Awareness, perceptions, and use of snus among young adults from the upper Midwest region of the U.S

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Background Since its introduction in 2006, snus has been aggressively marketed by tobacco companies. However, little is known about the awareness, perceptions, and use of snus among young adults after Camel and Marlboro snus were sold nationwide in 2010. Methods Data were collected from 2,607 young adults (ages 20–28) who participated in the Minnesota Adolescent Community Cohort Study in 2010–2011. Data include awareness of snus, ever and past-30 day use, perceived potential of snus as a quit aid, and perceived harmfulness and addictiveness of snus relative to cigarettes. We assessed the association between these outcome variables and socio-demographic characteristics. Results Overall, 64.8% of participants were aware of snus, 14.5% ever used snus, and 3.2% used snus in the past 30 days. Men and participants who smoked >100 cigarettes in their lifetime were associated with these three outcomes (p<0.05). Among those who were aware of snus, 16.3% agreed snus can help people quit smoking, 17.3% agreed snus is less harmful than cigarettes, and 11.3% agreed snus is less addictive than cigarettes. These perceptions were associated with ever use and past 30-day use of snus (p<0.05). Conclusions In this regional sample of U.S. young adults, the majority of young adults were aware of snus, and over 1 in 10 had used snus. More young adults in our sample than the overall U.S. adult population believed that snus is less harmful than cigarettes. Perceptions of snus are associated with snus use. Strategic health communication interventions targeting young adults to confront the positive perceptions associated with snus may be needed to curb the interest in snus. PMID:22821750

  19. Sensory and other neurogenic effects of exposures to airborne office dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølhave, L.; Kjærgaard, S. K.; Attermann, J.

    This Danish Office Dust Experiment investigated the response of 24 healthy non-sensitive adult subjects to exposure to normal office dust in the air (7 μg m -3 clean air, 136 and 390 μg m -3 TSP). The dust had no major identifiable specific reactive components. The exposure duration was 5 1/4 h and was arranged in a climate chamber in controlled atmospheric conditions. Measurements were made acutely at exposure onset, subacutely at exposure end and next day (late). As secondary aims the time course and threshold of any observed effect of the exposures, and the characteristics of any hyperresponding subgroup were investigated. In a questionnaire with 36 questions the dust exposures caused increased acute, subacute and late perceptions of reduced air quality, acute and subacute increased odor intensity, acute eye irritation, acute and late heavy head, subacute feeling of perspiration, and subacute general irritation. Cough increased subacutely during exposures. In addition, a performance test showed effects of dust exposures which also affected "Mood Scale" ratings. No effect was seen on an addition test for distraction, and objective measurements of skin humidity. The overall conclusion of the study is that healthy subjects without hypersensitivity reactions seem to respond to airborne house dust. The responses are both subjective sensory reactions and other neurogenic effects even at exposure levels within the range found in normal buildings. Some of the effects appeared acutely and decreased through adaptation while others increased during prolonged exposure and remained for more than 17 h after the exposure ended. The findings may indicate for this type of dust a threshold level for the dose-response relationships below 140 μg m -3.

  20. Mu Opioid Receptors Mediate the Effects of Chronic Ethanol Binge Drinking on the Hippocampal Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Contet, Candice; Kim, Airee; Le, David; Iyengar, Siddharth; Kotzebue, Roxanne W.; Yuan, Clara J.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol exposure and withdrawal alter the generation of new neurons in the adult hippocampus. The endogenous opioid system, in particular the μ opioid receptor (MOR), can modulate neural progenitors and also plays a critical role in ethanol drinking and dependence. In the present study, we sought to determine whether MOR contributes to the effects of ethanol on the dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenic niche. MOR wild-type (WT), heterozygous (Het) and knockout (KO) littermates were subjected to voluntary ethanol drinking in repeated limited-access two-bottle choice (2BC) sessions. MOR deficiency did not alter progenitor proliferation, neuronal differentiation and maturation, apoptosis or microglia in ethanol-naïve mice. When exposed to five consecutive weeks of 2BC, MOR mutant mice exhibited a gene-dosage dependent reduction of ethanol consumption compared to WT mice. Introducing a week of ethanol deprivation between each week of 2BC increased ethanol consumption in all genotypes and produced equivalent intakes in WT, Het and KO mice. Under the latter paradigm, ethanol drinking decreased progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the DG of WT mice. Interestingly, WT mice exhibited a strong negative correlation between ethanol intake and proliferation, which was disrupted in Het and KO mice. Moreover, MOR deficiency blocked the effect of ethanol on neuronal differentiation. MOR deficiency also protected against the neuroimmune response to ethanol drinking. Finally, chronic binge drinking induced a paradoxical decrease in apoptosis, which was independent of MOR. Altogether our data suggest that MOR is implicated in some of the neuroplastic changes produced by chronic ethanol exposure in the DG. PMID:23461397

  1. Distinct Effects of Chronic Dopaminergic Stimulation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Striatal Doublecortin Expression in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Rachele; Steigleder, Tobias; Schlachetzki, Johannes C. M.; Waldmann, Elisabeth; Schwab, Stefan; Winner, Beate; Winkler, Jürgen; Kohl, Zacharias

    2016-01-01

    While adult neurogenesis is considered to be restricted to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ), recent studies in humans and rodents provide evidence for newly generated neurons in regions generally considered as non-neurogenic, e.g., the striatum. Stimulating dopaminergic neurotransmission has the potential to enhance adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and the DG most likely via D2/D3 dopamine (DA) receptors. Here, we investigated the effect of two distinct preferential D2/D3 DA agonists, Pramipexole (PPX), and Ropinirole (ROP), on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and striatum of adult naïve mice. To determine newly generated cells in the DG incorporating 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) a proliferation paradigm was performed in which two BrdU injections (100 mg/kg) were applied intraperitoneally within 12 h after a 14-days-DA agonist treatment. Interestingly, PPX, but not ROP significantly enhanced the proliferation in the DG by 42% compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-injected control mice. To analyze the proportion of newly generated cells differentiating into mature neurons, we quantified cells co-expressing BrdU and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) 32 days after the last of five BrdU injections (50 mg/kg) applied at the beginning of 14-days DA agonist or PBS administration. Again, PPX only enhanced neurogenesis in the DG significantly compared to ROP- and PBS-injected mice. Moreover, we explored the pro-neurogenic effect of both DA agonists in the striatum by quantifying neuroblasts expressing doublecortin (DCX) in the entire striatum, as well as in the dorsal and ventral sub-regions separately. We observed a significantly higher number of DCX+ neuroblasts in the dorsal compared to the ventral sub-region of the striatum in PPX-injected mice. These results suggest that the stimulation of hippocampal and dorsal striatal neurogenesis may be up-regulated by PPX. The increased generation of neural cells, both in constitutively active

  2. Experience with botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Juenemann, Klaus-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Control of the lower urinary tract is a complex, multilevel process that involves both the peripheral and central nervous system. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) is a widespread chronic illness that impairs millions of people worldwide. Neurogenic LUTD has a major impact on quality of life, affecting emotional, social, sexual, occupational and physical aspects of daily life, and in addition to the debilitating manifestations for patients, it also imposes a substantial economic burden on every healthcare system. First-line treatment for neurogenic LUTD includes antimuscarinics and some form of catheterization, preferably intermittent self-catheterization. However, the treatment effect is often unsatisfactory, so that other options have to be considered. Moreover, neurogenic LUTD is a challenge because all available treatment modalities (i.e. conservative, minimally invasive and invasive therapies) may fail. In recent years, botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) treatment has been shown to be an effective pharmacological therapy option in patients refractory to antimuscarinic and neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). Several studies have shown that BoNT/A injection significantly reduces detrusor muscle overactivity. Also BoNT/A treatment of NDO has revealed a significant improvement of lower urinary tract function with regard to reduced urinary incontinence, reduced detrusor pressure, increased bladder capacity and improved quality of life in NDO. PMID:24489607

  3. The reliability of differentiating neurogenic claudication from vascular claudication based on symptomatic presentation

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Mélissa; Rosas-Arellano, M. Patricia; Gurr, Kevin R.; Bailey, Stewart I.; Taylor, David C.; Grewal, Ruby; Lawlor, D. Kirk; Bailey, Chris S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intermittent claudication can be neurogenic or vascular. Physicians use a profile based on symptom attributes to differentiate the 2 types of claudication, and this guides their investigations for diagnosis of the underlying pathology. We evaluated the validity of these symptom attributes in differentiating neurogenic from vascular claudication. Methods Patients with a diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) or peripheral vascular disease (PVD) who reported claudication answered 14 questions characterizing their symptoms. We determined the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative likelihood ratios (PLR and NLR) for neurogenic and vascular claudication for each symptom attribute. Results We studied 53 patients. The most sensitive symptom attribute to rule out LSS was the absence of “triggering of pain with standing alone” (sensitivity 0.97, NLR 0.050). Pain alleviators and symptom location data showed a weak clinical significance for LSS and PVD. Constellation of symptoms yielded the strongest associations: patients with a positive shopping cart sign whose symptoms were located above the knees, triggered with standing alone and relieved with sitting had a strong likelihood of neurogenic claudication (PLR 13). Patients with symptoms in the calf that were relieved with standing alone had a strong likelihood of vascular claudication (PLR 20.0). Conclusion The classic symptom attributes used to differentiate neurogenic from vascular claudication are at best weakly valid independently. However, certain constellation of symptoms are much more indicative of etiology. These results can guide general practitioners in their evaluation of and investigation for claudication. PMID:24284143

  4. Human tau expression reduces adult neurogenesis in a mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Komuro, Yutaro; Xu, Guixiang; Bhaskar, Kiran; Lamb, Bruce T

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of hyperphosphorylated and aggregated microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) is a central feature of a class of neurodegenerative diseases termed tauopathies. Notably, there is increasing evidence that tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease, are also characterized by a reduction in neurogenesis, the birth of adult neurons. However, the exact relationship between hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of MAPT and neurogenic deficits remains unclear, including whether this is an early- or late-stage disease marker. In the present study, we used the genomic-based hTau mouse model of tauopathy to examine the temporal and spatial regulation of adult neurogenesis during the course of the disease. Surprisingly, hTau mice exhibited reductions in adult neurogenesis in 2 different brain regions by as early as 2 months of age, before the development of robust MAPT pathology in this model. This reduction was found to be due to reduced proliferation and not because of enhanced apoptosis in the hippocampus. At these same time points, hTau mice also exhibited altered MAPT phosphorylation with neurogenic precursors. To examine whether the effects of MAPT on neurogenesis were cell autonomous, neurospheres prepared from hTau animals were examined in vitro, revealing a growth deficit when compared with non-transgenic neurosphere cultures. Taken together, these studies provide evidence that altered adult neurogenesis is a robust and early marker of altered, cell-autonomous function of MAPT in the hTau mouse mode of tauopathy and that altered adult neurogenesis should be examined as a potential marker and therapeutic target for human tauopathies.

  5. Time-of-Day-Dependent Enhancement of Adult Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2008-01-01

    Background Adult neurogenesis occurs in specific regions of the mammalian brain such as the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In the neurogenic region, neural progenitor cells continuously divide and give birth to new neurons. Although biological properties of neurons and glia in the hippocampus have been demonstrated to fluctuate depending on specific times of the day, it is unclear if neural progenitors and neurogenesis in the adult brain are temporally controlled within the day. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we demonstrate that in the dentate gyrus of the adult mouse hippocampus, the number of M-phase cells shows a day/night variation throughout the day, with a significant increase during the nighttime. The M-phase cell number is constant throughout the day in the subventricular zone of the forebrain, another site of adult neurogenesis, indicating the daily rhythm of progenitor mitosis is region-specific. Importantly, the nighttime enhancement of hippocampal progenitor mitosis is accompanied by a nighttime increase of newborn neurons. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus occurs in a time-of-day-dependent fashion, which may dictate daily modifications of dentate gyrus physiology. PMID:19048107

  6. Congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy in megaconial myopathy due to a mutation in CHKB gene.

    PubMed

    Castro-Gago, Manuel; Dacruz-Alvarez, David; Pintos-Martínez, Elena; Beiras-Iglesias, Andrés; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta gene (CHKB) mutations have been identified in Megaconial Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (MDCMC) patients, a very rare inborn error of metabolism with 21 cases reported worldwide. We report the case of a Spanish boy of Caucasian origin who presented a generalized congenital muscular hypotonia, more intense at lower limb muscles, mildly elevated creatine kinase (CK), serum aspartate transaminase (AST) and lactate. Electromyography (EMG) showed neurogenic potentials in the proximal muscles. Histological studies of a muscle biopsy showed neurogenic atrophy with enlarged mitochondria in the periphery of the fibers, and complex I deficiency. Finally, genetic analysis showed the presence of a homozygous mutation in the gene for choline kinase beta (CHKB: NM_005198.4:c.810T>A, p.Tyr270(∗)). We describe here the second Spanish patient whit mutation in CHKB gene, who despite having the same mutation, presented an atypical aspect: congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy progressing to a combined neuropathic and myopathic phenotype (mixed pattern).

  7. Ventral midbrain neural stem cells have delayed neurogenic potential in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Shane V; Spitere, Katie; Sullivan, Aideen M; O'Keeffe, Gerard W

    2014-01-24

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have been the focus of an intensive effort to direct their differentiation in vitro towards desired neuronal phenotypes for cell replacement therapies. It is thought that NSCs derived from older embryos have limited neurogenic capacity and are restricted towards an astroglial fate. This idea is largely based on studies that typically analysed NSC-derived progeny following one week of in vitro differentiation. In this report, the neurogenic capacity of older ventral midbrain (VM) NSCs was assessed. When the older NSCs were differentiated for three weeks, there were significant increases in the numbers of newly born neurons at 14 and 21 days, as assessed by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Therefore this study demonstrates that older NSCs retain significantly more neurogenic potential than was previously thought. These data have implications for NSC preparatory protocols and the choice of donor age for cell transplantation studies, and contributes to the understanding of NSC behaviour in vitro.

  8. New tools for the identification of developmentally regulated enhancer regions in embryonic and adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Mitchell P; Krauss, Jana; Koehler, Carla; Boden, Cindy; Harris, Matthew P

    2013-03-01

    We have conducted a screen to identify developmentally regulated enhancers that drive tissue-specific Gal4 expression in zebrafish. We obtained 63 stable transgenic lines with expression patterns in embryonic or adult zebrafish. The use of a newly identified minimal promoter from the medaka edar locus resulted in a relatively unbiased set of expression patterns representing many tissue types derived from all germ layers. Subsequent detailed characterization of selected lines showed strong and reproducible Gal4-driven GFP expression in diverse tissues, including neurons from the central and peripheral nervous systems, pigment cells, erythrocytes, and peridermal cells. By screening adults for GFP expression, we also isolated lines expressed in tissues of the adult zebrafish, including scales, fin rays, and joints. The new and efficient minimal promoter and large number of transactivating driver-lines we identified will provide the zebrafish community with a useful resource for further enhancer trap screening, as well as precise investigation of tissue-specific processes in vivo.

  9. Gsx2 controls region-specific activation of neural stem cells and injury-induced neurogenesis in the adult subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    López-Juárez, Alejandro; Howard, Jennifer; Ullom, Kristy; Howard, Lindsey; Grande, Andrew; Pardo, Andrea; Waclaw, Ronald; Sun, Yu-Yo; Yang, Dianer; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Campbell, Kenneth; Nakafuku, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in widespread regions along the lateral ventricle and generate diverse olfactory bulb (OB) interneuron subtypes in the adult mouse brain. Molecular mechanisms underlying their regional diversity, however, are not well understood. Here we show that the homeodomain transcription factor Gsx2 plays a crucial role in the region-specific control of adult NSCs in both persistent and injury-induced neurogenesis. In the intact brain, Gsx2 is expressed in a regionally restricted subset of NSCs and promotes the activation and lineage progression of stem cells, thereby controlling the production of selective OB neuron subtypes. Moreover, Gsx2 is ectopically induced in damaged brains outside its normal expression domains and is required for injury-induced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ). These results demonstrate that mobilization of adult NSCs is controlled in a region-specific manner and that distinct mechanisms operate in continuous and injury-induced neurogenesis in the adult brain. PMID:23723414

  10. Gsx2 controls region-specific activation of neural stem cells and injury-induced neurogenesis in the adult subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    López-Juárez, Alejandro; Howard, Jennifer; Ullom, Kristy; Howard, Lindsey; Grande, Andrew; Pardo, Andrea; Waclaw, Ronald; Sun, Yu-Yo; Yang, Dianer; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Campbell, Kenneth; Nakafuku, Masato

    2013-06-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in widespread regions along the lateral ventricle and generate diverse olfactory bulb (OB) interneuron subtypes in the adult mouse brain. Molecular mechanisms underlying their regional diversity, however, are not well understood. Here we show that the homeodomain transcription factor Gsx2 plays a crucial role in the region-specific control of adult NSCs in both persistent and injury-induced neurogenesis. In the intact brain, Gsx2 is expressed in a regionally restricted subset of NSCs and promotes the activation and lineage progression of stem cells, thereby controlling the production of selective OB neuron subtypes. Moreover, Gsx2 is ectopically induced in damaged brains outside its normal expression domains and is required for injury-induced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ). These results demonstrate that mobilization of adult NSCs is controlled in a region-specific manner and that distinct mechanisms operate in continuous and injury-induced neurogenesis in the adult brain.

  11. Regional Variation in Use of Complementary Health Approaches by U.S. Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... nonmineral dietary supplements was highest in the Mountain, Pacific, and West North Central regions. The Mountain (28. ... or meditation was approximately 40% higher in the Pacific and Mountain regions than the national average. Yoga ...

  12. Effect of adult onset hypothyroidism on behavioral parameters and acetylcholinesterase isoforms activity in specific brain regions of male mice.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulou, Catherine G; Constantinou, Caterina; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Giompres, Panagiotis; Margarity, Marigoula

    2016-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal development and function of mammalian central nervous system (CNS); TH dysregulation has been implicated in several cognitive and behavioral deficits related to dysfunctions of neurotransmitter systems. In the present study, we investigated the effects of adult onset hypothyroidism on the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and on related behavioral parameters. For this purpose we used adult male Balb/cJ mice that were divided randomly into euthyroid and hypothyroid animal groups. Animals were rendered hypothyroid through administration of 1% w/v KClO4 in their drinking water for 8weeks. At the end of the treatment, learning/memory procedures were examined through step-through passive avoidance task while fear/anxiety was assessed using elevated plus-maze (EPM) and open-field (OF) tests. AChE activity was determined colorimetrically in two different fractions, salt-soluble fraction (SS) (containing mainly the G1 isoform) and detergent-soluble fraction (DS) (containing mainly the G4 isoform) in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, midbrain, hippocampus and striatum. Our results indicate that adult onset hypothyroidism caused significant memory impairment and increased fear/anxiety. Moreover, the activity of both isoforms of AChE was reduced in all brain regions examined in a brain region- and isoform-specific manner. PMID:27317840

  13. Effect of adult onset hypothyroidism on behavioral parameters and acetylcholinesterase isoforms activity in specific brain regions of male mice.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulou, Catherine G; Constantinou, Caterina; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Giompres, Panagiotis; Margarity, Marigoula

    2016-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal development and function of mammalian central nervous system (CNS); TH dysregulation has been implicated in several cognitive and behavioral deficits related to dysfunctions of neurotransmitter systems. In the present study, we investigated the effects of adult onset hypothyroidism on the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and on related behavioral parameters. For this purpose we used adult male Balb/cJ mice that were divided randomly into euthyroid and hypothyroid animal groups. Animals were rendered hypothyroid through administration of 1% w/v KClO4 in their drinking water for 8weeks. At the end of the treatment, learning/memory procedures were examined through step-through passive avoidance task while fear/anxiety was assessed using elevated plus-maze (EPM) and open-field (OF) tests. AChE activity was determined colorimetrically in two different fractions, salt-soluble fraction (SS) (containing mainly the G1 isoform) and detergent-soluble fraction (DS) (containing mainly the G4 isoform) in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, midbrain, hippocampus and striatum. Our results indicate that adult onset hypothyroidism caused significant memory impairment and increased fear/anxiety. Moreover, the activity of both isoforms of AChE was reduced in all brain regions examined in a brain region- and isoform-specific manner.

  14. Office of Education, Region 7, Guidance and Counseling Project for Adult Basic Education. Phase 2 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Extension Teaching and Field Service Bureau.

    This report interprets information from the first phase of a Federally funded adult basic educational guidance and counseling project in Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Findings and conclusions are presented as to the cultural, psychological, and other characteristics of students; problems encountered in designing guidance…

  15. Extracerebellar progenitors grafted to the neurogenic milieu of the postnatal rat cerebellum adapt to the host environment but fail to acquire cerebellar identities.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Chiara; Gribaudo, Simona; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Leto, Ketty; De Marchis, Silvia; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2010-04-01

    Stem or progenitor cells acquire specific regional identities during early ontogenesis. Nonetheless, there is evidence that cells heterotopically transplanted to neurogenic regions of the developing or mature central nervous system may switch their fate to adopt host-specific phenotypes. Here, we isolated progenitor cells from different germinative sites along the neuraxis where GABAergic interneurons are produced (telencephalic subventricular zone, medial ganglionic eminence, ventral mesencephalon and dorsal spinal cord), and grafted them to the prospective white matter of the postnatal rat cerebellum, at the time when local interneurons are generated. The phenotype acquired by transplanted cells was assessed by different criteria, including expression of region-specific transcription factors, acquisition of morphological and neurochemical traits, and integration in the cerebellar cytoarchitecture. Regardless of their origin, all the different types of donor cells engrafted in the cerebellar parenchyma and developed mature neurons that shared some morphological and neurochemical features with local inhibitory interneurons, particularly in the deep nuclei. Nevertheless, transplanted cells failed to activate cerebellar-specific regulatory genes. In addition, their major structural features, the expression profiles of type-specific markers and the laminar placement in the recipient cortex did not match those of endogenous interneurons generated during the same developmental period. Therefore, although exogenous cells are influenced by the cerebellar milieu and show remarkable capabilities for adapting to the foreign environment, they essentially fail to switch their fate, integrate in the host neurogenic mechanisms and adopt clear-cut cerebellar identities.

  16. Regional decoupling between NW Atlantic barnacle recruit and adult density is related to changes in pelagic food supply and benthic disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Stephen W. B.; Scrosati, Ricardo A.; Tam, Jamie C.; Sussmann, Andrea V.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the regional variation in barnacle ( Semibalanus balanoides) recruit and adult abundance on the NW Atlantic coast. At the end of the recruitment season (June-July), we sampled wave-exposed rocky intertidal sites in two regions on the open Atlantic coast (Maine, AM, and Nova Scotia, AN) and in two regions on the Gulf of St. Lawrence coast (Northumberland Strait, GN, and Cape Breton Island, GC). Recruit density was highest in the southernmost region (AM), followed by GN and, then, by AN and GC. Regional values of nearshore primary productivity (satellite data of chlorophyll- a concentration, a surrogate for phytoplankton abundance) were highest for AM and GN, suggesting that food supply (barnacles are filter feeders) is an important factor determining regional recruitment patterns. Adult barnacle density was regionally decoupled from recruit density. Adults occurred in very low abundances on the Gulf of St. Lawrence coast (GN and GC) and were relatively abundant on the Atlantic coast (AM and AN), although always in much lower abundances than recruits. The low adult densities on the Gulf of St. Lawrence coast seem to result mainly from intense ice scour, as this coast freezes extensively every winter, as opposed to the ice-free Atlantic coast. Ice scour thus appears to override regional recruitment differences in determining adult density. Therefore, our data suggest that both pelagic food supply and benthic disturbance contribute to setting regional patterns in barnacle population structure on the NW Atlantic coast.

  17. Fetal Alcohol Exposure Reduces Adult Brain Plasticity. Science Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Science Briefs" summarize the findings and implications of a recent study in basic science or clinical research. This Brief summarizes the findings and implications of "Moderate Fetal Alcohol Exposure Impairs the Neurogenic Response to an Enriched Environment in Adult Mice" (I. Y. Choi; A. M. Allan; and L. A. Cunningham). Observations of mice…

  18. Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Hippocampus: Why the Dentate Gyrus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity…

  19. Neurotoxic effects of ochratoxin A on the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Paradells, Sara; Rocamonde, Brenda; Llinares, Cristina; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Jimenez, Misericordia; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Zipancic, Ivan; Soria, Jose Miguel; Garcia-Esparza, Ma Angeles

    2015-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin that was discovered as a secondary metabolite of the fungal species Aspergillus and Penicillium, is a common contaminant in food and animal feed. This mycotoxin has been described as teratogenic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and has been proven a potent neurotoxin. Other authors have previously reported the effects of OTA in different structures of the central nervous system as well as in some neurogenic regions. However, the impact of OTA exposure in the subventricular zone (SVZ) has not been assessed yet. To elucidate whether OTA affects neural precursors of the mouse SVZ we investigated, in vitro and in vivo, the effects of OTA exposure on the SVZ and on the neural precursors obtained from this neurogenic niche. In this work, we prove the cumulative effect of OTA exposure on proliferation, differentiation and depletion of neural stem cells cultured from the SVZ. In addition, we corroborated these results in vivo by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. As a result, we found a significant alteration in the proliferation process, which was evidenced by a decrease in the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive cells and glial cells, as well as, a significant decrease in the number of neuroblasts in the SVZ. To summarize, in this study we demonstrate how OTA could be a threat to the developing and the adult SVZ through its impact in cell viability, proliferation and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25256750

  20. Neurotoxic effects of ochratoxin A on the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Paradells, Sara; Rocamonde, Brenda; Llinares, Cristina; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Jimenez, Misericordia; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Zipancic, Ivan; Soria, Jose Miguel; Garcia-Esparza, Ma Angeles

    2015-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin that was discovered as a secondary metabolite of the fungal species Aspergillus and Penicillium, is a common contaminant in food and animal feed. This mycotoxin has been described as teratogenic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and has been proven a potent neurotoxin. Other authors have previously reported the effects of OTA in different structures of the central nervous system as well as in some neurogenic regions. However, the impact of OTA exposure in the subventricular zone (SVZ) has not been assessed yet. To elucidate whether OTA affects neural precursors of the mouse SVZ we investigated, in vitro and in vivo, the effects of OTA exposure on the SVZ and on the neural precursors obtained from this neurogenic niche. In this work, we prove the cumulative effect of OTA exposure on proliferation, differentiation and depletion of neural stem cells cultured from the SVZ. In addition, we corroborated these results in vivo by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. As a result, we found a significant alteration in the proliferation process, which was evidenced by a decrease in the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive cells and glial cells, as well as, a significant decrease in the number of neuroblasts in the SVZ. To summarize, in this study we demonstrate how OTA could be a threat to the developing and the adult SVZ through its impact in cell viability, proliferation and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner.

  1. Regionally distinct responses of microglia and glial progenitor cells to whole brain irradiation in adult and aging rats.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kun; Schindler, Matthew K; McQuail, Joseph A; Forbes, M Elizabeth; Riddle, David R

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy has proven efficacy for treating brain tumors and metastases. Higher doses and larger treatment fields increase the probability of eliminating neoplasms and preventing reoccurrence, but dose and field are limited by damage to normal tissues. Normal tissue injury is greatest during development and in populations of proliferating cells but also occurs in adults and older individuals and in non-proliferative cell populations. To better understand radiation-induced normal tissue injury and how it may be affected by aging, we exposed young adult, middle-aged, and old rats to 10 Gy of whole brain irradiation and assessed in gray- and white matter the responses of microglia, the primary cellular mediators of radiation-induced neuroinflammation, and oligodendrocyte precursor cells, the largest population of proliferating cells in the adult brain. We found that aging and/or irradiation caused only a few microglia to transition to the classically "activated" phenotype, e.g., enlarged cell body, few processes, and markers of phagocytosis, that is seen following more damaging neural insults. Microglial changes in response to aging and irradiation were relatively modest and three markers of reactivity - morphology, proliferation, and expression of the lysosomal marker CD68- were regulated largely independently within individual cells. Proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursors did not appear to be altered during normal aging but increased following irradiation. The impacts of irradiation and aging on both microglia and oligodendrocyte precursors were heterogeneous between white- and gray matter and among regions of gray matter, indicating that there are regional regulators of the neural response to brain irradiation. By several measures, the CA3 region of the hippocampus appeared to be differentially sensitive to effects of aging and irradiation. The changes assessed here likely contribute to injury following inflammatory challenges like brain irradiation and

  2. miR-155 Is Essential for Inflammation-Induced Hippocampal Neurogenic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Woodbury, Maya E.; Freilich, Robert W.; Cheng, Christopher J.; Asai, Hirohide; Ikezu, Seiko; Boucher, Jonathan D.; Slack, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral and CNS inflammation leads to aberrations in developmental and postnatal neurogenesis, yet little is known about the mechanism linking inflammation to neurogenic abnormalities. Specific miRs regulate peripheral and CNS inflammatory responses. miR-155 is the most significantly upregulated miR in primary murine microglia stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a proinflammatory Toll-Like Receptor 4 ligand. Here, we demonstrate that miR-155 is essential for robust IL6 gene induction in microglia under LPS stimulation in vitro. LPS-stimulated microglia enhance astrogliogenesis of cocultured neural stem cells (NSCs), whereas blockade of IL6 or genetic ablation of microglial miR-155 restores neural differentiation. miR-155 knock-out mice show reversal of LPS-induced neurogenic deficits and microglial activation in vivo. Moreover, mice with transgenic elevated expression of miR-155 in nestin-positive neural and hematopoietic stem cells, including microglia, show increased cell proliferation and ectopically localized doublecortin-positive immature neurons and radial glia-like cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) granular cell layer. Microglia have proliferative and neurogenic effects on NSCs, which are significantly altered by microglial miR-155 overexpression. In addition, miR-155 elevation leads to increased microglial numbers and amoeboid morphology in the DG. Our study demonstrates that miR-155 is essential for inflammation-induced neurogenic deficits via microglial activation and induction of IL6 and is sufficient for disrupting normal hippocampal development. PMID:26134658

  3. 5-HT7 receptors are involved in neurogenic dural vasodilatation in an experimental model of migraine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Fang, Yannan; Liang, Jianbo; Yan, Miansheng; Hu, Rong; Pan, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic dural vasodilation has been demonstrated to play an important role in migraine. 5-HT(7) receptors have been found on trigeminal nerve endings and middle meningeal arteries and demonstrated involved in the dilatation of meningeal arteries. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether 5-HT(7) receptors are involved in neurogenic dural vasodilation in migraine. The neurogenic dural vasodilation model of migraine was used in this study. Unilateral electrical stimulation of dura mater was performed in anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were pretreated with selective 5-HT(7) receptor agonist AS19, 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist SB269970, 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonist sumatriptan, or vehicles. Blood flow of the middle meningeal artery (MMA) was measured by a laser Doppler flowmetry. AS19 significantly increased the basal and stimulated blood flows of the middle meningeal artery following electrical stimulation of dura mater, and its effect was dose dependent at the early stage. SB269970 and sumatriptan significantly reduced the basal and stimulated blood flows of middle meningeal artery. The present study demonstrates for the first time that 5-HT(7) receptors are involved in neurogenic dural vasodilation evoked by electrical stimulation of dura mater and maybe of relevance in the pathophysiology and treatment of migraine.

  4. Ruptured spinal arteriovenous malformation: Presenting as stunned myocardium and neurogenic shock

    PubMed Central

    Mehesry, Tasneem H.; Shaikh, Nissar; Malmstrom, Mohammad F.; Marcus, Marco A. E.; Khan, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical syndrome usually defined as an acute pulmonary edema occurring shortly after a central neurologic insult. NPE was identified 100 years ago, but it is still underappreciated in the clinical setup. NPE usually appears within minutes to hours after the injury. It has a high mortality rate if not recognized early and treated appropriately. Similarly, neurogenic shock is a known complication of spinal cord injury reported incidence is more than 20% in isolated upper cervical spinal injury. But NPE is rare to occur, and stunned myocardium (SM) is not reported in spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) rupture. SM is a reversible cardiomyopathy resulting in transient left ventricular dysfunction which has been described to occur in the setting of catecholamine release during situations of physiologic stress. We report a case of high spinal AVM rupture presenting as SM, NPE, and neurogenic shock. Case Description: A 32-year-old male who presented with sudden onset of pain and weakness in upper limbs. Imaging studies showed AVM rupture by imaging techniques. Initially, the patient had severe hypertension, respiratory distress requiring intubation and ventilation, then he developed hypotension, bradycardia, and asystole, which required immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation and atropine. He remained with quadriplegia and suffered from frequent episodes of bradycardia and asystole. Conclusions: Spinal AVM rupture can present as neurogenic shock, stunned myocardium, and pulmonary edema. Early recognition of AVM rupture and prompt surgical intervention, as well as aggressive treatment of shock, may enhance recovery and decrease the long-term morbidity. PMID:26539315

  5. miR-155 Is Essential for Inflammation-Induced Hippocampal Neurogenic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Woodbury, Maya E; Freilich, Robert W; Cheng, Christopher J; Asai, Hirohide; Ikezu, Seiko; Boucher, Jonathan D; Slack, Frank; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral and CNS inflammation leads to aberrations in developmental and postnatal neurogenesis, yet little is known about the mechanism linking inflammation to neurogenic abnormalities. Specific miRs regulate peripheral and CNS inflammatory responses. miR-155 is the most significantly upregulated miR in primary murine microglia stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a proinflammatory Toll-Like Receptor 4 ligand. Here, we demonstrate that miR-155 is essential for robust IL6 gene induction in microglia under LPS stimulation in vitro. LPS-stimulated microglia enhance astrogliogenesis of cocultured neural stem cells (NSCs), whereas blockade of IL6 or genetic ablation of microglial miR-155 restores neural differentiation. miR-155 knock-out mice show reversal of LPS-induced neurogenic deficits and microglial activation in vivo. Moreover, mice with transgenic elevated expression of miR-155 in nestin-positive neural and hematopoietic stem cells, including microglia, show increased cell proliferation and ectopically localized doublecortin-positive immature neurons and radial glia-like cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) granular cell layer. Microglia have proliferative and neurogenic effects on NSCs, which are significantly altered by microglial miR-155 overexpression. In addition, miR-155 elevation leads to increased microglial numbers and amoeboid morphology in the DG. Our study demonstrates that miR-155 is essential for inflammation-induced neurogenic deficits via microglial activation and induction of IL6 and is sufficient for disrupting normal hippocampal development.

  6. Neurogenic Language Disorders in Children. International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabbro, Franco, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Language disorders in children are one of the most frequent causes of difficulties in communication, social interaction, learning and academic achievement. It has been estimated that over 5% of children present with some kind of language disorder. This volume illustrates the state of the art in neurogenic language disorders in children. The most…

  7. A Clinician Survey of Speech and Non-Speech Characteristics of Neurogenic Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theys, Catherine; van Wieringen, Astrid; De Nil, Luc F.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents survey data on 58 Dutch-speaking patients with neurogenic stuttering following various neurological injuries. Stroke was the most prevalent cause of stuttering in our patients, followed by traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative diseases, and other causes. Speech and non-speech characteristics were analyzed separately for…

  8. Regenerative medicine using adult neural stem cells: the potential for diabetes therapy and other pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Tomoko; Asashima, Makoto

    2012-06-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs), which are responsible for continuous neurogenesis during the adult stage, are present in human adults. The typical neurogenic regions are the hippocampus and the subventricular zone; recent studies have revealed that NSCs also exist in the olfactory bulb. Olfactory bulb-derived neural stem cells (OB NSCs) have the potential to be used in therapeutic applications and can be easily harvested without harm to the patient. Through the combined influence of extrinsic cues and innate programming, adult neurogenesis is a finely regulated process occurring in a specialized cellular environment, a niche. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of adult NSCs and their cellular niche is not only important to understand the physiological roles of neurogenesis in adulthood, but also to provide the knowledge necessary for developing new therapeutic applications using adult NSCs in other organs with similar regulatory environments. Diabetes is a devastating disease affecting more than 200 million people worldwide. Numerous diabetic patients suffer increased symptom severity after the onset, involving complications such as retinopathy and nephropathy. Therefore, the development of treatments for fundamental diabetes is important. The utilization of autologous cells from patients with diabetes may address challenges regarding the compatibility of donor tissues as well as provide the means to naturally and safely restore function, reducing future risks while also providing a long-term cure. Here, we review recent findings regarding the use of adult OB NSCs as a potential diabetes cure, and discuss the potential of OB NSC-based pharmaceutical applications for neuronal diseases and mental disorders.

  9. State and Regional Prevalence of Diagnosed Multiple Chronic Conditions Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Ward, Brian W; Black, Lindsey I

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and care management of multiple (two or more) chronic conditions (MCC) are important public health concerns (1). Approximately 25% of U.S. adults have diagnoses of MCC (2). Care management of MCC presents a challenge to both patients and providers because of the substantial costs associated with treating more than one condition and the traditional care strategies that focus on single conditions as opposed to enhanced care coordination (3,4). Maintaining surveillance, targeting service delivery, and projecting resources are all important to meet this challenge, and these actions can be informed by identifying state and other regional variations in MCC prevalence (5,6). Data from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used to estimate prevalence of MCC (defined as two or more of 10 diagnosed chronic conditions) for each U.S. state and region by age and sex. Significant state and regional variation in MCC prevalence was found, with state-level estimates ranging from 19.0% in Colorado to 38.2% in Kentucky. MCC prevalence also varied by region, ranging from 21.4% in the Pacific region to 34.5% in the East South Central region. The prevalence of MCC was higher among women than among men within certain U.S. regions, and was higher in older persons in all regions. Such findings further the research and surveillance objectives stated in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) publication, Multiple Chronic Conditions: A Strategic Framework (1). Furthermore, geographic disparities in MCC prevalence can inform state-level surveillance programs and groups targeting service delivery or allocating resources for MCC prevention activities. PMID:27467707

  10. The regional association of rising type 2 diabetes incidence with magnesium in drinking water among young adults.

    PubMed

    Kousa, Anne; Puustinen, Niina; Karvonen, Marjatta; Moltchanova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes is increasing among Finnish young adults. A slightly increased risk in men was found in the north-east and western part of the country. The higher risk areas in women were found in the western coastal area and in eastern Finland. The present register-based study aimed to evaluate the regional association of the incidence of type 2 diabetes among young adults with the concentration of magnesium in local ground water. The association was evaluated using Bayesian modeling of geo-referenced data aggregated into a regular 10 km × 10 km grid cells. No marked association was found, although suggestive findings were detected for magnesium in well water and diabetes in young adult women. The results of this register-based study did not completely rule out the association of well water magnesium with the geographical variation of type 2 diabetes. The incidence of type 2 diabetes was much higher among individuals aged 40 or over. These suggestive findings indicate that the association between magnesium and type 2 diabetes would also be worth examining among individuals over 40 years of age.

  11. Differential expression of neurogenes among breast cancer subtypes identifies high risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Nogueira, Patricia; Bragado, Paloma; Almendro, Vanessa; Ametller, Elisabet; Rios, Jose; Choudhury, Sibgat

    2016-01-01

    The nervous system is now recognized to be a relevant component of the tumor microenvironment. Receptors for neuropeptides and neurotransmitters have been identified in breast cancer. However, very little is known about the role of neurogenes in regulating breast cancer progression. Our purpose was to identify neurogenes associated with breast cancer tumorigenesis with a potential to be used as biomarker and/or targets for treatment. We used three databases of human genes: GeneGo, GeneCards and Eugenes to generate a list of 1266 relevant neurogenes. Then we used bioinformatics tools to interrogate two published breast cancer databases SAGE and MicMa (n=96) and generated a list of 7 neurogenes that are differentially express among breast cancer subtypes. The clinical potential was further investigated using the GOBO database (n=1881). We identified 6 neurogenes that are differentially expressed among breast cancer subtypes and whose expression correlates with prognosis. Histamine receptor1 (HRH1), neuropilin2 (NRP2), ephrin-B1 (EFNB1), neural growth factor receptor (NGFR) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) were differentially overexpressed in basal and HER2-enriched tumor samples and syntaxin 1A (STX1A) was overexpressed in HER2-enriched and luminal B tumors. Analysis of HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A expression using the GOBO database showed that their expression significantly correlated with a shorter overall survival (p < 0.0001) and distant metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). In contrast, elevated co-expression of NGFR, EFNB1 and APP was associated with longer overall (p < 0.0001) and metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). We propose that HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A can be used as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for basal and HER2-enriched breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26673618

  12. [Risk factors for arterial hypertension in the adult population of an urban region of Ecuador].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Benavides, Rina Elizabeth; Torres-Valdez, Maritza; Sigüencia-Cruz, Wilson; Añez-Ramos, Roberto; Salazar-Vílchez, Juan; Rojas-Quintero, Joselyn; Bermúdez-Pirela, Valmore

    2016-06-01

    Objectives . To determine the risk factors for arterial hypertension (HTN) in the adult resident population of the city of Cuenca, Ecuador Materials and methods A cross-sectional analytical study of adults selected via multistage random sampling who underwent clinical, anthropometric, and laboratory evaluations. The diagnosis of HTN was defined according to the JNC-7 criteria. A multiple logistic regression model was performed Results A total of 318 persons were included. The prevalence of HTN was 25.8% (males: 27.2% vs. females: 24.7%; p = 0.617). In the multiple logistic regression model, the risk factors for HTN were age > 60 years (OR, 8.68; 95% CI, 3.56-21.14; p < 0.001), obesity according to body mass index (OR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.04-5.70; p = 0.042), high caloric intake (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.01- 4.53; p = 0.044), and family history of HTN (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.02-2.90; p = 0.040) Conclusions The presence of HTN in this population is associated with both intrinsic and environmental factors, which should be considered in routine evaluations to ensure its early identification and control. PMID:27656923

  13. An interneuron progenitor maintains neurogenic potential in vivo and differentiates into GABAergic interneurons after transplantation in the postnatal rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Hong, Peiwei; Gao, Hui; Chen, Yuntian; Yang, Qi; Jiang, Mei; Li, Hedong

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of cortical GABAergic interneurons are involved in numerous neurological disorders including epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism; and replenishment of these cells by transplantation strategy has proven to be a feasible and effective method to help revert the symptoms in several animal models. To develop methodology of generating transplantable GABAergic interneurons for therapy, we previously reported the isolation of a v-myc-induced GABAergic interneuron progenitor clone GE6 from embryonic ganglionic eminence (GE). These cells can proliferate and form functional inhibitory synapses in culture. Here, we tested their differentiation behavior in vivo by transplanting them into the postnatal rat forebrain. We found that GE6 cells migrate extensively in the neonatal forebrain and differentiate into both neurons and glia, but preferentially into neurons when compared with a sister progenitor clone CTX8. The neurogenic potential of GE6 cells is also maintained after transplantation into a non-permissive environment such as adult cortex or when treated with inflammatory cytokine in culture. The GE6-derived neurons were able to mature in vivo as GABAergic interneurons expressing GABAergic, not glutamatergic, presynaptic puncta. Finally, we propose that v-myc-induced human interneuron progenitor clones could be an alternative cell source of transplantable GABAergic interneurons for treating related neurological diseases in future clinic. PMID:26750620

  14. Loss of neurogenesis in Hydra leads to compensatory regulation of neurogenic and neurotransmission genes in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Y; Buzgariu, W; Galliot, B

    2016-01-01

    Hydra continuously differentiates a sophisticated nervous system made of mechanosensory cells (nematocytes) and sensory-motor and ganglionic neurons from interstitial stem cells. However, this dynamic adult neurogenesis is dispensable for morphogenesis. Indeed animals depleted of their interstitial stem cells and interstitial progenitors lose their active behaviours but maintain their developmental fitness, and regenerate and bud when force-fed. To characterize the impact of the loss of neurogenesis in Hydra, we first performed transcriptomic profiling at five positions along the body axis. We found neurogenic genes predominantly expressed along the central body column, which contains stem cells and progenitors, and neurotransmission genes predominantly expressed at the extremities, where the nervous system is dense. Next, we performed transcriptomics on animals depleted of their interstitial cells by hydroxyurea, colchicine or heat-shock treatment. By crossing these results with cell-type-specific transcriptomics, we identified epithelial genes up-regulated upon loss of neurogenesis: transcription factors (Dlx, Dlx1, DMBX1/Manacle, Ets1, Gli3, KLF11, LMX1A, ZNF436, Shox1), epitheliopeptides (Arminins, PW peptide), neurosignalling components (CAMK1D, DDCl2, Inx1), ligand-ion channel receptors (CHRNA1, NaC7), G-Protein Coupled Receptors and FMRFRL. Hence epitheliomuscular cells seemingly enhance their sensing ability when neurogenesis is compromised. This unsuspected plasticity might reflect the extended multifunctionality of epithelial-like cells in early eumetazoan evolution.

  15. Neurogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells on aligned electrospun polypyrrole/polylactide composite nanofibers with electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junfeng; Cheng, Liang; Sun, Xiaodan; Wang, Xiumei; Jin, Shouhong; Li, Junxiang; Wu, Qiong

    2016-09-01

    Adult central nervous system (CNS) tissue has a limited capacity to recover after trauma or disease. Recent medical cell therapy using polymeric biomaterialloaded stem cells with the capability of differentiation to specific neural population has directed focuses toward the recovery of CNS. Fibers that can provide topographical, biochemical and electrical cues would be attractive for directing the differentiation of stem cells into electro-responsive cells such as neuronal cells. Here we report on the fabrication of an electrospun polypyrrole/polylactide composite nanofiber film that direct or determine the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), via combination of aligned surface topography, and electrical stimulation (ES). The surface morphology, mechanical properties and electric properties of the film were characterized. Comparing with that on random surface film, expression of neurofilament-lowest and nestin of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stemcells (huMSCs) cultured on film with aligned surface topography and ES were obviously enhanced. These results suggest that aligned topography combining with ES facilitates the neurogenic differentiation of huMSCs and the aligned conductive film can act as a potential nerve scaffold.

  16. Loss of neurogenesis in Hydra leads to compensatory regulation of neurogenic and neurotransmission genes in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hydra continuously differentiates a sophisticated nervous system made of mechanosensory cells (nematocytes) and sensory–motor and ganglionic neurons from interstitial stem cells. However, this dynamic adult neurogenesis is dispensable for morphogenesis. Indeed animals depleted of their interstitial stem cells and interstitial progenitors lose their active behaviours but maintain their developmental fitness, and regenerate and bud when force-fed. To characterize the impact of the loss of neurogenesis in Hydra, we first performed transcriptomic profiling at five positions along the body axis. We found neurogenic genes predominantly expressed along the central body column, which contains stem cells and progenitors, and neurotransmission genes predominantly expressed at the extremities, where the nervous system is dense. Next, we performed transcriptomics on animals depleted of their interstitial cells by hydroxyurea, colchicine or heat-shock treatment. By crossing these results with cell-type-specific transcriptomics, we identified epithelial genes up-regulated upon loss of neurogenesis: transcription factors (Dlx, Dlx1, DMBX1/Manacle, Ets1, Gli3, KLF11, LMX1A, ZNF436, Shox1), epitheliopeptides (Arminins, PW peptide), neurosignalling components (CAMK1D, DDCl2, Inx1), ligand-ion channel receptors (CHRNA1, NaC7), G-Protein Coupled Receptors and FMRFRL. Hence epitheliomuscular cells seemingly enhance their sensing ability when neurogenesis is compromised. This unsuspected plasticity might reflect the extended multifunctionality of epithelial-like cells in early eumetazoan evolution. PMID:26598723

  17. A Morphologic and Morphometric Study of Foramen Vesalius in Dry Adult Human Skulls of Gujarat Region

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Praveen R.; Rajguru, Jaba

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The foramen Vesalius is located within bony plate between the foramen ovale and the foramen rotundum in the floor of middle cranial fossa. This foramen allows passage of emissary veins which communicate cavernous sinus and pterygoid plexus of veins. AIM: To study the morphological and morphometric variations of foramen Vesalius in dry adult human skulls. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty dry adult human skulls were studied for variations in size, shape, presence/absence and any duplication/multiplication of the foramen Vesalius. After collecting data, appropriate statistical analysis was done. Results: The mean maximum dimension of foramen Vesalius was 0.98±0.67 mm on right side and 1.12±0.73 mm on left side. Foramen Vesalius was present in 90 (60%) skulls out of 150 observed. The incidence was 41(27.33%) on right side and 49 (32.67%) on left side. Foramen Vesalius was present unilaterally in 32 (35.56%) and bilaterally in 29 (32.23%) out of 90 skulls. Duplication of this foramen was observed in two skulls (one right side and one on left side). Foramen Vesalius was round in 72%, oval in 24% and irregular in 4% of total foramina present. Conclusion: Foramen Vesalius was present in 60% of total skulls studied. The foramen showed variations in incidence and shapes, while there was no statistically significant difference in the maximum dimension between foramen Vesalius on right and left side. There could be some developmental reasons to explain these variations. The findings of this study could be important to anatomists and also equally essential for clinicians who approach middle cranial cavity for various procedures. PMID:25859437

  18. Comparison of Regional Brain Perfusion Levels in Chronically Smoking and Non-Smoking Adults

    PubMed Central

    Durazzo, Timothy C.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.; Murray, Donna E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic cigarette smoking is associated with numerous abnormalities in brain neurobiology, but few studies specifically investigated the chronic effects of smoking (compared to the acute effects of smoking, nicotine administration, or nicotine withdrawal) on cerebral perfusion (i.e., blood flow). Predominately middle-aged male (47 ± 11 years of age) smokers (n = 34) and non-smokers (n = 27) were compared on regional cortical perfusion measured by continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance studies at 4 Tesla. Smokers showed significantly lower perfusion than non-smokers in the bilateral medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortices, bilateral inferior parietal lobules, bilateral superior temporal gyri, left posterior cingulate, right isthmus of cingulate, and right supramarginal gyrus. Greater lifetime duration of smoking (adjusted for age) was related to lower perfusion in multiple brain regions. The results indicated smokers showed significant perfusion deficits in anterior cortical regions implicated in the development, progression, and maintenance of all addictive disorders. Smokers concurrently demonstrated reduced blood flow in posterior brain regions that show morphological and metabolic aberrations as well as elevated beta amyloid deposition demonstrated by those with early stage Alzheimer disease. The findings provide additional novel evidence of the adverse effects of cigarette smoking on the human brain. PMID:26193290

  19. Comparison of Regional Brain Perfusion Levels in Chronically Smoking and Non-Smoking Adults.

    PubMed

    Durazzo, Timothy C; Meyerhoff, Dieter J; Murray, Donna E

    2015-07-16

    Chronic cigarette smoking is associated with numerous abnormalities in brain neurobiology, but few studies specifically investigated the chronic effects of smoking (compared to the acute effects of smoking, nicotine administration, or nicotine withdrawal) on cerebral perfusion (i.e., blood flow). Predominately middle-aged male (47 ± 11 years of age) smokers (n = 34) and non-smokers (n = 27) were compared on regional cortical perfusion measured by continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance studies at 4 Tesla. Smokers showed significantly lower perfusion than non-smokers in the bilateral medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortices, bilateral inferior parietal lobules, bilateral superior temporal gyri, left posterior cingulate, right isthmus of cingulate, and right supramarginal gyrus. Greater lifetime duration of smoking (adjusted for age) was related to lower perfusion in multiple brain regions. The results indicated smokers showed significant perfusion deficits in anterior cortical regions implicated in the development, progression, and maintenance of all addictive disorders. Smokers concurrently demonstrated reduced blood flow in posterior brain regions that show morphological and metabolic aberrations as well as elevated beta amyloid deposition demonstrated by those with early stage Alzheimer disease. The findings provide additional novel evidence of the adverse effects of cigarette smoking on the human brain.

  20. Additive effects of physical exercise and environmental enrichment on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fabel, Klaus; Wolf, Susanne A; Ehninger, Dan; Babu, Harish; Leal-Galicia, Perla; Kempermann, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Voluntary physical exercise (wheel running, RUN) and environmental enrichment both stimulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis but do so by different mechanisms. RUN induces precursor cell proliferation, whereas ENR exerts a survival-promoting effect on newborn cells. In addition, continued RUN prevented the physiologically occurring age-related decline in precursor cell in the dentate gyrus but did not lead to a corresponding increase in net neurogenesis. We hypothesized that in the absence of appropriate cognitive stimuli the potential for neurogenesis could not be realized but that an increased potential by proliferating precursor cells due to RUN could actually lead to more adult neurogenesis if an appropriate survival-promoting stimulus follows the exercise. We thus asked whether a sequential combination of RUN and ENR (RUNENR) would show additive effects that are distinct from the application of either paradigm alone. We found that the effects of 10 days of RUN followed by 35 days of ENR were additive in that the combined stimulation yielded an approximately 30% greater increase in new neurons than either stimulus alone, which also increased neurogenesis. Surprisingly, this result indicates that although overall the amount of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus is poorly predictive of net adult neurogenesis, an increased neurogenic potential nevertheless provides the basis for a greater efficiency of the same survival-promoting stimulus. We thus propose that physical activity can "prime" the neurogenic region of the dentate gyrus for increased neurogenesis in the case the animal is exposed to an additional cognitive stimulus, here represented by the enrichment paradigm.

  1. Cone beam computed tomographic analyses of alveolar bone anatomy at the maxillary anterior region in Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhixuan; Chen, Wu; Shen, Ming; Sun, Chao; Li, Jun; Chen, Ning

    2014-11-01

    To provide an anatomical basis for clinical implant esthetics, we evaluated the morphology of the nasopalatine canal (NPC) and analyzed labial and interproximal bone anatomy at the maxillary anterior region. We sought to investigate the effect of maxillary protrusion and tooth labiolingual inclination on labial bone anatomy in Chinese adults. Three dimensional (3D) images were reconstructed using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images from 80 Chinese subjects and by SimPlant 11.04. The dimensions of the NPC, the thickness and profile of the labial bone, the width and height of the interproximal bone, angle sella-nasion-subspinale (SNA) and angle upper central incisor-nasion,subspinale (U1-NA) were measured. The incisive foramen of the NPC was markedly wider than its nasal foramen. The dimension of its labial bone wall demonstrated an increasing width from the crestal to apical measurements. The labial bone at the maxillary anterior region was rather thin, especially at 3 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) and the mid-root level; the profile of the labial bone was more curved at the central incisor, and the interproximal bone became wider and shorter posteriorly. There were significant relationships between maxillary protrusion and labial bone profile, tooth labiolingual inclination and labial bone thickness (P < 0.02). To achieve optimal esthetic outcome of implant, bone augmentation is necessary at the maxillary anterior region. For immediate or early placement at the maxillary anterior region, the implant should be located palatally to reduce labial bone resorption and marginal recession; its apex should be angulated palatally to avoid labial perforation at the apical region. To protect the NPC, implants at the central incisor region should be placed away from NPC. PMID:25469120

  2. Maintenance of neural stem cell regional identity in culture.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Ryan N; Lu, Changqing; Lim, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are distributed throughout the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) in the adult mouse brain. NSCs located in spatially distinct regions of the V-SVZ generate different types of olfactory bulb (OB) neurons, and the regional expression of specific transcription factors correlates with these differences in NSC developmental potential. In a recent article, we show that Nkx2.1-expressing embryonic precursors give rise to NKX2.1+ NSCs located in the ventral V-SVZ of adult mice. Here we characterize a V-SVZ monolayer culture system that retains regional gene expression and neurogenic potential of NSCs from the dorsal and ventral V-SVZ. In particular, we find that Nkx2.1-lineage V-SVZ NSCs maintain Nkx2.1 expression through serial passage and can generate new neurons in vitro. Thus, V-SVZ NSCs retain key aspects of their in vivo regional identity in culture, providing new experimental opportunities for understanding how such developmental patterns are established and maintained during development. PMID:27606338

  3. Gray and White Matter Structures in the Midcingulate Cortex Region Contribute to Body Mass Index in Chinese Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    He, Qinghua; Chen, Chuansheng; Dong, Qi; Xue, Gui; Chen, Chunhui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Bechara, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are rapidly becoming a central public health challenge around the world. Previous studies have suggested that elevated Body Mass Index (BMI) might be associated with structural changes in both gray and white matter, but this association is still not well understood. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between BMI and brain structure with a relatively large sample of young adults (N = 336) in a small age range (20 ± 1 years). VBM results showed significant negative correlations between BMI and Gray Matter Volumes (GMV) in the MCC, left OFC, and left VMPFC. There was also a significant negative correlation between BMI and white matter integrity as indexed by fractional anisotropy (FA) in bilateral cingulum. Further tractography analysis showed a significant negative correlation between BMI and the number of fibers passing the MCC region. Regression analysis showed that gray matter and white matter in these regions both contributed to the variance of BMI. These results remained significant even when analysis was restricted to the subjects with normal-weights. Finally, we found that decision making ability (as assessed by the Iowa Gambling Task) mediated the association between the structure of the MCC (a region responsible for impulse control and decision making) and BMI. These results shed light on the structural neural basis of weight variations. PMID:24146133

  4. Regional resources buffer the impact of functional limitations on perceived autonomy in older adults with multiple illnesses.

    PubMed

    Schüz, Benjamin; Westland, Josh N; Wurm, Susanne; Tesch-Römer, Clemens; Wolff, Julia K; Warner, Lisa M; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Retaining perceptions of autonomy is a key component of successful aging. Perceived autonomy refers to the capacity to make and enact self-directed decisions. These perceptions are often threatened in older adults with multiple illnesses, when functional limitations resulting from these illnesses impede the enactment of self-directed decisions. Regional resources (in Germany specifically at the level of administrative districts) might counteract these impediments of autonomy. Economically stronger districts can provide more-concrete support resources for older adults, buffering the negative effect of functional limitations on self-perceived autonomy. This study assessed participants aged over 65 with 2 or more chronic conditions. In total, N = 287 provided data (Mage = 73.3, SD = 5.07), and n = 97 were women. Gross domestic product (GDP) per capita was used as a proxy measure of administrative district wealth in Germany. Hierarchical multilevel regression analyses with cross-level interactions were conducted. Results suggest that the detrimental effect of functional limitations on perceived autonomy is less pronounced for participants residing in higher GDP districts. Conversely, for participants in lower GDP districts, the effect is exacerbated. This finding suggests that districts with greater financial resources might be better able to invest in supports that promote and facilitate autonomy and, thus, provide a buffer against threats to individual perceived autonomy. PMID:26691299

  5. An association analysis of the HLA gene region in latent autoimmune diabetes in adults

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Pathophysiological similarities between latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) and type 1 diabetes indicate an overlap in genetic susceptibility. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 are major susceptibility genes for type 1 diabetes but studies of these genes in LADA have been limited. Our aim was to define patterns of HLA-encoded susceptibility/protection in a large, well characterised LADA cohort, and to establish association with disease and age at diagnosis. Materials and methods Patients with LADA (n=387, including 211 patients from the UK Prospective Diabetes Study) and non-diabetic control subjects (n=327) were of British/Irish European origin. The HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 genes were genotyped by sequence-specific PCR. Results As in type 1 diabetes mellitus, DRB1*0301_DQB1*0201 (odds ratio [OR]=3.08, 95% CI 2.32–4.12, p=1.2× 10−16) and DRB1*0401_DQB1*0302 (OR=2.57, 95% CI 1.80–3.73, p=4.5×10−8) were the main susceptibility haplotypes in LADA, and DRB1*1501_DQB1*0602 was protective (OR=0.21, 95% CI 0.13–0.34, p=4.2×10−13). Differential susceptibility was conferred by DR4 subtypes: DRB1*0401 was predisposing (OR=1.79, 95% CI 1.35–2.38, p=2.7×10−5) whereas DRB1*0403 was protective (OR=0.37, 95% CI 0.13–0.97, p=0.033). The highest-risk genotypes were DRB1*0301/DRB1*0401 and DQB1*0201/DQB1*0302 (OR=5.14, 95% CI 2.68–10.69, p=1.3×10−8; and OR=6.88, 95% CI 3.54–14.68, p=1.2×10−11, respectively). These genotypes and those containing DRB1*0401 and DQB1*0302 associated with a younger age at diagnosis in LADA, whereas genotypes containing DRB1*1501 and DQB1*0602 associated with an older age at diagnosis. Conclusions/interpretation Patterns of susceptibility at the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 loci in LADA are similar to those reported for type 1 diabetes, supporting the hypothesis that autoimmune diabetes occurring in adults is an age-related extension of the pathophysiological process presenting as childhood-onset type 1 diabetes. PMID

  6. Precocious puberty: clinical and endocrine profile and factors indicating neurogenic precocity in Indian children.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Anurag; Sharma, Jyoti; Kabra, Madhulika; Kumar Gupta, Arun; Menon, P S N

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical and endocrine profile of patients with precocious puberty followed up in a tertiary care hospital. Records of 140 patients (114 girls, 26 boys) with precocious puberty were reviewed. Clinical features including age of onset, stage of pubertal development, presenting symptoms, features suggestive of CNS involvement and family history were analyzed. Endocrine investigations included basal and GnRH-stimulated levels of LH and FSH as well as 17OHP, DHEA, hCG and thyroid profile. Abdominal and pelvic ultrasonography and CNS imaging were correlated with clinical features. Girls outnumbered boys in this series (4.4:1). Neurogenic central isosexual precocious puberty (CIPP) was more common in boys (10 out of 18, 55.6%) than girls (16 out of 77, 20.8%). The most common cause of neurogenic CIPP was hypothalamic hamartoma present in five girls and four boys. Other causes of neurogenic CIPP included neurotuberculosis, pituitary adenoma, hydrocephalus, post radiotherapy, CNS tumors and malformations. Peripheral precocious puberty (PPP) was secondary to adrenal causes in boys and ovarian cysts in girls. Benign variants of precocious puberty, such as premature thelarche and premature adrenarche, were present in 23 and six girls, respectively. Hypothyroidism was present in four girls and McCune-Albright syndrome in one girl. Girls with neurogenic CIPP had a lower age of onset as compared to idiopathic CIPP (3.6 +/- 2.7 years vs 5.4 +/- 2.5 years, p = 0.014). The lowest age of onset was seen in girls with hypothalamic hamartoma (1.6 +/- 0.9 years). Forty-seven girls with CIPP (seven neurogenic and 40 idiopathic) presented after the age of 6 years. Features of CNS involvement, in the form of seizures, mental retardation, raised intracranial tension or focal neurological deficits, were present in seven girls (43.8%) and four boys (40%), and gelastic seizures were present in three children. Girls with CIPP had greater bone age

  7. Emphysematous Pyelonephritis Caused by Citrobacter freundii in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jeong; Park, Ji Sang; Lim, Hye Jin; Jung, Jihye; Shin, Dong Geum; Lee, Ki-Deok; Jung, Yoon Young; Min, Kyung Wan; Han, Kyung-Ah

    2013-09-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a rare, life-threatening complication of upper urinary tract infections that is characterized by the presence of gas in the renal parenchyma and perirenal space. It commonly occurs in diabetic patients. Escherichia coli are the most common causative organisms, with few reports implicating Citrobacter freundii as the etiologic agent in EPN. A 57-year-old woman with diabetes and neurogenic bladder visited at our department with confused mentality, myalgia, and general weakness. Further investigation revealed that the patient suffered from unilateral EPN with sepsis caused by C. freundii. The patient's condition was improved considerably with percutaneous drainage and use of intravenous antibiotics for several weeks. However, renal function eventually deteriorated to permanent renal failure, which required hemodialysis. In conclusion, C. freundii may be the causative pathogen of EPN in a patient with type 2 diabetes and neurogenic bladder.

  8. Evaluation and Management of Neurogenic Bladder: What Is New in China?

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder (NB) or neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD), a dysfunction of the urinary bladder and urethra due to disease of the central nervous system or peripheral nerves, is a major global medical and social problem. Numerous nervous system abnormalities, such as: stroke, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord tumors, congenital spina bifida, and diabetes, can cause NB/NLUTD. There are two major types of bladder control problems associated with NB/NLUTD: the bladder becomes either overactive or underactive depending on the nature, level, and extent of nerve damage. This review specifically focuses on the diagnosis and management of NB/NLUTD in China as well as on recent efforts to treat this disease. PMID:26266405

  9. A Case of Neuro-Behcet’s Disease Presenting with Central Neurogenic Hyperventilation

    PubMed Central

    Alkhachroum, Ayham M.; Saeed, Saba; Kaur, Jaspreet; Shams, Tanzila; De Georgia, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 46 Final Diagnosis: Central hyperventilation Symptoms: Hyperventilation Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Neurology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Behcet’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder usually characterized by the triad of oral ulcers, genital ulcers, and uveitis. Central to the pathogenesis of Behcet’s disease is an autoimmune vasculitis. Neurological involvement, so called “Neuro-Behcet’s disease”, occurs in 10–20% of patients, usually from a meningoencephalitis or venous thrombosis. Case Report: We report the case of a 46-year-old patient with Neuro-Behcet’s disease who presented with central neurogenic hyperventilation as a result of brainstem involvement from venulitis. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, central neurogenic hyperventilation has not previously been described in a patient with Neuro-Behcet’s disease. PMID:26965646

  10. Evaluation and Management of Neurogenic Bladder: What Is New in China?

    PubMed

    Liao, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder (NB) or neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD), a dysfunction of the urinary bladder and urethra due to disease of the central nervous system or peripheral nerves, is a major global medical and social problem. Numerous nervous system abnormalities, such as: stroke, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord tumors, congenital spina bifida, and diabetes, can cause NB/NLUTD. There are two major types of bladder control problems associated with NB/NLUTD: the bladder becomes either overactive or underactive depending on the nature, level, and extent of nerve damage. This review specifically focuses on the diagnosis and management of NB/NLUTD in China as well as on recent efforts to treat this disease. PMID:26266405

  11. N-Docosahexaenoylethanolamine ameliorates ethanol-induced impairment of neural stem cell neurogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mohammad Abdur; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that prenatal exposure to ethanol interferes with embryonic and fetal development, and causes abnormal neurodevelopment. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid highly enriched in the brain, was shown to be essential for proper brain development and function. Recently, we found that N-docosahexenoyethanolamine (synaptamide), an endogenous metabolite of DHA, is a potent PKA-dependent neurogenic factor for neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation. In this study, we demonstrate that ethanol at pharmacologically relevant concentrations downregulates cAMP signaling in NSC and impairs neurogenic differentiation. In contrast, synaptamide reverses ethanol-impaired NSC neurogenic differentiation through counter-acting on the cAMP production system. NSC exposure to ethanol (25-50 mM) for 4 days dose-dependently decreased the number of Tuj-1 positive neurons and PKA/CREB phosphorylation with a concomitant reduction of cellular cAMP. Ethanol-induced cAMP reduction was accompanied by the inhibition of G-protein activation and expression of adenylyl cyclase (AC) 7 and AC8, as well as PDE4 upregulation. In contrast to ethanol, synaptamide increased cAMP production, GTPγS binding, and expression of AC7 and AC8 isoforms in a cAMP-dependent manner, offsetting the ethanol-induced impairment in neurogenic differentiation. These results indicate that synaptamide can reduce ethanol-induced impairment of neuronal differentiation by counter-affecting shared targets in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)/cAMP signaling. The synaptamide-mediated mechanism observed in this study may offer a possible avenue for ameliorating the adverse impact of fetal alcohol exposure on neurodevelopment. PMID:26586023

  12. N-Docosahexaenoylethanolamine ameliorates ethanol-induced impairment of neural stem cell neurogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mohammad Abdur; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that prenatal exposure to ethanol interferes with embryonic and fetal development, and causes abnormal neurodevelopment. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid highly enriched in the brain, was shown to be essential for proper brain development and function. Recently, we found that N-docosahexenoyethanolamine (synaptamide), an endogenous metabolite of DHA, is a potent PKA-dependent neurogenic factor for neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation. In this study, we demonstrate that ethanol at pharmacologically relevant concentrations downregulates cAMP signaling in NSC and impairs neurogenic differentiation. In contrast, synaptamide reverses ethanol-impaired NSC neurogenic differentiation through counter-acting on the cAMP production system. NSC exposure to ethanol (25-50 mM) for 4 days dose-dependently decreased the number of Tuj-1 positive neurons and PKA/CREB phosphorylation with a concomitant reduction of cellular cAMP. Ethanol-induced cAMP reduction was accompanied by the inhibition of G-protein activation and expression of adenylyl cyclase (AC) 7 and AC8, as well as PDE4 upregulation. In contrast to ethanol, synaptamide increased cAMP production, GTPγS binding, and expression of AC7 and AC8 isoforms in a cAMP-dependent manner, offsetting the ethanol-induced impairment in neurogenic differentiation. These results indicate that synaptamide can reduce ethanol-induced impairment of neuronal differentiation by counter-affecting shared targets in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)/cAMP signaling. The synaptamide-mediated mechanism observed in this study may offer a possible avenue for ameliorating the adverse impact of fetal alcohol exposure on neurodevelopment.

  13. National, regional, and global trends in adult overweight and obesity prevalences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity prevalence are commonly used for public and policy communication of the extent of the obesity epidemic, yet comparable estimates of trends in overweight and obesity prevalence by country are not available. Methods We estimated trends between 1980 and 2008 in overweight and obesity prevalence and their uncertainty for adults 20 years of age and older in 199 countries and territories. Data were from a previous study, which used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate mean body mass index (BMI) based on published and unpublished health examination surveys and epidemiologic studies. Here, we used the estimated mean BMIs in a regression model to predict overweight and obesity prevalence by age, country, year, and sex. The uncertainty of the estimates included both those of the Bayesian hierarchical model and the uncertainty due to cross-walking from mean BMI to overweight and obesity prevalence. Results The global age-standardized prevalence of obesity nearly doubled from 6.4% (95% uncertainty interval 5.7-7.2%) in 1980 to 12.0% (11.5-12.5%) in 2008. Half of this rise occurred in the 20 years between 1980 and 2000, and half occurred in the 8 years between 2000 and 2008. The age-standardized prevalence of overweight increased from 24.6% (22.7-26.7%) to 34.4% (33.2-35.5%) during the same 28-year period. In 2008, female obesity prevalence ranged from 1.4% (0.7-2.2%) in Bangladesh and 1.5% (0.9-2.4%) in Madagascar to 70.4% (61.9-78.9%) in Tonga and 74.8% (66.7-82.1%) in Nauru. Male obesity was below 1% in Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Ethiopia, and was highest in Cook Islands (60.1%, 52.6-67.6%) and Nauru (67.9%, 60.5-75.0%). Conclusions Globally, the prevalence of overweight and obesity has increased since 1980, and the increase has accelerated. Although obesity increased in most countries, levels and trends varied substantially. These data on trends in overweight and obesity may be used to set targets for obesity

  14. From the archives of the AFIP. Imaging of musculoskeletal neurogenic tumors: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Murphey, M D; Smith, W S; Smith, S E; Kransdorf, M J; Temple, H T

    1999-01-01

    Numerous neurogenic tumors can affect the musculoskeletal system, including traumatic neuroma, Morton neuroma, neural fibrolipoma, nerve sheath ganglion, neurilemoma, neurofibroma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs). The diagnosis of neurogenic tumors can be suggested from their imaging appearances, including lesion shape and intrinsic imaging characteristics. It is also important to establish lesion location along a typical nerve distribution (eg, plantar digital nerve in Morton neuroma, median nerve in neural fibrolipoma, large nerve trunk in benign and malignant PNSTs). Traumatic and Morton neuromas are commonly related to an amputation stump or are located in the intermetatarsal space, respectively. Neural fibrolipomas show fat interspersed between nerve fascicles and are often associated with macrodactyly. Nerve sheath ganglion has a cystic appearance and commonly occurs about the knee. Radiologic characteristics of neurilemoma, neurofibroma, and malignant PNST at computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging include fusiform shape, identification of entering and exiting nerve, low attenuation at CT, target sign, fascicular sign, split-fat sign, and associated muscle atrophy. Although differentiation of neurilemoma from neurofibroma and of benign from malignant PNST is problematic, recognition of the radiologic appearances of neurogenic tumors often allows prospective diagnosis and improves clinical management of patients.

  15. Changes of neural markers expression during late neurogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Khosravizadeh, Zahra; Bahramian, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different studies have been done to obtain sufficient number of neural cells for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, spinal cord, and traumatic brain injury because neural stem cells are limited in central nerves system. Recently, several studies have shown that adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are the appropriate source of multipotent stem cells. Furthermore, these cells are found in large quantities. The aim of this study was an assessment of proliferation and potential of neurogenic differentiation of ADSCs with passing time. Materials and Methods: Neurosphere formation was used for neural induction in isolated human ADSCs (hADSCs). The rate of proliferation was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and potential of neural differentiation of induced hADSCs was evaluated by immunocytochemical and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis after 10 and 14 days post-induction. Results: The rate of proliferation of induced hADSCs increased after 14 days while the expression of nestin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and microtubule-associated protein 2 was decreased with passing time during neurogenic differentiation. Conclusion: These findings showed that the proliferation of induced cells increased with passing time, but in early neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs, neural expression was higher than late of differentiation. Thus, using of induced cells in early differentiation may be suggested for in vivo application. PMID:26605238

  16. Complications of untreated and ineffectively treated neurogenic bladder dysfunctions in children: our own practical classification.

    PubMed

    Kroll, P; Zachwieja, J

    2016-04-01

    The neurogenic dysfunctions of the detrusor and the sphincter are caused by either a known congenital defect of the nervous system or by acquired damage to the nervous system. In patients with idiopathic bladder dysfunctions neurological examinations fail to reveal any pathology in the nervous system. The treatment strategy for the patient with detrusor-sphincter dysfunction should be based on a comprehensive functional and morphological evaluation. Clean Intermittent Catheterization is mandatory if voiding is ineffective. Reduced bladder capacity related to detrusor overactivity and decreased bladder walls compliance is successfully managed conservatively with oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment prevents complications in the majority of patients. However, despite proper conservative treatment, some patients still develop complications. We propose our own practical classification of complications characteristic for the bladder and sphincter dysfunctions: 1. Urinary tract infections; 2. Urolithiasis; 3. Anatomic changes in the lower urinary tract; 4. Anatomic changes in the upper urinary tract; 5. Functional disturbances of kidneys parenchyma; 6. Urinary incontinence. Proposed practical classification of complications of bladder and sphincter dysfunctions is clear and simple. This classification can be used both in children with neurogenic and non-neurogenic dysfunctions. It is helpful in planning follow-up procedures and evaluation of treatment results. PMID:27097940

  17. Neurogenic inflammation and colliquative lymphadenitis with persistent orthopox virus DNA detection in a human case of cowpox virus infection transmitted by a domestic cat.

    PubMed

    Hobi, S; Mueller, R S; Hill, M; Nitsche, A; Löscher, T; Guggemos, W; Ständer, S; Rjosk-Dendorfer, D; Wollenberg, A

    2015-08-01

    Cowpox viruses are orthopoxviruses that may survive in the environment for years. Rodents are regarded as the primary hosts, but transmission to other species has been reported. This report describes a cowpox virus infection in a cat with subsequent transmission to its owner leading to protracted, atypical and severe clinical signs. A young cat presented with multiple crusts and plaques on the neck, muzzle and tail base. The owner developed an erythematous lesion with elevated margins, central necrosis and crust formation below the left breast, a neurogenic inflammation, enlarged regional lymph nodes, a colliquative lymphadenitis and concomitant flu-like symptoms. Cultures were taken at the first visit from the cat's lesional skin and the patient's skin, and polymerase chain reaction with sequencing of the haemagglutinin region of both were positive for cowpox virus. The patient was treated with various antibiotics and methylprednisolone and was in clinical remission after 7 months.

  18. Insecticide resistance status of Colorado potato beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) adults in northern Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Tian; Xiong, Man-Hui; Lu, Wei-Ping; Liu, Ping; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2010-08-01

    Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), has become the economically most important insect defoliator of potatoes, Solanum tuberosum L., in northern Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region in China. Currently, control of Colorado potato beetle relies mainly on chemical insecticides. And this may result in insecticide resistance. In this study, LD50 values were measured by a topical bioassay for 14 conventional insecticides in seven local populations from Urumqi, Changji, Tacheng, Nilka, Gongliu, Qapqal, and Tekes counties (cities). The Tekes field population was the most susceptible population and was selected as a reference strain. Compared with the Tekes strain, the Changji, Qapqal, Nilka, Tacheng, and Gongliu populations exhibited moderate to very high levels of resistance to cyhalothrin. The Qapqal and Changji populations showed a moderate and a very high resistance to deltamethrin, respectively. And the Changji population developed a high resistance against alpha-cypermethrin. Moreover, the Qapqal population had a moderate resistance to carbofuran, and the Urumqi population reached high level of resistance to endosulfan. Possible resistance mechanisms of the Changji and Qapqal populations were determined using three enzyme inhibitors. Triphenyl phosphate (TPP), diethylmeleate, and piperonyl butoxide (PBO) had little synergism to cyhalothrin in the two populations. In contrast, PBO and TPP exhibited some synergistic effects to carbofuran in the Qapqal population, indicating the involvement of monooxygenases and esterases in conferring carbofuran resistance. It seems that additional mechanisms, such as target site insensitivity, should play an important role in Colorado potato beetle resistances to cyhalothrin and carbofuran in northern Xinjiang local populations.

  19. Endocrine and neurogenic regulation of the orphan nuclear receptors Nur77 and Nurr-1 in the adrenal glands.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, I J; Lau, L F

    1994-01-01

    nurr77 and nurr-1 are growth factor-inducible members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor gene superfamily. In order to gain insight into the potential roles of nur77 in the living organism, we used pharmacologic treatments to examine the expression of nur77 in the mouse adrenal gland. We found that nur77 and nurr-1 are induced in the adrenal gland upon treatment with pentylene tetrazole (Ptz; Metrazole). This induction is separable into distinct endocrine and neurogenic mechanisms. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrates that nur77 expression upon Ptz treatment in the adrenal cortex is localized primarily to the inner cortical region, the zona fasciculata-reticularis, with minimal induction in the zona glomerulosa. This induction is inhibitable by pretreatment with dexamethasone, indicating involvement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the activation of adrenal cortical expression. When mice were injected with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), nur77 expression in the adrenal gland spanned all cortical layers including the zona glomerulosa, but medullary expression was not induced. Ptz also induces expression of both nur77 and nurr-1 in the adrenal medulla. Medullary induction is likely to have a neurogenic origin, as nur77 expression was not inhibitable by dexamethasone pretreatment and induction was seen after treatment with the cholinergic neurotransmitter nicotine. nur77 is also inducible by ACTH, forskolin, and the second messenger analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP in the ACTH-responsive adrenal cortical cell line Y-1. Significantly, Nur77 isolated from ACTH-stimulated Y-1 cells bound to its response element whereas Nur77 present in unstimulated cells did not. Moreover, Nur77 in ACTH-treated Y-1 cells was hypophosphorylated at serine 354 compared with that in untreated cells. These results, taken together with the previous observation that dephosphorylation of serine 354 affects DNA binding affinity in vitro, show for the first time that

  20. Hepatogenic and neurogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from abattoir-derived bovine fetuses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are multipotent progenitor cells characterized by their ability to both self-renew and differentiate into tissues of mesodermal origin. The plasticity or transdifferentiation potential of MSC is not limited to mesodermal derivatives, since under appropriate cell culture conditions and stimulation by bioactive factors, MSC have also been differentiated into endodermal (hepatocytes) and neuroectodermal (neurons) cells. The potential of MSC for hepatogenic and neurogenic differentiation has been well documented in different animal models; however, few reports are currently available on large animal models. In the present study we sought to characterize the hepatogenic and neurogenic differentiation and multipotent potential of bovine MSC (bMSC) isolated from bone marrow (BM) of abattoir-derived fetuses. Results Plastic-adherent bMSC isolated from fetal BM maintained a fibroblast-like morphology under monolayer culture conditions. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that bMSC populations were positive for MSC markers CD29 and CD73 and pluripotency markers OCT4 and NANOG; whereas, were negative for hematopoietic markers CD34 and CD45. Levels of mRNA of hepatic genes α-fetoprotein (AFP), albumin (ALB), alpha1 antitrypsin (α1AT), connexin 32 (CNX32), tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) and cytochrome P450 (CYP3A4) were up-regulated in bMSC during a 28-Day period of hepatogenic differentiation. Functional analyses in differentiated bMSC cultures evidenced an increase (P < 0.05) in albumin and urea production and glycogen storage. bMSC cultured under neurogenic conditions expressed NESTIN and MAP2 proteins at 24 h of culture; whereas, at 144 h also expressed TRKA and PrPC. Levels of MAP2 and TRKA mRNA were up-regulated at the end of the differentiation period. Conversely, bMSC expressed lower levels of NANOG mRNA during both hepatogenic and neurogenic differentiation processes. Conclusion The expression patterns of linage

  1. cis-Regulatory control of the initial neurogenic pattern of onecut gene expression in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Barsi, Julius C; Davidson, Eric H

    2016-01-01

    Specification of the ciliated band (CB) of echinoid embryos executes three spatial functions essential for postgastrular organization. These are establishment of a band about 5 cells wide which delimits and bounds other embryonic territories; definition of a neurogenic domain within this band; and generation within it of arrays of ciliary cells that bear the special long cilia from which the structure derives its name. In Strongylocentrotus purpuratus the spatial coordinates of the future ciliated band are initially and exactly determined by the disposition of a ring of cells that transcriptionally activate the onecut homeodomain regulatory gene, beginning in blastula stage, long before the appearance of the CB per se. Thus the cis-regulatory apparatus that governs onecut expression in the blastula directly reveals the genomic sequence code by which these aspects of the spatial organization of the embryo are initially determined. We screened the entire onecut locus and its flanking region for transcriptionally active cis-regulatory elements, and by means of BAC recombineered deletions identified three separated and required cis-regulatory modules that execute different functions. The operating logic of the crucial spatial control module accounting for the spectacularly precise and beautiful early onecut expression domain depends on spatial repression. Previously predicted oral ectoderm and aboral ectoderm repressors were identified by cis-regulatory mutation as the products of goosecoid and irxa genes respectively, while the pan-ectodermal activator SoxB1 supplies a transcriptional driver function.

  2. Influence of the maternal use of labetalol on the neurogenic mechanism for cerebral autoregulation assessed by means of NIRS.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, Alexander; Varon, Carolina; Thewissen, Liesbeth; Naulaers, Gunnar; Lemmers, Petra; Van Bel, Frank; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Labetalol is a drug used in the treatment of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP). In a previous study we investigated the influence of the maternal use of labetalol on the cerebral autoregulation (CA) mechanism of neonates. In that study, we found that labetalol induces impaired CA during the first day of life, with CA returning to a normal status by the third day after birth. This effect was hypothesized to be caused by labetalol-induced vasodilation. However, no strong evidence for this claim was found. In this study we aim to find stronger evidence for the vasodilation effect caused by labetalol, by investigating its effect on the neurogenic mechanism (NM) involved in CA. The status of the NM was assessed by means of transfer function analysis between the low frequency content of the autonomic control activity (LFA), obtained by processing of the heart rate (HR), and the regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO₂). We found that neonates from mothers treated with labetalol presented a lower LFA and an impaired NM response during the first day of life, with values returning to normal by the end of the third day. These results reflect a vasodilation effect caused by labetalol, and indicate that the impaired CA observed in the previous study is caused by vasodilation.

  3. White rice intake varies in its association with metabolic markers of diabetes and dyslipidemia across region among Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Fei; Howard, Annie-Green; Herring, Amy H.; Popkin, Barry M.; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims There are inconsistent associations between white rice consumption with diabetes and dyslipidemia, perhaps due to the nature of samples studied and quality of diet data. Methods Using regionally diverse data from adults enrolled in the China Health and Nutrition Survey (n=7,878) with diet data from three repeated 24-hour recalls and fasting blood to derive diabetes and dyslipidemia, we examined the odds of diabetes and dyslipidemia in participants across region-specific tertiles of percent energy from white rice consumption. Results The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes, high triglycerides, high low-density lipoprotein (LDL), low high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and atherogenic dyslipidemia (AD) were 4.7%, 31.8%, 31.3%, 25.9%, and 14.6%, respectively. We found an inverse association between highest (versus lowest) tertile of rice intake and diabetes in Central China [Odds Ratio (OR): 0.59, 95% CI: 0.36–0.99]. Highest rice consumption was also associated with high triglycerides (OR: 1.46, 95%CI: 1.09–1.95), low HDL (OR: 1.38, 95%CI: 1.03–1.85) and AD (OR: 1.63, 95%CI: 1.15–2.31) in the North, and low LDL (OR: 0.54, 95%CI: 0.42–0.69) in the Central. Conclusions The association between white rice consumption with diabetes and dyslipidemia markers varied across regions of China, suggesting a role of other dietary and health-related exposures, beyond rice. PMID:26068010

  4. Predictors of loss to follow-up in antiretroviral treatment for adult patients in the Oromia region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Megerso, Abebe; Garoma, Sileshi; Eticha, Tolosa; Workineh, Tilaye; Daba, Shallo; Tarekegn, Mihretu; Habtamu, Zelalem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It is known that antiretroviral treatment (ART) reduces mortality from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome related causes. Patient’s lost to follow-up (LTFU) in this treatment poses a paramount problem to the public and health care services. Information on predictors of loss to follow-up is scarce in this study area and similar settings. Therefore, this study aimed at identifying correlates of loss to follow-up in ART among adult patients in the Oromia region of Ethiopia. Methods A case–control study was conducted between February 2015 and April 2015 using medical records. The stratified sampling technique was used to select health facilities. The number of patient records to be included in the study was proportionally allocated to each stratum based on their patient proportion in the regional data. Specific health facilities from which to include the records were randomly selected from a list of the health facilities per stratum. All adult patient records registered as LTFU (416) in the selected health facilities during the 12-month period prior to the data collection date, and 832 patients with good adherence to ART were included. Data were double-entered into Epi Info 7 and analyzed using SPSS 20. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression were used to report the results. Qualitative data were thematically analyzed using open code computer software. Results Age 15–24 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 19.82 95% CI: 6.80, 57.73); day laborers (AOR, 5.36; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.23, 8.89), rural residents (AOR, 2.35; 95% CI: 1.45, 3.89), World Health Organization clinical stage IV (AOR, 2.29; 95% CI: 1.45, 3.62), baseline CD4 <350 cells/mL (AOR, 2.06; 95% CI: 1.36, 3.13), suboptimal adherence to ART (AOR, 7.42; 95% CI: 1.87, 29.41), were factors which increased the risk of loss to follow-up in ART. Conclusion Multiple risk factors, both socioeconomic and clinical, were associated with loss to follow-up. Attention is required to

  5. Keewatin Regional Education Authority Pilot Education Project (KREA): Computer Assisted Learning, Adult Education Keewatin Region. Report on Year I of 2 Year Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Heidi

    A pilot project in computer-assisted learning was conducted to allow adults who have not succeeded in traditional education programs to work independently at their own level and receive regular constructive feedback. The project was also intended for adults requiring specialized training to get this training in their community and improve their…

  6. S100A6 (calcyclin) is a novel marker of neural stem cells and astrocyte precursors in the subgranular zone of the adult mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Jun; Jinno, Shozo

    2014-01-01

    S100A6 (calcyclin), an EF-hand calcium binding protein, is considered to play various roles in the brain, for example, cell proliferation and differentiation, calcium homeostasis, and neuronal degeneration. In addition to some limbic nuclei, S100A6 is distributed in the rostral migratory stream, one of the major neurogenic niches of the adult brain. However, the potential involvement of S100A6 in adult neurogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the role of S100A6 in the other major neurogenic niche, the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the adult mouse hippocampus. Immunofluorescent multiple labeling showed that S100A6 was highly expressed in neural stem cells labeled by sex determining region Y-box 2, brain lipid-binding protein protein and glial fibrillary acidic protein. S100A6+ cells often extended a long process typical of radial glial morphology. In addition, S100A6 was found in some S100β+ astrocyte lineage cells. Interestingly, proliferating cell nuclear antigen was detected in a fraction of S100A6+/S100β+ cells. These cells were considered to be lineage-restricted astrocyte precursors maintaining mitotic potential. On the other hand, S100A6 was rarely seen in neural lineage cells labeled by T-box brain protein 2, doublecortin, calretinin and calbindin D28K. Cell fate-tracing experiment using BrdU showed that the majority of newly generated immature astrocytes were immunoreactive for S100A6, while mature astrocytes lacked S100A6 immunoreactivity. Administration of S100 protein inhibitor, trifluoperazine, caused a reduction in production of S100β+ astrocyte lineage cells, but had no impact on neurogenesis. Overall, our data provide the first evidence that S100A6 is a specific marker of neural stem cells and astrocyte precursors, and may be especially important for generation of astrocytes in the adult hippocampus.

  7. Heterogeneous generation of new cells in the adult echinoderm nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Mashanov, Vladimir S.; Zueva, Olga R.; García-Arrarás, José E.

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis, generation of new functional cells in the mature central nervous system (CNS), has been documented in a number of diverse organisms, ranging from humans to invertebrates. However, the origin and evolution of this phenomenon is still poorly understood for many of the key phylogenetic groups. Echinoderms are one such phylum, positioned as a sister group to chordates within the monophyletic clade Deuterostomia. They are well known for the ability of their adult organs, including the CNS, to completely regenerate after injury. Nothing is known, however, about production of new cells in the nervous tissue under normal physiological conditions in these animals. In this study, we show that new cells are continuously generated in the mature radial nerve cord (RNC) of the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima. Importantly, this neurogenic activity is not evenly distributed, but is significantly more extensive in the lateral regions of the RNC than along the midline. Some of the new cells generated in the apical region of the ectoneural neuroepithelium leave their place of origin and migrate basally to populate the neural parenchyma. Gene expression analysis showed that generation of new cells in the adult sea cucumber CNS is associated with transcriptional activity of genes known to be involved in regulation of various aspects of neurogenesis in other animals. Further analysis of one of those genes, the transcription factor Myc, showed that it is expressed, in some, but not all radial glial cells, suggesting heterogeneity of this CNS progenitor cell population in echinoderms. PMID:26441553

  8. Striking a Balance: Academic Advising and the Advisory Working Alliance with Adult Master's-Level Credential Candidates at Regional Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Cindy Franklin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the advising approaches and the training received by academic advisors to form an advisory working alliance with adult master's-level credential candidates in educator preparation programs at regional campuses in Southern and Central California. This advisory working alliance concept…

  9. Implementation of Information Communication Technology in the Teaching/Learning Process for Sustainable Development of Adults in West Africa Sub Sahara Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwobi, Anthonia; Ngozi, Ugwuoke; Rufina, Nwachukwu; Ogbonnaya, Kingsley A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the implementation of information technology in the teaching/learning process for sustainable development of adults in West Africa Sub Sahara Region (WASSR). Three research questions and two hypotheses guided the study. The population for the study was 3071 participants and instructors drawn from 10 education centres that were…

  10. Influence of enrichment on behavioral and neurogenic effects of antidepressants in Wistar rats submitted to repeated forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Possamai, Fernanda; dos Santos, Juliano; Walber, Thais; Marcon, Juliana C; dos Santos, Tiago Souza; Lino de Oliveira, Cilene

    2015-04-01

    Repeated forced swimming test (rFST) may detect gradual effects of antidepressants in adult rats. Antidepressants, as enrichment, affected behavior and neurogenesis in rats. However, the influence of enrichment on behavioral and neurogenic effects of antidepressants is unknown. Here, effects of antidepressants on rFST and hippocampal neurogenesis were investigated in rats under enriched conditions. Behaviors of male Wistar rats, housed from weaning in standard (SE) or enriched environment (EE), were registered during rFST. The rFST consisted of 15min of swimming (pretest) followed by 5min of swimming in the first (test), seventh (retest 1) and fourteenth (retest 2) days after pretest. One hour before the test, rats received an intraperitoneal injection of saline (1ml/kg), fluoxetine (2.5mg/kg) or imipramine (2.5 or 5mg/kg). These treatments were performed daily until the day of the retest 2. After retest 2, rats were euthanized for the identification of markers for neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Fluoxetine or imipramine decreased immobility in retests 1 and 2, as compared to saline. EE abolished these differences. In EE, fluoxetine or imipramine (5mg/kg) reduced immobility time in retest 2, as compared to the test. Independent of the housing conditions, fluoxetine and imipramine (5mg/kg) increased the ratio of immature neurons per progenitor cell in the hippocampus. In summary, antidepressants or enrichment counteracted the high immobility in rFST. Enrichment changed the effects of antidepressants in rFST depending on the type, and the dose of a substance but failed to change neurogenesis in control or antidepressant treated-rats. Effects of antidepressants and enrichment on rFST seemed neurogenesis-independent.

  11. Role of opioid receptors in neurogenic dural vasodilation and sensitization of trigeminal neurones in anaesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, D J; Shepheard, S L; Cook, D A; Hargreaves, R J; Hill, R G; Cumberbatch, M J

    2001-01-01

    Migraine headache is thought to be caused by a distension of meningeal blood vessels, the activation of trigeminal sensory neurones and the the development of a central sensitization within the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). It has been proposed that clinically effective 5-HT1B/1D agonists act peripherally to inhibit the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and neurogenic dural vasodilation, and to attenuate nociceptive neurotransmission within the TNC. Since opioids are also effective anti-migraine agents the present studies investigated the role of opioids within the trigemino-vascular system in anaesthetised rats. Electrical stimulation of the dura mater evoked neurogenic dural vasodilation which was significantly inhibited by morphine (1 mg kg−1) the selective μ-opioid agonist DAGO (10 μg kg−1) and the mixed agonist/antagonist butorphanol (1 mg kg−1) but not by the κ- and δ-opioid agonists (±) U50488H (100 μg kg−1) and DPDPE (1 mg kg−1). Morphine had no effect on CGRP-evoked dural vasodilation. In electrophysiological studies morphine (1 – 10 mg kg−1) significantly attenuated brainstem neuronal activity in response to electrical stimulation of the dura by 65% at 10 mg kg−1. Morphine (3 mg kg−1) also inhibited the TNC neuronal sensitization following CGRP-evoked dilation. The present studies have demonstrated that opioids block the nociceptive neurotransmission within the trigeminal nucleus caudalis and in addition inhibit neurogenic dural vasodilation via an action on μ-opioid receptors located on trigeminal sensory fibres innervating dural blood vessels. These peripheral and central actions are similar to those of the ‘triptan' 5-HT1B/1D agonists and could account for the anti-migraine actions of opioids. PMID:11454653

  12. Furosemide modifies heart hypertrophy and glycosaminoglycan myocardium content in a rat model of neurogenic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pourzitaki, Chryssa; Tsaousi, Georgia; Manthou, Maria Eleni; Karakiulakis, Georgios; Kouvelas, Dimitrios; Papakonstantinou, Eleni

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for atherogenesis and heart hypertrophy, both of which are associated with specific morphological and functional changes of the myocardium. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are complex molecules involved both in tissue morphology and function. In the present study, we investigated the effects of neurogenic hypertension and subsequent antihypertensive treatment with furosemide, on heart hypertrophy and the content of GAGs in the myocardium. Neurogenic hypertension was achieved in male Wistar rats by bilateral aortic denervation (bAD). At days 2, 7 and 15 after surgery, animals were sacrificed and the hearts were dissected away, weighted, and homogenized. Total GAGs were assessed by measuring the uronic acid content colorimetrically and individual GAGs were isolated and characterized by enzymatic treatment, with GAG-degrading enzymes, using electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gradient gels and cellulose acetate membranes. In bAD-animals blood pressure, blood pressure lability, heart rate and heart weight were significantly increased 15 days postoperatively. These effects were prevented by treatment with furosemide. Major GAGs identified in the heart were chondroitin sulphates, heparin (H), heparan sulphate (HS) and hyaluronic acid. The content of uronic and the relative content of H and HS in the heart in bAD animals significantly decreased from day 2 to day 15 postoperatively. Furosemide prevented the bAD induced decrease in GAG content. Considering that H and HS are potent inhibitors of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, our results indicate that heart hypertrophy induced by neurogenic hypertension may be associated with decreases in the relative content of heparin and heparan sulphate in the heart. PMID:27221775

  13. Neurogenic bowel management after spinal cord injury: A systematic review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Krassioukov, Andrei; Eng, Janice J.; Claxton, Geri; Sakakibara, Brodie M.; Shum, Serena

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To systematically review evidence for the management of neurogenic bowel in individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI). DATA SOURCES Literature searches were conducted for relevant articles, as well as practice guidelines, using numerous electronic databases. Manual searches of retrieved articles from 1950 to July 2009 were also conducted to identify literature. STUDY SELECTION Randomized controlled trials, prospective cohort, case-control, and pre-post studies, and case reports that assessed pharmacological and non-pharmacological intervention for the management of the neurogenic bowel in SCI were included. DATA EXTRACTION Two independent reviewers evaluated each study’s quality, using the PEDro scale for RCTs and the Downs & Black scale for all other studies. Results were tabulated and levels of evidence assigned. DATA SYNTHESIS 2956 studies were found as a result of the literature search. Upon review of the titles and abstracts, 52 studies met the inclusion criteria. Multi-faceted programs are the first approach to neurogenic bowel and are supported by lower levels of evidence. Of the non-pharmacological (conservative and non-surgical) interventions, transanal irrigation is a promising treatment to reduce constipation and fecal incontinence. When conservative management is not effective, pharmacological interventions (e.g., prokinetic agents) are supported by strong evidence for the treatment of chronic constipation. When conservative and pharmacological treatments are not effective, surgical interventions may be considered and are supported by lower levels of evidence in reducing complications. CONCLUSIONS Often, more than one procedure is necessary to develop an effective bowel routine. Evidence is low for non-pharmacological approaches and high for pharmacological interventions. PMID:20212501

  14. Neurogenic and myogenic motor activity in the colon of the guinea pig, mouse, rabbit, and rat.

    PubMed

    Costa, M; Dodds, K N; Wiklendt, L; Spencer, N J; Brookes, S J H; Dinning, P G

    2013-11-15

    Gastrointestinal motility involves interactions between myogenic and neurogenic processes intrinsic to the gut wall. We have compared the presence of propagating myogenic contractions of the isolated colon in four experimental animals (guinea pig, mouse, rabbit, and rat), following blockade of enteric neural activity. Isolated colonic preparations were distended with fluid, with the anal end either closed or open. Spatiotemporal maps of changes in diameter were constructed from video recordings. Distension-induced peristaltic contractions were abolished by tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.6 μM) in all animal species. Subsequent addition of carbachol (0.1-1 μM) did not evoke myogenic motor patterns in the mouse or guinea pig, although some activity was observed in rabbit and rat colon. These myogenic contractions propagated both orally and anally and differed from neurogenic propagating contractions in their frequency, extent of propagation, and polarity. Niflumic acid (300 μM), used to block myogenic activity, also blocked neural peristalsis and thus cannot be used to discriminate between these mechanisms. In all species, except the mouse colon, small myogenic "ripple" contractions were revealed in TTX, but in both rat and rabbit an additional, higher-frequency ripple-type contraction was superimposed. Following blockade of enteric nerve function, a muscarinic agonist can evoke propulsive myogenic peristaltic contractions in isolated rabbit and rat colon, but not in guinea pig or mouse colon. Marked differences between species exist in the ability of myogenic mechanisms to propel luminal content, but in all species there is normally a complex interplay between neurogenic and myogenic processes.

  15. Quantifiable diagnosis of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is strongly based on the histological characterization of muscle biopsies. However, this morphological analysis is mostly a subjective process and difficult to quantify. We have tested if network science can provide a novel framework to extract useful information from muscle biopsies, developing a novel method that analyzes muscle samples in an objective, automated, fast and precise manner. Methods Our database consisted of 102 muscle biopsy images from 70 individuals (including controls, patients with neurogenic atrophies and patients with muscular dystrophies). We used this to develop a new method, Neuromuscular DIseases Computerized Image Analysis (NDICIA), that uses network science analysis to capture the defining signature of muscle biopsy images. NDICIA characterizes muscle tissues by representing each image as a network, with fibers serving as nodes and fiber contacts as links. Results After a ‘training’ phase with control and pathological biopsies, NDICIA was able to quantify the degree of pathology of each sample. We validated our method by comparing NDICIA quantification of the severity of muscular dystrophies with a pathologist’s evaluation of the degree of pathology, resulting in a strong correlation (R = 0.900, P <0.00001). Importantly, our approach can be used to quantify new images without the need for prior ‘training’. Therefore, we show that network science analysis captures the useful information contained in muscle biopsies, helping the diagnosis of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies. Conclusions Our novel network analysis approach will serve as a valuable tool for assessing the etiology of muscular dystrophies or neurogenic atrophies, and has the potential to quantify treatment outcomes in preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:23514382

  16. A mathematical model of salt-sensitive hypertension: the neurogenic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Averina, Viktoria A; Othmer, Hans G; Fink, Gregory D; Osborn, John W

    2014-09-12

    Salt sensitivity of arterial pressure (salt-sensitive hypertension) is a serious global health issue. The causes of salt-sensitive hypertension are extremely complex and mathematical models can elucidate potential mechanisms that are experimentally inaccessible. Until recently, the only mathematical model for long-term control of arterial pressure was the model of Guyton and Coleman; referred to as the G-C model. The core of this model is the assumption that sodium excretion is driven by renal perfusion pressure, the so-called 'renal function curve'. Thus, the G-C model dictates that all forms of hypertension are due to a primary shift of the renal function curve to a higher operating pressure. However, several recent experimental studies in a model of hypertension produced by the combination of a high salt intake and administration of angiotensin II, the AngII-salt model, are inconsistent with the G-C model. We developed a new mathematical model that does not limit the cause of salt-sensitive hypertension solely to primary renal dysfunction. The model is the first known mathematical counterexample to the assumption that all salt-sensitive forms of hypertension require a primary shift of renal function: we show that in at least one salt-sensitive form of hypertension the requirement is not necessary. We will refer to this computational model as the 'neurogenic model'. In this Symposium Review we discuss how, despite fundamental differences between the G-C model and the neurogenic model regarding mechanisms regulating sodium excretion and vascular resistance, they generate similar haemodynamic profiles of AngII-salt hypertension. In addition, the steady-state relationships between arterial pressure and sodium excretion, a correlation that is often erroneously presented as the 'renal function curve', are also similar in both models. Our findings suggest that salt-sensitive hypertension is not due solely to renal dysfunction, as predicted by the G-C model, but may

  17. A mathematical model of salt-sensitive hypertension: the neurogenic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Averina, Viktoria A; Othmer, Hans G; Fink, Gregory D; Osborn, John W

    2015-07-15

    Salt sensitivity of arterial pressure (salt-sensitive hypertension) is a serious global health issue. The causes of salt-sensitive hypertension are extremely complex and mathematical models can elucidate potential mechanisms that are experimentally inaccessible. Until recently, the only mathematical model for long-term control of arterial pressure was the model of Guyton and Coleman; referred to as the G-C model. The core of this model is the assumption that sodium excretion is driven by renal perfusion pressure, the so-called 'renal function curve'. Thus, the G-C model dictates that all forms of hypertension are due to a primary shift of the renal function curve to a higher operating pressure. However, several recent experimental studies in a model of hypertension produced by the combination of a high salt intake and administration of angiotensin II, the AngII-salt model, are inconsistent with the G-C model. We developed a new mathematical model that does not limit the cause of salt-sensitive hypertension solely to primary renal dysfunction. The model is the first known mathematical counterexample to the assumption that all salt-sensitive forms of hypertension require a primary shift of renal function: we show that in at least one salt-sensitive form of hypertension the requirement is not necessary. We will refer to this computational model as the 'neurogenic model'. In this Symposium Review we discuss how, despite fundamental differences between the G-C model and the neurogenic model regarding mechanisms regulating sodium excretion and vascular resistance, they generate similar haemodynamic profiles of AngII-salt hypertension. In addition, the steady-state relationships between arterial pressure and sodium excretion, a correlation that is often erroneously presented as the 'renal function curve', are also similar in both models. Our findings suggest that salt-sensitive hypertension is not due solely to renal dysfunction, as predicted by the G-C model, but may

  18. Native myocardial longitudinal (T 1) relaxation time: Regional, age, and sex associations in the healthy adult heart

    PubMed Central

    Rauhalammi, Samuli M.O.; Mangion, Kenneth; Barrientos, Pauline Hall; Carrick, David J.A.; Clerfond, Guillaume; McClure, John; McComb, Christie; Radjenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at two field strengths to assess healthy adults' regional myocardial noncontrast (native) T 1 relaxation time distribution, and global myocardial native T 1 between sexes and across age groups. Materials and Methods In all, 84 healthy volunteers underwent MRI at 1.5T and 3.0T. T 1 maps were acquired in three left ventricular short axis slices using an optimized modified Look–Locker inversion recovery investigational prototype sequence. T 1 measurements in msec were calculated from 16 regions‐of‐interest, and a global T 1 value from all evaluable segments per subject. Associations were assessed with a multivariate linear regression model. Results In total, 1297 (96.5%) segments were evaluable at 1.5T and 1263 (94.0%) segments at 3.0T. Native T 1 was higher in septal than lateral myocardium (1.5T: 956.3 ± 44.4 vs. 939.2 ± 54.2 msec; P < 0.001; 3.0T: 1158.2 ± 45.9 vs. 1148.9 ± 56.9 msec; P = 0.012). Native T 1 decreased with increasing age in females but not in males. Among lowest age tertile (<33 years) global native T 1 was higher in females than in males at 1.5T (960.0 ± 20.3 vs. 931.5 ± 22.2 msec, respectively; P = 0.003) and 3.0T (1166.5 ± 19.7 vs. 1130.2 ± 20.6 msec; P < 0.001). No sex differences were observed in upper age tertile (≥55 years) at 1.5T (937.7 ± 25.4 vs. 934.7 ± 22.3 msec; P = 0.762) or 3.0T (1153.0 ± 30.0 vs. 1132.3 ± 23.5 msec; P = 0.056). Association of global native T 1 to age (P = 0.002) and sex (P < 0.001) was independent of field strength and body size. Conclusion In healthy adults, native T 1 values are highest in the ventricular septum. Global native T 1 was inversely associated with age in women, but not in men. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:541–548. PMID:26946323

  19. Embryonic Nkx2.1-expressing neural precursor cells contribute to the regional heterogeneity of adult V-SVZ neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Ryan N; Lim, Daniel A

    2015-11-15

    The adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the lateral ventricle produces several subtypes of olfactory bulb (OB) interneurons throughout life. Neural stem cells (NSCs) within this zone are heterogeneous, with NSCs located in different regions of the lateral ventricle wall generating distinct OB interneuron subtypes. The regional expression of specific transcription factors appears to correspond to such geographical differences in the developmental potential of V-SVZ NSCs. However, the transcriptional definition and developmental origin of V-SVZ NSC regional identity are not well understood. In this study, we found that a population of NSCs in the ventral region of the V-SVZ expresses the transcription factor Nkx2.1 and is derived from Nkx2.1-expressing (Nkx2.1+) embryonic precursors. To follow the fate of Nkx2.1+ cells and their progeny in vivo, we used mice with an Nkx2.1-CreER "knock-in" allele. Nkx2.1+ V-SVZ NSCs labeled in adult mice generated interneurons for the deep granule cell layer of the OB. Embryonic brain Nkx2.1+ precursors labeled at embryonic day 12.5 gave rise to Nkx2.1+ NSCs of the ventral V-SVZ in postnatal and adult mice. Thus, embryonic Nkx2.1+ neural precursors give rise to a population of Nkx2.1+ NSCs in the ventral V-SVZ where they contribute to the regional heterogeneity of V-SVZ NSCs.

  20. Trends in the Educational Gradient of Mortality Among US Adults Aged 45 to 84 Years: Bringing Regional Context Into the Explanation

    PubMed Central

    Berkman, Lisa F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated trends in the educational gradient of US adult mortality, which has increased at the national level since the mid-1980s, within US regions. Methods. We used data from the 1986–2006 National Health Interview Survey Linked Mortality File on non-Hispanic White and Black adults aged 45 to 84 years (n = 498 517). We examined trends in the gradient within 4 US regions by race–gender subgroup by using age-standardized death rates. Results. Trends in the gradient exhibited a few subtle regional differences. Among women, the gradient was often narrowest in the Northeast. The region’s distinction grew over time mainly because low-educated women in the Northeast did not experience a significant increase in mortality like their counterparts in other regions (particularly for White women). Among White men, the gradient narrowed to a small degree in the West. Conclusions. The subtle regional differences indicate that geographic context can accentuate or suppress trends in the gradient. Studies of smaller areas may provide insights into the specific contextual characteristics (e.g., state tax policies) that have shaped the trends, and thus help explain and reverse the widening mortality disparities among US adults. PMID:24228659

  1. [Caring for children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction: social representation of these children's and their mothers' needs].

    PubMed

    Furlan, Maria de Fátima Farinha Martins; Ferriani, Maria das Graças Carvalho; Gomes, Romeu

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know and analyze the representations and needs of school-age children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction and of their mothers. This is a qualitative study; whose methodology was based on social representations. According to the interposition of empirical end analytical categories, the living and caring are respectively represented by mothers as "a problem" and "all me"; the children, in turn, interpret the differentiated and prejudiced interaction they suffer in the setting they live in as "it is not fair".

  2. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) Channel and Neurogenic Inflammation in Pathogenesis of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hang; Li, ShuZhuang

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and it affects 300 million people worldwide. However, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie asthma remains limited. Recent studies have suggested that transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), one of the transient receptor potential cation channels, may be involved in airway inflammation in asthma. The present review discusses the relationship between TRPA1 and neurogenic inflammation in asthma, hoping to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:27539812

  3. Aphasia, apraxia and neurogenic stuttering as complications of metrizamide myelography (speech deficits following myelography).

    PubMed

    Pimental, P A; Gorelick, P B

    1985-11-01

    Aphasia following metrizamide myelography has been reported infrequently. During a seven-month period, we examined two patients who developed Broca's aphasia, apraxia of speech, oral-buccal-facial apraxia and neurogenic stuttering after intrathecal metrizamide administration. In each case, focal neurologic deficits were accompanied by clinical, electroencephalographic and radiologic signs of generalized neurologic disease. Serial speech and language evaluations initially revealed severe deficits that were largely resolved by the third day post-myelography. Out-patient follow-up examinations demonstrated persistence of mild speech and language abnormalities in each case. Our findings suggest that metrizamide may cause longlasting neurologic dysfunction. PMID:4082914

  4. Back Pain, Neurogenic Symptoms, and Physical Function in Relation to Spondylolisthesis among Elderly Men

    PubMed Central

    Denard, Patrick J.; Holton, Kathleen F.; Miller, Jessica; Fink, Howard A.; Kado, Deborah M.; Marshall, Lynn M.; Yoo, Jung U.

    2010-01-01

    Background Context Degenerative spondylolisthesis is a presumed cause of back pain. Previous studies of spondylolisthesis and back pain included only women or combined results for men and women. Comparisons of the frequency of back pain, neurogenic symptoms, and functional limitations specifically among elderly men with and without spondylolisthesis are needed. Purpose To determine associations of prevalent spondylolisthesis with back pain symptoms, neurogenic symptoms, and functional limitations among elderly men. Study Design/ Setting: Cross-sectional epidemiologic study conducted within the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) cohort. The MrOS cohort is comprised of 5,995 community dwelling men ages ≥65 years who were recruited at 6 US academic medical centers. Extensive self-reported data and lumbar spine radiographs were obtained for all MrOS participants at baseline. Patient Sample For this study, 300 men were selected at random specifically for the evaluation of spondylolisthesis on the baseline spine radiographs. Outcome Measures Standardized questionnaires were used to assess self-reported back pain, leg pain (radiculopathy), lower extremity numbness (paresthesias) and lower extremity weakness occurring in the past 12 months, and to ascertain current difficulty with activities of daily living. Methods In the present study, radiographic spondylolisthesis was classified as forward slip of ≥5%. Prevalence of back pain, neurogenic symptoms and difficulty with activities of daily living were compared between men with and without spondylolisthesis using chisquare or Fisher’s exact tests. Results Spondylolisthesis was present among 92 (31%) men. Among men with and without spondylolisthesis, back pain (63% vs. 67%, p=0.46) and moderate/severe back pain (41% vs. 38%, p=0.76) were reported with similar frequency. Men with spondylolisthesis more often reported radiculopathy (33% vs. 22%, p=0.06), paresthesias (18% vs. 11%, p= 0.10) and weakness (18% vs. 9%, p=0

  5. How botulinum toxin in neurogenic detrusor overactivity can reduce upper urinary tract damage?

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Maximilien; Grise, Philippe; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin are the cornerstone of medical treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The primary aim of this treatment is to ensure a low pressure regimen in the urinary bladder, but the mechanisms leading to long-term protection of the urinary tract remain poorly understood. In this paper, we highlight the potential benefits of intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin regarding local effects on the bladder structures, urinary tract infections, stone disease, vesico ureteral reflux, hydronephrosis, renal function based on a comprehensive literature review. PMID:26981445

  6. The novel anti-migraine agent rizatriptan inhibits neurogenic dural vasodilation and extravasation.

    PubMed

    Williamson, D J; Shepheard, S L; Hill, R G; Hargreaves, R J

    1997-06-01

    These studies in anaesthetised rats showed, using intravital microscopy, that the novel anti-migraine agent, rizatriptan, significantly reduced electrically stimulated dural vasodilation but had no effect on increases in dural vessel diameter produced by exogenous substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Rizatriptan also significantly inhibited dural plasma protein extravasation produced by high intensity electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion. We suggest that rizatriptan inhibits the release of sensory neuropeptides from perivascular trigeminal nerves to prevent neurogenic vasodilation and extravasation in the dura mater. These prejunctional inhibitory effects may be involved in the anti-migraine action of rizatriptan. PMID:9203569

  7. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) Channel and Neurogenic Inflammation in Pathogenesis of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hang; Li, ShuZhuang

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and it affects 300 million people worldwide. However, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie asthma remains limited. Recent studies have suggested that transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), one of the transient receptor potential cation channels, may be involved in airway inflammation in asthma. The present review discusses the relationship between TRPA1 and neurogenic inflammation in asthma, hoping to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:27539812

  8. Neurogenic benign fasciculations, pseudomyotonia, and pseudotetany. A disease in search of a name.

    PubMed

    Coërs, C; Telerman-Toppet, N; Durdu, J

    1981-05-01

    We studied two patients with abnormal spontaneous muscular activity. The first had widespread fasciculations, painful spasms, delayed muscular relaxation, and hyperhidrosis. Improvement occurred after several years. The second case had generalized paresthesia, mild stiffness, a positive result from Trusseau's test, and was relieved by administration of carbamazepine. Both patients had abnormal conduction velocity. Examination of muscle biopsy specimens disclosed fiber type grouping and increased collateral ramification of motor axons. These observations exemplify symptoms and signs that resemble those of myotonia and tetany and occasionally occur in partial denervation. they provide additional evidence of the neurogenic nature of Isaacs-Mertens syndrome. PMID:7224912

  9. Multipotent neurogenic fate of mesenchymal stem cell is determined by Cdk4-mediated hypophosphorylation of Smad-STAT3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Janet; Kang, Dongrim; Lee, Do-Hyeong; Kim, Yoon-Ja; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Kim, Dong-Ik; Lee, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) in complex with a corresponding cyclin plays a pivotal role in neurogenic differentiation. In particular, Cdk4 activity acts as a signaling switch to direct human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to neural transdifferentiation. However, the molecular evidence of how Cdk4 activity converts MSCs to neurogenic lineage remains unknown. Here, we found that Cdk4 inhibition in human MSCs enriches the populations of neural stem and progenitor pools rather than differentiated glial and neuronal cell pools. Interestingly, Cdk4 inhibition directly inactivates Smads and subsequently STAT3 signaling by hypophosphorylation, and both Cdk4 and Smads levels are linked during the processes of neural transdifferentiation and differentiation. In summary, our results provide novel molecular evidence in which Cdk4 inhibition leads to directing human MSCs to a multipotent neurogenic fate by inactivating Smads-STAT3 signaling. PMID:27192561

  10. Reawakening the sleeping beauty in the adult brain: neurogenesis from parenchymal glia.

    PubMed

    Péron, Sophie; Berninger, Benedikt

    2015-10-01

    Life-long neurogenesis is highly restricted to specialized niches in the adult mammalian brain and therefore the brain's capacity for spontaneous regeneration is extremely limited. However, recent work has demonstrated that under certain circumstances parenchymal astrocytes and NG2 glia can generate neuronal progeny. In the striatum, stroke or excitotoxic lesions can reawaken in astrocytes a latent neurogenic program resulting in the genesis of new neurons. By contrast, in brain areas that fail to mount a neurogenic response following injury, such as the cerebral cortex, forced expression of neurogenic reprogramming factors can lineage convert local glia into induced neurons. Yet, injury-induced and reprogramming-induced neurogenesis exhibit intriguing commonalities, suggesting that they may converge on similar mechanisms.

  11. Sexual dimorphism in neuronal number of the posterodorsal medial amygdala is independent of circulating androgens and regional volume in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Morris, John A; Jordan, Cynthia L; Breedlove, S Marc

    2008-02-10

    The posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePD) in rodents integrates olfactory and pheromonal information, which, coupled with the appropriate hormonal signals, may facilitate or repress reproductive behavior in adulthood. MePD volume and neuronal soma size are greater in male rats than in females, and these sexual dimorphisms are maintained by adult circulating hormone levels. Castration of adult males causes these measures to shrink to the size seen in females 4 weeks later, whereas testosterone treatment of adult females for 4 weeks enlarges these measures to the size of males. We used stereological methods to count the number of cells in the MePD and found that, in addition to the sex difference in regional volume and soma size, males also have more MePD neurons than do females, yet these numbers are unaffected by the presence or absence of androgen in adults of either sex. Males also have more glial cells than do females, but, in contrast to the effects on neuronal number, the number of glial cells is affected by androgen in the right MePD of both sexes and, therefore, may contribute to regional volume changes in adulthood in that hemisphere. Thus, regional volume, neuronal size, and glial numbers vary in the MePD of adult rats in response to circulating androgens, but neuronal number does not. These results suggest that the sex difference in neuronal number in the rat MePD may be "organized" by androgens prior to adulthood, whereas regional volume, neuronal size, and glial numbers can be altered by androgens in adulthood. PMID:18076082

  12. Proceedings of the Eastern Regional Adult Education Research Conference (2nd, University Park, PA, March 16-18, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kathleen P., Ed.; Ferro, Trenton R., Ed.

    Focusing on interactions between theory and practice in adult education, this proceedings of refereed papers (45), symposia (3) and roundtable summaries (21) include the following: "Adult Literacy Classroom as a Social System" (Beder); "Documenting Outcomes for Learners and Their Communities" (Bingman, Mincey); "Essence of Leadership: Looking…

  13. From network structure to network reorganization: implications for adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider-Mizell, Casey M.; Parent, Jack M.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Zochowski, Michal R.; Sander, Leonard M.

    2010-12-01

    Networks can be dynamical systems that undergo functional and structural reorganization. One example of such a process is adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in which new cells are continuously born and incorporate into the existing network of the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus. Many of these introduced cells mature and become indistinguishable from established neurons, joining the existing network. Activity in the network environment is known to promote birth, survival and incorporation of new cells. However, after epileptogenic injury, changes to the connectivity structure around the neurogenic niche are known to correlate with aberrant neurogenesis. The possible role of network-level changes in the development of epilepsy is not well understood. In this paper, we use a computational model to investigate how the structural and functional outcomes of network reorganization, driven by addition of new cells during neurogenesis, depend on the original network structure. We find that there is a stable network topology that allows the network to incorporate new neurons in a manner that enhances activity of the persistently active region, but maintains global network properties. In networks having other connectivity structures, new cells can greatly alter the distribution of firing activity and destroy the initial activity patterns. We thus find that new cells are able to provide focused enhancement of network only for small-world networks with sufficient inhibition. Network-level deviations from this topology, such as those caused by epileptogenic injury, can set the network down a path that develops toward pathological dynamics and aberrant structural integration of new cells.

  14. Updating stored memory requires adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pereira, Irene; Carrión, Ángel M

    2015-09-11

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis appears to influence hippocampal functions, such as memory formation for example. While adult hippocampal neurogenesis is known to be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and consolidation processes, the role of such immature neurons in memory reconsolidation, a process involved in the modification of stored memories, remains unclear. Here, using a novel fast X-ray ablation protocol to deplete neurogenic cells, we have found that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is required to update object recognition stored memory more than to reinforce it. Indeed, we show that immature neurons were selectively recruited to hippocampal circuits during the updating of stored information. Thus, our data demonstrate a new role for neurogenesis in cognitive processes, adult hippocampal neurogenesis being required for the updating of stored OR memories. These findings suggest that manipulating adult neurogenesis may have a therapeutic application in conditions associated with traumatic stored memory, for example.

  15. Updating stored memory requires adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Pereira, Irene; Carrión, Ángel M

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis appears to influence hippocampal functions, such as memory formation for example. While adult hippocampal neurogenesis is known to be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and consolidation processes, the role of such immature neurons in memory reconsolidation, a process involved in the modification of stored memories, remains unclear. Here, using a novel fast X-ray ablation protocol to deplete neurogenic cells, we have found that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is required to update object recognition stored memory more than to reinforce it. Indeed, we show that immature neurons were selectively recruited to hippocampal circuits during the updating of stored information. Thus, our data demonstrate a new role for neurogenesis in cognitive processes, adult hippocampal neurogenesis being required for the updating of stored OR memories. These findings suggest that manipulating adult neurogenesis may have a therapeutic application in conditions associated with traumatic stored memory, for example. PMID:26358557

  16. Effects and Safety of Aqueous Extract of Poncirus fructus in Spinal Cord Injury with Neurogenic Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hee; Lee, Su Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effects and safety of the aqueous extract of the dried, immature fruit of Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf., known as Poncirus fructus (PF), in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients with neurogenic bowel. Methods. Thirty-one SCI patients with neurogenic bowel were recruited. Patients were evaluated based on clinical information, constipation score, Bristol Stool Form Scale, stool retention score using plain abdominal radiograph, and colon transit time. PF was administered in dosages of 800 mg each prior to breakfast and lunch for 14 days. Results. The morphological feature of the stool before and after administration indicated a statistically significant difference from 3.52 ± 1.33 to 4.32 ± 1.44 points (p < 0.05). Stool retention score before and after administration of PF was represented with low significance (7.25 ± 1.60 to 6.46 ± 1.53 points) in the whole colon (p < 0.05), and the colon transit time was significantly shortened (57.41 ± 20.7 to 41.2 ± 25.5 hours) in terms of the whole transit time (p < 0.05). Side effects were observed in 7 people (28.0%) consisting of 2 people with soft stools and 5 people with diarrhea. Conclusion. For SCI patients, PF administration significantly improved defecation patterns, defecation retention, and colon transit time. PF could be an effective aid to improve colonic motility and constipation. PMID:27738444

  17. Electrically evoked neuropeptide release and neurogenic inflammation differ between rat and human skin

    PubMed Central

    Sauerstein, Katja; Klede, Monika; Hilliges, Marita; Schmelz, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Protein extravasation and vasodilatation can be induced by neuropeptides released from nociceptive afferents (neurogenic inflammation). We measured electrically evoked neuropeptide release and concomitant protein extravasation in human and rat skin using intradermal microdialysis. Plasmapheresis capillaries were inserted intradermally at a length of 1.5 cm in the volar forearm of human subjects or abdominal skin of rats. Capillaries were perfused with Ringer solution at a flow rate of 2.5 or 1.6 μl min−1. After a baseline period of 60 min capillaries were stimulated electrically (1 Hz, 80 mA, 0.5 ms or 4 Hz, 30 mA, 0.5 ms) for 30 min using a surface electrode directly above the capillaries and a stainless-steel wire inserted in the capillaries. Total protein concentration was assessed photometrically and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In rat skin, electrical stimulation increased CGRP and total protein concentration in the dialysate. SP measurements showed a larger variance but only for the 1 Hz stimulation was the increased release significant. In human skin, electrical stimulation provoked a large flare reaction and at a frequency of 4 Hz both CGRP and SP concentrations increased significantly. In spite of the large flare reactions no protein extravasation was induced, which suggests major species differences. It will be of interest to investigate whether the lack of neurogenic protein extravasation is also valid under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:11118507

  18. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    PubMed

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs). Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system.

  19. Microneedle Electrode Array for Electrical Impedance Myography to Characterize Neurogenic Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Li, Yi; Liu, Mingsheng; Cui, Liying; Yu, Yude

    2016-05-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a noninvasive technique for neuromuscular assessment, wherein a low-intensity alternating current is applied to a muscle, and the consequent surface voltage patterns are evaluated. Commercial wet electrodes are most commonly used for EIM. However, these electrodes are not suitable for use on small muscles, as they do not effectively solve the problem of high electrode-skin contact impedance (ESCI) that negatively influences the quality of recorded biopotentials. To address this problem, we fabricated a novel microneedle electrode array (MEA) that consists of 124-µm-long microneedles. Compared to wet electrodes, the MEA could pierce through the outer skin surface in a painless and micro-invasive manner, and could thus effectively reduce ESCI. The MEA has excellent test-retest reproducibility, with intraclass correlation coefficients exceeding 0.920. When used in combination with EIM, the MEA differentiated the affected muscles from the unaffected muscles in patients with neurogenic myopathy, by using EIM parameters of reactance and phase (p = 0.023 and 0.008, respectively). Thus, the novel MEA is a practical and reusable device for EIM assessment in cases of neurogenic myopathy. However, further refinement of the electrode is needed to enhance the clinical application of the system. PMID:26407702

  20. Effects of sangre de drago in an in vitro model of cutaneous neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ulysse; Garcia-Le Gal, Caridad; Le Gal, Grégoire; Boulais, Nicholas; Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Dorange, Germaine; Lefeuvre, Luc; Gougerot, Agnés; Misery, Laurent

    2010-09-01

    Sangre de drago (SD) is a viscous bright red resin collected from Croton lechleri trees that grow in the South American jungle. This sap is used extensively in the native pharmacopoeia to treat skin disorders. Its effectiveness as an inhibitor of neurogenic inflammation has been recently demonstrated. To understand the underlying mechanisms of these effects, we examined the ability of SD to reduce substance P (SP) release in an in vitro model of cutaneous neurogenic inflammation (CNI). This model is based on an enzyme immunoassay of SP (an inducer of CNI) in a porcine co-culture of dorsal root ganglion neurons and keratinocytes. After incubation with different concentrations of SD, we noted an immediate and significant dose-dependent decrease in basal SP release, with average values of 32% at 1% SD (v/v) and 26% at 0.1% (v/v). On the other hand, pretreatment (72 or 1 h) of the co-culture with 1% SD (v/v) was sufficient to induce a 111% (72 h) or 65% (1 h) inhibition of capsaicin-induced SP release, while 0.1% SD (v/v) triggered a 109% (72 h) or 30% (1 h) inhibition. We conclude that sangre de drago is a potent inhibitor of CNI through direct inhibition of neuropeptide release by sensory afferent nerves.

  1. Mechanisms of nitric oxide-mediated, neurogenic vasodilation in mesenteric resistance arteries of toad Bufo marinus.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Brett L; Donald, John A

    2010-03-01

    This study determined the role of nitric oxide (NO) in neurogenic vasodilation in mesenteric resistance arteries of the toad Bufo marinus. NO synthase (NOS) was anatomically demonstrated in perivascular nerves, but not in the endothelium. ACh and nicotine caused TTX-sensitive neurogenic vasodilation of mesenteric arteries. The ACh-induced vasodilation was endothelium-independent and was mediated by the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase signaling pathway, inasmuch as the vasodilation was blocked by the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one and the NOS inhibitors N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine. Furthermore, the ACh-induced vasodilation was significantly decreased by the more selective neural NOS inhibitor N(5)-(1-imino-3-butenyl)-l-ornithine. The nicotine-induced vasodilation was endothelium-independent and mediated by NO and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), inasmuch as pretreatment of mesenteric arteries with a combination of N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine and the CGRP receptor antagonist CGRP-(8-37) blocked the vasodilation. Clotrimazole significantly decreased the ACh-induced response, providing evidence that a component of the NO vasodilation involved Ca(2+)-activated K(+) or voltage-gated K(+) channels. These data show that NO control of mesenteric resistance arteries of toad is provided by nitrergic nerves, rather than the endothelium, and implicate NO as a potentially important regulator of gut blood flow and peripheral blood pressure. PMID:20071617

  2. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs). Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system. PMID:26136659

  3. The vascular and neurogenic factors associated with erectile dysfunction in patients after pelvic fractures

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yong; Wendong, Sun; Zhao, Shengtian; Liu, Tongyan; Liu, Yuqiang; Zhang, Xiulin; Yuan, Mingzhen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of pelvic fractures. To identify the vascular and neurogenic factors associated with ED, 120 patients admitted with ED after traumatic pelvic fracture between January 2009 and June 2013 were enrolled in this study. All patients answered the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire. Nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) testing confirmed the occurrence of ED in 96 (80%) patients on whom penile duplex ultrasound and neurophysiological testing were further performed. Of these ED patients 29 (30%) were demonstrated only with vascular abnormality, 41 (42.7%) were detected only with neural abnormality, 26 (27.1%) revealed mixed abnormalities. Of the 55 patients (29+26) with vascular problems, 7 patients (12.7%) with abnormal arterial response to intracavernous injection of Bimix (15mg papaverine and 1mg phentolamine), 31 (56.4%) with corporal veno-occlusive dysfunction and 17 (30.9%) had both problems. Of the 67 (41+26) patients with abnormal neurophysiological outcomes, 51 (76.1%) with abnormal bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR), 20 (29.9%) with pathological pudendal nerve evoked potentials (PDEPs) and 25 (37.3%) with abnormal posterior tibial somatosensory nerve evoked potentials (PTSSEPs). Our observation indicated that neurogenic factors are important for the generation of ED in patients with pelvic fracture; venous impotence is more common than arteriogenic ED. PMID:26689522

  4. Racial and Regional Disparities in the Effect of the Affordable Care Act’s Dependent Coverage Provision on Young Adult Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John W; Salim, Ali; Sommers, Benjamin D; Tsai, Thomas C; Scott, Kirstin W; Song, Zirui

    2015-01-01

    Background Disparities in trauma outcomes based on insurance and race are especially pronounced among young adults who have relatively high uninsured rates and incur a disproportionate share of trauma in the population. The 2010 dependent coverage provision (DCP) of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allowed young adults to remain on their parent’s health insurance plans until age 26, leading to over 3 million young adults gaining insurance. We investigated the impact of the DCP on racial disparities in coverage expansion among trauma patients. Study Design Using the 2007–2012 National Trauma Databank, we compared changes in coverage among 529,844 19–25 year-olds to 484,974 controls aged 27–34 not affected by the DCP. Subgroup analyses were conducted by race and ethnicity and by census region. Results The pre-DCP uninsured rates among young adults were highest among black patients (48.1%) and Hispanic patients (44.3%), and significantly lower among Non-Hispanic white patients (28.9%). However, Non-Hispanic white young adults experienced a significantly greater absolute reduction in the uninsured rate (−4.9 percentage points) than black (−2.9, p=0.01) and Hispanic (−1.7, p<0.001) young adults. These absolute reductions correspond to a 17.0% relative reduction in the uninsured rate for white patients, 6.1% for black patients, and 3.7% for Hispanic patients. Racial disparities in the provision’s impact on coverage among trauma patients were largest in the South and West census regions (p<0.01). Conclusions While the DCP increased insurance coverage for young adult trauma patients of all races, both absolute and relative racial disparities in insurance coverage widened. The extent of these racial disparities also differed by geographic region. Though this policy produced overall progress towards greater coverage among young adults, its heterogeneous impact by race has important implications for future disparities research in trauma. PMID:26141468

  5. Variation in hemoglobin F production among normal and sickle cell adults is not related to nucleotide substitutions in the gamma promoter regions.

    PubMed

    Economou, E P; Antonarakis, S E; Kazazian, H H; Serjeant, G R; Dover, G J

    1991-01-01

    Single nucleotide substitutions in the promoter regions of the A gamma- and G gamma-globin genes have been associated with increased fetal hemoglobin (HbF) production. We wished to determine whether these or other unrecognized substitutions in the gamma promoter regions are responsible for the 20-fold variation in HbF production in sickle cell patients or normal adults. From a random sampling of 250 sickle cell (SS) patients and 125 normal adults, 17 individuals representing the highest and lowest HbF producers were selected for study. All three common restriction fragment length polymorphism beta-globin region haplotypes (Benin, Central African Republic, and Senegal) were found in both the highest and lowest HbF producers with SS disease. Using the polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of the amplified DNA product, we examined the promoter regions of both the A gamma and G gamma genes from -350 bp to +50 bp of the CAP site. No mutations were found in either gamma gene promoter region. We conclude that nucleotide substitutions in the promoter regions (-350 to +50 bp) of both gamma genes are not responsible for the marked variation in HbF production among SS or normal individuals.

  6. Differential longitudinal changes in cortical thickness, surface area and volume across the adult life span: regions of accelerating and decelerating change.

    PubMed

    Storsve, Andreas B; Fjell, Anders M; Tamnes, Christian K; Westlye, Lars T; Overbye, Knut; Aasland, Hilde W; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2014-06-18

    Human cortical thickness and surface area are genetically independent, emerge through different neurobiological events during development, and are sensitive to different clinical conditions. However, the relationship between changes in the two over time is unknown. Additionally, longitudinal studies have almost invariably been restricted to older adults, precluding the delineation of adult life span trajectories of change in cortical structure. In this longitudinal study, we investigated changes in cortical thickness, surface area, and volume after an average interval of 3.6 years in 207 well screened healthy adults aged 23-87 years. We hypothesized that the relationships among metrics are dynamic across the life span, that the primary contributor to cortical volume reductions in aging is cortical thinning, and that magnitude of change varies with age and region. Changes over time were seen in cortical area (mean annual percentage change [APC], -0.19), thickness (APC, -0.35), and volume (APC, -0.51) in most regions. Volume changes were primarily explained by changes in thickness rather than area. A negative relationship between change in thickness and surface area was found across several regions, where more thinning was associated with less decrease in area, and vice versa. Accelerating changes with increasing age was seen in temporal and occipital cortices. In contrast, decelerating changes were seen in prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. In conclusion, a dynamic relationship between cortical thickness and surface area changes exists throughout the adult life span. The mixture of accelerating and decelerating changes further demonstrates the importance of studying these metrics across the entire adult life span. PMID:24948804

  7. Differential longitudinal changes in cortical thickness, surface area and volume across the adult life span: regions of accelerating and decelerating change.

    PubMed

    Storsve, Andreas B; Fjell, Anders M; Tamnes, Christian K; Westlye, Lars T; Overbye, Knut; Aasland, Hilde W; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2014-06-18

    Human cortical thickness and surface area are genetically independent, emerge through different neurobiological events during development, and are sensitive to different clinical conditions. However, the relationship between changes in the two over time is unknown. Additionally, longitudinal studies have almost invariably been restricted to older adults, precluding the delineation of adult life span trajectories of change in cortical structure. In this longitudinal study, we investigated changes in cortical thickness, surface area, and volume after an average interval of 3.6 years in 207 well screened healthy adults aged 23-87 years. We hypothesized that the relationships among metrics are dynamic across the life span, that the primary contributor to cortical volume reductions in aging is cortical thinning, and that magnitude of change varies with age and region. Changes over time were seen in cortical area (mean annual percentage change [APC], -0.19), thickness (APC, -0.35), and volume (APC, -0.51) in most regions. Volume changes were primarily explained by changes in thickness rather than area. A negative relationship between change in thickness and surface area was found across several regions, where more thinning was associated with less decrease in area, and vice versa. Accelerating changes with increasing age was seen in temporal and occipital cortices. In contrast, decelerating changes were seen in prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. In conclusion, a dynamic relationship between cortical thickness and surface area changes exists throughout the adult life span. The mixture of accelerating and decelerating changes further demonstrates the importance of studying these metrics across the entire adult life span.

  8. Identifying signatures of selection at the enhancer of split neurogenic gene complex in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Stuart J; Long, Anthony D

    2005-03-01

    The Enhancer of split gene complex (E(spl)-C) is one of the more highly annotated gene regions in Drosophila, and the 12 genes within the complex help determine the spacing and patterning of adult bristles. Any E(spl)-C coding, transcribed, or cis-regulatory regions experiencing nonneutral evolution are strong candidates to harbor polymorphisms contributing to naturally occurring variation in bristle number. We confirm that the E(spl)-C is strongly conserved and show that 74% of regulatory elements previously identified in D. melanogaster are conserved in D. pseudoobscura. Regulatory elements in enhancer regions show lower nucleotide diversity and more rare polymorphisms compared with adjacent nonregulatory DNA, suggesting they are under purifying selection, and these effects are particularly pronounced when considering only conserved regulatory elements. The ratio of polymorphism to divergence was significantly different between binding sites and nonbinding sites for transcription factors within enhancer regions, suggesting the action of some form of selection. Too few polymorphisms in regions of the 3' UTR harboring regulatory motifs prevents adequate comparison of diversity and the polymorphism frequency spectrum between 3' UTR motif and nonmotif sequence. We identified at least two broad regions of the gene complex showing strong population subdivision among four populations, which is suggestive of local adaptation or background selection. Finally, two regions of the E(spl)-C exhibit low nucleotide diversity, a high level of rare polymorphisms, and an increase in linkage disequilibrium, which together suggest the action of positive selection. Notably, the gene m2 shows a significant deviation from neutrality by the McDonald-Kreitman test and resides in one of the two regions putatively experiencing a selective sweep. All sites in regions apparently visible to various selective forces are candidates for future work to determine their phenotypic effects.

  9. Neurogenic Stuttering

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts FAQ Basic Research Resources Brochures Free E-Books Free Videos Webinars Blog Referral Lists Newsletters Check your Library Books on Stuttering Product LIst Links Translations Podcasts Press ...

  10. Neurogenic bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... of underactive bladder: Full bladder and possibly urine leakage Inability to tell when the bladder is full ... Constant urine leakage can cause skin to break down and lead to pressure sores Kidney damage may occur if the bladder ...

  11. Geographic information systems and spatial analysis of adult Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in the Middle Atlantic region of the U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, J.E.; Price, S.D.; Das, A.; Shields, T.M.; Glass, G.E.

    2003-01-01

    In the Middle Atlantic region of the U.S.A., the vector of Lyme disease, human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, babesiosis, and other human and veterinary pathogens is the black-legged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say. In 1997 and 1998, 663 adult I. scapularis ticks were collected from 320 transects spanning 66,400 km2 in five states of the Middle Atlantic region. Tick abundance patterns were clustered, with relatively high numbers along the coastal plain of the Chesapeake Bay, decreasing to the west and south. There were significant associations between tick abundance and land cover, distance to water, distance to forest edge, elevation, and soil type.

  12. Spatial characterization of proteolytic enzyme activity in the foregut region of the adult necrophagous fly, Protophormia terraenovae.

    PubMed

    Rivers, David B; Acca, Gillian; Fink, Marc; Brogan, Rebecca; Schoeffield, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    The spatial distribution of proteolytic enzymes in the adult foregut of Protophormia terraenovae was studied in the context of protein digestion and regurgitation. Based on substrate specificity, pH optima, and use of specific protease inhibitors, all adults tested displayed enzyme activity in the foregut consistent with pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin. Chymotrypsin-like and trypsin-like enzyme activity were detected in all gut fluids and tissues tested, with chymotrypsin displaying the highest activity in saliva and salivary gland tissue, whereas maximal trypsin activity was evident in the crop. Pepsin-like activity was only evident in crop fluids and tissues. The activity of all three enzymes was low or undetectable (pepsin) in the fluids and tissue homogenates derived from the esophagus and cardia of any of the adults assayed. Fed adult females displayed higher enzyme activities than fed males, and the activity of all three enzymes were much more prevalent in fed adults than starved. The pH optimum of the trypsin-like enzyme was between pH 7.0 and 8.0; chymotrypsin was near pH 8.0; and maximal pepsin-like activity occurred between pH 1.0 and 2.0. Regurgitate from fed adult females displayed enzyme activity consistent with the proteolytic enzymes detected in crop gut fluids. Enzymes in regurgitate were not derived from food sources based on assays of bovine liver samples. These latter observations suggest that adult flies release fluids from foregut when encountering dry foods, potentially as a means to initiate extra-oral digestion.

  13. A mathematical model of salt-sensitive hypertension: the neurogenic hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Averina, Viktoria A; Othmer, Hans G; Fink, Gregory D; Osborn, John W

    2015-01-01

    Salt sensitivity of arterial pressure (salt-sensitive hypertension) is a serious global health issue. The causes of salt-sensitive hypertension are extremely complex and mathematical models can elucidate potential mechanisms that are experimentally inaccessible. Until recently, the only mathematical model for long-term control of arterial pressure was the model of Guyton and Coleman; referred to as the G-C model. The core of this model is the assumption that sodium excretion is driven by renal perfusion pressure, the so-called ‘renal function curve’. Thus, the G-C model dictates that all forms of hypertension are due to a primary shift of the renal function curve to a higher operating pressure. However, several recent experimental studies in a model of hypertension produced by the combination of a high salt intake and administration of angiotensin II, the AngII–salt model, are inconsistent with the G-C model. We developed a new mathematical model that does not limit the cause of salt-sensitive hypertension solely to primary renal dysfunction. The model is the first known mathematical counterexample to the assumption that all salt-sensitive forms of hypertension require a primary shift of renal function: we show that in at least one salt-sensitive form of hypertension the requirement is not necessary. We will refer to this computational model as the ‘neurogenic model’. In this Symposium Review we discuss how, despite fundamental differences between the G-C model and the neurogenic model regarding mechanisms regulating sodium excretion and vascular resistance, they generate similar haemodynamic profiles of AngII–salt hypertension. In addition, the steady-state relationships between arterial pressure and sodium excretion, a correlation that is often erroneously presented as the ‘renal function curve’, are also similar in both models. Our findings suggest that salt-sensitive hypertension is not due solely to renal dysfunction, as predicted by the G

  14. The selective PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan inhibits neurogenic vasodilation and edema formation in the mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Banki, E; Hajna, Zs; Kemeny, A; Botz, B; Nagy, P; Bolcskei, K; Toth, G; Reglodi, D; Helyes, Zs

    2014-10-01

    We have earlier shown that PACAP-38 decreases neurogenic inflammation. However, there were no data on its receptorial mechanism and the involvement of its PAC1 and VPAC1/2 receptors (PAC1R, VPAC1/2R) in this inhibitory effect. Neurogenic inflammation in the mouse ear was induced by topical application of the Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) receptor activator mustard oil (MO). Consequent neurogenic edema, vasodilation and plasma leakage were assessed by measuring ear thickness with engineer's micrometer, detecting tissue perfusion by laser Doppler scanning and Evans blue or indocyanine green extravasation by intravital videomicroscopy or fluorescence imaging, respectively. Myeloperoxidase activity, an indicator of neutrophil infiltration, was measured from the ear homogenates with spectrophotometry. The selective PAC1R agonist maxadilan, the VPAC1/2R agonist vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or the vehicle were administered i.p. 15 min before MO. Substance P (SP) concentration of the ear was assessed by radioimmunoassay. Maxadilan significantly diminished MO-induced neurogenic edema, increase of vascular permeability and vasodilation. These inhibitory effects of maxadilan may be partially due to the decreased substance P (SP) levels. In contrast, inhibitory effect of VIP on ear swelling was moderate, without any effect on MO-induced plasma leakage or SP release, however, activation of VPAC1/2R inhibited the increased microcirculation caused by the early arteriolar vasodilation. Neither the PAC1R, nor the VPAC1/2R agonist influenced the MO-evoked increase in tissue myeloperoxidase activity. These results clearly show that PAC1R activation inhibits acute neurogenic arterial vasodilation and plasma protein leakage from the venules, while VPAC1/2R stimulation is only involved in the attenuation of vasodilation.

  15. Relationships between host species and morphometric patterns in Fasciola hepatica adults and eggs from the northern Bolivian Altiplano hyperendemic region.

    PubMed

    Valero, M A; Darce, N A; Panova, M; Mas-Coma, S

    2001-12-01

    The highest prevalences and intensities of human fasciolosis by Fasciola hepatica are found in the northern Bolivian Altiplano, where sheep and cattle are the main reservoir host species and pigs and donkeys the secondary ones. Morphometric comparisons of many linear measurements, areas and ratios of F. hepatica adults (from sheep, cattle and pigs) and eggs (from sheep, cattle, pigs and donkeys) in natural liver fluke populations of the Bolivian Altiplano, as well as of F. hepatica adults and eggs experimentally obtained in Wistar rats infected with Altiplanic sheep, cattle and pig isolates, were made using computer image analysis and an allometric model. Although morphometric values of adult flukes from natural populations of sheep, cattle, and pigs showed great overlap, there were clear differences in allometric growth. The allometries analyzed were: body area (BA) versus body length (BL), BA versus body width (BW), BA versus perimeter (Pe), BA versus distance between posterior end of body and ventral sucker (P-VS), BL versus BW, BL versus Pe, and BL versus P-VS. These allometries show a good fit in the seven pairs of variables in all the populations examined. Comparative statistical analysis of the allometries shows that fluke adult populations from sheep, cattle and pigs significantly differ in BL versus BW and BL versus P-VS functions. Statistical analysis of F. hepatica egg size shows characteristic morphometric traits in each definitive host species. In experimentally infected rats, fluke adult allometry and egg morphometry do not vary depending on the Altiplanic definitive host species isolate. Our study reveals that the definitive host species decisively influences the size of F. hepatica adults and eggs, and these influences do not persist in a rodent definitive host model.

  16. HETEROTOPICALLY TRANSPLANTED CVO NEURAL STEM CELLS GENERATE NEURONS AND MIGRATE WITH SVZ CELLS IN THE ADULT MOUSE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Lori B.; Cai, Jingli; Enikolopov, Grigori; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Production of new neurons throughout adulthood has been well characterized in two brain regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the anterolateral ventricle and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus. The neurons produced from these regions arise from neural stem cells (NSCs) found in highly regulated stem cell niches. We recently showed that midline structures called circumventricular organs (CVOs) also contain NSCs capable of neurogenesis and/or astrogliogenesis in vitro and in situ [3]. The present study demonstrates that NSCs derived from two astrogliogenic CVOs, the median eminence and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis of the Nestin-GFP mouse, possess the potential to integrate into the SVZ and differentiate into cells with a neuronal phenotype. These NSCs, following expansion and BrdU-labeling in culture and heterotopic transplantation into a region proximal to the SVZ in adult mice, migrate caudally to the SVZ and express early neuronal markers (TUC-4, PSA-NCAM) as they migrate along the rostral migratory stream. CVO-derived BrdU+ cells ultimately reach the olfactory bulb where they express early (PSA-NCAM) and mature (NeuN) neuronal markers. Collectively, these data suggest that although NSCs derived from the ME and OVLT CVOs are astrogliogenic in situ, they produce cells phenotypic of neurons in vivo when placed in a neurogenic environment. These findings may have implications for neural repair in the adult brain. PMID:20298755

  17. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  18. [Neurogenic bladder function disorders in patients with meningomyelocele: S2k guidelines on diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Stein, R; Assion, C; Beetz, R; Bürst, M; Cremer, R; Ermert, A; Goepel, M; Kuwertz-Bröking, E; Ludwikowski, B; Michael, T; Pannek, J; Peters, H; Rohrmann, D; Rübben, I; Schröder, A; Trollmann, R; Thüroff, J W; Wagner, W

    2015-02-01

    The treatment of children and adolescents with meningomyelocele has experienced a clear change in the last 30 years. The establishment of pharmacotherapy, clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) and infection prophylaxis have improved the prognosis for patients and have led to new therapeutic strategies. The interdisciplinary cooperation between neonatologists, neurosurgeons, pediatric neurologists, pediatric urologists, pediatric nephrologists, pediatric orthopedists and pediatric surgeons leads to optimization of individualized therapy. These guidelines present definitions and classifications, investigations and timing which are described in detail. The conservative and operative therapy options for neurogenic bladder function disorders are described and discussed with reference to the current literature. The brief overview provides in each case assistance for the treating physician in the care of this patient group and facilitates the interdisciplinary cooperation. PMID:25690576

  19. [Role of thermo TRP channels in cutaneous neurogenic inflammation and itch].

    PubMed

    XIE, Zhi-qiang

    2009-07-01

    The temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, is also called thermo TRP, including TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPM8 and TRPA1, which are expressed in sensory neurons and non-neuronal cells (e.g.keratinocyte, mast cell) of the skin. Thermo TRP channels are activated/sensitized by physical and chemical mediators, which participate in thermosensation and thermoregulation, so that they are key players in pruritus or pain pathogenesis. Thermo TRP channels are also involved in cutaneous neurogenic inflammation, thus they are regarded as molecular targets for future therapy in skin inflammation, pruritus and pain. In addition, following a basic syntax and molecular substrate of nociception and pruriception established by TRP channels-centered concept, the sensory categories can be distinguished and re-defined. Thermo TRP channels should be taken into account when analyzing the pathogenesis and management of itch or pruritic dermatosis.

  20. Do changes in the coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities contribute to neurogenic hypertension?

    PubMed

    Zoccal, Daniel B; Paton, Julian F R; Machado, Benedito H

    2009-12-01

    1. It is well known that respiration markedly modulates the sympathetic nervous system. Interactions between pontine and medullary neurons involved in the control of sympathetic and respiratory functions are the main mechanism underlying the respiratory related oscillations in sympathetic nerve activity. 2. Recently, in rats treated with chronic intermittent hypoxia, we demonstrated that alterations in respiratory pattern may drive increased sympathetic outflow and hence the development of systemic hypertension. These experiments, performed in the in situ working heart-brain stem preparation, raise the possibility that enhanced central coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities could be a potential mechanism underpinning the development and/or the maintenance of neurogenic hypertension. 3. In the present review, we discuss the neural basis of the enhanced entrainment between respiratory and sympathetic neurons in the brain stem that can be induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia and the possible implications of these mechanisms in the genesis of sympathetic overactivity and, consequently, hypertension. PMID:19413588

  1. [Posttraumatic stress disorder in patients with neurogenic amnesia for the traumatic event].

    PubMed

    Podoll, K; Kunert, H J; Sass, H

    2000-10-01

    The development of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in patients with neurogenic amnesia for the traumatic event is recorded in 2 own patients and in 19 cases from the clinical literature. With a single exception, all patients were accident victims with closed head injuries. Only about three quarters of the patients completely fulfilled DSM-III-R criteria of PTSD. Nineteen patients displayed involuntary conscious memories of aspects of the traumatic event (presenting as recurrent intrusive thoughts, images or dreams) co-existent with a complete or partial lack of voluntary conscious memories of the trauma, suggesting that different memory systems and distinct brain mechanisms subserve these phenomena. The said clinical observations are discussed against the background of current neuropsychological models of multiple memory systems. The recorded cases demonstrate that declarative episodic memory is not necessary for symptoms of PTSD to emerge, whereas preserved functions of non-declarative memory systems represent a sufficient condition for the development of PTSD symptoms.

  2. Early Embolization for Ruptured Aneurysm in Acute Stage of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage with Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Meguro, T.; Rada, K. TE; Hirotsune, N.; Nishino, S.; Asano, T.; Manabe, T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Four cases of ruptured aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) presented with severe neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE). On admission, two patients were grade IV and two were grade V according to Hunt and Hess grading. All patients needed respiratory management with the assistance of a ventilator. Three of them underwent endovascular treatment for the ruptured aneurysms within three days from onset after ensuring hemodynamic stability. Immediately after the endovascular treatment, lumbar spinal drainage was inserted in all the patients. The pulmonary edema findings disappeared rapidly after the respiratory management. The results were good recovery in two, and moderate disability in two. We concluded that early embolization of ruptured aneurysm and placement of spinal drainage is a satisfactory option for severe SAH with NPE. PMID:20566097

  3. NTOS symptoms and mobility: a case study on neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome involving massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Streit, Robin S

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) is a neuromuscular condition affecting brachial plexus functionality. NTOS is characterized by paresthesia, pain, muscle fatigue, and restricted mobility in the upper extremity. This study quantified massage therapy's possible contribution to treatment of NTOS. A 24-year-old female with NTOS received eight treatments over 35 days. Treatment included myofascial release, trigger point therapy, cross fiber friction, muscle stripping, and gentle passive stretching. Abduction and lateral rotation at the glenohumeral (GH joint) assessments measured range of motion (ROM). A resisted muscle test evaluated upper extremity strength. The client rated symptoms daily via a visual analog scale (VAS). Findings showed improvement in ROM at the GH joint. VAS ratings revealed a reduction in muscle weakness, pain, numbness, and 'paresthesia'. Results suggest massage may be useful as part of a broad approach to managing NTOS symptoms and improving mobility. PMID:24411148

  4. Transpulmonary Thermodilution-Based Management of Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Tatsushi; Kazumata, Ken; Ueyama-Mutoh, Tomoko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Tatsuya

    2015-11-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a potentially catastrophic but treatable systemic event after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The development of NPE most frequently occurs immediately after SAH, and the severity is usually self-limiting. Despite extensive research efforts and a breadth of collective clinical experience, accurate diagnosis of NPE can be difficult, and effective hemodynamic treatment options are limited. Recently, a bedside transpulmonary thermodilution device has been introduced that traces physiological patterns consistent with current theories regarding the mechanism (hydrostatic or permeability PE) of NPE. This article provides an overview of the clinical usefulness of the advanced technique for use in the neurointensive care unit for the diagnosis and management of post-SAH NPE.

  5. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome: current diagnostic criteria and advances in MRI diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Magill, Stephen T; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Weinstein, Philip R; Chin, Cynthia T; Jacques, Line

    2015-09-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (nTOS) is caused by compression of the brachial plexus as it traverses from the thoracic outlet to the axilla. Diagnosing nTOS can be difficult because of overlap with other complex pain and entrapment syndromes. An nTOS diagnosis is made based on patient history, physical exam, electrodiagnostic studies, and, more recently, interpretation of MR neurograms with tractography. Advances in high-resolution MRI and tractography can confirm an nTOS diagnosis and identify the location of nerve compression, allowing tailored surgical decompression. In this report, the authors review the current diagnostic criteria, present an update on advances in MRI, and provide case examples demonstrating how MR neurography (MRN) can aid in diagnosing nTOS. The authors conclude that improved high-resolution MRN and tractography are valuable tools for identifying the source of nerve compression in patients with nTOS and can augment current diagnostic modalities for this syndrome.

  6. Self-maintenance of neurogenic inflammation contributes to a vicious cycle in skin.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Olivier; Lebonvallet, Nicolas; L'Herondelle, Killian; Le Gall-Ianotto, Christelle; Buhé, Virginie; Plée-Gautier, Emmanuelle; Carré, Jean-Luc; Lefeuvre, Luc; Misery, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Cutaneous neurogenic inflammation (CNI) is frequently associated with skin disorders. CNI is not limited to the retrograde signalling of nociceptive sensory nerve endings but can instead be regarded as a multicellular phenomenon. Thus, soluble mediators participating in communication among sensory nerves, skin and immune cells are key components of CNI. These interactions induce the self-maintenance of CNI, promoting a vicious cycle. Certain G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a prominent role in these cell interactions and contribute to self-maintenance. Protease-activated receptors 2 and 4 (PAR-2 and PAR-4, respectively) and Mas-related G protein-coupled receptors (Mrgprs) are implicated in the synthesis and release of neuropeptides, proteases and soluble mediators from most cutaneous cells. Regulation of the expression and release of these mediators contributes to the vicious cycle of CNI. The authors propose certain hypothetical therapeutic options to interrupt this cycle, which might reduce skin symptoms and improve patient quality of life.

  7. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  8. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  9. Age-related deterioration of cortical responses to slow FM sounds in the auditory belt region of adult C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Tsukano, Hiroaki; Horie, Masao; Honma, Yuusuke; Ohga, Shinpei; Hishida, Ryuichi; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Takahashi, Sugata; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2013-11-27

    To compare age-related deterioration of neural responses in each subfield of the auditory cortex in C57BL/6 mice, we evaluated amplitudes of tonal responses in young (5-11 weeks old) and adult (16-23 weeks old) groups using transcranial flavoprotein fluorescence imaging. Cortical responses to 20-kHz amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds, which were mainly found in the anterior auditory field (AAF) and the primary auditory cortex (AI) of the core region, were not markedly different between the two groups. In contrast, cortical responses to direction reversal of slow frequency-modulated (FM) sounds, which were mainly found in the ultrasonic field (UF), were significantly disrupted in the adult group compared with those in the young group. To investigate the mechanisms underlying such age-related deterioration, biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was injected into UF. The number of retrograde labeled neurons in the dorsal division of the medial geniculate body (MGd) was markedly reduced in the adult group compared with that in the young group. These results strongly suggest that cortical responses to FM direction reversal in UF of adult C57BL/6 mice are mainly deteriorated by loss of non-lemniscal thalamic inputs from MGd to UF due to aging.

  10. Reduced Cerebral Oxygen Content in the DG and SVZ In Situ Promotes Neurogenesis in the Adult Rat Brain In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhou, Yanzhao; Zhao, Tong; Wu, Liying; Huang, Xin; Wu, Kuiwu; Xu, Lun; Li, Dahu; Liu, Shuhong; Zhao, Yongqi; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult brain occurs mainly within two neurogenic structures, the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain. It has been reported that mild hypoxia promoted the proliferation of Neural Stem Cells (NSCs)in vitro. Our previous study further demonstrated that an external hypoxic environment stimulated neurogenesis in the adult rat brain in vivo. However, it remains unknown how external hypoxic environments affect the oxygen content in the brain and result in neurogenesis. Here we use an optical fiber luminescent oxygen sensor to detect the oxygen content in the adult rat brain in situ under normoxia and hypoxia. We found that the distribution of oxygen in cerebral regions is spatiotemporally heterogeneous. The Po2 values in the ventricles (45∼50 Torr) and DG (approximately 10 Torr) were much higher than those of other parts of the brain, such as the cortex and thalamus (approximately 2 Torr). Interestingly, our in vivo studies showed that an external hypoxic environment could change the intrinsic oxygen content in brain tissues, notably reducing oxygen levels in both the DG and SVZ, the major sites of adult neurogenesis. Furthermore, the hypoxic environment also increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, two factors that have been reported to regulate neurogenesis, within the DG and SVZ. Thus, we have demonstrated that reducing the oxygen content of the external environment decreased Po2 levels in the DG and SVZ. This reduced oxygen level in the DG and SVZ might be the main mechanism triggering neurogenesis in the adult brain. More importantly, we speculate that varying oxygen levels may be the physiological basis of the regionally restricted neurogenesis in the adult brain.

  11. Anatomical variations in the brachial plexus roots: implications for diagnosis of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Vanessa; Smith, Riley; Caldwell, Gregory; Smith, Heather F

    2016-07-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) is the most common type of TOS. Typically it results from impingement of the neurovasculature as it passes between the anterior and middle scalene muscles; this classic anatomical relationship being the foundation of clinical diagnosis. Positional testing relies on vascular compromise occurring when the subclavian artery is compressed in this space. This study describes several anatomical variations observed in this relationship. Sixty-five cadavers (35m/30f) were assessed to determine the frequency and extent of brachial plexus branching variants. A total of thirty-one variations from "classic" anatomy were observed (47.7%). In two specimens (3.1%), the entire superior trunk coursed completely anterior to the anterior scalene in a position of relative vulnerability. In 27 instances, a portion of or the entire superior trunk pierced the anterior scalene muscle, and in two, the middle trunk also pierced the muscle belly. Interestingly, while two bilateral branching variations were observed, the majority occurred unilaterally, and almost exclusively on the left side. There were no sex differences in frequency. The high frequency of these variations and their potential to predispose patients to neurogenic TOS suggest that current diagnostic methods may be insufficient in clinical diagnosis. Due to lack of vascular compromise, patients with the piercing variant would not display positive signs on the traditional positional tests. The use of ultrasound to determine the route of the brachial plexus could determine whether this variation is present in patients who suffer from TOS symptoms but lack a diagnosis based on traditional positional testing. PMID:27133185

  12. Use of botulinum toxin in individuals with neurogenic detrusor overactivity: State of the art review

    PubMed Central

    Linsenmeyer, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injection into the bladder wall has been shown to be an effective alternative to anticholinergic (antimuscarinic) medications and more invasive surgery in those with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and urinary incontinence who are not tolerating anticholinergic medications. In August 2011, Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for this use. Clinically, intradetrusor injection of BoNT has been found to decrease urinary incontinence and improve quality of life. Its impact on urodynamic parameters is an increase in the maximum cystometric (bladder) capacity and decrease in the maximum detrusor pressures. The most common side effects are urinary tract infections and urinary retention. There have been rare reports and a black box warning of distant spread of BoNT. BoNT has gained popularity because of its effectiveness and long duration of action, relative ease of administration, easy learning curve, reproducibility of results on repeated administration, and low incidence of complications. Objective To discuss the structure and function, mechanisms of action, clinical and urodynamic studies, injection technique, potential beneficial and adverse effects, and potential areas of research of BoNT. Methods Literature search focused on botulinum toxin in MEDLINE/PubMed. Search terms included botulinum toxin, neurogenic bladder, NDO, botox bladder, botox spinal cord injury, botox, FDA, botox side effects. All papers identified were English language, full-text papers. In addition, English abstracts of non-English papers were noted. The reference list of identified articles was also searched for further papers. Conclusion Botulinum toxin is an alternative treatment for individuals with NDO who fail to tolerate anticholinergic medications. Its popularity has increased because of the literature, which has supported its effectiveness, safety, easy

  13. Oxygen Tension Within the Neurogenic Niche Regulates Dopaminergic Neurogenesis in the Developing Midbrain.

    PubMed

    Wagenführ, Lisa; Meyer, Anne Karen; Marrone, Lara; Storch, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen tension is an important factor controlling stem cell proliferation and maintenance in various stem cell populations with a particular relevance in midbrain dopaminergic progenitors. Further studies have shown that the oxygen-dependent transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is involved in these processes. However, all available studies on oxygen effects in dopaminergic neuroprogenitors were performed in vitro and thus it remains unclear whether tissue oxygen tension in the embryonic midbrain is also relevant for the regulation of dopaminergic neurogenesis in vivo. We thus dissect here the effects of oxygen tension in combination with HIF-1α conditional knockout on dopaminergic neurogenesis by using a novel experimental design allowing for the control of oxygen tension within the microenvironment of the neurogenic niche of the murine fetal midbrain in vivo. The microenvironment of the midbrain dopaminergic neurogenic niche was detected as hypoxic with oxygen tensions below 1.1%. Maternal oxygen treatment of 10%, 21%, and 75% atmospheric oxygen tension for 48 h translates into robust changes in fetal midbrain oxygenation. Fetal midbrain hypoxia hampered the generation of dopaminergic neurons and is accompanied with restricted fetal midbrain development. In contrast, induced hyperoxia stimulated proliferation and differentiation of dopaminergic progenitors during early and late embryogenesis. Oxygen effects were not directly mediated through HIF-1α signaling. These data--in agreement with in vitro data-indicate that oxygen is a crucial regulator of developmental dopaminergic neurogenesis. Our study provides the initial framework for future studies on molecular mechanisms mediating oxygen regulation of dopaminergic neurogenesis within the fetal midbrain as its natural environment.

  14. Neurogenic vision loss: Causes and outcome. An experience from a tertiary center in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Gupta, Mani; Chaudhari, Tejendra Sukdeo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vision loss can be a consequence of numerous disorders of eye and neural pathway conveying visual input to brain. A variety of conditions can affect visual pathway producing neurogenic vision loss. The presentation and course of vision loss depends on the site of involvement and underlying etiology. We conducted this unprecedented study to evaluate the characteristics and outcome of various diseases of the visual pathway. Materials and Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we evaluated 64 patients with neurogenic visual impairment. Ophthalmological causes were excluded in all of them. Their presentation, ophthalmological characteristics and investigation findings were recorded. These patients were followed up till 6 months. Results: Out of 69 patients evaluated, 5 were excluded as they had ophthalmological abnormalities. The remaining 64 cases (113 eyes) were enrolled. 54 cases were due to diseases of anterior visual pathway and rest 10 had cortical vision loss. The etiologic distribution is as follows: Isolated optic neuritis- 12 (19%), multiple sclerosis- 4 (6.3%), neuromyelitis optica- 5 (7.9%), tubercular meningitis- 15 (23.8%), non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy, ischemic optic neuropathy complicating cavernous sinus thrombosis, cryptococcal meningitis, malignant infiltration of optic nerve, Crouzon's syndrome, calvarial thickening and traumatic occipital gliosis- 1 (1.6%) case each, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, pituitary adenoma, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy- 3 (4.8%) cases each, cortical venous thrombosis 5 (7.9%), subacute scleroing panencephalitis- 4 (6.3%) cases. Conclusions: The diseases of anterior visual pathway were much more common than cortical vision loss. A majority of our patients had severe impairment of vision at presentation. PMID:25288834

  15. A novel CGRP-neutralizing Spiegelmer attenuates neurogenic plasma protein extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Hoehlig, K; Johnson, K W; Pryazhnikov, E; Maasch, C; Clemens-Smith, A; Purschke, W G; Vauléon, S; Buchner, K; Jarosch, F; Khiroug, L; Vater, A; Klussmann, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays an important role in the pathology of migraine, and recent clinical trials suggest the inhibition of CGRP-mediated processes as a new therapeutic option in migraine. In this study, we describe the generation of NOX-L41, a CGRP-neutralizing mirror-image (l-)aptamer (Spiegelmer) and investigate its in vitro and in vivo function. Experimental Approach A CGRP-binding Spiegelmer was identified by in vitro selection. Binding studies were performed using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and the inhibitory activity was determined in cell-based assays. The pharmacokinetic profile comparing i.v. and s.c. dosing was analysed in rats. Intravital two-photon microscopy was employed to follow extravasation from meningeal vessels. Finally, in vivo efficacy was tested in a model of electrically evoked meningeal plasma protein extravasation (PPE) in rats. Key Results We identified NOX-L41, a novel CGRP-neutralizing Spiegelmer. SPR studies showed that NOX-L41 binds to human and rat/mouse CGRP with sub-nanomolar affinities and is highly selective against related peptides such as amylin. In vitro, NOX-L41 effectively inhibited CGRP-induced cAMP formation in SK-N-MC cells. In rats, NOX-L41 had a plasma half-life of 8 h. Pharmacodynamic studies showed that NOX-L41 extravasates from blood vessels in the dura mater and inhibits neurogenic meningeal PPE for at least 18 h after single dosing. Conclusions and Implications This is the first description of the CGRP-neutralizing Spiegelmer NOX-L41. Preclinical studies confirmed a role for CGRP in neurogenic PPE and provided proof-of-concept for the potential use of this new drug candidate for the treatment or prevention of migraine. PMID:25659966

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells secretome as a modulator of the neurogenic niche: basic insights and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Antonio J.; Sousa, Joao C.; Costa, Bruno M.; Pires, Ana O.; Mateus-Pinheiro, António; Teixeira, F. G.; Pinto, Luisa; Sousa, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) share few characteristics apart from self-renewal and multipotency. In fact, the neurogenic and osteogenic stem cell niches derive from two distinct embryonary structures; while the later originates from the mesoderm, as all the connective tissues do, the first derives from the ectoderm. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that stem cells isolated from one niche could form terminally differentiated cells from the other. Additionally, these two niches are associated to tissues/systems (e.g., bone and central nervous system) that have markedly different needs and display diverse functions within the human body. Nevertheless they do share common features. For instance, the differentiation of both NSCs and MSCs is intimately associated with the bone morphogenetic protein family. Moreover, both NSCs and MSCs secrete a panel of common growth factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), among others. But it is not the features they share but the interaction between them that seem most important, and worth exploring; namely, it has already been shown that there are mutually beneficially effects when these cell types are co-cultured in vitro. In fact the use of MSCs, and their secretome, become a strong candidate to be used as a therapeutic tool for CNS applications, namely by triggering the endogenous proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitors, among other mechanisms. Quite interestingly it was recently revealed that MSCs could be found in the human brain, in the vicinity of capillaries. In the present review we highlight how MSCs and NSCs in the neurogenic niches interact. Furthermore, we propose directions on this field and explore the future therapeutic possibilities that may arise from the combination/interaction of MSCs and NSCs. PMID:26217178

  17. Bladder neck closure and suprapubic catheter placement as definitive management of neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Colli, Janet; Lloyd, L. Keith

    2011-01-01

    Objective Surgical management for neurogenic bladder may require abandonment of the native urethra due to intractable urinary incontinence, irreparable urethral erosion, severe scarring from previous transurethral procedures, or urethrocutaneous fistula. In these patients, bladder neck closure (BNC) excludes the native urethra and provides continence while preserving the antireflux mechanism of the native ureters. This procedure is commonly combined with ileovesicostomy or continent catheterizable stoma, with or without augmentation enterocystoplasty. Alternatively, BNC can be paired with suprapubic catheter diversion. This strategy does not require a bowel segment, resulting in shorter operative times and less opportunity for bowel-related morbidity. The study purpose is to examine preoperative characteristics, indications, complications, and long-term maintenance of renal function of BNC patients. Methods A retrospective review of medical records of 35 patients who underwent BNC with suprapubic catheter placement from 1998 to 2007 by a single surgeon (LKL) was completed. Results Neurogenic bladder was attributable to spinal cord injury in 71%, 23% had multiple sclerosis, and 9% had cerebrovascular accident. Indications for BNC included severe urethral erosion in 80%, decubitus ulcer exacerbated by urinary incontinence in 34%, urethrocutaneous fistula in 11%, and other indications in 9%. The overall complication rate was 17%. All but two patients were continent at follow-up. Forty-nine per cent of patients had imaging available for review, none of which showed deterioration of the upper tracts. Conclusions Our results suggest that BNC in conjunction with suprapubic catheter diversion provides an excellent chance at urethral continence with a reasonable complication rate. PMID:21756565

  18. Thinking about Seeing: perceptual sources of knowledge are encoded in the theory of mind brain regions of sighted and blind adults

    PubMed Central

    Koster-Hale, Jorie; Bedny, Marina; Saxe, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Blind people's inferences about how other people see provide a window into fundamental questions about the human capacity to think about one another's thoughts. By working with blind individuals, we can ask both what kinds of representations people form about others’ minds, and how much these representations depend on the observer having had similar mental states themselves. Thinking about others’ mental states depends on a specific group of brain regions, including the right temporo-parietal junction (RTPJ). We investigated the representations of others’ mental states in these brain regions, using multivoxel pattern analyses (MVPA). We found that, first, in the RTPJ of sighted adults, the pattern of neural response distinguished the source of the mental state (did the protagonist see or hear something?) but not the valence (did the protagonist feel good or bad?). Second, these neural representations were preserved in congenitally blind adults. These results suggest that the temporo-parietal junction contains explicit, abstract representations of features of others’ mental states, including the perceptual source. The persistence of these representations in congenitally blind adults, who have no first-person experience with sight, provides evidence that these representations emerge even in the absence of first-person perceptual experiences. PMID:24960530

  19. Thinking about seeing: perceptual sources of knowledge are encoded in the theory of mind brain regions of sighted and blind adults.

    PubMed

    Koster-Hale, Jorie; Bedny, Marina; Saxe, Rebecca

    2014-10-01

    Blind people's inferences about how other people see provide a window into fundamental questions about the human capacity to think about one another's thoughts. By working with blind individuals, we can ask both what kinds of representations people form about others' minds, and how much these representations depend on the observer having had similar mental states themselves. Thinking about others' mental states depends on a specific group of brain regions, including the right temporo-parietal junction (RTPJ). We investigated the representations of others' mental states in these brain regions, using multivoxel pattern analyses (MVPA). We found that, first, in the RTPJ of sighted adults, the pattern of neural response distinguished the source of the mental state (did the protagonist see or hear something?) but not the valence (did the protagonist feel good or bad?). Second, these neural representations were preserved in congenitally blind adults. These results suggest that the temporo-parietal junction contains explicit, abstract representations of features of others' mental states, including the perceptual source. The persistence of these representations in congenitally blind adults, who have no first-person experience with sight, provides evidence that these representations emerge even in the absence of relevant first-person perceptual experiences.

  20. Outdoor physical activity and self rated health in older adults living in two regions of the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Older adults spend little time outdoors and many are physically inactive. The relationship between outdoor physical activity and self rated health has not been studied in older adults. This paper aimed to assess the relation of location of physical activity to self rated health and physical activity minutes. This was an observational study of ambulatory adults 66 years and older conducted in 2005–2008. Participants (N = 754) completed survey measures of physical activity location and self rated health, and wore an accelerometer to objectively assess physical activity. A mixed model linear regression procedure adjusted for neighborhood clustering effects. Differences in self rated health and physical activity minutes were compared across three physical activity settings (indoor only, outdoor only, both indoor and outdoor). Results Minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity were significantly greater in those who were physically active at least once a week outdoors compared with those who were physically active indoors only. Self rated health was significantly related to being physically active but did not vary by location of activity. Conclusions Older adults who were physically active outdoors accumulated significantly more physical activity, but self-rated health was not significantly greater than those being physically active indoors. PMID:22846594

  1. Effects of Geographic Region upon Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Results: A Hawaii-Mainland United States Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsushima, William T.; Bratton, Joseph C.

    1977-01-01

    Investigated geographic differences in Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) results by comparing 60 Hawaiian and 60 mainland United States psychiatric outpatients. The influence of pidgin English led to expectations that Hawaiian subjects would have significantly lower WAIS Verbal scores than mainland subjects. Data verified these…

  2. Toxicity assessment of four insecticides with different modes of action on pupae and adults of Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a relevant predator of the Neotropical Region.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Marilina Noelia; Schneider, Marcela Inés; Rimoldi, Federico; Ladux, Lorena Sabrina; Desneux, Nicolas; Ronco, Alicia Estela

    2016-08-01

    Pesticides can be toxic to nontarget organisms including the natural enemies of agricultural pests, thus reducing the biodiversity of agroecosystems. The lethal and sublethal effects of four insecticides with different modes of action-pyriproxyfen, teflubenzuron, acetamiprid, and cypermethrin-were evaluated on pupae and adults of Eriopis connexa, an effective predator in horticultural crops. Pupal survival was reduced by pyriproxyfen (26 %) and cypermethrin (41 %). Malformations in adults emerged from treated pupae were observed after acetamiprid (82.7 and 100 % for 100 and 200 mg a.i./l, respectively), pyriproxyfen (48.6 %), and cypermethrin (13.3 %) treatments. A longer mean oviposition time was also observed in adults emerged from pupae treated with cypermethrin. Moreover, the latter insecticide as well as teflubenzuron did not reduce reproductive parameters, whereas females emerged from pyriproxyfen-treated pupae were not be able to lay eggs even when females showed large abdomens. Upon exposure of adults, survival was reduced to approximately 90 % by acetamiprid, but no reduction occurred with pyriproxyfen, teflubenzuron, or cypermethrin though the fecundity at fifth oviposition time of the female survivors was reduced. Pyriproxyfen decreased the hatching at all the oviposition times tested, whereas fertility was reduced in the fourth and fifth ovipositions by teflubenzuron and in the first and third ovipositions by cypermethrin. In conclusion, all four insecticides tested exhibited lethal or sublethal effects, or both, on E. connexa. The neurotoxic insecticides were more harmful than the insect-growth regulators, and pupae were more susceptible than adults. The toxicity of insecticides on the conservation of predators in agroecosystems of the Neotropical Region is discussed. PMID:27074926

  3. Toxicity assessment of four insecticides with different modes of action on pupae and adults of Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a relevant predator of the Neotropical Region.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Marilina Noelia; Schneider, Marcela Inés; Rimoldi, Federico; Ladux, Lorena Sabrina; Desneux, Nicolas; Ronco, Alicia Estela

    2016-08-01

    Pesticides can be toxic to nontarget organisms including the natural enemies of agricultural pests, thus reducing the biodiversity of agroecosystems. The lethal and sublethal effects of four insecticides with different modes of action-pyriproxyfen, teflubenzuron, acetamiprid, and cypermethrin-were evaluated on pupae and adults of Eriopis connexa, an effective predator in horticultural crops. Pupal survival was reduced by pyriproxyfen (26 %) and cypermethrin (41 %). Malformations in adults emerged from treated pupae were observed after acetamiprid (82.7 and 100 % for 100 and 200 mg a.i./l, respectively), pyriproxyfen (48.6 %), and cypermethrin (13.3 %) treatments. A longer mean oviposition time was also observed in adults emerged from pupae treated with cypermethrin. Moreover, the latter insecticide as well as teflubenzuron did not reduce reproductive parameters, whereas females emerged from pyriproxyfen-treated pupae were not be able to lay eggs even when females showed large abdomens. Upon exposure of adults, survival was reduced to approximately 90 % by acetamiprid, but no reduction occurred with pyriproxyfen, teflubenzuron, or cypermethrin though the fecundity at fifth oviposition time of the female survivors was reduced. Pyriproxyfen decreased the hatching at all the oviposition times tested, whereas fertility was reduced in the fourth and fifth ovipositions by teflubenzuron and in the first and third ovipositions by cypermethrin. In conclusion, all four insecticides tested exhibited lethal or sublethal effects, or both, on E. connexa. The neurotoxic insecticides were more harmful than the insect-growth regulators, and pupae were more susceptible than adults. The toxicity of insecticides on the conservation of predators in agroecosystems of the Neotropical Region is discussed.

  4. Long-Term Fate Mapping Using Conditional Lentiviral Vectors Reveals a Continuous Contribution of Radial Glia-Like Cells to Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aelvoet, Sarah-Ann; Pascual-Brazo, Jesus; Libbrecht, Sarah; Reumers, Veerle; Gijsbers, Rik; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Newborn neurons are generated throughout life in two neurogenic regions, the subventricular zone and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Stimulation of adult neurogenesis is considered as an attractive endogenous repair mechanism to treat different neurological disorders. Although tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, important questions remain unanswered, regarding the identity and the behavior of neural stem cells in the dentate gyrus. We previously showed that conditional Cre-Flex lentiviral vectors can be used to label neural stem cells in the subventricular zone and to track the migration of their progeny with non-invasive bioluminescence imaging. Here, we applied these Cre-Flex lentiviral vectors to study neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus with bioluminescence imaging and histological techniques. Stereotactic injection of the Cre-Flex vectors into the dentate gyrus of transgenic Nestin-Cre mice resulted in specific labeling of the nestin-positive neural stem cells. The labeled cell population could be detected with bioluminescence imaging until 9 months post injection, but no significant increase in the number of labeled cells over time was observed with this imaging technique. Nevertheless, the specific labeling of the nestin-positive neural stem cells, combined with histological analysis at different time points, allowed detailed analysis of their neurogenic potential. This long-term fate mapping revealed that a stable pool of labeled nestin-positive neural stem cells continuously contributes to the generation of newborn neurons in the mouse brain until 9 months post injection. In conclusion, the Cre-Flex technology is a valuable tool to address remaining questions regarding neural stem cell identity and behavior in the dentate gyrus. PMID:26600383

  5. Regional variation in the prevalence of overweight/obesity, hypertension and diabetes and their correlates among the adult rural population in India.

    PubMed

    Meshram, I I; Vishnu Vardhana Rao, M; Sudershan Rao, V; Laxmaiah, A; Polasa, K

    2016-04-14

    A community-based, cross-sectional study was carried out in five regions of India by adopting a multistage random sampling procedure. Information was collected from the participants about socio-demographic particulars such as age, sex, occupation, education, etc. Anthropometric measurements such as height, weight and waist and hip circumferences were measured and three measurements of blood pressure were obtained. Fasting blood sugar was assessed using a Glucometer. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics, χ(2) test for association and logistic regression analysis. A total of 7531 subjects were covered for anthropometry and blood pressure. The overall prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity was 29 and 21%, respectively, and was higher in the Southern region (40% each) as compared with other regions. The prevalence of hypertension was 18 and 16% and diabetes was 9·5% each among men and women, respectively. The risk of hypertension and diabetes was significantly higher among adults from the Southern and Western regions, the among elderly, among overweight/obese individuals and those with abdominal obesity. In conclusion, the prevalence of overweight/obesity and hypertension was higher in the Southern region, whereas diabetes was higher in the Southern and Western regions. Factors such as increasing age, male sex, overweight/obesity, and abdominal obesity were important risk factors for hypertension and diabetes. Appropriate health and nutrition education should be given to the community to control these problems. PMID:26867590

  6. Regional variation in the prevalence of overweight/obesity, hypertension and diabetes and their correlates among the adult rural population in India.

    PubMed

    Meshram, I I; Vishnu Vardhana Rao, M; Sudershan Rao, V; Laxmaiah, A; Polasa, K

    2016-04-14

    A community-based, cross-sectional study was carried out in five regions of India by adopting a multistage random sampling procedure. Information was collected from the participants about socio-demographic particulars such as age, sex, occupation, education, etc. Anthropometric measurements such as height, weight and waist and hip circumferences were measured and three measurements of blood pressure were obtained. Fasting blood sugar was assessed using a Glucometer. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics, χ(2) test for association and logistic regression analysis. A total of 7531 subjects were covered for anthropometry and blood pressure. The overall prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity was 29 and 21%, respectively, and was higher in the Southern region (40% each) as compared with other regions. The prevalence of hypertension was 18 and 16% and diabetes was 9·5% each among men and women, respectively. The risk of hypertension and diabetes was significantly higher among adults from the Southern and Western regions, the among elderly, among overweight/obese individuals and those with abdominal obesity. In conclusion, the prevalence of overweight/obesity and hypertension was higher in the Southern region, whereas diabetes was higher in the Southern and Western regions. Factors such as increasing age, male sex, overweight/obesity, and abdominal obesity were important risk factors for hypertension and diabetes. Appropriate health and nutrition education should be given to the community to control these problems.

  7. IGF-I: A Key Growth Factor that Regulates Neurogenesis and Synaptogenesis from Embryonic to Adult Stages of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Estévez, Vanesa; Defterali, Çağla; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The generation of neurons in the adult mammalian brain requires the activation of quiescent neural stem cells (NSCs). This activation and the sequential steps of neuron formation from NSCs are regulated by a number of stimuli, which include growth factors. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) exert pleiotropic effects, regulating multiple cellular processes depending on their concentration, cell type, and the developmental stage of the animal. Although IGF-I expression is relatively high in the embryonic brain its levels drop sharply in the adult brain except in neurogenic regions, i.e., the hippocampus (HP) and the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb (SVZ-OB). By contrast, the expression of IGF-IR remains relatively high in the brain irrespective of the age of the animal. Evidence indicates that IGF-I influences NSC proliferation and differentiation into neurons and glia as well as neuronal maturation including synapse formation. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that IGF-I not only promote adult neurogenesis by regulating NSC number and differentiation but also by influencing neuronal positioning and migration as described during SVZ-OB neurogenesis. In this article we will revise and discuss the actions reported for IGF-I signaling in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models, focusing on the maintenance and proliferation of NSCs/progenitors, neurogenesis, and neuron integration in synaptic circuits. PMID:26941597

  8. Effects of subchronic inhalation of low concentrations of nitrogen dioxide. 1. The proximal alveolar region of juvenile and adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.Y.; Graham, J.A.; Miller, F.J.; Ospital, J.J.; Crapo, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques were devised to isolate tissue from the epithelium of terminal airways and the alveoli proximal to the airways. One-day-old juveniles and six week old adult rats were exposed to either room air or 0.5 ppm NO/sub 2/ for 23 hrs per day seven days per week. An additional group of adult rats were exposed to 2.0 ppm NO/sub 2/ for the same duration. Two daily hour spikes to three times the background levels (0.5 to 1.5 ppm and 2.0 to 6.0 ppm) were applied Mon. through Fri. Morphometric analysis revealed that epithelial injury occurred in all exposed animals. The juvenile rats which had been exposed to 0.5 ppm NO/sub 2/ exhibited changes in the characteristics of type II epithelial cells. These cells spread to cover more alveolar surface and became thinner. Adult animals exposed to 0.5 and 2.0 ppm NO/sub 2/ showed changes in alveolar macrophages and in the alveolar interstitium in addition to changes in the epithelium.

  9. Feeling Present in Arousing Virtual Reality Worlds: Prefrontal Brain Regions Differentially Orchestrate Presence Experience in Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Thomas; Speck, Dominique; Wettstein, Denise; Masnari, Ornella; Beeli, Gian; Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) is a powerful tool for simulating aspects of the real world. The success of VR is thought to depend on its ability to evoke a sense of “being there”, that is, the feeling of “Presence”. In view of the rapid progress in the development of increasingly more sophisticated virtual environments (VE), the importance of understanding the neural underpinnings of presence is growing. To date however, the neural correlates of this phenomenon have received very scant attention. An fMRI-based study with 52 adults and 25 children was therefore conducted using a highly immersive VE. The experience of presence in adult subjects was found to be modulated by two major strategies involving two homologous prefrontal brain structures. Whereas the right DLPFC controlled the sense of presence by down-regulating the activation in the egocentric dorsal visual processing stream, the left DLPFC up-regulated widespread areas of the medial prefrontal cortex known to be involved in self-reflective and stimulus-independent thoughts. In contrast, there was no evidence of these two strategies in children. In fact, anatomical analyses showed that these two prefrontal areas have not yet reached full maturity in children. Taken together, this study presents the first findings that show activation of a highly specific neural network orchestrating the experience of presence in adult subjects, and that the absence of activity in this neural network might contribute to the generally increased susceptibility of children for the experience of presence in VEs. PMID:18958209

  10. Developmental cues and persistent neurogenic potential within an in vitro neural niche

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Neurogenesis, the production of neural cell-types from neural stem cells (NSCs), occurs during development as well as within select regions of the adult brain. NSCs in the adult subependymal zone (SEZ) exist in a well-categorized niche microenvironment established by surrounding cells and their molecular products. The components of this niche maintain the NSCs and their definitive properties, including the ability to self-renew and multipotency (neuronal and glial differentiation). Results We describe a model in vitro NSC niche, derived from embryonic stem cells, that produces many of the cells and products of the developing subventricular zone (SVZ) and adult SEZ NSC niche. We demonstrate a possible role for apoptosis and for components of the extracellular matrix in the maintenance of the NSC population within our niche cultures. We characterize expression of genes relevant to NSC self-renewal and the process of neurogenesis and compare these findings to gene expression produced by an established neural-induction protocol employing retinoic acid. Conclusions The in vitro NSC niche shows an identity that is distinct from the neurally induced embryonic cells that were used to derive it. Molecular and cellular components found in our in vitro NSC niche include NSCs, neural progeny, and ECM components and their receptors. Establishment of the in vitro NSC niche occurs in conjunction with apoptosis. Applications of this culture system range from studies of signaling events fundamental to niche formation and maintenance as well as development of unique NSC transplant platforms to treat disease or injury. PMID:20074373

  11. Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    John, Cynthia A; Day, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome are secondary events that affect patients with traumatic brain injury. All 3 syndromes affect both sodium and water balance; however, they have differences in pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Differentiating between hypernatremia (central neurogenic diabetes insipidus) and the 2 hyponatremia syndromes (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome) is critical for preventing worsening neurological outcomes in patients with head injuries.

  12. Acute and Chronic Electroconvulsive Seizures (ECS) Differentially Regulate the Expression of Epigenetic Machinery in the Adult Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Pusalkar, Madhavi; Ghosh, Shreya; Jaggar, Minal; Husain, Basma Fatima Anwar; Galande, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive seizure treatment is a fast-acting antidepressant therapy that evokes rapid transcriptional, neurogenic, and behavioral changes. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute to altered gene regulation, which underlies the neurogenic and behavioral effects of electroconvulsive seizure. We hypothesized that electroconvulsive seizure may modulate the expression of epigenetic machinery, thus establishing potential alterations in the epigenetic landscape. Methods: We examined the influence of acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure on the gene expression of histone modifiers, namely histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetylases, histone methyltransferases, and histone (lysine) demethylases as well as DNA modifying enzymes, including DNA methyltransferases, DNA demethylases, and methyl-CpG-binding proteins in the hippocampi of adult male Wistar rats using quantitative real time-PCR analysis. Further, we examined the influence of acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure on global and residue-specific histone acetylation and methylation levels within the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in the cellular and behavioral effects of electroconvulsive seizure. Results: Acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure induced a primarily unique, and in certain cases bidirectional, regulation of histone and DNA modifiers, and methyl-CpG-binding proteins, with an overlapping pattern of gene regulation restricted to Sirt4, Mll3, Jmjd3, Gadd45b, Tet2, and Tet3. Global histone acetylation and methylation levels were predominantly unchanged, with the exception of a significant decline in H3K9 acetylation in the hippocampus following chronic electroconvulsive seizure. Conclusions: Electroconvulsive seizure treatment evokes the transcriptional regulation of several histone and DNA modifiers, and methyl-CpG-binding proteins within the hippocampus, with a predominantly distinct pattern of regulation induced by acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure. PMID

  13. Effects of acute microinjections of the thyroid hormone derivative 3-iodothyronamine to the preoptic region of adult male rats on sleep, thermoregulation and motor activity.

    PubMed

    James, Thomas D; Moffett, Steven X; Scanlan, Thomas S; Martin, Joseph V

    2013-06-01

    The decarboxylated thyroid hormone derivative 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) has been reported as having behavioral and physiological consequences distinct from those of thyroid hormones. Here, we investigate the effects of T1AM on EEG-defined sleep after acute administration to the preoptic region of adult male rats. Our laboratory recently demonstrated a decrease in EEG-defined sleep after administration of 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) to the same brain region. After injection of T1AM or vehicle solution, EEG, EMG, activity, and core body temperature were recorded for 24h. Sleep parameters were determined from EEG and EMG data. Earlier investigations found contrasting systemic effects of T3 and T1AM, such as decreased heart rate and body temperature after intraperitoneal T1AM injection. However, nREM sleep was decreased in the present study after injections of 1 or 3 μg T1AM, but not after 0.3 or 10 μg, closely mimicking the previously reported effects of T3 administration to the preoptic region. The biphasic dose-response observed after either T1AM or T3 administration seems to indicate shared mechanisms and/or functions of sleep regulation in the preoptic region. Consistent with systemic administration of T1AM, however, microinjection of T1AM decreased body temperature. The current study is the first to show modulation of sleep by T1AM, and suggests that T1AM and T3 have both shared and independent effects in the adult mammalian brain.

  14. Effects of acute microinjections of the thyroid hormone derivative 3-iodothyronamine to the preoptic region of adult male rats on sleep, thermoregulation and motor activity.

    PubMed

    James, Thomas D; Moffett, Steven X; Scanlan, Thomas S; Martin, Joseph V

    2013-06-01

    The decarboxylated thyroid hormone derivative 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) has been reported as having behavioral and physiological consequences distinct from those of thyroid hormones. Here, we investigate the effects of T1AM on EEG-defined sleep after acute administration to the preoptic region of adult male rats. Our laboratory recently demonstrated a decrease in EEG-defined sleep after administration of 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) to the same brain region. After injection of T1AM or vehicle solution, EEG, EMG, activity, and core body temperature were recorded for 24h. Sleep parameters were determined from EEG and EMG data. Earlier investigations found contrasting systemic effects of T3 and T1AM, such as decreased heart rate and body temperature after intraperitoneal T1AM injection. However, nREM sleep was decreased in the present study after injections of 1 or 3 μg T1AM, but not after 0.3 or 10 μg, closely mimicking the previously reported effects of T3 administration to the preoptic region. The biphasic dose-response observed after either T1AM or T3 administration seems to indicate shared mechanisms and/or functions of sleep regulation in the preoptic region. Consistent with systemic administration of T1AM, however, microinjection of T1AM decreased body temperature. The current study is the first to show modulation of sleep by T1AM, and suggests that T1AM and T3 have both shared and independent effects in the adult mammalian brain. PMID:23702093

  15. Longitudinal Assessment of Global and Regional Rate of Grey Matter Atrophy in 1,172 Healthy Older Adults: Modulation by Sex and Age

    PubMed Central

    Crivello, Fabrice; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie; Tzourio, Christophe; Mazoyer, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the neuroanatomical changes in healthy older adults is important to differentiate pathological from normal brain structural aging. The present study investigated the annualized rate of GM atrophy in a large sample of older participants, focusing on the hippocampus, and searching for modulation by age and sex. In this 4-year longitudinal community cohort study, we used a VBM analysis to estimate the annualized rate of GM loss, at both the global and regional levels, in 1,172 healthy older adults (65–82 years) scanned at 1.5T. The global annualized rate of GM was −4.0 cm3/year (−0.83%/year). The highest rates of regional GM loss were found in the frontal and parietal cortices, middle occipital gyri, temporal cortex and hippocampus. The rate of GM atrophy was higher in women (−4.7 cm3/year, −0.91%/year) than men (−3.3 cm3/year, −0.65%/year). The global annualized rate of GM atrophy remained constant throughout the age range of the cohort, in both sexes. This pattern was replicated at the regional level, with the exception of the hippocampi, which showed a rate of GM atrophy that accelerated with age (2.8%/year per year of age) similarly for men and women. The present study reports a global and regional description of the annualized rate of grey matter loss and its evolution after the age of 65. Our results suggest greater anatomical vulnerability of women in late life and highlight a specific vulnerability of the hippocampus to the aging processes after 65 years of age. PMID:25469789

  16. Relationships between in vivo microdamage and the remarkable regional material and strain heterogeneity of cortical bone of adult deer, elk, sheep and horse calcanei.

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Sybrowsky, Christian L; Anderson, Wm Erick; Chow, Frank

    2011-12-01

    Natural loading of the calcanei of deer, elk, sheep and horses produces marked regional differences in prevalent/predominant strain modes: compression in the dorsal cortex, shear in medial-lateral cortices, and tension/shear in the plantar cortex. This consistent non-uniform strain distribution is useful for investigating mechanisms that mediate the development of the remarkable regional material variations of these bones (e.g. collagen orientation, mineralization, remodeling rates and secondary osteon morphotypes, size and population density). Regional differences in strain-mode-specific microdamage prevalence and/or morphology might evoke and sustain the remodeling that produces this material heterogeneity in accordance with local strain characteristics. Adult calcanei from 11 animals of each species (deer, elk, sheep and horses) were transversely sectioned and examined using light and confocal microscopy. With light microscopy, 20 linear microcracks were identified (deer: 10; elk: six; horse: four; sheep: none), and with confocal microscopy substantially more microdamage with typically non-linear morphology was identified (deer: 45; elk: 24; horse: 15; sheep: none). No clear regional patterns of strain-mode-specific microdamage were found in the three species with microdamage. In these species, the highest overall concentrations occurred in the plantar cortex. This might reflect increased susceptibility of microdamage in habitual tension/shear. Absence of detectable microdamage in sheep calcanei may represent the (presumably) relatively greater physical activity of deer, elk and horses. Absence of differences in microdamage prevalence/morphology between dorsal, medial and lateral cortices of these bones, and the general absence of spatial patterns of strain-mode-specific microdamage, might reflect the prior emergence of non-uniform osteon-mediated adaptations that reduce deleterious concentrations of microdamage by the adult stage of bone development.

  17. VSX2 and ASCL1 Are Indicators of Neurogenic Competence in Human Retinal Progenitor Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Lynda S.; Pinilla, Isabel; Saha, Jishnu; Clermont, Joshua M.; Lien, Jessica S.; Borys, Katarzyna D.; Capowski, Elizabeth E.; Phillips, M. Joseph; Gamm, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) culture techniques are frequently used for CNS tissue modeling and organoid production, including generation of retina-like tissues. A proposed advantage of these 3D systems is their potential to more closely approximate in vivo cellular microenvironments, which could translate into improved manufacture and/or maintenance of neuronal populations. Visual System Homeobox 2 (VSX2) labels all multipotent retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) and is known to play important roles in retinal development. In contrast, the proneural transcription factor Acheate scute-like 1 (ASCL1) is expressed transiently in a subset of RPCs, but is required for the production of most retinal neurons. Therefore, we asked whether the presence of VSX2 and ASCL1 could gauge neurogenic potential in 3D retinal cultures derived from human prenatal tissue or ES cells (hESCs). Short term prenatal 3D retinal cultures displayed multiple characteristics of human RPCs (hRPCs) found in situ, including robust expression of VSX2. Upon initiation of hRPC differentiation, there was a small increase in co-labeling of VSX2+ cells with ASCL1, along with a modest increase in the number of PKCα+ neurons. However, 3D prenatal retinal cultures lost expression of VSX2 and ASCL1 over time while concurrently becoming refractory to neuronal differentiation. Conversely, 3D optic vesicles derived from hESCs (hESC-OVs) maintained a robust VSX2+ hRPC population that could spontaneously co-express ASCL1 and generate photoreceptors and other retinal neurons for an extended period of time. These results show that VSX2 and ASCL1 can serve as markers for neurogenic potential in cultured hRPCs. Furthermore, unlike hESC-OVs, maintenance of 3D structure does not independently convey an advantage in the culture of prenatal hRPCs, further illustrating differences in the survival and differentiation requirements of hRPCs extracted from native tissue vs. those generated entirely in vitro. PMID:26292211

  18. The various types of neurogenic bladder dysfunction: an update of current therapeutic concepts.

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, H

    1990-05-01

    weak reflex detrusor contractions are present. (3) With the combination of an areflexive or hyporeflexive detrusor and a flaccid pelvic floor, passive voiding by abdominal straining or by the Credé manoeuvre is usually recommended, but should be replaced by CIC if this mechanism of bladder emptying creates unphysiological high and dangerous intravesical pressures, or if vesico-uretero-renal reflux is present. Neurogenic urinary stress incontinence is usually associated with this type of lesion and can be successfully treated by the implantation of an artificial urinary sphincter (Scott). However in two thirds of the patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction, additional, usually operative treatment is necessary to meet the criteria for implantation. Moreover, a 30% rate of repair operations must be accepted by patients, but is becoming less frequently required with an improved design of the device.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  19. Comprehensive multi-modality assessment of regional and global arterial structure and function in adults born preterm

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Henry; Birse, Katherine; Davis, Esther F; Whitworth, Polly; Aggarwal, Veena; Lewandowski, Adam J; Leeson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with higher blood pressure, which could be because preterm birth alters early aortic elastin and collagen development to cause increased arterial stiffness. We measured central and conduit artery size and multiple indices of arterial stiffness to define the extent and severity of macrovascular changes in individuals born preterm. A total of 102 young adults born preterm and 102 controls who were born after an uncomplicated pregnancy underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance on a Siemens 1.5 T scanner to measure the aortic cross-sectional area in multiple locations. Ultrasound imaging with a Philips CX50 and linear array probe was used to measure carotid and brachial artery diameters. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the augmentation index were measured by SphygmoCor, brachial-femoral pulse wave velocity by Vicorder and aortic pulse wave velocity by cardiovascular magnetic resonance. The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) was used as a measurement of global stiffness, and ultrasound was used to assess peripheral vessel distensibility. Adults born preterm had 20% smaller thoracic and abdominal aortic lumens (2.19±0.44 vs. 2.69±0.60 cm2, P<0.001; 1.25±0.36 vs. 1.94±0.45 cm2, P<0.001, respectively) but similar carotid and brachial diameters to adults born at term. Pulse wave velocity was increased (5.82±0.80 vs. 5.47±0.59 m s−1, P<0.01, 9.06±1.25 vs. 8.33±1.28 m s−1, P=0.01, 5.23±1.19 vs. 4.75±0.91 m s−1, P<0.01) and carotid distensibility was decreased (4.75±1.31 vs. 5.60±1.48 mm Hg−1103, P<0.001) in this group compared with the group born at term. However, the global and peripheral arterial stiffness measured by CAVI and brachial ultrasound did not differ (5.95±0.72 vs. 5.98±0.60, P=0.80 and 1.07±0.48 vs. 1.19±0.54 mm Hg−1103, P=0.12, respectively). Adults who are born preterm have significant differences in their aortic structure from adults born at term, but they have

  20. Transmission electron microscopy of malignant neurogenic rat cells during invasion into embryonic chick heart fragments in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mørk, S J; Laerum, O D; De Ridder, L

    1983-01-01

    Invasion of chemically induced brain tumour cells from BD IX-rats into precultured fragments of embryonic chick heart (PHF) was studied by transmission electron microscopy. The malignant cells from monolayer cultures were suspended and allowed to form aggregates for 24 hours on a gyratory shaker. The single aggregates were allowed ro attach to a single PHF and thereafter incubated in a confronting culture on a gyratory shaker. Invasion into the PHF started with cytoplasmic cell extensions between PHF cells and vanishing of heart cell junctions. Irreversible intracellular alterations in heart cells followed the disruption of intracellular contact by the malignant neurogenic cells. The latter exhibited fewer microvilli when invading the PHF than when located at the periphery. No junctions connecting heart cells with neurogenic cells were observed. Malignant cells were lying between the PHF and no extensions were seen in PHF cells. Hetero/autophagosomes were regularly present in the malignant cells and also in PHF cells. The aggregates of the 13 tumourigenic neurogenic cell lines tested, all produced the same alterations in the PHF cells.

  1. Myogenic and neurogenic differentiation of human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) are regulated by pluronic block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Taşlı, P Neslihan; Doğan, Ayşegül; Demirci, Selami; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2016-03-01

    Stem cells with high proliferation, self-renewal and differentiation capacities are promising for tissue engineering approaches. Among stem cells, human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) having mesenchymal stem cell characteristics are highly proliferative and able to differentiate into several cell lineages. Researchers have recently focused on transplanting stem cells with bioconductive and/or bioinductive materials that can provide cell commitment to the desired cell lineages. In the present study, effects of pluronic block copolymers (F68, F127 and P85) on in vitro myo- and neurogenic differentiation of human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) were investigated. As P85 was found to exert considerable toxicity to hTGSCs even at low concentrations, it was not evaluated for further differentiation experiments. Immunocytochemical analysis, gene and protein expression studies revealed that while F68 treatment increased lineage-specific gene expression in both myo- and neuro-genically differentiated cells, F127 did not result in any remarkable difference compared to cells treated with differentiation medium. Subsequent studies are required to explore the exact mechanisms of how F68 increases the myogenic and neurogenic differentiation of hTGSCs. The present work indicates that pluronic F68 might be used in functional skeletal and neural tissue engineering applications.

  2. The use of a co-design model in improving timely bleed reporting by adults with haemophilia living in the Auckland region of New Zealand.

    PubMed

    d'Young, A I; Young, L; Ockelford, P A; Brasser, M; Slavin, K; Manson, L; Preston, S

    2014-05-01

    Many adult patients diagnosed with phenotypically moderate and severe haemophilia living in the Auckland region of New Zealand do not report bleeding episodes within a timeframe that allows for optimal assessment and management. This can result in poor clinical outcomes for patients and poor oversight of the use of expensive clotting factor concentrates. Our goal was to improve both the number and speed at which bleeding episodes were reported to our centre, improving access to care and clinical oversight of the use of expensive factor concentrates and aiding the development of a care partnership with patients. We worked with 70 adult PWH living in the Auckland region of New Zealand with moderate and severe haemophilia A and B. Over a 5-month period between March and July 2013 we used a co-design model to develop and implement a range of strategies to improve the timing and frequency of bleed reporting. Mean bleed reporting time was reduced threefold, with a threefold increase in the number of bleeds reported per month. We reduced the number of bleeding episodes reported outside of a prespecified 48-h time limit by 68%. We significantly improved bleed reporting and time to report, indicating improved access to our services, improved clinical oversight and improved accountability to our national funder. We have achieved a care partnership and a reduction in factor consumption for the study population without compromising the quality of care they receive.

  3. The use of a co-design model in improving timely bleed reporting by adults with haemophilia living in the Auckland region of New Zealand.

    PubMed

    d'Young, A I; Young, L; Ockelford, P A; Brasser, M; Slavin, K; Manson, L; Preston, S

    2014-05-01

    Many adult patients diagnosed with phenotypically moderate and severe haemophilia living in the Auckland region of New Zealand do not report bleeding episodes within a timeframe that allows for optimal assessment and management. This can result in poor clinical outcomes for patients and poor oversight of the use of expensive clotting factor concentrates. Our goal was to improve both the number and speed at which bleeding episodes were reported to our centre, improving access to care and clinical oversight of the use of expensive factor concentrates and aiding the development of a care partnership with patients. We worked with 70 adult PWH living in the Auckland region of New Zealand with moderate and severe haemophilia A and B. Over a 5-month period between March and July 2013 we used a co-design model to develop and implement a range of strategies to improve the timing and frequency of bleed reporting. Mean bleed reporting time was reduced threefold, with a threefold increase in the number of bleeds reported per month. We reduced the number of bleeding episodes reported outside of a prespecified 48-h time limit by 68%. We significantly improved bleed reporting and time to report, indicating improved access to our services, improved clinical oversight and improved accountability to our national funder. We have achieved a care partnership and a reduction in factor consumption for the study population without compromising the quality of care they receive. PMID:24286288

  4. Expression profiling of synaptic microRNAs from the adult rat brain identifies regional differences and seizure-induced dynamic modulation

    PubMed Central

    Pichardo-Casas, Israel; Goff, Loyal A; Swerdel, Mavis R; Athie, Alejandro; Davila, Jonathan; Ramos-Brossier, Mariana; Lapid-Volosin, Martha; Friedman, Wilma J; Hart, Ronald P; Vaca, Luis

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, microRNAs or miRNAs have been proposed to target neuronal mRNAs localized near the synapse, exerting a pivotal role in modulating local protein synthesis, and presumably affecting adaptive mechanisms such as synaptic plasticity. In the present study we have characterized the distribution of miRNAs in five regions of the adult mammalian brain and compared the relative abundance between total fractions and purified synaptoneurosomes (SN), using three different methodologies. The results show selective enrichment or depletion of some miRNAs when comparing total versus SN fractions. These miRNAs were different for each brain region explored. Changes in distribution could not be attributed to simple diffusion or to a targeting sequence inside the miRNAs. In silico analysis suggest that the differences in distribution may be related to the preferential concentration of synaptically localized mRNA targeted by the miRNAs. These results favor a model of co-transport of the miRNA-mRNA complex to the synapse, although further studies are required to validate this hypothesis. Using an in vivo model for increasing excitatory activity in the cortex and the hippocampus indicates that the distribution of some miRNAs can be modulated by enhanced neuronal (epileptogenic) activity. All these results demonstrate the dynamic modulation in the local distribution of miRNAs from the adult brain, which may play key roles in controlling localized protein synthesis at the synapse. PMID:22197703

  5. Global, regional and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults 1980-2013: A systematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Marie; Fleming, Tom; Robinson, Margaret; Thomson, Blake; Graetz, Nicholas; Margono, Christopher; Mullany, Erin C; Biryukov, Stan; Abbafati, Cristiana; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Abraham, Jerry P; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen ME; Achoki, Tom; AlBuhairan, Fadia S; Alemu, Zewdie A; Alfonso, Rafael; Ali, Mohammed K; Ali, Raghib; Guzman, Nelson Alvis; Ammar, Walid; Anwari, Palwasha; Banerjee, Amitava; Barquera, Simon; Basu, Sanjay; Bennett, Derrick A; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Blore, Jed; Cabral, Norberto; Nonato, Ismael Campos; Chang, Jung-Chen; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Courville, Karen J; Criqui, Michael H; Cundiff, David K; Dabhadkar, Kaustubh C; Dandona, Lalit; Davis, Adrian; Dayama, Anand; Dharmaratne, Samath D; Ding, Eric L; Durrani, Adnan M; Esteghamati, Alireza; Farzadfar, Farshad; Fay, Derek FJ; Feigin, Valery L; Flaxman, Abraham; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H; Goto, Atsushi; Green, Mark A; Gupta, Rajeev; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Hankey, Graeme J; Harewood, Heather C; Havmoeller, Rasmus; Hay, Simon; Hernandez, Lucia; Husseini, Abdullatif; Idrisov, Bulat T; Ikeda, Nayu; Islami, Farhad; Jahangir, Eiman; Jassal, Simerjot K; Jee, Sun Ha; Jeffreys, Mona; Jonas, Jost B; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Khalifa, Shams Eldin Ali Hassan; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Khader, Yousef Saleh; Khang, Young-Ho; Kim, Daniel; Kimokoti, Ruth W; Kinge, Jonas M; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Kosen, Soewarta; Kwan, Gene; Lai, Taavi; Leinsalu, Mall; Li, Yichong; Liang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Shiwei; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Lotufo, Paulo A; Lu, Yuan; Ma, Jixiang; Mainoo, Nana Kwaku; Mensah, George A; Merriman, Tony R; Mokdad, Ali H; Moschandreas, Joanna; Naghavi, Mohsen; Naheed, Aliya; Nand, Devina; Narayan, KM Venkat; Nelson, Erica Leigh; Neuhouser, Marian L; Nisar, Muhammad Imran; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Oti, Samuel O; Pedroza, Andrea; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Roy, Nobhojit; Sampson, Uchechukwu; Seo, Hyeyoung; Sepanlou, Sadaf G; Shibuya, Kenji; Shiri, Rahman; Shiue, Ivy; Singh, Gitanjali M; Singh, Jasvinder A; Skirbekk, Vegard; Stapelberg, Nicolas JC; Sturua, Lela; Sykes, Bryan L; Tobias, Martin; Tran, Bach X; Trasande, Leonardo; Toyoshima, Hideaki; van de Vijver, Steven; Vasankari, Tommi J; Veerman, J Lennert; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo; Vlassov, Vasiliy Victorovich; Vollset, Stein Emil; Vos, Theo; Wang, Claire; Wang, Sharon XiaoRong; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Werdecker, Andrea; Wright, Jonathan L; Yang, Y Claire; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Yoon, Jihyun; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Zhao, Yong; Zhou, Maigeng; Zhu, Shankuan; Lopez, Alan D; Murray, Christopher JL

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2010, overweight and obesity were estimated to cause 3.4 million deaths, 3.9% of years of life lost, and 3.8% of DALYs globally. The rise in obesity has led to widespread calls for regular monitoring of changes in overweight and obesity prevalence in all populations. Comparative, up-to-date information on levels and trends is essential both to quantify population health effects and to prompt decision-makers to prioritize action. Methods We systematically identified surveys, reports, and published studies (n = 1,769) that included information on height and weight, both through physical measurements and self-reports. Mixed effects linear regression was used to correct for the bias in self-reports. Age-sex-country-year observations (n = 19,244) on prevalence of obesity and overweight were synthesized using a spatio-temporal Gaussian Process Regression model to estimate prevalence with 95% uncertainty intervals. Findings Globally, the proportion of adults with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or greater increased from 28.8% (95% UI: 28.4-29.3) in 1980 to 36.9% (36.3-37.4) in 2013 for men and from 29.8% (29.3-30.2) to 38.0% (37.5-38.5) for women. Increases were observed in both developed and developing countries. There have been substantial increases in prevalence among children and adolescents in developed countries, with 23.8% (22.9-24.7) of boys and 22.6% (21.7-23.6) of girls being either overweight or obese in 2013. The prevalence of overweight and obesity is also rising among children and adolescents in developing countries as well, rising from 8.1% (7.7-8.6) to 12.9% (12.3-13.5) in 2013 for boys and from 8.4% (8.1-8.8) to 13.4% (13.0-13.9) in girls. Among adults, estimated prevalence of obesity exceeds 50% among men in Tonga and women in Kuwait, Kiribati, Federated States of Micronesia, Libya, Qatar, Tonga, and Samoa. Since 2006, the increase in adult obesity in developed countries has stabilized. Interpretation Because of the established health risks

  6. Fine mapping of juvenile primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) on 1q21-q31 and exculsion of adult-POAG from the respective region

    SciTech Connect

    Child, A.; Sarfarazi, M.; Crick, R.P.

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile POAG is an autosomal dominant eye disorder which has recently been mapped to 1q21-q24, in a region of 14-23 cM. We report here linkage analysis of 9 microsatellite repeat markers spanning this region in families from England, Scotland and Sardinia. We have observed no recombinants with D1S433 (Z=2.86) and obtained looser linkage with D1S196 ({theta}=0.03; Z=6.38), D1S431 ({theta}=0.14; Z=2.74), D1S210 ({theta}=0.06; Z=1.32), D1S452 ({theta}=0.18; Z=0.729) and D1S242 ({theta}=0.08; Z=2.29). In one family, a critical recombinant in an affected individual localizes the J-POAG locus between D1S452 and D1S242 in a 3 cM region. However, other recombinants in two normal individuals from different families suggests that J-POAG may be localized in a 1 cM distance between D1S433 and D1S431. These unaffected individuals have well passed the age-of-onset in their respective pedigrees. This result suggests that either these two recombinant individuals are gene carriers (i.e., non-penetrants) or there are more than one gene in this region causing the same disease. The possibility of the latter is less likely, since in addition to a total of 4 non-penetrant individuals in our panel, other such cases have also been reported previously. This in turn suggests that the precentage of non-penetrant cases in J-POAG may be considerably higher than it was previously appreciated. Study of 14 families with adult-onset POAG revealed no segregation with the above-mentioned linked microsatellite markers. Our findings confirm, for the first time, that adult-POAG is genetically distinct from the J-POAG. Genetic linkage study of adult families with additional STRPs is currently in progress.

  7. Flow of glucose carbon into cholesterol and phospholipids in various regions of the adult rat brain: enhanced incorporation into hypothalamic phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Barkai, A.I.

    1981-01-01

    The contribution of glucose carbon to the biosynthesis of cholesterol and phospholipids in distinct brain regions was studied quantitatively in the adult male rat. Rates of flow of glucose carbon into the lipids in vivo were calculated from two measurements: the curve representing the decrease in plasma /sup 14/C-glucose with time and the specific activity of the cerebral lipid 180 minutes after a rapid intravenous injection of a tracer dose of D-U /sup 14/C-glucose. The following brain regions were studied: cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, medulla, and corpus callosum and cerebellum. The values for carbon flow into phospholipids were significantly higher in the hypothalamus than in the whole brain, whereas small, but insignificant, regional differences were found for carbon flow into cholesterol. The conversion of U-/sup 14/C-glucose to individual phospholipids of both hypothalamus and cerebral cortex was further investigated in vitro in order to establish whether the higher rate of carbon flow into hypothalamic phospholipids resulted from enhanced synthesis of a particular phospholipid. In agreement with the results obtained in vivo, the rate of incorporation of /sup 14/C into total phospholipids was 60% higher in hypothalamic tissue. The results indicate that the higher rate of carbon flow into hypothalamic phospholipids might be attributed to enhanced incorporation of glucose carbon to phosphatidyl-choline and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine following a faster conversion of glucose to glycerol in this brain region.

  8. Genetic Evaluation of E. coli Strains Isolated from Asymptomatic Children with Neurogenic Bladders

    PubMed Central

    Kryger, John; Burleigh, Alexandra; Christensen, Melissa; Hopkins, Walter

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to describe the genetic profiles of E. coli that colonize asymptomatic pediatric neurogenic bladders. E. coli was isolated from 25 of 80 urine samples. Patients were excluded if they presented with symptomatic urinary tract infection or received treatment with antibiotics in the preceding three months. Multiplex PCR was performed to determine E. coli phylotype (A, B1, B2, and D) and the presence of seven pathogenicity islands (PAIs) and 10 virulence factors (VFs). E. coli strains were predominantly of the B1 and B2 phylotype, with few strains in the A or D phylotype. The PAIs IV536, ICFT073, and IICFT073 had the highest prevalence: 76%, 64%, and 48%, respectively. The PAIs II536, IJ96, and IIJ96 were less prevalent: 28%, 20%, and 24%, respectively. The most prevalent VF was vat (40%), while the least prevalent VFs were sfa (8%) and iha (12%). None of the strains carried the VF fyuA, which is very common in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). The genetic profiles of E. coli in this cohort seem to be more similar to UPEC than to commensal E. coli. However, they appear to have reduced virulence potential that allows them to colonize asymptomatically. PMID:26609542

  9. [Sporadic case of non-progressive neurogenic muscular atrophy localized in both calf muscles].

    PubMed

    Hara, Kenju; Tateyama, Maki; Suzuki, Naoki; Shibano, Ken; Tanaka, Keiko; Ishiguro, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of difficulty in standing on her toes. Neurological examination showed muscle weakness in both calf muscles. Her serum creatine kinase (CK) level was slightly elevated. MRI revealed hyper-intense signals localized in both the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Histological examinations of biopsied muscle specimens showed a marked variation in fiber size, small angular fibers, and hypertrophic and splitting fibers, but no muscle fiber necrosis or regeneration or inflammatory cell infiltration. ATPase stained sections showed small grouped atrophy of type 1 fibers. NADH-TR stained sections showed target/targetoid fibers predominantly in type 1 fibers. Dysferlin immunoreactivity was normal. Follow-up clinical evaluation for one year showed no progression. This patient was diagnosed as having an unknown type of spinal muscular atrophy or benign calf amyotrophy. Sporadic cases characterized by elderly-onset, neurogenic muscular atrophy localized in both calf muscles, and non-progressive course are extremely rare in Japan.

  10. Diazoxide enhances excitotoxicity-induced neurogenesis and attenuates neurodegeneration in the rat non-neurogenic hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moreno, M; Batlle, M; Ortega, F J; Gimeno-Bayón, J; Andrade, C; Mahy, N; Rodríguez, M J

    2016-10-01

    Diazoxide, a well-known mitochondrial KATP channel opener with neuroprotective effects, has been proposed for the effective and safe treatment of neuroinflammation. To test whether diazoxide affects the neurogenesis associated with excitotoxicity in brain injury, we induced lesions by injecting excitotoxic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) into the rat hippocampus and analyzed the effects of a daily oral administration of diazoxide on the induced lesion. Specific glial and neuronal staining showed that NMDA elicited a strong glial reaction associated with progressive neuronal loss in the whole hippocampal formation. Doublecortin immunohistochemistry and bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-NeuN double immunohistochemistry revealed that NMDA also induced cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the lesioned non-neurogenic hippocampus. Furthermore, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells in the injured hippocampus expressed transcription factor Sp8 indicating that the excitotoxic lesion elicited the migration of progenitors from the subventricular zone and/or the reprograming of reactive astrocytes. Diazoxide treatment attenuated the NMDA-induced hippocampal injury in rats, as demonstrated by decreases in the size of the lesion, neuronal loss and microglial reaction. Diazoxide also increased the number of BrdU/NeuN double-stained cells and elevated the number of Sp8-positive cells in the lesioned hippocampus. These results indicate a role for KATP channel activation in regulating excitotoxicity-induced neurogenesis in brain injury.

  11. Bladder wall thickness in the assessment of neurogenic bladder: a translational discussion of current clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Renea M.

    2016-01-01

    The prospective trial by Kim et al. “Can Bladder Wall Thickness Predict Videourodynamic Findings in Children with Spina Bifida?” published in Journal of Urology investigated the measurement of bladder wall thickness (BWT) as a non-invasive assessment tool for lower urinary tract changes in neurogenic bladder (NGB). In this study, no significant association was observed between BWT and high-risk urodynamic parameters. This editorial discusses the basic science of bladder wall thickening as well as prior studies relating wall thickness to clinical parameters. Although Kim et al. provide a unique literature contribution in terms of assessment of BWT at defined percent cystometric capacity, specific aspects of study methodology and population may have contributed to a lack of correlation with high-risk urodynamic findings. The application of non-invasive modalities to lower urinary tract assessment of NGB remains a promising and relevant area of future research to prevent progression to end stage lower urinary tract changes for all individuals with spina bifida. PMID:26889485

  12. Optimal bladder diary duration for patients with suprapontine neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinidis, Charalampos; Kratiras, Zisis; Samarinas, Michael; Skriapas, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To identify the minimum bladder diary's length required to furnish reliable documentation of LUTS in a specific cohort of patients suffering from neurogenic urinary dysfunction secondary to suprapontine pathology. Materials and Methods: From January 2008 to January 2014, patients suffering from suprapontine pathology and LUTS were requested to prospectively complete a bladder diary form for 7 consecutive days. Micturitions per day, excreta per micturition, urgency and incontinence episodes and voided volume per day were evaluated from the completed diaries. We compared the averaged records of consecutive days (2-6 days) to the total 7 days records for each patient's diary, seeking the minimum diary's length that could provide records comparable to the 7 days average, the reference point in terms of reliability. Results: From 285 subjects, 94 male and 69 female patients enrolled in the study. The records of day 1 were significantly different from the average of the 7 days records in every parameter, showing relatively small correlation and providing insufficient documentation. Correlations gradually increased along the increase in diary's duration. According to our results a 3-day duration bladder diary is efficient and can provide results comparable to a 7 day length for four of our evaluated parameters. Regarding incontinence episodes, 3 days seems inadequate to furnish comparable results, showing a borderline difference. Conclusions: A 3-day diary can be used, as its reliability is efficient regarding number of micturition per day, excreta per micturition, episodes of urgency and voided volume per day. PMID:27564288

  13. Blunt cavernous nerve injury: A new animal model mimicking postradical prostatectomy neurogenic impotence.

    PubMed

    Karakiewicz, P I; Bazinet, M; Zvara, P; Begin, L R; Brock, G B

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to develop an animal model of cavernous nerve injury similar to that encountered among patients having undergone a successful nerve sparing radical prostatectomy and to compare patterns of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase staining to quality of erections using the newly developed model. We studied 50 mature Sprague Dawley rats, which were divided into five equal groups. Animals were either observed (sham), underwent an exploratory laparotomy, underwent moderate or severe percussive injury to both cavernous nerves, or underwent ablation of both cavernous nerves. Between 28 and 30 days later, all animals underwent electrostimulation and simultaneous recording of intracavernosal pressure. After sacrifice, penes were harvested and penile tissue NADPH-diaphorase staining pattern was assessed. Severity of cavernous nerve percussive injury and NADPH-diaphorase staining patterns correlated with the quality of recorded erections. This model is a useful experimental tool for research in the field of erectile dysfunction such as is encountered following a successful nerve sparing radical prostatectomy. Penile biopsy assessing NADPH-diaphorase staining may potentially prove to be a useful minimally-invasive diagnostic modality quantifying neurogenic erectile function among patients following radical prostatectomy. PMID:21224162

  14. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  15. Do We Need Surveillance Urethro-Cystoscopy in Patients with Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Knüpfer, Stephanie C.; Mehnert, Ulrich; Bode-Lesniewska, Beata; Kessler, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the value of surveillance urethro-cystoscopy in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) in regard to the conflicting literature as it is generally agreed that patients with NLUTD are at increased risk for bladder cancer. Materials and Methods In a cross-sectional study, a consecutive series of 129 patients (50 females, 79 males, mean age 51, range 18–88) suffering from NLUTD for at least 5 years was prospectively investigated using urethro-cystoscopy and bladder washing cytology at a single university spinal cord injury (SCI) center. Results Due to suspicious urethro-cystoscopy and/or bladder washing cytology findings, 13 (10%) of 129 patients underwent transurethral resection of the bladder lesion and/or random bladder biopsies. Overall, 9 relevant histological findings were found in 5% (7/129) of our patients: bladder melanosis (n = 1), nephrogenic adenoma (n = 3), keratinizing squamous metaplasia (n = 1), intestinal metaplasia (n = 3), and muscle-invasive adenocarcinoma of the bladder (n = 1). Conclusions Using surveillance urethro-cystoscopy, we found relevant histological findings in 5% of our patients suffering from NLUTD for at least 5 years. Thus, surveillance urethro-cystoscopy might be warranted, although the ideal starting point and frequency remain to be determined in further prospective studies. PMID:26513149

  16. A step-wise approach to sperm retrieval in men with neurogenic anejaculation.

    PubMed

    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Normal fertility is dependent on intravaginal delivery of semen through ejaculation. This process is highly dependent on an intact ejaculatory reflex arc, which can be disrupted through any type of trauma or disease causing damage to the CNS and/or peripheral nerves. Neurogenic anejaculation is most commonly associated with spinal cord injury. This aetiology is especially relevant because most men with spinal cord injuries are injured at reproductive age. Assisted ejaculation in the form of penile vibratory stimulation is the first choice for sperm retrieval in such patients because it is noninvasive and inexpensive. In patients in whom vibratory stimulation fails, electroejaculation is almost always successful. When both methods of assisted ejaculation are unsuccessful, sperm retrieval by aspiration from either the vas deferens or the epididymis, or by testicular biopsy or surgery are reasonable options. In such cases the most inexpensive and least invasive methods should be considered first. The obtained semen can be used for intravaginal or intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  17. Neurogenic stuttering as a manifestation of stroke and a mask of dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Rao, P R

    1991-01-01

    R. L. was a 52-year-old man who was referred for an SLP consultation to determine the nature of his fluency disorder, whether or not treatment would be beneficial, and finally whether resumption of pre-trauma vocational status was feasible. The patient was involved in a motor vehicle accident with no resulting detectable trauma. However, shortly after the accident, R. L. developed a severe dysfluency that was later described as cortical stuttering. We reviewed the medical and rehabilitation work-up that attempted to determine whether the communication disorder was functional or organic in origin. Once the fluency disorder was determined to be caused by a suspected small, focal, hemispheric lesion, a five-month treatment program was undertaken that used a noval prosthetic approach to restore fluency. Once fluency was restored with the use of an artificial larynx, a residual anomia was detected and treated. The case of R. L. illustrates a stuttering that appeared to be caused by a combined neurogenic dyspraxic (vocal control), dysarthric (motor control), and dysnomic (word-finding) dysfluency. The literature on this issue was reviewed and the underlying mechanism of recovery was discussed.

  18. A clinically authentic mouse model of enterovirus 71 (EV-A71)-induced neurogenic pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Chua, Beng Hooi; Alonso, Sylvie; Chow, Vincent T K; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) is a neurotropic virus that sporadically causes fatal neurologic illness among infected children. Animal models of EV-A71 infection exist, but they do not recapitulate in animals the spectrum of disease and pathology observed in fatal human cases. Specifically, neurogenic pulmonary oedema (NPE)-the main cause of EV-A71 infection-related mortality-is not observed in any of these models. This limits their utility in understanding viral pathogenesis of neurologic infections. We report the development of a mouse model of EV-A71 infection displaying NPE in severely affected animals. We inoculated one-week-old BALB/c mice with an adapted EV-A71 strain and identified clinical signs consistent with observations in human cases and other animal models. We also observed respiratory distress in some mice. At necropsy, we found their lungs to be heavier and incompletely collapsed compared to other mice. Serum levels of catecholamines and histopathology of lung and brain tissues of these mice strongly indicated onset of NPE. The localization of virally-induced brain lesions also suggested a potential pathogenic mechanism for EV-A71-induced NPE. This novel mouse model of virally-induced NPE represents a valuable resource for studying viral mechanisms of neuro-pathogenesis and pre-clinical testing of potential therapeutics and prophylactics against EV-A71-related neurologic complications. PMID:27357918

  19. Videothoracoscopy in the treatment of benign neurogenic tumours of the posterior mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Brzeziński, Daniel; Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The indications for videothoracoscopy are very broad and include the treatment of mediastinal tumours. Aim To present our experience of using the minimally invasive technique in treating benign neurogenic tumours. Material and methods Twenty-two patients were treated due to tumours of the posterior mediastinum from 2003 to 2012. The size of the tumours ranged from 2 cm to 25 cm. Tumours up to the size of 6 cm were treated using videothoracoscopy (VT), bigger ones through thoracotomy. Results The videothoracoscopy technique was used in 17 patients, thoracotomy in 5. In 2 cases conversion was required due to adhesions in the pleural cavity preventing VT treatment. Complications related to the procedure were not observed. The average time of hospital stay after VT treatment was 4 days, while after thoracotomy it was 6 days. Histologically, tumours of benign nature were found in all cases. Schwannoma was diagnosed in 15 patients, ganglioneuroma in 3 patients, neurofibroma in 3 patients, and chemodectoma in 1 patient. None of the 3 cases of neurofibroma was associated with Recklinghausen's disease. At a mean follow-up of 60 months no recurrence of the tumour was found. Conclusions In the case of tumours up to 6 cm the best surgical technique is videothoracoscopy. In the case of large tumours the best access is the open technique. The minimally invasive technique allows one to shorten the patient's treatment time, reduce postoperative pain and obtain a good cosmetic effect of the treatment. PMID:25337152

  20. A step-wise approach to sperm retrieval in men with neurogenic anejaculation.

    PubMed

    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Normal fertility is dependent on intravaginal delivery of semen through ejaculation. This process is highly dependent on an intact ejaculatory reflex arc, which can be disrupted through any type of trauma or disease causing damage to the CNS and/or peripheral nerves. Neurogenic anejaculation is most commonly associated with spinal cord injury. This aetiology is especially relevant because most men with spinal cord injuries are injured at reproductive age. Assisted ejaculation in the form of penile vibratory stimulation is the first choice for sperm retrieval in such patients because it is noninvasive and inexpensive. In patients in whom vibratory stimulation fails, electroejaculation is almost always successful. When both methods of assisted ejaculation are unsuccessful, sperm retrieval by aspiration from either the vas deferens or the epididymis, or by testicular biopsy or surgery are reasonable options. In such cases the most inexpensive and least invasive methods should be considered first. The obtained semen can be used for intravaginal or intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection. PMID:26481575

  1. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment. PMID:24445575

  2. A Patient With Focal Dystonia That Occurred Secondary to a Peripheral Neurogenic Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minho; Lee, Jong Ha; Yun, Dong Hwan; Chon, Jinmann; Han, Yoo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions. Patients with dystonia may experience uncontrollable twisting, repetitive movements, or abnormal posture. A 55-year-old man presented with an involuntary left forearm supination, which he had experienced for five years. There was no history of antecedent trauma to the wrist or elbow. Although conventional therapeutic modalities had been performed, the symptoms persisted. When he visited our hospital, electromyography was performed. Reduced conduction velocity was evident at the elbow-axilla segment of the left median nerve. We suspected that there was a problem on the median nerve between the elbow and the axilla. For this reason, we performed an ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging study. A spindle-shaped soft tissue mass was observed at the left median nerve that suggested the possibility of neurofibroma. Dystonia caused by traumatic or compressive peripheral nerve injury has often been reported, but focal dystonia due to a neurogenic tumor is extremely rare. Here, we report our case with a review of the literature. PMID:26361606

  3. The enigma of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome following motor vehicle collisions

    PubMed Central

    Munro, A. Ian; McPherson, G. Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Background The concept of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (N-TOS) including upper and lower plexus syndromes secondary to soft tissue neck injury after motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) has been contentious. We considered that analysis of objective data from this group of patients could provide insight into this controversial type of N-TOS. Methods During the 10-year period January 2001 through December 2010 we examined patients who had received a diagnosis of N-TOS following an MVC. We graded the principal diagnosis based on the objective data from our physical examination. Results In total 263 patients received a diagnosis of N-TOS during the study period. At the highest accuracy level of diagnosis there were 56 patients with ulnar entrapment syndrome (UES), 40 with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and 55 with nonorganic disease (NOD), for a total of 151 (57.4%) cases in which the diagnosis of N-TOS was brought into question. The elevated arm stress test (EAST) reproduced the symptoms of UES in 33 of the 56 patients of UES (58.9%) and reproduced the symptoms of CTS in 18 of the 40 patients with CTS (45.0%). Conclusion There appears to be a high incidence of misdiagnosis of N-TOS following MVCs. The EAST is not a prime test for N-TOS. PMID:27454840

  4. A clinically authentic mouse model of enterovirus 71 (EV-A71)-induced neurogenic pulmonary oedema

    PubMed Central

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Chua, Beng Hooi; Alonso, Sylvie; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) is a neurotropic virus that sporadically causes fatal neurologic illness among infected children. Animal models of EV-A71 infection exist, but they do not recapitulate in animals the spectrum of disease and pathology observed in fatal human cases. Specifically, neurogenic pulmonary oedema (NPE)—the main cause of EV-A71 infection-related mortality—is not observed in any of these models. This limits their utility in understanding viral pathogenesis of neurologic infections. We report the development of a mouse model of EV-A71 infection displaying NPE in severely affected animals. We inoculated one-week-old BALB/c mice with an adapted EV-A71 strain and identified clinical signs consistent with observations in human cases and other animal models. We also observed respiratory distress in some mice. At necropsy, we found their lungs to be heavier and incompletely collapsed compared to other mice. Serum levels of catecholamines and histopathology of lung and brain tissues of these mice strongly indicated onset of NPE. The localization of virally-induced brain lesions also suggested a potential pathogenic mechanism for EV-A71-induced NPE. This novel mouse model of virally-induced NPE represents a valuable resource for studying viral mechanisms of neuro-pathogenesis and pre-clinical testing of potential therapeutics and prophylactics against EV-A71-related neurologic complications. PMID:27357918

  5. Estrogen treatment enhances neurogenic differentiation of human adipose derived stem cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Razavi, Mohamad Reza; Ahmadi, Nafiseh; Kazemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Estrogen is a sexual hormone that has prominent effects on reproductive and non-reproductive tissues. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of estrogen on the proliferation and neural differentiation of human adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) during neurogenic differentiation. Materials and Methods: Isolated human ADSCs were trans-differentiated in neural induction medium containing neurobasal medium, N2 and B27 with or without 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment. Proliferation rate and neural differentiation of human ADSCs were assessed using MTT assay, immunostaining and real time RT- PCR analysis, respectively. Results: Analysis of data show that estradiol treatment can significantly increase proliferation rate of differentiated cells (P<0.05). Immunocytochemical and real time RT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression of precursor and mature neuronal markers (nestin and MAP2) was significantly higher in the E2 treated cell cultures when compared to the untreated cell cultures (P<0.05). Conclusion: According to our findings, estrogen can promote proliferation and neuronal differentiation of human ADSCs. PMID:26557969

  6. Serum Glycine Is Associated with Regional Body Fat and Insulin Resistance in Functionally-Limited Older Adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic profiling may provide insight into biologic mechanisms related to age-related increases in regional adiposity and insulin resistance. The objectives of the current study were to characterize the association between mid-thigh intermuscular and subcutaneous adipose tissue (IMAT, SCAT, respec...

  7. Measuring the effects of aging and sex on regional brain stiffness with MR elastography in healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Arani, Arvin; Murphy, Matthew C; Glaser, Kevin J; Manduca, Armando; Lake, David S; Kruse, Scott; Jack, Clifford R; Ehman, Richard; Huston, John

    2015-01-01

    Changes in tissue composition and cellular architecture have been associated with neurological disease, and these in turn can affect biomechanical properties. Natural biological factors such as aging and an individual’s sex also affect underlying tissue biomechanics in different brain regions. Understanding the normal changes is necessary before determining the efficacy of stiffness imaging for neurological disease diagnosis and therapy monitoring. The objective of this study was to evaluate global and regional changes in brain stiffness as a function of age and sex, using improved MRE acquisition and processing that has been shown to provide median stiffness values that are typically reproducible to within 1% in global measurements and within 2% for regional measurements. Furthermore, this is the first study to report the effects of age and sex over the entire cerebrum volume and over the full frontal, occipital, parietal, temporal, deep gray matter/white matter (insula, deep gray nuclei and white matter tracts), and cerebellum volumes. In 45 volunteers, we observed a significant linear correlation between age and brain stiffness in the cerebrum (P<.0001), frontal lobes (P<.0001), occipital lobes (P=.0005), parietal lobes (P=.0002), and the temporal lobes (P<.0001) of the brain. No significant linear correlation between brain stiffness and age was observed in the cerebellum (P=.74), and the sensory-motor regions (P=.32) of the brain, and a weak linear trend was observed in the deep gray matter/white matter (P=.075). A multiple linear regression model predicted an annual decline of 0.011±0.002 kPa in cerebrum stiffness with a theoretical median age value (76 years old) of 2.56±0.08 kPa. Sexual dimorphism was observed in the temporal (P=.03) and occipital (P=.001) lobes of the brain, but no significant difference was observed in any of the other brain regions (P>.20 for all other regions). The model predicted female occipital and temporal lobes to be 0.23 k

  8. Measuring the effects of aging and sex on regional brain stiffness with MR elastography in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Arani, Arvin; Murphy, Matthew C; Glaser, Kevin J; Manduca, Armando; Lake, David S; Kruse, Scott A; Jack, Clifford R; Ehman, Richard L; Huston, John

    2015-05-01

    Changes in tissue composition and cellular architecture have been associated with neurological disease, and these in turn can affect biomechanical properties. Natural biological factors such as aging and an individual's sex also affect underlying tissue biomechanics in different brain regions. Understanding the normal changes is necessary before determining the efficacy of stiffness imaging for neurological disease diagnosis and therapy monitoring. The objective of this study was to evaluate global and regional changes in brain stiffness as a function of age and sex, using improved MRE acquisition and processing that have been shown to provide median stiffness values that are typically reproducible to within 1% in global measurements and within 2% for regional measurements. Furthermore, this is the first study to report the effects of age and sex over the entire cerebrum volume and over the full frontal, occipital, parietal, temporal, deep gray matter/white matter (insula, deep gray nuclei and white matter tracts), and cerebellum volumes. In 45 volunteers, we observed a significant linear correlation between age and brain stiffness in the cerebrum (P<.0001), frontal lobes (P<.0001), occipital lobes (P=.0005), parietal lobes (P=.0002), and the temporal lobes (P<.0001) of the brain. No significant linear correlation between brain stiffness and age was observed in the cerebellum (P=.74), and the sensory-motor regions (P=.32) of the brain, and a weak linear trend was observed in the deep gray matter/white matter (P=.075). A multiple linear regression model predicted an annual decline of 0.011 ± 0.002 kPa in cerebrum stiffness with a theoretical median age value (76 years old) of 2.56 ± 0.08 kPa. Sexual dimorphism was observed in the temporal (P=.03) and occipital (P=.001) lobes of the brain, but no significant difference was observed in any of the other brain regions (P>.20 for all other regions). The model predicted female occipital and temporal lobes to be 0.23 k

  9. Alcohol and adult hippocampal neurogenesis: promiscuous drug, wanton effects.

    PubMed

    Geil, Chelsea R; Hayes, Dayna M; McClain, Justin A; Liput, Daniel J; Marshall, S Alex; Chen, Kevin Y; Nixon, Kimberly

    2014-10-01

    Adult neurogenesis is now widely accepted as an important contributor to hippocampal integrity and function but also dysfunction when adult neurogenesis is affected in neuropsychiatric diseases such as alcohol use disorders. Excessive alcohol consumption, the defining characteristic of alcohol use disorders, results in a variety of cognitive and behavioral impairments related wholly or in part to hippocampal structure and function. Recent preclinical work has shown that adult neurogenesis may be one route by which alcohol produces hippocampal neuropathology. Alcohol is a pharmacologically promiscuous drug capable of interfering with adult neurogenesis through multiple mechanisms. This review will discuss the primary mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis including alcohol's effects on neurotransmitters, CREB and its downstream effectors, and the neurogenic niche.

  10. Association between dietary pattern and risk of cardiovascular disease among adults in the Middle East and North Africa region: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Aljefree, Najlaa; Ahmed, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper reviews the evidence related to the association of dietary pattern with coronary heart disease (CHD), strokes, and the associated risk factors among adults in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Methods A systematic review of published articles between January 1990 and March 2015 was conducted using Pro-Quest Public Health, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar. The term ‘dietary pattern’ refers to data derived from dietary pattern analyses and individual food component analyses. Results The search identified 15 studies. The available data in the MENA region showed that Western dietary pattern has been predominant among adults with fewer adherences to the traditional diet, such as the Mediterranean diet. The Western dietary pattern was found to be associated with an increased risk of dyslipidaemia, diabetes, metabolic syndrome (MetS), body mass index (BMI), and hypertension. The Mediterranean diet, labelled in two studies as ‘the traditional Lebanese diet’, was negatively associated with BMI, waist circumference (WC), and the risk of diabetes, while one study found no association between the Mediterranean diet and MetS. Two randomised controlled trials conducted in Iran demonstrated the effect of the dietary approach to stop hypertension (DASH) in reducing metabolic risk among patients with diabetes and MetS. Likewise, the consumption of dairy products was associated with decreased blood pressure and WC, while the intake of whole grains was associated with reduced WC. In addition, the high consumption of black tea was found to be associated with decreased serum lipids. The intake of fish, vegetable oils, and tea had a protective effect on CHD, whereas the intake of full-fat yoghurt and hydrogenated fats was associated with an increased risk of CHD. Conclusion There appears to be a significant association of Western dietary pattern with the increased risk of CHD, strokes, and associated risk factors among adults in the MENA region

  11. Regional Myelin and Axon Damage and Neuroinflammation in the Adult Mouse Brain After Long-Term Postnatal Vanadium Exposure.

    PubMed

    Azeez, Idris A; Olopade, Funmilayo; Laperchia, Claudia; Andrioli, Anna; Scambi, Ilaria; Onwuka, Silas K; Bentivoglio, Marina; Olopade, James O

    2016-09-01

    Environmental exposure to vanadium occurs in areas of persistent burning of fossil fuels; this metal is known to induce oxidative stress and oligodendrocyte damage. Here, we determined whether vanadium exposure (3 mg/kg) in mice during the first 3 postnatal months leads to a sustained neuroinflammatory response. Body weight monitoring, and muscle strength and open field tests showed reduction of body weight gain and locomotor impairment in vanadium-exposed mice. Myelin histochemistry and immunohistochemistry for astrocytes, microglia, and nonphosphorylated neurofilaments revealed striking regional heterogeneity. Myelin damage involved the midline corpus callosum and fibers in cortical gray matter, hippocampus, and diencephalon that were associated with axonal damage. Astrocyte and microglial activation was identified in the same regions and in the internal capsule; however, no overt myelin and axon damage was observed in the latter. Double immunofluorescence revealed induction of high tumor necrosis factor (TNF) immunoreactivity in reactive astrocytes. Western blotting analysis showed significant induction of TNF and interleukin-1β expression. Together these findings show that chronic postnatal vanadium exposure leads to functional deficit and region-dependent myelin damage that does not spare axons. This injury is associated with glial cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine induction, which may reflect both neurotoxic and neuroprotective responses. PMID:27390101

  12. Viral and host factors associated with the HIV-1 viral load setpoint in adults from Mbeya Region, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Saathoff, Elmar; Pritsch, Michael; Geldmacher, Christof; Koehler, Rebecca N.; Maboko, Leonard; Maganga, Lucas; Geis, Steffen; McCutchan, Francine E.; Kijak, Gustavo H.; Kim, Jerome H.; Arroyo, Miguel A.; Gerhardt, Martina; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Robb, Merlin L.; Williamson, Carolyn; Michael, Nelson L.; Hoelscher, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background The viral load setpoint (VLS) is an important predictor of HIV disease progression, but there is a lack of information regarding the VLS and its possible determinants in African populations. Methods Initially HIV negative adults from three distinct groups (female barworkers, females and males from the general population) were followed for up to four years. The VLS was calculated for 108 seroconverters and associations of the VLS with possible risk factors were analyzed using univariate and multivariate regression. Results The median VLS for female barworkers, females and males from the general population were 69,850, 28,600 and 158,000 RNA copies/ml respectively. Significant associations with an elevated viral load were observed for male gender (Risk Ratio (RR)=1.83, 95% confidence interval (95%CI)=1.14–2.93), the expression of harmful HLA I alleles (RR=1.73, 95%CI=1.13–2.66) and multiple infection with different HIV-1 subtypes (RR=1.65, 95%CI =1.03–2.66). Barworkers were considerably more often infected with different HIV-1 subtypes than participants from the general population. Conclusions Our study confirms that gender and the expression of different HLA class I alleles are important determinants of the viremia at VLS and it also corroborates an earlier finding that multiple infection with different HIV-1 subtypes is associated with a higher VLS. PMID:20632457

  13. Isolation of Radial Glia-Like Neural Stem Cells from Fetal and Adult Mouse Forebrain via Selective Adhesion to a Novel Adhesive Peptide-Conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Markó, Károly; Kőhidi, Tímea; Hádinger, Nóra; Jelitai, Márta; Mező, Gábor; Madarász, Emília

    2011-01-01

    Preferential adhesion of neural stem cells to surfaces covered with a novel synthetic adhesive polypeptide (AK-cyclo[RGDfC]) provided a unique, rapid procedure for isolating radial glia-like cells from both fetal and adult rodent brain. Radial glia-like (RGl) neural stem/progenitor cells grew readily on the peptide-covered surfaces under serum-free culture conditions in the presence of EGF as the only growth factor supplement. Proliferating cells derived either from fetal (E 14.5) forebrain or from different regions of the adult brain maintained several radial glia-specific features including nestin, RC2 immunoreactivity and Pax6, Sox2, Blbp, Glast gene expression. Proliferating RGl cells were obtained also from non-neurogenic zones including the parenchyma of the adult cerebral cortex and dorsal midbrain. Continuous proliferation allowed isolating one-cell derived clones of radial glia-like cells. All clones generated neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes under appropriate inducing conditions. Electrophysiological characterization indicated that passive conductance with large delayed rectifying potassium current might be a uniform feature of non-induced radial glia-like cells. Upon induction, all clones gave rise to GABAergic neurons. Significant differences were found, however, among the clones in the generation of glutamatergic and cathecolamine-synthesizing neurons and in the production of oligodendrocytes. PMID:22163310

  14. Short-term erythrosine B-induced inhibition of the brain regional serotonergic activity suppresses motor activity (exploratory behavior) of young adult mammals.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Arindam; Poddar, Mrinal K

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies showed that repeated ingestion of erythrosine B (artificial food color) developed behavioral hyperactivity, but nothing is known about its single administration effect as well as the neurochemical (s) involvement. The present study provides evidence that a single higher dosage (10, 100 or 200 mg/kg, p.o.) of erythrosine administration to young adult male rats reduced motor activity (MA) maximally at 2 h and brain regional (medulla-pons, hippocampus and hypothalamus) serotonergic activity (measuring steady-state levels of 5-HT and 5-HIAA, pargyline-induced 5-HT accumulation and 5-HIAA declination rate and 5-HT receptor binding) under similar experimental condition. The degree of erythrosine-induced inhibition of both MA and brain regional serotonergic activity was dosage dependent. Lower dosage (1 mg/kg, p.o.) did not affect either of the above. Erythrosine (100 or 200 mg/kg, p.o.)-induced MA suppression was also observed in the presence of specific MAO-A inhibitor, clorgyline (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or MAO-B inhibitor, deprenyl (5 mg/kg, i.p.); but their co-application (5 mg/kg, i.p., each) effectively prevented the erythrosine-induced motor suppression. Altogether these results suggest that a single higher dosage of erythrosine (10-200 mg/kg, p.o.) may reduce MA by reducing serotonergic activity with modulation of central dopaminergic activity depending on the brain regions.

  15. Effect of Alzheimer's Disease Risk Variant rs3824968 at SORL1 on Regional Gray Matter Volume and Age-Related Interaction in Adult Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chu-Chung; Liu, Mu-En; Kao, Hung-Wen; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Yang, Albert C.; Wang, Ying-Hsiu; Chen, Tong-Ru; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Lin, Ching-Po

    2016-01-01

    Sortilin receptor 1 (SORL1) is involved in cellular trafficking of amyloid precursor protein and plays an essential role in amyloid-beta peptide generation in Alzheimer disease (AD). The major A allele in a SORL1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs3824968, is associated with an increased AD risk. However, the role of SORL1 rs3824968 in the normal ageing process has rarely been examined in relation to brain structural morphology. This study investigated the association between SORL1 rs3824968 and grey matter (GM) volume in a nondemented Chinese population of 318 adults within a wide age range (21–92 years). Through voxel-based morphometry, we found that participants carrying SORL1 allele A exhibited significantly smaller GM volumes in the right posterior cingulate, left middle occipital, medial frontal, and superior temporal gyri. Considerable interaction between age and SORL1 suggested a detrimental and accelerated ageing effect of allele A on putamen. These findings provide evidence that SORL1 rs3824968 modulates regional GM volume and is associated with brain trajectory during the adult lifespan. PMID:26996954

  16. Favorite foods of older adults living in the Black Belt Region of the United States. Influences of ethnicity, gender, and education.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongbin; Buys, David R; Judd, Suzanne E; Gower, Barbara A; Locher, Julie L

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine food preferences of older adults living in the Black Belt Region of the Southeastern United States and the extent to which food preferences vary according to ethnicity, gender, and educational level. 270 older adults who were receiving home health services were interviewed in their home and were queried regarding their favorite foods. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample. Chi-square analysis or one-way analyses of variance was used, where appropriate, in bivariate analyses, and logistic regression models were used in multivariate analyses. A total of 1,857 favorite foods were reported (mean per person=6.88). The top ten favorite foods reported included: (1) chicken (of any kind), (2) collard greens, (3) cornbread, (4) green or string beans, (5) fish (fried catfish is implied), (6) turnip greens, (7) potatoes, (8) apples, (9) tomatoes, fried chicken, and eggs tied, and (10) steak and ice cream tied. African Americans and those with lower levels of education were more likely to report traditional Southern foods among their favorite foods and had a more limited repertoire of favorite foods. Findings have implications for understanding health disparities that may be associated with diet and development of culturally-appropriate nutrition interventions.

  17. Favorite Foods of Older Adults Living in the Black Belt Region of the United States: Influences of Ethnicity, Gender, and Education

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongbin; Buys, David R.; Judd, Suzanne E.; Gower, Barbara A.; Locher, Julie L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine food preferences of older adults living in the Black Belt Region of the Southeastern United States and the extent to which food preferences vary according to ethnicity, gender, and educational level. 270 older adults who were receiving home health services were interviewed in their home and were queried regarding their favorite foods. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample. Chi-square analysis or one-way analyses of variance was used, where appropriate, in bivariate analyses, and logistic regression models were used in multivariate analyses. A total of 1,857 favorite foods were reported (mean per person = 6.88). The top ten favorite foods reported included: 1) chicken (of any kind), 2) collard greens, 3) cornbread, 4) green or string beans, 5) fish (fried catfish is implied), 6) turnip greens, 7) potatoes, 8) apples, 9) tomatoes, fried chicken, and eggs tied, and 10) steak and ice cream tied. African Americans and those with lower levels of education were more likely to report traditional Southern foods among their favorite foods and had a more limited repertoire of favorite foods. Findings have implications for understanding health disparities that may be associated with diet and development of culturally-appropriate nutrition interventions. PMID:23262296

  18. [Do vitamins from foods fortified exceed the allowed limits? Study carried out in population young adolescent and young adult of the metropolitan region of Chile].

    PubMed

    Freixas Sepúlveda, Alejandra; Díaz Narváez, Víctor Patricio; Durán Agüero, Samuel; Gaete Verdugo, María Cristina

    2013-01-01

    In order to analyze the usual consumption of vitamins in an adolescent population and young adult in the Metropolitan Region, were 213 food fortified with vitamins of the Chilean market. A survey of consumption and nutrient intake was calculated. The result added vitamins added to food. The normality of the variables of the intake was assessed and data were subjected to analysis of descriptive statisticians and percentiles are determined. Estimated percentages of subjects whose values exceed those fixed for DDR and UL listed for each vitamin and percentage of excess for each case. Discriminant analysis was performed using the M Box test. The correlation canonical and the Statisticians Wilks were estimated. Finally it was estimated the percentage of correctly classified data. Data were processed by the program SPSS 20.0 with a significance level of α ≤ 0.05. The results indicate that you for all the studied vitamins, the percentage of subjects who more than the DDR is for total folate (96.4%) and the lowest percentage is given for the vitamin E and B12 in young adult women. The percentage of subjects who exceed the UL values is greatest for the vitamin B3 (91.9%). According to the canonical correlation, there are differences in behavior between the groups. It is recommended to monitor the behavior and consumption of food fortified with vitamins, especially of the complex B and A.

  19. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  20. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  1. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis.

  2. Age-related changes in the neurophysiology of language in adults: relationship to regional cortical thinning and white matter microstructure.

    PubMed

    Kemmotsu, Nobuko; Girard, Holly M; Kucukboyaci, N Erkut; McEvoy, Linda K; Hagler, Donald J; Dale, Anders M; Halgren, Eric; McDonald, Carrie R

    2012-08-29

    Although reading skill remains relatively stable with advancing age in humans, neurophysiological measures suggest potential reductions in efficiency of lexical information processing. It is unclear whether these age-related changes are secondary to decreases in regional cortical thickness and/or microstructure of fiber tracts essential to language. Magnetoencephalography, volumetric MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging were performed in 10 young (18-33 years) and 10 middle-aged (42-64 years) human individuals to evaluate the spatiotemporal dynamics and structural correlates of age-related changes in lexical-semantic processing. Increasing age was associated with reduced activity in left temporal lobe regions from 250 to 350 ms and in left inferior prefrontal cortex from 350 to 450 ms (i.e., N400). Hierarchical regression indicated that age no longer predicted left inferior prefrontal activity after cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA) of the uncinate fasciculus (UF) were considered. Interestingly, FA of the UF was a stronger predictor of the N400 response than cortical thickness. Age-related reductions in left-lateralization of language responses were observed between 250 and 350 ms, and were associated with left temporal thinning and frontotemporal FA reductions. N400 reductions were not associated with poorer task performance. Rather, increasing age was associated with reduction in the left prefrontal N400, which in turn was also associated with slower response time. These results reveal that changes in the neurophysiology of language occur by middle age and appear to be partially mediated by structural brain loss. These neurophysiological changes may reflect an adaptive process that ensues as communication between left perisylvian regions declines.

  3. Toluene effects on oxidative stress in brain regions of young-adult, middle-age, and senescent Brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.; Royland, Joyce E.; Richards, Judy E.; Besas, Jonathan; MacPhail, Robert C.

    2011-11-15

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is not well understood. To extend knowledge in this area, we examined effects in rat brain of the volatile organic compound, toluene. The objective was to test whether oxidative stress (OS) plays a role in the adverse effects caused by toluene exposure, and if so, if effects are age-dependent. OS parameters were selected to measure the production of reactive oxygen species (NADPH Quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), NADH Ubiquinone reductase (UBIQ-RD)), antioxidant homeostasis (total antioxidant substances (TAS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS), glutathione transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GRD)), and oxidative damage (total aconitase and protein carbonyls). In this study, Brown Norway rats (4, 12, and 24 months) were dosed orally with toluene (0, 0.65 or 1 g/kg) in corn oil. Four hours later, frontal cortex, cerebellum, striatum, and hippocampus were dissected, quick frozen on dry ice, and stored at - 80 Degree-Sign C until analysis. Some parameters of OS were found to increase with age in select brain regions. Toluene exposure also resulted in increased OS in select brain regions. For example, an increase in NQO1 activity was seen in frontal cortex and cerebellum of 4 and 12 month old rats following toluene exposure, but only in the hippocampus of 24 month old rats. Similarly, age and toluene effects on glutathione enzymes were varied and brain-region specific. Markers of oxidative damage reflected changes in oxidative stress. Total aconitase activity was increased by toluene in frontal cortex and cerebellum at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Protein carbonyls in both brain regions and in all age groups were increased by toluene, but step-down analyses indicated toluene effects were statistically significant only in 12 month old rats. These results indicate changes in OS parameters with age and toluene exposure

  4. Phenotypic analysis of adults of Fasciola hepatica, Fasciola gigantica and intermediate forms from the endemic region of Gilan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, K; Valero, M A; Panova, M; Periago, M V; Massoud, J; Mas-Coma, S

    2006-12-01

    Fascioliasis is an important human and animal disease caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. In Iran, the distribution of these two species overlaps in most areas, including the northern human endemic province of Gilan where both fasciolids are simultaneously found in individual cattle and buffaloes. A phenotypic study of fasciolid adult flukes from naturally infected bovines from Gilan was carried out by means of an exhaustive morphometric analysis using traditional microscopic measurements and an allometric model. The Iranian fasciolids were compared to F. hepatica and F. gigantica standard populations, i.e. from geographical areas where both species do not co-exist (Bolivia and Burkina Faso, respectively). Although morphometric values somewhat overlapped, there were clear differences in allometric growth. The allometric function was adjusted to 25 pairs of variables. Results obtained revealed that Iranian F. hepatica-like specimens are larger than the F. hepatica standard and Iranian F. gigantica-like specimens are longer and narrower than the F. gigantica standard, but with smaller body area. Measurements which permit a specific differentiation in allopatric populations (distance between ventral sucker and posterior end of the body; ratio between body length and body width) overlap in the specimens from Gilan, thus proving the presence of intermediate forms. When compared to the standard populations, the different Iranian fasciolid morphs show greater differences in F. gigantica-like specimens than in F. hepatica-like specimens. This study shows that simple, traditional microscopic measurements may be sufficient for the morphometric characterisation of fasciolids, even in areas where intermediate forms are present. PMID:16901748

  5. Chronic inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis enhances both subventricular zone neurogenesis and olfactory learning in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Romero-Grimaldi, Carmen; Gheusi, Gilles; Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Estrada, Carmen

    2006-11-01

    The ability to generate new neurons during the course of adult life is preserved in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the mammalian brain. These two regions constitute specifically regulated neurogenic niches, and provide newborn neurons involved in olfactory and spatial learning, respectively. Nitric oxide (NO) is a negative regulator of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone, whereas its role in the dentate gyrus remains controversial. Using systemic administration of NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors to chronically inhibit NO production, we increased neural precursor proliferation in the subventricular zone as well as neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb, without modifying the number of mitotic cells or the granular cell layer thickness in the dentate gyrus. The same treatment specifically improved olfactory learning performance, whereas spatial learning and memory was unchanged, thus demonstrating that olfactory memory is closely associated with the level of ongoing neurogenesis in the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb. The anatomical specificity of the NOS inhibitor actions was not due to differences in the availability of NO, as demonstrated by immunohistochemical detection of neuronal NOS and S-nitrosylated proteins in both regions. Remarkably, the distinct NO sensitivity might result from a differential expression of epidermal growth factor receptor in precursor cells in both regions, as the proliferative effect of NOS inhibitors in the subventricular zone was restricted to the cells that expressed this receptor.

  6. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  7. Administration of kisspeptin-54 into discrete regions of the hypothalamus potently increases plasma luteinising hormone and testosterone in male adult rats.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M; Murphy, K G; Thompson, E L; Patel, S; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R

    2006-05-01

    Kisspeptin-54 is the peptide product of the KiSS-1 gene and an endogenous agonist of the GPR54 receptor. KiSS-1 was initially discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene, but recent studies demonstrate that the kisspeptin/GPR54 system is a key regulator of the reproductive system. Disrupted GPR54 signalling causes hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in rodents and man. Intracerebroventricular or peripheral administration of kisspeptin potently stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis via the hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone system. We have investigated the effect of injection of kisspeptin-54 into discrete hypothalamic regions on the HPG axis. To construct a dose-response curve for the effects of intrahypothalamic kisspeptin administration, adult male Wistar rats were cannulated into the medial preoptic area (MPOA) at the level of the organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT). Kisspeptin-54 was injected into the MPOA at doses of 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 pmol. At 60 min following injection of 1, 10 or 100 pmol kisspeptin-54, plasma luteinising hormone (LH) and total testosterone levels were significantly increased. Adult male Wistar rats were then cannulated into the rostral preoptic area at the level of the OVLT (RPOA), the MPOA, the paraventricular (PVN), dorsomedial (DMN) and arcuate hypothalamic nuclei, and the lateral hypothalamic area. A dose of 1 pmol kisspeptin-54 was administered into all areas. The circulating levels of LH and total testosterone were significantly increased 60 min postinjection of kisspeptin-54 into the RPOA, MPOA, PVN and arcuate nucleus. Our results suggest that kisspeptin may mediate its effects on the HPG axis via these regions of the hypothalamus.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide and antioxidizing enzymes involved in modulation of transient facilitatory effects of nicotine on neurogenic contractile responses in rat gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Ozger Ilhan, Sevil; Sarioglu, Yusuf; Vural, Ismail Mert; Dileköz, Ergin; Oztürk, Gökçe Sevim; Ercan, Zeynep Sevim

    2008-06-10

    Nicotine acts as an agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors play a role in the modulation of neurotransmitter release in both the central and the peripheral nervous system. Moderate reactive oxygen species levels modulate the regulation of physiological functions e.g. neurotransmitter release. Previously in rabbit gastric fundus we demonstrated that nicotine transiently increased neurogenic contraction induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS). In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), antioxidizing enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) on nicotine induced increases at cholinergic neurotransmission in rabbit gastric fundus. Although H2O2 did not alter nicotine induced transient neurogenic contractions at concentrations of 10(-6) and 10(-5) M, at high concentration (10(-4) M) H2O2 inhibited nicotine induced increases. Catalase (500 units/ml), enhanced the effect of nicotine but did not alter nicotine induced transient neurogenic contractions at the concentrations of 100 and 250 units/ml. SOD (75,150 and 225 units/ml) did not alter nicotine induced transient neurogenic contractions. In conclusion, at high concentration H2O2 (10(-4) M) inhibited nicotine's transient ability to augment neurogenic contractions and catalase (500 units/ml) enhanced the effect of nicotine. PMID:18455720

  9. Sex-specific effects of prenatal chronic mild stress on adult spatial learning capacity and regional glutamate receptor expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Ma, Yuchao; Hu, Jingmin; Zhang, Xinxin; Cheng, Wenwen; Jiang, Han; Li, Min; Ren, Jintao; Zhang, Xiaosong; Liu, Mengxi; Sun, Anji; Wang, Qi; Li, Xiaobai

    2016-07-01

    Both animal experiments and clinical studies have demonstrated that prenatal stress can cause cognitive disorders in offspring. To explore the scope of these deficits and identify potential underlying mechanisms, we examined the spatial learning and memory performance and glutamate receptor (GluR) expression patterns of adult rats exposed to prenatal chronic mild stress (PCMS). Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to reveal the interrelationships among spatial learning indices and GluR expression changes. Female PCMS-exposed offspring exhibited markedly impaired spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze (MWM) task compared to control females, while PCMS-exposed males showed better initial spatial learning in the MWM compared to control males. PCMS also altered basal and post-MWM glutamate receptor expression patterns, but these effects differed markedly between sexes. Male PCMS-exposed offspring exhibited elevated basal expression of NR1, mGluR5, and mGluR2/3 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), whereas females showed no basal expression changes. Following MWM training, PCMS-exposed males expressed higher NR1 in the PFC and mammillary body (MB), higher mGluR2/3 in PFC, and lower NR2B in the hippocampus (HIP), PFC, and MB compared to unstressed MWM-trained males. Female PCMS-exposed offspring showed strongly reduced NR1 in MB and NR2B in the HIP, PFC, and MB, and increased mGluR2/3 in PFC compared to unstressed MWM-trained females. This is the first report suggesting that NMDA subunits in the MB are involved in spatial learning. Additionally, PCA further suggests that the NR1-NR2B form is the most important for spatial memory formation. These results reveal long-term sex-specific effects of PCMS on spatial learning and memory performance in adulthood and implicate GluR expression changes within HIP, PFC, and MB as possible molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive dysfunction in offspring exposed to prenatal stress.

  10. Staphylococcus saprophyticus native valve endocarditis in a diabetic patient with neurogenic bladder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Kusaba, Koji; Yamakuchi, Hiroki; Hamada, Yohei; Urakami, Toshiharu; Aoki, Yosuke

    2015-09-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with 2-day history of malaise and dyspnea. He had mitral prolapse and type II diabetes mellitus with neurogenic bladder, which was cared for by catheterization on his own. On arrival the patient was in septic condition with hypoxemia, and physical examination revealed systolic murmur at the apex. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed vegetation of the mitral and the aortic valve. The presence of continuous bacteremia was confirmed by multiple sets of blood culture, whereby gram-positive cocci was retrieved and identified as Staphylococcus saprophyticus (S. saprophyticus) both phenotypically and genetically. Because two major criteria of the Modified Duke Criteria were met, the patient was diagnosed with native valve endocarditis due to S. saprophyticus. The urine culture was also positive for gram-positive cocci, phenotypically identified as Staphylococcus warneri, which was subsequently identified as S. saprophyticus with the use of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and MALDI-TOF MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry), indicating strongly that the intermittent catheterization-associated urinary tract infection resulted in bacteremia that eventually lead to infective endocarditis. This patient was treated with vancomycin and clindamycin. Because of multiple cerebral infarctions, the patient underwent mitral and aortic valve replacement on hospital day 5. Blood culture turned negative at 6th hospital day. Antibiotic therapy was continued for six weeks after surgery. The patient's clinical course was uneventful thereafter, and was discharged home. This is the first case report of native valve endocarditis caused by S. saprophyticus of confirmed urinary origin.

  11. Neurogenic Exacerbation of Microglial and Astrocyte Responses to Neisseria meningitidis and Borrelia burgdorferi1

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita S.; Sterka, David G.; Gray, David L.; Bost, Kenneth L.; Marriott, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Although glial cells are recognized for their roles in maintaining neuronal function, there is growing appreciation of the ability of resident CNS cells to initiate and/or augment inflammation following trauma or infection. The tachykinin, substance P (SP), is well known to augment inflammatory responses at peripheral sites and its presence throughout the CNS raises the possibility that this neuropeptide might serve a similar function within the brain. In support of this hypothesis, we have recently demonstrated the expression of high affinity receptors for SP (Neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptors) on microglia and shown that this tachykinin can significantly elevate bacterially induced inflammatory prostanoid production by isolated cultures of these cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that endogenous SP/NK-1R interactions are an essential component in the initiation and/or progression of CNS inflammation in vivo following exposure to two clinically relevant bacterial CNS pathogens, Neisseria meningitidis and Borrelia burgdorferi. We show that in vivo elevations in inflammatory cytokine production and decreases in the production of an immunosuppressive cytokine are markedly attenuated in mice genetically deficient in the expression of the NK-1R or in mice treated with a specific NK-1R antagonist. Furthermore, we have used isolated cultures of microglia and astrocytes to demonstrate that SP can augment inflammatory cytokine production by these resident CNS cell types following exposure to either of these bacterial pathogens. Taken together, these studies indicate a potentially important role for neurogenic exacerbation of resident glial immune responses in CNS inflammatory diseases, such as bacterial meningitis. PMID:18523290

  12. Long-Term Cost-Effectiveness of Transanal Irrigation in Patients with Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Anton; Kumar, Gayathri; Christensen, Peter; Mealing, Stuart; Størling, Zenia M.; Andersen, Frederikke; Kirshblum, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Background People suffering from neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD) and an ineffective bowel regimen often suffer from fecal incontinence (FI) and related symptoms, which have a huge impact on their quality of life. In these situations, transanal irrigation (TAI) has been shown to reduce these symptoms and improve quality of life. Aim To investigate the long-term cost-effectiveness of initiating TAI in patients with NBD who have failed standard bowel care (SBC). Methods A deterministic Markov decision model was developed to project the lifetime health economic outcomes, including quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), episodes of FI, urinary tract infections (UTIs), and stoma surgery when initiating TAI relative to continuing SBC. A data set consisting of 227 patients with NBD due to spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple sclerosis, spina bifida and cauda equina syndrome was used in the analysis. In the model a 30-year old individual with SCI was used as a base-case. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was applied to evaluate the robustness of the model. Results The model predicts that a 30-year old SCI patient with a life expectancy of 37 years initiating TAI will experience a 36% reduction in FI episodes, a 29% reduction in UTIs, a 35% reduction in likelihood of stoma surgery and a 0.4 improvement in QALYs, compared with patients continuing SBC. A lifetime cost-saving of £21,768 per patient was estimated for TAI versus continuing SBC alone. Conclusion TAI is a cost-saving treatment strategy reducing risk of stoma surgery, UTIs, episodes of FI and improving QALYs for NBD patients who have failed SBC. PMID:27557052

  13. Staphylococcus saprophyticus native valve endocarditis in a diabetic patient with neurogenic bladder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Kusaba, Koji; Yamakuchi, Hiroki; Hamada, Yohei; Urakami, Toshiharu; Aoki, Yosuke

    2015-09-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with 2-day history of malaise and dyspnea. He had mitral prolapse and type II diabetes mellitus with neurogenic bladder, which was cared for by catheterization on his own. On arrival the patient was in septic condition with hypoxemia, and physical examination revealed systolic murmur at the apex. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed vegetation of the mitral and the aortic valve. The presence of continuous bacteremia was confirmed by multiple sets of blood culture, whereby gram-positive cocci was retrieved and identified as Staphylococcus saprophyticus (S. saprophyticus) both phenotypically and genetically. Because two major criteria of the Modified Duke Criteria were met, the patient was diagnosed with native valve endocarditis due to S. saprophyticus. The urine culture was also positive for gram-positive cocci, phenotypically identified as Staphylococcus warneri, which was subsequently identified as S. saprophyticus with the use of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and MALDI-TOF MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry), indicating strongly that the intermittent catheterization-associated urinary tract infection resulted in bacteremia that eventually lead to infective endocarditis. This patient was treated with vancomycin and clindamycin. Because of multiple cerebral infarctions, the patient underwent mitral and aortic valve replacement on hospital day 5. Blood culture turned negative at 6th hospital day. Antibiotic therapy was continued for six weeks after surgery. The patient's clinical course was uneventful thereafter, and was discharged home. This is the first case report of native valve endocarditis caused by S. saprophyticus of confirmed urinary origin. PMID:26184852

  14. The role of EGFR and ErbB family related proteins in the oligodendrocyte specification in germinal niches of the adult mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Contreras, Alma Y.; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    In the adult brain, multipotent progenitor cells have been identified in three areas: the ventricular-subventricular zone (VZ-SVZ), adjacent to the striatal wall of the lateral ventricles, the subgranular zone (SGZ), located at the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the subcallosal zone (SCZ), located between the corpus callosum and the CA1 and CA2 regions of the hippocampus. The neural progenitor cells of these regions express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, ErbB-1 or HER1). EGF, the most important ligand for the EGFR, is a potent mitogenic agent that stimulates proliferation, survival, migration and differentiation into the oligodendrocyte lineage. Other ErbB receptors also activate several intracellular pathways for oligodendrocyte specification, migration and survival. However, the specific downstream pathways related to oligodendrogenesis and the hierarchic interaction among intracellular signaling cascades is not well-known. We summarize the current data regarding the role of EGFR and ErbB family signaling on neural stem cells and the downstream cascades involved in oligodendrogenesis in the neurogenic niches of the adult brain. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate proliferation, differentiation, migration of oligodendrocytes and myelination is of critical importance for the field of neurobiology and constitutes a crucial step in the design of stem-cell-based therapies for demyelinating diseases. PMID:24381541

  15. Effects of inhalation of 0. 12 and 0. 25 parts per million ozone on the proximal alveolar region of juvenile and adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, B.E.; Miller, F.J.; Crapo, J.D.

    1985-12-01

    The degree of lung injury caused by prolonged inhalation of low levels of ozone (O3) is of interest since urban environmental levels periodically reach 0.2 to 0.3 ppm. Since the area of the junction of the conductive and respiratory regions of the lung has been reported as the major site of injury due to O3 inhalation, techniques were devised to specifically study alveolar tissue from this region. One-day-old or 6-week-old male rats were exposed to either 0.25 ppm O3 12 hours/day or to continuous room air for 6 weeks. An additional group of 6-week-old rats were exposed to 0.12 ppm O3 for the same time period. All lungs were fixed at the end of the exposure by intratracheal installation of buffered 2% glutaraldehyde. Cylinders of tissue containing a cross-section of a terminal bronchiole were punched out of lung tissue slices using a sharpened cannula. These tissue cylinders were oriented, embedded in Epon, serial sectioned until the first alveolar duct bifurcation was reached, and then thin sectioned for electron microscopy. Qualitative examination of the tissue revealed little observable damage to the proximal alveolar tissues. However, by ultrastructure morphometric analysis, significant changes occurred in the alveolar epithelium of the proximal alveolar region of all exposed animals. In the animals exposed to 0.25 ppm O3 from 1 day of age (juvenile animals), the number of type 1 epithelial cells doubled, their mean surface area decreased 38%, and their mean thickness increased 24%. The number of alveolar type 2 epithelial cells increased, and the number of alveolar macrophages doubled. Adult animals exposed to 0.25 ppm O3 showed similar patterns of changes in the epithelium of the proximal alveolar region and in addition had a doubling of interstitial macrophages, indicating a mild inflammatory stimulus in the interstitium.

  16. Localization of the fourth locus (GLC1E) for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to the 10p15-p14 region.

    PubMed

    Sarfarazi, M; Child, A; Stoilova, D; Brice, G; Desai, T; Trifan, O C; Poinoosawmy, D; Crick, R P

    1998-03-01

    One of the major causes of blindness is primary open-angle glaucoma, which affects millions of elderly people worldwide. Genetic studies have so far mapped three loci for the adult-onset form of this condition to the 2cen-q13, 3q21-q24, and 8q23 regions. Herein, we report the localization of a fourth locus, to the 10p15-p14 region, in one large British family with a classical form of normal-tension open-angle glaucoma. Of the 42 meioses genotyped in this pedigree, 39 subjects (16 affected) inherited a haplotype compatible with their prior clinical designation, whereas the remaining 3 were classified as unknown. Although a maximum LOD score of 10.00 at a recombination fraction of straight theta=.00 was obtained with D10S1216, 21 other markers provided significant values, varying between 3.77 and 9.70. When only the affected meioses of this kindred were analyzed, LOD scores remained statistically significant, ranging from 3.16 (D10S527) to 3.57 (D10S506). Two critical recombinational events in the affected subjects positioned this new locus to a region of approximately 21 cM, flanked by D10S1729 and D10S1664. However, an additional recombination in a 59-year-old unaffected female suggests that this locus resides between D10S585 (or D10S1172) and D10S1664, within a genetic distance of 5-11 cM. However, the latter minimum region must be taken cautiously, because the incomplete penetrance has previously been documented for this group of eye conditions. A partial list of genes that positionally are considered as candidates includes NET1, PRKCT, ITIH2, IL2RA, IL15RA, IT1H2, hGATA3, the mRNA for open reading frame KIAA0019, and the gene for D123 protein.

  17. Co-effects of matrix low elasticity and aligned topography on stem cell neurogenic differentiation and rapid neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shenglian; Liu, Xi; Yu, Shukui; Wang, Xiumei; Zhang, Shuming; Wu, Qiong; Sun, Xiaodan; Mao, Haiquan

    2016-05-01

    The development of novel biomaterials that deliver precise regulatory signals to direct stem cell fate for nerve regeneration is the focus of current intensive research efforts. In this study, a hierarchically aligned fibrillar fibrin hydrogel (AFG) that was fabricated through electrospinning and the concurrent molecular self-assembly process mimics both the soft and oriented features of nerve tissue, thus providing hybrid biophysical cues to instruct cell behavior in vitro and in vivo. The electrospun hydrogels were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized light microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering assay and atomic force microscopy (AFM), showing a hierarchically linear-ordered structure from the nanoscale to the macroscale with a soft elastic character (elasticity ~1 kPa). We found that this low elasticity and aligned topography of AFG exhibit co-effects on promoting the neurogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUMSCs) in comparison to random fibrin hydrogel (RFG) and tissue culture plate (TCP) control after two week cell culture in growth medium lacking supplementation with soluble neurogenic induction factors. In addition, AFG also induces dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to rapidly project numerous long neurite outgrowths longitudinally along the AFG fibers for a total neurite extension distance of 1.96 mm in three days in the absence of neurotrophic factor supplementation. Moreover, the AFG implanted in a rat T9 dorsal hemisection spinal cord injury model was found to promote endogenous neural cell fast migration and axonal invasion along AFG fibers, resulting in aligned tissue cables in vivo. Our results suggest that matrix stiffness and aligned topography may instruct stem cell neurogenic differentiation and rapid neurite outgrowth, providing great promise for biomaterial design for applications in nerve regeneration.The development of novel biomaterials that deliver precise regulatory signals to

  18. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  19. Brain-targeted angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 overexpression attenuates neurogenic hypertension by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sriramula, Srinivas; Xia, Huijing; Xu, Ping; Lazartigues, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Overactivity of the renin-angiotensin system, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenases (COX) in the brain are implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We previously reported that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) overexpression in the brain attenuates the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension, a neurogenic hypertension model with enhanced brain renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic activity. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we investigated whether oxidative stress, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and cyclooxygenase (COX) activation in the brain are modulated by ACE2 in neurogenic hypertension. Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension significantly increased expression of Nox-2 (+61±5%), Nox-4 (+50±13%), and nitrotyrosine (+89±32%) and reduced activity of the antioxidant enzymes, catalase (-29±4%) and superoxide dismutase (-31±7%), indicating increased oxidative stress in the brain of nontransgenic mice. This increased oxidative stress was attenuated in transgenic mice overexpressing ACE2 in the brain. Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced reduction of neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression (-26±7%) and phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase/total endothelial nitric oxide synthase (-30±3%), and enhanced phosphorylation of protein kinase B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the paraventricular nucleus, were reversed by ACE2 overexpression. In addition, ACE2 overexpression blunted the hypertension-mediated increase in gene and protein expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in the paraventricular nucleus. Furthermore, gene silencing of either COX-1 or COX-2 in the brain, reduced microglial activation and accompanied neuroinflammation, ultimately attenuating Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension. Together, these data provide evidence that brain ACE2 overexpression reduces oxidative stress and COX-mediated neuroinflammation, improves antioxidant and nitric oxide signaling, and

  20. Co-effects of matrix low elasticity and aligned topography on stem cell neurogenic differentiation and rapid neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shenglian; Liu, Xi; Yu, Shukui; Wang, Xiumei; Zhang, Shuming; Wu, Qiong; Sun, Xiaodan; Mao, Haiquan

    2016-05-21

    The development of novel biomaterials that deliver precise regulatory signals to direct stem cell fate for nerve regeneration is the focus of current intensive research efforts. In this study, a hierarchically aligned fibrillar fibrin hydrogel (AFG) that was fabricated through electrospinning and the concurrent molecular self-assembly process mimics both the soft and oriented features of nerve tissue, thus providing hybrid biophysical cues to instruct cell behavior in vitro and in vivo. The electrospun hydrogels were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized light microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering assay and atomic force microscopy (AFM), showing a hierarchically linear-ordered structure from the nanoscale to the macroscale with a soft elastic character (elasticity ∼1 kPa). We found that this low elasticity and aligned topography of AFG exhibit co-effects on promoting the neurogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUMSCs) in comparison to random fibrin hydrogel (RFG) and tissue culture plate (TCP) control after two week cell culture in growth medium lacking supplementation with soluble neurogenic induction factors. In addition, AFG also induces dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to rapidly project numerous long neurite outgrowths longitudinally along the AFG fibers for a total neurite extension distance of 1.96 mm in three days in the absence of neurotrophic factor supplementation. Moreover, the AFG implanted in a rat T9 dorsal hemisection spinal cord injury model was found to promote endogenous neural cell fast migration and axonal invasion along AFG fibers, resulting in aligned tissue cables in vivo. Our results suggest that matrix stiffness and aligned topography may instruct stem cell neurogenic differentiation and rapid neurite outgrowth, providing great promise for biomaterial design for applications in nerve regeneration. PMID:27124547

  1. Protein Kinase Cδ Mediates Neurogenic but Not Mitogenic Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corbit, Kevin C.; Foster, David A.; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    1999-01-01

    In several neuronal cell systems, fibroblast-derived growth factor (FGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) act as neurogenic agents, whereas epidermal growth factor (EGF) acts as a mitogen. The mechanisms responsible for these different cellular fates are unclear. We report here that although FGF, NGF, and EGF all activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (extracellular signal-related kinase [ERK]) in rat hippocampal (H19-7) and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, the activation of ERK by the neurogenic agents FGF and NGF is dependent upon protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), whereas ERK activation in response to the mitogenic EGF is independent of PKCδ. Antisense PKCδ oligonucleotides or the PKCδ-specific inhibitor rottlerin inhibited FGF- and NGF-induced, but not EGF-induced, ERK activation. In contrast, EGF-induced ERK activation was inhibited by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin, which had no effect upon FGF-induced ERK activation. Rottlerin also inhibited the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK) in response to activated Raf, but had no effect upon c-Raf activity or ERK activation by activated MEK. These results indicate that PKCδ functions either downstream from or in parallel with c-Raf, but upstream of MEK. Inhibition of PKCδ also blocked neurite outgrowth induced by FGF and NGF in PC12 cells and by activated Raf in H19-7 cells, indicating a role for PKCδ in the neurogenic effects of FGF, NGF, and Raf. Interestingly, the PKCδ requirement is apparently cell type specific, since FGF-induced ERK activation was independent of PKCδ in NIH 3T3 murine fibroblasts, in which FGF is a mitogen. These data demonstrate that PKCδ contributes to growth factor specificity and response in neuronal cells and may also promote cell-type-specific differences in growth factor signaling. PMID:10330161

  2. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of invasive Candida infections in adults in the Middle East region: Expert panel recommendations.

    PubMed

    Alothman, Adel F; Al-Musawi, Tariq; Al-Abdely, Hail M; Salman, Jameela Al; Almaslamani, Muna; Yared, Nadine; Butt, Adeel A; Raghubir, Nirvana; Morsi, Waleed El; Al Thaqafi, Abdulhakeem O

    2014-02-01

    Invasive Candida infections contribute to significant morbidity and mortality in patients with healthcare-associated infections. They represent a major burden on the public health system, and are challenging to diagnose and treat. A multidisciplinary expert panel critically reviewed available evidence to provide consensus recommendations for the management of invasive Candida infections in the Middle East. Based on diagnosis, recommendations were provided for the management of Candida infections in non-neutropenic and neutropenic patients. Polyenes (amphotericin B-deoxycholate [AmB-d] and lipid formulations amphotericin B [LFAmB]), triazoles (fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole), echinocandins (caspofungin, anidulafungin, and micafungin) and flucytosine are the recommended categories of antifungal agents for treatment of Candida infections. Echinocandins are preferred for treatment of proven and suspected Candida infections, especially in critically ill patients or those with previous exposure to azoles. Recommendations were also provided for infections caused by specific Candida species as well as management of different disease conditions. The experts highlighted that the guidelines should be used along with clinical judgment. Given the paucity of published data from the region, research in the form of randomized clinical trials should be given priority. PMID:24035607

  3. Religion and survival in a secular region. A twenty year follow-up of 734 Danish adults born in 1914.

    PubMed

    la Cour, Peter; Avlund, Kirsten; Schultz-Larsen, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse associations of religiosity and mortality in a secular region. The sample consisted of 734 Danish, community dwelling elderly persons, living in a secular culture, and all aged 70 when primary data were collected. Secondary data consisted of a 20 year follow-up on vital status or exact age of death. The study was designed to be highly comparable to studies conducted in more religious environments in order to compare results. Three variables of religion were investigated in relation to survival: importance of affiliation, church attendance and listening to religious media. Relative hazards (RH) of dying were controlled in models including gender, education, medical and mental health, social relations, help given and received, and health behaviour. The results showed significant and positive associations between claiming religious affiliation important and survival (relative hazard of dying=RH .70; 95% CI .58-.85) and church attendance and survival (RH .73; 95% CI .64-.87). Results decreased and only stayed significant regarding church attendance when controlled for covariates. Nearly all significant effects were seen in women, but not in men. The effect size of the full sample is less than in more religious environments in United States samples. Although the positive overall RHs are comparable to those of other studies, the mediating variables and pathways of effects seem dissimilar in this sample from a secular environment. Receiving and especially giving help to others are suggested as variables of explanatory value.

  4. [Botulinum neurotoxin type A in neurogenic detrusor overactivity: consensus paper of the Working Group Neuro-Urology of the DMGP].

    PubMed

    Böthig, R; Kaufmann, A; Bremer, J; Pannek, J; Domurath, B

    2014-04-01

    The use of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT-A) for suppression of neurogenic detrusor overactivity was first reported in 2000. Since that time, this method has gained widespread use. A number of recommendations and consensus statements have already been published. The current practice-oriented consensus paper takes into account recent developments and the over 10-year experience of most members of the Working Group Neuro-Urology of the German-speaking Medical Society for Paraplegia (DMGP) with a focus on the use of BoNT-A in paraplegic patients and in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:24604016

  5. Reversible T-wave inversions and neurogenic myocardial stunning in a patient with recurrent stress-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Yasushi; Kaneko, Kyouichi; Kodama, Yusuke; Li, Hui-Ling; Suyama, Jumpei; Toshida, Tsutomu; Kayano, Hiroyuki; Shinozuka, Akira; Gokan, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Youichi

    2014-05-01

    A 72-year-old female was diagnosed as a stress-induced cardiomyopathy from apical ballooning pattern of left ventricular dysfunction without coronary artery stenosis after the mental stress. ECG showed the transient T-wave inversions after the ST-segment elevations. By the mental stress after 1 year, she showed a transient dysfunction with similar ECG changes again. T-wave inversions recovered earlier, and cardiac sympathetic dysfunction showed a lighter response corresponding to the less severe dysfunction than those after the first onset. Wellens' ECG pattern was associated with the degree of neurogenic myocardial stunning with sympathetic hyperinnervation caused by mental stress. PMID:24147830

  6. Antibody to the central region of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 gp46 is associated with the progression of adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sagara, Yasuko; Inoue, Yukiko; Ohshima, Koichi; Kojima, Eijiro; Utsunomiya, Atae; Tsujimura, Mitsushi; Shiraki, Hiroshi; Kashiwagi, Seizaburo

    2007-02-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). HTLV-1 is spread by cell-to-cell transmission via the gp46-197 region, Asp197 to Leu216, on the envelope protein gp46. In the present study, we revealed a positive correlation between the appearance of an antibody recognizing the gp46-197 region (anti-gp46-197 antibody) and the severity of ATL. The prevalence and titer of the anti-gp46-197 antibody were found to be elevated along with the progression of ATL. In serial samples obtained from a single patient, the anti-gp46-197 antibody was detected before treatment in acute phase, then diminished after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, to which the patient had a complete response. However, the antibody appeared again before a relapse, along with an increase of the serum-soluble interleukin-2 receptor level and proviral load. The results from the other six patients also indicate that seroconversion of this antibody was synchronized with the deterioration of ATL. Taken together, the findings indicate that the anti-gp46-197 antibody may be a novel beacon for gauging the efficacy of therapeutic approaches to ATL, and a survey of this antibody would be useful for identifying asymptomatic carriers infected with HTLV-1 who are at high risk of developing ATL.

  7. Effect of Alpha-1-Adrenergic Agonist, Midodrine for the Management of Long-Standing Neurogenic Shock in Patient with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taikwan

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of a 71-year-old male patient who had suffered from long-lasting neurogenic shock for 13 weeks after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by a bicycle accident. The neurogenic shock was resolved dramatically 2 weeks after the administration of alpha-1-adrenergic agonist, midodrine hydrochloride. In usual cases, neurogenic shock tends to improve between 2 and 6 weeks after SCI; however, in a few cases, the shock lasts for several months. In our case, spinal shock lasted for 13 weeks and exhibited very sensitive decline of blood pressure for even a slight decrease of dopamine despite recovered bulbospongiosus reflex. Three days after midodrine hydrochloride was added, hypotension improved dramatically. We discuss our rare case with pertinent literatures. PMID:27169082

  8. Stem cell recruitment of newly formed host cells via a successful seduction? Filling the gap between neurogenic niche and injured brain site.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Naoki; Kaneko, Yuji; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Yankee, Ernest; McGrogan, Michael; Case, Casey; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report that a unique mechanism of action exerted by stem cells in the repair of the traumatically injured brain involves their ability to harness a biobridge between neurogenic niche and injured brain site. This biobridge, visualized immunohistochemically and laser captured, corresponded to an area between the neurogenic subventricular zone and the injured cortex. That the biobridge expressed high levels of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases characterized initially by a stream of transplanted stem cells, but subsequently contained only few to non-detectable grafts and overgrown by newly formed host cells, implicates a novel property of stem cells. The transplanted stem cells manifest themselves as pathways for trafficking the migration of host neurogenic cells, but once this biobridge is formed between the neurogenic site and the injured brain site, the grafted cells disappear and relinquish their task to the host neurogenic cells. Our findings reveal that long-distance migration of host cells from the neurogenic niche to the injured brain site can be achieved through transplanted stem cells serving as biobridges for initiation of endogenous repair mechanisms. This is the first report of a stem cell-paved "biobridge". Indeed, to date the two major schools of discipline in stem cell repair mechanism primarily support the concept of "cell replacement" and bystander effects of "trophic factor secretion". The present novel observations of a stem cell seducing a host cell to engage in brain repair advances basic science concepts on stem cell biology and extracellular matrix, as well as provokes translational research on propagating this stem cell-paved biobridge beyond cell replacement and trophic factor secretion for the treatment of traumatic brain injury and other neurological disorders.

  9. Localization of a locus (GLC1B) for adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma to the 2cen-q13 region

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilova, D.; Trifan, O.C.; Sarfarazi, M.

    1996-08-15

    Primary open angle glaucoma (GLC1) is a common ocular disorder with a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve and visual field defects that is often associated with an elevated intraocular pressure. The severe but rare juvenile-onset type has previously been mapped to 1q21-q31, and its genetic heterogeneity has been established. Herein, we present a new locus (GLC1B) for one form of GLC1 on chromosome 2cen-q13 with a clinical presentation of low to moderate intraocular pressure, onset in late 40s, and a good response to medical treatment. Two-point and haplotype analyses of affected and unaffected meioses in six families provided maximum linkage information with D2S417, GATA112EO3, D2S113, D2S373, and D2S274 (lod scores ranging from 3.11 to 6.48) within a region of 8.5 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S2264. Analysis of affected meioses alone revealed no recombination with an additional two markers (D2S2264 and D2S135) in a region of 11.2 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S176. Analysis of unaffected meioses identified only one healthy 86-year-old male who has inherited the entire affected haplotype and, hence, is a gene carrier for this condition. Eight additional families with similar and/or different clinical presentation did not show any linkage to this region and, therefore, provided evidence for genetic heterogeneity of adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma. 63 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Effects of acute microinjections of thyroid hormone to the preoptic region of euthyroid adult male rats on sleep and motor activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Joseph V; Giannopoulos, Phillip F; Moffett, Steven X; James, Thomas D

    2013-06-21

    In adult brain tissue, thyroid hormones are known to have multiple effects which are not mediated by chronic influences of the hormones on heterodimeric thyroid hormone nuclear receptors. Previous work has shown that acute microinjections of l-triiodothyronine (T3) to the preoptic region significantly influence EEG-defined sleep in hypothyroid rats. The current study examined the effects of similar microinjections in euthyroid rats. In 7 rats with histologically confirmed microinjection sites bilaterally placed in the preoptic region, slow-wave sleep time was significantly decreased, but REM and waking were increased as compared to vehicle-injected controls. The EEG-defined parameters were significantly influenced by the microinjections in a biphasic dose-response relationship; the lowest (0.3μg) and highest (10μg) doses tested were without significant effect while intermediate doses (1 and 3μg) induced significant differences from controls. There were significant diurnal variations in the measures, yet no significant interactions between the effect of hormone and time of day were demonstrated. Core body temperature was not significantly altered in the current study. The demonstration of effects of T3 within hours instead of days is consistent with a rapid mechanism of action such as a direct influence on neurotransmission. Since the T3-mediated effects were robust in the current work, euthyroid rats retain thyroid hormone sensitivity which would be needed if sleep-regulatory mechanisms in the preoptic region are continuously modulated by the hormones. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled LInked: BRES-D-12-01552 & BRES-D-12-01363R2.

  11. Effects of acute microinjections of thyroid hormone to the preoptic region of euthyroid adult male rats on sleep and motor activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Joseph V; Giannopoulos, Phillip F; Moffett, Steven X; James, Thomas D

    2013-06-21

    In adult brain tissue, thyroid hormones are known to have multiple effects which are not mediated by chronic influences of the hormones on heterodimeric thyroid hormone nuclear receptors. Previous work has shown that acute microinjections of l-triiodothyronine (T3) to the preoptic region significantly influence EEG-defined sleep in hypothyroid rats. The current study examined the effects of similar microinjections in euthyroid rats. In 7 rats with histologically confirmed microinjection sites bilaterally placed in the preoptic region, slow-wave sleep time was significantly decreased, but REM and waking were increased as compared to vehicle-injected controls. The EEG-defined parameters were significantly influenced by the microinjections in a biphasic dose-response relationship; the lowest (0.3μg) and highest (10μg) doses tested were without significant effect while intermediate doses (1 and 3μg) induced significant differences from controls. There were significant diurnal variations in the measures, yet no significant interactions between the effect of hormone and time of day were demonstrated. Core body temperature was not significantly altered in the current study. The demonstration of effects of T3 within hours instead of days is consistent with a rapid mechanism of action such as a direct influence on neurotransmission. Since the T3-mediated effects were robust in the current work, euthyroid rats retain thyroid hormone sensitivity which would be needed if sleep-regulatory mechanisms in the preoptic region are continuously modulated by the hormones. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled LInked: BRES-D-12-01552 & BRES-D-12-01363R2. PMID:23348377

  12. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Hale; Pomeranz, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a neurological disorder producing peripheral neurogenic inflammatory process in hands and feet distal to injury, which may lead to severe disability. Symptoms are often out of proportion to the initiating event and not limited to a single peripheral nerve. There is no gold standard in diagnosis of this entity, and a multidisciplinary approach is necessary for proper diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most useful diagnostic modalities in early stages of CRPS (when clinical diagnosis is most difficult), the most desirable time to diagnose this disorder to expedite treatment and improve function. This article discusses MRI findings of CRPS, particularly in the early phase, and differential considerations. PMID:27518298

  13. Radial glia and neural progenitors in the adult zebrafish central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Than-Trong, Emmanuel; Bally-Cuif, Laure

    2015-08-01

    The adult central nervous system (CNS) of the zebrafish, owing to its enrichment in constitutive neurogenic niches, is becoming an increasingly used model to address fundamental questions pertaining to adult neural stem cell (NSC) biology, adult neurogenesis and neuronal repair. Studies conducted in several CNS territories (notably the telencephalon, retina, midbrain, cerebellum and spinal cord) highlighted the presence, in these niches, of progenitor cells displaying NSC-like characters. While pointing to radial glial cells (RG) as major long-lasting, constitutively active and/or activatable progenitors in most domains, these studies also revealed a high heterogeneity in the progenitor subtypes used at the top of neurogenic hierarchies, including the persistence of neuroepithelial (NE) progenitors in some areas. Likewise, dissecting the molecular pathways underlying RG maintenance and recruitment under physiological conditions and upon repair in the zebrafish model revealed shared processes but also specific cascades triggering or sustaining reparative NSC recruitment. Together, the zebrafish adult brain reveals an extensive complexity of adult NSC niches, properties and control pathways, which extends existing understanding of adult NSC biology and gives access to novel mechanisms of efficient NSC maintenance and recruitment in an adult vertebrate brain. PMID:25976648

  14. Long-term results of postanal repair for neurogenic faecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Setti Carraro, P; Kamm, M A; Nicholls, R J

    1994-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1986, 54 patients underwent postanal repair for neurogenic faecal incontinence. Forty-two (41 women) were available for follow-up 5-8 (median 6.2) years after operation. Of these, 34 women attended for clinical and anorectal physiological assessment. Anal endosonography was also performed in 30 patients. In the 34 patients examined, continence categories (Browning and Parks' classification) of C (n = 12) and D (n = 22) before surgery became A (n = 2), B (n = 12), C (n = 16) and D (n = 1) at 6 months and A (n = 4), B (n = 5), C (n = 21) and D (n = 4) at 5-8 years. Nine patients therefore had continence for solids and liquids, five of whom were incontinent to flatus, in the long term. Assessment of outcome by patients revealed long-term improvement in 28 and no change in six. Two of the 34 patients assessed were housebound because of incontinence. Of the total of 54 patients, only one required a stoma. The length of the anal canal increased significantly from a preoperative median (range) of 2.0 (1.5-4.0) cm to 3.8 (1.8-5.5) cm 5-8 years after surgery. Perineal descent at rest decreased markedly. Progression of neuromuscular damage was demonstrated by prolongation of the pudendal nerve terminal motor latency from a median (range) 2.38 (1.80-3.35) ms to 2.80 (2.20-4.25) ms and increasing median (range) fibre density in the external sphincter, from 1.86 (1.76-2.40) to 3.63 (2.03-6.20). The pudendal nerve terminal latency was the only preoperative physiological variable that correlated significantly with long-term outcome (A and B 2.20 ms versus C and D 2.65 ms, P < 0.05). At long-term assessment, maximal anal squeeze pressure was the only physiological variable that correlated significantly with clinical outcome. Anal endosonography revealed a clinically undetected sphincter defect in 19 of 30 patients examined but the presence of a defect did not relate to clinical outcome. PMID:8313093

  15. Differential effect of lithium on cell number in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in adult mice: a stereological study

    PubMed Central

    Rajkowska, G.; Clarke, G.; Mahajan, G.; Licht, C.M.M.; van de Werd, H.J.J. M.; Yuan, P.; Stockmeier, C.A.; Manji, H.K.; Uylings, H.B.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Neuroimaging studies note lithium-related increases in the volume of gray matter in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. Postmortem human studies report alterations in neuronal and glial cell density and size in the PFC of lithium-treated subjects. Rodents treated with lithium exhibit cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. However, it is not known whether hippocampal and PFC volume are also increased in these animals or whether cell number in the PFC is altered. Methods Using stereological methods, this study estimated the total number of neurons, glia and the packing density of astrocytes in the DG and PFC of normal adult mice treated with lithium and evaluated the total volume of these regions and the entire neocortex. Results Lithium treatment increased the total number of neurons and glia in the DG (25% and 21%, respectively) and the density of astrocytes but did not alter the total number in the PFC. However, the volume of the hippocampus and its subfields, the PFC and its subareas, and the entire neocortex were not altered by lithium. Conclusions Both neuronal and glial cells accounted for lithium-induced cell proliferation in the DG. That the number of neurons and glia were unchanged in the PFC is consistent with the view that this region is not a neurogenic zone. Further studies are required to clarify the impact of lithium treatment on the PFC under pathological conditions and to investigate the dissociation between increased cell proliferation and unchanged volume in the hippocampus. PMID:26842627

  16. A partial MECP2 duplication in a mildly affected adult male: a putative role for the 3' untranslated region in the MECP2 duplication phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Duplications of the X-linked MECP2 gene are associated with moderate to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, and neuropsychiatric illness in males, while triplications are associated with a more severe phenotype. Most carrier females show complete skewing of X-inactivation in peripheral blood and an apparent susceptibility to specific personality traits or neuropsychiatric symptoms. Methods We describe the clinical phenotype of a pedigree segregating a duplication of MECP2 found on clinical array comparative genomic hybridization. The position, size, and extent of the duplication were delineated in peripheral blood samples from affected individuals using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and fluorescence in situ hybridization, as well as targeted high-resolution oligonucleotide microarray analysis and long-range PCR. The molecular consequences of the rearrangement were studied in lymphoblast cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR, reverse transcriptase PCR, and western blot analysis. Results We observed a partial MECP2 duplication in an adult male with epilepsy and mild neurocognitive impairment who was able to function independently; this phenotype has not previously been reported among males harboring gains in MECP2 copy number. The same duplication was inherited by this individual’s daughter who was also affected with neurocognitive impairment and epilepsy and carried an additional copy-number variant. The duplicated segment involved all four exons of MECP2, but excluded almost the entire 3' untranslated region (UTR), and the genomic rearrangement resulted in a MECP2-TEX28 fusion gene mRNA transcript. Increased expression of MECP2 and the resulting fusion gene were both confirmed; however, western blot analysis of lysates from lymphoblast cells demonstrated increased MeCP2 protein without evidence of a stable fusion gene protein product. C