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Sample records for adult normal human

  1. Immunohistochemical Study of Expression of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 in Normal Adult Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Liu, Ruihua; Su, Zhongxue; Zhang, Yuecun; Zhang, Wenfang; Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Fuwu; Guo, Yuji; Li, Chuangang; Hao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The expression pattern of Sohlh1 (spermatogenesis and oogenesis specific basic helix-loop-helix 1) and Sohlh2 in mice has been reported in previous studies. Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 are specifically expressed in spermatogonia, prespermatogonia in male mice and oocytes of primordial and primary follicles in female mice. In this report, we studied the expression pattern of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 in human adult tissues. Immunohistochemical staining of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 was performed in 5 samples of normal ovaries and testes, respectively. The results revealed that Sohlh genes are not only expressed in oocytes and spermatogonia, but also in granular cells, theca cells, Sertoli cells and Leydig cells, and in smooth muscles of blood vessel walls. To further investigate the expression of Sohlh genes in other adult human tissues, we collected representative normal adult tissues developed from three embryonic germ layers. Compared with the expression in mice, Sohlhs exhibited a much more extensive expression pattern in human tissues. Sohlhs were detected in testis, ovary and epithelia developed from embryonic endoderm, ectoderm and tissues developed from embryonic mesoderm. Sohlh signals were found in spermatogonia, Sertoli cells and also Leydig cells in testis, while in ovary, the expression was mainly in oocytes of primordial and primary follicles, granular cells and theca cells of secondary follicles. Compared with Sohlh2, the expression of Sohlh1 was stronger and more extensive. Our study explored the expression of Sohlh genes in human tissues and might provide insights for functional studies of Sohlh genes. PMID:26375665

  2. Human growth hormone (GH1) gene polymorphism map in a normal-statured adult population

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Cristina; Audí, Laura; Carrascosa, Antonio; Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Pérez-Arroyo, Annalisa; Ulied, Angels; Andaluz, Pilar; Arjona, Rosa; Albisu, Marian; Clemente, María; Gussinyé, Miquel; Yeste, Diego

    2007-01-01

    Objective GH1 gene presents a complex map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the entire promoter, coding and noncoding regions. The aim of the study was to establish the complete map of GH1 gene SNPs in our control normal population and to analyse its association with adult height. Design, subjects and measurements A systematic GH1 gene analysis was designed in a control population of 307 adults of both sexes with height normally distributed within normal range for the same population: −2 standard deviation scores (SDS) to +2 SDS. An analysis was performed on individual and combined genotype associations with adult height. Results Twenty-five SNPs presented a frequency over 1%: 11 in the promoter (P1 to P11), three in the 5′UTR region (P12 to P14), one in exon 1 (P15), three in intron 1 (P16 to P18), two in intron 2 (P19 and P20), two in exon 4 (P21 and P22) and three in intron 4 (P23 to P25). Twenty-nine additional changes with frequencies under 1% were found in 29 subjects. P8, P19, P20 and P25 had not been previously described. P6, P12, P17 and P25 accounted for 6·2% of the variation in adult height (P = 0·0007) in this population with genotypes A/G at P6, G/G at P6 and A/G at P12 decreasing height SDS (−0·063 ± 0·031, −0·693 ± 0·350 and −0·489 ± 0·265, Mean ± SE) and genotypes A/T at P17 and T/G at P25 increasing height SDS (+1·094 ± 0·456 and +1·184 ± 0·432). Conclusions This study established the GH1 gene sequence variation map in a normal adult height control population confirming the high density of SNPs in a relatively small gene. Our study shows that the more frequent SNPs did not significantly contribute to height determination, while only one promoter and two intronic SNPs contributed significantly to it. Studies in larger populations will have to confirm the associations and in vitro functional studies will elucidate the mechanisms involved. Systematic GH1 gene analysis in patients with growth delay and suspected

  3. Normalizing the environment recapitulates adult human immune traits in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Beura, Lalit K; Hamilton, Sara E; Bi, Kevin; Schenkel, Jason M; Odumade, Oludare A; Casey, Kerry A; Thompson, Emily A; Fraser, Kathryn A; Rosato, Pamela C; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick P; Jenkins, Marc K; Vezys, Vaiva; Haining, W Nicholas; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David

    2016-04-28

    Our current understanding of immunology was largely defined in laboratory mice, partly because they are inbred and genetically homogeneous, can be genetically manipulated, allow kinetic tissue analyses to be carried out from the onset of disease, and permit the use of tractable disease models. Comparably reductionist experiments are neither technically nor ethically possible in humans. However, there is growing concern that laboratory mice do not reflect relevant aspects of the human immune system, which may account for failures to translate disease treatments from bench to bedside. Laboratory mice live in abnormally hygienic specific pathogen free (SPF) barrier facilities. Here we show that standard laboratory mouse husbandry has profound effects on the immune system and that environmental changes produce mice with immune systems closer to those of adult humans. Laboratory mice--like newborn, but not adult, humans--lack effector-differentiated and mucosally distributed memory T cells. These cell populations were present in free-living barn populations of feral mice and pet store mice with diverse microbial experience, and were induced in laboratory mice after co-housing with pet store mice, suggesting that the environment is involved in the induction of these cells. Altering the living conditions of mice profoundly affected the cellular composition of the innate and adaptive immune systems, resulted in global changes in blood cell gene expression to patterns that more closely reflected the immune signatures of adult humans rather than neonates, altered resistance to infection, and influenced T-cell differentiation in response to a de novo viral infection. These data highlight the effects of environment on the basal immune state and response to infection and suggest that restoring physiological microbial exposure in laboratory mice could provide a relevant tool for modelling immunological events in free-living organisms, including humans. PMID:27096360

  4. Normalizing the environment recapitulates adult human immune traits in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Beura, Lalit K; Hamilton, Sara E; Bi, Kevin; Schenkel, Jason M; Odumade, Oludare A; Casey, Kerry A; Thompson, Emily A; Fraser, Kathryn A; Rosato, Pamela C; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick P; Jenkins, Marc K; Vezys, Vaiva; Haining, W Nicholas; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David

    2016-04-28

    Our current understanding of immunology was largely defined in laboratory mice, partly because they are inbred and genetically homogeneous, can be genetically manipulated, allow kinetic tissue analyses to be carried out from the onset of disease, and permit the use of tractable disease models. Comparably reductionist experiments are neither technically nor ethically possible in humans. However, there is growing concern that laboratory mice do not reflect relevant aspects of the human immune system, which may account for failures to translate disease treatments from bench to bedside. Laboratory mice live in abnormally hygienic specific pathogen free (SPF) barrier facilities. Here we show that standard laboratory mouse husbandry has profound effects on the immune system and that environmental changes produce mice with immune systems closer to those of adult humans. Laboratory mice--like newborn, but not adult, humans--lack effector-differentiated and mucosally distributed memory T cells. These cell populations were present in free-living barn populations of feral mice and pet store mice with diverse microbial experience, and were induced in laboratory mice after co-housing with pet store mice, suggesting that the environment is involved in the induction of these cells. Altering the living conditions of mice profoundly affected the cellular composition of the innate and adaptive immune systems, resulted in global changes in blood cell gene expression to patterns that more closely reflected the immune signatures of adult humans rather than neonates, altered resistance to infection, and influenced T-cell differentiation in response to a de novo viral infection. These data highlight the effects of environment on the basal immune state and response to infection and suggest that restoring physiological microbial exposure in laboratory mice could provide a relevant tool for modelling immunological events in free-living organisms, including humans.

  5. MRI-based surface area estimates in the normal adult human brain: evidence for structural organisation.

    PubMed Central

    Sisodiya, S; Free, S; Fish, D; Shorvon, S

    1996-01-01

    There are a number of quantitative relationships between geometric parameters describing the structure of the normal human cerebral cortex examined in vivo using volumetric magnetic resonance imaging. A voxel-counting method is used to estimate grey-white interface surface area. The effects of bias associated with the method are considered. In 33 normal controls, the cerebral hemispheres were symmetric in terms of total volume, irrespective of handedness, but not in terms of surface areas for right-handers. The surface area of the grey matter-white matter interface was directly proportional to the cortical grey matter volume, suggesting that growth of the neocortex is primarily tangential, with repetition of a basic structural element rather than gross alterations in the thickness of the cortex. The majority of the surface area of the grey-white interface lies within gyral white matter cores. The mean thickness of the cortex of the right cerebral hemisphere in vivo was 3.0 mm and that of the left 3.3 mm. There was a relationship between the cross-sectional area of the corpus callosum and grey-white interface surface area, suggesting that a fixed proportion and cortical neurons extend interhemispheric axons. These findings suggest that there are general architectural principles governing the organisation of the complex, but ordered, human cerebral cortex. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8621342

  6. Fourier analysis of human soft tissue facial shape: sex differences in normal adults.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Schmitz, J H; Miani, A; Taroni, G

    1995-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in human facial form involves both size and shape variations of the soft tissue structures. These variations are conventionally appreciated using linear and angular measurements, as well as ratios, taken from photographs or radiographs. Unfortunately this metric approach provides adequate quantitative information about size only, eluding the problems of shape definition. Mathematical methods such as the Fourier series allow a correct quantitative analysis of shape and of its changes. A method for the reconstruction of outlines starting from selected landmarks and for their Fourier analysis has been developed, and applied to analyse sex differences in shape of the soft tissue facial contour in a group of healthy young adults. When standardised for size, no sex differences were found between both cosine and sine coefficients of the Fourier series expansion. This shape similarity was largely overwhelmed by the very evident size differences and it could be measured only using the proper mathematical methods. PMID:8586558

  7. Seroepidemiology of human herpesvirus 6 infection in normal children and adults.

    PubMed

    Okuno, T; Takahashi, K; Balachandra, K; Shiraki, K; Yamanishi, K; Takahashi, M; Baba, K

    1989-04-01

    Sera from normal subjects were examined for reactivity to human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) by the anticomplement immunofluorescence test. Of a total of 179 serum specimens from donors aged from under 10 to 59 years, 141 specimens showed positive reactivity against HHV-6. The positive rate was 70 to 83% for all age groups, and there were no substantial differences in the positive rates. Sera from younger children aged from 0 to 21 months were then examined in detail. The antibody-positive rate of children aged from 0 to 5 months decreased from 52 to 5%, but it gradually increased by 12 months. Almost all children had the antibody against this virus after 13 months of age.

  8. A resource of ribosomal RNA-depleted RNA-Seq data from different normal adult and fetal human tissues.

    PubMed

    Choy, Jocelyn Y H; Boon, Priscilla L S; Bertin, Nicolas; Fullwood, Melissa J

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is the most fundamental level at which the genotype leads to the phenotype of the organism. Enabled by ultra-high-throughput next-generation DNA sequencing, RNA-Seq involves shotgun sequencing of fragmented RNA transcripts by next-generation sequencing followed by in silico assembly, and is rapidly becoming the most popular method for gene expression analysis. Poly[A]+ RNA-Seq analyses of normal human adult tissue samples such as Illumina's Human BodyMap 2.0 Project and the RNA-Seq atlas have provided a useful global resource and framework for comparisons with diseased tissues such as cancer. However, these analyses have failed to provide information on poly[A]-RNA, which is abundant in our cells. The most recent advances in RNA-Seq analyses use ribosomal RNA-depletion to provide information on both poly[A]+ and poly[A]-RNA. In this paper, we describe the use of Illumina's HiSeq 2000 to generate high quality rRNA-depleted RNA-Seq datasets from human fetal and adult tissues. The datasets reported here will be useful in understanding the different expression profiles in different tissues.

  9. Bone morphogenetic protein-7 expression and activity in the human adult normal kidney is predominantly localized to the distal nephron.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, P; Haag, J; Câmpean, V; Goldschmeding, R; Atalla, A; Amann, K; Aigner, T

    2006-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP)-7 plays an important role during fetal kidney development. In the adult, BMP-7 is most strongly expressed in the kidney compared to other organs, but the exact expression pattern as well as the function of BMP-7 is unclear. The major aim of the present study was to define which parts of the human kidney do physiologically express BMP-7 and which cells appear to be targets of BMP activity by showing phosphorylated BMP-receptor-associated Smads 1, 5, or 8 and inhibitor of differentiation factor 1 (ID1) expression. BMP-7 expression was localized by immunohistology to the epithelia of the distal tubule as well as the collecting ducts (CDs). Phospho-Smads 1/5/8 and ID1 expression largely colocalized with BMP-7 and was also localized in the epithelia of the distal tubule and the CDs. This was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction-based mRNA expression analysis. In vitro, proximal tubular cells (PTCs) expressed BMP receptors and BMP-receptor-associated Smads and were reactive to BMP-7. Our data indicate that BMP-7 expression in the adult human kidney appears to be more restricted than in the fetal situation and predominantly found in the distal nephron. Also, evidence of in vivo BMP signalling (i.e. phospho-Smads and ID1 expression) was found there. These findings suggest that BMP-7 plays a physiological role mostly in this part of the kidney. Still, as reported previously, PTCs are responsive to BMP-7, but presumably not in an autocrine or paracrine mode in normal adult kidneys. PMID:16807538

  10. α-synuclein phosphorylation and truncation are normal events in the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Muntané, G; Ferrer, I; Martinez-Vicente, M

    2012-01-01

    α-synuclein is a key protein in Lewy body diseases (LBDs) and a major component of Lewy bodies and related aberrant cytoplasmic and neuritic inclusions. Regional differences in α-synuclein have been associated with selective neuronal vulnerability to Lewy pathology. Furthermore, phosphorylation at serine 129 (Ser129) and α-synuclein truncation have been considered crucial in the pathogenesis of Lewy inclusions. The present study shows consistent reduction in α-synuclein protein expression levels in the human substantia nigra and nucleus basalis of Meynert compared with other brain regions independently of age and pathology. Phosphorylated α-synuclein at Ser129 is naturally increased in these same regions, thus inversely related with the total amount of α-synuclein. In contrast, truncated α-synuclein is naturally observed in control and diseased brains and correlating with the total amount of α-synuclein. Several truncated variants have been identified where some of these variants are truncated at the C-terminal domain, whereas others are truncated at the N-terminal domain, and all are present in cases with and without Lewy pathology. Although accumulation of truncated α-synuclein variants and phosphorylated α-synuclein occurs in Lewy bodies, α-synuclein phosphorylation and truncation can be considered constitutive in control and diseased brains.

  11. Protonation states of histidine and other key residues in deoxy normal human adult hemoglobin by neutron protein crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalevsky, Andrey; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Shibayama, Naoya; Park, Sam-Yong; Ishikawa, Takuya; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, S. Zoe; Langan, Paul; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-11-01

    Using neutron diffraction analysis, the protonation states of 35 of 38 histidine residues were determined for the deoxy form of normal human adult hemoglobin. Distal and buried histidines may contribute to the increased affinity of the deoxy state for hydrogen ions and its decreased affinity for oxygen compared with the oxygenated form. The protonation states of the histidine residues key to the function of deoxy (T-state) human hemoglobin have been investigated using neutron protein crystallography. These residues can reversibly bind protons, thereby regulating the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. By examining the OMIT F{sub o} − F{sub c} and 2F{sub o} − F{sub c} neutron scattering maps, the protonation states of 35 of the 38 His residues were directly determined. The remaining three residues were found to be disordered. Surprisingly, seven pairs of His residues from equivalent α or β chains, αHis20, αHis50, αHis58, αHis89, βHis63, βHis143 and βHis146, have different protonation states. The protonation of distal His residues in the α{sub 1}β{sub 1} heterodimer and the protonation of αHis103 in both subunits demonstrates that these residues may participate in buffering hydrogen ions and may influence the oxygen binding. The observed protonation states of His residues are compared with their ΔpK{sub a} between the deoxy and oxy states. Examination of inter-subunit interfaces provided evidence for interactions that are essential for the stability of the deoxy tertiary structure.

  12. Bender Gestalt Performance of Normal Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacks, Patricia; Storandt, Martha

    1982-01-01

    Provides normative data on the Bender Gestalt Test (BGT) with a sample of 334 normal older adults. Showed that these older adults do not perform on the BGT in a manner that can be called brain damaged. Use of the cut-off score developed with younger persons appears appropriate. (Author)

  13. Anatomical Network Comparison of Human Upper and Lower, Newborn and Adult, and Normal and Abnormal Limbs, with Notes on Development, Pathology and Limb Serial Homology vs. Homoplasy

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Rui; Esteve-Altava, Borja; Smith, Christopher; Boughner, Julia C.; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2015-01-01

    How do the various anatomical parts (modules) of the animal body evolve into very different integrated forms (integration) yet still function properly without decreasing the individual’s survival? This long-standing question remains unanswered for multiple reasons, including lack of consensus about conceptual definitions and approaches, as well as a reasonable bias toward the study of hard tissues over soft tissues. A major difficulty concerns the non-trivial technical hurdles of addressing this problem, specifically the lack of quantitative tools to quantify and compare variation across multiple disparate anatomical parts and tissue types. In this paper we apply for the first time a powerful new quantitative tool, Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), to examine and compare in detail the musculoskeletal modularity and integration of normal and abnormal human upper and lower limbs. In contrast to other morphological methods, the strength of AnNA is that it allows efficient and direct empirical comparisons among body parts with even vastly different architectures (e.g. upper and lower limbs) and diverse or complex tissue composition (e.g. bones, cartilages and muscles), by quantifying the spatial organization of these parts—their topological patterns relative to each other—using tools borrowed from network theory. Our results reveal similarities between the skeletal networks of the normal newborn/adult upper limb vs. lower limb, with exception to the shoulder vs. pelvis. However, when muscles are included, the overall musculoskeletal network organization of the upper limb is strikingly different from that of the lower limb, particularly that of the more proximal structures of each limb. Importantly, the obtained data provide further evidence to be added to the vast amount of paleontological, gross anatomical, developmental, molecular and embryological data recently obtained that contradicts the long-standing dogma that the upper and lower limbs are serial

  14. Anatomical Network Comparison of Human Upper and Lower, Newborn and Adult, and Normal and Abnormal Limbs, with Notes on Development, Pathology and Limb Serial Homology vs. Homoplasy.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Rui; Esteve-Altava, Borja; Smith, Christopher; Boughner, Julia C; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2015-01-01

    How do the various anatomical parts (modules) of the animal body evolve into very different integrated forms (integration) yet still function properly without decreasing the individual's survival? This long-standing question remains unanswered for multiple reasons, including lack of consensus about conceptual definitions and approaches, as well as a reasonable bias toward the study of hard tissues over soft tissues. A major difficulty concerns the non-trivial technical hurdles of addressing this problem, specifically the lack of quantitative tools to quantify and compare variation across multiple disparate anatomical parts and tissue types. In this paper we apply for the first time a powerful new quantitative tool, Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), to examine and compare in detail the musculoskeletal modularity and integration of normal and abnormal human upper and lower limbs. In contrast to other morphological methods, the strength of AnNA is that it allows efficient and direct empirical comparisons among body parts with even vastly different architectures (e.g. upper and lower limbs) and diverse or complex tissue composition (e.g. bones, cartilages and muscles), by quantifying the spatial organization of these parts-their topological patterns relative to each other-using tools borrowed from network theory. Our results reveal similarities between the skeletal networks of the normal newborn/adult upper limb vs. lower limb, with exception to the shoulder vs. pelvis. However, when muscles are included, the overall musculoskeletal network organization of the upper limb is strikingly different from that of the lower limb, particularly that of the more proximal structures of each limb. Importantly, the obtained data provide further evidence to be added to the vast amount of paleontological, gross anatomical, developmental, molecular and embryological data recently obtained that contradicts the long-standing dogma that the upper and lower limbs are serial homologues

  15. Histological and immunohistochemical study of estrogen and progesterone receptors in normal human breast tissue in adult age groups vulnerable to malignancy.

    PubMed

    Goyal, R; Gupta, T; Gupta, R; Aggarwal, A; Sahni, D; Singh, G

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of receptor status has become standard procedure for assessing breast cancer patients. Estrogen causes epithelial proliferation in breast tissue via the estrogen receptor (ER). The progesterone receptor (PR) is also regulated by the estrogen gene. Analyzing ER and PR together gives information regarding the likely response of carcinoma patients to hormonal therapy. The aim of the present study was to record the expression patterns of ER and PR in normal mammary tissue in different age groups to provide reference data to facilitate histological diagnosis. Breast tissues from the upper outer quadrant of each side of 27 adult female cadavers were examined after H & E staining. ER and PR were identified and examined by immunohistochemistry. The percentage area occupied by parenchyma relative to stromal tissue was calculated in different age groups and was about 4:6, 3.5:6.5, 3:7, 2:8, and 1.5:8.5 in the 3rd, 4th and 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th, and 10th decades of life, respectively. Both ER and PR were present in all age groups and the numbers of both receptors were maximal during the 4th decade. The distribution and staining patterns for both ER and PR were recorded in different age groups. The contiguous pattern of ER, which is considered pathognomonic of breast carcinoma, was not seen except in one case in the 6th decade. Moderately stained ER and PR receptor sites predominated throughout. The study of normal breast tissue of similar age might provide comparisons that will help histopathologists to make clinical diagnoses from breast biopsies. Clin. Anat. 29:729-737, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27038435

  16. Arts & Humanities in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter on lifelong learning focuses on the theme of the arts and humanities in adult literacy education. The following articles are included: (1) "In Defense of a Practical Education" (Earl Shorris); (2) "From the Program Director" (Elizabeth Bryant McCrary); (3) "Vermont Council on the Humanities: Book Discussion…

  17. Direct determination of protonation states of histidine residues in a 2 A neutron structure of deoxy-human normal adult hemoglobin and implications for the Bohr effect.

    PubMed

    Kovalevsky, Andrey Y; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Shibayama, Naoya; Park, Sam-Yong; Ishikawa, Takuya; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Zoe; Langan, Paul; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-04-30

    We have investigated the protonation states of histidine residues (potential Bohr groups) in the deoxy form (T state) of human hemoglobin by direct determination of hydrogen (deuterium) positions with the neutron protein crystallography technique. The reversible binding of protons is key to the allosteric regulation of human hemoglobin. The protonation states of 35 of the 38 His residues were directly determined from neutron scattering omit maps, with 3 of the remaining residues being disordered. Protonation states of 5 equivalent His residues--alpha His20, alpha His50, alpha His89, beta His143, and beta His146--differ between the symmetry-related globin subunits. The distal His residues, alpha His58 and beta His63, are protonated in the alpha 1 beta 1 heterodimer and are neutral in alpha 2 beta 2. Buried residue alpha His103 is found to be protonated in both subunits. These distal and buried residues have the potential to act as Bohr groups. The observed protonation states of His residues are compared to changes in their pK(a) values during the transition from the T to the R state and the results provide some new insights into our understanding of the molecular mechanism of the Bohr effect.

  18. NORMAL HUMAN VARIATION: REFOCUSSING THE ENHANCEMENT DEBATE

    PubMed Central

    Kahane, Guy; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-01-01

    This article draws attention to several common mistakes in thinking about biomedical enhancement, mistakes that are made even by some supporters of enhancement. We illustrate these mistakes by examining objections that John Harris has recently raised against the use of pharmacological interventions to directly modulate moral decision-making. We then apply these lessons to other influential figures in the debate about enhancement. One upshot of our argument is that many considerations presented as powerful objections to enhancement are really strong considerations in favour of biomedical enhancement, just in a different direction. Another upshot is that it is unfortunate that much of the current debate focuses on interventions that will radically transform normal human capacities. Such interventions are unlikely to be available in the near future, and may not even be feasible. But our argument shows that the enhancement project can still have a radical impact on human life even if biomedical enhancement operated entirely within the normal human range. PMID:23906367

  19. Normal and abnormal intestinal absorption by humans

    PubMed Central

    Heizer, William D.

    1979-01-01

    Adults eating a Western diet digest and absorb ingested food containing approximately 100 g fat, 350 g carbohydrate, and 75 g protein daily. Normal fat absorption requires adequate gastric, pancreatic, liver-biliary, mucosal, and lymphatic function. Carbohydrate and protein absorption is much less dependent on liver-biliary and lymphatic function. The intestine has a large reserve capacity for digestion and absorption of nutrients which is due to both excess function and to adaptive changes which increase function in one segment of the digestive-absorptive system when it is decreased or lost in another segment. The large reserve capacity explains why most of the prevalent intestinal diseases seldom cause clinically detectable changes in absorption. However, there are more than 30 less-common human diseases which cause malabsorption of one or more nutrients. Those that cause the malabsorption syndrome, i.e., steatorrhea and weight loss, can be conveniently categorized according to the major deficiency leading to the absorptive defect as follows: insufficient pancreatic enzyme activity, insufficient bile acid, disease of the small intestinal wall, multiple defects, mechanism unknown, and drug-induced malabsorption. A few diseases, most of which are congenital, cause malabsorption of only one or a few related nutrients such as lactose malabsorption in lactase deficiency. Most of the tests currently in use for detecting and diagnosing the cause of malabsorption are relatively insensitive and nonspecific. Chemical analysis of the fat in a three-day stool collection remains the single best test for diagnosing the malabsorption syndrome. However, a breath test using Triolein labeled with either the radioactive or stable isotope of carbon may be an important recent advance. Other breath tests are also currently being investigated for quantitating absorption or malabsorption of various substances including bile acids and various sugars. Studies of the function of the

  20. Viscoelastic properties of the normal human bladder.

    PubMed

    Andersson, S; Kronström, A; Bjerle, P

    1989-01-01

    Continuous and stepwise cystometry were performed through suprapubic catheters in 12 healthy young subjects in order to assess passive viscoelastic variables of the normal human bladder during the collection phase. Elastic contants increased non-linearly with bladder distension. Relative elastic modulus and relaxation time of the bladder wall increased or tended to increase with bladder distension and infusion rate. There was considerable interindividual variation in all variables suggesting that discrimination between normal and abnormal bladder wall viscoelasticity may be difficult in routine clinical practice.

  1. Effect of propranolol on normal human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fortier, N L; Snyder, L M; Palek, J; Weiss, E B; Mancini, C; Falcone, J

    1977-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to standardize the effect of propranolol on normal human red cells and thus establish certain parameters enabling us to evaluate propranolol's effect on pathological cells. Normal human erythrocytes lost 40 MEq. of potassium, decreased the intracellular pH by 0.06 units, and shifted the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve 6.0 mm. Hg to the right in the presence of propranolol. The series of events and magnitude of the response induced by propranolol was time dependent and sensitive to temperature, pH, drug concentration, and erythrocyte concentration. Calcium was an absolute requirement for maximal propranolol action with simultaneous incorporation of trace amounts of radioactive calcium into the cell. Chelation of calcium with EDTA or EGTA inhibited the response to propranolol.

  2. Working memory training using EEG neurofeedback in normal young adults.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shi; Cheng, Chen; Wu, Xia; Guo, Xiaojuan; Yao, Li; Zhang, Jiacai

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that working memory (WM) performance can be improved by intensive and adaptive computerized training. Here, we explored the WM training effect using Electroencephalography (EEG) neurofeedback (NF) in normal young adults. In the first study, we identified the EEG features related to WM in normal young adults. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed that the power ratio of the theta-to-alpha rhythms in the anterior-parietal region, accurately classified a high percentage of the EEG trials recorded during WM and fixation control (FC) tasks. Based on these results, a second study aimed to assess the training effects of the theta-to-alpha ratio and tested the hypothesis that up-regulating the power ratio can improve working memory behavior. Our results demonstrated that these normal young adults succeeded in improving their WM performance with EEG NF, and the pre- and post-test evaluations also indicated that WM performance increase in experimental group was significantly greater than control groups. In summary, our findings provided preliminarily evidence that WM performance can be improved through learned regulation of the EEG power ratio using EEG NF.

  3. Ankle brachial pressure index of normal, healthy, younger adults.

    PubMed

    Niblo, Jane; Coull, Alison

    Doppler ultrasound and ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) calculations are used in the assessment of lower limb vascularity, specifically to determine arterial deficiency. ABPI is important as it is used as an indicator when deciding management options for the treatment of leg ulceration. This study aimed to investigate the range of ABPI measurement, using Doppler ultrasound and sphygmomanometry in 36 young healthy adults aged 18-55 years. The findings show a mean ABPI in the left leg of 1.19 and a mean ABPI of 1.17 in the right leg which, while within the normal range, are consistently in the upper range and significantly higher than the acknowledged 'normal' midpoint of 1.0. It would appear that younger people will have ABPIs within the upper aspect of the normal range and well above the established norm of 1.0. PMID:24151719

  4. Transthyretin and Normal Human Pregnancy: Mini Review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiushi; Liu, Chongdong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    Since transthyretin (TTR) was discovered, it has been regarded as a serum protein carrier of thyroid hormones and retinol. However, many other important functions of TTR have been found recently, and current evidence suggests that it plays a role in human receptivity and normal pregnancy. TTR is abundant in the uterine cavity, uterine secretion, placenta, and serum of pregnant females in the peri-implantation uterus and the first trimester of pregnancy. It may be involved in the delivery of maternal thyroid hormones to the fetus. In addition, it appears to play a key role in the preeclampsia mechanism and may be involved in spiral artery remodeling. This review will summarize what is currently known about TTR and normal pregnancy; it will focus on our findings regarding the role of TTR in the spiral artery remodeling process and the additional research required in the future. PMID:27650990

  5. Cytologic features of the normal pineal gland of adults.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Heffernan, José A; Bárcena, Carmen; Agra, Carolina; Asunción, Alfonso

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that the histology of normal pineal gland may resemble not only pineal tumors but also gliomas, owing to its cellularity which is much greater than that of normal white or gray matter. Our recent experience with a case in which part of a normal gland was submitted for intraoperative consultation, together with the scarcity of cytologic descriptions, led us to perform a cyto-histologic correlation study. In addition to the intraoperative case, we collected five pineal glands from consecutive adult autopsies. During the squash procedure, we often noted the presence of calcified grains. Smears were hypercellular, distributed in tissue fibrillary fragments and as numerous single cells, with crystalline structures. Pineal gland cells (pineocytes) were large, round, epithelioid with ill-defined cytoplasms and moderate nuclear pleomorphism. Spindle cells with greater fibrillary quality were less common. One of the most remarkable findings seen in all cases was the presence of cytoplasmic pigment. Histological evaluation and immunohistochemical staining confirmed that the tissue was normal pineal gland. The histology showed a characteristic lobular aspect and frequent corpora arenacea. The pigment seen cytologically was also encountered in histology and corresponded to lipofuscin. Cytologic features of the pineal gland are peculiar when compared to other normal structures of the central nervous system. These features correlate closely with what is seen on histology. In an adequate clinical context, and in combination with frozen sections, cytology allows a specific recognition of the pineal gland during intraoperative pathologic consultations.

  6. Prevalences of human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 in normal Thai population.

    PubMed

    Thawaranantha, D; Chimabutra, K; Balachandra, K; Warachit, P; Pantuwatana, S; Inagi, R; Kurata, T; Yamanishi, K

    1999-06-01

    Prevalences of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) DNA were investigated in normal Thai population. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and saliva were collected from 238 healthy adults in five provinces which might be a representative of each part of the country, and 120 normal children in one province. Prevalences of HHV-6 DNA PBMC were 45.5-74.3% in adults and 78.3% in children, and in saliva, very low prevalences were detected; 5.7-8.6% in adults and 15.0% in children, respectively. Additionally, all HHV-6 DNA detected in this study were variant B. Comparingly to those of HHV-7 DNA, the prevalences were significantly higher than those of HHV-6, ie, 82.9-91.4% in PBMC of adults, 85% in PBMC of children, 84.8-89.0% in saliva of adults and 92.5% in saliva of children. HHV-6 and HHV-7 isolation from saliva specimens were also performed. No HHV-6 could be isolated from any samples, whereas, in the present study, HHV-7 could be isolated as 90.0% from children and as 20.0-54.5% from adults.

  7. Vowel perception by noise masked normal-hearing young adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richie, Carolyn; Kewley-Port, Diane; Coughlin, Maureen

    2005-08-01

    This study examined vowel perception by young normal-hearing (YNH) adults, in various listening conditions designed to simulate mild-to-moderate sloping sensorineural hearing loss. YNH listeners were individually age- and gender-matched to young hearing-impaired (YHI) listeners tested in a previous study [Richie et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 2923-2933 (2003)]. YNH listeners were tested in three conditions designed to create equal audibility with the YHI listeners; a low signal level with and without a simulated hearing loss, and a high signal level with a simulated hearing loss. Listeners discriminated changes in synthetic vowel tokens /smcapi e ɛ invv æ/ when F1 or F2 varied in frequency. Comparison of YNH with YHI results failed to reveal significant differences between groups in terms of performance on vowel discrimination, in conditions of similar audibility by using both noise masking to elevate the hearing thresholds of the YNH and applying frequency-specific gain to the YHI listeners. Further, analysis of learning curves suggests that while the YHI listeners completed an average of 46% more test blocks than YNH listeners, the YHI achieved a level of discrimination similar to that of the YNH within the same number of blocks. Apparently, when age and gender are closely matched between young hearing-impaired and normal-hearing adults, performance on vowel tasks may be explained by audibility alone.

  8. Computerized tomographic study of normal Evans index in adult Nigerians

    PubMed Central

    Hamidu, Ahmed Umdagas; Olarinoye-Akorede, Sefiya Adebanke; Ekott, David Solomon; Danborno, Barnabas; Mahmud, Muhammad Raj; Balogun, Muhammad Shakir

    2015-01-01

    Background: The evaluation of degree of ventricular enlargement should be based on established indices rather than on personal experience as this is highly subjective. Our aim was to establish normal values for Evans index in a Nigerian adult population as none has been found in the Nigerian medical literature. Materials and Methods: Axial computerized tomographic brain scans of 488 normal subjects were reviewed retrospectively. Of them, 319 (65.36%) of the patients were males and 169 (34.63%) were females; their ages ranged from 18 to 84 years with a mean age of 37.26 years. The images were acquired using a multi-slice GE Sigma excite scanner. Evans index was measured as the linear ratio of the total width of the frontal horns of the cerebral lateral ventricles to the maximum intracranial diameter. Results: The mean value for Evans index for the studied population was 0.252 ± 0.04. The EI increased with age and it was slightly higher among males. The difference in Evans value in males and females was not statistically significant. Individuals above 60 years old had the highest Evans values in both sexes. Conclusion: This study has established ranges of normal value for Evans index in a Nigerian population. It agrees with the diagnostic cut-off value of > 0.3 for hydrocephalus and it compares well with that of the Caucasians. PMID:25552852

  9. Prevalence of voice quality deviations in the normal adult population.

    PubMed

    Brindle, B R; Morris, H L

    1979-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of voice quality deviations in a normal adult population. One-hundred twelve subjects, aged 17 to 80, read a short paragraph aloud into a high-fidelity tape recorder and completed a case history questionnaire. A group of 11 pretrained judges rated overall performance of each taped sample on a seven-point equal-appearing intervals scale, then designated those quality components which contributed toward deviant ratings. Eighty-two percent of the group received a mean severity rating lower than 1.99; 16% had a rating between 2.00 and 2.99; and 2% was assigned a mean rating higher than 3.00.

  10. Aspartame metabolism in normal adults, phenylketonuric heterozygotes, and diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Filer, L J; Stegink, L D

    1989-01-01

    This study reviews clinical studies testing the effects of various doses of aspartame on blood levels of phenylalanine, aspartate, and methanol in normal subjects and known phenylketonuric heterozygotes. The effect of aspartame on the phenylalanine-to-large neutral amino acid ratio under various feeding situations is shown. The clinical studies of aspartame in diabetic subjects are limited to observations of its effects on blood levels of glucose, lipids, insulin, and glucagon. These studies clearly demonstrate the safety of this high-intensity sweetener for use by humans.

  11. Iodopovidone pleurodesis does not effect thyroid function in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Yeginsu, Ali; Karamustafaoglu, Altemur; Ozugurlu, Fikret; Etikan, Ilker

    2007-08-01

    Iodopovidone is an effective, safe, cheap, and easily available agent for pleurodesis. On the other hand, topical applications of iodopovidone may cause thyroid dysfunction. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the effects of intrapleural administration of iodopovidone on thyroid function. Twelve patients have undergone iodopovidone pleurodesis so far. A mixture of 20 ml 10% iodopovidone and 80 ml 0.9% saline solution was administered into the pleural cavity through the chest tube. Thyroid hormone (TSH, TT4, TT3, FT4, FT3) levels were routinely measured just before pleurodesis, and at the 24th and 72nd h of pleurodesis. No statistically significant alteration in thyroid function was determined (P>0.05). We did not observe any signs or symptoms of hyper- or hypothyroidism in any patient. Nine patients had a complete response to pleurodesis (75%). One patient who had undergone iodopovidone pleurodesis suffered from a moderate degree of transient chest pain. In conclusion, iodopovidone pleurodesis is safe and does not cause any thyroid dysfunction in normal adults.

  12. Normal anatomy and histology of the adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Menke, Aswin L; Spitsbergen, Jan M; Wolterbeek, Andre P M; Woutersen, Ruud A

    2011-08-01

    The zebrafish has been shown to be an excellent vertebrate model for studying the roles of specific genes and signaling pathways. The sequencing of its genome and the relative ease with which gene modifications can be performed have led to the creation of numerous human disease models that can be used for testing the potential and the toxicity of new pharmaceutical compounds. Many pharmaceutical companies already use the zebrafish for prescreening purposes. So far, the focus has been on ecotoxicity and the effects on embryonic development, but there is a trend to expand the use of the zebrafish with acute, subchronic, and chronic toxicity studies that are currently still carried out with the more conventional test animals such as rodents. However, before we can fully realize the potential of the zebrafish as an animal model for understanding human development, disease, and toxicology, we must first greatly advance our knowledge of normal zebrafish physiology, anatomy, and histology. To further this knowledge, we describe, in the present article, location and histology of the major zebrafish organ systems with a brief description of their function.

  13. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  14. Novel surface markers directed against adult human gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Galivo, Feorillo H; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Maria T; Zhong, YongPing; Streeter, Philip R; Grompe, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Novel cell surface-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated against extrahepatic biliary cells were developed for the isolation and characterization of different cell subsets from normal adult human gallbladder. Eleven antigenically distinct gallbladder subpopulations were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. They were classified into epithelial, mesenchymal, and pancreatobiliary (PDX1(+)SOX9(+)) subsets based on gene expression profiling. These antigenically distinct human gallbladder cell subsets could potentially also reflect different functional properties in regards to bile physiology, cell renewal and plasticity. Three of the novel monoclonal antibodies differentially labeled archival sections of primary carcinoma of human gallbladder relative to normal tissue. The novel monoclonal antibodies described herein enable the identification and characterization of antigenically diverse cell subsets within adult human gallbladder and are putative tumor biomarkers.

  15. Methylation similarities of two CpG sites within exon 5 of human H19 between normal tissues and testicular germ cell tumours of adolescents and adults, without correlation with allelic and total level of expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, A. J.; Verkerk, A. J.; Dekker, M. C.; van Gurp, R. J.; Oosterhuis, J. W.; Looijenga, L. H.

    1997-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) of adolescents and adults morphologically mimic different stages of embryogenesis. Established cell lines of these cancers are used as informative models to study early development. We found that, in contrast to normal development, TGCTs show a consistent biallelic expression of imprinted genes, including H19, irrespective of histology. Methylation of particular cytosine residues of H19 correlates with inhibition of expression, which has not been studied in TGCTs thus far. We investigated the methylation status of two CpG sites within the 3' region of H19 (exon 5: positions 3321 and 3324) both in normal tissues as well as in TGCTs. To obtain quantitative data of these specific sites, the ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction technique, instead of Southern blot analysis, was applied. The results were compared with the allelic status and the total level of expression of this gene. Additionally, the undifferentiated cells and differentiated derivatives of the TGCT-derived cell line NT2-D1 were analysed. While peripheral blood showed no H19 expression and complete methylation, a heterogeneous but consistent pattern of methylation and level of expression was found in the other normal tissues, without a correlation between the two. The separate histological entities of TGCTs resembled the pattern of their nonmalignant tissues. While the CpG sites remained completely methylated in NT2-D1, H19 expression was induced upon differentiation. These data indicate that methylation of the CpG sites within exon 5 of H19 is tissue dependent, without regulating allelic status and/or total level of expression. Of special note is the finding that, also regarding methylation of these particular sites of H19, TGCTs mimic their non-malignant counterparts, in spite of their consistent biallelic expression. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9310237

  16. Sox2 and Jagged1 Expression in Normal and Drug-Damaged Adult Mouse Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Sean; Taylor, Ruth R.; Forge, Andrew; Hume, Clifford R.

    2007-01-01

    Inner ear hair cells detect environmental signals associated with hearing, balance, and body orientation. In humans and other mammals, significant hair cell loss leads to irreversible hearing and balance deficits, whereas hair cell loss in nonmammalian vertebrates is repaired by the spontaneous generation of replacement hair cells. Research in mammalian hair cell regeneration is hampered by the lack of in vivo damage models for the adult mouse inner ear and the paucity of cell-type-specific markers for non-sensory cells within the sensory receptor epithelia. The present study delineates a protocol to drug damage the adult mouse auditory epithelium (organ of Corti) in situ and uses this protocol to investigate Sox2 and Jagged1 expression in damaged inner ear sensory epithelia. In other tissues, the transcription factor Sox2 and a ligand member of the Notch signaling pathway, Jagged1, are involved in regenerative processes. Both are involved in early inner ear development and are expressed in developing support cells, but little is known about their expressions in the adult. We describe a nonsurgical technique for inducing hair cell damage in adult mouse organ of Corti by a single high-dose injection of the aminoglycoside kanamycin followed by a single injection of the loop diuretic furosemide. This drug combination causes the rapid death of outer hair cells throughout the cochlea. Using immunocytochemical techniques, Sox2 is shown to be expressed specifically in support cells in normal adult mouse inner ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 is absent from auditory hair cells, but is expressed in a subset of vestibular hair cells. Double-labeling experiments with Sox2 and calbindin suggest Sox2-positive hair cells are Type II. Jagged1 is also expressed in support cells in the adult ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 and Jagged1 may be involved in the maintenance of support cells in adult mouse inner ear. PMID:18157569

  17. Cephalic phase metabolic responses in normal weight adults.

    PubMed

    Bruce, D G; Storlien, L H; Furler, S M; Chisholm, D J

    1987-08-01

    The presence and physiologic importance of cephalic phase insulin release in humans remains controversial. The aim of these studies was to determine whether cephalic phase insulin release could be demonstrated in normal weight subjects and whether it would be associated with changes in blood glucose, free fatty acid, and pancreatic polypeptide levels. The studies were followed by a hyperglycemic clamp to determine whether cephalic responses would alter overall glucose disposal or glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In all, 17 subjects were studied on two occasions with and without (control study) presentation of food stimuli. Tease-feeding alone (n = 6), or the administration of a sweet taste alone (aspartame, n = 5) failed to stimulate cephalic responses. However, the presentation of the combined stimuli (tease meals plus sweet taste, n = 7) resulted in a significant fall (P less than .005) in blood glucose levels and a variable rise in serum insulin (% insulin rise 38 +/- 15%, P less than .05) and C-peptide levels (7 +/- 6%, NS) within five minutes of the food presentation when compared with control studies, with no change seen in free fatty acid or pancreatic polypeptide levels. The blood glucose fall correlated strongly (r = .90, P less than .01) with a score of the subjective response to the food and taste.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Developmental hematopoiesis in normal human fetal blood.

    PubMed

    Forestier, F; Daffos, F; Catherine, N; Renard, M; Andreux, J P

    1991-06-01

    Using an easy and safe procedure for fetal blood sampling in utero, we studied 3,415 fetuses for prenatal diagnosis. Retrospectively, 2,860 normal blood samples, performed from the 18th week of gestation to the end of pregnancy, were selected. Differentials were evaluated in 732 cases. Burst-forming unit erythroid (BFU-E) and erythropoietin (Epo) were measured in 27 and 163 cases, respectively. Total nucleated cell and platelet counts did not change from the 18th to the 30th week of gestation. The lymphocytes represented the main population and the decrease of normoblastic cells made up for the increase in neutrophils. The increase of red blood cells and hemoglobin was substantial during the studied period. At mid trimester threefold more BFU-E were obtained than at birth. Epo levels remained stable throughout the pregnancy and no correlation was found between Epo and gestational age. These normal values of fetal erythropoiesis will improve our knowledge of physiology and provide a better insight into developmental hematopoiesis.

  19. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Expression in Normal and Diseased Human Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oronzi Scott, M.; Sylvester, J. E.; Heiman-Patterson, T.; Shi, Y.-J.; Fieles, W.; Stedman, H.; Burghes, A.; Ray, P.; Worton, R.; Fischbeck, K. H.

    1988-03-01

    A probe for the 5' end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene was used to study expression of the gene in normal human muscle, myogenic cell cultures, and muscle from patients with DMD. Expression was found in RNA from normal fetal muscle, adult cardiac and skeletal muscle, and cultured muscle after myoblast fusion. In DMD muscle, expression of this portion of the gene was also revealed by in situ RNA hybridization, particularly in regenerating muscle fibers.

  20. Fatty acid uptake in normal human myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Vyska, K.; Meyer, W.; Stremmel, W.; Notohamiprodjo, G.; Minami, K.; Machulla, H.J.; Gleichmann, U.; Meyer, H.; Koerfer, R. )

    1991-09-01

    Fatty acid binding protein has been found in rat aortic endothelial cell membrane. It has been identified to be a 40-kDa protein that corresponds to a 40-kDa fatty acid binding protein with high affinity for a variety of long chain fatty acids isolated from rat heart myocytes. It is proposed that this endothelial membrane fatty acid binding protein might mediate the myocardial uptake of fatty acids. For evaluation of this hypothesis in vivo, influx kinetics of tracer-labeled fatty acids was examined in 15 normal subjects by scintigraphic techniques. Variation of the plasma fatty acid concentration and plasma perfusion rate has been achieved by modulation of nutrition state and exercise conditions. The clinical results suggest that the myocardial fatty acid influx rate is saturable by increasing fatty acid plasma concentration as well as by increasing plasma flow. For analysis of these data, functional relations describing fatty acid transport from plasma into myocardial tissue in the presence and absence of an unstirred layer were developed. The fitting of these relations to experimental data indicate that the free fatty acid influx into myocardial tissue reveals the criteria of a reaction on a capillary surface in the vicinity of flowing plasma but not of a reaction in extravascular space or in an unstirred layer and that the fatty acid influx into normal myocardium is a saturable process that is characterized by the quantity corresponding to the Michaelis-Menten constant, Km, and the maximal velocity, Vmax, 0.24 {plus minus} 0.024 mumol/g and 0.37 {plus minus} 0.013 mumol/g(g.min), respectively. These data are compatible with a nondiffusional uptake process mediated by the initial interaction of fatty acids with the 40-kDa membrane fatty acid binding protein of cardiac endothelial cells.

  1. Normal values for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in adults and children.

    PubMed

    Kawel-Boehm, Nadine; Maceira, Alicia; Valsangiacomo-Buechel, Emanuela R; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Turkbey, Evrim B; Williams, Rupert; Plein, Sven; Tee, Michael; Eng, John; Bluemke, David A

    2015-04-18

    Morphological and functional parameters such as chamber size and function, aortic diameters and distensibility, flow and T1 and T2* relaxation time can be assessed and quantified by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Knowledge of normal values for quantitative CMR is crucial to interpretation of results and to distinguish normal from disease. In this review, we present normal reference values for morphological and functional CMR parameters of the cardiovascular system based on the peer-reviewed literature and current CMR techniques and sequences.

  2. Age and Gender Effects on Wideband Absorbance in Adults with Normal Outer and Middle Ear Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazlan, Rafidah; Kei, Joseph; Ya, Cheng Li; Yusof, Wan Nur Hanim Mohd; Saim, Lokman; Zhao, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of age and gender on wideband energy absorbance in adults with normal middle ear function. Method: Forty young adults (14 men, 26 women, aged 20-38 years), 31 middle-aged adults (16 men, 15 women, aged 42-64 years), and 30 older adults (20 men, 10 women, aged 65-82 years) were assessed. Energy absorbance…

  3. Accelerated aging syndromes, are they relevant to normal human aging?

    PubMed

    Dreesen, Oliver; Stewart, Colin L

    2011-09-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS) and Werner syndromes are diseases that clinically resemble some aspects of accelerated aging. HGPS is caused by mutations in theLMNA gene resulting in post-translational processing defects that trigger Progeria in children. Werner syndrome, arising from mutations in the WRN helicase gene, causes premature aging in young adults. What are the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these disorders and what aspects of the diseases resemble physiological human aging? Much of what we know stems from the study of patient derived fibroblasts with both mutations resulting in increased DNA damage, primarily at telomeres. However, in vivo patients with Werner's develop arteriosclerosis, among other pathologies. In HGPS patients, including iPS derived cells from HGPS patients, as well as some mouse models for Progeria, vascular smooth muscle (VSM) appears to be among the most severely affected tissues. Defective Lamin processing, associated with DNA damage, is present in VSM from old individuals, indicating processing defects may be a factor in normal aging. Whether persistent DNA damage, particularly at telomeres, is the root cause for these pathologies remains to be established, since not all progeroid Lmna mutations result in DNA damage and genome instability.

  4. Normal human serum contains a natural IgM antibody cytotoxic for human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ollert, M W; David, K; Schmitt, C; Hauenschild, A; Bredehorst, R; Erttmann, R; Vogel, C W

    1996-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is characterized by the second highest spontaneous regression of any human malignant disorder, a phenomenon that remains to be elucidated. In this study, a survey of 94 normal human adult sera revealed a considerable natural humoral cytotoxicity against human NB cell lines in approximately one-third of the tested sera of both genders. Specific cell killing by these sera was in the range of 40% to 95%. Serum cytotoxicity was dependent on an intact classical pathway of complement. By several lines of evidence, IgM antibodies were identified as the cytotoxic factor in the sera. Further analyses revealed that a 260-kDa protein was recognized by natural IgM of cytotoxic sera in Western blots of NB cell extracts. The antigen was expressed on the surface of seven human NB cell lines but not on human melanoma or other control tumor cell lines derived from kidney, pancreas, colon, bone, skeletal muscle, lymphatic system, and bone marrow. Furthermore, no reactivity was observed with normal human fibroblasts, melanocytes, and epidermal keratinocytes. The antigen was expressed in vivo as detected by immunohistochemistry in both the tumor of a NB patient and NB tumors established in nude rats from human NB cell lines. Most interestingly, the IgM anti-NB antibody was absent from the sera of 11 human NB patients with active disease. The anti-NB IgM also could not be detected in tumor tissue obtained from a NB patient. Collectively, our data suggest the existence of a natural humoral immunological tumor defense mechanism, which could account for the in vivo phenomenon of spontaneous NB tumor regression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8633097

  5. Normal range values for thromboelastography in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Scarpelini, S; Rhind, S G; Nascimento, B; Tien, H; Shek, P N; Peng, H T; Huang, H; Pinto, R; Speers, V; Reis, M; Rizoli, S B

    2009-12-01

    Thromboelastography (TEG) provides a functional evaluation of coagulation. It has characteristics of an ideal coagulation test for trauma, but is not frequently used, partially due to lack of both standardized techniques and normal values. We determined normal values for our population, compared them to those of the manufacturer and evaluated the effect of gender, age, blood type, and ethnicity. The technique was standardized using citrated blood, kaolin and was performed on a Haemoscope 5000 device. Volunteers were interviewed and excluded if pregnant, on anticoagulants or having a bleeding disorder. The TEG parameters analyzed were R, K, alpha, MA, LY30, and coagulation index. All volunteers outside the manufacturer's normal range underwent extensive coagulation investigations. Reference ranges for 95% for 118 healthy volunteers were R: 3.8-9.8 min, K: 0.7-3.4 min, alpha: 47.8-77.7 degrees, MA: 49.7-72.7 mm, LY30: -2.3-5.77%, coagulation index: -5.1-3.6. Most values were significantly different from those of the manufacturer, which would have diagnosed coagulopathy in 10 volunteers, for whom additional investigation revealed no disease (81% specificity). Healthy women were significantly more hypercoagulable than men. Aging was not associated with hypercoagulability and East Asian ethnicity was not with hypocoagulability. In our population, the manufacturer's normal values for citrated blood-kaolin had a specificity of 81% and would incorrectly identify 8.5% of the healthy volunteers as coagulopathic. This study supports the manufacturer's recommendation that each institution should determine its own normal values before adopting TEG, a procedure which may be impractical. Consideration should be given to a multi-institutional study to establish wide standard values for TEG.

  6. Taste perception in normal and overweight Mexican adults.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cordero, Erika; Malacara-Hernandez, Juan Manuel; Martinez-Cordero, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of obesity in Mexico is the highest in the world, with almost 70% of adults being classified as overweight or obese. The increased prevalence of obesity in Mexico, and globally, may be related to the changing food environment, providing increased access to highly palatable, but obesogenic, food products. One potential mechanism for this association is changing food perceptions, an area poorly studied in transitional countries. Thus, we conducted a study to determine the degree to which perception thresholds for four basic tastes are associated with anthropometric variables, hormone levels, and energy intake. Bitter and sweet taste had the lowest and highest thresholds, respectively, and women reported a greater sensitivity to these flavors compared to men. Overall, the perception thresholds to each flavor were not associated with energy intake or body mass index (BMI), while the perception threshold of aspartame was negatively associated with energy intake. Based on the results of our study, in a sample of Mexican adults, sensory taste response to basic flavors is not associated with energy intake or BMI. PMID:25681653

  7. Taste perception in normal and overweight Mexican adults.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cordero, Erika; Malacara-Hernandez, Juan Manuel; Martinez-Cordero, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of obesity in Mexico is the highest in the world, with almost 70% of adults being classified as overweight or obese. The increased prevalence of obesity in Mexico, and globally, may be related to the changing food environment, providing increased access to highly palatable, but obesogenic, food products. One potential mechanism for this association is changing food perceptions, an area poorly studied in transitional countries. Thus, we conducted a study to determine the degree to which perception thresholds for four basic tastes are associated with anthropometric variables, hormone levels, and energy intake. Bitter and sweet taste had the lowest and highest thresholds, respectively, and women reported a greater sensitivity to these flavors compared to men. Overall, the perception thresholds to each flavor were not associated with energy intake or body mass index (BMI), while the perception threshold of aspartame was negatively associated with energy intake. Based on the results of our study, in a sample of Mexican adults, sensory taste response to basic flavors is not associated with energy intake or BMI.

  8. The Importance and Perceived Reality of TV for Normal and Deviant Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostman, Ronald E.; And Others

    A total of 155 nonlabeled, normal adults and 28 labeled, schizophrenic adults were interviewed in a study to determine differences in the two groups' perceptions of television utility and reality. Hypotheses were formulated concerning expected differences in the reported importance of television in interpersonal communication, relaxation, and…

  9. Localization of coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in normal and regenerating human muscle.

    PubMed

    Sinnreich, M; Shaw, C A; Pari, G; Nalbantoglu, J; Holland, P C; Karpati, G

    2005-08-01

    The primary receptor for Adenovirus and Coxsackie virus (CAR) serves as main port of entry of the adenovirus vector mediating gene transfer into skeletal muscle. Information about CAR expression in normal and diseased human skeletal muscle is lacking. C'- or N'-terminally directed polyclonal antibodies against CAR were generated and immunohistochemical analysis of CAR on morphologically normal and regenerating human skeletal muscle of children and adults was performed. In morphologically normal human muscle fibers, CAR immunoreactivity was limited to the neuromuscular junction. In regenerating muscle fibers, CAR was abundantly co-expressed with markers of regeneration. The function of CAR at the neuromuscular junction is currently unknown. Co-expression of CAR with markers of regeneration suggests that CAR is developmentally regulated, and may serve as a marker of skeletal muscle fiber regeneration.

  10. Effects of mental practice on normal adult balance ability

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of mental practice on the balance abilities of normal individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental or control group (n=15 each). Participants in both groups performed balance training in a seated position on a gym ball for 20 minutes per session, five sessions per week, for 4 weeks. Members of the experimental group also performed mental practice for 10 minutes before the balance training. After the intervention, balance measuring equipment (Good Balance, Metitur, Finland) was used to quantitatively measure balance ability. [Results] Significant post-training gains were observed in the mediolateral, index of balance function, and time variables of participants of the experimental group. [Conclusion] The application of mental practice with balance training positively affected balance ability. PMID:27512260

  11. Effects of mental practice on normal adult balance ability.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of mental practice on the balance abilities of normal individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental or control group (n=15 each). Participants in both groups performed balance training in a seated position on a gym ball for 20 minutes per session, five sessions per week, for 4 weeks. Members of the experimental group also performed mental practice for 10 minutes before the balance training. After the intervention, balance measuring equipment (Good Balance, Metitur, Finland) was used to quantitatively measure balance ability. [Results] Significant post-training gains were observed in the mediolateral, index of balance function, and time variables of participants of the experimental group. [Conclusion] The application of mental practice with balance training positively affected balance ability.

  12. Intermuscular Coherence in Normal Adults: Variability and Changes with Age

    PubMed Central

    Jaiser, Stephan R.; Baker, Mark R.; Baker, Stuart N.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated beta-band intermuscular coherence (IMC) in 92 healthy adults stratified by decade of age, and analysed variability between and within subjects. In the dominant upper limb, IMC was estimated between extensor digitorum communis and first dorsal interosseous as well as between flexor digitorum superficialis and first dorsal interosseous. In the ipsilateral lower limb, IMC was measured between medial gastrocnemius and extensor digitorum brevis as well as between tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum brevis. Age-related changes in IMC were analysed with age as a continuous variable or binned by decade. Intrasession variance of IMC was examined by dividing sessions into pairs of epochs and comparing coherence estimates between these pairs. Eight volunteers returned for a further session after one year, allowing us to compare intrasession and intersession variance. We found no age-related changes in IMC amplitude across almost six decades of age, allowing us to collate data from all ages into an aggregate normative dataset. Interindividual variability ranged over two orders of magnitude. Intrasession variance was significantly greater than expected from statistical variability alone, and intersession variance was even larger. Potential contributors include fluctuations in task performance, differences in electrode montage and short-term random variation in central coupling. These factors require further exploration and, where possible, minimisation. This study provides evidence that coherence is remarkably robust to senescent changes in the nervous system and provides a large normative dataset for future applications of IMC as a biomarker in disease states. PMID:26901129

  13. Establishing the Proteome of Normal Human Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Natelson, Benjamin H.; Angel, Thomas E.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Hixson, Kim K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Camp, David G.; Coyle, Patricia K.; Smith, Richard D.; Bergquist, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the entire protein content, the proteome, of normal human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) would enable insights into neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Until now technologic hurdles and access to true normal samples hindered attaining this goal. Methods and Principal Findings We applied immunoaffinity separation and high sensitivity and resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine CSF from healthy normal individuals. 2630 proteins in CSF from normal subjects were identified, of which 56% were CSF-specific, not found in the much larger set of 3654 proteins we have identified in plasma. We also examined CSF from groups of subjects previously examined by others as surrogates for normals where neurologic symptoms warranted a lumbar puncture but where clinical laboratory were reported as normal. We found statistically significant differences between their CSF proteins and our non-neurological normals. We also examined CSF from 10 volunteer subjects who had lumbar punctures at least 4 weeks apart and found that there was little variability in CSF proteins in an individual as compared to subject to subject. Conclusions Our results represent the most comprehensive characterization of true normal CSF to date. This normal CSF proteome establishes a comparative standard and basis for investigations into a variety of diseases with neurological and psychiatric features. PMID:20552007

  14. Tongue Palate Contact Patterns of Velar Stops in Normal Adult English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liker, Marko; Gibbon, Fiona E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a more detailed description of normal tongue palate contact patterns for the occlusion phase of velar stops than currently exists. The study used electropalatography (EPG) to record seven normally speaking adults' contact patterns of voiceless velar stops in nine VkV contexts. A variety of EPG indices measured: per cent…

  15. Decorin and biglycan of normal and pathologic human corneas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Hevelone, N. D.; Roth, M. R.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Rodrigues, M. R.; Nirankari, V. S.; Conrad, G. W.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Corneas with scars and certain chronic pathologic conditions contain highly sulfated dermatan sulfate, but little is known of the core proteins that carry these atypical glycosaminoglycans. In this study the proteoglycan proteins attached to dermatan sulfate in normal and pathologic human corneas were examined to identify primary genes involved in the pathobiology of corneal scarring. METHODS: Proteoglycans from human corneas with chronic edema, bullous keratopathy, and keratoconus and from normal corneas were analyzed using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), quantitative immunoblotting, and immunohistology with peptide antibodies to decorin and biglycan. RESULTS: Proteoglycans from pathologic corneas exhibit increased size heterogeneity and binding of the cationic dye alcian blue compared with those in normal corneas. Decorin and biglycan extracted from normal and diseased corneas exhibited similar molecular size distribution patterns. In approximately half of the pathologic corneas, the level of biglycan was elevated an average of seven times above normal, and decorin was elevated approximately three times above normal. The increases were associated with highly charged molecular forms of decorin and biglycan, indicating modification of the proteins with dermatan sulfate chains of increased sulfation. Immunostaining of corneal sections showed an abnormal stromal localization of biglycan in pathologic corneas. CONCLUSIONS: The increased dermatan sulfate associated with chronic corneal pathologic conditions results from stromal accumulation of decorin and particularly of biglycan in the affected corneas. These proteins bear dermatan sulfate chains with increased sulfation compared with normal stromal proteoglycans.

  16. Multivariate analysis of somatosensory evoked potential parameters in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Gundel, A

    1983-01-01

    Cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) to median nerve stimulation were recorded in 65 normal subjects. Absolute peak latencies and amplitudes of cervical components N9, P10, N11, N13, P17, and cortical components P16, N20, P25, and N35 were measured. By means of partial correlations the interdependency of SEP-features could be verified in addition to the well-known dependence on arm length and age. In certain respects our results replicate other studies finding significant correlations between age and latency of early SEP-components as well as inverse relations between age and cervical amplitudes. Further analysis disclosed high inter-correlations between the latencies and between the amplitudes of the cervical and cortical components also revealing a certain exceptional position of the positive wave P17. In contrast to an inverse relation of amplitude and latency of the cervical components there were positive correlations between the respective features in the cortical evoked response. The findings are discussed with regard to the current knowledge about the origins of the SEP-components. PMID:6667105

  17. Assessment of urinary iodine excretion among normal Kuwaiti adults.

    PubMed

    Al-Yatama, Fatma I; Al-Bader, Maie D; Al-Mazidi, Zaidan M; Ali, Ameena; Al-Omair, Ali S; Al-Jehma, Nasser A; Mohammed, Fawziah

    2009-12-01

    This study was performed to investigate the status of iodine intake among the Kuwaiti population and its effect on thyroid function. The study group was comprised of 139 females and 86 males with a mean age of 33 and 35 years, respectively. Urinary iodine excretion (UIE) and serum free T4 (FT4), thyrotropin hormone (TSH), antiperoxidase antibodies (anti- TPOAb), and antithyroglobulin antibodies (anti-TGAb) were determined. Median UIE was 148 μg/L (within the recommended level by the World Health Organization [WHO]). However, UIE levels of <100 and <50 μg/L were detected in both male and female groups, respectively. Serum levels of TSH and FT4 were normal for all except one of the participants who suffered from hyperthyroidism, possibly as a result of elevated iodine intake, which was reflected in an increased UIE of 590 μg/L. Elevated anti-TPOAb >75 IU/mL and anti-TGAb >150 IU/mL were detected in 15% and 34% of subjects; only 10% of them had elevated levels of both anti-TPOAb and anti-TGAb. Thus, based on the WHO recommendations, the iodine intake for the Kuwaiti population is adequate. However, it is recommended that a national study be conducted by the appropriate authority in order to eliminate any artifacts which may have appeared in this study.

  18. Human pancreatic polypeptide in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Hanukoglu, A; Chalew, S; Kowarski, A A

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of human pancreatic polypeptide may be useful for assessment of gastrointestinal function, integrity of the parasympathetic nervous system or screening for endocrine neoplasia. In adults hPP levels have been reported to increase with age. However hPP levels throughout childhood have not been well characterized in comparison with the adult range. We studied fasting human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) from 45 pediatric patients, from infancy - 15 years, and 18 older adolescents and adults aged 16-45 years. The mean hPP level of children (233 +/- 147 pg/ml) was significantly higher than that (113 +/- 35 pg/ml) of adults (P less than .0001). There was no difference in mean hPP levels of children with normal growth hormone secretion compared to growth hormone deficient patients. There was no effect of gender or body mass index on hPP levels. We conclude that fasting hPP levels must be interpreted with respect to the age of the subject, children particularly, in that preteens may have higher fasting levels than older teenagers and adults.

  19. Human pancreatic polypeptide in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Hanukoglu, A; Chalew, S; Kowarski, A A

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of human pancreatic polypeptide may be useful for assessment of gastrointestinal function, integrity of the parasympathetic nervous system or screening for endocrine neoplasia. In adults hPP levels have been reported to increase with age. However hPP levels throughout childhood have not been well characterized in comparison with the adult range. We studied fasting human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) from 45 pediatric patients, from infancy - 15 years, and 18 older adolescents and adults aged 16-45 years. The mean hPP level of children (233 +/- 147 pg/ml) was significantly higher than that (113 +/- 35 pg/ml) of adults (P less than .0001). There was no difference in mean hPP levels of children with normal growth hormone secretion compared to growth hormone deficient patients. There was no effect of gender or body mass index on hPP levels. We conclude that fasting hPP levels must be interpreted with respect to the age of the subject, children particularly, in that preteens may have higher fasting levels than older teenagers and adults. PMID:2307392

  20. DPOAE suppression tuning: Cochlear immaturity in premature neonates or auditory aging in normal-hearing adults?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdala, Carolina

    2001-12-01

    Previous work has shown that distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) suppression tuning curves (STCs) recorded from premature neonates are narrower than adult STCs at both low and high frequencies. This has been interpreted to indicate an immaturity in cochlear function prior to term birth. However, an alternative explanation for this finding is that adult DPOAE STCs are broadened and reflect cochlear hair cell loss in normal-hearing adults due to aging, and natural exposure to noise and ototoxins. This alternative hypothesis can be tested by studying suppression tuning in normal-hearing school-aged children. If normal-hearing children, who have not aged significantly or been exposed to noise/ototoxins, have DPOAE suppression tuning similar to adults, the auditory aging hypothesis can be ruled out. However, if children have tuning similar to premature neonates and dissimilar from adults, it implicates aging or other factors intrinsic to the adult cochlea. DPOAE STCs were recorded at 1500, 3000, and 6000 Hz using optimal parameters in normal-hearing children and adults. DPOAE STCs collected previously from premature neonates were used for age comparisons. In general, results indicate that tuning curves from children are comparable to adult STCs and significantly different from neonatal STCS at 1500 and 6000 Hz. Only the growth of suppression was not adultlike in children and only at 6000 Hz. These findings do not strongly support the auditory aging hypothesis as a primary explanation for previously observed neonatal-adult differences in DPOAE suppression tuning. It suggests that these age differences are most likely due to immaturities in the neonatal cochlea. However, nonadultlike suppression growth observed in children at 6000 Hz warrants further attention and may be indicative of subtle alternations in the adult cochlea at high frequencies.

  1. [Generation of new nerve cells in the adult human brain].

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Meyer, Morten; Rasmussen, Jens Zimmer

    2003-03-31

    Generation of new nerve cells (neurogenesis) is normally considered to be limited to the fetal and early postnatal period. Thus, damaged nerve cells are not expected to be replaced by generation of new cells. The brain is, however, more plastic than previously assumed. This also includes neurogenesis in the adult human brain. In particular two brain regions show continuous division of neural stem and progenitor cells generating neurons and glial cells, namely the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zones of the lateral ventricles. From the latter region newly generated neuroblasts (immature nerve cells) migrate toward the olfactory bulb where they differentiate into neurons. In the dentate gyrus the newly generated neurons become functionally integrated in the granule cell layer, where they are believed to be of importance to learning and memory. It is at present not known whether neurogenesis in the adult human brain can be manipulated for specific repair after brain damage.

  2. Labile methyl balances for normal humans on various dietary regimens.

    PubMed

    Mudd, S H; Poole, J R

    1975-06-01

    Normal young adult male and female subjects were maintained on fixed dietary regimens which were either essentially normal or were semisynthetic and curtailed in methionine and choline intakes and virtually free of cystine. The subjects maintained stable weights and remained in positive nitrogen balance or within the zone of sulfur equilibrium. Choline intakes were calculated, and urinary excretions of creatinine, creatine, and sacrosine were measured. Creatinine excretions of male subjects on essentially normal diets outweighed the total intakes of labile methyl groups. Taking into account the excretions of additional methylated compounds, as judged from published values, it appears that methyl neogenesis must normally play a role in both males and females. When labile methyl intake is curtailed, de novo formation of methyl groups is quantitatively more significant than ingestion of preformed methyl moieties. On the normal diets used in these experiments, the average homocysteinyl moiety in males cycled between methionine and homocysteine at least 1.9 times before being converted to cystathionine. For females, the average number of cycles was at least 1.5. When labile methyl intake was curtailed, the average number of cycles rose to 3.9 for males and 3.0 for females under the conditions employed.

  3. Human Adult Cortical Reorganization and Consequent Visual Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Dilks, Daniel D.; Serences, John T.; Rosenau, Benjamin J.; Yantis, Steven; McCloskey, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Neural and behavioral evidence for cortical reorganization in the adult somatosensory system after loss of sensory input (e.g., amputation) has been well documented. In contrast, evidence for reorganization in the adult visual system is far less clear: neural evidence is the subject of controversy, behavioral evidence is sparse, and studies combining neural and behavioral evidence have not previously been reported. Here, we report converging behavioral and neuroimaging evidence from a stroke patient (B.L.) in support of cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system. B.L.’s stroke spared the primary visual cortex (V1), but destroyed fibers that normally provide input to V1 from the upper left visual field (LVF). As a consequence, B.L. is blind in the upper LVF, and exhibits distorted perception in the lower LVF: stimuli appear vertically elongated, toward and into the blind upper LVF. For example, a square presented in the lower LVF is perceived as a rectangle extending upward. We hypothesized that the perceptual distortion was a consequence of cortical reorganization in V1. Extensive behavioral testing supported our hypothesis, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) confirmed V1 reorganization. Together, the behavioral and fMRI data show that loss of input to V1 after a stroke leads to cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system, and provide the first evidence that reorganization of the adult visual system affects visual perception. These findings contribute to our understanding of the human adult brain’s capacity to change and has implications for topics ranging from learning to recovery from brain damage. PMID:17804619

  4. Angiogenic properties of adult human thymus fat.

    PubMed

    Salas, Julián; Montiel, Mercedes; Jiménez, Eugenio; Valenzuela, Miguel; Valderrama, José Francisco; Castillo, Rafael; González, Sergio; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2009-11-01

    The endogenous proangiogenic properties of adipose tissue are well recognized. Although the adult human thymus has long been known to degenerate into fat tissue, it has never been considered as a potential source of angiogenic factors. We have investigated the expression of diverse angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor A and B, angiopoietin 1, and tyrosine-protein kinase receptor-2 (an angiopoietin receptor), and then analyzed their physiological role on endothelial cell migration and proliferation, two relevant events in angiogenesis. The detection of the gene and protein expression of the various proteins has been performed by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We show, for the first time, that adult thymus fat produces a variety of angiogenic factors and induces the proliferation and migration of human umbilical cord endothelial cells. Based on these findings, we suggest that this fat has a potential angiogenic function that might affect thymic function and ongoing adipogenesis within the thymus.

  5. Self-Monitoring of Listening Abilities in Normal-Hearing Children, Normal-Hearing Adults, and Children with Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Rothpletz, Ann M.; Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-monitoring has been shown to be an essential skill for various aspects of our lives, including our health, education, and interpersonal relationships. Likewise, the ability to monitor one’s speech reception in noisy environments may be a fundamental skill for communication, particularly for those who are often confronted with challenging listening environments, such as students and children with hearing loss. Purpose The purpose of this project was to determine if normal-hearing children, normal-hearing adults, and children with cochlear implants can monitor their listening ability in noise and recognize when they are not able to perceive spoken messages. Research Design Participants were administered an Objective-Subjective listening task in which their subjective judgments of their ability to understand sentences from the Coordinate Response Measure corpus presented in speech spectrum noise were compared to their objective performance on the same task. Study Sample Participants included 41 normal-hearing children, 35 normal-hearing adults, and 10 children with cochlear implants. Data Collection and Analysis On the Objective-Subjective listening task, the level of the masker noise remained constant at 63 dB SPL, while the level of the target sentences varied over a 12 dB range in a block of trials. Psychometric functions, relating proportion correct (Objective condition) and proportion perceived as intelligible (Subjective condition) to target/masker ratio (T/M), were estimated for each participant. Thresholds were defined as the T/M required to produce 51% correct (Objective condition) and 51% perceived as intelligible (Subjective condition). Discrepancy scores between listeners’ threshold estimates in the Objective and Subjective conditions served as an index of self-monitoring ability. In addition, the normal-hearing children were administered tests of cognitive skills and academic achievement, and results from these measures were compared

  6. Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses cornerstone of Montessori theory, normalization, which asserts that if a child is placed in an optimum prepared environment where inner impulses match external opportunities, the undeviated self emerges, a being totally in harmony with its surroundings. Makes distinctions regarding normalization, normalized, and normality, indicating how…

  7. Changes in orexin (hypocretin) neuronal expression with normal aging in the human hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Nicholas J; Rodriguez, Michael L; Waters, Karen A; Machaalani, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that decreased orexin expression changes sleep regulation with normal aging. This study examined orexin A and B expression in the tuberal hypothalamus in infants (0-1 year; n = 8), children (4-10 years; n = 7), young adults (22-32 years; n = 4), and older (48-60 years; n = 7) adults. Neuronal expression was defined by the percentage positive orexin immunoreactive (Ox-ir) neurons in the whole tuberal hypothalamus, and in the dorsal medial (DMH), perifornical, and lateral hypothalamus. In addition, the number of Ox-ir neurons/mm(2), regional distribution, and co-localization were examined. Within the whole tuberal hypothalamic section, there was a 23% decrease in the percentage of Ox-ir neurons between infants and older adults (p < 0.001), and a 10% decrease in older compared with younger adults (p = 0.023). These changes were confined to the DMH and/or perifornical hypothalamus. There was a 9%-24% decrease in Ox neurons/mm(2) in adults compared with infants and/or children (p ≤ 0.001). These results demonstrate a decrease in Ox expression with normal human maturation and aging. This may contribute to changes in sleep regulation during development and with aging.

  8. The thermal sensitivity of normal and ataxia telangiectasia human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Azzam, E.I.

    1982-01-01

    Human normal and ataxia telangiectasia (AT) heterozygote and homozygote cell strains were heated at 42.0 and 45.0/sup 0/C to determine their thermal responses. All cell strains had approximately the same thermal sensitivity and were less thermally sensitive than Chinese hamster cells or many other rodent cell lines reported in the literature. No shoulders were observed on the survival curves for heating at 42.0 or 45.0/sup 0/C. Thermal tolerance developed in both the normal and AT cell strains with heating for prolonged intervals at 42.0/sup 0/C.

  9. The thermal sensitivity of normal and ataxia telangiectasia human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Azzam, E.I.

    1982-11-01

    Human normal and ataxia telangiectasia (AT) heterozygote and homozygote cell strains were heated at 42.0 and 45.0/sup 0/C to determine their thermal responses. All cell strains had approximately the same thermal sensitivity and were less thermally sensitive than Chinese hamster cells or many other rodent cell lines reported in the literature. No shoulders were observed on the survival curves for heating at 42.0 or 45.0/sup 0/C. Thermal tolerance developed in both the normal and AT cells strains with heating for prolonged intervals at 42.0GAMMA.

  10. Audibility-based predictions of speech recognition for children and adults with normal hearing

    PubMed Central

    McCreery, Ryan W.; Stelmachowicz, Patricia G.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between audibility and predictions of speech recognition for children and adults with normal hearing. The Speech Intelligibility Index (SII) is used to quantify the audibility of speech signals and can be applied to transfer functions to predict speech recognition scores. Although the SII is used clinically with children, relatively few studies have evaluated SII predictions of children’s speech recognition directly. Children have required more audibility than adults to reach maximum levels of speech understanding in previous studies. Furthermore, children may require greater bandwidth than adults for optimal speech understanding, which could influence frequency-importance functions used to calculate the SII. Speech recognition was measured for 116 children and 19 adults with normal hearing. Stimulus bandwidth and background noise level were varied systematically in order to evaluate speech recognition as predicted by the SII and derive frequency-importance functions for children and adults. Results suggested that children required greater audibility to reach the same level of speech understanding as adults. However, differences in performance between adults and children did not vary across frequency bands. PMID:22225061

  11. Audibility-based predictions of speech recognition for children and adults with normal hearing.

    PubMed

    McCreery, Ryan W; Stelmachowicz, Patricia G

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the relationship between audibility and predictions of speech recognition for children and adults with normal hearing. The Speech Intelligibility Index (SII) is used to quantify the audibility of speech signals and can be applied to transfer functions to predict speech recognition scores. Although the SII is used clinically with children, relatively few studies have evaluated SII predictions of children's speech recognition directly. Children have required more audibility than adults to reach maximum levels of speech understanding in previous studies. Furthermore, children may require greater bandwidth than adults for optimal speech understanding, which could influence frequency-importance functions used to calculate the SII. Speech recognition was measured for 116 children and 19 adults with normal hearing. Stimulus bandwidth and background noise level were varied systematically in order to evaluate speech recognition as predicted by the SII and derive frequency-importance functions for children and adults. Results suggested that children required greater audibility to reach the same level of speech understanding as adults. However, differences in performance between adults and children did not vary across frequency bands.

  12. From hundreds to thousands: Widening the normal human Urinome

    PubMed Central

    Santucci, Laura; Candiano, Giovanni; Petretto, Andrea; Bruschi, Maurizio; Lavarello, Chiara; Inglese, Elvira; Giorgio Righetti, Pier; Marco Ghiggeri, Gian

    2014-01-01

    The limits on protein detection in urine are unknown. Improving the analytical approach to detection would increase the number of identified proteins and potentially strengthen their predictive potential in diseases. Here, we present the data that resulted from a combination of analytical procedures for maximizing sensitivity and reproducibility of normal human urinary proteome analysis. These procedures are ultracentrifugation, vesicle separation, combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL) and solvent removal of pigments. Proteins were identified by an Orbitrap Velos Mass Spectrometry. 3429 proteins are characterized, 1724 of which are novel discoveries. The data are related to Santucci et al. (in press) [1] and available both here and at ChorusProject.org under project name “From hundreds to thousands: widening the normal human Urinome”. The material supplied to Chorus Progect.org includes technical MS spectra data only. PMID:26217681

  13. Claspin promotes normal replication fork rates in human cells.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Helleday, Thomas; Caldecott, Keith W

    2008-06-01

    The S phase-specific adaptor protein Claspin mediates the checkpoint response to replication stress by facilitating phosphorylation of Chk1 by ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR). Evidence suggests that these components of the ATR pathway also play a critical role during physiological S phase. Chk1 is required for high rates of global replication fork progression, and Claspin interacts with the replication machinery and might therefore monitor normal DNA replication. Here, we have used DNA fiber labeling to investigate, for the first time, whether human Claspin is required for high rates of replication fork progression during normal S phase. We report that Claspin-depleted HeLa and HCT116 cells display levels of replication fork slowing similar to those observed in Chk1-depleted cells. This was also true in primary human 1BR3 fibroblasts, albeit to a lesser extent, suggesting that Claspin is a universal requirement for high replication fork rates in human cells. Interestingly, Claspin-depleted cells retained significant levels of Chk1 phosphorylation at both Ser317 and Ser345, raising the possibility that Claspin function during normal fork progression may extend beyond facilitating phosphorylation of either individual residue. Consistent with this possibility, depletion of Chk1 and Claspin together doubled the percentage of very slow forks, compared with depletion of either protein alone.

  14. Attitudes of Overweight and Normal Weight Adults Regarding Exercise at a Health Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Wayne C.; Miller, Todd A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare attitudes of overweight (OW) and normal weight (NW) adults regarding health club exercise. Design: A 46-item survey (23 pairs of attitude/value statements) measured attitudes toward exercising at a health club 30 minutes, twice a week, for a month. Setting: Survey posted on surveymonkey.com. Respondents (men = 730, women =…

  15. Individual Variability in Delayed Auditory Feedback Effects on Speech Fluency and Rate in Normally Fluent Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chon, HeeCheong; Kraft, Shelly Jo; Zhang, Jingfei; Loucks, Torrey; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed auditory feedback (DAF) is known to induce stuttering-like disfluencies (SLDs) and cause speech rate reductions in normally fluent adults, but the reason for speech disruptions is not fully known, and individual variation has not been well characterized. Studying individual variation in susceptibility to DAF may identify factors…

  16. Proteoglycans on normal and migrating human corneal endothelium.

    PubMed

    Davies, Y; Lewis, D; Fullwood, N J; Nieduszynski, I A; Marcyniuk, B; Albon, J; Tullo, A

    1999-03-01

    Proteoglycans are of fundamental importance to the normal functioning of the cornea. They consist of a core protein to which one or more glycosaminoglycan chains are attached. Cell surface proteoglycans are known to mediate many aspects of cell behaviour including cell adhesion, control of extracellular matrix deposition, cell proliferation, cell migration, leukocyte adhesion and modulation of growth factor activity. This paper describes the first investigation into the distribution and function of the three main classes of proteoglycans on human corneal endothelium. Immuno-gold labelling techniques were used at the light, scanning and transmission electron microscope level to localise heparan sulphate, chondroitin sulphate and keratan sulphate proteoglycans on human corneal endothelium. Human corneas were freeze-wounded and kept in organ culture for 3 days in order to study the distribution of proteoglycans on migrating corneal endothelium. An Optimas image analysis system was used to quantify the change in proteoglycan labelling during cell migration. Labelling for chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate was at very low levels on normal corneal endothelium while keratan sulphate labelling was at high levels. The wound healing experiments showed that migrating cells had increased labelling for heparan sulphate and chondroitin sulphate with greatly decreased labelling for keratan sulphate. Statistical analysis showed these changes were highly significant (P<0.001). Transmission electron microscopy revealed that chondroitin sulphate and keratan sulphate were present throughout Descemet's membrane while heparan sulphate was concentrated at the interface of Descemet's membrane and the migrating corneal endothelial cells. The pattern of occurrence of chondroitin sulphate, heparan sulphate and keratan sulphate on the human endothelium in normal and wounded cornea suggests that these proteoglycans are linked to the process of cell migration.

  17. Human factors of flight-deck checklists: The normal checklist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, Asaf; Wiener, Earl L.

    1991-01-01

    Although the aircraft checklist has long been regarded as the foundation of pilot standardization and cockpit safety, it has escaped the scrutiny of the human factors profession. The improper use, or the non-use, of the normal checklist by flight crews is often cited as the probable cause or at least a contributing factor to aircraft accidents. An attempt is made to analyze the normal checklist, its functions, format, design, length, usage, and the limitations of the humans who must interact with it. The development of the checklist from the certification of a new model to its delivery and use by the customer are discussed. The influence of the government, particularly the FAA Principle Operations Inspector, the manufacturer's philosophy, the airline's culture, and the end user, the pilot, influence the ultimate design and usage of this device. The effects of airline mergers and acquisitions on checklist usage and design are noted. In addition, the interaction between production pressures and checklist usage and checklist management are addressed. Finally, a list of design guidelines for normal checklists is provided.

  18. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  19. Uroplakin Gene Expression by Normal and Neoplastic Human Urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Lobban, E. Dawn; Smith, Barbara A.; Hall, Geoffrey D.; Harnden, Patricia; Roberts, Paul; Selby, Peter J.; Trejdosiewicz, Ludwik K.; Southgate, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    cDNA sequences for human uroplakins UPIa, UPIb, UPII, and UPIII were cloned and used to investigate uroplakin transcription by normal and neoplastic urothelial cells. Normal urothelium expressed mRNA for all four uroplakins, although UPIII could be detected only by ribonuclease protection assay. By in situ hybridization, UPIa and UPII were confined to superficial cells and UPIb was also expressed by intermediate cells. Cultured normal human urothelial cells showed a proliferative basal/intermediate cell phenotype and constitutive expression of UPIb only. Uroplakin expression by transitional cell carcinoma cell lines was related to their differentiated phenotype in vitro. RT4 cells expressed all uroplakins, VM-CUB-3 expressed three uroplakins, RT112 and HT1376 cells expressed only UPIb in high abundance, and COLO232, KK47, and EJ cells had no detectable expression. These results correlated with patterns of uroplakin expression in tumors. UPIa and UPII were detected superficially only in well differentiated transitional cell carcinoma papillae. UPIb was positive in seven of nine and overexpressed in five of nine noninvasive transitional cell carcinomas and was also present in four of eight invasive transitional cell carcinomas. Lymph node metastases retained the same pattern of UPIb expression as the primary tumor. Unlike the three differentiation-regulated uroplakins, UPIb may have an alternative role in urothelial cell/tissue processes. PMID:9846985

  20. Uroplakin gene expression by normal and neoplastic human urothelium.

    PubMed

    Lobban, E D; Smith, B A; Hall, G D; Harnden, P; Roberts, P; Selby, P J; Trejdosiewicz, L K; Southgate, J

    1998-12-01

    cDNA sequences for human uroplakins UPIa, UPIb, UPII, and UPIII were cloned and used to investigate uroplakin transcription by normal and neoplastic urothelial cells. Normal urothelium expressed mRNA for all four uroplakins, although UPIII could be detected only by ribonuclease protection assay. By in situ hybridization, UPIa and UPII were confined to superficial cells and UPIb was also expressed by intermediate cells. Cultured normal human urothelial cells showed a proliferative basal/intermediate cell phenotype and constitutive expression of UPIb only. Uroplakin expression by transitional cell carcinoma cell lines was related to their differentiated phenotype in vitro. RT4 cells expressed all uroplakins, VM-CUB-3 expressed three uroplakins, RT112 and HT1376 cells expressed only UPIb in high abundance, and COLO232, KK47, and EJ cells had no detectable expression. These results correlated with patterns of uroplakin expression in tumors. UPIa and UPII were detected superficially only in well differentiated transitional cell carcinoma papillae. UPIb was positive in seven of nine and overexpressed in five of nine noninvasive transitional cell carcinomas and was also present in four of eight invasive transitional cell carcinomas. Lymph node metastases retained the same pattern of UPIb expression as the primary tumor. Unlike the three differentiation-regulated uroplakins, UPIb may have an alternative role in urothelial cell/tissue processes. PMID:9846985

  1. Thiamin requirement of the adult human.

    PubMed

    Sauberlich, H E; Herman, Y F; Stevens, C O; Herman, R H

    1979-11-01

    Young adult male subjects maintained on a metabolic ward were fed diets providing controlled intakes of thiamin and either 2800 or 3600 kcal. The higher level of calories was attained by an increased intake of carbohydrates. Constant weights were maintained by the subjects by adjusting daily activity and exercise schedules. Thiamin requirements were evaluated in terms of erythrocyte transketolase activity and urinary excretion of the vitamin. The results of the study revealed that a relationship exists between thiamin requirement and caloric intake and expenditure. Thus, when the calories being utilized were derived primarily from carbohydrate sources, the minimum adult male requirement for thiamin appeared to be 0.30 mg of thiamin per 1000 kcal. Urinary excretion of thiamin and erythrocyte transketolase activity appear to be reasonably reliable reflections of thiamin intakes and thiamin nutritional status. The use of these measurements in nutrition surveys appears justified. The microbiological assay (Lactobacillus viridescens) for measuring thiamin levels in urine samples appears to be a somewhat more sensitive but valid procedure as an alternate for the thiochrome method. Judged from the results of this study, the recommended intake for the adult human of 0.40 mg of thiamin per 1000 kcal by FAO/WHO and the recommended allowance of 0.5 mg per 1000 kcal by the Food and Nutrition Board of the NAS-NRC appear reasonable and amply allow for biological variations and other factors that may influence the requirement for this vitamin.

  2. Normalizing and scaling of data to derive human response corridors from impact tests.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that variability is inherent in any biological experiment. Human cadavers (Post-Mortem Human Subjects, PMHS) are routinely used to determine responses to impact loading for crashworthiness applications including civilian (motor vehicle) and military environments. It is important to transform measured variables from PMHS tests (accelerations, forces and deflections) to a standard or reference population, termed normalization. The transformation process should account for inter-specimen variations with some underlying assumptions used during normalization. Scaling is a process by which normalized responses are converted from one standard to another (example, mid-size adult male to large-male and small-size female adults, and to pediatric populations). These responses are used to derive corridors to assess the biofidelity of anthropomorphic test devices (crash dummies) used to predict injury in impact environments and design injury mitigating devices. This survey examines the pros and cons of different approaches for obtaining normalized and scaled responses and corridors used in biomechanical studies for over four decades. Specifically, the equal-stress equal-velocity and impulse-momentum methods along with their variations are discussed in this review. Methods ranging from subjective to quasi-static loading to different approaches are discussed for deriving temporal mean and plus minus one standard deviation human corridors of time-varying fundamental responses and cross variables (e.g., force-deflection). The survey offers some insights into the potential efficacy of these approaches with examples from recent impact tests and concludes with recommendations for future studies. The importance of considering various parameters during the experimental design of human impact tests is stressed.

  3. Normalizing and scaling of data to derive human response corridors from impact tests.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that variability is inherent in any biological experiment. Human cadavers (Post-Mortem Human Subjects, PMHS) are routinely used to determine responses to impact loading for crashworthiness applications including civilian (motor vehicle) and military environments. It is important to transform measured variables from PMHS tests (accelerations, forces and deflections) to a standard or reference population, termed normalization. The transformation process should account for inter-specimen variations with some underlying assumptions used during normalization. Scaling is a process by which normalized responses are converted from one standard to another (example, mid-size adult male to large-male and small-size female adults, and to pediatric populations). These responses are used to derive corridors to assess the biofidelity of anthropomorphic test devices (crash dummies) used to predict injury in impact environments and design injury mitigating devices. This survey examines the pros and cons of different approaches for obtaining normalized and scaled responses and corridors used in biomechanical studies for over four decades. Specifically, the equal-stress equal-velocity and impulse-momentum methods along with their variations are discussed in this review. Methods ranging from subjective to quasi-static loading to different approaches are discussed for deriving temporal mean and plus minus one standard deviation human corridors of time-varying fundamental responses and cross variables (e.g., force-deflection). The survey offers some insights into the potential efficacy of these approaches with examples from recent impact tests and concludes with recommendations for future studies. The importance of considering various parameters during the experimental design of human impact tests is stressed. PMID:24726322

  4. Effects of ozone in normal human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, James T; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Brahmbhatt, Krupa; Yarosh, Dan; Pernodet, Nadine

    2013-05-01

    Ozone is a tropospheric pollutant that can form at ground level as a result of an interaction between sunlight and hydrocarbon engine emissions. As ozone is an extremely oxidative reaction product, epidermal cells are in the outer layer of defense against ozone. We exposed normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) to concentrations of ozone that have been measured in cities and assayed for its effects. Hydrogen peroxide and IL-1α levels both increased while ATP levels decreased. We found a decrease in the NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, sirtuin 3. Lastly, we found that ozone increased DNA damage as evaluated by Comet assay. Taken together, our results show increased damage to NHEK that will ultimately impair normal cellular function as a result of an environmentally relevant ozone exposure.

  5. Effects of water immersion on plasma catecholamines in normal humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Johnson, G.; Denunzio, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in order to determine whether water immersion to the neck (NI) alters plasma catecholamines in normal humans. Eight normal subjects were studied during a seated control study (C) and during 4 hr of NI, and the levels of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) as determined by radioenzymatic assay were measured hourly. Results show that despite the induction of a marked natriuresis and diuresis indicating significant central hypervolemia, NI failed to alter plasma NE or E levels compared with those of either C or the corresponding prestudy 1.5 hr. In addition, the diuresis and natriuresis was found to vary independently of NE. These results indicate that the response of the sympathetic nervous system to acute volume alteration may differ from the reported response to chronic volume expansion.

  6. Optical Properties of Human Cancer and Normal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Christopher; Sun, Nan; Johnson, Jeffrey; Stack, Sharon; Tanner, Carol; Ruggiero, Steven

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of human oral and ovarian cancer and normal cells. Specifically, we have measured the absolute optical extinction for both whole cells and intra-cellular material in aqueous suspension. Measurements were conducted over a wavelength range of 250 to 1000nm with 1 nm resolution using Light Transmission Spectroscopy (LTS). This provides both the absolute extinction of materials under study and, with Mie inversion, the absolute number of particles of a given diameter as a function of diameter in the range of 1 to 3000 nm. Our preliminary studies show significant differences in both the extinction and particle size distributions associated with cancer versus normal cells, which appear to be correlated with differences in the particle size distribution in the range of ~ 50 to 250 nm.

  7. Immortalization of human normal and NF1 neurofibroma Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Chang, Lung-Ji; Neubauer, Debbie R; Muir, David F; Wallace, Margaret R

    2016-10-01

    Neurofibromas, which are benign Schwann cell tumors, are the hallmark feature in the autosomal dominant condition neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and are associated with biallelic loss of NF1 gene function. There is a need for effective therapies for neurofibromas, particularly the larger, plexiform neurofibromas. Tissue culture is an important tool for research. However, it is difficult to derive enriched human Schwann cell cultures, and most enter replicative senescence after 6-10 passages, impeding cell-based research in NF1. Through exogenous expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase and murine cyclin-dependent kinase (mCdk4), normal (NF1 wild-type), neurofibroma-derived Schwann cells heterozygous for NF1 mutation, and neurofibroma-derived Schwann cells homozygous for NF1 mutation were immortalized, including some matched samples from the same NF1 patient. Initial experiments employed retroviral vectors, while subsequent work utilized lentiviral vectors carrying these genes because of improved efficiency. Expression of both transgenes was required for immortalization. Molecular and immunohistochemical analysis indicated that these cell lines are of Schwann cell lineage and have a range of phenotypes, many of which are consistent with their primary cultures. This is the first report of immortalization and detailed characterization of multiple human NF1 normal nerve and neurofibroma-derived Schwann cell lines, which will be highly useful research tools to study NF1 and other Schwann tumor biology and conditions. PMID:27617404

  8. A quantitative transcriptome reference map of the normal human brain.

    PubMed

    Caracausi, Maria; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Piovesan, Allison; Bruno, Samantha; Strippoli, Pierluigi

    2014-10-01

    We performed an innovative systematic meta-analysis of 60 gene expression profiles of whole normal human brain, to provide a quantitative transcriptome reference map of it, i.e. a reference typical value of expression for each of the 39,250 known, mapped and 26,026 uncharacterized (unmapped) transcripts. To this aim, we used the software named Transcriptome Mapper (TRAM), which is able to generate transcriptome maps based on gene expression data from multiple sources. We also analyzed differential expression by comparing the brain transcriptome with those derived from human foetal brain gene expression, from a pool of human tissues (except the brain) and from the two normal human brain regions cerebellum and cerebral cortex, which are two of the main regions severely affected when cognitive impairment occurs, as happens in the case of trisomy 21. Data were downloaded from microarray databases, processed and analyzed using TRAM software and validated in vitro by assaying gene expression through several magnitude orders by 'real-time' reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The excellent agreement between in silico and experimental data suggested that our transcriptome maps may be a useful quantitative reference benchmark for gene expression studies related to the human brain. Furthermore, our analysis yielded biological insights about those genes which have an intrinsic over-/under-expression in the brain, in addition offering a basis for the regional analysis of gene expression. This could be useful for the study of chromosomal alterations associated to cognitive impairment, such as trisomy 21, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability. PMID:25185649

  9. A quantitative transcriptome reference map of the normal human brain.

    PubMed

    Caracausi, Maria; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Piovesan, Allison; Bruno, Samantha; Strippoli, Pierluigi

    2014-10-01

    We performed an innovative systematic meta-analysis of 60 gene expression profiles of whole normal human brain, to provide a quantitative transcriptome reference map of it, i.e. a reference typical value of expression for each of the 39,250 known, mapped and 26,026 uncharacterized (unmapped) transcripts. To this aim, we used the software named Transcriptome Mapper (TRAM), which is able to generate transcriptome maps based on gene expression data from multiple sources. We also analyzed differential expression by comparing the brain transcriptome with those derived from human foetal brain gene expression, from a pool of human tissues (except the brain) and from the two normal human brain regions cerebellum and cerebral cortex, which are two of the main regions severely affected when cognitive impairment occurs, as happens in the case of trisomy 21. Data were downloaded from microarray databases, processed and analyzed using TRAM software and validated in vitro by assaying gene expression through several magnitude orders by 'real-time' reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The excellent agreement between in silico and experimental data suggested that our transcriptome maps may be a useful quantitative reference benchmark for gene expression studies related to the human brain. Furthermore, our analysis yielded biological insights about those genes which have an intrinsic over-/under-expression in the brain, in addition offering a basis for the regional analysis of gene expression. This could be useful for the study of chromosomal alterations associated to cognitive impairment, such as trisomy 21, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability.

  10. Regulation of p53 during senescence in normal human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Reuben H; Kang, Mo K; Kim, Terresa; Yang, Paul; Bae, Susan; Williams, Drake W; Phung, Samantha; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Hong, Christine; Park, No-Hee

    2015-01-01

    p53, the guardian of the genome, is a tumor suppressor protein and critical for the genomic integrity of the cells. Many studies have shown that intracellular level of p53 is enhanced during replicative senescence in normal fibroblasts, and the enhanced level of p53 is viewed as the cause of senescence. Here, we report that, unlike in normal fibroblasts, the level of intracellular p53 reduces during replicative senescence and oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). We found that the intracellular p53 level was also decreased in age-dependent manner in normal human epithelial tissues. Senescent NHKs exhibited an enhanced level of p16INK4A, induced G2 cell cycle arrest, and lowered the p53 expression and transactivation activity. We found that low level of p53 in senescent NHKs was due to reduced transcription of p53. The methylation status at the p53 promoter was not altered during senescence, but senescent NHKs exhibited notably lower level of acetylated histone 3 (H3) at the p53 promoter in comparison with rapidly proliferating cells. Moreover, p53 knockdown in rapidly proliferating NHKs resulted in the disruption of fidelity in repaired DNA. Taken together, our study demonstrates that p53 level is diminished during replicative senescence and OIS and that such diminution is associated with H3 deacetylation at the p53 promoter. The reduced intracellular p53 level in keratinocytes of the elderly could be a contributing factor for more frequent development of epithelial cancer in the elderly because of the loss of genomic integrity of cells. PMID:26138448

  11. The ionic components of normal human oesophageal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, D; Milne, G; Curtis, M; Nicholson, G

    1979-11-01

    The distribution of cations and anions in normal human oesophageal epithelium has been investigated with the pyroantimonate and silver-osmium tetroxide techniques. There is a discontinuous distribution of both ions in the intercellular space. The ions are associated with various organelles, as has already been described in the literature. Specifically, in the oesophageal epithelium, there are a few deposits of pyroantimonate and occasional silver in the membrane coating granules, but here is no apparent relationship of either ion with the tonofilaments or glycogen particles. The superficial cells are leaky and contain fewer ions than the deeper functional layer cells.

  12. The significance of paired astrocyte nuclei in normal human nervous tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Pittella, J E; Brasileiro-Filho, G

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative study of astrocytes was carried out in 80 microscopic fields and the number of paired nuclei in 100 consecutive astrocytes of the temporo-occipital gyrus cortex was determined in 13 patients with no cerebral or liver disease. No significant correlation was found between astrocyte number and the percentage of paired nuclei. When studies on astrocytes in hepatic encephalopathy, liver cirrhosis and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis are taken into consideration it is suggested that these cells are in continuous variable renewal in normal adult human nervous tissue, as occurs in other animal species. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3654344

  13. Do adults with cochlear implants rely on different acoustic cues for phoneme perception than adults with normal hearing?

    PubMed Central

    Moberly, Aaron C.; Lowenstein, Joanna H.; Tarr, Eric; Caldwell-Tarr, Amanda; Welling, D. Bradley; Shahin, Antoine J.; Nittrouer, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Several acoustic cues specify any single phonemic contrast. Nonetheless, adult, native speakers of a language share weighting strategies, showing preferential attention to some properties over others. Cochlear implant (CI) signal processing disrupts the salience of some cues: in general, amplitude structure remains readily available, but spectral structure less so. This study asked how well speech recognition is supported if CI users shift attention to salient cues not weighted strongly by native speakers. Method 20 adults with CIs participated. The /bɑ/-/wɑ/ contrast was used because spectral and amplitude structure varies in correlated fashion for this contrast. Normal-hearing adults weight the spectral cue strongly, but the amplitude cue negligibly. Three measurements were made: labeling decisions, spectral and amplitude discrimination, and word recognition. Results Outcomes varied across listeners: some weighted the spectral cue strongly, some weighted the amplitude cue, and some weighted neither. Spectral discrimination predicted spectral weighting. Spectral weighting explained the most variance in word recognition. Age of onset of hearing loss predicted spectral weighting, but not unique variance in word recognition. Conclusions The weighting strategies of listeners with normal hearing likely support speech recognition best, so efforts in implant design, fitting, and training should focus on developing those strategies. PMID:24686722

  14. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  15. A multisegment computer simulation of normal human gait.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, L A; Winter, D A

    1997-12-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a computer simulation of normal human walking that would use as driving moments resultant joint moments from a gait analysis. The system description, initial conditions and driving moments were taken from an inverse dynamics analysis of a normal walking trial. A nine-segment three-dimensional (3-D) model, including a two-part foot, was used. Torsional, linear springs and dampers were used at the hip joints to keep the trunk vertical and at the knee and ankle joints to prevent nonphysiological motion. Dampers at other joints were required to ensure a smooth and realistic motion. The simulated human successfully completed one step (550 ms), including both single and double support phases. The model proved to be sensitive to changes in the spring stiffness values of the trunk controllers. Similar sensitivity was found with the springs used to prevent hyperextension of the knee at heel contact and of the metatarsal-phalangeal joint at push-off. In general, there was much less sensitivity to the damping coefficients. This simulation improves on previous efforts because it incorporates some features necessary in simulations designed to answer clinical science questions. Other control algorithms are required, however, to ensure that the model can be realistically adapted to different subjects.

  16. Disposition of human fibrinopeptide A in normal and nephrectomized rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Harenberg, J.; Stehle, G.; Waibel, S.; Hermann, H.J.; Eisenhut, M.; Zimmermann, R.

    1983-10-01

    The distribution, elimination, and metabolism of human fibrinopeptide A (FPA) were studied in normal and nephrectomized rabbits. The activity of /sup 125/I-labeled desamino-tyrosyl human FPA (DAT-FPA) was followed over 4 hours after i.v. administration. Results show that in normal rabbits (n . 10) DAT-FPA is eliminated from plasma in four phases with half-lives of 30 sec, 3.5 min, 15 min, and 90 min. The distribution of /sup 123/I-labeled DAT-FPA in plasma was determined in 15 control rabbits with scintigraphy over 2 hours. DAT-FPA was distributed primarily in the cardiovascular system, liver, and kidneys. In some animals minimal radioactivity was detected over the gall bladder. Radioactivity accumulated rapidly in the urinary bladder, approximately 50% being recorded after 15 min and 90% after 120 min. In the heart area radioactivity decreased with half-lives of 25 sec, 7.5 min, 25 min, and 180 min. Nephrectomized rabbits had similar initial fast distribution of DAT-FPA after administration of /sup 125/I-labeled (n . 10) and /sup 123/I-labeled peptide (n . 10). The estimated half-life of the slow component was in the order of several hours. The results of the scintigraphic and gel chromatographic studies show that FPA is primarily excreted in the urine. Previously reported half-lives of FPA reflect distribution rather than steady state conditions.

  17. Proliferation of normal human keratinocytes on silicone substrates.

    PubMed

    Rosdy, M; Grisoni, B; Clauss, L C

    1991-07-01

    Several polydimethylsiloxane elastomers and gels were tested as culture substrates for proliferating normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Growth kinetics of normal human keratinocytes (NHK) and dermal fibroblasts were compared on 'very soft', 'soft' and 'hard' silicone gels, as well as on standard cell culture polystyrene dishes. Water contact angles and chemical compositions (IRFT-HATR) of the different silicone surfaces were found to be equivalent, although very different from standard cell culture polystyrene. The topography of the surfaces as well as the shape of the keratinocytes and fibroblasts grown on the different substrates were visualized by scanning electron microscopy, and compared. Although the surface softness and topography of the substrates differed markedly, dermal fibroblasts proliferated in serum-containing medium in equivalent manner on all substrates. Again no correlation could be found between the characteristics and the attachment of the substrates and rapid proliferation of the epidermal keratinocytes in defined medium. The epidermal keratinocytes spread, secreted a structured extracellular matrix network and grew up to confluence on all silicone substrates (elastomers and gels), except the relatively 'hard' silicone gel; this could be due to a direct interference by the waves observed on the silicone gel surfaces. PMID:1654138

  18. The effect of replacement of methionine by homocystine on survival of malignant and normal adult mammalian cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Halpern, B C; Clark, B R; Hardy, D N; Halpern, R M; Smith, R A

    1974-04-01

    In tissue cultures of normal adult and malignant mammalian cells, homocystine has been substituted for methionine in a medium rich in folic acid and cyanocobalamin. Normal adult cells thrive. Three highly malignant cell types from three different species, including man, die.

  19. The Influence of Lumbar Joint Mobilization on Joint Position Sense in Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wontae

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of lumbar joint mobilization on the joint position sense (JPS) of normal adults. [Subjects] A total of 30 normal adults were divided into an experimental group (n = 15) and a control group (n = 15). [Methods] The experimental group received lumbar joint mobilization and massage, and the control group received massage only. Both the experimental and control groups were evaluated for joint position error (JPE) by using a digital dual inclinometer before and after the experiment. [Results] In the before and after comparison for the experimental group, statistically significant differences were found in flexion, extension, left lateral flexion, and right lateral flexion. There was no statistically significant difference in the before and after comparison for the control group. [Conclusion] Because lumbar joint mobilization can reduce JPE and improve JPS, its use in the treatment of patients with lumbar problems is recommended. PMID:25540513

  20. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination.

    PubMed

    Malik, Astha; Kondratov, Roman V; Jamasbi, Roudabeh J; Geusz, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte proliferation during

  1. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination

    PubMed Central

    Kondratov, Roman V.; Jamasbi, Roudabeh J.

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte proliferation during

  2. Input clustering in the normal and learned circuits of adult barn owls

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Thomas J; DeBello, William M

    2015-01-01

    Experience-dependent formation of synaptic input clusters can occur in juvenile brains. Whether this also occurs in adults is largely unknown. We previously reconstructed the normal and learned circuits of prism-adapted barn owls and found that changes in clustering of axo-dendritic contacts (putative synapses) predicted functional circuit strength. Here we asked whether comparable changes occurred in normal and prism-removed adults. Across all anatomical zones, no systematic differences in the primary metrics for within-branch or between-branch clustering were observed: 95–99% of contacts resided within clusters (<10–20 microns from nearest neighbor) regardless of circuit strength. Bouton volumes, a proxy measure of synaptic strength, were on average larger in the functionally strong zones, indicating that changes in synaptic efficacy contributed to the differences in circuit strength. Bootstrap analysis showed that the distribution of inter-contact distances strongly deviated from random not in the functionally strong zones but in those that had been strong during the sensitive period (60d ~ 250d), indicating that clusters formed early in life were preserved regardless of current value. While cluster formation in juveniles appeared to require the production of new synapses, cluster formation in adults did not. In total, these results support a model in which high cluster dynamics in juveniles sculpt a potential connectivity map that is refined in adulthood. We propose that preservation of clusters in functionally weak adult circuits provides a storage mechanism for disused but potentially useful pathways. PMID:25701706

  3. Human cancers overexpress genes that are specific to a variety of normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Joseph; Netanely, Dvir; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression data from three different kinds of samples: normal human tissues, human cancer cell lines, and leukemic cells from lymphoid and myeloid leukemia pediatric patients. We have searched for genes that are overexpressed in human cancer and also show specific patterns of tissue-dependent expression in normal tissues. Using the expression data of the normal tissues, we identified 4,346 genes with a high variability of expression and clustered these genes according to their relative expression level. Of 91 stable clusters obtained, 24 clusters included genes preferentially expressed either only in hematopoietic tissues or in hematopoietic and one to two other tissues; 28 clusters included genes preferentially expressed in various nonhematopoietic tissues such as neuronal, testis, liver, kidney, muscle, lung, pancreas, and placenta. Analysis of the expression levels of these two groups of genes in the human cancer cell lines and leukemias identified genes that were highly expressed in cancer cells but not in their normal counterparts and, thus, were overexpressed in the cancers. The different cancer cell lines and leukemias varied in the number and identity of these overexpressed genes. The results indicate that many genes that are overexpressed in human cancer cells are specific to a variety of normal tissues, including normal tissues other than those from which the cancer originated. It is suggested that this general property of cancer cells plays a major role in determining the behavior of the cancers, including their metastatic potential. PMID:16339305

  4. Reinforcing and subjective effects of caffeine in normal human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Stern, K N; Chait, L D; Johanson, C E

    1989-01-01

    The reinforcing and subjective effects of caffeine (100 and 300 mg, PO) were determined in a group of 18 normal, healthy adults. Subjects (eight females, ten males) were light to moderate users of caffeine, and had no history of drug abuse. A discrete-trial choice procedure was used in which subjects were allowed to choose between the self-administration of color-coded capsules containing either placebo or caffeine. The number of times caffeine was chosen over placebo was used as the primary index of reinforcing efficacy. Subjective effects were measured before and several times after capsule ingestion. The low dose of caffeine was chosen on 42.6% of occasions, not significantly different from chance (50%). The high dose of caffeine was chosen on 38.9% of occasions, significantly less than expected by chance, indicating that this dose served as a punisher. Both doses of caffeine produced stimulant-like subjective effects, with aversive effects such as increased anxiety predominating after the high dose. When subjects were divided into groups of caffeine-sensitive choosers and nonchoosers, a consistent relationship emerged between caffeine choice and subjective effects; nonchoosers reported primarily aversive effects after caffeine (increased anxiety and dysphoria), whereas choosers reported stimulant and "positive" mood effects. When compared with previous findings, these results demonstrate that caffeine is less reinforcing than amphetamine and related psychomotor stimulants. PMID:2498963

  5. Rethinking Adult Literacy Programs: A Humanities-Based Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anania, Joanne

    The Roosevelt University Humanities Enrichment Program tries to acknowledge the adult part of adult literacy. Its instructional materials are of interest and value to the adult student and, therefore, provide incentives for reading and discussion instead of serving merely as skill-building exercises. The materials are drawn from literature,…

  6. Reference values for echocardiographic parameters and indexes of left ventricular function in healthy, young adult sheep used in translational research: comparison with standardized values in humans

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Paola; Olea, Fernanda D; Lorenzi, Andrea De; Salmo, Fabián; Janavel, Gustavo L Vera; Hnatiuk, Anna P; Guevara, Eduardo; Crottogini, Alberto J

    2011-01-01

    Ovine models of ischemic heart disease and cardiac failure are increasingly used in translational research. However, reliable extrapolation of the results to the clinical setting requires knowing if ovine normal left ventricular (LV) function is comparable to that of humans. We thus assessed for echocardiographic LV dimensions and indexes in a large normal adult sheep population and compared them with standardized values in normal human adults. Bidimensional and tissue Doppler echocardiograms were performed in 69 young adult Corriedale sheep under light sedation. LV dimensions and indexes of systolic and diastolic function were measured. Absolute and body surface areanormalized values were compared to those for normal adult humans and their statistical distribution was assessed. Normalized dimensions (except for end diastolic diameter) as well as ejection fraction and fractional shortening fell within the ranges established by the American Society of Echocardiography and European Association of Echocardiography for normal adult humans. Normalized end diastolic diameter exceeded the upper normal limit but got close to it when correcting for the higher heart mass/body surface area ratio of sheep with respect to humans. Diastolic parameters also fell within normal human ranges except for a slightly lower mitral deceleration time. All values exhibited a Gaussian distribution. We conclude that echocardiographic parameters of systolic and diastolic LV performance in young adult sheep can be reliably extrapolated to the adult human, thus supporting the use of ovine models of human heart disease in translational research. PMID:22140597

  7. Predictors of reintegration to normal living in older adults discharged from an intensive rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Bourdeau, Isabelle; Desrosiers, Johanne; Gosselin, Suzanne

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to explore which of many personal and environmental variables are the best predictors of reintegration to normal living in older adults discharged from an inpatient rehabilitation unit. A few days before discharge from rehabilitation, more than 15 biopsychosocial characteristics of 94 people over 60 years were evaluated with reliable and valid tests. The participants' reintegration to normal living was evaluated 3 months later (n=86) with the reintegration to normal living index. This questionnaire comprises 11 items covering physical, social, and psychological dimensions of daily living. From multivariate regression analyses, functional independence, balance, grip strength, and general well-being are the best predictors and explain 26 and 27% of the variance in reintegration to normal living. This study suggests that by increasing efforts to maximize functional independence, balance, grip strength, and well-being, rehabilitation professionals can expect older adults to achieve a greater degree of reintegration in their activities and social roles and may contribute to their quality of life. PMID:19008674

  8. Human penile erection and organic impotence: normal histology and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Conti, G; Virag, R

    1989-01-01

    A very large amount of human material (7 embryos, 12 stillborns, 12 penes of males aged between 2 and 86 years, as well as bioptical material from 80 subjects affected by impotence problems) has been examined so as to study the penis arterial and venous walls, the blood flow regulation mechanisms and the intracavernal trabecular morphology. The amount of muscle tissue and of collagenous connective tissue has been numerically quantified by computer-assisted methods. This study enables the authors to underline three fundamental facts: (a) it confirms the normal penile erection mechanism, and the consequent theory, (b) it confirms that vascular sclerosis is a systemic phenomenon correlated to age, and that the penis is not exempt, and (c) in the case of impotence problems, the same sclerosis phenomenon may appear at an earlier age, and therefore induce pathological impotence. PMID:2800066

  9. Recombinant human LCAT normalizes plasma lipoprotein profile in LCAT deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, Sara; Tinti, Cristina; Salvini, Laura; Tinti, Laura; Ossoli, Alice; Vitali, Cecilia; Sousa, Vitor; Orsini, Gaetano; Nolli, Maria Luisa; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura

    2013-11-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is the enzyme responsible for cholesterol esterification in plasma. Mutations in the LCAT gene leads to two rare disorders, familial LCAT deficiency and fish-eye disease, both characterized by severe hypoalphalipoproteinemia associated with several lipoprotein abnormalities. No specific treatment is presently available for genetic LCAT deficiency. In the present study, recombinant human LCAT was expressed and tested for its ability to correct the lipoprotein profile in LCAT deficient plasma. The results show that rhLCAT efficiently reduces the amount of unesterified cholesterol (-30%) and promotes the production of plasma cholesteryl esters (+210%) in LCAT deficient plasma. rhLCAT induces a marked increase in HDL-C levels (+89%) and induces the maturation of small preβ-HDL into alpha-migrating particles. Moreover, the abnormal phospholipid-rich particles migrating in the LDL region were converted in normally sized LDL.

  10. Recombinant human LCAT normalizes plasma lipoprotein profile in LCAT deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, Sara; Tinti, Cristina; Salvini, Laura; Tinti, Laura; Ossoli, Alice; Vitali, Cecilia; Sousa, Vitor; Orsini, Gaetano; Nolli, Maria Luisa; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura

    2013-11-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is the enzyme responsible for cholesterol esterification in plasma. Mutations in the LCAT gene leads to two rare disorders, familial LCAT deficiency and fish-eye disease, both characterized by severe hypoalphalipoproteinemia associated with several lipoprotein abnormalities. No specific treatment is presently available for genetic LCAT deficiency. In the present study, recombinant human LCAT was expressed and tested for its ability to correct the lipoprotein profile in LCAT deficient plasma. The results show that rhLCAT efficiently reduces the amount of unesterified cholesterol (-30%) and promotes the production of plasma cholesteryl esters (+210%) in LCAT deficient plasma. rhLCAT induces a marked increase in HDL-C levels (+89%) and induces the maturation of small preβ-HDL into alpha-migrating particles. Moreover, the abnormal phospholipid-rich particles migrating in the LDL region were converted in normally sized LDL. PMID:24140107

  11. Germline stem cells and neo-oogenesis in the adult human ovary.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yifei; Wu, Chao; Lyu, Qifeng; Yang, Dongzi; Albertini, David F; Keefe, David L; Liu, Lin

    2007-06-01

    It remains unclear whether neo-oogenesis occurs in postnatal ovaries of mammals, based on studies in mice. We thought to test whether adult human ovaries contain germline stem cells (GSCs) and undergo neo-oogenesis. Rather than using genetic manipulation which is unethical in humans, we took the approach of analyzing the expression of meiotic marker genes and genes for germ cell proliferation, which are required for neo-oogenesis, in adult human ovaries covering an age range from 28 to 53 years old, compared to testis and fetal ovaries served as positive controls. We show that active meiosis, neo-oogenesis and GSCs are unlikely to exist in normal, adult, human ovaries. No early meiotic-specific or oogenesis-associated mRNAs for SPO11, PRDM9, SCP1, TERT and NOBOX were detectable in adult human ovaries using RT-PCR, compared to fetal ovary and adult testis controls. These findings are further corroborated by the absence of early meiocytes and proliferating germ cells in adult human ovarian cortex probed with markers for meiosis (SCP3), oogonium (OCT3/4, c-KIT), and cell cycle progression (Ki-67, PCNA), in contrast to fetal ovary controls. If postnatal oogenesis is confirmed in mice, then this species would represent an exception to the rule that neo-oogenesis does not occur in adults.

  12. Have you got any cholesterol? Adults' views of human nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schibeci, Renato; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    1994-12-01

    The general aim of our human nutrition project is to develop a health education model grounded in ‘everyday’ or ‘situated’ cognition (Hennessey, 1993). In 1993, we began pilot work to document adult understanding of human nutrition. We used a HyperCard stack as the basis for a series of interviews with 50 adults (25 university students, and 25 adults from offcampus). The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the NUDIST computer program. A summary of the views of these 50 adults on selected aspects of human nutrition is presented in this paper.

  13. Complement Interaction with Trypanosomatid Promastigotes in Normal Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Mercedes; Moreno, Inmaculada; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Toraño, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    In normal human serum (NHS), axenic promastigotes of Crithidia, Phytomonas, and Leishmania trigger complement activation, and from 1.2 to 1.8 × 105 C3 molecules are deposited per promastigote within 2.5 min. In Leishmania, promastigote C3 binding capacity remains constant during in vitro metacyclogenesis. C3 deposition on promastigotes activated through the classical complement pathway reaches a 50% maximum after ∼50 s, and represents >85% of total C3 bound. In C1q- and C2-deficient human sera, promastigotes cannot activate the classical pathway (CP) unless purified C1q or C2 factors, respectively, are supplemented, demonstrating a requirement for CP factor in promastigote C3 opsonization. NHS depleted of natural anti-Leishmania antibodies cannot trigger promastigote CP activation, but IgM addition restores C3 binding. Furthermore, Leishmania binds natural antibodies in ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA)-treated NHS; after EDTA removal, promastigote-bound IgM triggers C3 deposition in natural antibody-depleted NHS. Serum collectins and pentraxins thus do not participate significantly in NHS promastigote C3 opsonization. Real-time kinetic analysis of promastigote CP-mediated lysis indicates that between 85–95% of parasites are killed within 2.5 min of serum contact. These data indicate that successful Leishmania infection in man must immediately follow promastigote transmission, and that Leishmania evasion strategies are shaped by the selective pressure exerted by complement. PMID:11854358

  14. Altered Human Memory Modification in the Presence of Normal Consolidation.

    PubMed

    Censor, Nitzan; Buch, Ethan R; Nader, Karim; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2016-09-01

    Following initial learning, the memory is stabilized by consolidation mechanisms, and subsequent modification of memory strength occurs via reconsolidation. Yet, it is not clear whether consolidation and memory modification are the same or different systems-level processes. Here, we report disrupted memory modification in the presence of normal consolidation of human motor memories, which relate to differences in lesioned brain structure after stroke. Furthermore, this behavioral dissociation was associated with macrostructural network architecture revealed by a graph-theoretical approach, and with white-matter microstructural integrity measured by diffusion-weighted MRI. Altered macrostructural network architecture and microstructural integrity of white-matter underlying critical nodes of the related network predicted disrupted memory modification. To the best of our knowledge, this provides the first evidence of mechanistic differences between consolidation, and subsequent memory modification through reconsolidation, in human procedural learning. These findings enable better understanding of these memory processes, which may guide interventional strategies to enhance brain function and resulting behavior. PMID:26271110

  15. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  16. Aspartame-sweetened beverage: effect on plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults and adults heterozygous for phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Wolf-Novak, L C; Filer, L J; Bell, E F; Ziegler, E E; Krause, W L; Brummel, M C

    1987-11-01

    Twelve normal subjects ingested either unsweetened beverage (n = 6) or beverage providing 4 mg/kg body weight as aspartame (APM) (n = 6). Neither beverage had any significant effect on plasma aspartate or phenylalanine concentrations. After this study, eight normal and six obligate phenylketonuric (PKU) heterozygous adults each ingested a 354-mL (12-oz) beverage serving on two occasions in a randomized cross-over design. On one occasion the beverage was not sweetened; on the other occasion, the beverage provided 10 mg APM/kg body weight. Plasma amino acid concentrations were measured throughout the 2-h study period. The addition of 10 mg APM/kg body weight to the beverage had no significant effect on plasma aspartate concentration. APM ingestion increased plasma phenylalanine levels of normal subjects from a mean +/- SD baseline value of 5.09 +/- 0.82 mumol/dL to a high mean value of 6.73 +/- 0.75 mumol/dL. In PKU heterozygous subjects the plasma phenylalanine level increased from a mean +/- SD of 9.04 +/- 1.71 to a high mean value of 12.1 +/- 2.08 mumol/dL. The data indicate ready metabolism of the aspartate and phenylalanine portion of APM when administered at levels likely to be ingested by individuals who drink diet beverages.

  17. Could adult hippocampal neurogenesis be relevant for human behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Jason S.; Cameron, Heather A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the function of adult neurogenesis is still unclear, tools for directly studying the behavioral role of new hippocampal neurons now exist in rodents. Since similar studies are impossible to do in humans, it is important to assess whether the role of new neurons in rodents is likely to be similar to that in humans. One feature of adult neurogenesis that varies tremendously across species is the number of neurons that are generated, so a key question is whether there are enough neurons generated in humans to impact function. In this review we examine neuroanatomy and circuit function in the hippocampus to ask how many granule neurons are needed to impact hippocampal function and then discuss what is known about numbers of new neurons produced in adult rats and humans. We conclude that relatively small numbers of neurons could affect hippocampal circuits and that the magnitude of adult neurogenesis in adult rats and humans is probably larger than generally believed. PMID:21736900

  18. Phytoestrogen Metabolism by Adult Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Pilar; Medina, Margarita; Sánchez-Jiménez, Abel; Landete, José Mᵃ

    2016-08-09

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived polyphenols with a structure similar to human estrogens. The three main groups of phytoestrogens, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans, are transformed into equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively, by bacteria. These metabolites have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activities than their precursors, and they are more bioavailable. The aim of this study was to analyze the metabolism of isoflavones, lignans and ellagitannins by gut microbiota, and to study the possible correlation in the metabolism of these three groups of phytoestrogens. In vitro fermentation experiments were performed with feces samples from 14 healthy adult volunteers, and metabolite formation was measured by HPLC-PAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. Only the microbiota of one subject produced equol, while most of them showed production of O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA). Significant inter-subject differences were observed in the metabolism of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein, while the glucoside isoflavones and their aglycones showed less variability, except for glycitin. Most subjects produced urolithins M-5 and E. Urolithin D was not detected, while uroltithin B was found in half of the individuals analyzed, and urolithins A and C were detected in two and four subjects, respectively. Enterolactone was found in all subjects, while enterodiol only appeared in five. Isoflavone metabolism could be correlated with the metabolism of lignans and ellagitannins. However, the metabolism of ellagitannins and lignans could not be correlated. This the first study where the metabolism of the three groups together of phytoestrogen, isoflavones, lignans, and ellagitannins by gut microbiota is analyzed.

  19. Generation and metabolism of lipoxygenase products in normal and membrane-damaged cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Green, F A

    1989-10-01

    The production and metabolism of lipoxygenase eicosanoids were studied in cultured human keratinocytes. The identity of these eicosanoid structures was established by a variety of chromatographic and analytical techniques. Normal cultured keratinocytes did not produce lipoxygenase eicosanoids either spontaneously or when given arachidonic acid in the presence of permeabilizing concentrations of ethanol or dimethyl sulfoxide. Freeze-thawing of human neonatal and adult keratinocytes resulted in a rapid release of linoleic and arachidonic acids over time. Activation of a latent 15-lipoxygenase was demonstrated by the synthesis of 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, and both these products were greatly increased in amount when the corresponding fatty acid precursor was added. Eicosanoid production by cells of newborn and adult origin was indistinguishable. Rapid metabolism of exogenous 15-HETE by normal keratinocytes was observed. Measurable quantities of esterified 15-HETE were found after 1 min, but by 18-20 h all the esterified 15-HETE was degraded to the extent that 80% of the recovered radioactivity was found in water-soluble form. In contrast, when labeled or unlabeled 5-HETE was used a much larger fraction was esterified intact (30% as opposed to 10%) and at the end of 18-20 hours a substantial peak of esterified 5-HETE remained. Intact esterified [3H] HETE were recovered only in the triacylglycerol fraction. The key findings that omega-6 lipoxygenase products are generated but not esterified by membrane-damaged keratinocytes, whereas these products are esterified but not generated by normal keratinocytes, may be of importance in transcellular metabolic control.

  20. Normal haematological reference values in the adult black population of the Witwatersrand.

    PubMed

    Tikly, M; Blumsohn, D; Solomons, H D; Govender, Y; Atkinson, P M

    1987-07-18

    Normal haematological reference values for healthy adult blacks residing on the Witwatersrand are given. The haemoglobin concentration was 13.95 +/- 0.8 g/dl for women and 15.82 +/- 1.05 g/dl for men. Leucocyte counts were lower than those found in whites, being 5.60 +/- 1.51 X 10(9)/l for both sexes. Platelet counts were 280 +/- 59.4 X 10(9)/l for men and 317 +/- 64.0 X 10(9)/l for women. The differential counts and other parameters are given in the text.

  1. A quantitative transcriptome reference map of the normal human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Caracausi, Maria; Rigon, Vania; Piovesan, Allison; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara

    2016-01-01

    We performed an innovative systematic meta-analysis of 41 gene expression profiles of normal human hippocampus to provide a quantitative transcriptome reference map of it, i.e. a reference typical value of expression for each of the 30,739 known mapped and the 16,258 uncharacterized (unmapped) transcripts. For this aim, we used the software called TRAM (Transcriptome Mapper), which is able to generate transcriptome maps based on gene expression data from multiple sources. We also analyzed differential expression by comparing the hippocampus with the whole brain transcriptome map to identify a typical expression pattern of this subregion compared with the whole organ. Finally, due to the fact that the hippocampus is one of the main brain region to be severely affected in trisomy 21 (the best known genetic cause of intellectual disability), a particular attention was paid to the expression of chromosome 21 (chr21) genes. Data were downloaded from microarray databases, processed, and analyzed using TRAM software. Among the main findings, the most over-expressed loci in the hippocampus are the expressed sequence tag cluster Hs.732685 and the member of the calmodulin gene family CALM2. The tubulin folding cofactor B (TBCB) gene is the best gene at behaving like a housekeeping gene. The hippocampus vs. the whole brain differential transcriptome map shows the over-expression of LINC00114, a long non-coding RNA mapped on chr21. The hippocampus transcriptome map was validated in vitro by assaying gene expression through several magnitude orders by "Real-Time" reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The highly significant agreement between in silico and experimental data suggested that our transcriptome map may be a useful quantitative reference benchmark for gene expression studies related to human hippocampus. Furthermore, our analysis yielded biological insights about those genes that have an intrinsic over-/under-expression in the hippocampus. PMID

  2. Musical hallucinations in normal children and adult non-psychiatric population

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Victor

    2009-01-01

    A descriptive account of musical hallucinations of a series of 19 people is presented. Five people reported the onset of hallucination before adulthood. In this paper we demonstrate that musical hallucinations are not necessarily pathological and can occur as a normal experience in people (children and adults) who have no contact with mental health services and no concurrent mental disorder. This is also the first paper to recognise that children can experience musical hallucinations. Also, we show that musical hallucinations are more common than previously thought, but people do not report their occurrence. It seems plausible that in musical hallucinations there is an insult to the ear or brain that produces a change in quality of these images, converting them to a psychotic experience. Musical hallucinations should be regarded as a continuum with normal experiences and clinical syndromes. PMID:21686956

  3. Progesterone Upregulates Gene Expression in Normal Human Thyroid Follicular Cells.

    PubMed

    Bertoni, Ana Paula Santin; Brum, Ilma Simoni; Hillebrand, Ana Caroline; Furlanetto, Tania Weber

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules are more prevalent in women than men, so female sex hormones may have an etiological role in these conditions. There are no data about direct effects of progesterone on thyroid cells, so the aim of the present study was to evaluate progesterone effects in the sodium-iodide symporter NIS, thyroglobulin TG, thyroperoxidase TPO, and KI-67 genes expression, in normal thyroid follicular cells, derived from human tissue. NIS, TG, TPO, and KI-67 mRNA expression increased significantly after TSH 20 μUI/mL, respectively: 2.08 times, P < 0.0001; 2.39 times, P = 0.01; 1.58 times, P = 0.0003; and 1.87 times, P < 0.0001. In thyroid cells treated with 20 μUI/mL TSH plus 10 nM progesterone, RNA expression of NIS, TG, and KI-67 genes increased, respectively: 1.78 times, P < 0.0001; 1.75 times, P = 0.037; and 1.95 times, P < 0.0001, and TPO mRNA expression also increased, though not significantly (1.77 times, P = 0.069). These effects were abolished by mifepristone, an antagonist of progesterone receptor, suggesting that genes involved in thyroid cell function and proliferation are upregulated by progesterone. This work provides evidence that progesterone has a direct effect on thyroid cells, upregulating genes involved in thyroid function and growth. PMID:26089899

  4. Transcriptional analysis of normal human fibroblast responses to microgravity stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongqing; Wang, Eugenia

    2008-03-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism(s) of how spaceflight affects cellular signaling pathways, quiescent normal human WI-38 fibroblasts were flown on the STS-93 space shuttle mission. Subsequently, RNA samples from the space-flown and ground-control cells were used to construct two cDNA libraries, which were then processed for suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify spaceflight-specific gene expression. The SSH data show that key genes related to oxidative stress, DNA repair, and fatty acid oxidation are activated by spaceflight, suggesting the induction of cellular oxidative stress. This is further substantiated by the up-regulation of neuregulin 1 and the calcium-binding protein calmodulin 2. Another obvious stress sign is that spaceflight evokes the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling pathways, along with up-regulating several G1-phase cell cycle traverse genes. Other genes showing up-regulation of expression are involved in protein synthesis and pro-apoptosis, as well as pro-survival. Interactome analysis of functionally related genes shows that c-Myc is the "hub" for those genes showing significant changes. Hence, our results suggest that microgravity travel may impact changes in gene expression mostly associated with cellular stress signaling, directing cells to either apoptotic death or premature senescence.

  5. 7Li NMR study of normal human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Post, J. F. M.; Panchalingam, K.; Withers, G.; Woessner, D. E.

    The biological action of lithium is of great interest because of the therapeutic efficacy of the cation in manic-depressive illness. To investigate possible molecular interactions of lithium, 7Li NMR studies were conducted on normal human erythrocytes which had been incubated with lithium chloride. The uptake of lithium ions was followed by 7Li NMR, using a dysprosium, tripolyphosphate shift reagent. Lithium uptake followed single-exponential kinetics with a time constant of 14.7 h. The intracellular lithium relaxation times were T 1 ⋍ 5 s and T 2 ⋍ 0.15 s, which implies a lengthening of the lithium correlation time. It was found that lithium does not interact significantly with hemoglobin, the erythrocyte membrane, or artificial phospholipid membranes. Based on measurements of lithium T1 and T2 in concentrated agar gels, the large difference between T1 and T2 for intracellular lithium ions may be due to diffusion of the hydrated lithium ion through heterogeneous electrostatic field gradients created by the erythrocyte membrane-associated cytoskeletal network. Lithium binding to the membrane-associated cytoskeleton, however, cannot be ruled out. Because of the large differences between T1 and T2 of intracellular lithium ions, 1Li NMR may be a sensitive and promising noninvasive method to probe the intracellular environment.

  6. Progesterone Upregulates Gene Expression in Normal Human Thyroid Follicular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertoni, Ana Paula Santin; Brum, Ilma Simoni; Hillebrand, Ana Caroline; Furlanetto, Tania Weber

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules are more prevalent in women than men, so female sex hormones may have an etiological role in these conditions. There are no data about direct effects of progesterone on thyroid cells, so the aim of the present study was to evaluate progesterone effects in the sodium-iodide symporter NIS, thyroglobulin TG, thyroperoxidase TPO, and KI-67 genes expression, in normal thyroid follicular cells, derived from human tissue. NIS, TG, TPO, and KI-67 mRNA expression increased significantly after TSH 20 μUI/mL, respectively: 2.08 times, P < 0.0001; 2.39 times, P = 0.01; 1.58 times, P = 0.0003; and 1.87 times, P < 0.0001. In thyroid cells treated with 20 μUI/mL TSH plus 10 nM progesterone, RNA expression of NIS, TG, and KI-67 genes increased, respectively: 1.78 times, P < 0.0001; 1.75 times, P = 0.037; and 1.95 times, P < 0.0001, and TPO mRNA expression also increased, though not significantly (1.77 times, P = 0.069). These effects were abolished by mifepristone, an antagonist of progesterone receptor, suggesting that genes involved in thyroid cell function and proliferation are upregulated by progesterone. This work provides evidence that progesterone has a direct effect on thyroid cells, upregulating genes involved in thyroid function and growth. PMID:26089899

  7. Ghrelin modulates testicular germ cells apoptosis and proliferation in adult normal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kheradmand, Arash; Dezfoulian, Omid; Alirezaei, Masoud; Rasoulian, Bahram

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spermatogenesis is closely associated with the balance between germ cells proliferation and apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerous studies have documented the direct action of ghrelin in the modulation of apoptosis in different cell types. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ghrelin may be considered as a modulator of spermatogenesis in normal adult rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ghrelin may be potentially implicated for abnormal spermatogenesis in some testicular germ cell tumors. -- Abstract: Under normal condition in the most mammals, spermatogenesis is closely associated with the balance between germ cells proliferation and apoptosis. The present study was designed to determine the effects of ghrelin treatment on in vivo quality and quantity expression of apoptosis and proliferation specific indices in rat testicular germ cells. Twenty eight adult normal rats were subdivided into equal control and treatment groups. Treatment group received 3 nmol of ghrelin as subcutaneous injection for 30 consecutive days or vehicle to the control animals. The rats from each group (n = 7) were killed on days 10 and 30 and their testes were taken for immunocytochemical evaluation and caspase-3 assay. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that the accumulations of Bax and PCNA peptides are generally more prominent in spermatocytes and spermatogonia of both groups. Likewise, the mean percentage of immunoreactive spermatocytes against Bax increased (P < 0.01) in the ghrelin-treated group on day 10, while despite of 30% increment in the Bax level of spermatocytes in the treated rats on day 30, however, it was not statistically significant. During the experimental period, only a few spermatogonia represented Bax expression and the changes of Bax immunolabling cells were negligible upon ghrelin treatment. Likewise, there were immunostaining cells against Bcl-2 in each germ cell neither in the control nor in the treated animals. In fact

  8. Seeing the Talker's Face Improves Free Recall of Speech for Young Adults with Normal Hearing but Not Older Adults with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Mary; Mishra, Sushmit; Stenfelt, Stefan; Lunner, Thomas; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Seeing the talker's face improves speech understanding in noise, possibly releasing resources for cognitive processing. We investigated whether it improves free recall of spoken two-digit numbers. Method: Twenty younger adults with normal hearing and 24 older adults with hearing loss listened to and subsequently recalled lists of 13…

  9. Adult Human Neurogenesis: From Microscopy to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases. PMID:21519376

  10. Inspiratory Flow Limitation in a Normal Population of Adults in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Palombini, Luciana O.; Tufik, Sergio; Rapoport, David M.; Ayappa, Indu A.; Guilleminault, Christian; de Godoy, Luciana B. M.; Castro, Laura S.; Bittencourt, Lia

    2013-01-01

    . Inspiratory flow limitation in a normal population of adults in São Paulo, Brazil. SLEEP 2013;36(11):1663-1668. PMID:24179299

  11. Phytoestrogen Metabolism by Adult Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Pilar; Medina, Margarita; Sánchez-Jiménez, Abel; Landete, José Mᵃ

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived polyphenols with a structure similar to human estrogens. The three main groups of phytoestrogens, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans, are transformed into equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively, by bacteria. These metabolites have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activities than their precursors, and they are more bioavailable. The aim of this study was to analyze the metabolism of isoflavones, lignans and ellagitannins by gut microbiota, and to study the possible correlation in the metabolism of these three groups of phytoestrogens. In vitro fermentation experiments were performed with feces samples from 14 healthy adult volunteers, and metabolite formation was measured by HPLC-PAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. Only the microbiota of one subject produced equol, while most of them showed production of O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA). Significant inter-subject differences were observed in the metabolism of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein, while the glucoside isoflavones and their aglycones showed less variability, except for glycitin. Most subjects produced urolithins M-5 and E. Urolithin D was not detected, while uroltithin B was found in half of the individuals analyzed, and urolithins A and C were detected in two and four subjects, respectively. Enterolactone was found in all subjects, while enterodiol only appeared in five. Isoflavone metabolism could be correlated with the metabolism of lignans and ellagitannins. However, the metabolism of ellagitannins and lignans could not be correlated. This the first study where the metabolism of the three groups together of phytoestrogen, isoflavones, lignans, and ellagitannins by gut microbiota is analyzed. PMID:27517891

  12. [Quantitative evaluation of carotid elasticity in normal adults by ET technique].

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuting; Luo, Yan; Jia, Yiping; Wen, Xiaorong; Lin, Ling

    2008-10-01

    This investigation was aimed to detect the carotid elasticity in normal adults by use of echo-tracking (ET) technique. The stiffness parameter (beta), pressure-strain elasticity modulus (Ep), arterial compliance (AC), argumentation index (AI) and one-point pulse wave velocity (PWV beta) of carotid in 145 normal adults with the average age of 47.0 were calculated. The population were divided into five groups according to age: 20-29 y, 30-39 y,40-49 y, 50-59 y and > or = 60 y. The elasticity parameters between left and right side, between male female and between different age groups were compared using SAS 6.12 statistic software. There was no difference in carotid elasticity regarding the side and gender. The carotid beta, Ep, AI and PWV beta were noted to increase with age while AC was noted to decrease with age. The carotid elasticity was found to correlate with age significantly, but not with side and gender. This change can be detected by ET technique.

  13. Normal Adult Aging and the Contextual Influences Affecting Speech and Meaningful Sound Perception

    PubMed Central

    Aydelott, Jennifer; Leech, Robert; Crinion, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    It is widely accepted that hearing loss increases markedly with age, beginning in the fourth decade ISO 7029 (2000). Age-related hearing loss is typified by high-frequency threshold elevation and associated reductions in speech perception because speech sounds, especially consonants, become inaudible. Nevertheless, older adults often report additional and progressive difficulties in the perception and comprehension of speech, often highlighted in adverse listening conditions that exceed those reported by younger adults with a similar degree of high-frequency hearing loss (Dubno, Dirks, & Morgan) leading to communication difficulties and social isolation (Weinstein & Ventry). Some of the age-related decline in speech perception can be accounted for by peripheral sensory problems but cognitive aging can also be a contributing factor. In this article, we review findings from the psycholinguistic literature predominantly over the last four years and present a pilot study illustrating how normal age-related changes in cognition and the linguistic context can influence speech-processing difficulties in older adults. For significant progress in understanding and improving the auditory performance of aging listeners to be made, we discuss how future research will have to be much more specific not only about which interactions between auditory and cognitive abilities are critical but also how they are modulated in the brain. PMID:21307006

  14. Normal adult aging and the contextual influences affecting speech and meaningful sound perception.

    PubMed

    Aydelott, Jennifer; Leech, Robert; Crinion, Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    It is widely accepted that hearing loss increases markedly with age, beginning in the fourth decade ISO 7029 (2000). Age-related hearing loss is typified by high-frequency threshold elevation and associated reductions in speech perception because speech sounds, especially consonants, become inaudible. Nevertheless, older adults often report additional and progressive difficulties in the perception and comprehension of speech, often highlighted in adverse listening conditions that exceed those reported by younger adults with a similar degree of high-frequency hearing loss (Dubno, Dirks, & Morgan) leading to communication difficulties and social isolation (Weinstein & Ventry). Some of the age-related decline in speech perception can be accounted for by peripheral sensory problems but cognitive aging can also be a contributing factor. In this article, we review findings from the psycholinguistic literature predominantly over the last four years and present a pilot study illustrating how normal age-related changes in cognition and the linguistic context can influence speech-processing difficulties in older adults. For significant progress in understanding and improving the auditory performance of aging listeners to be made, we discuss how future research will have to be much more specific not only about which interactions between auditory and cognitive abilities are critical but also how they are modulated in the brain. PMID:21307006

  15. Prevalence of Central Obesity among Adults with Normal BMI and Its Association with Metabolic Diseases in Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Rui; Gao, Chunshi; Jiang, Lingling; Lv, Xin; Song, Yuanyuan; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of central obesity among adults with normal BMI and its association with metabolic diseases in Jilin Province, China. Methods A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in Jilin Province of China. Information was collected by face to face interview. Descriptive data analysis and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of prevalence/frequency were conducted. Log-binomial regression analyses were used to find the independent factors associated with central obesity and to explore the adjusted association between central obesity and metabolic diseases among adults with normal BMI. Results Among the adult residents with normal BMI in Jilin Province, 55.6% of participants with central obesity self-assessed as normal weight and 27.0% thought their body weight were above normal. 12.7% of central obesity people took methods to lose weight, while 85.3% didn’t. Female, older people and non-manual worker had higher risk to be central obesity among adults with normal BMI. Hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia were significantly associated with central obesity among adults with normal BMI, the PRs were 1.337 (1.224–1.461), 1.323 (1.193–1.456) and 1.261 (1.152–1.381) separately when adjusted for gender, age and BMI. Conclusions Hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia were significantly associated with central obesity among adults with normal BMI in Jilin Province, China. The low rates of awareness and control of central obesity among adults with normal BMI should be improved by government and health department. PMID:27467819

  16. White matter lateralization and interhemispheric coherence to auditory modulations in normal reading and dyslexic adults.

    PubMed

    Vandermosten, Maaike; Poelmans, Hanne; Sunaert, Stefan; Ghesquière, Pol; Wouters, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Neural activation of slow acoustic variations that are important for syllable identification is more lateralized to the right hemisphere than activation of fast acoustic changes that are important for phoneme identification. It has been suggested that this complementary function at different hemispheres is rooted in a different degree of white matter myelination in the left versus right hemisphere. The present study will investigate this structure-function relationship with Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and Auditory Steady-State Responses (ASSR), respectively. With DTI we examined white matter lateralization in the cortical auditory and language regions (i.e. posterior region of the superior temporal gyrus and the arcuate fasciculus) and white matter integrity in the splenium of the corpus callosum. With ASSR we examined interhemispheric coherence to slow, syllabic-rate (i.e. 4 Hz) and fast, phonemic-rate (i.e. 20 Hz) modulations. These structural and functional techniques were applied in a group of normal reading adults and a group of dyslexic adults for whom previously reduced functional interhemispheric connectivity at 20 Hz has been reported (Poelmans et al. (2012). Ear and Hearing, 33, 134-143). This sample was chosen since it is hypothesized that in dyslexic readers insufficient hemispheric asymmetry in myelination might relate to their auditory and phonological problems. Results demonstrate reduced white matter lateralization in the posterior superior temporal gyrus and the arcuate fasciculus in the dyslexic readers. Additionally, white matter lateralization in the posterior superior temporal gyrus and white matter integrity in the splenium of the corpus callosum related to interhemispheric coherence to phonemic-rate modulations (i.e. 20 Hz). Interestingly, this correlation pattern was opposite in normal versus dyslexic readers. These results might imply that less pronounced left white matter dominance in dyslexic adults might relate to their problems to

  17. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal human responses to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Frise, Matthew C.; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Nickol, Annabel H.; Curtis, M. Kate; Pollard, Karen A.; Roberts, David J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Dorrington, Keith L.; Robbins, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Iron bioavailability has been identified as a factor that influences cellular hypoxia sensing, putatively via an action on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. We therefore hypothesized that clinical iron deficiency would disturb integrated human responses to hypoxia. METHODS. We performed a prospective, controlled, observational study of the effects of iron status on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Individuals with absolute iron deficiency (ID) and an iron-replete (IR) control group were exposed to two 6-hour periods of isocapnic hypoxia. The second hypoxic exposure was preceded by i.v. infusion of iron. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was serially assessed with Doppler echocardiography. RESULTS. Thirteen ID individuals completed the study and were age- and sex-matched with controls. PASP did not differ by group or study day before each hypoxic exposure. During the first 6-hour hypoxic exposure, the rise in PASP was 6.2 mmHg greater in the ID group (absolute rises 16.1 and 10.7 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference, 2.7–9.7 mmHg, P = 0.001). Intravenous iron attenuated the PASP rise in both groups; however, the effect was greater in ID participants than in controls (absolute reductions 11.1 and 6.8 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference in change, –8.3 to –0.3 mmHg, P = 0.035). Serum erythropoietin responses to hypoxia also differed between groups. CONCLUSION. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal responses to hypoxia, as evidenced by exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension that is reversed by subsequent iron administration. Disturbed hypoxia sensing and signaling provides a mechanism through which iron deficiency may be detrimental to human health. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01847352). FUNDING. M.C. Frise is the recipient of a British Heart Foundation Clinical Research Training Fellowship (FS/14/48/30828). K.L. Dorrington is supported by the Dunhill Medical Trust (R178/1110). D.J. Roberts was

  18. Time course of ozone-induced neutrophilia in normal humans

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Siefkin, A.D.; McDonald, R.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Five normal human subjects were exposed for 1 h to filtered air (FA) once and to 0.3 ppm O{sub 3} on 3 separate days. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was obtained less than 1 h after FA and either less than 1, 6, or 24 h after O{sub 3} exposure. FEV1 was measured before the exposures and the BAL. The first aliquot (proximal airway (PA) sample) was analyzed separately from the pooled Aliquots 2 through 4 (distal airway and alveolar surface (DAAS) sample). The data from the PA and DAAS samples were then combined to calculate the values that would have been obtained by pooling all BAL washes. FEV1 was significantly (p less than 0.05) decreased 1 h after O{sub 3} exposure, but it returned to preexposure values at 6 and 24 h after O{sub 3}. The percent of neutrophils in the PA sample was significantly elevated at less than 1 h (3.7%) at 6 h (16.5%), and at 24 h (9.2%) after O{sub 3}. The percent of neutrophils in the DAAS sample and calculated pooled values were significantly elevated at 6 h (4.1 and 7.6%) and at 24 h (5.1 and 5.8%) after O{sub 3}. These data demonstrate that O{sub 3}-induced symptoms, FEV1 decrements, and airway neutrophilia follow different time courses and indicate that the pooling of BAL washes may obscure the detection of an O{sub 3}-induced bronchiolitis. The degree of neutrophilia in the BAL did not correlate with the sensitivity of the individual subjects when measured by acute changes in FEV1, suggesting a dichotomy of pathways that result in O{sub 3}-induced airway neutrophilia and pulmonary function decrements.

  19. Gustofacial and olfactofacial responses in human adults.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Romy; Ellgring, Heiner; Macht, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Adults' facial reactions in response to tastes and odors were investigated in order to determine whether differential facial displays observed in newborns remain stable in adults who exhibit a greater voluntary facial control. Twenty-eight healthy nonsmokers (14 females) tasted solutions of PROP (bitter), NaCl (salty), citric acid (sour), sucrose (sweet), and glutamate (umami) differing in concentration (low, medium, and high) and smelled different odors (banana, cinnamon, clove, coffee, fish, and garlic). Their facial reactions were video recorded and analyzed using the Facial Action Coding System. Adults' facial reactions discriminated between stimuli with opponent valences. Unpleasant tastes and odors elicited negative displays (brow lower, upper lip raise, and lip corner depress). The pleasant sweet taste elicited positive displays (lip suck), whereas the pleasant odors did not. Unlike newborns, adults smiled with higher concentrations of some unpleasant tastes that can be regarded as serving communicative functions. Moreover, adults expressed negative displays with higher sweetness. Except for the "social" smile in response to unpleasant tastes, adults' facial reactions elicited by tastes and odors mostly correspond to those found in newborns. In conclusion, adults' facial reactions to tastes and odors appear to remain stable in their basic displays; however, some additional reactions might reflect socialization influences.

  20. Mesenchymal progenitor cell markers in human articular cartilage: normal distribution and changes in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Shawn P; Miyaki, Shigeru; Asahara, Hiroshi; D'Lima, Darryl D; Lotz, Martin K

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Recent findings suggest that articular cartilage contains mesenchymal progenitor cells. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of stem cell markers (Notch-1, Stro-1 and VCAM-1) and of molecules that modulate progenitor differentiation (Notch-1 and Sox9) in normal adult human articular cartilage and in osteoarthritis (OA) cartilage. Methods Expression of the markers was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and flow cytometry. Hoechst 33342 dye was used to identify and sort the cartilage side population (SP). Multilineage differentiation assays including chondrogenesis, osteogenesis and adipogenesis were performed on SP and non-SP (NSP) cells. Results A surprisingly high number (>45%) of cells were positive for Notch-1, Stro-1 and VCAM-1 throughout normal cartilage. Expression of these markers was higher in the superficial zone (SZ) of normal cartilage as compared to the middle zone (MZ) and deep zone (DZ). Non-fibrillated OA cartilage SZ showed reduced Notch-1 and Sox9 staining frequency, while Notch-1, Stro-1 and VCAM-1 positive cells were increased in the MZ. Most cells in OA clusters were positive for each molecule tested. The frequency of SP cells in cartilage was 0.14 ± 0.05% and no difference was found between normal and OA. SP cells displayed chondrogenic and osteogenic but not adipogenic differentiation potential. Conclusions These results show a surprisingly high number of cells that express putative progenitor cell markers in human cartilage. In contrast, the percentage of SP cells is much lower and within the range of expected stem cell frequency. Thus, markers such as Notch-1, Stro-1 or VCAM-1 may not be useful to identify progenitors in cartilage. Instead, their increased expression in OA cartilage implicates involvement in the abnormal cell activation and differentiation process characteristic of OA. PMID:19500336

  1. Mapping of corticotropic cells in the normal human pituitary.

    PubMed

    Trouillas, J; Guigard, M P; Fonlupt, P; Souchier, C; Girod, C

    1996-05-01

    We accomplished the first mapping of corticotropic cells in the whole human adult pituitary. Corticotropic cells were identified by immunocytochemistry (ICC) and quantified by image analysis on 12 pituitaries obtained from people who had died suddenly. An overall view of each pituitary was given by 15-21 sections (mean 18 sections) at 300-micron intervals on six slides. Each section was systematically treated by indirect immunoperoxidase using an anti-ACTH[17-39] polyclonal antiserum. All the measures were done with a x 6.3 objective lens, each field (0. 5 mm2) being considered as the unit area. The mean pituitary density (surface of labeled cells/total surface) of corticotropic cells (9.5 +/- 3.0% per 0. 5 mm2) is significantly higher in men (11.5 +/- 5.1%) than in women (7.0 +/- 1.3%). This difference is due to an inverse relationship between the corticotropic cell density and the weight of the pituitary, which is higher in women than in men. The mean diameter of corticotropic cells is 14.9 micron and their total number per pituitary is approximately 10(7) cells. We confirmed that the spatial distribution of corticotropic cells is nonuniform: they are mainly distributed in the anteromedian part of the anterior lobe. In addition, our results demonstrated that the inferior part of the pituitary contained three times more corticotropic cells than the superior part (mean density 18.0% vs 6.0%) and the anterior part twice as many as the posterior part (mean density 12.3% vs 6.8%). On the horizontal plane, the pituitary was divided into eight zones, in which the mean of area was 2.5-21.0%. The maximal cell density may reach 40-60%. The use of this map should help the pathologist to recognize if there is corticotropic hyperplasia in a small pituitary fragment surgically removed from a patient with Cushing's disease. On the basis of this study, we put forward some criteria for diagnosing corticotropic hyperplasia. PMID:8627004

  2. Adult Literacy Education and Human Rights: A View from Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Susan M.; Kooij, Christina S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that adult literacy as part of international development is an issue of both human rights and women's rights. We explore this by presenting a case study of the effects of one innovative adult literacy program in Afghanistan that places men and women, as well as various ethnicities, together in the same classroom as…

  3. Sleep Duration and Subsequent Cortical Thinning in Cognitively Normal Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Spira, Adam P.; Gonzalez, Christopher E.; Venkatraman, Vijay K.; Wu, Mark N.; Pacheco, Jennifer; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Resnick, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine the association between self-reported sleep duration and cortical thinning among older adults. Methods: We studied 122 cognitively normal participants in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging with a mean age = 66.6 y (range, 51–84) at baseline sleep assessment and 69.5 y (range, 56–86) at initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Participants reported average sleep duration and completed a mean of 7.6 1.5-T MRI scans (range, 3–11), with mean follow-up from initial scan of 8.0 y (range, 2.0–11.8). Results: In analyses adjusted for age, sex, education, race, and interval between sleep assessment and initial MRI scan, participants reporting > 7 h sleep at baseline had thinner cortex in the inferior occipital gyrus and sulcus of the left hemisphere at initial MRI scan than those reporting 7 h (cluster P < 0.05). In adjusted longitudinal analyses, compared to those reporting 7 h of sleep, participants reporting < 7 h exhibited higher rates of subsequent thinning in the superior temporal sulcus and gyrus, inferior and middle frontal gyrus, and superior frontal sulcus of the left hemisphere, and in the superior frontal gyrus of the right hemisphere; those reporting > 7 h of sleep had higher rates of thinning in the superior frontal and middle frontal gyrus of the left hemisphere (cluster P < 0.05 for all). In sensitivity analyses, adjustment for apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 genotype reduced or eliminated some effects but revealed others. When reports of < 7 h of sleep were compared to reports of 7 or 8 h combined, there were no significant associations with cortical thinning. Conclusions: Among cognitively normal older adults, sleep durations of < 7 h and > 7 h may increase the rate of subsequent frontotemporal gray matter atrophy. Additional studies, including those that use objective sleep measures and investigate mechanisms linking sleep duration to gray matter loss, are needed. Citation: Spira AP, Gonzalez CE, Venkatraman

  4. An investigation of body part as object (BPO) responses in normal and brain-damaged adults.

    PubMed

    Duffy, R J; Duffy, J R

    1989-07-01

    A test of simple pantomime was administered to three groups of adults and comparisons were made across groups of the incidence of subjects who exhibited body part as object (BPO) responses and of the mean frequency of occurrence of BPO in each group. The three groups were left-hemisphere-damaged aphasics (N = 28), right-hemisphere-damaged (N = 24), and normal controls (N = 28). The results indicated no significant differences among groups on the BPO measures. Also, to test the strength of association between the frequency of occurrence of BPO and measures of limb apraxia and severity of aphasia for the left-hemisphere-damaged aphasic group, correlation coefficients were obtained. The correlations were low and nonsignificant. The results of this investigation do not support the common clinical assumption that the occurrence of BPO during the performance of simple pantomimes is pathognomic for left-hemisphere pathology or associated with limb apraxia.

  5. Plasma and urine diketopiperazine concentrations in normal adults ingesting large quantities of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Cho, E S; Coon, J D; Stegink, L D

    1987-07-01

    In aqueous solution, aspartame can cyclicize to form its corresponding diketopiperazine (3-carboxymethyl-6-benzyl-2,5-diketopiperazine; DKP) and methanol. We measured plasma and urinary concentrations of DKP in samples obtained from six normal adult subjects ingesting 2.2 mg DKP/kg body weight. The DKP was administered as part of a dose of 200 mg aspartame/kg body weight. DKP concentrations in plasma were below the detection limit (less than 1 microgram/ml) of the high-pressure liquid chromatographic method at each time interval after ingestion at which they were measured. Mean (+/- SD) total urinary DKP excreted during the first 24-hr period after dosing was 6.68 +/- 1.30 mg (4.83 +/- 0.23% of the ingested DKP dose). Approximately 44% of the total DKP excreted was excreted in the first 4 hr after dosing.

  6. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults

    PubMed Central

    KHONSARI, Shadi; SUGANTHY, Mayuran; BURCZYNSKA, Beata; DANG, Vu; CHOUDHURY, Manika; PACHENARI, Azra

    2015-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  7. Periodontal implications of orthodontic treatment in adults with reduced or normal periodontal tissues versus those of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R L; Leggott, P J; Quinn, R S; Eakle, W S; Chambers, D

    1989-09-01

    This longitudinal study monitored periodontal status in 20 adults and 20 adolescents undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Ten adults had generalized periodontitis and received periodontal treatment, including periodontal surgery, before orthodontic treatment. They also received periodontal maintenance at 3-month intervals during orthodontic treatment. The other 10 adults had normal periodontal tissues. Neither these latter adults nor the adolescents received periodontal maintenance during orthodontic treatment. Periodontal status was determined (1) at six standard sites before fixed appliances were placed (baseline), (2) at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months after appliances had been placed, and (3) 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after appliances had been removed. At each of these visits, these sites were assessed for plaque index, gingival index, bleeding tendency, and pocket depth. Loss of attachment between baseline and 3 months after appliances were removed and tooth loss were also determined. Complete data were obtained for 15 adolescents and 14 adults. During orthodontic treatment the adolescent group showed significantly more (p less than 0.05) periodontal inflammation and supragingival plaque than the adults; after appliances were removed, this pattern was no longer statistically significant. For loss of attachment, there were no significant differences among adolescents, adults with normal periodontal tissues, or adults with reduced but healthy periodontal tissues who had undergone treatment for periodontal disease. For tooth loss, three nonstudy site teeth with pockets deeper than 6 mm and/or furcation involvements were lost because of periodontal abscesses in the adult group treated for periodontal disease. PMID:2773862

  8. Arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 is essential for sustaining normal adult hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fan; Cheng, Guoyan; Hamard, Pierre-Jacques; Greenblatt, Sarah; Wang, Lan; Man, Na; Perna, Fabiana; Xu, Haiming; Tadi, Madhavi; Luciani, Luisa; Nimer, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic regulators play critical roles in normal hematopoiesis, and the activity of these enzymes is frequently altered in hematopoietic cancers. The major type II protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 catalyzes the formation of symmetric dimethyl arginine and has been implicated in various cellular processes, including pluripotency and tumorigenesis. Here, we generated Prmt5 conditional KO mice to evaluate the contribution of PRMT5 to adult hematopoiesis. Loss of PRMT5 triggered an initial but transient expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs); however, Prmt5 deletion resulted in a concurrent loss of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), leading to fatal BM aplasia. PRMT5-specific effects on hematopoiesis were cell intrinsic and depended on PRMT5 methyltransferase activity. We found that PRMT5-deficient hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells exhibited severely impaired cytokine signaling as well as upregulation of p53 and expression of its downstream targets. Together, our results demonstrate that PRMT5 plays distinct roles in the behavior of HSCs compared with HPCs and is essential for the maintenance of adult hematopoietic cells. PMID:26258414

  9. Differences of Sagittal Lumbosacral Parameters between Patients with Lumbar Spondylolysis and Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jin; Peng, Bao-Gan; Li, Yong-Chao; Zhang, Nai-Yang; Yang, Liang; Li, Duan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have suggested an association between elevated pelvic incidence (PI) and the development of lumbar spondylolysis. However, there is still lack of investigation for Han Chinese people concerning the normal range of spinopelvic parameters and relationship between abnormal sagittal parameters and lumbar diseases. The objective of the study was to investigate sagittal lumbosacral parameters of adult lumbar spondylolysis patients in Han Chinese population. Methods: A total of 52 adult patients with symptomatic lumbar spondylolysis treated in the General Hospital of Armed Police Force (Beijing, China) were identified as the spondylolysis group. All the 52 patients were divided into two subgroups, Subgroup A: 36 patients with simple lumbar spondylolysis, and Subgroup B: 16 patients with lumbar spondylolysis accompanying with mild lumbar spondylolisthesis (slip percentage <30%). Altogether 207 healthy adults were chosen as the control group. All patients and the control group took lumbosacral lateral radiographs. Seven sagittal lumbosacral parameters, including PI, pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), lumbar lordosis (LL), L5 incidence, L5 slope, and sacral table angle (STA), were measured in the lateral radiographs. All the parameters aforementioned were compared between the two subgroups and between the spondylolysis group and the control group with independent-sample t-test. Results: There were no statistically significant differences of all seven sagittal lumbosacral parameters between Subgroup A and Subgroup B. PI, PT, SS, and LL were higher (P < 0.05) in the spondylolysis group than those in the control group, but STA was lower (P < 0.001) in the spondylolysis group. Conclusions: Current study results suggest that increased PI and decreased STA may play important roles in the pathology of lumbar spondylolysis in Han Chinese population. PMID:27174324

  10. Apolipoprotein ε4 is associated with lower brain volume in cognitively normal Chinese but not white older adults.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Jennifer S; Lee, Allen K L; Takada, Leonel T; Busovaca, Edgar; Bonham, Luke W; Chao, Steven Z; Tse, Marian; He, Jing; Schwarz, Christopher G; Carmichael, Owen T; Matthews, Brandy R; Karydas, Anna; Weiner, Michael W; Coppola, Giovanni; DeCarli, Charles S; Miller, Bruce L; Rosen, Howard J

    2015-01-01

    Studying ethnically diverse groups is important for furthering our understanding of biological mechanisms of disease that may vary across human populations. The ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (APOE ε4) is a well-established risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and may confer anatomic and functional effects years before clinical signs of cognitive decline are observed. The allele frequency of APOE ε4 varies both across and within populations, and the size of the effect it confers for dementia risk may be affected by other factors. Our objective was to investigate the role APOE ε4 plays in moderating brain volume in cognitively normal Chinese older adults, compared to older white Americans. We hypothesized that carrying APOE ε4 would be associated with reduced brain volume and that the magnitude of this effect would be different between ethnic groups. We performed whole brain analysis of structural MRIs from Chinese living in America (n = 41) and Shanghai (n = 30) and compared them to white Americans (n = 71). We found a significant interaction effect of carrying APOE ε4 and being Chinese. The APOE ε4xChinese interaction was associated with lower volume in bilateral cuneus and left middle frontal gyrus (Puncorrected<0.001), with suggestive findings in right entorhinal cortex and left hippocampus (Puncorrected<0.01), all regions that are associated with neurodegeneration in AD. After correction for multiple testing, the left cuneus remained significantly associated with the interaction effect (PFWE = 0.05). Our study suggests there is a differential effect of APOE ε4 on brain volume in Chinese versus white cognitively normal elderly adults. This represents a novel finding that, if verified in larger studies, has implications for how biological, environmental and/or lifestyle factors may modify APOE ε4 effects on the brain in diverse populations. PMID:25738563

  11. PCNA immunoreactivity revealing normal proliferative activity in the brain of an adult Elasmobranch, Torpedo marmorata.

    PubMed

    Margotta, Vito

    2007-01-01

    The brain of adult heterothermic vertebrates can be already provided of quiescent cells, scattered ("matrix cells") and/or clustered ("matrix areas"). These typical cells, in some regions located at or near ventricular surfaces and at peri-ependymal layers, in other territories populating their framework, maintain some embryonic properties and are responsible of normal or variously experimentally induced proliferative activities. On these topics there are a great number of reports concerning Teleostean Osteichthyes, Urodele and Anuran Amphibians, Lacertilian Reptiles. At the contrary, only few are the contributions regarding the Petromyzontidae. Involving an immunocytochemical marker, the Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), revealing proliferative events, in the last years we have undertaken a reappraisal focused on these encephalic performances in normal adult poikilothermal vertebrates. To provide a valid comparison between our results and the literature data, our choice of the specimens was based on the desire to employ organisms belonging to the same or phylogenetically close species used by previous Authors in similar studies. In our immunocytochemical panorama there is a substantial agreement between our contributions and bibliographic references concerning natural encephalic proliferative phenomena in these vertebrates. At this point of our study, the last missing piece was represented by the Chondrichthyes about which the literature data are lacking. In order to fill this gap, the aim of the present research is to investigate, involving the same PCNA test, whether proliferative events also persist in the brain of adult cartilaginous fishes. The immunostaining images obtained in the Elasmo branch Torpedo marmorata, well-known for the emission of high electrical discharges, exhibit undifferentiated cells in relationship with the ependymal epithelium lining the cavities of all cerebral districts; some other neuroblasts are scattered in the mesencephalic

  12. Repeated ingestion of aspartame-sweetened beverage: effect on plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1988-03-01

    Aspartame (APM) is a dipeptide sweetener (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester). It has been suggested that excessive use of the product might elevate plasma aspartate and phenylalanine concentrations. Eight normal adults (four male, four female) ingested three successive 12-oz servings of APM-sweetened beverage at two-hour intervals. The study was carried out in two parts in a randomized cross-over design. In one study the beverage was not sweetened. In the other, the beverage provided 10 mg APM/kg body weight per serving. Plasma amino acid concentrations were measured throughout the six-hour study period. The addition of APM to the beverage had no significant effect on plasma aspartate concentration. APM addition did increase plasma phenylalanine levels 1.64 to 2.05 mumol/dL above baseline values (5.09 +/- 0.82 mumol/dL) 30 to 45 minutes after each dose. However, plasma phenylalanine levels did not exceed normal postprandial values at any time. The data indicate ready metabolism of APM's amino acid content when administered at levels likely to be ingested by individuals who are heavy users of such beverages.

  13. Judging Normality and Attractiveness in Faces: Direct Evidence of a More Refined Representation for Own-Race, Young Adult Faces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaomei; Short, Lindsey A; Chan, Harmonie S J; Mondloch, Catherine J

    2016-09-01

    Young and older adults are more sensitive to deviations from normality in young than older adult faces, suggesting that the dimensions of face space are optimized for young adult faces. Here, we extend these findings to own-race faces and provide converging evidence using an attractiveness rating task. In Experiment 1, Caucasian and Chinese adults were shown own- and other-race face pairs; one member was undistorted and the other had compressed or expanded features. Participants indicated which member of each pair was more normal (a task that requires referencing a norm) and which was more expanded (a task that simply requires discrimination). Participants showed an own-race advantage in the normality task but not the discrimination task. In Experiment 2, participants rated the facial attractiveness of own- and other-race faces (Experiment 2a) or young and older adult faces (Experiment 2b). Between-rater variability in ratings of individual faces was higher for other-race and older adult faces; reduced consensus in attractiveness judgments reflects a less refined face space. Collectively, these results provide direct evidence that the dimensions of face space are optimized for own-race and young adult faces, which may underlie face race- and age-based deficits in recognition.

  14. Judging Normality and Attractiveness in Faces: Direct Evidence of a More Refined Representation for Own-Race, Young Adult Faces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaomei; Short, Lindsey A; Chan, Harmonie S J; Mondloch, Catherine J

    2016-09-01

    Young and older adults are more sensitive to deviations from normality in young than older adult faces, suggesting that the dimensions of face space are optimized for young adult faces. Here, we extend these findings to own-race faces and provide converging evidence using an attractiveness rating task. In Experiment 1, Caucasian and Chinese adults were shown own- and other-race face pairs; one member was undistorted and the other had compressed or expanded features. Participants indicated which member of each pair was more normal (a task that requires referencing a norm) and which was more expanded (a task that simply requires discrimination). Participants showed an own-race advantage in the normality task but not the discrimination task. In Experiment 2, participants rated the facial attractiveness of own- and other-race faces (Experiment 2a) or young and older adult faces (Experiment 2b). Between-rater variability in ratings of individual faces was higher for other-race and older adult faces; reduced consensus in attractiveness judgments reflects a less refined face space. Collectively, these results provide direct evidence that the dimensions of face space are optimized for own-race and young adult faces, which may underlie face race- and age-based deficits in recognition. PMID:27335127

  15. Posture and Gender Differentially Affect Heart Rate Variability of Symptomatic Mitral Valve Prolapse and Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chien-Jung; Chen, Ya-Chu; Lee, Chih-Hsien; Yang, Ing-Fang; Yang, Ten-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) has been shown to be a useful measure of autonomic activity in healthy and mitral valve prolapsed (MVP) subjects. However, the effects of posture and gender on HRV in symptomatic MVP and normal adults had not been elucidated in Taiwan. Methods A total of 118 MVP patients (7 males, 39 ± 7 years old; and 111 females, 42 ± 13 years old) and 148 healthy control (54 males, 28 ± 4 years old; and 94 females, 26 ± 6 years old) were investigated. The diagnosis of MVP was confirmed by cross-sectional echocardiography. A locally developed Taiwanese machine was used to record the HRV parameters for MVP and control groups in three stationary positions. Thereafter, the HRV time-domain parameters, and the frequency-domain parameters derived from fast Fourier transform or autoregressive methods were analyzed. Results The MVP group showed a decrease in time domain parameters and obtunded postural effects on frequency domain parameters moreso than the control group. Though the parasympathetic tone was dominant in female (higher RMSSD, nHF and lower nLF vs. male), the sympathetic outflow was higher in MVP female (lower SDNN, NN50 and higher nLF vs. normal female). While the parasympathetic activity was lower in male, sympathetic outflow was dominant in MVP male (lower nHF and higher nLF vs. normal male). Conclusions Both MVP female and male subjects had elevated levels of sympathetic outflow. The obtunded postural effects on frequency domain measures testified to the autonomic dysregulation of MVP subjects. PMID:27471360

  16. Neural stem cells in the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    For decades, it was believed that the adult brain was a quiescent organ unable to produce new neurons. At the beginning of the1960's, this dogma was challenged by a small group of neuroscientists. To date, it is well-known that new neurons are generated in the adult brain throughout life. Adult neurogenesis is primary confined to the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus within the hippocampus. In both the human and the rodent brain, the primary progenitor of adult SVZ is a subpopulation of astrocytes that have stem-cell-like features. The human SVZ possesses a peculiar cell composition and displays important organizational differences when compared to the SVZ of other mammals. Some evidence suggests that the human SVZ may be not only an endogenous source of neural precursor cells for brain repair, but also a source of brain tumors. In this review, we described the cytoarchitecture and cellular composition of the SVZ in the adult human brain. We also discussed some clinical implications of SVZ, such as: stem-cell-based therapies against neurodegenerative diseases and its potential as a source of malignant cells. Understanding the biology of human SVZ and its neural progenitors is one of the crucial steps to develop novel therapies against neurological diseases in humans. PMID:23181200

  17. Humanities and the Adult Learner in an Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Dale; Kamholtz, Jonathan

    Humanities courses have often been given little attention in continuing education for adults, possibly because they have been viewed as not "practical" or not "job-oriented" enough in our career-oriented, technologically advanced society. However, the humanities should be an integral part of our culture and of the lives of educated persons--a…

  18. On the classification of normally distributed neurons: an application to human dentate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ristanović, Dušan; Milošević, Nebojša T; Marić, Dušica L

    2011-03-01

    One of the major goals in cellular neurobiology is the meaningful cell classification. However, in cell classification there are many unresolved issues that need to be addressed. Neuronal classification usually starts with grouping cells into classes according to their main morphological features. If one tries to test quantitatively such a qualitative classification, a considerable overlap in cell types often appears. There is little published information on it. In order to remove the above-mentioned shortcoming, we undertook the present study with the aim to offer a novel method for solving the class overlapping problem. To illustrate our method, we analyzed a sample of 124 neurons from adult human dentate nucleus. Among them we qualitatively selected 55 neurons with small dendritic fields (the small neurons), and 69 asymmetrical neurons with large dendritic fields (the large neurons). We showed that these two samples are normally and independently distributed. By measuring the neuronal soma areas of both samples, we observed that the corresponding normal curves cut each other. We proved that the abscissa of the point of intersection of the curves could represent the boundary between the two adjacent overlapping neuronal classes, since the error done by such division is minimal. Statistical evaluation of the division was also performed.

  19. Quantitative analysis of p53 expression in human normal and cancer tissue microarray with global normalization method

    PubMed Central

    Idikio, Halliday A

    2011-01-01

    Tissue microarray based immunohistochemical staining and proteomics are important tools to create and validate clinically relevant cancer biomarkers. Immunohistochemical stains using formalin-fixed tissue microarray sections for protein expression are scored manually and semi-quantitatively. Digital image analysis methods remove some of the drawbacks of manual scoring but may need other methods such as normalization to provide across the board utility. In the present study, quantitative proteomics-based global normalization method was used to evaluate its utility in the analysis of p53 protein expression in mixed human normal and cancer tissue microarray. Global normalization used the mean or median of β-actin to calculate ratios of individual core stain intensities, then log transformed the ratios, calculate a mean or median and subtracted the value from the log of ratios. In the absence of global normalization of p53 protein expression, 44% (42 of 95) of tissue cores were positive using the median of intensity values and 40% (38 of 95) using the mean of intensities as cut-off points. With global normalization, p53 positive cores changed to 20% (19 of 95) when using median of intensities and 15.8%(15 of 95) when the mean of intensities were used. In conclusion, the global normalization method helped to define positive p53 staining in the tissue microarray set used. The method used helped to define clear cut-off points and confirmed all negatively stained tissue cores. Such normalization methods should help to better define clinically useful biomarkers. PMID:21738821

  20. Teaching Human Rights: Grades 7 through Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiman, David A.

    This curriculum resource on human rights is rooted in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and seeks to help students understand the issues involved. Using the rights categories suggested by the Universal Declaration, this book offers new ways of teaching about familiar themes. The book contains activities to encourage students…

  1. Landmark-based morphometrics of the normal adult brain using MRI.

    PubMed

    Free, S L; O'Higgins, P; Maudgil, D D; Dryden, I L; Lemieux, L; Fish, D R; Shorvon, S D

    2001-05-01

    We describe the application of statistical shape analysis to homologous landmarks on the cortical surface of the adult human brain. Statistical shape analysis has a sound theoretical basis. Landmarks are identified on the surface of a 3-D reconstruction of the segmented cortical surface from magnetic resonance image (MRI) data. Using publicly available software (morphologika) the location and size dependence of the landmarks are removed and the differences in landmark distribution across subjects are analysed using principal component analysis. These differences, representing shape differences between subjects, can be visually assessed using wireframe models and transformation grids. The MRI data of 58 adult brains (27 female and 15 left handed) were examined. Shape differences in the whole brain are described which concern the relative orientation of frontal lobe sulci. Analysis of all 116 hemispheres revealed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) between left and right hemispheres. This finding was significant for right- but not left-handed subjects alone. No other significant age, gender, handedness, or brain-size correlations with shape differences were found.

  2. Electrical impedance characterization of normal and cancerous human hepatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Shlomi; Ivorra, Antoni; Reuter, Victor E; Rubinsky, Boris; Solomon, Stephen B

    2010-07-01

    The four-electrode method was used to measure the ex vivo complex electrical impedance of tissues from 14 hepatic tumors and the surrounding normal liver from six patients. Measurements were done in the frequency range 1-400 kHz. It was found that the conductivity of the tumor tissue was much higher than that of the normal liver tissue in this frequency range (from 0.14 +/- 0.06 S m(-1) versus 0.03 +/- 0.01 S m(-1) at 1 kHz to 0.25 +/- 0.06 S m(-1) versus 0.15 +/- 0.03 S m(-1) at 400 kHz). The Cole-Cole models were estimated from the experimental data and the four parameters (rho(0), rho(infinity), alpha, f(c)) were obtained using a least-squares fit algorithm. The Cole-Cole parameters for the cancerous and normal liver are 9 +/- 4 Omega m(-1), 2.2 +/- 0.7 Omega m(-1), 0.5 +/- 0.2, 140 +/- 103 kHz and 50 +/- 28 Omega m(-1), 3.2 +/- 0.6 Omega m(-1), 0.64 +/- 0.04, 10 +/- 7 kHz, respectively. These data can contribute to developing bioelectric applications for tissue diagnostics and in tissue treatment planning with electrical fields such as radiofrequency tissue ablation, electrochemotherapy and gene therapy with reversible electroporation, nanoscale pulsing and irreversible electroporation.

  3. PCNA immunoreactivity revealing normal proliferative activity in the brain of adult Lampetra planeri (Bloch, 1784).

    PubMed

    Margotta, Vito; Caronti, Brunella; Colombari, Paolo Tito; Castiglia, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    It is now well known that the Teleosts among Osteichthyes, Urodele and Anuran Amphibians, Lacertilian Reptiles possess encephalic natural proliferative activities even into adulthood, as demonstrated by a great number of researches performed both under normal and various experimental conditions. Few years ago we have undertaken in adult heterothermic vertebrates a reappraisal on spontaneous cerebral proliferative events involving some organisms (Podarcis sicula, Triturus carnifex, Rana esculenta, Carassius carassius) representative of these vertebrates and belonging to the same or phylogenetically similar species used by previous researchers in studies having the same object. In our investigations, these performances were revealed by a proliferative immunocytochemical marker, the Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA). At this point of our study in the scenario emerging from findings a missing piece is represented by Petromyzontidae. To fill up this gap in the present investigation, using our usual test, we have paid attention to adult specimens of Lampetra planeri. The obtained immunostaining panorama has revealed the presence of a considerable number of spontaneous proliferative activities. These events might differ in quantity, in various encephalic districts. PCNA-labelled cells appeared scattered in the cranial portion of olfactory bulbs, while the PCNA expression has been observed steadily localized with a distinctly continous distribution in cells interposed among the ependymal epithelium which lines the cavities of the proximal portion of the olfactory region and of the cerebral ventricles. DNA synthesis activity has been also found in cells scattered in the telencephalic, diencephalic, mesencephalic and medulla oblongata periventricular grey. This immunoreactivity was not revealable in the cerebellum. Our findings are discussed in the light of bibliographic news.

  4. Normal range of bleeding scores for the ISTH-BAT: adult and pediatric data from the merging project

    PubMed Central

    Elbatarny, M.; Mollah, S.; Grabell, J.; Bae, S.; Deforest, M.; Tuttle, A.; Hopman, W.; Clark, D. S.; Mauer, A. C.; Bowman, M.; Riddel, J.; Christopherson, P. A.; Montgomery, R. R.; Rand, M. L.; Coller, B.; James, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bleeding Assessment Tools (BATs) have been developed to aid in the standardized evaluation of bleeding symptoms. The Vicenza Bleeding Questionnaire (BQ), published in 2005, established a common framework and scoring key that has undergone subsequent modification over the years, culminating in the publication of the ISTH-BAT in 2010. Understanding the normal range of bleeding scores is critical when assessing the utility of a BAT. Within the context of The Merging Project, a bioinformatics system was created to facilitate the merging of legacy data derived from four different (but all Vicenza-based) BATs; the MCMDM1-VWD BQ, the Condensed MCMDM-1VWD BQ, the Pediatric Bleeding Questionnaire and the ISTH-BAT. Data from 1040 normal adults and 328 children were included in the final analysis, which showed that the normal range is 0–3 for adult males, 0–5 for adult females and 0–2 in children for both males and females. Therefore, the cut-off for a positive or abnormal BS is ≥4 in adult males, ≥6 in adult females and ≥3 in children. This information can now be used to objectively assess bleeding symptoms as normal or abnormal in future studies. PMID:25196510

  5. Normal range of bleeding scores for the ISTH-BAT: adult and pediatric data from the merging project.

    PubMed

    Elbatarny, M; Mollah, S; Grabell, J; Bae, S; Deforest, M; Tuttle, A; Hopman, W; Clark, D S; Mauer, A C; Bowman, M; Riddel, J; Christopherson, P A; Montgomery, R R; Rand, M L; Coller, B; James, P D

    2014-11-01

    Bleeding Assessment Tools (BATs) have been developed to aid in the standardized evaluation of bleeding symptoms. The Vicenza Bleeding Questionnaire (BQ), published in 2005, established a common framework and scoring key that has undergone subsequent modification over the years, culminating in the publication of the ISTH-BAT in 2010. Understanding the normal range of bleeding scores is critical when assessing the utility of a BAT. Within the context of The Merging Project, a bioinformatics system was created to facilitate the merging of legacy data derived from four different (but all Vicenza-based) BATs; the MCMDM1-VWD BQ, the Condensed MCMDM-1VWD BQ, the Pediatric Bleeding Questionnaire and the ISTH-BAT. Data from 1040 normal adults and 328 children were included in the final analysis, which showed that the normal range is 0-3 for adult males, 0-5 for adult females and 0-2 in children for both males and females. Therefore, the cut-off for a positive or abnormal BS is ≥4 in adult males, ≥6 in adult females and ≥3 in children. This information can now be used to objectively assess bleeding symptoms as normal or abnormal in future studies.

  6. Craniofacial morphological characteristics of Chinese adults with normal occlusion and different skeletal divergence.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Danna; Gao, Hui; Ren, Yijin

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the craniofacial morphologic characteristics of different vertical dysplasias in a population of Chinese adults with normal occlusion. Sixty-nine subjects (39 males and 30 females) were selected from 800 healthy students between 18 and 24 years of age. Lateral cephalograms were obtained and 27 hard and 10 soft tissue measurements were analysed. The subjects were then divided into three groups: high angle, low angle, or control according to the value of FH-MP. Intraclass correlation coefficient was determined for the repeated measurements. One-way analysis of variance was used to determine the differences between the groups. The results showed that the low-angle group had a larger cranial basis angle (N-S-Ar) and the high-angle group had a shorter maxilla (Ans-Ptm; P < 0.01). The high-angle group displayed vertical hyperdivergency with increased PP-OP, OP-MP, gonial, and lower gonial angles, whereas the low-angle group showed significant hypodivergence with decreased values for all variables (P < 0.01). The low-angle group displayed a more protrusive chin and the high-angle group a more retrusive chin (P < 0.01). Differences in dentoalveolar measurements in the divergent groups were mainly in the anterior region. Moreover, the low-angle group had a thicker and the high-angle group a thinner lower dentoalveolus (P < 0.01). For face height measurements, the main differences in the divergent groups were at the anterior lower third (P < 0.01). Soft tissue deviations were less obvious in the high-angle group and in general less significant than those of the hard tissues in both divergent groups. Significantly different morphological characteristics exist in Chinese adults with vertical dysplasia but normal occlusion. Major skeletal cephalometric changes were found for the lower facial third. The soft tissues showed a well-adapting mechanism of soft tissue coverage for the skeletal dysplasia.

  7. The development of hepatic stellate cells in normal and abnormal human fetuses – an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Christine K C; Pereira, Tamara N; Pozniak, Katarzyna N; Ramsing, Mette; Vogel, Ida; Ramm, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    The precise embryological origin and development of hepatic stellate cells is not established. Animal studies and observations on human fetuses suggest that they derive from posterior mesodermal cells that migrate via the septum transversum and developing diaphragm to form submesothelial cells beneath the liver capsule, which give rise to mesenchymal cells including hepatic stellate cells. However, it is unclear if these are similar to hepatic stellate cells in adults or if this is the only source of stellate cells. We have studied hepatic stellate cells by immunohistochemistry, in developing human liver from autopsies of fetuses with and without malformations and growth restriction, using cellular Retinol Binding Protein-1 (cRBP-1), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and α-Smooth Muscle Actin (αSMA) antibodies, to identify factors that influence their development. We found that hepatic stellate cells expressing cRBP-1 are present from the end of the first trimester of gestation and reduce in density throughout gestation. They appear abnormally formed and variably reduced in number in fetuses with abnormal mesothelial Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) function, diaphragmatic hernia and in ectopic liver nodules without mesothelium. Stellate cells showed similarities to intravascular cells and their presence in a fetus with diaphragm agenesis suggests they may be derived from circulating stem cells. Our observations suggest circulating stem cells as well as mesothelium can give rise to hepatic stellate cells, and that they require normal mesothelial function for their development. PMID:26265759

  8. A novel immortalized human endometrial stromal cell line with normal progestational response.

    PubMed

    Krikun, Graciela; Mor, Gil; Alvero, Ayesha; Guller, Seth; Schatz, Frederick; Sapi, Eva; Rahman, Mizanur; Caze, Rebeca; Qumsiyeh, Mazin; Lockwood, Charles J

    2004-05-01

    Obtaining primary human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs) for in vitro studies is limited by the scarcity of adequate human material and the inability to passage these cells in culture for long periods. Immortalization of these cells would greatly facilitate studies; however, the process of immortalization often results in abnormal karyotypes and aberrant functional characteristics. To meet this need, we have introduced telomerase into cultured HESCs to prevent the normal shortening of telomeres observed in adult somatic cells during mitosis. We have now developed and analyzed a newly immortalized HESC line that contains no clonal chromosomal structural or numerical abnormalities. In addition, when compared with the primary unpassaged parent cells, the new cell line displayed similar biochemical endpoints after treatment with ovarian steroids. Classical decidualization response to estradiol plus medroxyprogesterone acetate were seen in both morphologically, and progestin was seen to induce or regulate the expression of IGF binding protein-1, fibronectin, prolactin, tissue factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and Fas/Fas ligand. In summary, an immortalized HESC line has been developed that is karyotypically, morphologically, and phenotypically similar to the primary parent cells, and it is a powerful and consistent resource for in vitro work.

  9. Thyroxine binding to serum thyronine-binding globulin in thyroidectomized adult and normal neonatal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.A.; Meyers, B.; Alex, S.; Fang, S.L.; Braverman, L.E.

    1988-05-01

    The amount of tracer (125I)T4 bound to serum thyronine-binding globulin (TBG) was measured by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in adult thyroidectomized (TX) rats and normal 1-day to 4-week-old rat puts. Thyroidectomy was associated with the appearance of significant amounts of (125I)T4 binding to serum TBG in lean rats, but not in obese Zucker rats. Treatment of the TX rats in vivo with replacement doses of T4 prevented this increase in TBG binding, but enrichment of serum from TX rats with T4 did not. Significant amounts of tracer (125I)T4 binding to TBG was present in serum from 1- to 3-week-old normal rat pups, but not in 1-day- or 4-week-old pups. There were significantly higher levels of TBG binding of (125I)T4 in serum from 2-week-old rat pups raised in litters of 16 pups compared to those raised in litters of 4 pups. All manipulations that result in the appearance of TBG in rat serum also result in either weight loss or a slowing in the rate of growth, suggesting that the appearance of TBG in rat serum has a nutritional component. This possibility is further supported by the observations that increases in TBG binding of (125I)T4 are not found in obese Zucker rats fed a low protein-high carbohydrate diet for 14 days or fasted for 7 days, or after thyroidectomy, perhaps owing to the large stores of fuel in the obese rat.

  10. Blood methanol concentrations in normal adult subjects administered abuse doses of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Brummel, M C; McMartin, K; Martin-Amat, G; Filer, L J; Baker, G L; Tephly, T R

    1981-02-01

    Blood methanol concentrations were measured in 30 normal adult subjects administered aspartame, a dipeptide methyl ester. The doses studied included the 99th percentile of projected daily ingestion (34 mg/kg body weight) and three doses considered to be in the abuse range (100, 150, and 200 mg/kg body weight). Methanol concentrations were below the level of detection (0.4 mg/dl) in the blood of the 12 normal subjects who ingested aspartame at 34 mg/kg. They were significantly elevated (p less than or equal to 0 .001) after ingestion of each abuse dose, with the mean peak blood methanol concentrations and the areas under the blood methanol concentration-time curve increasing in proportion to dose. Mean (+/- SD) peak blood methanol concentrations were 1.27 +/- 0.48 mg/dl at the 100 mg/kg dose, 2.14 +/- 0.35 mg/dl at the 150 mg/kg dose, and 2.58 +/- 0.78 mg/dl at the 200 mg/kg dose. Blood methanol concentrations returned to predosing levels by 8 h after administration of the 100 mg/kg dose. Methanol was still detected in the blood 8 h after the subjects had ingested aspartame at 150 or 200 mg/kg. Blood formate analyses were carried out in the 6 subjects who ingested aspartame at 200 mg/kg, since recent studies indicate that the toxic effects of methanol are due to formate accumulation. No significant increase in blood formate concentrations over predosing concentrations was noted. No changes were noted in any of the blood chemistry profile parameters measured 24 h after aspartame ingestion, compared to values noted before administration. Similarly, no differences were noted in ophthalmologic examinations carried out before and after aspartame loading.

  11. Hexyl-nicotinate-induced vasodilation in normal human skin.

    PubMed

    Dowd, P M; Whitefield, M; Greaves, M W

    1987-01-01

    Hexyl nicotinate in a lotion formulation was applied topically to the skin of 10 healthy volunteers with clinically normal skin. Erythematous responses were assessed visually and skin blood flow determined by means of a laser Doppler flow meter which measures the blood cell flux (Pf2 Perimed, Sweden). Mean erythematous responses and increased blood cell flux were dose-related but in several subjects increases in blood flow occurred in the presence of barely detectable erythematous responses. In some subjects, hexyl nicotinate may be an effective cutaneous vasodilator even in the presence of minimal erythema.

  12. New neurons in the adult striatum: from rodents to humans

    PubMed Central

    Inta, Dragos; Cameron, Heather A.; Gass, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Most neurons are generated during development and are not replaced during adulthood, even if they are lost to injury or disease. It is firmly established, however, that new neurons are generated in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of virtually all adult mammals, including humans [1]. Many questions still remain, however, regarding adult neurogenesis in other brain regions and particularly in humans, where standard birthdating methods are not generally feasible. Exciting recent evidence indicates that calretinin-expressing interneurons are added to the adult human striatum at a substantial rate [2]. The role of new neurons is unknown, but studies in rodents will be able to further elucidate their identity and origin and then begin to understand their regulation and function. PMID:26298770

  13. IgE antibody levels to ingested soya protein determined in a normal adult population.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, B F

    1982-01-01

    Levels of soy protein-specific IgE were measured in a normal adult population (seventy-four males, and fifteen females) who ingested soya-containing and control diets during two 4-week periods. Increases in soya-specific IgE were observed for some individuals following ingestion of the soya-containing diet, and for the female group the increase in soya-specific IgE was statistically significant (P = 0.02). The increase of soya-specific IgE was small and led to lower levels than that associated with adverse effects. The increase in soya-specific IgE in the female group was accompanied by a significant increase (P = 0.02) in total immunoglobulin A. Changes in the level of soy-specific haemagglutinating antibody, soya-specific IgG, IgA and IgM as measured by ELISA and the immunoconglutinin titre could not be related to ingestion of the soya-containing diet.

  14. Greater cortical thinning in normal older adults predicts later cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Jennifer; Goh, Joshua O.; Kraut, Michael A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Resnick, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Cross-sectional studies have shown regional differences in cortical thickness between healthy older adults and patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We now demonstrate that participants who subsequently develop cognitive impairment leading to a diagnosis of MCI or AD (n=25) experience greater cortical thinning in specific neuroanatomical regions compared to control participants who remained cognitively normal (n=96). Based on 8 years of annual MRI scans beginning an average of 11 years prior to onset of cognitive impairment, participants who developed cognitive impairment subsequent to the scanning period had greater longitudinal cortical thinning in the temporal poles and left medial temporal lobe compared to controls. No significant regional cortical thickness differences were found at baseline between the two study groups indicating that we are capturing a critical time when brain changes occur before behavioral manifestations of impairment are detectable. Our findings suggest that early events of the pathway that leads to cognitive impairment may involve the temporal lobe, and that this increased atrophy could be considered an early biomarker of neurodegeneration predictive of cognitive impairment years later. PMID:25311277

  15. The Drosophila Couch Potato Gene: An Essential Gene Required for Normal Adult Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bellen, H. J.; Vaessin, H.; Bier, E.; Kolodkin, A.; D'Evelyn, D.; Kooyer, S.; Jan, Y. N.

    1992-01-01

    Through enhancer detection screens we have isolated 14 insertions in an essential gene that is expressed in embryonic sensory mother cells (SMC), in most cells of the mature embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS), and in glial cells of the PNS and the central nervous system (CNS). Embryos homozygote for amorphic alleles die, but show no obvious defects in their cuticle, PNS or CNS. The gene has been named couch potato (cpo) because several insertional alleles alter adult behavior. Homozygous hypomorphic cpo flies recover slowly from ether anaesthesia, show aberrant flight behavior, fail to move toward light and do not exhibit normal negative geotactic behavior. However, the flies are able to groom and walk, and some are able to fly when prodded, indicating that not all processes required for behavior are severely affected. A molecular analysis shows that the 14 insertions are confined to a few hundred nucleotides which probably contain key regulatory sequences of the gene. The orientation of these insertions and their position within this DNA fragment play an important role in the couch potato phenotype. In situ hybridization to whole mount embryos suggest that some insertions affect the levels of transcription of cpo in most cells in which it is expressed. PMID:1644278

  16. Effect of whey protein and glycomacropeptide on measures of satiety in normal-weight adult women.

    PubMed

    Chungchunlam, Sylvia M S; Henare, Sharon J; Ganesh, Siva; Moughan, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Protein is the most satiating macronutrient and dairy whey protein is thought to be more satiating than other protein sources. The purported satiating effect of whey protein may be attributable to the presence of glycomacropeptide (GMP). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of GMP in the satiating effect of whey protein. Isoenergetic (~1600 kJ) preload drinks contained GMP isolate (86% GMP, "GMP"), whey protein isolate (WPI) with 21% naturally occurring GMP, WPI with 2% naturally present GMP, or maltodextrin carbohydrate ("carbohydrate"). Satiety was assessed in 22 normal-weight adult women by determining the consumption of a test meal provided ad libitum 120 min following ingestion of a preload drink, and also by using visual analogue scales (VAS) for rating feelings of hunger, desire to eat, prospective consumption and fullness (appetite). The ad libitum test meal intake was significantly different between the preload drinks (p = 0.0003), with food intake following ingestion of both WPI preload drinks (regardless of the amount of GMP) being ~18% lower compared with the beverages enriched with carbohydrate or GMP alone. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the VAS-rated feelings of appetite among the four preload drinks. GMP alone did not reduce subsequent food intake compared with a drink enriched with carbohydrate, but whey protein had a greater satiating effect than carbohydrate. The presence of GMP in whey does not appear to be the cause of the observed effect of whey protein on satiety.

  17. Effect of whey protein and glycomacropeptide on measures of satiety in normal-weight adult women.

    PubMed

    Chungchunlam, Sylvia M S; Henare, Sharon J; Ganesh, Siva; Moughan, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Protein is the most satiating macronutrient and dairy whey protein is thought to be more satiating than other protein sources. The purported satiating effect of whey protein may be attributable to the presence of glycomacropeptide (GMP). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of GMP in the satiating effect of whey protein. Isoenergetic (~1600 kJ) preload drinks contained GMP isolate (86% GMP, "GMP"), whey protein isolate (WPI) with 21% naturally occurring GMP, WPI with 2% naturally present GMP, or maltodextrin carbohydrate ("carbohydrate"). Satiety was assessed in 22 normal-weight adult women by determining the consumption of a test meal provided ad libitum 120 min following ingestion of a preload drink, and also by using visual analogue scales (VAS) for rating feelings of hunger, desire to eat, prospective consumption and fullness (appetite). The ad libitum test meal intake was significantly different between the preload drinks (p = 0.0003), with food intake following ingestion of both WPI preload drinks (regardless of the amount of GMP) being ~18% lower compared with the beverages enriched with carbohydrate or GMP alone. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the VAS-rated feelings of appetite among the four preload drinks. GMP alone did not reduce subsequent food intake compared with a drink enriched with carbohydrate, but whey protein had a greater satiating effect than carbohydrate. The presence of GMP in whey does not appear to be the cause of the observed effect of whey protein on satiety. PMID:24698990

  18. Establishing normal values for nickel in human lung disease.

    PubMed

    Andersen, I; Svenes, K

    1999-12-01

    People working in the nickel refining industry are known to have a higher concentration of nickel in lung tissue than the general population. To be able to evaluate a potential nickel exposure from other sources, e.g., welding, it is important to have sufficient data on what is normal for a local population. Several local factors such as the content of nickel in air and soil can have a significant impact on this so-called normal value. As almost all surgical equipment contains nickel, the sampling process can in itself be a source of contamination. The scope of this work was to investigate if there was any measurable contamination from the sampling instruments routinely used in hospitals, and if the presence of a nickel refinery had any effect on the nickel content in the lungs of the general population. Autopsy lung tissue samples were collected in situ from 50 people who had lived in the county of Vest Agder in Norway. Two samples were collected from each person; one with a regular scalpel (Swann-Norton) and forceps, and one with a titanium knife and plastic forceps. None of the persons had any known connection to the nickel refinery. The samples were collected at random and no special attention was given to age, sex and place of residence. The autopsies were performed according to Norwegian law and in understanding with the next of kin. The arithmetic mean value +/- s of nickel was 0.64 +/- 0.56 microgram g-1 and 0.29 +/- 0.20 microgram g-1 dry weight, respectively, for samples collected with a regular scalpel and a titanium knife (P < 0.0001). For people who lived 8 km and closer to the refinery by the time of death, the nickel content was 0.41 +/- 0.19 microgram g-1 and for those who had lived between 8 and 70 km away from the refinery it was 0.18 +/- 0.13 microgram g-1 (P < 0.015). No statistical difference was established between results for males and females. Previous investigations have shown that the nickel content in lung tissue varies in the so

  19. Human papilloma virus DNAs immortalize normal human mammary epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Band, V.; Zajchowski, D.; Kulesa, V.; Sager, R. )

    1990-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are most commonly associated with cervical carcinoma in patients and induce immortalization of human keratinocytes in culture. HPV has not been associated with breast cancer. This report describes the immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (76N) by plasmid pHPV18 or pHPV16, each containing the linearized viral genome. Transfectants were grown continuously for more than 60 passages, whereas 76N cells senesce after 18-20 passages. The transfectants also differ from 76N cells in cloning in a completely defined medium called D2 and growing a minimally supplemented defined medium (D3) containing epidermal growth factor. All transfectant tested contain integrated HPV DNA, express HPV RNA, and produce HPV E7 protein. HPV transfectants do not form tumors in a nude mouse assay. It is concluded that products of the HPV genome induce immortalization of human breast epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements. This result raises the possibility that HPV might be involved in breast cancer. Furthermore, other tissue-specific primary epithelial cells that are presently difficult to grown and investigate may also be immortalized by HPV.

  20. Adult human metapneumonovirus (hMPV) pneumonia mimicking Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Irshad, Nadia; Connolly, James J

    2016-01-01

    In adults hospitalized with viral pneumonias the main differential diagnostic consideration is influenza pneumonia. The respiratory viruses causing viral influenza like illnesses (ILIs), e.g., RSV may closely resemble influenza. Rarely, extrapulmonary findings of some ILIs may resemble Legionnaire's disease (LD), e.g., adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV-3). We present a most unusual case of human metapneumonovirus pneumonia (hMPV) with some characteristic extrapulmonary findings characteristic of LD, e.g., relative bradycardia, as well as mildly elevated serum transaminases and hyphosphatemia. We believe this is the first reported case of hMPV pneumonia in a hospitalized adult that had some features of LD.

  1. Adult human metapneumonovirus (hMPV) pneumonia mimicking Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Irshad, Nadia; Connolly, James J

    2016-01-01

    In adults hospitalized with viral pneumonias the main differential diagnostic consideration is influenza pneumonia. The respiratory viruses causing viral influenza like illnesses (ILIs), e.g., RSV may closely resemble influenza. Rarely, extrapulmonary findings of some ILIs may resemble Legionnaire's disease (LD), e.g., adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV-3). We present a most unusual case of human metapneumonovirus pneumonia (hMPV) with some characteristic extrapulmonary findings characteristic of LD, e.g., relative bradycardia, as well as mildly elevated serum transaminases and hyphosphatemia. We believe this is the first reported case of hMPV pneumonia in a hospitalized adult that had some features of LD. PMID:26988110

  2. Specific binding of beta-endorphin to normal human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chenet, B.; Hollis, V. Jr.; Kang, Y.; Simpkins, C.

    1986-03-05

    Beta-endorphin (BE) exhibits peripheral functions which may not be mediated by interactions with receptors in the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated binding of BE to both opioid and non-opioid receptors on lymphocytes and monocytes. Abood has reported specific binding of /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine in erythrocytes. Using 5 x 10/sup -11/M /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and 10/sup -5/M unlabeled BE, they have detected 50% specific binding to human erythrocytes. This finding is supported by results from immunoelectron microscopy using rabbit anti-BE antibody and biotinylated secondary antibody with avidin-biotin complexes horseradish peroxidase. Binding is clearly observed and is confined to only one side of the cells. Conclusions: (1) BE binding to human erythrocytes was demonstrated by radioreceptor assay and immunoelectron microscopy, and (2) BE binding sites exist on only one side of the cells.

  3. Neurophysiological model of the normal and abnormal human pupil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenz, W.; Robin, M.; Barez, S.; Stark, L.

    1985-01-01

    Anatomical, experimental, and computer simulation studies were used to determine the structure of the neurophysiological model of the pupil size control system. The computer simulation of this model demonstrates the role played by each of the elements in the neurological pathways influencing the size of the pupil. Simulations of the effect of drugs and common abnormalities in the system help to illustrate the workings of the pathways and processes involved. The simulation program allows the user to select pupil condition (normal or an abnormality), specific site along the neurological pathway (retina, hypothalamus, etc.) drug class input (barbiturate, narcotic, etc.), stimulus/response mode, display mode, stimulus type and input waveform, stimulus or background intensity and frequency, the input and output conditions, and the response at the neuroanatomical site. The model can be used as a teaching aid or as a tool for testing hypotheses regarding the system.

  4. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues.

    PubMed

    Djomehri, Sabra I; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S H; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P

    2015-01-01

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095 mg/cc, bone: 570-1415 mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340 mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590 mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220 mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450 mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740 mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770 mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations. PMID:25856386

  5. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    DOE PAGES

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-raymore » fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.« less

  6. Mineral Density Volume Gradients in Normal and Diseased Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations. PMID:25856386

  7. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.

  8. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20–40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans. PMID:21220336

  9. Does Silent Reading Speed in Normal Adult Readers Depend on Early Visual Processes? Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korinth, Sebastian Peter; Sommer, Werner; Breznitz, Zvia

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship of reading speed and early visual processes in normal readers. Here we examined the association of the early P1, N170 and late N1 component in visual event-related potentials (ERPs) with silent reading speed and a number of additional cognitive skills in a sample of 52 adult German readers utilizing a Lexical…

  10. Digital music exposure reliably induces temporary threshold shift (TTS) in normal hearing human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, C. G.; Dell, S.; Hensley, B.; Hall, J. W.; Campbell, K. C. M.; Antonelli, P. J.; Green, G. E.; Miller, J. M.; Guire, K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives One of the challenges for evaluating new otoprotective agents for potential benefit in human populations is availability of an established clinical paradigm with real world relevance. These studies were explicitly designed to develop a real-world digital music exposure that reliably induces temporary threshold shift (TTS) in normal hearing human subjects. Design Thirty-three subjects participated in studies that measured effects of digital music player use on hearing. Subjects selected either rock or pop music, which was then presented at 93–95 (n=10), 98–100 (n=11), or 100–102 (n=12) dBA in-ear exposure level for a period of four hours. Audiograms and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were measured prior to and after music exposure. Post-music tests were initiated 15 min, 1 hr 15 min, 2 hr 15 min, and 3 hr 15 min after the exposure ended. Additional tests were conducted the following day and one week later. Results Changes in thresholds after the lowest level exposure were difficult to distinguish from test-retest variability; however, TTS was reliably detected after higher levels of sound exposure. Changes in audiometric thresholds had a “notch” configuration, with the largest changes observed at 4 kHz (mean=6.3±3.9dB; range=0–13 dB). Recovery was largely complete within the first 4 hours post-exposure, and all subjects showed complete recovery of both thresholds and DPOAE measures when tested 1-week post-exposure. Conclusions These data provide insight into the variability of TTS induced by music player use in a healthy, normal-hearing, young adult population, with music playlist, level, and duration carefully controlled. These data confirm the likelihood of temporary changes in auditory function following digital music player use. Such data are essential for the development of a human clinical trial protocol that provides a highly powered design for evaluating novel therapeutics in human clinical trials. Care must be

  11. A controlled trial of reduced meal frequency without caloric restriction in healthy, normal-weight, middle-aged adults123

    PubMed Central

    Stote, Kim S; Baer, David J; Spears, Karen; Paul, David R; Harris, G Keith; Rumpler, William V; Strycula, Pilar; Najjar, Samer S; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ingram, Donald K; Longo, Dan L; Mattson, Mark P

    2009-01-01

    Background Although consumption of 3 meals/d is the most common pattern of eating in industrialized countries, a scientific rationale for this meal frequency with respect to optimal health is lacking. A diet with less meal frequency can improve the health and extend the lifespan of laboratory animals, but its effect on humans has never been tested. Objective A pilot study was conducted to establish the effects of a reduced-meal-frequency diet on health indicators in healthy, normal-weight adults. Design The study was a randomized crossover design with two 8-wk treatment periods. During the treatment periods, subjects consumed all of the calories needed for weight maintenance in either 3 meals/d or 1 meal/d. Results Subjects who completed the study maintained their body weight within 2 kg of their initial weight throughout the 6-mo period. There were no significant effects of meal frequency on heart rate, body temperature, or most of the blood variables measured. However, when consuming 1 meal/d, subjects had a significant increase in hunger; a significant modification of body composition, including reductions in fat mass; significant increases in blood pressure and in total, LDL-, and HDL-cholesterol concentrations; and a significant decrease in concentrations of cortisol. Conclusions Normal-weight subjects are able to comply with a 1 meal/d diet. When meal frequency is decreased without a reduction in overall calorie intake, modest changes occur in body composition, some cardiovascular disease risk factors, and hematologic variables. Diurnal variations may affect outcomes. PMID:17413096

  12. Age-Related Gene Expression Differences in Monocytes from Human Neonates, Young Adults, and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ann-Jay; Kollmann, Tobias R.; Smale, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of age-related differences in the innate and adaptive immune systems have been proposed to contribute to the increased susceptibility to infection of human neonates and older adults. The emergence of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provides an opportunity to obtain an unbiased, comprehensive, and quantitative view of gene expression differences in defined cell types from different age groups. An examination of ex vivo human monocyte responses to lipopolysaccharide stimulation or Listeria monocytogenes infection by RNA-seq revealed extensive similarities between neonates, young adults, and older adults, with an unexpectedly small number of genes exhibiting statistically significant age-dependent differences. By examining the differentially induced genes in the context of transcription factor binding motifs and RNA-seq data sets from mutant mouse strains, a previously described deficiency in interferon response factor-3 activity could be implicated in most of the differences between newborns and young adults. Contrary to these observations, older adults exhibited elevated expression of inflammatory genes at baseline, yet the responses following stimulation correlated more closely with those observed in younger adults. Notably, major differences in the expression of constitutively expressed genes were not observed, suggesting that the age-related differences are driven by environmental influences rather than cell-autonomous differences in monocyte development. PMID:26147648

  13. Effects of Load on Normal Human Osteoblast Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reseland, J. E.; Devakottai, Sundar; Sundaresan, A.

    2013-02-01

    The effects of load on the secretion and expression of bone markers were tested at different stages of differentiation of primary human osteoblasts. NHOs were both seeded with and without cytodex 3 beads (Sigma),transferred to a NASA rotating wall vessel (modeled microgravity) and harvested at day 7 and day 14. Differentiated and undifferentiated NHOs were loaded at 6-50G for 30 min and compared to cells incubated at 1G after 1 day and 3 days. Collectively the results demonstrate that load has a differential effect on osteoblast differentiation as seen in modeled microgravity and shows specificity in expression of bone cell markers vs. expression of secreted paracrine signaling markers.

  14. Nonlinear time series analysis of normal and pathological human walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingwell, Jonathan B.; Cusumano, Joseph P.

    2000-12-01

    Characterizing locomotor dynamics is essential for understanding the neuromuscular control of locomotion. In particular, quantifying dynamic stability during walking is important for assessing people who have a greater risk of falling. However, traditional biomechanical methods of defining stability have not quantified the resistance of the neuromuscular system to perturbations, suggesting that more precise definitions are required. For the present study, average maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponents were estimated to quantify the local dynamic stability of human walking kinematics. Local scaling exponents, defined as the local slopes of the correlation sum curves, were also calculated to quantify the local scaling structure of each embedded time series. Comparisons were made between overground and motorized treadmill walking in young healthy subjects and between diabetic neuropathic (NP) patients and healthy controls (CO) during overground walking. A modification of the method of surrogate data was developed to examine the stochastic nature of the fluctuations overlying the nominally periodic patterns in these data sets. Results demonstrated that having subjects walk on a motorized treadmill artificially stabilized their natural locomotor kinematics by small but statistically significant amounts. Furthermore, a paradox previously present in the biomechanical literature that resulted from mistakenly equating variability with dynamic stability was resolved. By slowing their self-selected walking speeds, NP patients adopted more locally stable gait patterns, even though they simultaneously exhibited greater kinematic variability than CO subjects. Additionally, the loss of peripheral sensation in NP patients was associated with statistically significant differences in the local scaling structure of their walking kinematics at those length scales where it was anticipated that sensory feedback would play the greatest role. Lastly, stride-to-stride fluctuations in the

  15. [The existence vomeronasal organ in adult humans].

    PubMed

    Rapiejko, Piotr; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Wojdas, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Jan; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2007-01-01

    The influence of chemical substances (feromones) on human emotional and physical condition has fascinated psychologists, sexuologists and laryngologists since centurie. Literature conveys inconsistent information on vomeronasal organ (VNO) occurrence in humans. This organ is often called Jacobson's, and 2 symmetrical openings leading into it, located on both sides of septum, are called Ruyasch's ducts. The aim of the study was to analyze vomeronasal organ occurrence in humans in relation to age and sex. The study was conducted in a group of 634 patients, aged 18-80 years. All patients underwent routine ENT examination including rhinoscopy, nasal cavity examination with usage of 2.5x magnification lens (surgical glasses) and surgical microscope with 10x magnification. All persons had nasal cavities examined endoscopically. Every time presence of vomeronasal organ openings, along with localization, size and symmetry of these was noted. Subjects, who presented Jacobson's organ, were asked to fill a questionnaire concerning influence of smells on erotic sensations. Vomeronasal organ was fund in 312 persons, that is 49.21%. In 83.65% of cases vomeronasal organ opening size was smaller than 0.2 mm, what restricted its visibility to usage of magnifying lens, microscope, or endoscope. In 16.34% of cases only vomeronasal organ ducts openings were well visible in routine rhinoscopy without magnification. Vomeronasal organ was found more often in men than women. VNO was significantly more rare in patients with nasal septal deviation. In these cases, vomeronasal organ was usually found unilaterally, in all the cases on the concave side of deviated nasal septum. PMID:18260256

  16. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  17. Effect of Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test on Bone Turnover Markers in Adults with Normal Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Shou-Kui; Wan, Jing-Bo; Jiang, Xiao-Hong; Zhu, Yong-Hua; Ma, Jin-Hong; Hua, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background It is well known that enteral nutrients result in acute suppression of bone turnover markers (BTMs), and incretin hormones are believed to play a significant role in this physiological skeletal response. However, there is limited research exploring the impact of parenteral nutrients on BTMs. Our aim was to assess the influence of intravenous glucose on BTMs in adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Material/Methods We conducted 1-h intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) in 24 subjects with NGT. Blood samples were collected before and 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60 min after administration of glucose, then serum levels of bone formation marker procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and resorption marker C-terminal cross-linking telopeptides of collagen type I (CTX) were measured. Results During IVGTT, the fasting CTX level fell gradually and reached a nadir of 80.4% of the basal value at 60 min. Conversely, the fasting P1NP level decreased mildly and reached a nadir of 90.6% of the basal value at 15 min, then gradually increased and reached 96.6% at 60 min. The CTX-to-P1NP ratio increased slightly and reached a peak of 104.3% of the basal value at 10 min, then fell gradually and reached a nadir of 83% at 60 min. Conclusions Our study indicates that intravenous glucose results in an acute suppression of BTMs in the absence of incretin hormones. The mechanism responsible for this needs further investigation. PMID:27447783

  18. ProNormz--an integrated approach for human proteins and protein kinases normalization.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Suresh; Raja, Kalpana; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2014-02-01

    The task of recognizing and normalizing protein name mentions in biomedical literature is a challenging task and important for text mining applications such as protein-protein interactions, pathway reconstruction and many more. In this paper, we present ProNormz, an integrated approach for human proteins (HPs) tagging and normalization. In Homo sapiens, a greater number of biological processes are regulated by a large human gene family called protein kinases by post translational phosphorylation. Recognition and normalization of human protein kinases (HPKs) is considered to be important for the extraction of the underlying information on its regulatory mechanism from biomedical literature. ProNormz distinguishes HPKs from other HPs besides tagging and normalization. To our knowledge, ProNormz is the first normalization system available to distinguish HPKs from other HPs in addition to gene normalization task. ProNormz incorporates a specialized synonyms dictionary for human proteins and protein kinases, a set of 15 string matching rules and a disambiguation module to achieve the normalization. Experimental results on benchmark BioCreative II training and test datasets show that our integrated approach achieve a fairly good performance and outperforms more sophisticated semantic similarity and disambiguation systems presented in BioCreative II GN task. As a freely available web tool, ProNormz is useful to developers as extensible gene normalization implementation, to researchers as a standard for comparing their innovative techniques, and to biologists for normalization and categorization of HPs and HPKs mentions in biomedical literature. URL: http://www.biominingbu.org/pronormz.

  19. Heterogeneity of serum low density lipoproteins in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, M.M.S.; Krauss, R.M.; Lindgren, F.T.; Forte, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    Equilibrium density gradient ultracentrifugation of serum low density lipoprotein (LDL) from twelve healthy human subjects was used to separate six subfractions with mean dinsity ranging from 1.0268 to 1.0597 g/ml. Mean corrected peak flotation rate (S/sup o//sub f/) measured by analytic ultracentrifugation, and mean particle diameter determined by negative staining electron microscopy, both declined significantly with increasing density of the subfractions. Major differences in chemical composition of the subfractions were noted, including a singnificantly lower triglyceride content and higher ratio of cholesteryl ester to triglyceride in the middle fractions compared with those of highest and lowest density. Concentration of fraction 2 correlated positively with HDL (P < 0.01) and negatively with VLDL (P < 0.001); concentration of fraction 4 correlated negatively with HDL (P < 0.05) and positively with VLDL (P < 0.001) and IDL (P < 0.01). LDL may thus include subspecies of differing structure and composition which might also have different metabolic and atherogenic roles.

  20. Morphometry of the normal human ear: a cross-sectional study from adolescence to mid-adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Ciusa, V; Serrao, G; Tartaglia, G M

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to supply information about: (1) normal gender-based dimensions of ears (linear distances and ratios, area); (2) left right symmetry; and (3) growth changes between adolescence and mid-adulthood. The three-dimensional co-ordinates of several soft-tissue landmarks on the ears and face were obtained by an electromagnetic digitizer in 40 male and 33 female adolescents aged 12-15 years. 73 young female and 89 young male adults aged 19-30 years, and 41 male and 38 female adults aged 31-56 years. From the landmarks, paired car width and length were calculated and averaged for age and gender, as well as the relevant ratios, ear areas and angles relative to the facial midline, and indices of left right symmetry. Comparisons were performed by factorial analysis of variance. All ear dimensions were significantly larger in men than in women (P < 0.005). A significant effect of age was found (P < 0.005), with larger values in older individuals. On average, the three-dimensional position of ears was symmetric, with symmetry coefficients ranging between 94 and 96%. Data collected in the present investigation could serve as a database for the quantitative description of human ear morphology during normal adolescent and adult growth.

  1. Altered expression of Lewis blood group and related antigens in fetal, normal adult and malignant tissues of the uterine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Nakayama, M; Tanizawa, O

    1990-01-01

    The expression of the Lewis blood group and its related antigens in fetal, normal adult and malignant tissues of the uterine endometrium was examined immunohistochemically using a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies with specificities for Lewis-a (La), Sialyl Lewis-a (SLa), Lewis-b (Lb), Lewis-X (LX), Sialyl Lewis-X (SLX) and Lewis-Y (LY) antigens. La, SLa and SLX having one fucose residue were detected in a small number of fetal tissues, while Lb and LY having two fucose residues were found in most cases. In the adult endometrium, expression of Lb and LY was considerably lower than those in fetal tissues, although expression of La and SLa was not different between these two tissues. Expression of LX and SLX was pronounced in adult when compared with fetal tissues. Malignant endometrial glands expressed La, SLa, Lb and LY, extensively, while LX and SLX were expressed less than in normal tissues. Lb and LY can thus be considered oncofetal antigens, extensively expressed in fetal and malignant tissues but not in normal adult tissues. Expression of Lb and LY was greater than that of La and SLA in carcinoma; an increase in the activity of fucose transferase might be associated with malignant transformation in the uterine endometrium.

  2. Predictors of food preferences in adult humans.

    PubMed

    Logue, A W; Smith, M E

    1986-06-01

    Predictors of preferences for a wide variety of foods were examined in 303 male and female human subjects ranging from 14-68 years of age. The subjects completed questionnaires which requested information on the subject's sex, age, thinness, sensation seeking and ethnic background, as well as on the subjects' food preferences. Largely consistent with previous studies, female subjects reported higher preferences for low-calorie foods, candy and wine, and lower preferences for meat, beer, spicy foods and milk. Younger subjects reported higher preferences for sweet foods and lower preferences for foods such as chili pepper that are considered acquired tastes. Thinner subjects tended to rate both sweet foods and meat lower than did other subjects. Preferences for spicy foods or foods likely to cause illness were positively correlated with sensation seeking while preferences for sweet or bland foods or foods unlikely to cause illness were negatively correlated with sensation seeking. Subjects for whom the primary cuisine on which they were raised was Oriental cuisine preferred alcoholic beverages and non-Oriental foods less than did other subjects. A factor analysis of the food preferences yielded ten factors including those for meat and potatoes, alcohol, spices and junk food. Data on predictors of food preferences can assist research on the determinants of food preferences, however much of the variance in food preferences remains to be explained.

  3. Do Adults with Cochlear Implants Rely on Different Acoustic Cues for Phoneme Perception than Adults with Normal Hearing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moberly, Aaron C.; Lowenstein, Joanna H.; Tarr, Eric; Caldwell-Tarr, Amanda; Welling, D. Bradley; Shahin, Antoine J.; Nittrouer, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Several acoustic cues specify any single phonemic contrast. Nonetheless, adult, native speakers of a language share weighting strategies, showing preferential attention to some properties over others. Cochlear implant (CI) signal processing disrupts the salience of some cues: In general, amplitude structure remains readily available, but…

  4. The subventricular zone continues to generate corpus callosum and rostral migratory stream astroglia in normal adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jiho; Orosco, Lori; Guo, Fuzheng; Chung, Seung-Hyuk; Bannerman, Peter; Mills Ko, Emily; Zarbalis, Kostas; Deng, Wenbin; Pleasure, David

    2015-03-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the CNS, and have many essential functions, including maintenance of blood-brain barrier integrity, and CNS water, ion, and glutamate homeostasis. Mammalian astrogliogenesis has generally been considered to be completed soon after birth, and to be reactivated in later life only under pathological circumstances. Here, by using genetic fate-mapping, we demonstrate that new corpus callosum astrocytes are continuously generated from nestin(+) subventricular zone (SVZ) neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in normal adult mice. These nestin fate-mapped corpus callosum astrocytes are uniformly postmitotic, express glutamate receptors, and form aquaporin-4(+) perivascular endfeet. The entry of new astrocytes from the SVZ into the corpus callosum appears to be balanced by astroglial apoptosis, because overall numbers of corpus callosum astrocytes remain constant during normal adulthood. Nestin fate-mapped astrocytes also flow anteriorly from the SVZ in association with the rostral migratory stream, but do not penetrate into the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb. Production of new astrocytes from nestin(+) NPCs is absent in the normal adult cortex, striatum, and spinal cord. Our study is the first to demonstrate ongoing SVZ astrogliogenesis in the normal adult mammalian forebrain.

  5. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about…

  6. Associations Between Abnormal Rod-Mediated Dark Adaptation and Health and Functioning in Older Adults With Normal Macular Health

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; Huisingh, Carrie; Jackson, Gregory R.; Curcio, Christine A.; Szalai, Alexander J.; Dashti, Nassrin; Clark, Mark; Rookard, Kia; McCrory, Mark A.; Wright, Tyler T.; Callahan, Michael A.; Kline, Lanning B.; Witherspoon, C. Douglas; McGwin, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Delayed rod-mediated dark adaptation (DA) is characteristic of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and also can be observed in some older adults in normal macular health. We examine cross-sectional associations between rod-mediated DA and risk factors for AMD in older adults in normal macular health. Methods. The sample consisted of adults aged ≥60 years old in normal macular health per grading of fundus photos using an established disease classification system. Rod-mediated DA was measured psychophysically following a photobleach using a computer-automated dark adaptometer with targets centered at 5° on the inferior vertical meridian. The speed of DA was characterized by the rod-intercept value, with abnormal DA defined as rod-intercept ≥ 12.3 minutes. We assessed several health and functional characteristics that the literature has suggested increase AMD risk (e.g., smoking, alcohol use, inflammatory markers, apolipoproteins, low luminance visual acuity, chronic medical conditions, body mass, family history). Results. Among 381 participants (mean age, 68.5 years; SD, 5.5), 78% had normal and 22% had abnormal DA, with the prevalence of abnormal DA increasing with age. After age-adjustment, abnormal DA was associated with increased odds of elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), heavy use of or abstention from alcohol, high blood pressure, and drop in visual acuity under mesopic conditions. Conclusions. Despite having normal macular health according to accepted definitions of AMD presence, approximately one-quarter of older adults recruited from primary eye care clinics had abnormal DA, which was associated with known risk factors for AMD, including elevated CRP. PMID:24854857

  7. Normal for an Asperger: Notions of the Meanings of Diagnoses among Adults with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosqvist, Hanna Bertilsdotter

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the production of a counterhegemonic discourse of "autistic normalcy" among adults with high-functioning autism by analyzing notions of diagnosis. The discourse analyses are based on material from ethnographic fieldwork in a Swedish educational setting. Study participants were 3 male and 9 female adults who had been diagnosed…

  8. Cellular localization of type I III and IV procollagen gene transcripts in normal and fibrotic human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Milani, S.; Herbst, H.; Schuppan, D.; Surrenti, C.; Riecken, E. O.; Stein, H.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have determined the cell types producing alpha 1 (I), alpha 2 (I), alpha 1 (III), and alpha 1 (IV) procollagen gene transcripts in adult human liver by in situ hybridization with [35S]-labeled RNA probes. The liver specimens comprised a total of 20 biopsies with normal histology and biopsies with fibrosis or cirrhosis at different clinical stages and of heterogeneous origins. In normal liver, procollagen type I, III, and IV transcripts were detected in stromal and vascular mesenchymal cells of portal tracts and central veins, as well as in some perisinusoidal cells of the lobule. In fibrotic liver, increased levels of these procollagen mRNAs were observed in the same locations, and particularly enhanced in stromal cells of fibrotic septa and portal tracts, as well as in perisinusoidal cells. Expression of alpha 1 (IV) procollagen RNA was additionally found in some vascular endothelial and bile duct epithelial cells. Although previously suggested as the major source of liver collagens, hepatocytes showed no significant procollagen transcript levels in any of our samples. Thus, procollagen synthesis does not appear to be a function of hepatocytes, but rather of mesenchymal, endothelial, and bile duct epithelial cells in adult human liver. These findings may have implications for the development of specifically targeted antifibrotic therapies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2372043

  9. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  10. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-06-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  11. From The Cover: Reconstruction of functionally normal and malignant human breast tissues in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Chavarria, Tony; Wu, Min; Magrane, Greg; Gray, Joe W.; Carey, Loucinda; Richardson, Andrea; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2004-04-01

    The study of normal breast epithelial morphogenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo has largely used rodent models. Efforts at studying mammary morphogenesis and cancer with xenotransplanted human epithelial cells have failed to recapitulate the full extent of development seen in the human breast. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model in which both the stromal and epithelial components of the reconstructed mammary gland are of human origin. Genetic modification of human stromal cells before the implantation of ostensibly normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in the outgrowth of benign and malignant lesions. This experimental model allows for studies of human epithelial morphogenesis and differentiation in vivo and underscores the critical role of heterotypic interactions in human breast development and carcinogenesis.

  12. Muscle protein analysis. II. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of normal and diseased human skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Barany, M.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1980-07-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the major proteins of normal and pathological human-muscle samples. The normal human-muscle pattern contains four myosin light chains: three that co-migrate with the myosin light chains from rabbit fast muscle (extensor digitorum longus), and one that co-migrates with the light chain 2 from rabbit slow muscle (soleus). Of seven Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples, four yielded patterns with decreased amounts of actin and myosin relative to normal muscle, while three samples gave patterns comparable to that for normal muscle. Six samples from patients with myotonic dystrophy also gave normal patterns. In nemaline rod myopathy, in contrast, the pattern was deficient in two of the fast-type myosin light chains.

  13. Ultrastructural characteristics of human adult and infant cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, W Y; Garey, L J

    1991-01-01

    Biopsy specimens of human cerebral cortex from three adults and two infants were studied by correlating their light microscopic features in semithin sections with their ultrastructural characteristics. There was good tissue preservation, due to a minimum delay between obtaining the specimens and fixation. Pyramidal cells had a prominent apical dendrite, fine heterochromatin clumps in the nucleus and generally small numbers of cytoplasmic organelles, except for numerous free ribosomes in some of the large pyramids of Layers III to VI. Non-pyramidal cells lacked an apical dendrite and were further classified, on size and ultrastructure, into small, medium and large types. Large numbers of asymmetrical and symmetrical synapses were present in the neuropil but very few axosomatic synapses were found in the human cerebral cortex compared with subhuman primates and other mammals. Some symmetrical synapses were characterised by the presence of wide pre- and postsynaptic densities. The same general features of the adult cortex were also encountered in the infant, with certain exceptions. Many of the infant neurons had less densely packed heterochromatin, but greater numbers of free ribosomes, compared with the adult, and lipofuscin was absent. There was a total absence of myelinated fibres from the infant cortex; more large diameter dendrites were present than in the adult and axosomatic synapses were commoner. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 PMID:2050578

  14. Positive and negative aggregation responses to cultured human tumor cell lines among different normal individuals.

    PubMed

    Bastida, E; Ordinas, A; Jamieson, G A

    1982-01-01

    Platelets from approximately 50% (7/16) of normal individuals have been shown to have greater sensitivity to aggregation induced by critical threshold concentrations of three human tumor cell lines. These results may have implications for the genetics and epidemiology of human neoplastic disease.

  15. What is normal nasal airflow? A computational study of 22 healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Jiang, Jianbo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nasal airflow is essential for functioning of the human nose. Given individual variation in nasal anatomy, there is yet no consensus what constitutes normal nasal airflow patterns. We attempt to obtain such information that is essential to differentiate disease-related variations. Methods Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulated nasal airflow in 22 healthy subjects during resting breathing. Streamline patterns, airflow distributions, velocity profiles, pressure, wall stress, turbulence, and vortical flow characteristics under quasi-steady state were analyzed. Patency ratings, acoustically measured minimum cross-sectional area (MCA), and rhinomanometric nasal resistance (NR) were examined for potential correlations with morphological and airflow-related variables. Results Common features across subjects included: >50% total pressure-drop reached near the inferior turbinate head; wall shear stress, NR, turbulence energy, and vorticity were lower in the turbinate than in the nasal valve region. However, location of the major flow path and coronal velocity distributions varied greatly across individuals. Surprisingly, on average, more flow passed through the middle than the inferior meatus and correlated with better patency ratings (r=-0.65, p<0.01). This middle flow percentage combined with peak post-vestibule nasal heat loss and MCA accounted for >70% of the variance in subjective patency ratings and predicted patency categories with 86% success. Nasal index correlated with forming of the anterior dorsal vortex. Expected for resting breathing, the functional impact for local and total turbulence, vorticity, and helicity was limited. As validation, rhinomanometric NR significantly correlated with CFD simulations (r=0.53, p<0.01). Conclusion Significant variations of nasal airflow found among healthy subjects; Key features may have clinically relevant applications. PMID:24664528

  16. Thyroid gland morphology in young adults: normal subjects versus those with prior low-dose neck irradiation in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.A.; Komorowski, R.A.; Cerletty, J.M.; Wilson, S.D.

    1983-12-01

    Thyroid glands obtained at autopsy from young adults were studied to establish more accurately the ''normal'' morphology in the groups 20 to 40 years of age. A total of 56 autopsy specimens (many obtained from trauma victims) were examined in detail by totally embedding and sectioning the thyroid glands. The morphology of these thyroid glands also was compared to that of surgically removed thyroid glands from 47 young adult patients with prior low-dose neck irradiation. The ''normal'' thyroid specimens frequently showed morphologic features, such as thyroid tissue outside the recognizable capsule of the gland (40 of 56 patients) and in the strap muscles of the neck (six of 56 patients), which are conditions commonly considered as evidence for invasive thyroid carcinoma. The thyroid glands from the ''normal'' young adult population were significantly different from those thyroid glands surgically removed from patients who had received irradiation. The irradiated thyroid glands invariably showed multiple nodules of a wide variety of histologic types, extensive lymphocytic infiltrates, and distorting fibrosis as well as a high incidence of malignancy (27 of 47 patients). A single 0.1 cm focus of papillary carcinoma was found in one specimen in the nonirradiated thyroid group. This study suggests that ''occult'' thyroid carcinomas in the group 20 to 40 years of age are rare and are significantly fewer in number than in the older population (P less than 0.02).

  17. Pleiotropic roles of Notch signaling in normal, malignant, and developmental hematopoiesis in the human

    PubMed Central

    Kushwah, Rahul; Guezguez, Borhane; Lee, Jung Bok; Hopkins, Claudia I; Bhatia, Mickie

    2014-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is evolutionarily conserved across species and plays an important role in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. It has been implicated in several different hematopoietic processes including early hematopoietic development as well as adult hematological malignancies in humans. This review focuses on recent developments in understanding the role of Notch signaling in the human hematopoietic system with an emphasis on hematopoietic initiation from human pluripotent stem cells and regulation within the bone marrow. Based on recent insights, we summarize potential strategies for treatment of human hematological malignancies toward the concept of targeting Notch signaling for fate regulation. PMID:25252682

  18. Drosophila as a model for the identification of genes causing adult human heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Matthew J.; Amrein, Hubert; Izatt, Joseph A.; Choma, Michael A.; Reedy, Mary C.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2006-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster genetics provides the advantage of molecularly defined P-element insertions and deletions that span the entire genome. Although Drosophila has been extensively used as a model system to study heart development, it has not been used to dissect the genetics of adult human heart disease because of an inability to phenotype the adult fly heart in vivo. Here we report the development of a strategy to measure cardiac function in awake adult Drosophila that opens the field of Drosophila genetics to the study of human dilated cardiomyopathies. Through the application of optical coherence tomography, we accurately distinguish between normal and abnormal cardiac function based on measurements of internal cardiac chamber dimensions in vivo. Normal Drosophila have a fractional shortening of 87 ± 4%, whereas cardiomyopathic flies that contain a mutation in troponin I or tropomyosin show severe impairment of systolic function. To determine whether the fly can be used as a model system to recapitulate human dilated cardiomyopathy, we generated transgenic Drosophila with inducible cardiac expression of a mutant of human δ-sarcoglycan (δsgS151A), which has previously been associated with familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Compared to transgenic flies overexpressing wild-type δsg, or the standard laboratory strain w1118, Drosophila expressing δsgS151A developed marked impairment of systolic function and significantly enlarged cardiac chambers. These data illustrate the utility of Drosophila as a model system to study dilated cardiomyopathy and the applicability of the vast genetic resources available in Drosophila to systematically study the genetic mechanisms responsible for human cardiac disease. PMID:16432241

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor in adult human dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Huerta, J J; Diaz-Trelles, R; Naves, F J; Llamosas, M M; Del Valle, M E; Vega, J A

    1996-09-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFalpha) enhances neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons. It binds a membrane protein, denominated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr). EGFr has been localized in developing and adult human DRG. However, it remains to be elucidated whether all DRG neurons express EGFr or whether differences exist among neuronal subtypes. This study was undertaken to investigate these topics in adult human DRG using immunoblotting, and combined immunohistochemistry and image analysis techniques. A mouse monoclonal antibody (clone F4) mapping within the intracytoplasmic domain of EGFr was used. Immunoblotting revealed two main proteins with estimated molecular masses of approximately/equal to 65 kDa and 170 kDa, and thus consistent with the full-length EGFr. Additional protein bands were also encountered. Light immunohistochemistry revealed specific immunoreactivity (IR) for EGFr-like proteins in most (86%) primary sensory neurons, the intensity of immunostaining being stronger in the small- and intermediate-sized ones. Furthermore, EGFr-like IR was also observed in the satellite glial cells of the ganglia as well as in the intraganglionic and dorsal root Schwann cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that EGFr, and other related proteins containing the epitope labeled with the antibody F4, are responsible for the EGFr IR reported in DRG. Furthermore, we demonstrated heterogeneity in the expression of EGFr-like IR in adult human primary sensory neurons, which suggests different responsiveness to their ligands.

  20. Foot pressure analysis of adults with flat and normal feet at different gait speeds on an ascending slope

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to determine the difference in foot pressures between flat and normal feet at different gait speeds on an ascending slope. [Subjects] This study enrolled 30 adults with normal (n=15) and flat feet (n=15), with ages from 21 to 30 years old, who had no history of neurological disorders or gait problems. A treadmill was used for the analysis of kinematic features during gait, using a slope of 10%, and gait velocities of slow, normal, and fast. [Methods] A foot pressure analyzer was used to measure changes in foot pressure. [Results] Compared to the normal subjects, the foot pressure of the flatfoot subjects showed a significant increase in the 2–3rd metatarsal region with increasing gait speed, whereas there were significant decreases in the 1st toe and 1st metatarsal regions with increasing gait speed. [Conclusion] The body weight of adults with flatfoot was concentrated on the 2–3rd metatarsal region during the stance phase and increased with walking speed on the ascending slope due to weakening of function of the medial longitudinal arch. PMID:26834348

  1. Foot pressure analysis of adults with flat and normal feet at different gait speeds on an ascending slope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to determine the difference in foot pressures between flat and normal feet at different gait speeds on an ascending slope. [Subjects] This study enrolled 30 adults with normal (n=15) and flat feet (n=15), with ages from 21 to 30 years old, who had no history of neurological disorders or gait problems. A treadmill was used for the analysis of kinematic features during gait, using a slope of 10%, and gait velocities of slow, normal, and fast. [Methods] A foot pressure analyzer was used to measure changes in foot pressure. [Results] Compared to the normal subjects, the foot pressure of the flatfoot subjects showed a significant increase in the 2-3rd metatarsal region with increasing gait speed, whereas there were significant decreases in the 1st toe and 1st metatarsal regions with increasing gait speed. [Conclusion] The body weight of adults with flatfoot was concentrated on the 2-3rd metatarsal region during the stance phase and increased with walking speed on the ascending slope due to weakening of function of the medial longitudinal arch.

  2. Serological survey of normal humans for natural antibody to cell surface antigens of melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, A N; Taormina, M C; Ikeda, H; Watanabe, T; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1980-01-01

    Sera of 106 normal adult men were tested for antibodies reacting with cell surface antigens of three established lines of cultured malignant melanoma. Positive reactions with a protein A assay for IgG antibodies were extremely rare (1-2%). The frequency of positive reactions with assays for IgM antibodies was higher: 5-15% in immune adherence assays and 55-82% in anti-C3 mixed hemadsorption assays. After low-titered sera and sera reacting with fetal calf serum components, conventional alloantigens, and widely distributed class 3 antigens were excluded, sera from seven individuals (one with IgG antibody and six with IgM antibodies) were selected for detailed analysis. The serum containing the IgG antibody came from a healthy 65-year-old Caucasian man; titers of antibody in his serum ranged from < 1/10 to 1/40,000 in tests with different melanoma cell lines. This IgG antibody identifies a differentiation antigen of melanocytes, provisionally designated Mel 1, that distinguishes two classes of melanomas: 22 melanoma cell lines typed Mel 1+ and 17 types Mel 1-. Mel 1 is expressed by fetal fibroblasts but not adult fibroblasts and can be found on a proportion of cultured epithelial cancer cell lines (5 out of 23) but not on glioma or B-cell lines. The melanoma antigens detected by the naturally occurring IgM antibodies are serologically unrelated to Mel 1 but, like Mel 1, appear to be differentiation antigens that distinguish subsets of melanoma. These IgM antibodies detect antigens that are identical or closely related to the AH antigen, a melanoma surface antigen that was initially defined by autologous antibody in a patient with melanoma. In view of the immunogenicity of both Mel 1 and the AH antigens in humans and their occurrence on more than 50% of melanomas, it remains to be seen whether antibody to these antigens can be elicited by specific vaccination of seronegative melanoma patients and whether this will have an influence on the clinical course of the disease

  3. Detection of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, J.W.; Malan-Shibley, L.B.; Janss, D.H.

    1980-01-28

    Studies were conducted to determine whether normal and/or neoplastic (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells contain the microsomal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) which catalyses the conversion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to carcinogenic intermediates. Low constitutive levels of AHH activity were found in homogenates of both normal human breast epithelial and MCF-7 cells. The addition of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) to the culture medium of either cell type significantly increased AHH activity. Peak induction of hydroxylase activity occurred following the in vitro addition of 10 ..mu..M DMBA. A time course of DMBA-induced AHH activity in both normal human breast epithelium and MCF-7 cells revealed maximal induction 16 hr after 10 ..mu..M DMBA was added to the culture medium. Benzo(a)pyrene (BP), 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) and benz(a)anthracene (BA) also induced AHH activity in normal and MCF-7 cells. For example, the addition of 10 ..mu..M BP to the culture medium of either normal human breast epithelial or MCF-7 cells for 16 hr increased AHH activity 13.8 and 65.3-fold, respectively. For all PAH, the magnitude of AHH induction was substantially greater in MCF-7 than normal breast epithelial cells. Finally, ..cap alpha..-naphthoflavone inhibited BA-induced AHH activity in MCF-7 cells. The study demonstrates the presence of a PAH-inducible AHH enzyme(s) in normal human breast epithelial cells grown in primary culture and in the human breast tumor cell line, MCF-7.

  4. Laterality of mental imagery generation and operation: tests with brain-damaged patients and normal adults.

    PubMed

    Hatta, T; Koike, M; Langman, P

    1994-08-01

    The relationships between hemispheric function and components of the imagery process were examined in patients with unilateral right and left brain damage and in intact adult subjects. In the image generation condition, subjects were required to mentally generate Katakana letters corresponding to Hiragana letters displayed on a CRT. The results for the intact adults suggested a left hemisphere superiority, but the unilaterally brain-damaged subjects showed no hemispheric difference in this task. In the imagery operation task (transformation or lateral translation), subjects were asked to find a genuine Kanji among distractors (pseudo-Kanji) that were constructed from two Kanji radicals (themselves real Kanji) that were either displayed in reverse order or shifted apart. The results for both intact adults and patients with unilateral brain damage suggest the superiority of the right hemisphere. PMID:7525640

  5. Normal for an Asperger: notions of the meanings of diagnoses among adults with Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna

    2012-04-01

    This study explores the production of a counterhegemonic discourse of "autistic normalcy" among adults with high-functioning autism by analyzing notions of diagnosis. The discourse analyses are based on material from ethnographic fieldwork in a Swedish educational setting. Study participants were 3 male and 9 female adults who had been diagnosed with Asperger syndrome. The notion of diagnosis comprises issues concerning coming out and knowledge production. The findings capture an ongoing reformulation process among people involved in the autistic self-advocacy movement when it comes to the meanings of Asperger syndrome and what it means to be a person with Asperger syndrome.

  6. Age- and sex-related changes in the normal human external nose.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Grandi, Gaia; De Menezes, Marcio; Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2011-01-30

    The objective of this study was to measure: (1) normal sex-related dimensions of external nose (linear distances, ratios, angles, volume and surface area); and (2) growth changes between childhood and old age. The three-dimensional coordinates of several soft-tissue landmarks on the external nose were obtained by a non-invasive, computerized digitizer in 519 male and 340 female healthy subjects aged 4-73 years. The subjects were divided into 11 non-overlapping age groups: for children and preadolescent subjects, 2-year spans were used, while larger intervals were used for adolescent and adult subjects. From the landmarks, nasal volume and external surface area; nasal and alar base widths, nasal height, nasal bridge length, philtrum length, nasal tip protrusion, right and left nostril lengths, superior and inferior nostril widths; nasal tip protrusion-to-nasal height, and nasal width-to-nasal height ratios; nasal convexity, alar slope, and nasal tip angles were calculated, and averaged for age and sex. Comparisons were performed by factorial analysis of variance. On average, men had larger nasal external volume and area, linear distances and nasal width-to-height ratio than women (p<0.01); no sex differences were found for the angles and the nasal tip protrusion-to-nasal height ratio. Age significantly influenced all analyzed measurements (p<0.001): nasal volume, area, linear distances increased from childhood to old age, while the nasal tip angle decreased as a function of age. No consistent age related patterns were found for the ratios and the nasal convexity and alar slope angles. Men and women had different age related patterns, with significant sex by age interactions (p<0.001). Overall, in most occasions male increments in nasal dimensions were larger than female ones. Data collected in the present investigation could serve as a database for the quantitative description of human nasal morphology during normal growth, development and aging. Forensic

  7. A Dominant-Negative Isoform of IKAROS Expands Primitive Normal Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Philip A.; Knapp, David J.H.F.; Kannan, Nagarajan; Miller, Paul H.; Babovic, Sonja; Bulaeva, Elizabeth; Aghaeepour, Nima; Rabu, Gabrielle; Rostamirad, Shabnam; Shih, Kingsley; Wei, Lisa; Eaves, Connie J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Disrupted IKAROS activity is a recurrent feature of some human leukemias, but effects on normal human hematopoietic cells are largely unknown. Here, we used lentivirally mediated expression of a dominant-negative isoform of IKAROS (IK6) to block normal IKAROS activity in primitive human cord blood cells and their progeny. This produced a marked (10-fold) increase in serially transplantable multipotent IK6+ cells as well as increased outputs of normally differentiating B cells and granulocytes in transplanted immunodeficient mice, without producing leukemia. Accompanying T/natural killer (NK) cell outputs were unaltered, and erythroid and platelet production was reduced. Mechanistically, IK6 specifically increased human granulopoietic progenitor sensitivity to two growth factors and activated CREB and its targets (c-FOS and Cyclin B1). In more primitive human cells, IK6 prematurely initiated a B cell transcriptional program without affecting the hematopoietic stem cell-associated gene expression profile. Some of these effects were species specific, thus identifying novel roles of IKAROS in regulating normal human hematopoietic cells. PMID:25418728

  8. Human Normal Bronchial Epithelial Cells: A Novel In Vitro Cell Model for Toxicity Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery. PMID:25861018

  9. Mild Memory Impairment in Healthy Older Adults Is Distinct from Normal Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargin, J. Weaver; Maruff, P.; Collie, A.; Masters, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mild memory impairment was detected in 28% of a sample of healthy community-dwelling older adults using the delayed recall trial of a word list learning task. Statistical analysis revealed that individuals with memory impairment also demonstrated relative deficits on other measures of memory, and tests of executive function, processing speed and…

  10. Foucault, Governmentality, Neoliberalism and Adult Education--Perspective on the Normalization of Social Risks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopecký, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with the relevance of the work of Foucault to critical analysis of the political concept of lifelong learning that currently dominates. This concept relates to the field of adult education and learning. The article makes reference to the relatively late incorporation of Foucault's work within andragogy. It shows the…

  11. Redefining Normal: A Critical Analysis of (Dis)ability in Young Adult Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwood, Jen Scott

    2013-01-01

    This literary analysis examines constructions of normalcy and disability within contemporary young adult literature, including "Jerk," "California" (Friesen, 2008), "Marcelo in the Real World" (Stork, 2009), and "Five Flavors of Dumb" (John, 2010). As recent winners of the Schneider Family Book Award from the American Library Association, these…

  12. Asiaticoside enhances normal human skin cell migration, attachment and growth in vitro wound healing model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Hye-Lee; Lee, Mi Hee; You, Kyung Eun; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Seo, Hyok Jin; Park, Jong-Chul

    2012-10-15

    Wound healing proceeds through a complex collaborative process involving many types of cells. Keratinocytes and fibroblasts of epidermal and dermal layers of the skin play prominent roles in this process. Asiaticoside, an active component of Centella asiatica, is known for beneficial effects on keloid and hypertrophic scar. However, the effects of this compound on normal human skin cells are not well known. Using in vitro systems, we observed the effects of asiaticoside on normal human skin cell behaviors related to healing. In a wound closure seeding model, asiaticoside increased migration rates of skin cells. By observing the numbers of cells attached and the area occupied by the cells, we concluded that asiaticoside also enhanced the initial skin cell adhesion. In cell proliferation assays, asiaticoside induced an increase in the number of normal human dermal fibroblasts. In conclusion, asiaticoside promotes skin cell behaviors involved in wound healing; and as a bioactive component of an artificial skin, may have therapeutic value.

  13. [Multipotency of adult stem cells derived from human amnion].

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingxia; Li, Weijia; Li, Bingzong; Li, Jing; Zhao, Chunhua

    2009-05-01

    Adult stem cells are drawing more and more attention due to the potential application in degenerative medicine without posing any moral problem. There is growing evidence showing that the human amnion contains various types of adult stem cell. Since amniotic tissue is readily available, it has the potential to be an important source of regenerative medicine material. In this study we tried to find multipotent adult stem cells in human amnion. We isolated stem cells from amniotic mesenchymal cells by limiting dilution assay. Similar to bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, these cells displayed a fibroblast like appearance. They were positive for CD105, CD29, CD44, negative for haematopoietic (GlyA, CD31, CD34, CD45) and epithelial cell (pan-CK) markers. These stem cells had the potential to differentiate not only into osteogenic, adipogenic and endothelial lineages, but also hepatocyte-like cells and neural cells at the single-cell level depending on the culture conditions. They had the capacity for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation even after being expanded for more than 30 population doublings in vitro. So they may be an ideal stem cell source for inherited or degenerative diseases treatment.

  14. Simian virus 40 large tumor antigen-immortalized normal human liver epithelial cells express hepatocyte characteristics and metabolize chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, A M; Cole, K E; Smoot, D T; Weston, A; Groopman, J D; Shields, P G; Vignaud, J M; Juillerat, M; Lipsky, M M; Trump, B F

    1993-01-01

    Normal human liver tissue and cultured human hepatocytes are valuable models to study xenobiotic metabolism and toxicity, but they only have a limited in vitro life-span and are not readily available. This report describes the establishment of replicative cultures of human adult liver epithelial cells in serum-free medium. The longevity of three of these cultures, derived from different donors, was extended by introduction of the simian virus 40 large T antigen gene. Two cell lines, THLE-2 and -3, established with a recombinant simian virus 40 large T antigen virus have undergone > 100 population doublings, are nontumorigenic when injected into athymic nude mice, have near-diploid karyotypes, and do not express alpha-fetoprotein. The cells express cytokeratin 18 and albumin in early passage, whereas higher-passage cells in logarithmic-phase growth also express cytokeratin 19. THLE-2 and -3 cells metabolize benzo[a]pyrene, N-nitrosodimethylamine, and aflatoxin B1 to their ultimate carcinogenic metabolites that adduct DNA, which indicates functional cytochrome P450 pathways. Other enzymes involved in metabolism of chemical carcinogens, such as epoxide hydrolase, NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione S-transferases, and glutathione peroxidase are also retained by THLE cells. Thus, these immortalized human liver cells constitute an in vitro model for pharmacotoxicological studies and for the investigation of etiology and pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7685115

  15. The systemizing quotient: an investigation of adults with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism, and normal sex differences.

    PubMed Central

    Baron-Cohen, Simon; Richler, Jennifer; Bisarya, Dheraj; Gurunathan, Nhishanth; Wheelwright, Sally

    2003-01-01

    Systemizing is the drive to analyse systems or construct systems. A recent model of psychological sex differences suggests that this is a major dimension in which the sexes differ, with males being more drawn to systemize than females. Currently, there are no self-report measures to assess this important dimension. A second major dimension of sex differences is empathizing (the drive to identify mental states and respond to these with an appropriate emotion). Previous studies find females score higher on empathy measures. We report a new self-report questionnaire, the Systemizing Quotient (SQ), for use with adults of normal intelligence. It contains 40 systemizing items and 20 control items. On each systemizing item, a person can score 2, 1 or 0, so the SQ has a maximum score of 80 and a minimum of zero. In Study 1, we measured the SQ of n = 278 adults (114 males, 164 females) from a general population, to test for predicted sex differences (male superiority) in systemizing. All subjects were also given the Empathy Quotient (EQ) to test if previous reports of female superiority would be replicated. In Study 2 we employed the SQ and the EQ with n = 47 adults (33 males, 14 females) with Asperger syndrome (AS) or high-functioning autism (HFA), who are predicted to be either normal or superior at systemizing, but impaired at empathizing. Their scores were compared with n = 47 matched adults from the general population in Study 1. In Study 1, as predicted, normal adult males scored significantly higher than females on the SQ and significantly lower on the EQ. In Study 2, again as predicted, adults with AS/HFA scored significantly higher on the SQ than matched controls, and significantly lower on the EQ than matched controls. The SQ reveals both a sex difference in systemizing in the general population and an unusually strong drive to systemize in AS/HFA. These results are discussed in relation to two linked theories: the 'empathizing-systemizing' (E-S) theory of sex

  16. Structure and function of adenylate kinase isozymes in normal humans and muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Takenaka, H; Fukumoto, K; Fukamachi, S; Yamaguchi, T; Sumida, M; Shiosaka, T; Kurokawa, Y; Okuda, H; Kuby, S A

    1987-01-01

    Two isozymes of adenylate kinase from human Duchenne muscular dystrophy serum, one of which was an aberrant form specific to DMD patients, were separated by Blue Sepharose CL-6B affinity chromatography. The separated aberrant form possessed a molecular weight of 98,000 +/- 1,500, whereas the normal serum isozyme had a weight of 87,000 +/- 1,600, as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, and sedimentation equilibrium. The sedimentation coefficients were 5.8 S and 5.6 S for the aberrant form and the normal form, respectively. Both serum isozymes are tetramers. The subunit size of the aberrant isozyme (Mr = 24,700) was very similar to that of the normal human liver isozyme, and the subunit size of the normal isozyme (Mr = 21,700) was very similar to that of the normal human muscle enzyme. The amino acid composition of the normal serum isozyme was similar to that of the muscle-type enzyme, and that of the aberrant isozyme was similar to that of the liver enzyme, with some exceptions in both cases.

  17. Magnetic measurements on human erythrocytes: Normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhnini, Lama

    2003-05-01

    In this article magnetic measurements were made on human erythrocytes at different hemoglobin states (normal and reduced hemoglobin). Different blood samples: normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle were studied. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples were taken from patients receiving lifelong blood transfusion treatment. All samples examined exhibited diamagnetic behavior. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples showed higher diamagnetic susceptibilities than that for the normal, which was attributed to the increase of membrane to hemoglobin volume ratio of the abnormal cells. Magnetic measurements showed that the erythrocytes in the reduced state showed less diamagnetic response in comparison with erythrocytes in the normal state. Analysis of the paramagnetic component of magnetization curves gave an effective magnetic moment of μeff=7.6 μB per reduced hemoglobin molecule. The same procedure was applied to sickle and beta thalassemia major samples and values for μeff were found to be comparable to that of the normal erythrocytes.

  18. Comparison between Siriraj mite allergen vaccine and standardized commercial mite vaccine by skin prick testing in normal Thai adults.

    PubMed

    Visitsunthorn, Nualanong; Pacharn, Punchama; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Weeravejsukit, Sirirat; Sripramong, Chaweewan; Sookrung, Nitat; Bunnag, Chaweewan

    2010-03-01

    House dust mite is a major cause of allergic asthma and rhinitis in Thai population. Skin prick test (SPT) is a useful tool for the diagnosis of the IgE-mediated reactions. The imported commercial mite vaccine for SPT is available but it is relatively expensive. Aim of this study is to compare Siriraj Mite Allergen Vaccine (SMAV) with standardized commercial mite allergen vaccine by skin prick testing in normal Thai adults. A double blind, self-controlled study between the SMAV and standardized commercial mite allergen vaccine was performed by SPT in 17 normal Thai adult males and non-pregnant or non-lactating females aged 18-60 years. The study showed that 35.29 % of non atopic adults had positive SPT reaction to Dp and Df of both SMAV and standardized commercial mite allergen vaccine. Mean wheal and flare diameters from SPT of Dp and Df of SMAV showed strong correlation with standardized commercial mite allergen vaccine (r= 0.768 and 0.897 in Dp and Df respectively, p <0.001). The intraclass correlation was also excellent (0.893 and 0.775 in Dp and Df respectively). There was no significant difference in wheal and flare diameter between SMAV and standardized commercial mite allergen vaccine. No systemic or large local reaction was found in any of the study cases.

  19. Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments using chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hannah; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Park, Sang-Ryoul; Chung, Sun-Ku; Jeong, Sangkyun; Yang, Inchul

    2016-01-01

    Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments employing chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard is reported. Human and chimpanzee RNAs exhibit single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in average 210-bp intervals. Spike-in chimpanzee RNA would behave the same as the human counterparts during the whole NGS procedures owing to the high sequence similarity. After discrimination of species origins of the NGS reads based on SNVs, the chimpanzee reads were used to read-by-read normalize biases and variations of human reads. By this approach, as many as 10,119 transcripts were simultaneously normalized for the entire NGS procedures leading to accurate and reproducible quantification of differential gene expression. In addition, incomparable data sets from different in-process degradations or from different library preparation methods were made well comparable by the normalization. Based on these results, we expect that the normalization approaches using near neighbor genomes as internal standards could be employed as a standard protocol, which will improve both accuracy and comparability of NGS results across different sample batches, laboratories and NGS platforms. PMID:27554056

  20. Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments using chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hannah; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Park, Sang-Ryoul; Chung, Sun-Ku; Jeong, Sangkyun; Yang, Inchul

    2016-01-01

    Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments employing chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard is reported. Human and chimpanzee RNAs exhibit single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in average 210-bp intervals. Spike-in chimpanzee RNA would behave the same as the human counterparts during the whole NGS procedures owing to the high sequence similarity. After discrimination of species origins of the NGS reads based on SNVs, the chimpanzee reads were used to read-by-read normalize biases and variations of human reads. By this approach, as many as 10,119 transcripts were simultaneously normalized for the entire NGS procedures leading to accurate and reproducible quantification of differential gene expression. In addition, incomparable data sets from different in-process degradations or from different library preparation methods were made well comparable by the normalization. Based on these results, we expect that the normalization approaches using near neighbor genomes as internal standards could be employed as a standard protocol, which will improve both accuracy and comparability of NGS results across different sample batches, laboratories and NGS platforms. PMID:27554056

  1. How long have adult humans been consuming milk?

    PubMed

    Gerbault, Pascale; Roffet-Salque, Mélanie; Evershed, Richard P; Thomas, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Lactase is the enzyme that breaks down the milk sugar lactose, and in most mammals, including most humans, lactase activity is down-regulated after the weaning period is completed. However, in about 35% of adults worldwide, lactase continues to be expressed throughout adulthood, a feature termed lactase persistence (LP). Genetic evidence indicates that LP is a recent human adaptation, and its current geographic distribution correlates with the relative historical importance of dairying in different human populations. Investigating archaeological evidence for fresh milk consumption has proved crucial in building an account of the joint evolution of LP and dairying. A powerful technique for investigating food processing, including milk processing, in ancient populations is lipid residue analysis on archaeological pottery. We review here the archaeological and genetic evidence available that have contributed to a better understanding of the gene-culture co-evolution of LP and dairying. PMID:24339181

  2. How long have adult humans been consuming milk?

    PubMed

    Gerbault, Pascale; Roffet-Salque, Mélanie; Evershed, Richard P; Thomas, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Lactase is the enzyme that breaks down the milk sugar lactose, and in most mammals, including most humans, lactase activity is down-regulated after the weaning period is completed. However, in about 35% of adults worldwide, lactase continues to be expressed throughout adulthood, a feature termed lactase persistence (LP). Genetic evidence indicates that LP is a recent human adaptation, and its current geographic distribution correlates with the relative historical importance of dairying in different human populations. Investigating archaeological evidence for fresh milk consumption has proved crucial in building an account of the joint evolution of LP and dairying. A powerful technique for investigating food processing, including milk processing, in ancient populations is lipid residue analysis on archaeological pottery. We review here the archaeological and genetic evidence available that have contributed to a better understanding of the gene-culture co-evolution of LP and dairying.

  3. Deep sequencing as a probe of normal stem cell fate and preneoplasia in human epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Using deep sequencing technology, methods based on the sporadic acquisition of somatic DNA mutations in human tissues have been used to trace the clonal evolution of progenitor cells in diseased states. However, the potential of these approaches to explore cell fate behavior of normal tissues and the initiation of preneoplasia remain underexploited. Focusing on the results of a recent deep sequencing study of eyelid epidermis, we show that the quantitative analysis of mutant clone size provides a general method to resolve the pattern of normal stem cell fate and to detect and characterize the mutational signature of rare field transformations in human tissues, with implications for the early detection of preneoplasia. PMID:26699486

  4. Hesperetin induces melanin production in adult human epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Usach, Iris; Taléns-Visconti, Raquel; Magraner-Pardo, Lorena; Peris, José-Esteban

    2015-06-01

    One of the major sources of flavonoids for humans are citrus fruits, hesperidin being the predominant flavonoid. Hesperetin (HSP), the aglycon of hesperidin, has been reported to provide health benefits such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects. However, the effect of HSP on skin pigmentation is not clear. Some authors have found that HSP induces melanogenesis in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells, which, if extrapolated to in vivo conditions, might protect skin against photodamage. Since the effect of HSP on normal melanocytes could be different to that observed on melanoma cells, the described effect of HSP on murine melanoma cells has been compared to the effect obtained using normal human melanocytes. HSP concentrations of 25 and 50 µM induced melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in human melanocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to control melanocytes, 25 µM HSP increased melanin production and tyrosinase activity 1.4-fold (p < 0.01) and 1.1-fold (p < 0.01), respectively, and the corresponding increases in the case of 50 µM HSP were 1.9-fold (p < 0.001) and 1.3-fold (p < 0.001). Therefore, HSP could be considered a valuable photoprotective substance if its capacity to increase melanin production in human melanocyte cultures could be reproduced on human skin.

  5. Neurons in the White Matter of the Adult Human Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Solá, M. Luisa; González-Delgado, Francisco J.; Pueyo-Morlans, Mercedes; Medina-Bolívar, O. Carolina; Hernández-Acosta, N. Carolina; González-Gómez, Miriam; Meyer, Gundela

    2009-01-01

    The white matter (WM) of the adult human neocortex contains the so-called “interstitial neurons”. They are most numerous in the superficial WM underlying the cortical gyri, and decrease in density toward the deep WM. They are morphologically heterogeneous. A subgroup of interstitial neurons display pyramidal-cell like morphologies, characterized by a polarized dendritic tree with a dominant apical dendrite, and covered with a variable number of dendritic spines. In addition, a large contingent of interstitial neurons can be classified as interneurons based on their neurochemical profile as well as on morphological criteria. WM- interneurons have multipolar or bipolar shapes and express GABA and a variety of other neuronal markers, such as calbindin and calretinin, the extracellular matrix protein reelin, or neuropeptide Y, somatostatin, and nitric oxide synthase. The heterogeneity of interstitial neurons may be relevant for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and schizophrenia. Interstitial neurons are most prominent in human brain, and only rudimentary in the brain of non-primate mammals. These evolutionary differences have precluded adequate experimental work on this cell population, which is usually considered as a relict of the subplate, a transient compartment proper of development and without a known function in the adult brain. The primate-specific prominence of the subplate in late fetal stages points to an important role in the establishment of interstitial neurons. Neurons in the adult WM may be actively involved in coordinating inter-areal connectivity and regulation of blood flow. Further studies in primates will be needed to elucidate the developmental history, adult components and activities of this large neuronal system. PMID:19543540

  6. Normative data on trail making test for neurologically normal, Chinese-speaking adults.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Bigler, Erin D

    2002-01-01

    This study presents normative data on the Trail Making Test Part A and the Chinese version of the Trail Making Test Part B (C-Trails B). The ages of the 110 participants ranged from 21 to 75 (M = 48, SD = 14.7) and years of education from 1 to 20 (M = 12, SD = 5). No gender effects were found on the test scores; however, age and education were significantly associated with scores on both Trails A (p < .01) and C-Trails B (p < .01). Results also suggest a high correlation (Pearson r = .69) between C-Trails B and the Digit Symbol-Coding subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition. In light of our earlier study, this finding provides further evidence that C-Trails B may be equivalent to the standard Trails B. Findings also demonstrate a need for norms adjusted for both age and education for adults whose primary language is Chinese.

  7. Secretion of Unconjugated Androgens and Estrogens by the Normal and Abnormal Human Testis before and after Human Chorionic Gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, R. L.; Kelch, R. P.; Jenner, M. R.; Kaplan, S. L.; Grumbach, M. M.

    1974-01-01

    The secretion of androgens and estrogens by normal and abnormal testes was compared by determining the concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione (Δ4A), testosterone (T), estrone (E1), and 17β-estradiol (E2) in peripheral and spermatic venous plasma samples from 14 normal men and 5 men with unilateral testicular atrophy. Four normal men and one patient with unilateral atrophy of the testis were given human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) before surgery. Plasma estrogens were determined by radioimmunoassay; plasma androgens were measured by the double-isotope dilution derivative technique. Peripheral concentrations of these steroids before and after HCG were similar in both the normal men and the patients with unilateral testicular atrophy. In normal men, the mean ±SE spermatic venous concentrations were DHEA, 73.1±11.7 ng/ml; Δ4A, 30.7±7.9 ng/ml; T, 751±114 ng/ml; E1, 306±55 pg/ml; and E2, 1298±216 pg/ml. Three of four subjects with unilateral testicular atrophy had greatly diminished spermatic venous levels of androgens and estrogens. HCG treatment increased the testicular secretion of DHEA and T fivefold, Δ4A threefold, E1 sixfold, and E2 eightfold in normal men. In the single subject with an atrophic testis who received HCG, the spermatic venous concentrations of androgens and estrogens were much less than in normal men similarly treated. We conclude that: (a) E1 is secreted by the human testis, but testicular secretion of E1 accounts for less than 5% of E1 production in normal men; (b) HCG stimulation produces increases in spermatic venous estrogens equal to or greater than the changes in androgens, including testosterone; and (c) strikingly decreased secretion of androgen and estrogen by unilateral atrophic human tests cannot be appreciated by analyses of peripheral steroid concentrations. PMID:4271572

  8. Induction of autoantibody-producing cells after the coculture of haptenated and normal human mononuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Pisko, E J; Foster, S L; Turner, R A

    1981-10-01

    The coculture of normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBL) and autologous mononuclear leukocytes coupled to the trinitrophenyl (TNP) hapten (TNP-PBL) was found to induce a polyclonal activation of antibody-producing cells. The polyclonal activation of antibody-producing cells was demonstrated by detecting the induction of cells producing antibody to sheep red blood cells using a complement-dependent, direct, hemolytic plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay. A ratio of four normal to one haptenated mononuclear leukocyte was found to be optimal for inducing the polyclonal activation of antibody-producing cell in these cultures. The plaque-forming cells assay in these experiments utilized monolayers of indicator red cells. Further evidence for the polyclonal induction of antibody-producing cells by TNP-PBL was provided by demonstrating PFC on monolayers of not only sheep red blood cells, but also autologous human red cells, bromelain-treated autologous red cells, TNP-coupled human and sheep red cells, and human autologous red cells coupled to human heat-aggregated IgG with chromic chloride. Thus cells secreting antibody to TNP, human red cells, and human IgG were induced. Anti-IgG and anti-human red cell-producing cells were first detected on Day 2 of culture and were still present on Day 9. Mononuclear leukocytes altered by chemical haptenation polyclonally stimulate normal mononuclear leukocytes to become antibody-producing cells. This polyclonal stimulation of antibody-producing cells includes cells producing antibodies to human IgG and human autologous red blood cells suggesting that autoantibody-producing cells are induced.

  9. Confirmation of Correlation between Brain Nerve Conduction Velocity and Intelligence Level in Normal Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. Edward; Vernon, Philip A.; Johnson, Andrew M.

    2004-01-01

    In 1992, Reed and Jensen ["Intelligence" 16 (1992) 259-272] reported a positive correlation (0.26; "p"= 0.002; 0.37 after correcting for restricted intelligence range) between a brain nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and intelligence level in 147 normal male students. In the first follow-up of their study, we report on a study using similar NCV…

  10. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in (Un)aided Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Adults.

    PubMed

    Van Dun, Bram; Kania, Anna; Dillon, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) are influenced by the characteristics of the stimulus, including level and hearing aid gain. Previous studies have measured CAEPs aided and unaided in individuals with normal hearing. There is a significant difference between providing amplification to a person with normal hearing and a person with hearing loss. This study investigated this difference and the effects of stimulus signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and audibility on the CAEP amplitude in a population with hearing loss. Twelve normal-hearing participants and 12 participants with a hearing loss participated in this study. Three speech sounds-/m/, /g/, and /t/-were presented in the free field. Unaided stimuli were presented at 55, 65, and 75 dB sound pressure level (SPL) and aided stimuli at 55 dB SPL with three different gains in steps of 10 dB. CAEPs were recorded and their amplitudes analyzed. Stimulus SNRs and audibility were determined. No significant effect of stimulus level or hearing aid gain was found in normal hearers. Conversely, a significant effect was found in hearing-impaired individuals. Audibility of the signal, which in some cases is determined by the signal level relative to threshold and in other cases by the SNR, is the dominant factor explaining changes in CAEP amplitude. CAEPs can potentially be used to assess the effects of hearing aid gain in hearing-impaired users. PMID:27587919

  11. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  12. Characterization of human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tălu, Stefan; Vlăduţiu, Cristina; Lupaşcu, Carmen A.

    2015-01-01

    AIM To characterize the human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal geometry and lacunarity parameters. METHODS Multifractal analysis using a box counting algorithm was carried out for a set of 12 segmented and skeletonized human retinal images, corresponding to both normal (6 images) and amblyopia states of the retina (6 images). RESULTS It was found that the microvascular geometry of the human retina network represents geometrical multifractals, characterized through subsets of regions having different scaling properties that are not evident in the fractal analysis. Multifractal analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a higher average of the generalized dimensions (Dq) for q=0, 1, 2 indicating a higher degree of the tree-dimensional complexity associated with the human retinal microvasculature network whereas images of healthy subjects show a lower value of generalized dimensions indicating normal complexity of biostructure. On the other hand, the lacunarity analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a lower average of the lacunarity parameter Λ than the corresponding values for normal images (segmented and skeletonized versions). CONCLUSION The multifractal and lacunarity analysis may be used as a non-invasive predictive complementary tool to distinguish amblyopic subjects from healthy subjects and hence this technique could be used for an early diagnosis of patients with amblyopia. PMID:26558216

  13. Synergistic action of photosensitizers and normal human serum in a bactericidal process. I. Effect of chlorophylls.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Andrzej; Jankowski, Stanisław; Mirończyk, Agnieszka

    2003-01-01

    Susceptibility of some Gram-negative strains against the bactericidal action of normal human serum (NHS) and of chlorophyll, which induces production of reactive oxygen species by light, was studied. A synergistic bactericidal activity of NHS and chlorophyll against E. coli K1 and Shigella flexneri strains was observed.

  14. Assessing the Toxicities of Regulated and Unregulated Disinfection By-products in Normal Human Colon Cells.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of over six hundred disinfection by-products (DBPs) and less than half of the total organic halides present in finished water has created a need for short-term in vitro assays to address toxicities that might be associated with human exposure. . We are using a normal...

  15. Insulin binding properties of normal and transformed human epidermal cultured keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Verrando, P.; Ortonne, J.P.

    1985-10-01

    Insulin binding to its receptors was studied in cultured normal and transformed (A431 line) human epidermal keratinocytes. The specific binding was a temperature-dependent, saturable process. Normal keratinocytes possess a mean value of about 80,000 receptors per cell. Fifteen hours exposure of the cells to insulin lowered their receptor number (about 65% loss in available sites); these reappeared when the hormone was removed from the culture medium. In the A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line, there is a net decrease in insulin binding (84% of the initial bound/free hormone ratio in comparison with normal cells) essentially related to a loss in receptor affinity for insulin. Thus, cultured human keratinocytes which express insulin receptors may be a useful tool in understanding skin pathology related to insulin disorders.

  16. Identification of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) as a potential diagnostic tool is attractive. MPM can effectively provide information about morphological and biochemical changes in biological tissues at the molecular level. In this paper, we attempt to identify normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections (both in transverse and longitudinal sections). The results show that MPM can display different microstructure changes in the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. MPM also can quantitatively describe the alteration of collagen content between normal and cancerous muscle layers. These are important pathological findings that MPM images can bring more detailed complementary information about tissue architecture and cell morphology through observing the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. This work demonstrates that MPM can be better for identifying the microstructural characteristics of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria in different sections.

  17. [A study of mandibular movement velocity and acceleration in young adults with normal people].

    PubMed

    Lu, P J

    1993-09-01

    The velocity and acceleration of mandibular movements including the border movement, habitual movement and functional movement were studied in 25 young adults by using D-SGG measuring instrument. The results showed that the conception of functional velocity and the maximum velocity of mandibular movement were developed. The physiological and clinical significance of the value of mandibular movement acceleration can be explained by Newton's Second law, F = ma. The author pointed out that in order to keep the necessary masticatory efficiency, the masticatory velocity enjoy the priority in matching with the masticatory force in mastication.

  18. Expression of a mutant human fibrillin allele upon a normal human or murine genetic background recapitulates a Marfan cellular phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Eldadah, Z A; Brenn, T; Furthmayr, H; Dietz, H C

    1995-01-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a connective tissue disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and caused by mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin, a 350-kD glycoprotein that multimerizes to form extracellular microfibrils. It has been unclear whether disease results from a relative deficiency of wild-type fibrillin; from a dominant-negative effect, in which mutant fibrillin monomers disrupt the function of the wild-type protein encoded by the normal allele; or from a dynamic and variable interplay between these two pathogenetic mechanisms. We have now addressed this issue in a cell culture system. A mutant fibrillin allele from a patient with severe MFS was expressed in normal human and murine fibroblasts by stable transfection. Immunohistochemical analysis of the resultant cell lines revealed markedly diminished fibrillin deposition and disorganized microfibrillar architecture. Pulse-chase studies demonstrated normal levels of fibrillin synthesis but substantially reduced deposition into the extracellular matrix. These data illustrate that expression of a mutant fibrillin allele, on a background of two normal alleles, is sufficient to disrupt normal microfibrillar assembly and reproduce the MFS cellular phenotype. This underscores the importance of the fibrillin amino-terminus in normal microfibrillar assembly and suggests that expression of the human extreme 5' fibrillin coding sequence may be sufficient, in isolation, to produce an animal model of MFS. Lastly, this substantiation of a dominant-negative effect offers mutant allele knockout as a potential strategy for gene therapy. Images PMID:7860770

  19. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness ( r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores ( r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness.

  20. Genome-wide quantification of rare somatic mutations in normal human tissues using massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Margaret L; Kinde, Isaac; Tomasetti, Cristian; McMahon, K Wyatt; Rosenquist, Thomas A; Grollman, Arthur P; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas

    2016-08-30

    We present the bottleneck sequencing system (BotSeqS), a next-generation sequencing method that simultaneously quantifies rare somatic point mutations across the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. BotSeqS combines molecular barcoding with a simple dilution step immediately before library amplification. We use BotSeqS to show age- and tissue-dependent accumulations of rare mutations and demonstrate that somatic mutational burden in normal human tissues can vary by several orders of magnitude, depending on biologic and environmental factors. We further show major differences between the mutational patterns of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in normal tissues. Lastly, the mutation spectra of normal tissues were different from each other, but similar to those of the cancers that arose in them. This technology can provide insights into the number and nature of genetic alterations in normal tissues and can be used to address a variety of fundamental questions about the genomes of diseased tissues.

  1. Genome-wide quantification of rare somatic mutations in normal human tissues using massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Margaret L.; Kinde, Isaac; Tomasetti, Cristian; McMahon, K. Wyatt; Rosenquist, Thomas A.; Grollman, Arthur P.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas

    2016-01-01

    We present the bottleneck sequencing system (BotSeqS), a next-generation sequencing method that simultaneously quantifies rare somatic point mutations across the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. BotSeqS combines molecular barcoding with a simple dilution step immediately before library amplification. We use BotSeqS to show age- and tissue-dependent accumulations of rare mutations and demonstrate that somatic mutational burden in normal human tissues can vary by several orders of magnitude, depending on biologic and environmental factors. We further show major differences between the mutational patterns of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in normal tissues. Lastly, the mutation spectra of normal tissues were different from each other, but similar to those of the cancers that arose in them. This technology can provide insights into the number and nature of genetic alterations in normal tissues and can be used to address a variety of fundamental questions about the genomes of diseased tissues. PMID:27528664

  2. Phonation time, phonation volume and air flow rate in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Prathanee, B; Watthanathon, J; Ruangjirachuporn, P

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the average phonation time, phonation volume and air flow rate, as well as the relationship between each of these parameters during two conditions (normal and deep breaths). Researchers expect to use these averages in screening of voice disorders. One hundred and three subjects, 67 males and 36 females, were studied. The instruments were a 9 liter respirometer, a tape recorder and a stop watch. The results indicated that the parameters for males were significantly greater than those for females. In addition, the findings suggested that the values of mean phonation time, phonation volume and air flow rate during deep breath were significantly greater than those during normal breath (p < 0.05). The phonation time was inversely related to the air flow rate. However, there was a positive relationship between phonation time and phonation volume, as well as between phonation volume and air flow rate. The findings supported our hypothesises.

  3. What component of executive functions contributes to normal and impaired reading comprehension in young adults?

    PubMed

    Georgiou, George K; Das, J P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to examine what component of executive functions (EF) - planning and working memory - predicts reading comprehension in young adults (Study 1), and (b) to examine if less skilled comprehenders experience deficits in the EF components (Study 2). In Study 1, we assessed 178 university students (120 females; mean age=21.82 years) on planning (Planned Connections, Planned Codes, and Planned Patterns), working memory (Listening Span, Digit Span Backward, and Digit Memory), and reading comprehension (Nelson-Denny Reading Test). The results of structural equation modeling indicated that only planning was a significant predictor of reading comprehension. In Study 2, we assessed 30 university students with a specific reading comprehension deficit (19 females; mean age=23.01 years) and 30 controls (18 females; mean age=22.77 years) on planning (Planned Connections and Crack the Code) and working memory (Listening Span and Digit Span Backward). The results showed that less skilled comprehenders performed significantly poorer than controls only in planning. Taken together, the findings of both studies suggest that planning is the preeminent component of EF that is driving its relationship with reading comprehension in young adults.

  4. [Construct validity of a new computer-assisted cognitive assessment battery in normal adults].

    PubMed

    Maeshima, S; Komai, N; Nakai, K; Oura, Y; Nakagawa, M; Itakura, T; Masuo, O; Yamaga, H; Okita, R; Ozaki, F; Moriwaki, H

    1999-01-01

    A computer-assisted battery for neuropsychological tests (CNT) has been designed to screen adults for cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to gather evidence for the construct validity of CNT and also investigate the relationship between CNT and conventional neuropsychological tests. Subjects were 45 healthy adults (21 men and 24 women), who ranged in age from 20 to 70 years (mean = 33.5, SD = 1.9) with no history of substance abuse, or of psychotic or neurological disorders. The CNT in our study consists of six subtests designed to assess various components of driving, such as digit span, visual scanning, visual and verbal memory, complex reaction time, and vigilance. Mini-mental state test, Kana-hiroi test, word fluency, the auditory-verbal learning test and Raven's colored progressive matrices were also performed as conventional neuropsychological tests. Results showed there were high correlations between each CNT subtests and conventional neuropsychological tests. A factor analysis (with varimax rotation) identified 4 factors with eigen values greater than 1, which accounted for over 70% of the variance. CNT was able to estimate each factor related to cognitive function such as learning and memory, attention, judgment, and visual scanning selectively. CNT may thus be a useful tool for detection of cognitive impairment, although this test has important limitations. Broader applications of these tests will require extensive population-based validation.

  5. Normalized Metadata Generation for Human Retrieval Using Multiple Video Surveillance Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Inhye; Lee, Seungwon; Paik, Joonki

    2016-01-01

    Since it is impossible for surveillance personnel to keep monitoring videos from a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an efficient technique is needed to help recognize important situations by retrieving the metadata of an object-of-interest. In a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an object detected in a camera has a different shape in another camera, which is a critical issue of wide-range, real-time surveillance systems. In order to address the problem, this paper presents an object retrieval method by extracting the normalized metadata of an object-of-interest from multiple, heterogeneous cameras. The proposed metadata generation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) generation of a three-dimensional (3D) human model; (ii) human object-based automatic scene calibration; and (iii) metadata generation. More specifically, an appropriately-generated 3D human model provides the foot-to-head direction information that is used as the input of the automatic calibration of each camera. The normalized object information is used to retrieve an object-of-interest in a wide-range, multiple-camera surveillance system in the form of metadata. Experimental results show that the 3D human model matches the ground truth, and automatic calibration-based normalization of metadata enables a successful retrieval and tracking of a human object in the multiple-camera video surveillance system. PMID:27347961

  6. Normalized Metadata Generation for Human Retrieval Using Multiple Video Surveillance Cameras.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Inhye; Lee, Seungwon; Paik, Joonki

    2016-01-01

    Since it is impossible for surveillance personnel to keep monitoring videos from a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an efficient technique is needed to help recognize important situations by retrieving the metadata of an object-of-interest. In a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an object detected in a camera has a different shape in another camera, which is a critical issue of wide-range, real-time surveillance systems. In order to address the problem, this paper presents an object retrieval method by extracting the normalized metadata of an object-of-interest from multiple, heterogeneous cameras. The proposed metadata generation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) generation of a three-dimensional (3D) human model; (ii) human object-based automatic scene calibration; and (iii) metadata generation. More specifically, an appropriately-generated 3D human model provides the foot-to-head direction information that is used as the input of the automatic calibration of each camera. The normalized object information is used to retrieve an object-of-interest in a wide-range, multiple-camera surveillance system in the form of metadata. Experimental results show that the 3D human model matches the ground truth, and automatic calibration-based normalization of metadata enables a successful retrieval and tracking of a human object in the multiple-camera video surveillance system. PMID:27347961

  7. Self-Reported Hearing Difficulties Among Adults With Normal Audiograms: The Beaver Dam Offspring Study

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Kelly L.; Pinto, Alex; Fischer, Mary E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Levy, Sarah; Tweed, Ted S.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Clinicians encounter patients who report experiencing hearing difficulty (HD) even when audiometric thresholds fall within normal limits. When there is no evidence of audiometric hearing loss, it generates debate over possible biomedical and psychosocial etiologies. It is possible that self-reported HDs relate to variables within and/or outside the scope of audiology. The purpose of this study is to identify how often, on a population basis, people with normal audiometric thresholds self-report HD and to identify factors associated with such HDs. Design This was a cross-sectional investigation of participants in the Beaver Dam Offspring Study. HD was defined as a self-reported HD on a four-item scale despite having pure-tone audiometric thresholds within normal limits (<20 dB HL0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 kHz bilaterally, at each frequency). Distortion product otoacoustic emissions and word-recognition performance in quiet and with competing messages were also analyzed. In addition to hearing assessments, relevant factors such as sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, environmental exposures, medical history, health-related quality of life, and symptoms of neurological disorders were also examined as possible risk factors. The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression was used to probe symptoms associated with depression, and the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 mental score was used to quantify psychological stress and social and role disability due to emotional problems. The Visual Function Questionnaire-25 and contrast sensitivity test were used to query vision difficulties. Results Of the 2783 participants, 686 participants had normal audiometric thresholds. An additional grouping variable was created based on the available scores of HD (four self-report questions), which reduced the total dataset to n = 682 (age range, 21–67 years). The percentage of individuals with normal audiometric thresholds who self-reported HD was 12.0% (82 of 682). The

  8. Multipotent progenitor cells isolated from adult human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I; Nair, I; Ferreri, K; Rawson, J; Kuroda, A; Pascual, M; Omori, K; Valiente, L; Orr, C; Al-Abdullah, I; Riggs, A; Kandeel, F; Mullen, Y

    2005-10-01

    The supply of islet cells is a limiting factor for the widespread application of islet transplantation of type-1 diabetes. Islets constitute 1% to 2% of pancreatic tissue, leaving approximately 98% as discard after islet isolation and purification. In this report we present our data on the isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from discarded adult human pancreatic tissue. The collected cells from discarded nonislet fractions, after enzymatic digestion and gradient purification of islets, were dissociated for suspension culture in a serum-free medium. The cell clusters grown to a size of 100 to 150 mum contained cells staining for stage-specific embryonic antigens, but not insulin or C-peptide. To direct cell differentiation toward islets, clusters were recultured in a pancreatic differentiation medium. Insulin and C-peptide-positive cells by immunocytochemistry appeared within a week, reaching over 10% of the cell population. Glucagon and somatostatin-positive cells were also detected. The cell clusters were found to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Cells from the same clusters also had the capacity for differentiation into neural cells, as documented by staining for neural and glial cell markers when cultured as monolayers in media containing neurotrophic factors. These data suggest that multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells exist within the human pancreatic tissue that is typically discarded during islet isolation procedures. These adult progenitor cells can be successfully differentiated into insulin-producing cells, and thus they have the potential for treatment of type-1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:16298614

  9. Resident aerobic microbiota of the adult human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, T T; Kirkeby, L P; Poulsen, K; Reinholdt, J; Kilian, M

    2000-10-01

    Recent evidence strongly suggests that the microbiota of the nasal cavity plays a crucial role in determining the reaction patterns of the mucosal and systemic immune system. However, little is known about the normal microbiota of the nasal cavity. The purpose of this study was to determine the microbiota in different parts of the nasal cavity and to develop and evaluate methods for this purpose. Samples were collected from 10 healthy adults by nasal washes and by swabbing of the mucosa through a sterile introduction device. Both methods gave results that were quantitatively and qualitatively reproducible, and revealed significant differences in the density of the nasal microbiota between individuals. The study revealed absence of gram-negative bacteria that are regular members of the commensal microbiota of the pharynx. Likewise, viridans type streptococci were sparsely represented. The nasal microbiota was dominated by species of the genera Corynebacterium, Aureobacterium, Rhodococcus, and Staphylococcus, including S. epidermis, S. capitis, S. hominis, S. haemolyticus, S. lugdunensis and S. warneri. These studies show that the microbiota of the nasal cavity of adults is strikingly different from that of the pharynx, and that the nasal cavity is a primary habitat for several species of diphtheroids recognized as opportunistic pathogens. Under special circumstances, single species, including IgA1 protease-producing bacteria, may become predominant in a restricted area of the nasal mucosa. PMID:11200821

  10. Expression and immunolocalization of Gpnmb, a glioma-associated glycoprotein, in normal and inflamed central nervous systems of adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian-Jun; Ma, Wen-Jie; Yokoyama, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma B (Gpnmb) is a type I transmembrane protein implicated in cell differentiation, inflammation, tissue regeneration, and tumor progression. Gpnmb, which is highly expressed in glioblastoma cells, is a potential therapeutic target. However, little is known about its expression, cellular localization, and roles in non-tumorous neural tissues. In this study, we examined Gpnmb expression in the central nervous system of adult rats under both normal and inflammatory conditions. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that Gpnmb mRNA was expressed in the cerebrum, cerebellum, brain stem, and spinal cord of normal adult rats. Immunoperoxidase staining revealed that Gpnmb-immunoreactive cells were widely distributed in the parenchyma of all brain regions examined, with the cells being most prevalent in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, cerebellar cortex, spinal dorsal horn, choroid plexus, ependyma, periventricular regions, and in layers II and III of the cerebral cortex. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that these cells were co-stained most frequently with the microglia/macrophage marker OX42, and occasionally with the radial glia marker RC2 or the neuronal marker NeuN. Furthermore, an intraperitoneal injection of bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide increased the number of Gpnmb and OX42 double-positive cells in the area postrema, which is one of the circumventricular organs, indicating infiltration of hematogenous macrophages. These results suggest that Gpnmb, which is expressed in microglia and macrophages in non-tumorous neural tissues, plays an important role in the regulation of immune/inflammatory responses. PMID:22574278

  11. Effects of Antioxidant Supplementation on Insulin Sensitivity, Endothelial Adhesion Molecules and Oxidative Stress in Normal Weight and Overweight Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Heather K.; Bourguignon, Cheryl M.; Weltman, Arthur L.; Vincent, Kevin R.; Barrett, Eugene; Innes, Karen E.; Taylor, Ann G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether short-term antioxidant supplementation affects insulin sensitivity, endothelial adhesion molecule levels, and oxidative stress in overweight young adults. Methods and Procedures A randomized, double-blind, controlled study tested the effects of antioxidants (AOX) on measures of insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment, HOMA and QUICKI), endothelial adhesion molecules (sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin), adiponectin and oxidative stress (lipid hydroperoxides, PEROX) in overweight and normal weight individuals (N=48, 18-30 years). Participants received either AOX (vitamin E 800IU, vitamin C 500mg, β-carotene 10mg) or placebo (PLC) for 8 weeks. Results HOMA values were initially higher in the overweight subjects and were lowered with AOX by week 8 (15% reduction, p=0.02). Adiponectin increased in both AOX groups. sICAM-1 and sE-selectin decreased in overweight AOX treated groups by 6% and 13%, respectively (p<0.05). Plasma PEROX were reduced by 0.31 and 0.70 nmol/ml in the normal weight and overweight AOX treated groups, respectively, by week 8 (p<0.05). Discussion AOX supplementation moderately lowers HOMA and endothelial adhesion molecule levels in overweight young adults. A potential mechanism to explain this finding is the reduction in oxidative stress by AOX. Long term studies are needed to determine whether AOX are effective in suppressing diabetes or vascular activation over time. PMID:19154960

  12. Effects of Indoor Horseback Riding and Virtual Reality Exercises on the Dynamic Balance Ability of Normal Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong; Park, Jungseo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to determine the effect of indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises on the dynamic balance ability of normal adults. [Subjects] This study enrolled 24 normal adults and divided them into two groups: an indoor horseback riding exercise group (IHREG, n = 12) and a virtual reality exercise group (VREG, n = 12). [Methods] IHREG exercised on indoor horseback riding equipment and VREG exercised using the Nintendo Wii Fit three times a week for six weeks. The Biodex Balance System was used to analyze dynamic balance as measured by the overall stability index (OSI), anteroposterior stability index (APSI), and mediolateral stability index (MLSI). [Results] In the within-group comparison, IHREG and VERG both showed significant decreases in the dynamic balance indexes of OSI, APSI, and MLSI after the intervention, but no significant difference was found between the groups. [Conclusion] Both indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises were effective at improving the subjects’ dynamic balance ability as measured by OSI, APSI, and MLSI, and can be used as additional exercises for patients with conditions affecting postural control. PMID:25540494

  13. Comparison between the Effects of Horseback Riding Exercise and Trunk Stability Exercise on the Balance of Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon Su; Lee, Chae-Woo; Lee, In-Sil

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the effects of horseback riding exercise and trunk stability exercise on static and dynamic balance in normal adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two normal adults residing in communities were randomly divided into a horseback riding exercise group and a trunk stability exercise group, and they conducted exercise for eight weeks. [Results] Sway times of the COG (center of gravity) decreased significantly, and the A-P (anterior-posterior) and M-L (medial-lateral) velocities significantly decreased in both groups. A comparison of sway times of the COG after the intervention between the two groups revealed that the horseback riding exercise group showed larger decreases than the trunk stability exercise group. [Conclusion] In terms of the musculoskeletal factor, horseback riding may result in functional improvement and increased stability, and it may stimulate proprioceptive sense input in neurological terms. It is therefore considered a composite exercise method that may strengthen the two factors simultaneously. PMID:25276009

  14. Effects of indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises on the dynamic balance ability of normal healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong; Park, Jungseo

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to determine the effect of indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises on the dynamic balance ability of normal adults. [Subjects] This study enrolled 24 normal adults and divided them into two groups: an indoor horseback riding exercise group (IHREG, n = 12) and a virtual reality exercise group (VREG, n = 12). [Methods] IHREG exercised on indoor horseback riding equipment and VREG exercised using the Nintendo Wii Fit three times a week for six weeks. The Biodex Balance System was used to analyze dynamic balance as measured by the overall stability index (OSI), anteroposterior stability index (APSI), and mediolateral stability index (MLSI). [Results] In the within-group comparison, IHREG and VERG both showed significant decreases in the dynamic balance indexes of OSI, APSI, and MLSI after the intervention, but no significant difference was found between the groups. [Conclusion] Both indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises were effective at improving the subjects' dynamic balance ability as measured by OSI, APSI, and MLSI, and can be used as additional exercises for patients with conditions affecting postural control. PMID:25540494

  15. Construction of a normalized directionally cloned cDNA library from adult heart and analysis of 3040 clones by partial sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Ogiwara, A; Uchiyama, I; Takagi, T; Yazaki, Y; Nakamura, Y

    1996-07-01

    Large-scale sequencing of clones from cDNA libraries derived from specific tissues is a rapid and efficient way of discovering novel genes expressed in those tissues. However, because the heart is continually contracting and relaxing, it strongly expresses muscle-contractile genes and/or mitochondrial genes, a bias that reduces the efficiency of this method. To improve the efficiency of identifying novel genes expressed in the heart, we constructed a normalized directionally cloned cDNA library from adult heart and partially sequenced 3040 clones. Comparisons of these sequence data with known DNA sequences in the database revealed that 57.1% of the clones matched human genes already known, 23.4% were identical or almost identical to human expressed sequence tags (ESTs), 14.2% bore no significant homology to any sequences in the database, and 1.2% represented repetitive sequences. The remaining 4.1% showed some homology with known genes, and Northern blot analysis of several clones in this category revealed that most of them were expressed mainly in the heart and skeletal muscle. After redundancy was excluded, the 3040 clones accounted for 1395 distinctive ESTs, 446 of which exhibited no match to any known sequence. Our results suggest that our normalized library is less redundant than standard libraries and is a useful resource for cataloging genes expressed in the heart. PMID:8661126

  16. Intellectual differences between schizophrenic patients and normal controls across the adult lifespan.

    PubMed

    Kondel, Tejinder K; Mortimer, Ann M; Leeson, Verity C; Laws, Keith R; Hirsch, Steven R

    2003-12-01

    A debate persists about whether IQ declines during the duration of schizophrenia or whether an early deficit remains static across the lifespan. To examine this, we measured estimated current IQ (Quick Test Revised: QTR) and estimated premorbid IQ (National Adult Reading Test: NART) in schizophrenic patients (n=110) and matched healthy controls (n=71) across a wide age range (20-88). Age correlated negatively with NART and QTR IQ for schizophrenic patients, but not for controls. A subset of 23 schizophrenic patients was also retested on the NART after 4 years to determine NART stability and they showed no significant change. We propose that the lower NART IQ in older patients reflects a lower 'starting point' and that this may be related to lower educational opportunities in older patients.

  17. A growth curve model of learning acquisition among cognitively normal older adults.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard N; Rosenberg, Adrienne L; Morris, John N; Allaire, Jason C; McCoy, Karin J M; Marsiske, Michael; Kleinman, Ken P; Rebok, George W; Malloy, Paul F

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to model recall and learning on the Auditory Verbal Learning Test using latent growth curve techniques. Participants were older adults recruited for the ACTIVE cognitive intervention pilot. A series of nested models revealed that an approximately logarithmic growth curve model provided optimal fit to the data. Although recall and learning factors were statistically uncorrelated, a fitted multivariate model suggested that initial recall was significantly associated with demographic characteristics but unrelated to health factors and cognitive abilities. Individual differences in learning were related to race/ethnicity, speed of processing, verbal knowledge, and global cognitive function level. These results suggest that failing to recognize initial recall and learning as distinct constructs clouds the interpretation of supraspan memory tasks.

  18. A GROWTH CURVE MODEL OF LEARNING ACQUISITION AMONG COGNITIVELY NORMAL OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard N.; Rosenberg, Adrienne L.; Morris, John N.; Allaire, Jason C.; McCoy, Karin J. M.; Marsiske, Michael; Kleinman, Ken P.; Rebok, George W.; Malloy, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to model recall and learning on the Auditory Verbal Learning Test using latent growth curve techniques. Participants were older adults recruited for the ACTIVE cognitive intervention pilot. A series of nested models revealed that an approximately logarithmic growth curve model provided optimal fit to the data. Although recall and learning factors were statistically uncorrelated, a fitted multivariate model suggested that initial recall was significantly associated with demographic characteristics but unrelated to health factors and cognitive abilities. Individual differences in learning were related to race/ethnicity, speed of processing, verbal knowledge, and global cognitive function level. These results suggest that failing to recognize initial recall and learning as distinct constructs clouds the interpretation of supraspan memory tasks. PMID:16036723

  19. Gonadectomy prior to puberty decreases normal parental behavior in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Kercmar, Jasmina; Snoj, Tomaz; Tobet, Stuart A.; Majdic, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones secreted by gonads influence development and expression of many behaviors including parental behaviors. The capacity to display many behaviors develops under the influence of sex steroid hormones; it begins with gonadal differentiation and lasts through puberty. The timing of gonadectomy may have important and long lasting effects on the organization and activation of neural circuits regulating the expression of different behaviors. The present study investigated the importance of exposure to endogenous gonadal steroid hormones during pubertal period/adolescence on parental behavior in adult mice. Male and female WT mice were gonadectomized either before puberty (25 days of age) or after puberty (60 days of age) and tested for parental behavior with and without estradiol benzoate (EB) replacement in adulthood. Additional groups of mice were gonadectomized at P25 and supplemented with estradiol (females) or testosterone (males) during puberty. Female mice gonadectomized after puberty or gonadectomized before puberty and supplemented with estradiol during puberty, displayed better pup directed parental behaviors in comparison to mice gonadectomized at 25 days of age regardless treatment with estradiol in adulthood. However, mice treated with EB in adulthood displayed better non-pup directed nest building behavior than when they were tested without EB treatment regardless of sex and time of gonadectomy. To examine whether the sensitivity to sex steroid hormones was altered due to differences in time without gonads prior to the testing, mice were also tested for female sex behavior and there were no differences between mice gonadectomized at P25 or P60, although this could not completely rule out the possibility that parental behavior is more sensitive to prolonged absence of steroid hormones than female sex behavior. These results suggest that the absence of gonads and thereby the absence of appropriate gonadal steroid hormones during puberty

  20. Human neural tuning estimated from compound action potentials in normal hearing human volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschooten, Eric; Desloovere, Christian; Joris, Philip X.

    2015-12-01

    The sharpness of cochlear frequency tuning in humans is debated. Evoked otoacoustic emissions and psychophysical measurements suggest sharper tuning in humans than in laboratory animals [15], but this is disputed based on comparisons of behavioral and electrophysiological measurements across species [14]. Here we used evoked mass potentials to electrophysiologically quantify tuning (Q10) in humans. We combined a notched noise forward masking paradigm [9] with the recording of trans tympanic compound action potentials (CAP) from masked probe tones in awake human and anesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta). We compare our results to data obtained with the same paradigm in cat and chinchilla [16], and find that CAP-Q10values in human are ˜1.6x higher than in cat and chinchilla and ˜1.3x higher than in monkey. To estimate frequency tuning of single auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) in humans, we derive conversion functions from ANFs in cat, chinchilla, and monkey and apply these to the human CAP measurements. The data suggest that sharp cochlear tuning is a feature of old-world primates.

  1. Uptake and distribution of hepatocyte growth factor in normal and regenerating adult rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, M. L.; Mars, W. M.; Zarnegar, R.; Michalopoulos, G. K.

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that systemically injected hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is primarily taken up by the liver. The present study shows that HGF injected systemically or through the portal circulation is retained primarily at periportal sites. The periportal retention of HGF seems to persist longer in regenerating liver. The percentage of the total HGF injected that was retained within the liver at 1 minute after injection varied with the dose. A maximal amount of 0.157 +/- 0.012 microgram of HGF per gram liver tissue is retained by normal liver. Analysis of the circulating form of HGF in the plasma showed a relative enrichment with time for the heterodimeric form of HGF. A portion of portally injected HGF, composed of both single chain and two chain (heterodimeric) form was excreted intact in the bile. This was found in both normal and regenerating liver. These studies show that the liver can sequester large amounts of HGF and that the sequestration occurs primarily at periportal sites. Our studies support the hypothesis that a nonlysosomal processing pathway for HGF is present in the liver. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8291602

  2. Association of Renal Manifestations with Serum Uric Acid in Korean Adults with Normal Uric Acid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Dong-Hyuk; Lee, Yong-Jae; Lee, Hye-Ree; Lee, Jung-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have reported that hyperuricemia is associated with the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Increasing evidences also suggest that hyperuricemia may have a pathogenic role in the progression of renal disease. Paradoxically, uric acid is also widely accepted to have antioxidant activity in experimental studies. We aimed to investigate the association between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and uric acid in healthy individuals with a normal serum level of uric acid. We examined renal function determined by GFR and uric acid in 3,376 subjects (1,896 men; 1,480 women; aged 20-80 yr) who underwent medical examinations at Gangnam Severance Hospital from November 2006 to June 2007. Determinants for renal function and uric acid levels were also investigated. In both men and women, GFR was negatively correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressures, fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, uric acid, log transformed C reactive protein, and log transformed triglycerides. In multivariate regression analysis, total uric acid was found to be an independent factor associated with estimated GFR in both men and women. This result suggests that uric acid appears to contribute to renal impairment in subjects with normal serum level of uric acid. PMID:21165292

  3. Uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 14 in two cases: An abnormal child and a normal adult

    SciTech Connect

    Papenhausen, P.R.; Mueller, O.T.; Sutcliffe, M.; Diamond, T.M.; Kousseff, B.G.; Johnson, V.P.

    1995-11-20

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) of a number of different chromosomes has been found in association with abnormal phenotypes. A growing body of evidence for an imprinting effect involving chromosome 14 has been accumulating. We report on a case of paternal UPD of chromosome 14 studied in late gestation due to polyhydramnios and a ventral wall hernia. A prenatal karyotype documented a balanced Robertsonian 14:14 translocation. The baby was born prematurely with hairy forehead, retrognathia, mild puckering of the lips and finger contractures. Hypotonia has persisted since birth and at age one year, a tracheostomy for laryngomalacia and gastrostomy for feeding remain necessary. Absence of maternal VNTR polymorphisms and homozygosity of paternal polymorphisms using chromosome 14 specific probes at D14S22 and D14S13 loci indicated paternal uniparental isodisomy (pUPID). Parental chromosomes were normal. We also report on a case of maternal LTPD in a normal patient with a balanced Robertsonian 14:14 translocation and a history of multiple miscarriages. Five previous reports of chromosome 14 UPD suggest that an adverse developmental effect may be more severe whenever the UPD is paternal in origin. This is the second reported patient with paternal UPD and the fifth reported with maternal UPD, and only few phenotypic similarities are apparent. Examination of these chromosome 14 UPD cases of maternal and paternal origin suggests that there are syndromic imprinting effects. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Analysis of IMP3 expression in normal and neoplastic human pituitary tissues.

    PubMed

    Righi, Alberto; Zhang, Shuya; Jin, Long; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Kovacs, Kalman; Kovacs, Gabor; Goth, Miklos I; Korbonits, Marta; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2010-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP3) is an oncofetal protein highly expressed in fetal tissue and malignant tumors but rarely found in adult benign tissues. In various tumors, IMP3 expression is correlated with increased tumor aggressiveness and reduced overall survival. To our knowledge, IMP3 expression has not been investigated in pituitary tumors. We analyzed the immunohistochemical expression of IMP3 in five normal pituitary tissues and 75 pituitary tumors (64 adenomas and 11 carcinomas) to determine if specific tumor types expressed IMP3 and if there were differences in IMP3 expression between adenomas and carcinomas. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that IMP3 was positive in four (80%) normal pituitaries with focal stain in a subset of normal anterior pituitary cells. IMP3 was expressed in 31% (20/64) of adenomas and in 36% (4/11) of carcinomas. A slightly higher level of IMP3 expression was observed in PRL-GH-TSH adenomas compared to the other types of pituitary adenomas. Expression of IMP3 was not significantly higher in carcinomas than in adenomas (p = 0.737). RT-PCR and Western Blotting supported the heterogeneous expression of IMP3. These results indicate that IMP3 is expressed both in normal and in neoplastic pituitary gland tissues without significant differences in expression levels in pituitary carcinomas. PMID:19898970

  5. Radiographic Comparison of Human Lung Shape During Normal Gravity and Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, D. B.; Friedman, P. J.; West, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Chest radiographs in five seated normal volunteers at 1 G and 0 G were made with a view toward comparing human lung shape during normal gravity and weightlessness. Lung shape was assessed by measuring lung heights and widths in upper, middle and lower lung regions. No significant differences were found between any of the 1-G and 0-G measurements, although there was a slight tendency for the lung to become shorter and wider at 0 G. The evidence that gravity causes regional differences in ventilation by direct action on the lung is consistent with the theoretical analysis of West and Matthews (1972).

  6. Hyperthermia and thermal tolerance in normal and ataxia telangiectasia human cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Azzam, E.I.

    1983-06-01

    Three normal human fibroblast strains, two human ataxia telangiectasia heterozygote cell strains, and two human ataxia telangiectasia homozygote cell strains were studied for their thermal responses between 41.0 and 46.0/sup 0/. The heat sensitivities of all cell strains were comparable, and all cell strains were relatively heat resistant compared to Chinese hamster cells. Both normal and ataxia telangiectasia human cells developed thermal tolerance during heating at temperatures less than or equal to 43/sup 0/ and during incubation at 37/sup 0/ after acute heating at 45.0/sup 0/. For survival measured down to the 5 to 10% level, heat survival curves for all seven human cell strains lacked shoulders, indicating the inability of such cells to accumulate sublethal heat damage. Analysis of the cell survival curve data by the method of Arrhenius showed that the thermal inactivation energies for human cells were 127 and 230 kcal/mol above and below the break at 43.5/sup 0/, respectively, and are about the same as for Chinese hamster cells and other animal cells, implying similar mechanisms of heat inactivation. Patients with AT are very radiosensitive, making radiotherapy in such patients difficult. Hyperthermia may provide an alternate means for cancer therapy in such patients.

  7. Heat shock protein 27 expression in the human testis showing normal and abnormal spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A; Assaf, Hanan A; Hussein, Mahmoud Rezk A

    2008-10-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones involved in protein folding, assembly and transport, and which play critical roles in the regulation of cell growth, survival and differentiation. We set out to test the hypothesis that HSP27 protein is expressed in the human testes and its expression varies with the state of spermatogenesis. HSP27 expression was examined in 30 human testicular biopsy specimens (normal spermatogenesis, maturation arrest and Sertoli cell only syndrome, 10 cases each) using immunofluorescent methods. The biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing investigations for infertility. The seminiferous epithelium of the human testes showing normal spermatogenesis had a cell type-specific expression of HSP27. HSP27 expression was strong in the cytoplasm of the Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, and Leydig cells. Alternatively, the expression was moderate in the spermatocytes, weak in the spermatids and absent in the spermatozoa. In testes showing maturation arrest, HSP27 expression was strong in the Sertoli cells, weak in the spermatogonia, and spermatocytes. It was absent in the spermatids and Leydig cells. In Sertoli cell only syndrome, HSP27 expression was strong in the Sertoli cells and absent in the Leydig cells. We report for the first time the expression patterns of HSP27 in the human testes and show differential expression during normal spermatogenesis, indicating a possible role in this process. The altered expression of this protein in testes showing abnormal spermatogenesis may be related to the pathogenesis of male infertility.

  8. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Murakami, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Okano, Teruo

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. {yields} The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. {yields} Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  9. Speech Recognition in Real-Life Background Noise by Young and Middle-Aged Adults with Normal Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Tae; Heo, Hye Jeong; Choi, Chul-Hee; Choi, Seong Hee; Lee, Kyungjae

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives People usually converse in real-life background noise. They experience more difficulty understanding speech in noise than in a quiet environment. The present study investigated how speech recognition in real-life background noise is affected by the type of noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and age. Subjects and Methods Eighteen young adults and fifteen middle-aged adults with normal hearing participated in the present study. Three types of noise [subway noise, vacuum noise, and multi-talker babble (MTB)] were presented via a loudspeaker at three SNRs of 5 dB, 0 dB, and -5 dB. Speech recognition was analyzed using the word recognition score. Results 1) Speech recognition in subway noise was the greatest in comparison to vacuum noise and MTB, 2) at the SNR of -5 dB, speech recognition was greater in subway noise than vacuum noise and in vacuum noise than MTB while at the SNRs of 0 and 5 dB, it was greater in subway noise than both vacuum noise and MTB and there was no difference between vacuum noise and MTB, 3) speech recognition decreased as the SNR decreased, and 4) young adults showed better speech recognition performance in all types of noises at all SNRs than middle-aged adults. Conclusions Speech recognition in real-life background noise was affected by the type of noise, SNR, and age. The results suggest that the frequency distribution, amplitude fluctuation, informational masking, and cognition may be important underlying factors determining speech recognition performance in noise. PMID:26185790

  10. Intermodal timing relations and audio-visual speech recognition by normal-hearing adults.

    PubMed

    McGrath, M; Summerfield, Q

    1985-02-01

    Audio-visual identification of sentences was measured as a function of audio delay in untrained observers with normal hearing; the soundtrack was replaced by rectangular pulses originally synchronized to the closing of the talker's vocal folds and then subjected to delay. When the soundtrack was delayed by 160 ms, identification scores were no better than when no acoustical information at all was provided. Delays of up to 80 ms had little effect on group-mean performance, but a separate analysis of a subgroup of better lipreaders showed a significant trend of reduced scores with increased delay in the range from 0-80 ms. A second experiment tested the interpretation that, although the main disruptive effect of the delay occurred on a syllabic time scale, better lipreaders might be attempting to use intermodal timing cues at a phonemic level. Normal-hearing observers determined whether a 120-Hz complex tone started before or after the opening of a pair of liplike Lissajou figures. Group-mean difference limens (70.7% correct DLs) were - 79 ms (sound leading) and + 138 ms (sound lagging), with no significant correlation between DLs and sentence lipreading scores. It was concluded that most observers, whether good lipreaders or not, possess insufficient sensitivity to intermodal timing cues in audio-visual speech for them to be used analogously to voice onset time in auditory speech perception. The results of both experiments imply that delays of up to about 40 ms introduced by signal-processing algorithms in aids to lipreading should not materially affect audio-visual speech understanding.

  11. Reduced hippocampal activity during encoding in cognitively normal adults carrying the APOE ε4 allele

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Maheen M.; Hutchinson, J. Benjamin; Shelton, Amy; Wagner, Anthony D.; Taylor, Joy L.

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4-related differences in memory performance have been detected before age 65. The hippocampus and the surrounding medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures are the first site affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the MTL is the seat of episodic memory, including visuo-spatial memory. While reports of APOE ε4-related differences in these brain structures are not consistent in either cross-sectional or longitudinal structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, there is increasing evidence that brain activity at baseline (defined as activity during fixation or rest) may differ in APOE ε4 carriers compared to non-carriers. In this fMRI study, cognitively normal APOE ε4 carriers and non-carriers engaged in a perspective-dependent spatial learning task (Shelton and Gabrieli, 2002) previously shown to activate MTL structures in older participants (Borghesani et al., 2008). A low-level, visually engaging dot-control task was used for comparison, in addition to fixation. APOE ε4 carriers showed less activation than non-carriers in the hippocampus proper during encoding. Specifically, when spatial encoding was contrasted against the dot-control task, encoding-related activation was significantly lower in carriers than non-carriers. By contrast, no ε4-related differences in the hippocampus were found when spatial encoding was compared with fixation. Lower activation, however, was not global since encoding-related activation in early visual cortex (left lingual gyrus) was not different between APOE ε4 carriers and non-carriers. The present data document APOE ε4-related differences in the hippocampus proper during encoding and underscore the role of low-level control contrasts for complex encoding tasks. These results have implications for fMRI studies that investigate the default-mode network (DMN) in middle -aged to older APOE ε4 carriers to help evaluate AD risk in this otherwise cognitively normal population. PMID

  12. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism is normal in young adults with Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.L.; Kumar, A.; Herscovitch, P.; Haxby, J.V.; Moore, A.M.; White, B.; Friedland, R.P.; Rapoport, S.I. )

    1990-03-01

    Regional CMRglc (rCMRglc) values were measured with ({sup 18}F)2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET), using a Scanditronix PC-1024-7B scanner, in 14 healthy, noninstitutionalized subjects with trisomy 21 (Down syndrome; DS) (mean age 30.0 years, range 25-38 years) and in 13 sex-matched, healthy volunteers (mean age 29.5 years, range 22-38 years). In the DS group, mean mental age on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test was 7.8 years and dementia was not present. Resting rCMRglc was determined with eyes covered and ears occluded in a quiet, darkened room. Global gray CMRglc equaled 8.76 +/- 0.76 mg/100 g/min (mean +/- SD) in the DS group as compared with 8.74 +/- 1.19 mg/100 g/min in the control group (p greater than 0.05). Gray matter regional measurements also did not differ between groups. The ratio of rCMRglc to global CMRglc, calculated to reduce the variance associated with absolute rCMRglc, and right/left ratios did not show any consistent differences. These results show that healthy young DS adults do not have alterations in regional or global brain glucose metabolism, as measured with 18FDG and PET, prior to an age at which the neuropathological changes in Alzheimer disease are reported to occur.

  13. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  14. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  15. FTIR microscopic comparative study on normal, premalignant, and malignant tissues of human intenstine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordechai, Shaul; Argov, Shmuel; Salman, Ahmad O.; Cohen, Beny; Ramesh, Jagannathan; Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Goldstein, Jed; Sinelnikov, Igor

    2000-07-01

    Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) employs a unique approach to optical diagnosis of tissue pathology based on the characteristic molecular vibrational spectra of the tissue. The architectural changes in the cellular and sub-cellular levels developing in abnormal tissue, including a majority of cancer forms, manifest themselves in different optical signatures, which can be detected in infrared spectroscopy. The biological systems we have studied include normal, premalignant (polyp) and malignant human colonic tissues from three patients. Our method is based on microscopic infrared study (FTIR-microscopy) of thin tissue specimens and a direct comparison with normal histopathological analysis, which serves as a `gold' reference. The normal intestine tissue has a stronger absorption than polyp and cancerous types over a wide region in all three cases. The detailed analysis showed that there is a significant decrease in total phosphate and creatine contents for polyp and cancerous tissue types in comparison to the controls.

  16. Expression of CD1d protein in human testis showing normal and abnormal spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A; Abdelwahed Hussein, Mahmoud-Rezk

    2011-05-01

    CD1d is a member of CD1 family of transmembrane glycoproteins, which represent antigen-presenting molecules. Immunofluorescent staining methods were utilized to examine expression pattern of CD1d in human testicular specimens. In testis showing normal spermatogenesis, a strong CD1d cytoplasmic expression was seen the Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, and Leydig cells. A moderate expression was observed in the spermatocytes. In testes showing maturation arrest, CD1d expression was strong in the Sertoli cells and weak in spermatogonia and spermatocytes compared to testis with normal spermatogenesis. In Sertoli cell only syndrome, CD1d expression was strong in the Sertoli and Leydig cells. This preliminary study displayed testicular infertility-related changes in CD1d expression. The ultrastructural changes associated with with normal and abnormal spermatogenesis are open for further investigations.

  17. Ethanolic Extracts of California Mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana Besser) Are Cytotoxic against Normal and Cancerous Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Somaweera, Himali; Lai, Gary C.; Blackeye, Rachel; Littlejohn, Beverly; Kirksey, Justine; Aguirre, Richard M.; LaPena, Vince; Pasqua, Anna; Hintz, Mary McCarthy

    2013-01-01

    California mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana Besser) is used by many tribes throughout California to treat a variety of conditions, including colds, allergies, and pain. California mugwort is also utilized as women’s medicine. Its use is on the rise outside of Native communities, often without the guidance of a traditional healer or experienced herbalist. Because it has been shown to have antiproliferative activity against plant and animal cells, we investigated whether California mugwort extracts have an effect on normal human cells as well as estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and estrogen receptor negative (ER−) human breast cancer cells. Ethanolic and aqueous extracts of A. douglasiana leaves were tested for cytotoxicity against unstimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC), as well as against an ER+ human breast cancer cell line (BT-474) and an ER− human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). An ethanolic leaf extract killed hPBMC, BT-474, and MDA-MB-231 cells with IC50 values of 23.6 ± 0.3, 27 ± 5, and 37 ± 4 μg/ml, respectively. An aqueous extract killed hPBMC with an IC50 value of 60 ± 10 μg/ml, but had no effect on the two cancer cell lines at concentrations up to 100 μg/ml. The results of this study indicate that the cytotoxicity of California mugwort extends to normal human cells, as well as cancerous cells. Therefore, until further is known about the safety of this medicine, caution should be taken when consuming extracts of California mugwort, whether as a tincture or as a tea. PMID:24073389

  18. Hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase 2B1b expression and localization in normal human brain

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Emily D.; Faye-Petersen, Ona; Falany, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    Steroid sulfonation in the human brain has not been well characterized. The major sulfotransferase (SULT) isoforms that conjugate steroids in humans are SULT1E1, SULT2A1, and SULT2B1b. SULT2B1b catalyzes the sulfonation of 3β-hydroxysteroids, including neurosteroids dehydroepiandrosterone and pregnenolone, as well as cholesterol and several hydroxycholesterols. SULT2B1b mRNA and protein expression were detected in adult and fetal human brain sections, whereas neither mRNA, nor protein expression were identified for SULT1E1 or SULT2A1. Using immunohistochemical analysis, SULT2B1b expression was detected in neurons and oligodendrocytes in adult brain and in epithelial tissues in 28-week-old fetal brain. Sulfonation of cholesterol, oxysterols, and neurosteroids in the brain is apparently catalyzed by SULT2B1b since expression of neither SULT2A1 nor SULT1E1 was detected in human brain sections. SULT2B1b mRNA and protein were also detected in human U373-MG glioblastoma cells. Both mRNA and protein expression of liver X receptor (LXR)-β, but not LXR-α, were detected in U373-MG cells, and LXR-β activation resulted in a decrease in SULT2B1b protein expression. Since hydroxycholesterols are important physiological LXR activators, this suggests a role for regulation of sterol metabolism by LXR and SULT2B1b. Therefore, elucidating key enzymes in the metabolism of cholesterol and neurosteroids could help define the properties of steroid conjugation in the human brain. PMID:24683427

  19. Neuropeptide Y in the adult and fetal human pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Badiu, Corin

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y was isolated from the porcine brain in 1982 and shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals. The peptide has been demonstrated to be present in sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the pineal gland in many mammalian species. In this investigation, we show by use of immunohistochemistry that neuropeptide Y is present in nerve fibers of the adult human pineal gland. The fibers are classical neuropeptidergic fibers endowed with large boutons en passage and primarily located in a perifollicular position with some fibers entering the pineal parenchyma inside the follicle. The distance from the immunoreactive terminals to the pinealocytes indicates a modulatory function of neuropeptide Y for pineal physiology. Some of the immunoreactive fibers might originate from neurons located in the brain and be a part of the central innervation of the pineal gland. In a series of human fetuses, neuropeptide Y-containing nerve fibers was present and could be detected as early as in the pineal of four- to five-month-old fetuses. This early innervation of the human pineal is different from most rodents, where the innervation starts postnatally.

  20. Morning and Evening Blue-Enriched Light Exposure Alters Metabolic Function in Normal Weight Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ivy N.; Zee, Phyllis C.; Shalman, Dov; Malkani, Roneil G.; Kang, Joseph; Reid, Kathryn J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to associations between light-dark exposure patterns, feeding behavior, and metabolism. This study aimed to determine the acute effects of 3 hours of morning versus evening blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light on hunger, metabolic function, and physiological arousal. Nineteen healthy adults completed this 4-day inpatient protocol under dim light conditions (<20lux). Participants were randomized to 3 hours of blue-enriched light exposure on Day 3 starting either 0.5 hours after wake (n = 9; morning group) or 10.5 hours after wake (n = 10; evening group). All participants remained in dim light on Day 2 to serve as their baseline. Subjective hunger and sleepiness scales were collected hourly. Blood was sampled at 30-minute intervals for 4 hours in association with the light exposure period for glucose, insulin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and area under the curve (AUC) for insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR and cortisol were calculated. Comparisons relative to baseline were done using t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs. In both the morning and evening groups, insulin total area, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-IR AUC were increased and subjective sleepiness was reduced with blue-enriched light compared to dim light. The evening group, but not the morning group, had significantly higher glucose peak value during blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light. There were no other significant differences between the morning or the evening groups in response to blue-enriched light exposure. Blue-enriched light exposure acutely alters glucose metabolism and sleepiness, however the mechanisms behind this relationship and its impacts on hunger and appetite regulation remain unclear. These results provide further support for a role of environmental light exposure in the regulation of metabolism. PMID:27191727

  1. Morning and Evening Blue-Enriched Light Exposure Alters Metabolic Function in Normal Weight Adults.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ivy N; Zee, Phyllis C; Shalman, Dov; Malkani, Roneil G; Kang, Joseph; Reid, Kathryn J

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to associations between light-dark exposure patterns, feeding behavior, and metabolism. This study aimed to determine the acute effects of 3 hours of morning versus evening blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light on hunger, metabolic function, and physiological arousal. Nineteen healthy adults completed this 4-day inpatient protocol under dim light conditions (<20lux). Participants were randomized to 3 hours of blue-enriched light exposure on Day 3 starting either 0.5 hours after wake (n = 9; morning group) or 10.5 hours after wake (n = 10; evening group). All participants remained in dim light on Day 2 to serve as their baseline. Subjective hunger and sleepiness scales were collected hourly. Blood was sampled at 30-minute intervals for 4 hours in association with the light exposure period for glucose, insulin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and area under the curve (AUC) for insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR and cortisol were calculated. Comparisons relative to baseline were done using t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs. In both the morning and evening groups, insulin total area, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-IR AUC were increased and subjective sleepiness was reduced with blue-enriched light compared to dim light. The evening group, but not the morning group, had significantly higher glucose peak value during blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light. There were no other significant differences between the morning or the evening groups in response to blue-enriched light exposure. Blue-enriched light exposure acutely alters glucose metabolism and sleepiness, however the mechanisms behind this relationship and its impacts on hunger and appetite regulation remain unclear. These results provide further support for a role of environmental light exposure in the regulation of metabolism. PMID:27191727

  2. Propagation of oestrogen receptor-positive and oestrogen-responsive normal human breast cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J.; Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Klitgaard, Marie Christine; Hopkinson, Branden M.; Petersen, Ole William; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the susceptibility of oestrogen receptor-positive (ERpos) normal human breast epithelial cells (HBECs) for clinical purposes or basic research awaits a proficient cell-based assay. Here we set out to identify markers for isolating ERpos cells and to expand what appear to be post-mitotic primary cells into exponentially growing cultures. We report a robust technique for isolating ERpos HBECs from reduction mammoplasties by FACS using two cell surface markers, CD166 and CD117, and an intracellular cytokeratin marker, Ks20.8, for further tracking single cells in culture. We show that ERpos HBECs are released from growth restraint by small molecule inhibitors of TGFβ signalling, and that growth is augmented further in response to oestrogen. Importantly, ER signalling is functionally active in ERpos cells in extended culture. These findings open a new avenue of experimentation with normal ERpos HBECs and provide a basis for understanding the evolution of human breast cancer. PMID:26564780

  3. Human skin fibroblast stromelysin: structure, glycosylation, substrate specificity, and differential expression in normal and tumorigenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, S.M.; Collier, I.E.; Kronberger, A.; Eisen, A.Z.; Marmer, B.L.; Grant, G.A.; Bauer, E.A.; Goldberg, G.I.

    1987-10-01

    The authors have purified and determined the complete primary structure of human stromelysin, a secreted metalloprotease with a wide range of substrate specificities. Human stromelysin is synthesized in a preproenzyme form with a calculated size of 53,977 Da and a 17-amino acid long signal peptide. Prostromelysin is secreted in two forms, with apparent molecular masses on NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE of 60 and 57 kDa. Human stromelysin is capable of degrading proteoglycan, fibronectin, laminin, and type IV collagen but not interstitial type I collagen. The enzyme is not capable of activating purified human fibroblast procollagenase. Analysis of its primary structure shows that stromelysin is in all likelihood the human analog of rat transin, which is an oncogene transformation-induced protease. The pattern of enzyme expression in normal and tumorigenic cells revealed that human skin fibroblasts in vitro secrete stromelysin constitutively. Human fetal lung fibroblasts transformed with simian virus 40, human bronchial epithelial cells transformed with the ras oncogene, fibrosarcoma cells (HT-1080), and a melanoma cell strain (A 2058), do not express this protease nor can the enzyme be induced in these cells by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The data indicate that the expression and the possible involvement of secreted metalloproteases in tumorigenesis result from a specific interaction between the transforming factor and the target cell, which may vary in different species.

  4. 3D Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model of Persistent VZV Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  5. Amount, avidity, and specificity of antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in normal human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Grzybowski, J; Trafny, E A; Wrembel-Wargocka, J; Patzer, J; Dzierzanowska, D; Zawistowska-Marciniak, I; Kłos, M

    1989-01-01

    Seventy-two normal human sera from healthy blood donors were tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in order to determine the amounts and avidities of immunoglobulins M and G antibodies to lipopolysaccharides of seven Fisher's immunotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and to exotoxin A. The patterns of specificity for seven immunotypes in all individual sera were determined. These data show a predominance of antibodies directed to Fisher's immunotypes 7 and 4 in the human population tested and may reflect frequency of occurrence of immunotypes outside the hospital environment. PMID:2502560

  6. System parameters for erythropoiesis control model: Comparison of normal values in human and mouse model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The computer model for erythropoietic control was adapted to the mouse system by altering system parameters originally given for the human to those which more realistically represent the mouse. Parameter values were obtained from a variety of literature sources. Using the mouse model, the mouse was studied as a potential experimental model for spaceflight. Simulation studies of dehydration and hypoxia were performed. A comparison of system parameters for the mouse and human models is presented. Aside from the obvious differences expected in fluid volumes, blood flows and metabolic rates, larger differences were observed in the following: erythrocyte life span, erythropoietin half-life, and normal arterial pO2.

  7. A simple procedure for the purification of eosinophil peroxidase from normal human blood.

    PubMed

    Menegazzi, R; Zabucchi, G; Patriarca, P

    1986-07-24

    A simple procedure to purify human eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) is described. The method uses pure anucleated granule-rich eosinophil fragments (cytosomes) as a suitable starting material from which EPO can be quickly isolated. The enzyme obtained by this procedure has both the biochemical and the spectral properties of EPO and shows a reasonable degree of purity, as judged by its rz value. This procedure, besides its simplicity and reproducibility, offers at least two other advantages over the methods currently used for EPO purification, the possibility of isolating EPO from small amounts of normal human blood and a very high recovery of the enzyme activity.

  8. Complementary antioxidant function of caffeine and green tea polyphenols in normal human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jagdeo, Jared; Brody, Neil

    2011-07-01

    The study of free radicals is particularly relevant in the context of human skin carcinogenesis and photoaging because of these oxidants' ability to induce DNA mutations and produce lipid peroxidation byproducts, including 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE). Therefore, it is important to identify and evaluate agents with the ability to modulate intracellular free radicals and HNE. The purpose of this research is to investigate the ability of antioxidants green tea polyphenols (GTPs) and caffeine, alone and in combination, to modulate the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced upregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) free radicals and HNE in normal human skin fibroblast WS-1 cells in vitro. GTPs and caffeine were selected for evaluation because these compounds have demonstrated antioxidative properties in various skin models. Furthermore, GTPs and caffeine share a close natural botanical association as caffeine is present in green tea, as well. Hydrogen peroxide is a well-known generator of free radicals that is produced during endogenous and UV-induced oxidation processes in human skin and was used to upregulate ROS and HNE in normal human fibroblast WS-1 cells. Using a flow cytometry-based assay, the results demonstrate that at 0.001% concentration, green tea polyphenols alone, and in combination with 0.1 mM caffeine, inhibited the upregulation of H2O2-generated free radicals and HNE in human skin fibroblasts in vitro. Caffeine alone demonstrated limited anti-oxidant properties.

  9. Polymorphism of the long-wavelength cone in normal human colour vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitz, Jay; Jacobs, Gerald H.

    1986-10-01

    Colour vision is based on the presence of multiple classes of cone each of which contains a different type of photopigment1. Colour matching tests have long revealed that the normal human has three cone types. Results from these tests have also been used to provide estimates of cone spectral sensitivities2. There are significant variations in colour matches made by individuals whose colour vision is classified as normal3-6. Some of this is due to individual differences in preretinal absorption and photopigment density, but some is also believed to arise because there is variation in the spectral positioning of the cone pigments among those who have normal colour vision. We have used a sensitive colour matching test to examine the magnitude and nature of this individual variation and here report evidence for the existence of two different long-wavelength cone mechanisms in normal humans. The different patterns of colour matches made by male and female subjects indicate these two mechanisms are inherited as an X-chromosome linked trait.

  10. Intraepithelial lymphocytes in normal human intestine do not express proteins associated with cytolytic function.

    PubMed Central

    Chott, A.; Gerdes, D.; Spooner, A.; Mosberger, I.; Kummer, J. A.; Ebert, E. C.; Blumberg, R. S.; Balk, S. P.

    1997-01-01

    Human small intestine contains a very large population of intraepithelial T lymphocytes (IELs) that are oligoclonal, appear functionally to be cytolytic T cells, and may contribute to the normal and pathological turnover of intestinal epithelial cells. This report addresses the cytolytic function of IELs in normal small intestine by examining their expression of molecules that carry out cell-mediated cytolysis. Immunohistochemical analyses of granzyme B, perforin, Fas ligand, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha demonstrated these proteins were not expressed by small intestinal IELs in situ. These proteins also were not expressed by colonic IELs or by lamina propria lymphocytes in the small or large intestine. Granzyme A, however, was expressed by a large fraction of IELs. In contrast to these in situ results, isolated and in vitro activated IELs were shown to express effector proteins consistent with cytolytic T cells, including granzyme B, Fas ligand, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma. These results are most consistent with the vast majority of IELs in normal human small intestine being resting cytolytic T cells and suggest that these cells do not contribute to the apoptotic cell death of epithelial cells in normal intestine. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9250156

  11. Expression of matricellular proteins in human uterine leiomyomas and normal myometrium.

    PubMed

    Bogusiewicz, Michal; Semczuk, Andrzej; Juszczak, Malgorzata; Langner, Ewa; Walczak, Katarzyna; Rzeski, Wojciech; Tomaszewski, Jacek; Rechberger, Tomasz

    2012-11-01

    Growth of human leiomyomas can probably be initiated as a response to injury, in a way similar to the development of keloids. Among many bioactive molecules, which are implicated in tissue repair, a pivotal role is attributed to matricellular proteins. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of tenascin-C (TNC), thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), SPARC/osteonectin and tenascin-X (TNX) in human uterine leiomyomas and normal myometrium. Immunostaining was performed on 33 pairs of paraffin-fixed sections and 9 cell-lines derived from uterine leiomyomas and normal myometrium. Fifteen (45.5%) leiomyomas investigated were positive for TNC, whereas all normal myometrial samples were immunonegative (χ²=19.41; p<0.001). Immunostaining for TSP-1 was observed in 20 (60.6%) uterine fibroids and in 12 (36.4%) control samples (χ²=3.88; p<0.05). The expression of SPARC/osteonectin protein was more frequently found in leiomyomas than in normal myometrium, but this difference was not significant. Apart from one fibroid culture and one myometrial culture, all the others revealed strong TNC immunostaining. Expression of TSP-1 and SPARC/osteonectin was weak to moderate in all established cell-lines. None of the tissues or cell lines investigated showed positive staining for TNX. In conclusion, TSP-1 and TNC are likely to play important roles in the pathogenesis of uterine leiomyomas, presumably affecting cell proliferation and/or extracellular matrix deposition.

  12. Loss of p53 induces epidermal growth factor receptor promoter activity in normal human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bheda, A; Creek, KE; Pirisi, L

    2008-01-01

    Overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in human papillomavirus type 16-immortalized human keratinocytes (HKc) is caused by the viral oncoprotein E6, which targets p53 for degradation. We have previously observed that expression of p53 RNAi in normal HKc is associated with an increase in EGFR mRNA and protein. We now report that p53 RNAi induces EGFR promoter activity up to approximately 10-fold in normal HKc, and this effect does not require intact p53 binding sites on the EGFR promoter. Exogenous wild-type p53 inhibits the EGFR promoter at low levels, and activates it at higher concentrations. Yin Yang 1 (YY1), which negatively regulates p53, induces EGFR promoter activity, and this effect is augmented by p53 RNAi. Intact p53 binding sites on the EGFR promoter are not required for activation by YY1. In addition, Sp1 and YY1 synergistically induce the EGFR promoter in normal HKc, indicating that Sp1 may recruit YY1 as a co-activator. Wild-type p53 suppressed Sp1- and YY1-mediated induction of the EGFR promoter. We conclude that acute loss of p53 in normal HKc induces EGFR expression bya mechanism that involves YY1 and Sp1 and does not require p53 binding to the EGFR promoter. PMID:18391986

  13. Gustatory reaction time to various sweeteners in human adults.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Kato, T; Matsuo, R; Kawamura, Y; Yoshida, M

    1985-09-01

    Reaction times to recognize the sweet taste of 12 sweeteners at various concentrations were measured in 48 human adults. The reaction time (T) decreased with increasing concentration (C) of each sweetener applied to the anterior dorsal tongue. The relationships between T and C, and T and logC were well described by a rectangular hyperbola formula for each of the 12 sweeteners. Reaction times to discriminate sweet taste quality between pairs of sweeteners were measured, then a similarity index was calculated. Factor analysis based on correlation coefficients between pairs of sweeteners which were obtained by the similarity indices has indicated classification of the sweeteners. Sucrose, fructose, glucose, maltose, sorbitol and aspartame tend to group together. Na-cyclamate and Na-saccharin form another group. DL-alanine, stevioside and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone are rather independent and do not belong to any group.

  14. Molecular prognostic markers for adult acute myeloid leukemia with normal cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Tara K; Wald, David; Chen, Yichu; Vermaat, Johanna M; Xiong, Yin; Tse, William

    2009-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogenous disorder that results from a block in the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells along with uncontrolled proliferation. In approximately 60% of cases, specific recurrent chromosomal aberrations can be identified by modern cytogenetic techniques. This cytogenetic information is the single most important tool to classify patients at their initial diagnosis into three prognostic categories: favorable, intermediate, and poor risk. Currently, favorable risk AML patients are usually treated with contemporary chemotherapy while poor risk AML patients receive allogeneic stem cell transplantation if suitable stem cell donors exist. The largest subgroup of AML patients (~40%) have no identifiable cytogenetic abnormalities and are classified as intermediate risk. The optimal therapeutic strategies for these patients are still largely unclear. Recently, it is becoming increasingly evident that it is possible to identify a subgroup of poorer risk patients among those with normal cytogenic AML (NC-AML). Molecular risk stratification for NC-AML patients may be possible due to mutations of NPM1, FLT3, MLL, and CEBPα as well as alterations in expression levels of BAALC, MN1, ERG, and AF1q. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm if poorer risk NC-AML patients have improved clinical outcomes after more aggressive therapy. PMID:19490647

  15. Categorization of common sounds by cochlear implanted and normal hearing adults.

    PubMed

    Collett, E; Marx, M; Gaillard, P; Roby, B; Fraysse, B; Deguine, O; Barone, P

    2016-05-01

    Auditory categorization involves grouping of acoustic events along one or more shared perceptual dimensions which can relate to both semantic and physical attributes. This process involves both high level cognitive processes (categorization) and low-level perceptual encoding of the acoustic signal, both of which are affected by the use of a cochlear implant (CI) device. The goal of this study was twofold: I) compare the categorization strategies of CI users and normal hearing listeners (NHL) II) investigate if any characteristics of the raw acoustic signal could explain the results. 16 experienced CI users and 20 NHL were tested using a Free-Sorting Task of 16 common sounds divided into 3 predefined categories of environmental, musical and vocal sounds. Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA) and Hierarchical Clustering based on Principal Components (HCPC) show that CI users followed a similar categorization strategy to that of NHL and were able to discriminate between the three different types of sounds. However results for CI users were more varied and showed less inter-participant agreement. Acoustic analysis also highlighted the average pitch salience and average autocorrelation peak as being important for the perception and categorization of the sounds. The results therefore show that on a broad level of categorization CI users may not have as many difficulties as previously thought in discriminating certain kinds of sound; however the perception of individual sounds remains challenging. PMID:27050944

  16. Body composition analyses by air displacement plethysmography in adults ranging from normal weight to extremely obese

    PubMed Central

    Hames, Kazanna C.; Anthony, Steven J.; Thornton, John C.; Gallagher, Dympna; Goodpaster, Bret H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare body composition parameters estimated by air displacement plethysmography (ADP) to dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in body mass index (BMI) classifications that include extremely obese (BMI≥40.0kg/m2), and to examine if differences between analyses were influenced by BMI. Design and Methods Fat free mass (FFM,kg), fat mass (FM,kg) and body fat (BF,%) were analyzed with both technologies. Results All outcome measures of ADP and DXA were highly correlated (r≥0.95,P<0.001 for FFM, FM and BF), but Bland-Altman analyses revealed significant bias (P<0.01 for all). ADP estimated greater FFM and lower FM and BF (P<0.01 for all). BMI explained 27% of the variance in differences between FFM measurements (P<0.001), and 37% and 33% of the variances in differences between FM and BF measurements, respectively (P<0.001 for both). Within normal weight and overweight classifications, ADP estimated greater FFM and lower FM and BF (P<0.001 for all), but the opposite occurred within the extremely obese classification; ADP estimated lower FFM and greater FM and BF (P<0.05 for all). Conclusions Body composition analyses by the two technologies were strongly congruent, but systematically different and influenced by BMI. Caution should be taken when utilizing ADP to estimate body composition parameters over a wide range of BMI classifications that include extremely obese. PMID:24170704

  17. Amyloid and metabolic PET imaging of cognitively normal adults with Alzheimer’s parents

    PubMed Central

    Mosconi, Lisa; Rinne, Juha O.; Tsui, Wai H.; Murray, John; Li, Yi; Glodzik, Lidia; McHugh, Pauline; Williams, Schantel; Cummings, Megan; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Scheinin, Noora; Viljanen, Tapio; Nagren, Kjell; de Leon, Mony J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between fibrillar amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposition and reduced glucose metabolism, a proxy for neuronal dysfunction, in cognitively normal (NL) individuals with a parent affected by late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Forty-seven 40–80 year-old NL received Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with 11C-Pittsburgh Compund B (PiB) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). These included 19 NL with a maternal history (MH), 12 NL with a paternal history (PH), and 16 NL with negative family history of AD (NH). Automated regions-of-interest, statistical parametric mapping, voxel-wise inter-modality correlations and logistic regressions were used to examine cerebral-to-cerebellar PiB and FDG standardized uptake value ratios across groups. The MH group showed higher PiB retention and lower metabolism in AD-regions compared to NH and PH, which were negatively correlated in posterior cingulate, frontal and parieto-temporal regions (Pearson r≤−0.57, P≤0.05). No correlations were observed in NH and PH. The combination of Aβ deposition and metabolism yielded accuracy ≥69% for MH vs NH and ≥71% for MH vs PH, with relative risk =1.9–5.1 (P’s≤0.005). NL with AD-affected mothers show co-occurring Aβ increases and hypometabolism in AD-vulnerable regions, suggesting an increased risk for AD. PMID:22503001

  18. Amyloid and metabolic positron emission tomography imaging of cognitively normal adults with Alzheimer's parents.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, Lisa; Rinne, Juha O; Tsui, Wai H; Murray, John; Li, Yi; Glodzik, Lidia; McHugh, Pauline; Williams, Schantel; Cummings, Megan; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Scheinin, Noora; Viljanen, Tapio; Någren, Kjell; de Leon, Mony J

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition and reduced glucose metabolism, a proxy for neuronal dysfunction, in cognitively normal (NL) individuals with a parent affected by late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). Forty-seven 40-80-year-old NL received positron emission tomography (PET) with (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG). These included 19 NL with a maternal history (MH), 12 NL with a paternal history (PH), and 16 NL with negative family history of AD (NH). Automated regions of interest, statistical parametric mapping, voxel-wise intermodality correlations, and logistic regressions were used to examine cerebral-to-cerebellar PiB and FDG standardized uptake value ratios across groups. The MH group showed higher PiB retention and lower metabolism in AD regions compared with NH and PH, which were negatively correlated in posterior cingulate, frontal, and parieto-temporal regions (Pearson r ≤ -0.57, p ≤ 0.05). No correlations were observed in NH and PH. The combination of Aβ deposition and metabolism yielded accuracy ≥ 69% for MH vs. NH and ≥ 71% for MH vs. PH, with relative risk = 1.9-5.1 (p values < 0.005). NL individuals with AD-affected mothers show co-occurring Aβ increases and hypometabolism in AD-vulnerable regions, suggesting an increased risk for AD.

  19. Transcriptional repression in normal human keratinocytes by wild-type and mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Salas, L M; Velazquez, A; Lopez-Bayghen, E; Woodworth, C D; Garrido, E; Gariglio, P; DiPaolo, J A

    1995-05-01

    Wild-type p53 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that inhibits cell proliferation and represses transcriptionally most TATA box-containing promoters in transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. This study demonstrates that p53 alters transcription of the long control region (LCR) of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18). Wild-type and mutant p53 143Val to Ala repressed the HPV-18 LCR promoter in normal human keratinocytes, the natural host cell for HPV infections. Repression by wild-type p53 was also observed in C-33A cells and in an HPV-16-immortalized cell line with an inducible wild-type p53. However, when C-33A cells were cotransfected with the HPV-18 LCR and mutant 143Val to Ala, repression did not occur. Mutant p53 135Cys to Ser did not induce repression in either normal human keratinocytes or in the C-33A line; although like 143Val to Ala, it is thought to affect the DNA binding activity of the wild-type protein. The ability of mutant p53 143Val to Ala to inactivate the HPV early promoter in normal cells (by approximately 60% reduction) suggests that this mutant may be able to associate with wild-type p53 and interact with TATA box-binding proteins. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the transcriptional activities of p53 mutants may be dependent upon the cell type assayed and the form of its endogenous p53. Furthermore, normal human keratinocytes represent an alternative model for determining the activities of p53 mutants.

  20. Bone morphogenetic protein-6 is a marker of serous acinar cell differentiation in normal and neoplastic human salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Heikinheimo, K A; Laine, M A; Ritvos, O V; Voutilainen, R J; Hogan, B L; Leivo, I V; Heikinheimo, A K

    1999-11-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-6, also known as vegetal-pale-gene-related and decaplentaplegic-vegetal-related) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of multifunctional signaling molecules. BMP-6 appears to play various biological roles in developing tissues, including regulation of epithelial differentiation. To study the possible involvement of BMP-6 in normal and neoplastic human salivary glands, we compared its mRNA and protein expression in 4 fetal and 15 adult salivary glands and in 22 benign and 32 malignant salivary gland tumors. In situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis indicated that BMP-6 transcripts are expressed at low levels in acinar cells of adult submandibular glands but not in ductal or stromal cells. BMP-6 was immunolocated specifically in serous acini of parotid and submandibular glands. None was found in primitive fetal acini or any other types of cell in adult salivary glands, including mucous acini and epithelial cells of intercalated, striated, and excretory ducts. All 16 cases of acinic cell carcinoma consistently exhibited cytoplasmic BMP-6 staining in the acinar tumor cells. Other cell types in these tumors, including intercalated duct-like cells, clear, vacuolated cells, and nonspecific glandular cells, exhibited no cytoplasmic BMP-6 staining. Other benign and malignant salivary gland tumors lacked BMP-6 immunoreactivity, except in areas of squamous differentiation. The results indicate that in salivary glands, BMP-6 expression is uniquely associated with acinar cell differentiation and suggest that BMP-6 may play a role in salivary gland function. More importantly, our experience of differential diagnostic problems related to salivary gland tumors suggests that the demonstration of consistent and specific BMP-6 immunoreactivity in acinic cell carcinoma is likely to be of clinical value.

  1. Novel Observations From Next-Generation RNA Sequencing of Highly Purified Human Adult and Fetal Islet Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, David M; Nowosielska, Anetta; Afik, Shaked; Pechhold, Susanne; Cura, Anthony J; Kennedy, Norman J; Kim, Soyoung; Kucukural, Alper; Davis, Roger J; Kent, Sally C; Greiner, Dale L; Garber, Manuel G; Harlan, David M; diIorio, Philip

    2015-09-01

    Understanding distinct gene expression patterns of normal adult and developing fetal human pancreatic α- and β-cells is crucial for developing stem cell therapies, islet regeneration strategies, and therapies designed to increase β-cell function in patients with diabetes (type 1 or 2). Toward that end, we have developed methods to highly purify α-, β-, and δ-cells from human fetal and adult pancreata by intracellular staining for the cell-specific hormone content, sorting the subpopulations by flow cytometry, and, using next-generation RNA sequencing, we report the detailed transcriptomes of fetal and adult α- and β-cells. We observed that human islet composition was not influenced by age, sex, or BMI, and transcripts for inflammatory gene products were noted in fetal β-cells. In addition, within highly purified adult glucagon-expressing α-cells, we observed surprisingly high insulin mRNA expression, but not insulin protein expression. This transcriptome analysis from highly purified islet α- and β-cell subsets from fetal and adult pancreata offers clear implications for strategies that seek to increase insulin expression in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25931473

  2. Evidence for keratin proteins in normal and abnormal human meibomian fluids.

    PubMed

    Ong, B L; Hodson, S A; Wigham, T; Miller, F; Larke, J R

    1991-12-01

    Hyperkeratinization of meibomian glands has been postulated to cause gland dysfunction. Recent investigations on rabbits show that keratin proteins are indeed present in the meibomian fluids of these animals. In this report we present our findings on the presence of these water-insoluble proteins in human meibomian secretions. 6 anti-cytokeratin antibodies, CK8, 18, 19, CK7, CK8, CK14, CK19 and AE1/AE3 were used against the keratin proteins expressed from the human meibomian fluids. Using the immunoblotting (dot blot) technique, abnormal waxy meibomian fluids obtained from subjects diagnosed to have meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) were compared to normal clear meibomian fluids. The results show that keratins are present in a higher concentration (10%) in the abnormal human meibomian excreta as compared to the normals. Even though the presence of protein markers for keratinization in the abnormal meibomian excreta were not shown, the increased presence of keratin proteins in the abnormal meibomian fluids suggests that, in MGD patients, hyperkeratinization of ductal epithelium may have taken place. More keratin proteins (possibly those of higher molecular weights) were produced in addition to the keratin proteins normally produced by the duct epithelium. The increased amount of keratin proteins in the abnormal meibomian fluids may be explained by the susceptibility of duct epithelium to undergo the process of hyperkeratinization as postulated by other researchers.

  3. Human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive cell walls of normal intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Toivanen, P

    1999-01-01

    The normal microbiota plays an important role in the health of the host, but little is known of how the human immune system recognizes and responds to Gram-positive indigenous bacteria. We have investigated cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to Gram-positive cell walls (CW) derived from four common intestinal indigenous bacteria, Eubacterium aerofaciens (Eu.a.), Eubacterium limosum(Eu.l.), Lactobacillus casei(L.c.), and Lactobacillus fermentum (L.f.). Our results indicate that Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota can induce cytokine responses of the human PBMC. The profile, level and kinetics of these responses are similar to those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CW derived from a pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes (S.p.). Bacterial CW are capable of inducing production of a proinflammatory cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and an anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, but not that of IL-4 or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Monocytes are the main cell population in PBMC to produce TNF-α and IL-10. Induction of cytokine secretion is serum-dependent; both CD14-dependent and -independent pathways are involved. These findings suggest that the human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota are similar to those induced by LPS or Gram-positive CW of the pathogens. PMID:10540188

  4. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as a negative regulator of normal human erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Zamai, L; Secchiero, P; Pierpaoli, S; Bassini, A; Papa, S; Alnemri, E S; Guidotti, L; Vitale, M; Zauli, G

    2000-06-15

    The impact of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) on normal hematopoietic development was investigated using adult peripheral blood CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells, induced to differentiate along the erythroid, megakaryocytic, granulocytic, and monocytic lineages by the addition of specific cytokine cocktails. TRAIL selectively reduced the number of erythroblasts, showing intermediate levels of glycophorin A (glycophorin A(interm)) surface expression, which appeared in liquid cultures supplemented with stem cell factor + interleukin 3 + erythropoietin at days 7-10. However, neither immature (day 4) glycophorin A(dim) erythroid cells nor mature (day 14) glycophorin A(bright) erythroblasts were sensitive to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Moreover, pre-exposure to TRAIL significantly decreased the number and size of erythroid colonies in semisolid assays. These adverse effects of TRAIL were selective for erythropoiesis, as TRAIL did not significantly influence the survival of cells differentiating along the megakaryocytic, granulocytic, or monocytic lineages. Furthermore, TRAIL was detected by Western blot analysis in lysates obtained from normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. These findings indicate that TRAIL acts in a lineage- and stage of differentiation-specific manner, as a negative regulator of normal erythropoiesis. (Blood. 2000;95:3716-3724) PMID:10845902

  5. Darkness during early postnatal development is required for normal circadian patterns in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Cambras, T; Canal, M M; Cernuda-Cernuda, R; García-Fernández, J M; Díez-Noguera, A

    2015-03-01

    Early light experience influences the brain during development. Perinatal light exposure has an important effect on the development of the circadian system, although the role of quantity versus quality of light in this process is still unclear. We tested the development of the circadian rhythm of locomotor activity under constant bright light from the day of weaning, of six groups of rats raised under different light conditions during suckling. Results indicated that when rats received daily darkness during suckling (rats reared under constant darkness or light-dark cycles with dim or bright light) became arrhythmic when exposed to continuous bright light after weaning. However, those rats reared in the absence of darkness (constant dim or bright light, or alternating dim and bright light) developed a circadian rhythm, which was stronger and had a shorter period depending on the quantity of light received during suckling. Vasointestinal polypeptide immunoreactivity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) was higher in those rats with weaker rhythms. However, no apparent differences among these groups were found in the melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells, which provide the SCN with light input in the photoentrainment process. When bright light was shifted to dim light in three of the groups on day 57 after weaning, all of them generated a circadian rhythm with a longer period in those rats previously arrhythmic. Our results indicate the importance of the amount of light received at the early stages of life in the development of the circadian system and suggest that darkness is needed for the normal development of circadian behaviour.

  6. Plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults administered aspartame in capsules or solution: lack of bioequivalence.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Bell, E F; Ziegler, E E

    1987-05-01

    Some clinical studies require administration of test compounds in capsules to assure that the compound cannot be distinguished from a placebo. This raises the question of whether the pharmacokinetic responses produced by capsule administration are similar to values obtained when test compounds are ingested in solution. To test this, plasma phenylalanine and aspartate concentrations were compared in ten normal subjects ingesting 3 g aspartame in solution and in capsules in a balanced Latin square design. Peak plasma phenylalanine levels were significantly higher (191 +/- 65.4 v 117 +/- 39.5 mumol/L, mean +/- SD) and were reached significantly earlier (32 +/- 15 v 123 +/- 74 minutes) when aspartame was administered in solution than when it was administered in capsules. The area under the four-hour plasma phenylalanine concentration-time curve was significantly higher (15,340 +/- 4,820 v 8,465 +/- 3,356 mumol/L X min) when aspartame was ingested in solution. Administration in solution also produced a significantly higher ratio of plasma phenylalanine concentration to the sum of the plasma concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids (0.36 +/- 0.12 v 0.23 +/- 0.06). Similarly, peak plasma aspartate concentrations were significantly higher 26.2 +/- 16.3 v 10.4 +/- 5.0 mumol/L) and were reached significantly earlier (30 +/- 14 v 106 +/- 61.3 min) when aspartame was administered in solution. The data indicate different plasma phenylalanine and aspartate pharmacokinetics between solution and capsule administration of aspartame.

  7. Audiovisual spoken word training can promote or impede auditory-only perceptual learning: prelingually deafened adults with late-acquired cochlear implants versus normal hearing adults

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Lynne E.; Eberhardt, Silvio P.; Auer, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    Training with audiovisual (AV) speech has been shown to promote auditory perceptual learning of vocoded acoustic speech by adults with normal hearing. In Experiment 1, we investigated whether AV speech promotes auditory-only (AO) perceptual learning in prelingually deafened adults with late-acquired cochlear implants. Participants were assigned to learn associations between spoken disyllabic C(=consonant)V(=vowel)CVC non-sense words and non-sense pictures (fribbles), under AV and then AO (AV-AO; or counter-balanced AO then AV, AO-AV, during Periods 1 then 2) training conditions. After training on each list of paired-associates (PA), testing was carried out AO. Across all training, AO PA test scores improved (7.2 percentage points) as did identification of consonants in new untrained CVCVC stimuli (3.5 percentage points). However, there was evidence that AV training impeded immediate AO perceptual learning: During Period-1, training scores across AV and AO conditions were not different, but AO test scores were dramatically lower in the AV-trained participants. During Period-2 AO training, the AV-AO participants obtained significantly higher AO test scores, demonstrating their ability to learn the auditory speech. Across both orders of training, whenever training was AV, AO test scores were significantly lower than training scores. Experiment 2 repeated the procedures with vocoded speech and 43 normal-hearing adults. Following AV training, their AO test scores were as high as or higher than following AO training. Also, their CVCVC identification scores patterned differently than those of the cochlear implant users. In Experiment 1, initial consonants were most accurate, and in Experiment 2, medial consonants were most accurate. We suggest that our results are consistent with a multisensory reverse hierarchy theory, which predicts that, whenever possible, perceivers carry out perceptual tasks immediately based on the experience and biases they bring to the task. We

  8. Glycosaminoglycan metabolism and cytokine release in normal and otosclerotic human bone cells interleukin-1 treated.

    PubMed

    Bodo, M; Carinci, P; Venti, G; Giammarioli, M; Donti, E; Stabellini, G; Paludetti, G; Becchetti, E

    1997-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), normal components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), and the glycosidases, that degrade them, play a key role in the bone remodelling process. The effects of interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) on GAG metabolism in normal and otosclerotic human bone cells as well as its capacity to modulate IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 secretion in both populations was analyzed. The amount of radiolabeled GAGs was lower in otosclerotic than in normal bone cells. IL-1 alpha reduced newly synthesized cellular and extracellular GAGs in normal cells, but only those of the cellular compartment in otosclerotic bone cells. It depressed heparan sulphate (HS) more in normal cells and chondroitin sulphate (CS) more in otosclerotic bone cells. The HA/total sulphated GAG ratio was shifted in favour of the latter in otosclerotic cells, whereas the opposite effect was seen after IL-1 alpha treatment. There was little difference in the beta-D-glucuronidase levels of the normal and pathological cells, while beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase was significantly increased in otosclerotic bone cells. As the activity of neither enzyme was modified by treatment with IL-1 alpha, the cytokine seems to exert its influences on GAG synthesis rather than on the degradation process. IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 secretion was markedly higher in otosclerotic cells. IL-1 alpha modulated the secretion of each interleukin differently, thus resulting in a cytokine cascade that may act in autocrine/paracrine manner on target cells. The authors suggest that changes in the cytokine network may have a specific, yet still unknown, role during normal and pathological osteogenesis.

  9. Does silent reading speed in normal adult readers depend on early visual processes? evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Korinth, Sebastian Peter; Sommer, Werner; Breznitz, Zvia

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship of reading speed and early visual processes in normal readers. Here we examined the association of the early P1, N170 and late N1 component in visual event-related potentials (ERPs) with silent reading speed and a number of additional cognitive skills in a sample of 52 adult German readers utilizing a Lexical Decision Task (LDT) and a Face Decision Task (FDT). Amplitudes of the N170 component in the LDT but, interestingly, also in the FDT correlated with behavioral tests measuring silent reading speed. We suggest that reading speed performance can be at least partially accounted for by the extraction of essential structural information from visual stimuli, consisting of a domain-general and a domain-specific expertise-based portion.

  10. Effects of consumption of caloric vs noncaloric sweet drinks on indices of hunger and food consumption in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Canty, D J; Chan, M M

    1991-05-01

    This study examined the effects of aspartame, saccharin, and sucrose on hunger and food intake. Twenty normal adults consumed a standard breakfast followed 3 h later by 200 mL of either water or a sweetened drink. One hour later, subjects' ad libitum consumption of a standardized lunch was measured. Subjects recorded self-assessments of hunger-related indices every half hour on visual analogue scales (VAS). ANOVA with repeated measures showed a significant effect of drink type on VAS scores 15 and 45 min after drinks were consumed but not for other times or for lunch consumption. Hunger-related ratings after drink consumption were generally highest for water, lower for noncaloric sweeteners (NCSs), and lowest for sugar. Pairwise comparisons of means showed that only the ratings for sugar and water were significantly different. The results show that, under the conditions of this study, NCSs do not increase hunger or food intake.

  11. Urinary excretion of 5-L-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid) is increased in normal adults consuming vegetarian or low protein diets.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A A; Persaud, C; Meakins, T S; Bundy, R

    1996-11-01

    A method for measuring 5-L-oxoproline in urine, which involves isolation by short-column chromatography, acid hydrolysis to glutamic acid and enzymic assay of glutamic acid, was used to measure the rate of excretion in normal adults, aged 20 to 45 y. There was no difference in the daily excretion between omnivorous males (217 micromol/d) and females (195 micromol/d). In vegetarian males, urinary 5-L-oxoproline (404 micromol/d) was significantly greater than in vegetarian females (267 micromol/d, P = 0.013). Compared with omnivorous males or females, excretion of 5-L-oxoproline was significantly greater in vegetarian males (P < 0.0001) and females (P= 0.005). When normal adults consumed a diet in which the protein content was controlled at either 4.0 or 6.2 g N/d for 5 d, there was a significant increase in urinary 5-L-oxoproline on d 5, compared with either d 1 or 4. There was a significant inverse linear relationship between the increased urinary 5-L-oxoproline on the fifth dietary day and the nitrogen content of the diet. On the basis of this relationship, when the urinary excretion of 5-L-oxoproline (320 micromol/d) for vegetarians was predicted from an estimate of their dietary intake of nitrogen, the estimate was, on average, close to the measured value (345 micromol/d). As a matter of course, vegetarians excrete more 5-L-oxoproline in urine than do omnivores, and we speculated that this difference might be accounted for by differences in dietary nitrogen and the endogenous capacity for de novo synthesis of glycine.

  12. Imaging of Keratoconic and normal human cornea with a Brillouin imaging system (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besner, Sebastien; Shao, Peng; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Pineda, Roberto; Yun, Seok-Hyun (Andy)

    2016-03-01

    Keratoconus is a degenerative disorder of the eye characterized by human cornea thinning and morphological change to a more conical shape. Current diagnosis of this disease relies on topographic imaging of the cornea. Early and differential diagnosis is difficult. In keratoconus, mechanical properties are found to be compromised. A clinically available invasive technique capable of measuring the mechanical properties of the cornea is of significant importance for understanding the mechanism of keratoconus development and improve detection and intervention in keratoconus. The capability of Brillouin imaging to detect local longitudinal modulus in human cornea has been demonstrated previously. We report our non-contact, non-invasive, clinically viable Brillouin imaging system engineered to evaluate mechanical properties human cornea in vivo. The system takes advantage of a highly dispersive 2-stage virtually imaged phased array (VIPA) to detect weak Brillouin scattering signal from biological samples. With a 1.5-mW light beam from a 780-nm single-wavelength laser source, the system is able to detect Brillouin frequency shift of a single point in human cornea less than 0.3 second, at a 5μm/30μm lateral/axial resolution. Sensitivity of the system was quantified to be ~ 10 MHz. A-scans at different sample locations on a human cornea with a motorized human interface. We imaged both normal and keratoconic human corneas with this system. Whereas no significantly difference were observed outside keratocnic cones compared with normal cornea, a highly statistically significantly decrease was found in the cone regions.

  13. Taste Bud-Derived BDNF Is Required to Maintain Normal Amounts of Innervation to Adult Taste Buds.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingbin; Ohman-Gault, Lisa; Ma, Liqun; Krimm, Robin F

    2015-01-01

    Gustatory neurons transmit chemical information from taste receptor cells, which reside in taste buds in the oral cavity, to the brain. As adult taste receptor cells are renewed at a constant rate, nerve fibers must reconnect with new taste receptor cells as they arise. Therefore, the maintenance of gustatory innervation to the taste bud is an active process. Understanding how this process is regulated is a fundamental concern of gustatory system biology. We speculated that because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for taste bud innervation during development, it might function to maintain innervation during adulthood. If so, taste buds should lose innervation when Bdnf is deleted in adult mice. To test this idea, we first removed Bdnf from all cells in adulthood using transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Ubiquitin promoter. When Bdnf was removed, approximately one-half of the innervation to taste buds was lost, and taste buds became smaller because of the loss of taste bud cells. Individual taste buds varied in the amount of innervation each lost, and those that lost the most innervation also lost the most taste bud cells. We then tested the idea that that the taste bud was the source of this BDNF by reducing Bdnf levels specifically in the lingual epithelium and taste buds. Taste buds were confirmed as the source of BDNF regulating innervation. We conclude that BDNF expressed in taste receptor cells is required to maintain normal levels of innervation in adulthood.

  14. Age related differences in reaction time components and diffusion properties of normal-appearing white matter in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiqin; Bender, Andrew R; Raz, Naftali

    2015-01-01

    Deterioration of the white matter (WM) is viewed as the neural substrate of age differences in speed of information processing (reaction time, RT). However, the relationship between WM and RT components is rarely examined in healthy aging. We assessed the relationship between RT components derived from the Ratcliff diffusion model and micro-structural properties of normal-appearing WM (NAWM) in 90 healthy adults (age 18-82 years). We replicated all major extant findings pertaining to age differences in RT components and WM: lower drift rate, greater response conservativeness, longer non-decision time, lower fractional anisotropy (FA), greater mean (MD), axial (AD) and radial (RD) diffusivity were associated with advanced age. Age differences in anterior regions of the cerebral WM exceeded those in posterior regions. However, the only relationship between RT components and WM was the positive association between DR in the body of the corpus callosum and non-decision time. Thus, in healthy adults, age differences in NAWM diffusion properties are not a major contributor to age differences in RT components. Longitudinal studies with more precise and specific estimates of regional myelin content and evaluation of the contribution of age-related vascular risk factors are necessary to understand cerebral substrates of age-related cognitive slowing.

  15. Taste Bud-Derived BDNF Is Required to Maintain Normal Amounts of Innervation to Adult Taste Buds123

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingbin; Ohman-Gault, Lisa; Ma, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gustatory neurons transmit chemical information from taste receptor cells, which reside in taste buds in the oral cavity, to the brain. As adult taste receptor cells are renewed at a constant rate, nerve fibers must reconnect with new taste receptor cells as they arise. Therefore, the maintenance of gustatory innervation to the taste bud is an active process. Understanding how this process is regulated is a fundamental concern of gustatory system biology. We speculated that because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for taste bud innervation during development, it might function to maintain innervation during adulthood. If so, taste buds should lose innervation when Bdnf is deleted in adult mice. To test this idea, we first removed Bdnf from all cells in adulthood using transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Ubiquitin promoter. When Bdnf was removed, approximately one-half of the innervation to taste buds was lost, and taste buds became smaller because of the loss of taste bud cells. Individual taste buds varied in the amount of innervation each lost, and those that lost the most innervation also lost the most taste bud cells. We then tested the idea that that the taste bud was the source of this BDNF by reducing Bdnf levels specifically in the lingual epithelium and taste buds. Taste buds were confirmed as the source of BDNF regulating innervation. We conclude that BDNF expressed in taste receptor cells is required to maintain normal levels of innervation in adulthood. PMID:26730405

  16. Taste Bud-Derived BDNF Is Required to Maintain Normal Amounts of Innervation to Adult Taste Buds.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingbin; Ohman-Gault, Lisa; Ma, Liqun; Krimm, Robin F

    2015-01-01

    Gustatory neurons transmit chemical information from taste receptor cells, which reside in taste buds in the oral cavity, to the brain. As adult taste receptor cells are renewed at a constant rate, nerve fibers must reconnect with new taste receptor cells as they arise. Therefore, the maintenance of gustatory innervation to the taste bud is an active process. Understanding how this process is regulated is a fundamental concern of gustatory system biology. We speculated that because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for taste bud innervation during development, it might function to maintain innervation during adulthood. If so, taste buds should lose innervation when Bdnf is deleted in adult mice. To test this idea, we first removed Bdnf from all cells in adulthood using transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Ubiquitin promoter. When Bdnf was removed, approximately one-half of the innervation to taste buds was lost, and taste buds became smaller because of the loss of taste bud cells. Individual taste buds varied in the amount of innervation each lost, and those that lost the most innervation also lost the most taste bud cells. We then tested the idea that that the taste bud was the source of this BDNF by reducing Bdnf levels specifically in the lingual epithelium and taste buds. Taste buds were confirmed as the source of BDNF regulating innervation. We conclude that BDNF expressed in taste receptor cells is required to maintain normal levels of innervation in adulthood. PMID:26730405

  17. Range of motion, muscle length, and balance performance in older adults with normal, pronated, and supinated feet

    PubMed Central

    Justine, Maria; Ruzali, Dhiya; Hazidin, Ezzaty; Said, Aisyah; Bukry, Saiful Adli; Manaf, Haidzir

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the lower limb joint range of motion and muscle length between different types of foot posture, and determine the correlation of range of motion and muscle length with balance performance. [Subjects and Methods] Ninety individuals (age, 65.2±4.6 years) were assessed using the Foot Posture Index to determine their type of foot (Normal [0 to +5], pronated [+6 to +9], and supinated [−1 to −4]; n=30 per group). The range of motion (goniometer), muscle length (goniometer and tape measure), and balance performance (functional reach test and four square step test) were measured for each participant. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman’s rank-order correlation. [Results] No significant differences were found in range of motion, muscle length, and balance performance among different types of foot posture, except for right and left ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. Balance performance was significantly correlated with selected muscle length and range of motion, especially in the supinated foot. [Conclusion] Range of motion and muscle length of the lower limb may be associated with balance performance in older adults with foot deformities. These findings may guide physiotherapists in choosing intervention based on specific assessments for older adults with foot deformity. PMID:27134384

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Ceftaroline in Normal Body Weight and Obese (Classes I, II, and III) Healthy Adult Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Justo, Julie Ann; Mayer, Stockton M.; Pai, Manjunath P.; Soriano, Melinda M.; Danziger, Larry H.; Novak, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of ceftaroline has not been well characterized in obese adults. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in 32 healthy adult volunteers aged 18 to 50 years in the normal, overweight, and obese body size ranges. Subjects were evenly assigned to 1 of 4 groups based on their body mass index (BMI) and total body weight (TBW) (ranges, 22.1 to 63.5 kg/m2 and 50.1 to 179.5 kg, respectively). Subjects in the lower-TBW groups were matched by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and serum creatinine to the upper-BMI groups. Serial plasma and urine samples were collected over 12 h after the start of the infusion, and the concentrations of ceftaroline fosamil (prodrug), ceftaroline, and ceftaroline M-1 (inactive metabolite) were assayed. Noncompartmental and population pharmacokinetic analyses were used to evaluate the data. The mean plasma ceftaroline maximum concentration and area under the curve were ca. 30% lower in subjects with a BMI of ≥40 kg/m2 compared to those <30 kg/m2. A five-compartment pharmacokinetic model with zero-order infusion and first-order elimination optimally described the plasma concentration-time profiles of the prodrug and ceftaroline. Estimated creatinine clearance (eCLCR) and TBW best explained ceftaroline clearance and volume of distribution, respectively. Although lower ceftaroline plasma concentrations were observed in obese subjects, Monte Carlo simulations suggest the probability of target attainment is ≥90% when the MIC is ≤1 μg/ml irrespective of TBW or eCLCR. No dosage adjustment for ceftaroline appears to be necessary based on TBW alone in adults with comparable eCLCR. Confirmation of these findings in infected obese patients is necessary to validate these findings in healthy volunteers. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01648127.) PMID:25896707

  19. Popcorn is more satiating than potato chips in normal-weight adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Strategies that may increase compliance to reduced energy intakes are needed to reduce the health burden of obesity. Conflicting evidence exists regarding the effects of snacking on satiety and energy intake. Methods This study compared short-term satiety from two common snack foods, low fat popcorn or potato chips. Using a counterbalanced within-subject design, 35 normal weight non-smoking participants (17 men, 18 women) ages 20–50 years (mean age 33 ± 11, BMI 23 ± 2 kg/m2) consumed four conditions each: 200 mL of water (control), one cup (4 g, 15 kcal) popcorn, 6 cups (27 g, 100 kcal) popcorn, and one cup (28 g, 150 kcal) potato chips, each with 200 mL water. Participants rated their hunger, satisfaction, prospective consumption, and thirst on 100 mm visual analogue scales 30 minutes after commencement of snack consumption. In addition, post-snack energy intake from an ad libitum meal (amount served less amount remaining) was measured, and the test food and meal combined energy intake and energy compensation were calculated. Results Participants expressed less hunger, more satisfaction, and lower estimates of prospective food consumption after six cups of popcorn compared to all other treatments (P < 0.05). Energy compensation was 220% ± 967%, 76% ± 143% and 42% ± 75% after one cup popcorn, six cups popcorn and one cup potato chips, respectively. Combined energy intake was significantly greater (P < 0.01) during the potato chips condition (803 ± 277 kcal) compared to control (716 ± 279 kcal) or popcorn conditions (698 ± 286 kcal for one cup and 739 ± 294 kcal for six cups). Combined energy intakes from both popcorn conditions were not significantly different than control (p > 0.05). Conclusion Popcorn exerted a stronger effect on short-term satiety than did potato chips as measured by subjective ratings and energy intake at a subsequent meal. This, combined with its relatively low calorie load

  20. Anti-galactose antibodies do not bind to normal human red cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.M.B.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the possibility that senescent cell IgG might have an anti-galactose (anti-gal) specificity as suggested by others. Anti-gal was isolated from normal human serum with ..cap alpha.. melibiose-agarose. The assays used were hemagglutination, rosetting, phagocytosis, and /sup 125/I protein A binding assay, immunoblotting, and glycine/HCL, pH 2.3, versus sugar elutions. Results revealed binding of anti-gal to rabbit but not human RBC. Immunoblotting of anti-gal revealed labeling of approx.29 bands in rabbit red cell membranes and no labeling of autologous human red cell membranes. The authors attempted to inhibit binding of anti-gal with various sugars. Melibiose caused enhancement rather than inhibition of agglutination when used at concentrations reported by previous investigators to cause inhibition. Neither ..cap alpha.. melibiose or galactose caused inhibition of phagocytosis of senescent cells. Senescent cell IgG was not displaced from freshly isolated old red cells by incubation with melibiose or galactose as determined by an /sup 125/I protein A binding assay. The authors were also unable to elute IgG from stored red cells with galactose. The authors conclude that senescent cell IgG does not have an anti-galactose specificity. The authors were unable to demonstrate an anti-gal antibody to normal human red cells.

  1. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shuhei; Murphy, Conleth G.; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Jasin, Maria; Moynahan, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR), a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold) and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold). Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications. PMID:27428646

  2. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shuhei; Murphy, Conleth G; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Jasin, Maria; Moynahan, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR), a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold) and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold). Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications. PMID:27428646

  3. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    DOE PAGES

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection.more » Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.« less

  4. Comprehensive cellular‐resolution atlas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Royall, Joshua J.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A.C.; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet‐Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A.; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A.; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L.; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A.; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W.; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H. Ronald; Hohmann, John G.; Jones, Allan R.; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Fischl, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole‐brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high‐resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion‐weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large‐format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto‐ and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127–3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27418273

  5. Comprehensive cellular-resolution atlas of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Ding, Song-Lin; Royall, Joshua J; Sunkin, Susan M; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A C; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H Ronald; Hohmann, John G; Jones, Allan R; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Hof, Patrick R; Fischl, Bruce; Lein, Ed S

    2016-11-01

    Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole-brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high-resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large-format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto- and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127-3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27418273

  6. Comprehensive cellular-resolution atlas of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Ding, Song-Lin; Royall, Joshua J; Sunkin, Susan M; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A C; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H Ronald; Hohmann, John G; Jones, Allan R; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Hof, Patrick R; Fischl, Bruce; Lein, Ed S

    2016-11-01

    Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole-brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high-resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large-format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto- and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127-3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.

  8. Behaviour of Solitary Adult Scandinavian Brown Bears (Ursus arctos) when Approached by Humans on Foot

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Gro Kvelprud; Støen, Ole-Gunnar; Sahlén, Veronica; Swenson, Jon E.

    2012-01-01

    Successful management has brought the Scandinavian brown bear (Ursus arctos L.) back from the brink of extinction, but as the population grows and expands the probability of bear-human encounters increases. More people express concerns about spending time in the forest, because of the possibility of encountering bears, and acceptance for the bear is decreasing. In this context, reliable information about the bear's normal behaviour during bear-human encounters is important. Here we describe the behaviour of brown bears when encountering humans on foot. During 2006–2009, we approached 30 adult (21 females, 9 males) GPS-collared bears 169 times during midday, using 1-minute positioning before, during and after the approach. Observer movements were registered with a handheld GPS. The approaches started 869±348 m from the bears, with the wind towards the bear when passing it at approximately 50 m. The bears were detected in 15% of the approaches, and none of the bears displayed any aggressive behaviour. Most bears (80%) left the initial site during the approach, going away from the observers, whereas some remained at the initial site after being approached (20%). Young bears left more often than older bears, possibly due to differences in experience, but the difference between ages decreased during the berry season compared to the pre-berry season. The flight initiation distance was longer for active bears (115±94 m) than passive bears (69±47 m), and was further affected by horizontal vegetation cover and the bear's age. Our findings show that bears try to avoid confrontations with humans on foot, and support the conclusions of earlier studies that the Scandinavian brown bear is normally not aggressive during encounters with humans. PMID:22363710

  9. Calcium currents and transients in co-cultured contracting normal and Duchenne muscular dystrophy human myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Imbert, Nathalie; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Duport, Gérard; Raymond, Guy; Hassoni, Abdul A; Constantin, Bruno; Cullen, Michael J; Cognard, Christian

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate differences in calcium movements between normal and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) human contracting myotubes co-cultured with explants of rat spinal cord with attached dorsal root ganglia. Membrane potential, variations of intracellular calcium concentration and T- and L-type calcium currents were recorded. Further, a descriptive and quantitative study by electron microscopy of the ultrastructure of the co-cultures was carried out. The resting membrane potential was slightly less negative in DMD (−61.4 ± 1.1 mV) than in normal myotubes (−65.5 ± 0.9 mV). Both types of myotube displayed spontaneous action potentials (mean firing frequency, 0.42 and 0.16 Hz, respectively), which triggered spontaneous calcium transients measured with Indo-1. The time integral under the spontaneous Ca2+ transients was significantly greater in DMD myotubes (97 ± 8 nm s) than in normal myotubes (67 ± 13 nm s). The L- and T-type current densities estimated from patch-clamp recordings were smaller in DMD cells (2.0 ± 0.5 and 0.90 ± 0.19 pA pF−1, respectively) than in normal cells (3.9 ± 0.7 and 1.39 ± 0.30 pA pF−1, respectively). The voltage-dependent inactivation relationships revealed a shift in the conditioning potential at which inactivation is half-maximal (Vh,0.5) of the T- and L-type currents towards less negative potentials, from −72.1 ± 0.7 and −53.7 ± 1.5 mV in normal cells to −61.9 ± 1.4 and −29.2 ± 1.4 mV in DMD cells, respectively. Both descriptive and quantitative studies by electron microscopy suggested a more advanced development of DMD myotubes as compared to normal ones. This conclusion was supported by the significantly larger capacitance of the DMD myotubes (408 ± 45 pF) than of the normal myotubes (299 ± 34 pF) of the same apparent size. Taken together, these results show that differences in T- and L-type calcium currents between normal and DMD myotubes cannot simply explain all observed

  10. Antigens of human trophoblasts: A working hypothesis for their role in normal and abnormal pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, W. Page; Temple, Anne; Lovins, R. E.; Smith, Nancy

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the preparation and characterization of antisera to human trophoblast membranes. Rabbit antisera were raised to trophoblast microvilli prepared by differential ultracentrifugation. Antibodies to serum proteins were removed by solid-phase immunoabsorption with normal human serum, and indirect immunofluorescence experiments with cryostat sections of human placentas showed that the absorbed anti-trophoblast sera reacted with trophoblasts as well as with stromal cells and endothelium of chorionic villi. The antisera also produced membrane fluorescence when studied on viable lymphocytes and certain human cell lines. These anti-trophoblast sera were also lymphocytotoxic, and this reaction was abolished by prior absorption of the antisera with leukocytes. The leukocyte-absorbed anti-trophoblast sera retained their ability to react with trophoblasts and certain human cell lines, but no longer reacted with lymphocytes or placental stromal cells and endothelium. Two categories of trophoblast membrane antigens are thus defined: one present on trophoblasts and certain human cells lines (tentatively designated TA1), and the other on trophoblasts and lymphocytes, villous fibroblasts, and endothelium (tentatively designated TA2). A working hypothesis is proposed stating that normal pregnancy involves the generation of anti-TA2 subsequent to blastocyst implantation and entrance of trophoblasts into the maternal circulation. This involves a mechanism similar to allogeneic cell stimulation and results in antibodies that block either the recognition or cytotoxicity of TA1. Failure to mount this response allows TA1 recognition and trophoblast immunopathology. Experimental and clinical studies in support of this working hypothesis, particularly involving abortion and toxemia, are cited from published reports. Images PMID:273921

  11. The measurement of intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity in human tumours and normal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, Patricia Ann

    Human tumour and normal cell radiosensitivity are thought to be important factors determining the response of tumour and normal tissues to radiotherapy, respectively. Clonogenic assays are the standard method for measuring radiosensitivity but they are of limited applicability for clinical use with fresh human tumours. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the Adhesive Tumour Cell Culture System (ATCCS), as a method for measuring the radiosensitivity of human tumours. A soft agar clonogenic assay, the modified Courtenay-Mills assay, was used as a standard to compare with the ATCCS. The demonstration that fibroblast contamination could occur with both assay methods led to the investigation of a new technique for removing unwanted fibroblasts from tumour cell suspensions and to the use of a multiwell assay for measuring fibroblast radiosensitivity. Established tumour cell lines were used to validate and optimise the ATCCS. Success rates with human tumour biopsy specimens were initially poor with both assay methods but further modifications led to success rates of ~70%. In a comparison of the modified Courtenay-Mills assay and the ATCCS there was close agreement between the measurements of surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) for established tumour cell lines but with primary tumour cultures the SF2 values were significantly lower in the ATCCS. The main limitations of the ATCCS for clinical use were inter-experimental variability and fibroblast contamination. Using antibody-coated magnetic beads as a method for removing fibroblasts from tumour cell suspensions, some selectivity for fibroblasts was shown, but the specificity was too low for this method to be of value in its current form. The multiwell assay was found to be a satisfactory method for measuring fibroblast radiosensitivity although inter-experimental variability may limit its clinical use as a predictive test for normal tissue damage in patients.

  12. Human lymphocyte surface immunoglobulin capping. Normal characteristics and anomalous behavior of chronic lymphocytic leukemic lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, H J

    1975-01-01

    The phenomenon of redistribution of surface membrane immunoglobulin (Ig) components (capping) has been well described in mouse lymphoid cells. The characteristics of this process in human lymphocytes are less clear. This study characterizes the phenomenon of surface membrane Ig redistribution of normal and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) lymphocytes with the use of fluoroscein-labeled anti-Ig sera. Normal lymphocytes underwent rapid cap formation after incubation with anti-Ig serum in the cold and subsequent rewarming. The morphology was characteristic with aggregation over the pole of the cell opposite the nucleus and over the uropod when present. The process was energy dependent but independent of protein synthesis, and could be inhibited by vincristine, vinblastine, and colchicine but not by cytochalasin B. CLL cells, on the other hand, though showing fluorescent complex aggregation on the surface, rarely demonstrated unidirectional movement of these aggregates to form a cap. Cap formation in these cells could not be stimulated by supplementing the energy source or protein concentration of the medium nor by adding glutamic acid which could partially reverse the vincristine and vinblastine inhibition of normal capping. The failure of agents which inhibit motility to inhibit capping of the normal lymphocytes suggests that active locomotion is not a direct prerequisite for capping. The results also suggest the involvement of microtubules in normal capping and the possibility that abnormal membrane structure or microtubular function could explain the failure of CLL cells to behave normally in this regard. The role of this cellular defect in the immune deficiencies exhibited by many patients with CLL, however, is not established. Images PMID:1088910

  13. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  14. Preferential orientation of biological apatite in normal and osteoporotic human vertebral trabeculae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabe, S.; Ishimoto, T.; Nakano, T.

    2009-05-01

    The preferential orientation of biological apatite (BAp) is a possible bone quality parameter for the comparison of the bone mechanical property. The preferential BAp orientation undergoes sensitive changes according to the change in the in vivo stress distribution, bone turnover rate etc., resulting in a variation of bone function. Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease characterized by reduced bone mass and deterioration of bone microstructure. The effect of osteoporosis on the preferential BAp orientation is however unknown. In this study, a microbeam-X-ray diffraction (μXRD) study was carried out on a trabecula extracted from osteoporotic and normal human vertebral bones and the degree of orientation for the BAp c-axis along its craniocaudal axis was analysed based on our previous report. A micro-computed tomography (μCT) measurement was also performed to analyze trabecular density and structure. In osteoporotic human vertebra, the trabecular number is markedly lower than that in normal vertebra. To sustain increased stress because of bone loss, the primary trabeculae, which are aligned parallel to the craniocaudal axis, tend to selectively remain while the secondary trabeculae, which are perpendicular to the craniocaudal axis, mostly disappear. Moreover, the primary trabecula from osteoporotic vertebra showed a significantly higher degree of BAp preferential orientation than the normal bone. This suggests that the remaining primary trabecula in osteoporotic vertebra is further reinforced by an increase in applied stress in vivo by enhancing the preferred BAp c-axis orientation along the trabecular direction.

  15. Dielectric spectroscopy of normal and malignant human lung cells at ultra-high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Egot-Lemaire, S; Pijanka, J; Sulé-Suso, J; Semenov, S

    2009-04-21

    Microwave techniques for biomedical applications aimed at cancer treatment or diagnosis, either by imaging or spectroscopy, are promising. Their use relies on knowledge of the dielectric properties of tissues, especially on a detectable difference between malignant and normal tissues. As most studies investigated the dielectric properties of ex vivo tissues, there is a need for better biophysical understanding of human tissues in their living state. As an essential component of tissues, cells represent valuable objects of analysis. The approach developed in this study is an investigation at cell level. Its aim was to compare human lung normal and malignant cells by dielectric spectroscopy in the beginning of the microwave range, where such information is of substantial biomedical importance. These cells were embedded in small and low-conductivity agarose hydrogels and laid on an open-ended coaxial probe connected to a vector network analyser operated from 200 MHz to 2 GHz. The comparison between normal and malignant cells was drawn using the variation of measured dielectric properties and fitting the measurements using the Maxwell-Wagner equation. Both methods revealed slight differences between the two cell lines, which were statistically significant regarding conductivities of composite gels and cells. PMID:19321925

  16. Effect of alpha 1-adrenoceptor blockade on resting and hyperemic myocardial blood flow in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, R; Rosen, S D; Camici, P G

    1996-10-01

    In the present study we aimed to assess the effect of alpha 1-adrenoceptor blockade on resting and hyperemic myocardial blood flow in normal humans. Myocardial blood flow, at baseline and after dipyridamole, was measured with positron emission tomography and 15O-labeled water in 11 normal volunteers at control and during alpha 1-blockade with doxazosin. Baseline myocardial blood flow during alpha 1-blockade was not different from control, whereas coronary resistance was significantly lower (73.48 +/- 18.31 vs. 89.84 +/- 27.96 mmHg.min.ml-1.g-1; P < 0.05). After dipyridamole, myocardial blood flow during alpha 1-blockade was significantly higher (3.50 +/- 0.75 vs. 2.58 +/- 0.54 ml.min-1.g-1; P < 0.01) and coronary resistance lower (25.30 +/- 7.37 vs. 33.89 +/- 7.04 mmHg.min.ml-1.g-1; P < 0.01) compared with control. In conclusion, in normal humans, dipyridamole-induced increase in myocardial blood flow is limited by alpha 1-mediated coronary vasoconstriction.

  17. Classification of normal and malignant human gastric mucosa tissue with confocal Raman microspectroscopy and wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yaogai; Shen, Aiguo; Jiang, Tao; Ai, Yong; Hu, Jiming

    2008-02-01

    Thirty-two samples from the human gastric mucosa tissue, including 13 normal and 19 malignant tissue samples were measured by confocal Raman microspectroscopy. The low signal-to-background ratio spectra from human gastric mucosa tissues were obtained by this technique without any sample preparation. Raman spectral interferences include a broad featureless sloping background due to fluorescence and noise. They mask most Raman spectral feature and lead to problems with precision and quantitation of the original spectral information. A preprocessed algorithm based on wavelet analysis was used to reduce noise and eliminate background/baseline of Raman spectra. Comparing preprocessed spectra of malignant gastric mucosa tissues with those of counterpart normal ones, there were obvious spectral changes, including intensity increase at ˜1156 cm -1 and intensity decrease at ˜1587 cm -1. The quantitative criterion based upon the intensity ratio of the ˜1156 and ˜1587 cm -1 was extracted for classification of the normal and malignant gastric mucosa tissue samples. This could result in a new diagnostic method, which would assist the early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  18. Normal genetic variation of the human foot: part 1: the paradox of normal anatomical alignment in an evolutionary epigenetic context.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Molecular genetics is changing our understanding of the developmental translation of genotype to phenotype between and within different phylogenetic groups. Together with a growing understanding of our own evolutionary relationships to common ancestors, the epigenetic processes involved enforce a reexamination of what is regarded as a normal foot structure. A revised populationist approach is proposed and supported by paleoanthropologic evidence that reflects a picture of emerging suitability for bipedalism that is driven by natural genetic divergence.

  19. Tensile Strength of Mineralized/Demineralized Human Normal and Carious Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Nishitani, Y.; Yoshiyama, M.; Tay, F.R.; Wadgaonkar, B.; Waller, J.; Agee, K.; Pashley, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    The bond strengths of resins to caries-affected dentin are low. This could be due to weakened organic matrix. The purpose of this work was to determine if the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of excavated carious dentin is weaker than that of normal dentin. Soft caries was excavated from extracted human molars, and the tooth was vertically sectioned into slabs. Each slab was trimmed to an hourglass shape, parallel or perpendicular to the tubule direction. Half of the specimens were mineralized, while the other half were completely demineralized in EDTA. ANOVA on ranks showed that the three-factor interactions (mineralization, caries, tubule direction) were all significant (p < 0.0001), indicating that mineralization and tubule direction gave different UTS results in normal and caries-affected dentin. No significant differences were seen between the UTS of normal and and that of caries-affected demineralized dentin in the parallel or perpendicular group. The matrix of demineralized caries-affected dentin was as strong as that of normal demineralized dentin when tested in the same direction. PMID:16246945

  20. Immunosuppressive activity of human amniotic fluid of normal and abnormal pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Shohat, B; Faktor, J M

    1988-01-01

    Twenty specimens of amniotic fluid (AF) obtained between week 16 and 18 of gestation from normal pregnant women and six specimens from pregnant women in which trisomia of chromosome 21 was found were tested for immunosuppressive activity. Incubation of normal human donor lymphocytes with 0.2-1 mL of AF from normal pregnant women for one hour at 37 degrees C was sufficient for induction of significant inhibition of the ability of these cells to induce a local xenogeneic graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) as well as inhibition of E and E-active rosette formation, the GVHR being the most sensitive test. On the other hand, amniotic fluid obtained from the six pregnant women in which trisomia of chromosome 21 was found showed no inhibitory activity in either the E or E-active rosette formation, nor in the local xenogeneic graft-versus-host reaction. AF from all the women tested was found to have no effect on phenotype expression of the lymphocytes, as tested by the monoclonal antibodies OKT4+ and OKT8+, nor on B-lymphocytes, as tested by surface immunoglobulins. No correlation was found between the alpha-fetoprotein levels in the sera of those women and the immunosuppressive activity. These findings indicate that genetic defects of the conceptus are not limited to the embryo but may affect the composition of immunosuppressive components present in normal amniotic fluid.

  1. Dynamic Knee Alignment and Collateral Knee Laxity and Its Variations in Normal Humans.

    PubMed

    Deep, Kamal; Picard, Frederic; Clarke, Jon V

    2015-01-01

    Alignment of normal, arthritic, and replaced human knees is a much debated subject as is the collateral ligamentous laxity. Traditional quantitative values have been challenged. Methods used to measure these are also not without flaws. Authors review the recent literature and a novel method of measurement of these values has been included. This method includes use of computer navigation technique in clinic setting for assessment of the normal or affected knee before the surgery. Computer navigation has been known for achievement of alignment accuracy during knee surgery. Now its use in clinic setting has added to the inventory of measurement methods. Authors dispel the common myth of straight mechanical axis in normal knees and also look at quantification of amount of collateral knee laxity. Based on the scientific studies, it has been shown that the mean alignment is in varus in normal knees. It changes from lying non-weight-bearing position to standing weight-bearing position in both coronal and the sagittal planes. It also varies with gender and race. The collateral laxity is also different for males and females. Further studies are needed to define the ideal alignment and collateral laxity which the surgeon should aim for individual knees. PMID:26636090

  2. Dynamic Knee Alignment and Collateral Knee Laxity and Its Variations in Normal Humans

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Kamal; Picard, Frederic; Clarke, Jon V.

    2015-01-01

    Alignment of normal, arthritic, and replaced human knees is a much debated subject as is the collateral ligamentous laxity. Traditional quantitative values have been challenged. Methods used to measure these are also not without flaws. Authors review the recent literature and a novel method of measurement of these values has been included. This method includes use of computer navigation technique in clinic setting for assessment of the normal or affected knee before the surgery. Computer navigation has been known for achievement of alignment accuracy during knee surgery. Now its use in clinic setting has added to the inventory of measurement methods. Authors dispel the common myth of straight mechanical axis in normal knees and also look at quantification of amount of collateral knee laxity. Based on the scientific studies, it has been shown that the mean alignment is in varus in normal knees. It changes from lying non-weight-bearing position to standing weight-bearing position in both coronal and the sagittal planes. It also varies with gender and race. The collateral laxity is also different for males and females. Further studies are needed to define the ideal alignment and collateral laxity which the surgeon should aim for individual knees. PMID:26636090

  3. Effect of the N-terminal residues on the quaternary dynamics of human adult hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shanyan; Mizuno, Misao; Ishikawa, Haruto; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-05-01

    The protein dynamics of human hemoglobin following ligand photolysis was studied by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy. The time-resolved spectra of two kinds of recombinant hemoglobin expressed in Escherichia coli, normal recombinant hemoglobin and the α(V1M)/β(V1M) double mutant, were compared with those of human adult hemoglobin (HbA) purified from blood. A frequency shift of the iron-histidine stretching [ν(Fe-His)] band was observed in the time-resolved spectra of all three hemoglobin samples, indicative of tertiary and quaternary changes in the protein following photolysis. The spectral changes of the α(V1M)/β(V1M) double mutant were distinct from those of HbA in the tens of microseconds region, whereas the spectral changes of normal recombinant hemoglobin were similar to those of HbA isolated from blood. These results demonstrated that a structural change in the N-termini is involved in the second step of the quaternary structure change of hemoglobin. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the allosteric pathway of HbA.

  4. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-06-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting.

  5. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity in subcellular fractions of normal and dystrophic human muscle.

    PubMed

    Kunze, D; Rüstow, B; Olthoff, D; Jung, K

    1985-03-15

    Biopsy samples from normal and dystrophic human muscle (Duchenne type) were fractionated by differential centrifugation and microsomes, mitochondria and cytosol were assayed for phosphatidic acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.4) and marker enzymes of mitochondria and cytosol. The activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was significantly lower in microsomes and higher in cytosol and mitochondria of dystrophic muscle than in the corresponding subcellular fractions of normal muscle. The results support an explanation of earlier findings that there is reduced G3P incorporation into diglycerides and phosphatidylcholine and a qualitative and quantitative change in the amount of phosphatidylcholine in dystrophic microsomes. The possible reasons for the reduction in the activity of only microsomal PA-P-ase were discussed.

  6. Clinical utility of laser-Doppler vibrometer measurements in live normal and pathologic human ears.

    PubMed

    Rosowski, John J; Nakajima, Hideko H; Merchant, Saumil N

    2008-01-01

    The laser-Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is a research tool that can be used to quickly measure the sound-induced velocity of the tympanic membrane near the umbo (the inferior tip of the malleus) in live human subjects and patients. In this manuscript we demonstrate the LDV to be a sensitive and selective tool for the diagnosis and differentiation of various ossicular disorders in patients with intact tympanic membranes and aerated middle ears. Patients with partial or total ossicular interruption or malleus fixation are readily separated from normal-hearing subjects with the LDV. The combination of LDV measurements and air-bone gap can distinguish patients with fixed stapes from those with normal ears. LDV measurements can also help differentiate air-bone gaps produced by ossicular pathologies from those associated with pathologies of inner-ear sound conduction such as a superior semicircular canal dehiscence.

  7. Immunohistochemical expression of tenascin in normal human salivary glands and in pleomorphic adenomas.

    PubMed

    Sunardhi-Widyaputra, S; Van Damme, B

    1993-03-01

    The presence of the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin was studied immunohistochemically in normal human salivary glands and in pleomorphic adenomas. Its expression was compared to that of fibronectin, and type IV collagen. In the normal salivary gland, tenascin was found with interruptions in periductal tissues, and continuously in blood vessels, fat cells and around nerve bundles. In pleomorphic adenoma, tenascin was detected surrounding the clusters of epithelioid cells, in areas with a myxoid and a chondroid matrix, and around some myoepithelial cells as a halo. As compared to fibronectin, there is a similar location of tenascin and fibronectin around tumor cell clusters but not in myxoid and chondroid matrices. Fibronectin was found around the cells in chondroid matrix. In conclusion, tenascin is not only found in malignant tumors but also in benign tumors such as pleomorphic adenoma. The presence of tenascin as a halo around myoepithelial cells suggests a role of these cells in development of myxoid and chondroid matrices.

  8. Characterization of two different agglutinators in the latex fixation test, occurring in normal human sera

    PubMed Central

    Klein, F.; Valkenburg, H. A.; Van Zwet, Theda L.; Lafeber, Geertruida J. M.

    1966-01-01

    Using a sensitive modification of the latex fixation test it is possible to detect a small agglutinating effect in about 60 per cent of normal human sera, after these have been heated for 30 minutes at 56°. This was shown to be caused by an IgM globulin with the properties of a rheumatoid factor. The factor is able to react with human IgG globulin and may represent an antibody to the IgG part of circulating antigen—antibody complexes. The heat treatment probably inactivates an inhibitor of the latex fixation reaction. In addition all normal human sera give an agglutination reaction with IgG coated latex at incubation temperatures of 37° or lower. It was shown that these reactions are caused by a thermolabile, non-reducible component with a sedimentation constant of about 10. This component is probably identical with the complement component C'1q. The agglutinating activity was found in the α2—β1 region after electrophoresis of untreated serum, but in the slow γ region after treatment of the serum with EDTA. This kind of agglutination may cause false positive reactions in latex tests which are carried out at 37° or less. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 3 PMID:4160336

  9. Identification and characterization of specific binding proteins for growth hormone in normal human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Herington, A C; Ymer, S; Stevenson, J

    1986-01-01

    The well-recognized "big" forms (45,000-100,000 mol wt) of immunoreactive human growth hormone (hGH) in human serum have been reported to be random aggregates or formal polymers. However, we have now investigated the possibility that they are protein-bound forms. After incubation of monomeric 125I-hGH with normal serum, gel chromatography indicated a peak of bound 125I-hGH (at approximately 120,000 mol wt), which was completely displaced by excess unlabeled hGH. When serum alone was chromatographed two peaks of specific binding were subsequently detected, the major peak, eluting between 74,000 and 85,000 mol wt corresponded to the 125I-hGH-binding protein complex observed at approximately 120,000 mol wt. Using a mini-gel filtration system for separating bound from free hormone, binding of 125I-hGH by normal human serum was dependent on time (equilibrium was reached in 2 h at 21 degrees C), temperature (21 degrees C greater than 37 degrees C), Ca2+ and serum concentrations. Binding was reversible and highly specific for hGH, not being displayed by GH or prolactins from several species. Scatchard analysis revealed linear plots with an affinity (KA) of 0.32 +/- 0.06 X 10(9) M-1 (n = 7). Human serum with low endogenous hGH levels, when added to rabbit liver membranes, decreased the binding of 125I-hGH in this tissue in a dose-dependent manner. These data indicate that human sera contain a specific, high affinity binding protein for hGH and that this may account, at least in part, for the known size heterogeneity of GH in serum. Its effect on GH binding to target tissues may indicate a role for the binding protein in the regulation of GH action. PMID:3711337

  10. Acute toxicity of silver and carbon nanoaerosols to normal and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jeannet, Natalie; Fierz, Martin; Schneider, Sarah; Künzi, Lisa; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Burtscher, Heinz; Geiser, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of engineered nanoparticles (NP) poses a still unknown risk. Individuals with chronic lung diseases are expected to be more vulnerable to adverse effects of NP than normal subjects, due to altered respiratory structures and functions. Realistic and dose-controlled aerosol exposures were performed using the deposition chamber NACIVT. Well-differentiated normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human bronchial epithelia (HBE) with established air-liquid interface and the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B were exposed to spark-generated silver and carbon nanoaerosols (20 nm diameter) at three different doses. Necrotic and apoptotic cell death, pro-inflammatory response, epithelial function and morphology were assessed within 24 h after aerosol exposure. NP exposure resulted in significantly higher necrosis in CF than normal HBE and BEAS-2B cells. Before and after NP treatment, CF HBE had higher caspase-3 activity and secreted more IL-6 and MCP-1 than normal HBE. Differentiated HBE had higher baseline secretion of IL-8 and less caspase-3 activity and MCP-1 secretion compared to BEAS-2B cells. These biomarkers increased moderately in response to NP exposure, except for MCP-1, which was reduced in HBE after AgNP treatment. No functional and structural alterations of the epithelia were observed in response to NP exposure. Significant differences between cell models suggest that more than one and fully differentiated HBE should be used in future toxicity studies of NP in vitro. Our findings support epidemiologic evidence that subjects with chronic airway diseases are more vulnerable to adverse effects of particulate air pollution. Thus, this sub-population needs to be included in nano-toxicity studies. PMID:26011645

  11. Acute toxicity of silver and carbon nanoaerosols to normal and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jeannet, Natalie; Fierz, Martin; Schneider, Sarah; Künzi, Lisa; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Burtscher, Heinz; Geiser, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of engineered nanoparticles (NP) poses a still unknown risk. Individuals with chronic lung diseases are expected to be more vulnerable to adverse effects of NP than normal subjects, due to altered respiratory structures and functions. Realistic and dose-controlled aerosol exposures were performed using the deposition chamber NACIVT. Well-differentiated normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human bronchial epithelia (HBE) with established air-liquid interface and the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B were exposed to spark-generated silver and carbon nanoaerosols (20 nm diameter) at three different doses. Necrotic and apoptotic cell death, pro-inflammatory response, epithelial function and morphology were assessed within 24 h after aerosol exposure. NP exposure resulted in significantly higher necrosis in CF than normal HBE and BEAS-2B cells. Before and after NP treatment, CF HBE had higher caspase-3 activity and secreted more IL-6 and MCP-1 than normal HBE. Differentiated HBE had higher baseline secretion of IL-8 and less caspase-3 activity and MCP-1 secretion compared to BEAS-2B cells. These biomarkers increased moderately in response to NP exposure, except for MCP-1, which was reduced in HBE after AgNP treatment. No functional and structural alterations of the epithelia were observed in response to NP exposure. Significant differences between cell models suggest that more than one and fully differentiated HBE should be used in future toxicity studies of NP in vitro. Our findings support epidemiologic evidence that subjects with chronic airway diseases are more vulnerable to adverse effects of particulate air pollution. Thus, this sub-population needs to be included in nano-toxicity studies.

  12. The Adult Learner. The Definitive Classic in Adult Education and Human Resource Development. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Malcolm S.; Holton, Elwood F., III; Swanson, Richard A.

    This book examines the core principles of adult learning and the roots of andragogy, advances in adult learning, and practice in adult learning. The following are among the topics discussed in the book's 17 chapters: importance of learning theory; theories of learning (concept of part and whole models of development, theories based on elemental…

  13. Calcitriol inhibits interleukin-10 expression in cultured human trophoblasts under normal and inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Barrera, David; Noyola-Martínez, Nancy; Avila, Euclides; Halhali, Ali; Larrea, Fernando; Díaz, Lorenza

    2012-03-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with systemic inflammation and increased expression of placental Th1-cytokines. IL-10 and calcitriol inhibit proinflammatory cytokines expression in human placenta helping to fetal allograft toleration. Regulation of placental IL-10 by calcitriol and Th-1 cytokines has not yet been fully elucidated. Since it is believed that calcitriol promotes a shift from a Th1- to a Th2 profile, we hypothesized that it would stimulate IL-10 in a normal and an inflammatory scenario to conjointly restrain inflammation. Therefore, we investigated calcitriol effects upon IL-10 expression in cultured human trophoblasts obtained from normal (NT) and preeclamptic (PE) pregnancies. Similar studies in the presence of TNF-α (as an inflammatory stressor) were also performed. Calcitriol dose-dependently inhibited IL-10 expression in NT, PE and TNF-α-challenged trophoblasts (P<0.05). This effect was prevented by a vitamin D receptor (VDR) antagonist. IL-10 expression was significantly stimulated by TNF-α and IL-1β, inhibited by IFN-γ and was not affected by IL-6. Finally, calcitriol inhibited TNF-α and IL-1β stimulation upon IL-10. In summary, in cultured human trophoblasts, calcitriol down-regulates IL-10 expression under normal as well as under natural and experimental inflammatory conditions. This effect is mediated by the VDR and might involve direct inhibition of TNF-α. In view of these and previous results it seems that in placenta calcitriol suppresses both Th1- and Th2 cytokines while undertakes the anti-inflammatory effects of IL-10 by itself, since both factors exert this task redundantly. The regulation of IL-10 by IFN-γ suggests that this cytokine could be a viable candidate to explain low IL-10 levels in preeclampsia.

  14. Estimation of polyclonal IgG4 hybrids in normal human serum

    PubMed Central

    Young, Elizabeth; Lock, Emma; Ward, Douglas G; Cook, Alexander; Harding, Stephen; Wallis, Gregg L F

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo or in vitro formation of IgG4 hybrid molecules, wherein the immunoglobulins have exchanged half molecules, has previously been reported under experimental conditions. Here we estimate the incidence of polyclonal IgG4 hybrids in normal human serum and comment on the existence of IgG4 molecules with different immunoglobulin light chains. Polyclonal IgG4 was purified from pooled or individual donor human sera and sequentially fractionated using light-chain affinity and size exclusion chromatography. Fractions were analysed by SDS–PAGE, immunoblotting, ELISA, immunodiffusion and matrix-assisted laser-desorption mass spectrometry. Polyclonal IgG4 purified from normal serum contained IgG4κ, IgG4λ and IgG4κ/λ molecules. Size exclusion chromatography showed that IgG4 was principally present in monomeric form (150 000 MW). SDS–PAGE, immunoblotting and ELISA showed the purity of the three IgG4 samples. Immunodiffusion, light-chain sandwich ELISA and mass spectrometry demonstrated that both κ and λ light chains were present on only the IgG4κ/λ molecules. The amounts of IgG4κ/λ hybrid molecules ranged from 21 to 33% from the five sera analysed. Based on the molecular weight these molecules were formed of two IgG4 heavy chains plus one κ and one λ light chain. Polyclonal IgG (IgG4-depleted) was similarly fractionated according to light-chain specificity. No evidence of hybrid IgG κ/λ antibodies was observed. These results indicate that hybrid IgG4κ/λ antibodies compose a substantial portion of IgG4 from normal human serum. PMID:24512211

  15. Effects of a prolonged standardized diet on normalizing the human metabolome123

    PubMed Central

    Winnike, Jason H; Busby, Marjorie G; Watkins, Paul B

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although the effects of acute dietary interventions on the human metabolome have been studied, the extent to which the metabolome can be normalized by extended dietary standardization has not yet been examined. Objective: We examined the metabolic profiles of healthy human subjects after extended dietary standardization to see whether the inherent variation in the human metabolome could be decreased. Design: A cohort of 10 healthy volunteers was admitted to a clinical research center for 2 wk of dietary standardization. Daily serum and urine samples and serum samples at a 2-wk follow-up visit were collected. The samples were analyzed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analyses. Results: NMR spectra were collected to globally profile the higher-concentration metabolites (>μmol/L concentrations). Metabolic changes were observed in some serum samples after day 1 or the 2-wk follow-up visit. For each subject, the samples from all other days had similar profiles. The urinary metabolome reflected no effects from dietary standardization. Pooled 24-h urine samples were studied, which indicated that any normalization that does occur would do so in <24 h. Conclusions: For both the urinary and serum metabolome, a single day of dietary standardization appears to provide all of the normalization that is achievable within the strict controls implemented in a clinical research setting. After 24 h, the subjects remain in their metabolic space; the remaining intra- and intersubject variations appear to be influenced by variables such as genetics, age, and lifestyle. PMID:19864408

  16. Ecological Effect of Ceftaroline-Avibactam on the Normal Human Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Rosenborg, Staffan; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Söderberg-Löfdal, Karin; Weintraub, Andrej

    2015-01-01

    Ceftaroline-avibactam is a new combination of the antibiotic ceftaroline with a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor, avibactam. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of ceftaroline-avibactam on the human intestinal microbiota. Fourteen healthy volunteers received ceftaroline-avibactam (600 mg ceftaroline fosamil and 600 mg avibactam) intravenously over 2 h every 8 h on days 1 to 6 and as a single dose on day 7. Fecal samples were collected on day −1 (within 24 h of the first infusion on day 1) and on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, and 21. Escherichia coli numbers decreased during the study and normalized on day 21. An increased number of Klebsiella bacteria appeared on day 14 and normalized on day 21. The number of other enterobacteria decreased during the study, and the number of enterococci decreased from days 2 to 7 and normalized on day 9. Candida numbers increased from days 5 to 9 and normalized after day 14. The number of lactobacilli decreased during the study and recovered on day 14. The number of bifidobacteria decreased on day 2 and normalized on day 21. The number of Bacteroides bacteria was unchanged. Clostridium difficile numbers decreased on days 7 and 9 and increased on days 14 and 21. A toxigenic C. difficile strain was detected in one volunteer on day 21 with no reported adverse events. Plasma samples were collected on days −1, 2, 5, and 7. Ceftaroline and avibactam concentrations were 0 to 34.5 mg/liter and 0 to 61.6 mg/liter, respectively, in plasma and 0 to 35.4 mg/kg and 0 to 98.5 mg/kg, respectively, in feces. (This study is registered in the European Clinical Trials Database [https://eudract.ema.europa.eu/] under number EudraCT 2012 004921-25.) PMID:25987638

  17. Isolation of alpha 1-protease inhibitor from human normal and malignant ovarian tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Bagdasarian, A; Wheeler, J; Stewart, G J; Ahmed, S S; Colman, R W

    1981-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are associated with normal and neoplastic tissues. Therefore protease inhibitors might also be involved in the control of cell function. alpha 1-protease antigen and antitryptic activity have been found in normal and neoplastic human ovarian homogenate. The inhibitor has been localized to ovarian stromal cells or tumor cells by immunoperoxidase staining. The protein was purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by alkaline gel and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis. Immunochemical studies revealed antigenic similarity of plasma alpha 1-protease inhibitor by double immunodiffusion and similar mobility on immunoelectrophoresis and two-dimensional electroimmunodiffusion. The molecular weight was similar to that described for plasma alpha 1-protease inhibitor: 60,000 by gel filtration and 53,500 by SDS electrophoresis. Furthermore, the phenotypic pattern as determined by acid starch gel electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation was PiMM, which is the predominant genetic variant in normal plasma alpha 1-protease inhibitor. An inhibitor ws isolated and purified from an ovarian carcinoma that exhibited functional, immunochemical, and physical similarity to the normal ovarian alpha 1-protease inhibitor. alpha 1-protease inhibitor from normal and malignant ovaries competitively inhibited bovine pancreatic trypsin at incubation times of 5 min at 30 degrees C. Inhibition constant (Ki) values were calculated at 0.67 and 0.51 inhibitory units, respectively. The alpha 1-protease inhibitor in malignant cells may be a factor in the control of proliferation in this tissue. Since ovulation is in part a proteolytic event, the alpha 1-protease inhibitor in ovarian cells may play a role in the control of this specialized tissue. Persistance of this protein in malignant ovarian tissue may be a vestige of its differentiated origin. Images PMID:6161137

  18. Multi-Atlas Library for Eliminating Normalization Failures in Non-Human Primates.

    PubMed

    Maldjian, Joseph A; Shively, Carol A; Nader, Michael A; Friedman, David P; Whitlow, Christopher T

    2016-04-01

    Current tools for automated skull stripping, normalization, and segmentation of non-human primate (NHP) brain MRI studies typically demonstrate high failure rates. Many of these failures are due to a poor initial estimate for the affine component of the transformation. The purpose of this study is to introduce a multi-atlas approach to overcome these limitations and drive the failure rate to near zero. A library of study-specific templates (SST) spanning three Old World primate species (Macaca fascicularis, M. mulatta, Chlorocebus aethiops) was created using a previously described unbiased automated approach. Several modifications were introduced to the methodology to improve initial affine estimation at the study-specific template level, and at the individual subject level. These involve performing multiple separate normalizations to a multi-atlas library of templates and selecting the best performing template on the basis of a covariance similarity metric. This template was then used as an initialization for the affine component of subsequent skull stripping and normalization procedures. Normalization failure rate for SST generation and individual-subject segmentation on a set of 150 NHP was evaluated on the basis of visual inspection. The previous automated template creation procedure results in excellent skull stripping, segmentation, and atlas labeling across species. Failure rate at the individual-subject level was approximately 1%, however at the SST generation level it was 17%. Using the new multi-atlas approach, failure rate was further reduced to zero for both SST generation and individual subject processing. We describe a multi-atlas library registration approach for driving normalization failures in NHP to zero. It is straightforward to implement, and can have application to a wide variety of existing tools, as well as in difficult populations including neonates and the elderly. This approach is also an important step towards developing fully automated

  19. Endothelin-1 production by normal human cultured keratinocytes and its regulation.

    PubMed

    Inoue, H; Wakisaka, N; Tane, N; Ando, K; Isono, E; Yamanaka, M; Aihara, M; Ishida, H

    1994-01-01

    The possibility that cultured keratinocytes produce endothelins were investigated. The results showed that cultured keratinocytes derived from normal human skin produce endothelin-1. Moreover, keratinocyte endothelin-1 production was completely inhibited by the presence of actinomycin D in the medium. As in the case of endothelial cells, recombinant interleukin-1beta was capable of promoting endothelin-1 production in keratinocytes, whereas herapin inhibited it. Thrombin also inhibited endothelin-1 production. These results indicate that the mechanism of endothelin-1 production in keratinocytes is slightly different from the mechanism in vascular endothelial cells.

  20. Nystagmus responses in a group of normal humans during earth-horizontal axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Conrad, III; Furman, Joseph M. R.

    1989-01-01

    Horizontal eye movement responses to earth-horizontal yaw axis rotation were evaluated in 50 normal human subjects who were uniformly distributed in age (20-69 years) and each age group was then divided by gender. Subjects were rotated with eyes open in the dark, using clockwise and counter-clockwise 60 deg velocity trapezoids. The nystagmus slow component velocity is analyzed. It is shown that, despite large intersubject variability, parameters which describe earth-horizontal yaw axis responses are loosely interrelated, and some of them vary significantly with gender and age.

  1. Autofluorescence of normal and tumor mucosa of human colon: a comprehensive analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottiroli, Giovanni F.; Marchesini, Renato; Croce, Anna C.; Dal Fante, Marco; Cuzzoni, Carolina; Di Palma, Silvana; Spinelli, Pasquale

    1993-08-01

    Both 'in vivo' and 'ex vivo' spectrofluorometric studies of neoplastic and non-neoplastic mucosa of human colon have been carried out, in order to verify the potentials of tissue natural fluorescence as a possible parameter to distinguish normal from diseased tissues, Spectrofluorometric analysis performed at colonoscopy on patients affected by neoplasia, showed that adenocarcinoma, adenoma and non-neoplastic mucosa differ in the fluorescence emissions. The results have been interpreted according to the data obtained on cryostatic sections from biopsies by means of a microspectrofluorometric analysis carried out on each histological component.

  2. Shilajit: evalution of its effects on blood chemistry of normal human subjects.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen; Jha, Jagrati; Shrinivas, V; Dwivedi, L K; Suresh, P; Sinha, M

    2003-10-01

    The effect of Shilajit on blood chemistry was studied in normal human volunteers. Administration of two gms of Shilajit for 45 days did not produced any significant change in physical parameters i.e. blood pressure, pulse rate and body weight and similarly no charge was observed in hematological parameters. A signification reduction in Serum Triglycerides, Serum cholesterol with simultaneous improvement in HDL Cholesterol was seen, besides Shilajit also improved antioxidant status of volunteers. Results of study suggest hypolipidemic and strong antioxidant activity of Shilajit.

  3. G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 is a novel regulator of collagen synthesis in adult human cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Karen M; Malhotra, Ricky; Philip, Jennifer L; Staron, Michelle L; Theccanat, Tiju; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Akhter, Shahab A

    2011-04-29

    Cardiac fibroblasts (CF) make up 60-70% of the total cell number in the heart and play a critical role in regulating normal myocardial function and in adverse remodeling following myocardial infarction and the transition to heart failure. Recent studies have shown that increased intracellular cAMP can inhibit CF transformation and collagen synthesis in adult rat CF; however, mechanisms by which cAMP production is regulated in CF have not been elucidated. We investigated the potential role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2) in modulating collagen synthesis by adult human CF isolated from normal and failing left ventricles. Baseline collagen synthesis was elevated in failing CF and was not inhibited by β-agonist stimulation in contrast to normal controls. β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) signaling was markedly uncoupled in the failing CF, and expression and activity of GRK2 were increased 3-fold. Overexpression of GRK2 in normal CF recapitulated a heart failure phenotype with minimal inhibition of collagen synthesis following β-agonist stimulation. In contrast, knockdown of GRK2 expression in normal CF enhanced cAMP production and led to greater β-agonist-mediated inhibition of basal and TGFβ-stimulated collagen synthesis versus control. Inhibition of GRK2 activity in failing CF by expression of the GRK2 inhibitor, GRK2ct, or siRNA-mediated knockdown restored β-agonist-stimulated inhibition of collagen synthesis and decreased collagen synthesis in response to TGFβ stimulation. GRK2 appears to play a significant role in regulating collagen synthesis in adult human CF, and increased activity of this kinase may be an important mechanism of maladaptive ventricular remodeling as mediated by cardiac fibroblasts.

  4. Differentiation of Overweight from Normal Weight Young Adults by Postprandial Heart Rate Variability and Systolic Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Taffe, Lauren; Stancil, Kimani; Bond, Vernon; Pemminati, Sudhakar; Gorantla, Vasavi Rakesh; Kadur, Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity and cardiovascular disease are inextricably linked and the health community’s response to the current epidemic of adolescent obesity may be improved by the ability to target adolescents at highest risk for developing cardiovascular disease in the future. Overweight manifests early as autonomic dysregulation and current methods do not permit differentiation of overweight adolescents or young adults at highest risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Aim This study was designed to test the hypothesis that scaling exponents motivated by nonlinear fractal analyses of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) differentiate overweight, otherwise healthy adolescent/young adult subjects at risk for developing prehypertension, the primary forerunner of cardiovascular disease. Materials and Methods The subjects were 18-20year old males with Body Mass Index (BMI) 20.1-42.5kg/m2. Electrocardiographic inter-beat (RR) intervals were measured during 3h periods of bed rest after overnight fasting and ingestion of 900Cal high-carbohydrate and high-fat test beverages on separate days. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), k-means cluster and ANOVA analyses of scaling coefficients α, α1, and α2, showed dependencies on hourly measurements of systolic blood pressure and on premeasured BMI. Results It was observed that α value increased during the caloric challenge, appears to represent metabolically-induced changes in HRV across the participants. An ancillary analysis was performed to determine the dependency on BMI without BMI as a parameter. Cluster analysis of the high-carbohydrate test beverage treatment and the high-fat treatment produced grouping with very little overlap. ANOVA on both clusters demonstrated significance at p<0.001. We were able to demonstrate increased sympathetic modulation of our study group during ingestion and metabolism of isocaloric high-carbohydrate and high-fat test beverages. Conclusion These findings demonstrate significantly different

  5. Adult somatic stem cells in the human parasite, Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J.; Wang, Bo; Lambrus, Bramwell G.; Tharp, Marla; Iyer, Harini; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Schistosomiasis is among the most prevalent human parasitic diseases, affecting more than 200 million people worldwide1. The etiological agents of this disease are trematode flatworms (Schistosoma) that live and lay eggs within the vasculature of the host. These eggs lodge in host tissues, causing inflammatory responses that are the primary cause of morbidity. Because these parasites can live and reproduce within human hosts for decades2, elucidating the mechanisms that promote their longevity is of fundamental importance. Although adult pluripotent stem cells, called neoblasts, drive long-term homeostatic tissue maintenance in long-lived free-living flatworms3,4 (e.g., planarians), and neoblast-like cells have been described in some parasitic tapeworms5, little is known about whether similar cell types exist in any trematode species. Here, we describe a population of neoblast-like cells in the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. These cells resemble planarian neoblasts morphologically and share their ability to proliferate and differentiate into derivatives of multiple germ layers. Capitalizing on available genomic resources6,7 and RNAseq-based gene expression profiling, we find that these schistosome neoblast-like cells express a fibroblast growth factor receptor ortholog. Using RNA interference we demonstrate that this gene is required for the maintenance of these neoblast-like cells. Our observations suggest that adaptation of developmental strategies shared by free-living ancestors to modern-day schistosomes likely contributed to the success of these animals as long-lived obligate parasites. We expect that future studies deciphering the function of these neoblast-like cells will have important implications for understanding the biology of these devastating parasites. PMID:23426263

  6. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans.

    PubMed

    Leggett, R; Giussani, A

    2015-06-01

    This paper reviews biokinetic data for technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans. The development of parameter values focuses on data for pertechnetate TcO(-)(4) the most commonly encountered form of technetium and the form expected to be present in body fluids. The model is intended as a default model for occupational or environmental intake of technetium, i.e. applicable in the absence of form- or site-specific information. Tissues depicted explicitly in the model include thyroid, salivary glands, stomach wall, right colon wall, liver, kidneys, and bone. Compared with the ICRP's current biokinetic model for occupational or environmental intake of technetium (ICRP 1993, 1994), the proposed model provides a more detailed and biologically realistic description of the systemic behaviour of technetium and is based on a broader set of experimental and medical data. For acute input of (99m)Tc (T(1/2) = 6.02 h) to blood, the ratios of cumulative (time-integrated) activity predicted by the current ICRP model to that predicted by the proposed model range from 0.4-7 for systemic regions addressed explicitly in both models. For acute input of (99)Tc (T(1/2) = 2.1 × 10(5) year) to blood, the corresponding ratios range from 0.2-30.

  7. Metric analysis of basal sphenoid angle in adult human skulls

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Dante Simionato; Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the variations in the angle basal sphenoid skulls of adult humans and their relationship to sex, age, ethnicity and cranial index. Methods The angles were measured in 160 skulls belonging to the Museum of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Department of Morphology. We use two flexible rules and a goniometer, having as reference points for the first rule the posterior end of the ethmoidal crest and dorsum of the sella turcica, and for the second rule the anterior margin of the foramen magnum and clivus, measuring the angle at the intersection of two. Results The average angle was 115.41°, with no statistical correlation between the value of the angle and sex or age. A statistical correlation was noted between the value of the angle and ethnicity, and between the angle and the horizontal cranial index. Conclusions The distribution of the angle basal sphenoid was the same in sex, and there was correlation between the angle and ethnicity, being the proportion of non-white individuals with an angle >125° significantly higher than that of whites with an angle >125°. There was correlation between the angle and the cranial index, because skulls with higher cranial index tend to have higher basiesfenoidal angle too. PMID:25295452

  8. Bone-forming capacity of adult human nasal chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pippenger, Benjamin E; Ventura, Manuela; Pelttari, Karoliina; Feliciano, Sandra; Jaquiery, Claude; Scherberich, Arnaud; Walboomers, X Frank; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Nasal chondrocytes (NC) derive from the same multipotent embryological segment that gives rise to the majority of the maxillofacial bone and have been reported to differentiate into osteoblast-like cells in vitro. In this study, we assessed the capacity of adult human NC, appropriately primed towards hypertrophic or osteoblastic differentiation, to form bone tissue in vivo. Hypertrophic induction of NC-based micromass pellets formed mineralized cartilaginous tissues rich in type X collagen, but upon implantation into subcutaneous pockets of nude mice remained avascular and reverted to stable hyaline-cartilage. In the same ectopic environment, NC embedded into ceramic scaffolds and primed with osteogenic medium only sporadically formed intramembranous bone tissue. A clonal study could not demonstrate that the low bone formation efficiency was related to a possibly small proportion of cells competent to become fully functional osteoblasts. We next tested whether the cues present in an orthotopic environment could induce a more efficient direct osteoblastic transformation of NC. Using a nude rat calvarial defect model, we demonstrated that (i) NC directly participated in frank bone formation and (ii) the efficiency of survival and bone formation by NC was significantly higher than that of reference osteogenic cells, namely bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. This study provides a proof-of-principle that NC have the plasticity to convert into bone cells and thereby represent an easily available cell source to be further investigated for craniofacial bone regeneration. PMID:25689393

  9. Expression of splice variants of mts1 gene in normal and neoplastic human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ambartsumyan, N.S. |; Grigorian, M.S.; Lukanidin, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    Data on cloning of cDNA corresponding to human mts1 gene transcripts are presented. By comparing nucleotide sequences of the genomic DNA clone and cDNA of mts1, it was shown that human osteosarcoma OHS cells contain two alternative splice variants of mts1 transcripts. Alternative splicing occurs in the 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mts1 pre-mRNA. Both splice variants, hu-mts1 and hu-mts1(var), demonstrate similar stability in the cells, and each contains one open reading frame for the MTS1 protein. However, the two types of transcripts are translated with different effectiveness. The level of transcription of mts1 splice variants in different normal and neoplastic tissues and cell lines varies significantly. The role of alternative splicing as the mechanism responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of mts1 gene expression is discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Expression, localisation and functional activation of NFAT-2 in normal human skin, psoriasis, and cultured keratocytes.

    PubMed

    Al-Daraji, Wael I; Malak, Tamer T; Prescott, Richard J; Abdellaoui, Adel; Ali, Mahmud M; Dabash, Tarek; Zelger, Bettina G; Zelger, Bernhard

    2009-06-18

    Ciclosporin A (CsA) is widely utilized for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis. The therapeutic effects of CsA are thought to be mediated via its immunosuppressive action on infiltrating lymphocytes in skin lesions. CsA and tacrolimus block T cell activation by inhibiting the phosphatase calcineurin and preventing translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of the transcription factor Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT). As calcineurin and NFAT 1 have been shown to be functionally active in cultured human keratocytes, expression of other NFAT family members such as NFAT-2 and possible functional activation was investigated in human keratocytes. RT-PCR and Western Analysis were used to investigate the presence of NFAT-2 mRNA and protein in human keratocytes. Tissue culture of human keratocytes and immunostaining of cells on coverslips and confocal microscopy were used to assess the degree of nuclear localisation of NFAT-2 in cultured cells. Keratome biopsies were taken from patients with psoriasis (lesional and non-lesional skin) and normal skin and immunohistochemistry was used to assess the NFAT-2 localisation in these biopsies using a well characterized anti-NFAT-2 antibody. The NFAT-2 mRNA and protein expression was demonstrated using RT-PCR and Western blotting. Moreover, the expression of NFAT-2 in normal skin, non-lesional and lesional psoriasis showed a striking basal staining suggesting a role for NFAT-2 in keratocytes proliferation. A range of cell types in the skin express NFAT-2. The expression of NFAT-2 in human keratocytes and response to different agonists provides perhaps a unique opportunity to examine the regulation, subcellular localization and kinetics of translocation of different NFATs in primary cultured human cells. In these experiments the author assessed the expression, localization of NFAT-2 in cultured human keratocytes and measured the degree of nuclear localisaion of NFAT-2 using immunofluorescence

  11. Visual Acuity of Simulated Thalamic Visual Prostheses in Normally Sighted Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Ailsa; Pezaris, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Simulation in normally sighted individuals is a crucial tool to evaluate the performance of potential visual prosthesis designs prior to human implantation of a device. Here, we investigated the effects of electrode count on visual acuity, learning rate and response time in 16 normally sighted subjects using a simulated thalamic visual prosthesis, providing the first performance reports for thalamic designs. A new letter recognition paradigm using a multiple-optotype two-alternative forced choice task was adapted from the Snellen eye chart, and specifically devised to be readily communicated to both human and non-human primate subjects. Validation of the method against a standard Snellen acuity test in 21 human subjects showed no significant differences between the two tests. The novel task was then used to address three questions about simulations of the center-weighted phosphene patterns typical of thalamic designs: What are the expected Snellen acuities for devices with varying numbers of contacts, do subjects display rapid adaptation to the new visual modality, and can response time in the task provide clues to the mechanisms of perception in low-resolution artificial vision? Population performance (hit rate) was significantly above chance when viewing Snellen 20/200 optotypes (Log MAR 1.0) with 370 phosphenes in the central 10 degrees of vision, ranging to Snellen 20/800 (Log MAR 1.6) with 25 central phosphenes. Furthermore, subjects demonstrated learning within the 1–2 hours of task experience indicating the potential for an effective rehabilitation and possibly better visual performance after a longer period of training. Response time differences suggest that direct letter perception occurred when hit rate was above 75%, whereas a slower strategy like feature-based pattern matching was used in conditions of lower relative resolution. As pattern matching can substantially boost effective acuity, these results suggest post-implant therapy should specifically

  12. An alternatively spliced surfactant protein B mRNA in normal human lung: disease implication.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Z; Wang, G; Demello, D E; Floros, J

    1999-01-01

    We identified an alternatively-spliced surfactant protein B (SP-B) mRNA from normal human lung with a 12 nt deletion at the beginning of exon 8. This deletion causes a loss of four amino acids in the SP-B precursor protein. Sequence comparison of the 3' splice sites reveals only one difference in the frequency of U/C in the 11 predominantly-pyrimidine nucleotide tract, 73% for the normal and 45% for the alternatively-spliced SP-B mRNA (77-99% for the consensus sequence). Analysis of SP-B mRNA in lung indicates that the abundance of the alternatively-spliced form is very low and varies among individuals. Although the relative abundance of the deletion form of SP-B mRNA remains constant among normal lungs, it is found with relatively higher abundance in the lungs of some individuals with diseases such as congenital alveolar proteinosis, respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, alveolar capillary dysplasia and hypophosphatasia. This observation points to the possibility that the alternative splicing is a potential regulatory mechanism of SP-B and may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease under certain circumstances. PMID:10493923

  13. Vertical normal modes of human ears: Individual variation and frequency estimation from pinna anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Parham; Takemoto, Hironori; Nishimura, Ryouichi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    Beyond the first peak of head-related transfer functions or pinna-related transfer functions (PRTFs) human pinnae are known to have two normal modes with "vertical" resonance patterns, involving two or three pressure anti-nodes in cavum, cymba, and fossa. However, little is known about individual variations in these modes, and there is no established model for estimating their center-frequencies from anthropometry. Here, with geometries of 38 pinnae measured, PRTFs were calculated and vertical modes visualized by numerical simulation. Most pinnae were found to have both Cavum-Fossa and Cavum-Cymba modes, with opposite-phase anti-nodes in cavum and either fossa or cymba, respectively. Nevertheless in both modes, fossa involvement varied substantially across pinnae, dependent on scaphoid fossa depth and cymba shallowness. Linear regression models were evaluated in mode frequency estimation, with 3322 measures derived from 31 pinna landmarks. The Cavum-Fossa normal mode frequency was best estimated [correlation coefficient r = 0.89, mean absolute error (MAE) = 257 Hz or 4.4%] by the distance from canal entrance to helix rim, and cymba horizontal depth. The Cavum-Cymba normal mode frequency was best estimated (r = 0.92, MAE = 247 Hz or 3.2%) by the sagittal-plane distance from concha floor to cymba anterior wall, and cavum horizontal depth. PMID:27586714

  14. Glycerophosphate acylation by microsomes and mitochondria of normal and dystrophic human muscle.

    PubMed

    Kunze, D; Rüstow, B; Olthoff, D

    1984-07-16

    The incorporation of [14C]glycerophosphate into phosphatidic acid, diacylglycerol, triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine by microsomes and mitochondria prepared from normal and dystrophic human muscle incubated in vitro in the presence of 0.3 mmol/l CDP-choline was measured. In mitochondria only phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol are labelled; the rate of incorporation into these two compounds showed no difference between dystrophic and normal mitochondria. In dystrophic microsomes the incorporation into phosphatidic acid was delayed and decreased. No incorporation of glycerol into diacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and triacylglycerol could be measured. Thus in dystrophic muscle microsomes only PA was labelled during an incubation of up to 45 min. In both types of microsomes the concentration of endogenous free fatty acids and diacylglycerol was nearly identical. The level of phosphatidylcholine was 186 and 79 nmol/mg microsomal protein in normal and dystrophic muscle microsomes, respectively. Whether the results could be explained as secondary changes was discussed. Despite some unsolved problems the conclusion was drawn that a better explanation of the results is to assume a primary defect involving microsomal-bound phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase and possibly glycerol-P-acyltransferases.

  15. Expression profile of undifferentiated cell transcription factor 1 in normal and cancerous human epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mouallif, Mustapha; Albert, Adelin; Zeddou, Mustapha; Ennaji, My Mustapha; Delvenne, Philippe; Guenin, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Undifferentiated cell Transcription Factor 1 (UTF1) is a chromatin-bound protein involved in stem cell differentiation. It was initially reported to be restricted to stem cells or germinal tissues. However, recent work suggests that UTF1 is also expressed in somatic cells and that its expression may increase during carcinogenesis. To further clarify the expression profile of UTF1, we evaluated UTF1 expression levels immunohistochemically in eight normal human epithelia (from breast, prostate, endometrium, bladder, colon, oesophagus, lung and kidney) and their corresponding tumours as well as in several epithelial cell lines. We showed UTF1 staining in normal and tumour epithelial tissues, but with varying intensities according to the tissue location. In vitro analyses also revealed that UTF1 is expressed in somatic epithelial cell lines even in the absence of Oct4A and Sox2, its two main known regulators. The comparison of UTF1 levels in normal and tumoral tissues revealed significant overexpression in endometrial and prostatic adenocarcinomas, whereas lower intensity of the staining was observed in renal and colic tumours, suggesting a potential tissue-specific function of UTF1. Altogether, these results highlight a potential dual role for UTF1, acting either as an oncogene or as a tumour suppressor depending on the tissue. These findings also question its role as a specific marker for stem cells. PMID:24738751

  16. Pulse wave imaging in normal, hypertensive and aneurysmal human aortas in vivo: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ronny X.; Luo, Jianwen; Balaram, Sandhya K.; Chaudhry, Farooq A.; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2013-07-01

    Arterial stiffness is a well-established biomarker for cardiovascular risk, especially in the case of hypertension. The progressive stages of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have also been associated with varying arterial stiffness. Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique that uses the pulse wave-induced arterial wall motion to map the propagation of the pulse wave and measure the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) as an index of arterial stiffness. In this study, the clinical feasibility of PWI was evaluated in normal, hypertensive, and aneurysmal human aortas. Radiofrequency-based speckle tracking was used to estimate the pulse wave-induced displacements in the abdominal aortic walls of normal (N = 15, mean age 32.5 ± 10.2 years), hypertensive (N = 13, mean age 60.8 ± 15.8 years), and aneurysmal (N = 5, mean age 71.6 ± 11.8 years) human subjects. Linear regression of the spatio-temporal variation of the displacement waveform in the anterior aortic wall over a single cardiac cycle yielded the slope as the PWV and the coefficient of determination r2 as an approximate measure of the pulse wave propagation uniformity. The aortic PWV measurements in all normal, hypertensive, and AAA subjects were 6.03 ± 1.68, 6.69 ± 2.80, and 10.54 ± 6.52 m s-1, respectively. There was no significant difference (p = 0.15) between the PWVs of the normal and hypertensive subjects while the PWVs of the AAA subjects were significantly higher (p < 0.001) compared to those of the other two groups. Also, the average r2 in the AAA subjects was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than that in the normal and hypertensive subjects. These preliminary results suggest that the regional PWV and the pulse wave propagation uniformity (r2) obtained using PWI, in addition to the PWI images and spatio-temporal maps that provide qualitative visualization of the pulse wave, may potentially provide valuable information for the clinical characterization of aneurysms

  17. Three-dimensional counting of morphologically normal human red blood cells via digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H.

    2015-01-01

    Counting morphologically normal cells in human red blood cells (RBCs) is extremely beneficial in the health care field. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) classification method of automatically determining the morphologically normal RBCs in the phase image of multiple human RBCs that are obtained by off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM). The RBC holograms are first recorded by DHM, and then the phase images of multiple RBCs are reconstructed by a computational numerical algorithm. To design the classifier, the three typical RBC shapes, which are stomatocyte, discocyte, and echinocyte, are used for training and testing. Nonmain or abnormal RBC shapes different from the three normal shapes are defined as the fourth category. Ten features, including projected surface area, average phase value, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, perimeter, mean corpuscular hemoglobin surface density, circularity, mean phase of center part, sphericity coefficient, elongation, and pallor, are extracted from each RBC after segmenting the reconstructed phase images by using a watershed transform algorithm. Moreover, four additional properties, such as projected surface area, perimeter, average phase value, and elongation, are measured from the inner part of each cell, which can give significant information beyond the previous 10 features for the separation of the RBC groups; these are verified in the experiment by the statistical method of Hotelling's T-square test. We also apply the principal component analysis algorithm to reduce the dimension number of variables and establish the Gaussian mixture densities using the projected data with the first eight principal components. Consequently, the Gaussian mixtures are used to design the discriminant functions based on Bayesian decision theory. To improve the performance of the Bayes classifier and the accuracy of estimation of its error rate, the leaving-one-out technique is applied. Experimental results show that the proposed method can

  18. Wound healing properties of ethyl acetate fraction of Moringa oleifera in normal human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gothai, Sivapragasam; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Tan, Woan Sean; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Wounds are the outcome of injuries to the skin that interrupt the soft tissue. Healing of a wound is a complex and long-drawn-out process of tissue repair and remodeling in response to injury. A large number of plants are used by folklore traditions for the treatment of cuts, wounds and burns. Moringa oleifera (MO) is an herb used as a traditional folk medicine for the treatment of various skin wounds and associated diseases. The underlying mechanisms of wound healing activity of ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves extract are completely unknown. Materials and Methods: In the current study, ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves was investigated for its efficacy on cell viability, proliferation and migration (wound closure rate) in human normal dermal fibroblast cells. Results: Results revealed that lower concentration (12.5 µg/ml, 25 µg/ml, and 50 µg/ml) of ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves showed remarkable proliferative and migratory effect on normal human dermal fibroblasts. Conclusion: This study suggested that ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves might be a potential therapeutic agent for skin wound healing by promoting fibroblast proliferation and migration through increasing the wound closure rate corroborating its traditional use. PMID:27069722

  19. The furano norclerodane diterpenoid disobulbin-D induces apoptosis in normal human liver L-02 cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Min; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Ruan, Jinlan; Tan, Xinqi; Liu, Jin; Wang, Cuifen; Zha, Xiao Ming; Zhang, Luyong

    2012-09-01

    Disobulbin-D (DBD), a hepatotoxic furano norclerodane diterpenoid, was isolated by bio-guided fractionation from the rhizome of Dioscorea bulbifera L. In working toward elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms of DBD toxicity, we treated normal human liver cell line L-02 cells with DBD in vitro and evaluated its toxicity in terms of cell viability, morphologic changes, induction of apoptosis/necrosis, and caspase 3 activity. The viability of L-02 cells was inhibited by DBD in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Apoptosis was supported by the Annexin V and propidium iodide assay, Hoechst 33258 staining, and the occurrence of a sub-G(1) peak. DBD can cause an increase in caspase 3 activity, and pretreatment with Ac-DEVD-CHO blocked cell death and attenuated the apoptosis, showing that DBD-induced L-02 cell apoptosis is caspase 3-dependent. These results suggest that the effects of DBD on the growth of normal human liver L-02 cells may be due to its induction of cell apoptosis, which may also explain the toxicity observed in the plants containing furano clerodane diterpenoids. PMID:21211949

  20. Particle irradiation induces FGF2 expression in normal human lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Bjornstad K, A.; Chang, E.; McNamara, M.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Lin, S. P.; Aragon, G.; Polansky, J. R.; Lui, G. M.; Blakely, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Particle Irradiation Induces FGF2 Expression in Normal Human Lens Cells. Particle radiations, including both proton and helium-ion beams, have been used to successfully treat choroidal melanoma, but with the complication of radiation-induced cataract. We have investigated a role for radiation-induced changes in the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) gene expression as part of the mechanism(s) underlying lens cell injury associated with cataract. Normal human lens epithelial (HLE) cells were cultured in vitro on extracellular matrix (ECM) originated from bovine corneal endothelial cells. This study reports evidence for rapid but transient induction of FGF2 transcripts, an increase of between 5- and 8-fold, within 0.5 h after exposure to particle radiation, followed by another wave of increased transcription at 2-3 h postirradiation. Immunofluorescence results confirm the enhanced levels of FGF2 protein rapidly after exposure to protons or helium ions, followed by another wave of increased activity unique to helium at 6 h postirradiation. This second wave of increased immunoreactivity was not observed in the proton-irradiated samples. Total FGF2 protein analysis after helium-ion exposures shows induced expression of three FGF2 isoforms, with an increase of up to 2-fold in the 18-kDa low-molecular-weight species. Studies of the effects of protons on individual FGF2 protein isoforms are in progress. Several mechanisms involving a role for FGF2 in radiation-induced cataract are discussed.

  1. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  2. The Fate of a Normal Human Cell Traversed by a Single Charged Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, C.; Zahnreich, S.; Kraft, D.; Friedrich, T.; Voss, K.-O.; Durante, M.; Ritter, S.

    2012-09-01

    The long-term ``fate'' of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability.

  3. Evaluating the genomic and sequence integrity of human ES cell lines; comparison to normal genomes.

    PubMed

    Funk, Walter D; Labat, Ivan; Sampathkumar, Janani; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Rosler, Elen; Steiger, Daniel; Sheibani, Nadia; Caillier, Stacy; Stache-Crain, Birgit; Johnson, Julie A; Meisner, Lorraine; Lacher, Markus D; Chapman, Karen B; Park, Myung Jin; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Drmanac, Rade; West, Michael D

    2012-03-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is a common chromosomal alteration that can occur during in vitro cultivation of human cells and can be accompanied by the accumulation of mutations in coding region sequences. We describe here a systematic application of current molecular technologies to provide a detailed understanding of genomic and sequence profiles of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines that were derived under GMP-compliant conditions. We first examined the overall chromosomal integrity using cytogenetic techniques to determine chromosome count, and to detect the presence of cytogenetically aberrant cells in the culture (mosaicism). Assays of copy number variation, using both microarray and sequence-based analyses, provide a detailed view genomic variation in these lines and shows that in early passage cultures of these lines, the size range and distribution of CNVs are entirely consistent with those seen in the genomes of normal individuals. Similarly, genome sequencing shows variation within these lines that is completely within the range seen in normal genomes. Important gene classes, such as tumor suppressors and genetic disease genes, do not display overtly disruptive mutations that could affect the overall safety of cell-based therapeutics. Complete sequence also allows the analysis of important transplantation antigens, such as ABO and HLA types. The combined application of cytogenetic and molecular technologies provides a detailed understanding of genomic and sequence profiles of GMP produced ES lines for potential use as therapeutic agents. PMID:22265736

  4. Expression of microRNA-370 in human breast cancer compare with normal samples

    PubMed Central

    Mollainezhad, Halimeh; Eskandari, Nahid; Pourazar, Abbasali; Salehi, Mansoor; Andalib, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the second leading cause of deaths from cancer in the woman. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous noncoding RNAs that are known critical player in carcinogenesis. The role of miR-370 in malignancies remains controversial because of its levels varying in different cancers according to its targets while the role of miR-370 in breast cancer has not been addressed so far. The aim of this study was to identify the expression pattern of miR-370 in human breast cancer tissue compared to adjacent healthy tissue. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two fresh frozen tissues (normal and malignant) from patients with breast cancer were examined for miR-370 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction method at 2013. Results: We observed up-regulation (six-fold higher) of miR-370 in breast cancer tissue compared with normal adjacent tissue. Tumor samples in stage III, invasive ductal type, larger tumor size, human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2+, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor−, P53 − status showed significantly increased expression in miR-370. Conclusion: Together, miR-370 may acts as an onco-miRNA, and it may have a novel role in breast cancer. Detection of miR-370 and its targets could be helpful as a diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:27563639

  5. Using infrared and Raman microspectroscopies to compare ex vivo involved psoriatic skin with normal human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Marie; Lefèvre, Thierry; Pouliot, Roxane; Auger, Michèle; Laroche, Gaétan

    2015-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic dermatosis that affects around 3% of the world's population. The etiology of this autoimmune pathology is not completely understood. The barrier function of psoriatic skin is known to be strongly altered, but the structural modifications at the origin of this dysfunction are not clear. To develop strategies to reduce symptoms of psoriasis or adequate substitutes for modeling, a deep understanding of the organization of psoriatic skin at a molecular level is required. Infrared and Raman microspectroscopies have been used to obtain direct molecular-level information on psoriatic and healthy human skin biopsies. From the intensities and positions of specific vibrational bands, the lipid and protein distribution and the lipid order have been mapped in the different layers of the skin. Results showed a similar distribution of lipids and collagen for normal and psoriatic human skin. However, psoriatic skin is characterized by heterogeneity in lipid/protein composition at the micrometer scale, a reduction in the definition of skin layer boundaries and a decrease in lipid chain order in the stratum corneum as compared to normal skin. A global decrease of the structural organization is exhibited in psoriatic skin that is compatible with an alteration of its barrier properties.

  6. The fate of a normal human cell traversed by a single charged particle.

    PubMed

    Fournier, C; Zahnreich, S; Kraft, D; Friedrich, T; Voss, K O; Durante, M; Ritter, S

    2012-01-01

    The long-term "fate" of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability. PMID:22966418

  7. Quantitative electron microscopic analysis of the epithelium of normal human alveolar mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bernimoulin, J P; Schroeder, H E

    1977-05-31

    The epithelium of normal human alveolar mucosa originating from the anterior vestibulum was subjected to stereologic analysis. Eight biopsies were collected half-way between the muco gingival junction and the vestibular fornix from 20 to 50 year-old females, and processed for light and electron microscopy. At two levels of magnification, electron micrographs were sampled from four artificially selected strata in regions of epithelial ridges. Stereologic point counting based on a computer-aided system for analyzing stratified epithelia served for examining a total of about 860 electron micrographs. The alveolar epithelium was 0.26 mm thick, occasionally interdigitated by short, slender connective tissue papillae, and consisted of (1) a narrow basal and suprabasal, and (2) a broad spinous and surface compartment. It displayed a differentiation pattern which, in most subjects studied, was similar to that of normal human buccal epithelium, however, on the average, produced less mature surface cells. This pattern was expressed mainly by a density increase of cytoplasmic filaments (98 A in diameter), a concomitant decrease of the cytoplasmic ground substance, the formation of dark-cored membrane coating granules, and invividually variable amounts of glycogen deposition. In some subjects, a mixed differentiation pattern was found. The structural organization of alveolar epithelium, in analogy to cheek epithelium, was compatible with the function of distensibility.

  8. Recall performance, plasma cortisol and plasma norepinephrine in normal human subjects.

    PubMed

    Bemelmans, Karel J; Goekoop, Jaap G; de Rijk, Roel; van Kempen, Godfried M J

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) correlates of recall performance in normal human subjects. Twenty-two normal human subjects were given one memory task: short-term recall of unrelated non-organizable lists of neutral words, in immediate recall conditions. Two types of memory were individualized: measures reflecting effortful processing and measures reflecting automatic processing, which were related to 3 daytime plasma cortisol (CORT) and plasma NE values, and assessed after venipuncture. It was hypothesized that plasma CORT is positively related and plasma norepinephrine (NE) is negatively related to effortful processing. Pearson correlation was computed and regression analysis was performed. Positive correlation appeared between plasma CORT values and negative correlation appeared between plasma NE values and measures reflecting effortful processing. However, stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that only morning plasma CORT values are functionally positively and afternoon plasma NE values are functionally negatively related to effortful processing. This suggests that morning HPA-axis activities enhance and afternoon SNS activities inhibit effortful processing.

  9. Goblet cells of the normal human bulbar conjunctiva and their assessment by impression cytology sampling.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Goblet cells of the conjunctiva are the main source of mucus for the ocular surface. The objectives of this review are to consider the goblet cells as assessed by various histological, cytological and electron microscopy methods, and to assess the consistency of published reports (over more than 25 years) of goblet cell density (GCD) from impression cytology specimens from nominally healthy human subjects. Reported GCD values have been notably variable, with a range from 24 to 2226 cells/mm² for average values. Data analysis suggests that a high density of goblet cells should be expected for the healthy human conjunctiva, with a tendency toward higher values in samples taken from normally covered locations (inferior and superior bulbar conjunctiva) of the open eye (at 973 +/- 789 cells/ mm²) than in samples taken from exposed (interpalpebral) locations (at 427 +/- 376 cells/mm²). No obvious change in GCD was found with respect to age, perhaps because the variability of the data did not allow detection of any age-related decline in GCD. Analyses of published data from 33 other sources indicated a trend for GCD to be lower than normal across a spectrum of ocular surface diseases.

  10. Adult, embryonic and fetal hemoglobin are expressed in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Emara, Marwan; Turner, A Robert; Allalunis-Turner, Joan

    2014-02-01

    Hemoglobin is a hemoprotein, produced mainly in erythrocytes circulating in the blood. However, non-erythroid hemoglobins have been previously reported in other cell types including human and rodent neurons of embryonic and adult brain, but not astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive tumor among gliomas. However, despite extensive basic and clinical research studies on GBM cells, little is known about glial defence mechanisms that allow these cells to survive and resist various types of treatment. We have shown previously that the newest members of vertebrate globin family, neuroglobin (Ngb) and cytoglobin (Cygb), are expressed in human GBM cells. In this study, we sought to determine whether hemoglobin is also expressed in GBM cells. Conventional RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, western blot analysis, mass spectrometry and fluorescence microscopy were used to investigate globin expression in GBM cell lines (M006x, M059J, M059K, M010b, U87R and U87T) that have unique characteristics in terms of tumor invasion and response to radiotherapy and hypoxia. The data showed that α, β, γ, δ, ζ and ε globins are expressed in all tested GBM cell lines. To our knowledge, we are the first to report expression of fetal, embryonic and adult hemoglobin in GBM cells under normal physiological conditions that may suggest an undefined function of those expressed hemoglobins. Together with our previous reports on globins (Ngb and Cygb) expression in GBM cells, the expression of different hemoglobins may constitute a part of series of active defence mechanisms supporting these cells to resist various types of treatments including chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  11. Human pluripotent stem cells as a model of trophoblast differentiation in both normal development and disease.

    PubMed

    Horii, Mariko; Li, Yingchun; Wakeland, Anna K; Pizzo, Donald P; Nelson, Katharine K; Sabatini, Karen; Laurent, Louise Chang; Liu, Ying; Parast, Mana M

    2016-07-01

    Trophoblast is the primary epithelial cell type in the placenta, a transient organ required for proper fetal growth and development. Different trophoblast subtypes are responsible for gas/nutrient exchange (syncytiotrophoblasts, STBs) and invasion and maternal vascular remodeling (extravillous trophoblasts, EVTs). Studies of early human placental development are severely hampered by the lack of a representative trophoblast stem cell (TSC) model with the capacity for self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into both STBs and EVTs. Primary cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) isolated from early-gestation (6-8 wk) human placentas are bipotential, a phenotype that is lost with increasing gestational age. We have identified a CDX2(+)/p63(+) CTB subpopulation in the early postimplantation human placenta that is significantly reduced later in gestation. We describe a reproducible protocol, using defined medium containing bone morphogenetic protein 4 by which human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can be differentiated into CDX2(+)/p63(+) CTB stem-like cells. These cells can be replated and further differentiated into STB- and EVT-like cells, based on marker expression, hormone secretion, and invasive ability. As in primary CTBs, differentiation of hPSC-derived CTBs in low oxygen leads to reduced human chorionic gonadotropin secretion and STB-associated gene expression, instead promoting differentiation into HLA-G(+) EVTs in an hypoxia-inducible, factor-dependent manner. To validate further the utility of hPSC-derived CTBs, we demonstrated that differentiation of trisomy 21 (T21) hPSCs recapitulates the delayed CTB maturation and blunted STB differentiation seen in T21 placentae. Collectively, our data suggest that hPSCs are a valuable model of human placental development, enabling us to recapitulate processes that result in both normal and diseased pregnancies. PMID:27325764

  12. Human tracheobronchial basal cells. Normal versus remodeling/repairing phenotypes in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Ahmad, Shama; Jian, Abhilasha; Li, Bilan; Smith, Russell W; Helm, Karen M; Seibold, Max A; Groshong, Steven D; White, Carl W; Reynolds, Susan D

    2013-12-01

    Human tracheobronchial epithelial (TBE) basal cells (BCs) function as progenitors in normal tissue. However, mechanistic studies are typically performed in vitro and frequently use BCs recovered from patients who die of nonrespiratory disease. It is not known whether the cadaveric epithelium (1) is undergoing homeostatic remodeling and/or repair, or (2) yields BC clones that represent homeostatic processes identified in tissue. We sought to compare the phenotype of TBE-BCs with that of BCs cultured under optimal clone-forming conditions. TBE pathology was evaluated using quantitative histomorphometry. The cultured BC phenotype was determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. Clone organization and cell phenotype were determined by immunostaining. The cadaveric TBE is 20% normal. In these regions, BCs are keratin (K)-5(+) and tetraspanin CD151(+), and demonstrate a low mitotic index. In contrast, 80% of the cadaveric TBE exhibits homeostatic remodeling/repair processes. In these regions, BCs are K5(+)/K14(+), and a subset expresses tissue factor (TF). Passage 1 TBE cells are BCs that are K5(+)/TF(+), and half coexpress CD151. Optimal clone formation conditions use an irradiated NIH3T3 fibroblast feeder layer (American Type Culture Collection, Frederick, MD) and serum-supplemented Epicult-B medium (Stemcell Technologies, La Jolla, CA). The TF(+)/CD151(-) BC subpopulation is the most clonogenic BC subtype, and is enriched with K14(+) cells. TF(+)/CD151(-) BCs generate clones containing BCs that are K5(+)/Trp63(+), but K14(-)/CD151(-). TF(+) cells are limited to the clone edge. In conclusion, clonogenic human TBE BCs (1) exhibit a molecular phenotype that is a composite of the normal and remodeling/reparative BC phenotypes observed in tissue, and (2) generate organoid clones that contain phenotypically distinct BC subpopulations.

  13. UPRT, a suicide-gene therapy candidate in higher eukaryotes, is required for Drosophila larval growth and normal adult lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arpan C.; Shimell, MaryJane; Leof, Emma R.; Haley, Macy J.; O’Connor, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) is a pyrimidine salvage pathway enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of uracil to uridine monophosphate (UMP). The enzyme is highly conserved from prokaryotes to humans and yet phylogenetic evidence suggests that UPRT homologues from higher-eukaryotes, including Drosophila, are incapable of binding uracil. Purified human UPRT also do not show any enzymatic activity in vitro, making microbial UPRT an attractive candidate for anti-microbial drug development, suicide-gene therapy, and cell-specific mRNA labeling techniques. Nevertheless, the enzymatic site of UPRT remains conserved across the animal kingdom indicating an in vivo role for the enzyme. We find that the Drosophila UPRT homologue, krishah (kri), codes for an enzyme that is required for larval growth, pre-pupal/pupal viability and long-term adult lifespan. Our findings suggest that UPRT from all higher eukaryotes is likely enzymatically active in vivo and challenges the previous notion that the enzyme is non-essential in higher eukaryotes and cautions against targeting the enzyme for therapeutic purposes. Our findings also suggest that expression of the endogenous UPRT gene will likely cause background incorporation when using microbial UPRT as a cell-specific mRNA labeling reagent in higher eukaryotes. PMID:26271729

  14. Validation of Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells as a Model for Influenza A Infections in Human Distal Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A. Sally; Chertow, Daniel S.; Moyer, Jenna E.; Suzich, Jon; Sandouk, Aline; Dorward, David W.; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Primary normal human bronchial/tracheal epithelial (NHBE) cells, derived from the distal-most aspect of the trachea at the bifurcation, have been used for a number of studies in respiratory disease research. Differences between the source tissue and the differentiated primary cells may impact infection studies based on this model. Therefore, we examined how well-differentiated NHBE cells compared with their source tissue, the human distal trachea, as well as the ramifications of these differences on influenza A viral pathogenesis research using this model. We employed a histological analysis including morphological measurements, electron microscopy, multi-label immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, lectin histochemistry, and microarray expression analysis to compare differentiated NHBEs to human distal tracheal epithelium. Pseudostratified epithelial height, cell type variety and distribution varied significantly. Electron microscopy confirmed differences in cellular attachment and paracellular junctions. Influenza receptor lectin histochemistry revealed that α2,3 sialic acids were rarely present on the apical aspect of the differentiated NHBE cells, but were present in low numbers in the distal trachea. We bound fluorochrome bioconjugated virus to respiratory tissue and NHBE cells and infected NHBE cells with human influenza A viruses. Both indicated that the pattern of infection progression in these cells correlated with autopsy studies of fatal cases from the 2009 pandemic. PMID:25604814

  15. CSF monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactate in the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (normal pressure hydrocephalus) related to CSF hydrodynamic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Malm, J; Kristensen, B; Ekstedt, J; Adolfsson, R; Wester, P

    1991-01-01

    Monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactic acid in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated on patients with the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (idiopathic normal pressure syndrome; AHS, n = 15), Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 14), multi-infarct dementia (MID, n = 13) and controls (n = 21). Patients had clinical and CSF hydrodynamic investigations. Monoamine concentrations were determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, cholinesterases and lactate were determined photometrically. In the AHS patients, CSF monoamine concentrations were not significantly different compared with controls, AD or MID patients. AHS and AD patients showed a similar reduction of CSF acetylcholinesterase activity compared with controls. Positive correlations were found in concentrations of CSF homovanillic acid, CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and CSF lactic acid versus CSF outflow conductance (that is, resistance against CSF outflow) in the AHS patients. A similar pattern was observed in a subgroup of MID patients characterised by dilated ventricles and disturbed CSF hydrodynamics. These data suggest that a low CSF outflow conductance may facilitate the clearance of acidic substances from the arachnoid space at the probenecid sensitive active transport site. Alternative explanations would be that a pathologically low CSF outflow conductance is accompanied by an inverse caudorostral flow of CSF or a compromised trans-ependymal diffusion. PMID:1709421

  16. Satiation due to equally palatable sweet and savory meals does not differ in normal weight young adults.

    PubMed

    Griffioen-Roose, Sanne; Mars, Monica; Finlayson, Graham; Blundell, John E; de Graaf, Cees

    2009-11-01

    Sensory properties are greatly involved in the process of satiation. Regarding the nature of sensory signals, an important distinction can be made between sweet and savory taste. It is unclear, however, whether sweet and savory differ in their influence on satiation. Our objective was to investigate the difference between a sweet and savory taste on satiation, independent of palatability, texture, energy density, and macronutrient composition. A crossover design was used, consisting of 3 test conditions in which 2 tastes (sweet and savory) were compared. Sixty-four healthy, nonsmoking, unrestrained participants (18 males and 46 females), with a mean age of 22.3 +/- 2.4 y and a mean BMI of 21.6 +/- 1.7 kg/m(2), enrolled. Rice was used as a test meal served in either a sweet or savory version. The meals were similar in palatability, texture, energy density, and macronutrient composition. Ad libitum intake, eating rate, and changes in pleasantness and appetite during the meals were measured. Ad libitum intake did not differ between the 2 meals; participants ate a mean of 314 +/- 144 g of the sweet meal and 333 +/- 159 g of the savory meal. Eating rate (sweet, 38 +/- 14 g/min; savory, 37 +/- 14 g/min) and changes in pleasantness and appetite during the meals were similar. Homogeneous meals with a sweet or savory taste, similar in palatability, texture, energy density, and macronutrient composition, do not differ in their influence on satiation in normal weight young adults.

  17. New three-dimensional cephalometric analyses among adults with a skeletal Class I pattern and normal occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Bayome, Mohamed; Park, Jae Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess new three-dimensional (3D) cephalometric variables, and to evaluate the relationships among skeletal and dentoalveolar variables through 3D cephalometric analysis. Methods Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were acquired from 38 young adults (18 men and 20 women; 22.6 ± 3.2 years) with normal occlusion. Thirty-five landmarks were digitized on the 3D-rendered views. Several measurements were obtained for selected landmarks. Correlations among different variables were calculated by means of Pearson's correlation coefficient values. Results The body of the mandible had a longer curve length in men (102.3 ± 4.4 mm) than in women (94.5 ± 4.7 mm) (p < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in the maxillary basal curve length. Men had significantly larger facial dimensions, whereas women had a larger gonial angle (117.0 ± 4.0 vs. 113.8 ± 3.3; p < 0.001). Strong-to-moderate correlation values were found among the vertical and transverse variables (r = 0.71 to 0.51). Conclusions The normative values of new 3D cephalometric parameters, including the maxillary and mandibular curve length, were obtained. Strong-to-moderate correlation values were found among several vertical and transverse variables through 3D cephalometric analysis. This method of cephalometric analyses can be useful in diagnosis and treatment planning for patients with dentofacial deformities. PMID:23671831

  18. Plasma amino acid concentrations in normal adults fed meals with added monosodium L-glutamate and aspartame.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1983-09-01

    Aspartame is a dipeptide sweetener containing aspartate. It has been suggested that aspartame addition to meals containing large amounts of monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) would result in a rapid rise in plasma glutamate and/or aspartate concentrations and increase the potential for dicarboxylic amino acid--induced toxicity. Sic normal adult subjects were fed three hamburger and milk shake meals providing protein at 1 g/kg body weight in a Latin square design. One meal had no additions, the second provided MSG at 150 mg/kg body weight, and the third provided MSG at 150 mg/kg body weight and aspartame at 23 mg/kg body weight. The addition of MSG alone significantly increased plasma glutamate + aspartate concentration above values noted after ingestion of the meal alone. Aspartame addition to meals already containing MSG did not further significantly increase plasma glutamate + aspartate concentration above values noted when only MSG was added. However, aspartame addition did significantly increase the mean plasma phenylalanine concentration above values noted after ingestion of the meal alone or the meal with added MSG, reflecting aspartame's phenylalanine content. The data do not support the suggestion that aspartame addition to high protein meals already containing large amounts of MSG, will promote a rapid and dangerous rise in plasma glutamate and aspartate concentrations.

  19. What is the normal small bowel length in humans? first donor-based cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Gondolesi, G; Ramisch, D; Padin, J; Almau, H; Sandi, M; Schelotto, P B; Fernandez, A; Rumbo, C; Solar, H

    2012-12-01

    Normal small bowel length (SBL) has been reported within a wide range, but never studied in a cohort of either pediatric or adult deceased donors. Between 5/2006 and 2/2011, SBL was measured in all grafts procured for intestinal transplantation at a single center and used for either isolated intestinal transplant (15) or multiorgan transplants (5) employing a standardized method. SBL was the only not significantly different variable among pediatric and adult donors divided by age 16. Furthermore, donors were classified in 3 groups: group 1: Height < 70 cm, group 2: 71-150 cm and group 3: ≥ 151 cm. Mean age was: 0.58, 5.6, 22.01 years, respectively. Mean height and weight were 65.8, 123.2, 166.1 cm (p = 0.001) and 6.9, 23.8, 65.2 kg (p = 0.001), for each group. The SBL by group was: 283.0, 324.7, 356.0 cm, remaining as the only nonsignificant variable (p = 0.06), in contrast to BMI, BSA (p = 0.001). The SBL/height ratio: 4.24, 2.7, 2.12 (p = 0.001; rho: -0.623) or SBL/BSA ratio was 8.36, 3.7, and 2.03, respectively (p : 0.0001; rho: -0.9). SBL does not increase with growth like other anthropometric variables. The SBL/height ratio significantly decreases with growth; however, bowel diameter increases, which needs further evaluation.

  20. Cellular differentiation hierarchies in normal and culture-adapted human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Enver, Tariq; Soneji, Shamit; Joshi, Chirag; Brown, John; Iborra, Francisco; Orntoft, Torben; Thykjaer, Thomas; Maltby, Edna; Smith, Kath; Abu Dawud, Raed; Jones, Mark; Matin, Maryam; Gokhale, Paul; Draper, Jonathan; Andrews, Peter W

    2005-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (HESC) lines vary in their characteristics and behaviour not only because they are derived from genetically outbred populations, but also because they may undergo progressive adaptation upon long-term culture in vitro. Such adaptation may reflect selection of variants with altered propensity for survival and retention of an undifferentiated phenotype. Elucidating the mechanisms involved will be important for understanding normal self-renewal and commitment to differentiation and for validating the safety of HESC-based therapy. We have investigated this process of adaptation at the cellular and molecular levels through a comparison of early passage (normal) and late passage (adapted) sublines of a single HESC line, H7. To account for spontaneous differentiation that occurs in HESC cultures, we sorted cells for SSEA3, which marks undifferentiated HESC. We show that the gene expression programmes of the adapted cells partially reflected their aberrant karyotype, but also resulted from a failure in X-inactivation, emphasizing the importance in adaptation of karyotypically silent epigenetic changes. On the basis of growth potential, ability to re-initiate ES cultures and global transcription profiles, we propose a cellular differentiation hierarchy for maintenance cultures of HESC: normal SSEA3+ cells represent pluripotent stem cells. Normal SSEA3- cells have exited this compartment, but retain multilineage differentiation potential. However, adapted SSEA3+ and SSEA3- cells co-segregate within the stem cell territory, implying that adaptation reflects an alteration in the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. As this balance is also an essential feature of cancer, the mechanisms of culture adaptation may mirror those of oncogenesis and tumour progression. PMID:16159889

  1. Variability of glutathione S-transferase isoenzyme patterns in matched normal and cancer human breast tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, M K; Engqvist-Goldstein, A; Montali, J A; Wheatley, J B; Schmidt, D E; Kauvar, L M

    1994-01-01

    The determination of GST levels in blood has been proposed to a marker of tumour burden in general, whereas level of the P1 isoenzyme has been identified as a prognostic factor for breast-cancer patients receiving no adjuvant chemotherapy. Particular glutathione S-transferase (GST) isoenzymes differ in their substrate specificity, however, and their presence or absence might therefore account for the resistance of tumours to particular chemotherapeutic drugs, as already established for cultured cell lines. Determination of the GST isoenzyme profile of a cancer tissue could have prognostic value in the selection of treatment if the levels of expression/activity show a degree of variation comparable with that exhibited by actual patient responses. Using reversed-phase h.p.l.c. to quantify affinity-isolated GSTs, we have analysed full isoenzyme profiles in the first large sample of matched normal and cancer human tissues (18 breast-cancer patients). In no patients did the tumour tissues express any isoenzymes that were not found in normal breast tissue. In addition to the GSTs, another enzyme, identified as enoyl-CoA isomerase, was regularly found in breast tissue cytosol following elution from a hexyl-glutathione affinity column. In most cases, the average level of GST was substantially elevated in the cancer tissues above the levels in normal breast tissue from the same patient. Furthermore, the relative levels of the isoenzymes were substantially more variable in the cancer samples than in the normal breast tissue, providing a plausible mechanism for the well established variable response to treatment. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7818489

  2. Leptin and Adiponectin Modulate the Self-renewal of Normal Human Breast Epithelial Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Esper, Raymond M; Dame, Michael; McClintock, Shannon; Holt, Peter R; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Wicha, Max S; Brenner, Dean E

    2015-12-01

    Multiple mechanisms are likely to account for the link between obesity and increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Two adipokines, leptin and adiponectin, are of particular interest due to their opposing biologic functions and associations with breast cancer risk. In the current study, we investigated the effects of leptin and adiponectin on normal breast epithelial stem cells. Levels of leptin in human adipose explant-derived conditioned media positively correlated with the size of the normal breast stem cell pool. In contrast, an inverse relationship was found for adiponectin. Moreover, a strong linear relationship was observed between the leptin/adiponectin ratio in adipose conditioned media and breast stem cell self-renewal. Consistent with these findings, exogenous leptin stimulated whereas adiponectin suppressed breast stem cell self-renewal. In addition to local in-breast effects, circulating factors, including leptin and adiponectin, may contribute to the link between obesity and breast cancer. Increased levels of leptin and reduced amounts of adiponectin were found in serum from obese compared with age-matched lean postmenopausal women. Interestingly, serum from obese women increased stem cell self-renewal by 30% compared with only 7% for lean control serum. Taken together, these data suggest a plausible explanation for the obesity-driven increase in postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Leptin and adiponectin may function as both endocrine and paracrine/juxtacrine factors to modulate the size of the normal stem cell pool. Interventions that disrupt this axis and thereby normalize breast stem cell self-renewal could reduce the risk of breast cancer.

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies Detect a Spectrin-Like Protein in Normal and Dystrophic Human Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleyard, S. T.; Dunn, M. J.; Dubowitz, V.; Scott, M. L.; Pittman, S. J.; Shotton, D. M.

    1984-02-01

    Spectrin is the major protein of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton, which is bound to the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane's lipid bilayer and is responsible for cell shape and membrane elasticity. Inability to identify spectrin in other cell types led to the assumption that this protein was unique to erythrocytes. However, spectrin-like proteins have been demonstrated recently in a variety of cell types, including skeletal and cardiac muscle, in several species. We used monoclonal antibodies against human erythrocyte spectrin subunits in an immunocytochemical study to detect related proteins in normal and diseased human skeletal muscle. Six of seven monoclonal antibodies against β -spectrin determinants were bound at the cytoplasmic surface of muscle fiber plasma membranes, whereas none of six monoclonal antibodies against α -spectrin determinants was bound. Muscle fibers of patients with neuromuscular diseases showed similar distribution and specificity of antibody binding to those of normal subjects, but the intensity of binding was increased. In contrast, probable regenerating fibers in muscle of patients with muscular dystrophies showed reduced binding of antibodies, but reduced binding was not seen in fetal muscle fibers nor in those of a patient with a myotubular myopathy. We conclude that human skeletal muscle fibers possess a spectrin-related protein associated with their plasma membrane that shows extensive β -chain similarities to erythrocyte spectrin but differs significantly with respect to the α -subunit. Its function may be associated with the maintenance of membrane and myofibril integrity during contraction, and the increased antibody binding in diseased muscle may reflect a structural rearrangement of spectrin or a compensatory increase in spectrin abundance in response to increased stress on these systems.

  4. Gene expression profiling of di-n-butyl phthalate in normal human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gwinn, Maureen R; Whipkey, Diana L; Tennant, Lora B; Weston, Ainsley

    2007-01-01

    Studies show that female workers in the personal-care industry have an increased risk of developing cancer believed to be the result of increased exposure to toxic and/or carcinogenic chemicals found in cosmetics, hair dyes, and nail polish. One chemical found in multiple personal-care products, di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), is a known endocrine disruptor and has been found in increased levels in women of childbearing age. The goal of this study was to elucidate mechanisms of phthalate toxicity in normal human cells to provide information concerning interindividual variation and gene-environment interactions. Normal human mammary epithelial cell strains were obtained from discarded tissues following reduction mammoplasty [Cooperative Human Tissue Network (sponsors: NCI/NDRI)]. Gene transcription in each cell strain was analyzed using high-density oligonucleotide DNA microarrays (U133A, Affymetrix) and changes in the expression of selected genes were verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (ABI). DNA microarrays were hybridized with total RNA that was collected after DBP treatment for 5 hr and 10 hr. RNA was harvested from the vehicle control (acetone) at 10 hr. Data Mining Tool software (Affymetrix) was used to separate genes in clusters based on their expression patterns over time. Only 57 genes were found to be altered in all four cell strains following exposure to DBP. These included genes involved in fertility (inhibin, placental growth factor), immune response (tumor necrosis factor induced protein), and antioxidant status (glutathione peroxidase). Data from this study will help clarify the role of DBP in reproductive toxicity, and yield biomarkers of exposure for future epidemiology studies. PMID:17725530

  5. Gene expression profiling of di-n-butyl phthalate in normal human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gwinn, Maureen R; Whipkey, Diana L; Tennant, Lora B; Weston, Ainsley

    2007-01-01

    Studies show that female workers in the personal-care industry have an increased risk of developing cancer believed to be the result of increased exposure to toxic and/or carcinogenic chemicals found in cosmetics, hair dyes, and nail polish. One chemical found in multiple personal-care products, di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), is a known endocrine disruptor and has been found in increased levels in women of childbearing age. The goal of this study was to elucidate mechanisms of phthalate toxicity in normal human cells to provide information concerning interindividual variation and gene-environment interactions. Normal human mammary epithelial cell strains were obtained from discarded tissues following reduction mammoplasty [Cooperative Human Tissue Network (sponsors: NCI/NDRI)]. Gene transcription in each cell strain was analyzed using high-density oligonucleotide DNA microarrays (U133A, Affymetrix) and changes in the expression of selected genes were verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (ABI). DNA microarrays were hybridized with total RNA that was collected after DBP treatment for 5 hr and 10 hr. RNA was harvested from the vehicle control (acetone) at 10 hr. Data Mining Tool software (Affymetrix) was used to separate genes in clusters based on their expression patterns over time. Only 57 genes were found to be altered in all four cell strains following exposure to DBP. These included genes involved in fertility (inhibin, placental growth factor), immune response (tumor necrosis factor induced protein), and antioxidant status (glutathione peroxidase). Data from this study will help clarify the role of DBP in reproductive toxicity, and yield biomarkers of exposure for future epidemiology studies.

  6. Rejoining of isochromatid breaks induced by heavy ions in G2-phase normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Durante, M.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Ito, H.; Wu, H.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    We reported previously that exposure of normal human fibroblasts in G2 phase of the cell cycle to high-LET radiation produces a much higher frequency of isochromatid breaks than exposure to gamma rays. We concluded that an increase in the production of isochromatid breaks is a signature of initial high-LET radiation-induced G2-phase damage. In this paper, we report the repair kinetics of isochromatid breaks induced by high-LET radiation in normal G2-phase human fibroblasts. Exponentially growing human fibroblasts (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays or energetic carbon (290 MeV/nucleon), silicon (490 MeV/nucleon), or iron (200 MeV/nucleon) ions. Prematurely condensed chromosomes were induced by calyculin A after different postirradiation incubation times ranging from 0 to 600 min. Chromosomes were stained with Giemsa, and aberrations were scored in cells at G2 phase. G2-phase fragments, the result of the induction of isochromatid breaks, decreased quickly with incubation time. The curve for the kinetics of the rejoining of chromatid-type breaks showed a slight upward curvature with time after exposure to 440 keV/microm iron particles, probably due to isochromatid-isochromatid break rejoining. The formation of chromatid exchanges after exposure to high-LET radiation therefore appears to be underestimated, because isochromatid-isochromatid exchanges cannot be detected. Increased induction of isochromatid breaks and rejoining of isochromatid breaks affect the overall kinetics of chromatid-type break rejoining after exposure to high-LET radiation.

  7. Long-term facilitation of genioglossus activity is present in normal humans during NREM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhuri, Susmita; Pierchala, Lisa; Aboubakr, Salah E.; Shkoukani, Mahdi; Badr, M. Safwan

    2008-01-01

    Episodic hypoxia (EH) is followed by increased ventilatory motor output in the recovery period indicative of long-term facilitation (LTF). We hypothesized that episodic hypoxia evokes LTF of genioglossus (GG) muscle activity in humans during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) sleep. We studied 12 normal non-flow limited humans during stable NREM sleep. We induced 10 brief (3 minute) episodes of isocapnic hypoxia followed by 5 minutes of room air. Measurements were obtained during control, hypoxia, and at 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes of recovery, respectively, for minute ventilation (V̇I), supraglottic pressure (PSG), upper airway resistance (RUA) and phasic GG electromyogram (EMGGG). In addition, sham studies were conducted on room air. During hypoxia there was a significant increase in phasic EMGGG (202.7±24.1% of control, p<0.01) and in V̇I (123.0±3.3% of control, p<0.05); however, only phasic EMGGG demonstrated a significant persistent increase throughout recovery (198.9±30.9%, 203.6±29.9% and 205.4±26.4% of control, at 5, 10, and 20 minutes of recovery, respectively, p<0.01). In multivariate regression analysis, age and phasic EMGGG activity during hypoxia were significant predictors of EMGGG at recovery 20 minutes. No significant changes in any of the measured parameters were noted during sham studies. Conclusion: 1) EH elicits LTF of GG in normal non-flow limited humans during NREM sleep, without ventilatory or mechanical LTF. 2) GG activity during the recovery period correlates with the magnitude of GG activation during hypoxia, and inversely with age. PMID:17945544

  8. Neurokinin B is critical for normal timing of sexual maturation but dispensable for adult reproductive function in female mice.

    PubMed

    True, Cadence; Nasrin Alam, Sayeda; Cox, Kimberly; Chan, Yee-Ming; Seminara, Stephanie B

    2015-04-01

    Humans carrying mutations in neurokinin B (NKB) or the NKB receptor fail to undergo puberty due to decreased secretion of GnRH. Despite this pubertal delay, many of these patients go on to achieve activation of their hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in adulthood, a phenomenon termed reversal, indicating that NKB signaling may play a more critical role for the timing of pubertal development than adult reproductive function. NKB receptor-deficient mice are hypogonadotropic but have no defects in the timing of sexual maturation. The current study has performed the first phenotypic evaluation of mice bearing mutations in Tac2, the gene encoding the NKB ligand, to determine whether they have impaired sexual development similar to their human counterparts. Male Tac2-/- mice showed no difference in the timing of sexual maturation or fertility compared with wild-type littermates and were fertile. In contrast, Tac2-/- females had profound delays in sexual maturation, with time to vaginal opening and first estrus occurring significantly later than controls, and initial abnormalities in estrous cycles. However, cycling recovered in adulthood and Tac2-/- females were fertile, although they produced fewer pups per litter. Thus, female Tac2-/- mice parallel humans harboring NKB pathway mutations, with delayed sexual maturation and activation of the reproductive cascade later in life. Moreover, direct comparison of NKB ligand and receptor-deficient females confirmed that only NKB ligand-deficient animals have delayed sexual maturation, suggesting that in the absence of the NKB receptor, NKB may regulate the timing of sexual maturation through other tachykinin receptors.

  9. Adult Education and the Human Environment: Transactions of a Celebration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones-Quartey, K. A. B., Ed.; And Others

    The document comprises a collection of speeches and seminar reports arising from the 25th anniversary celebration of the Institute of Adult Education at the University of Ghana. The theme of the celebration, introduced in the first chapter, was Adult Education and Man's Environment--the Next Quarter-Century. The second chapter comprises the…

  10. Transcriptional profiling of adult neural stem-like cells from the human brain.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Behnan, Jinan; Helseth, Eirik; Langmoen, Iver A

    2014-01-01

    There is a great potential for the development of new cell replacement strategies based on adult human neural stem-like cells. However, little is known about the hierarchy of cells and the unique molecular properties of stem- and progenitor cells of the nervous system. Stem cells from the adult human brain can be propagated and expanded in vitro as free floating neurospheres that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three cell types of the central nervous system. Here we report the first global gene expression study of adult human neural stem-like cells originating from five human subventricular zone biopsies (mean age 42, range 33-60). Compared to adult human brain tissue, we identified 1,189 genes that were significantly up- and down-regulated in adult human neural stem-like cells (1% false discovery rate). We found that adult human neural stem-like cells express stem cell markers and have reduced levels of markers that are typical of the mature cells in the nervous system. We report that the genes being highly expressed in adult human neural stem-like cells are associated with developmental processes and the extracellular region of the cell. The calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions are enriched among the most differentially regulated genes between adult human neural stem-like cells and adult human brain tissue. We confirmed the expression of 10 of the most up-regulated genes in adult human neural stem-like cells in an additional sample set that included adult human neural stem-like cells (n = 6), foetal human neural stem cells (n = 1) and human brain tissues (n = 12). The NGFR, SLITRK6 and KCNS3 receptors were further investigated by immunofluorescence and shown to be heterogeneously expressed in spheres. These receptors could potentially serve as new markers for the identification and characterisation of neural stem- and progenitor cells or as targets for manipulation of cellular fate.

  11. Transcriptional Profiling of Adult Neural Stem-Like Cells from the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Vik-Mo, Einar O.; Behnan, Jinan; Helseth, Eirik; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2014-01-01

    There is a great potential for the development of new cell replacement strategies based on adult human neural stem-like cells. However, little is known about the hierarchy of cells and the unique molecular properties of stem- and progenitor cells of the nervous system. Stem cells from the adult human brain can be propagated and expanded in vitro as free floating neurospheres that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three cell types of the central nervous system. Here we report the first global gene expression study of adult human neural stem-like cells originating from five human subventricular zone biopsies (mean age 42, range 33–60). Compared to adult human brain tissue, we identified 1,189 genes that were significantly up- and down-regulated in adult human neural stem-like cells (1% false discovery rate). We found that adult human neural stem-like cells express stem cell markers and have reduced levels of markers that are typical of the mature cells in the nervous system. We report that the genes being highly expressed in adult human neural stem-like cells are associated with developmental processes and the extracellular region of the cell. The calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions are enriched among the most differentially regulated genes between adult human neural stem-like cells and adult human brain tissue. We confirmed the expression of 10 of the most up-regulated genes in adult human neural stem-like cells in an additional sample set that included adult human neural stem-like cells (n = 6), foetal human neural stem cells (n = 1) and human brain tissues (n = 12). The NGFR, SLITRK6 and KCNS3 receptors were further investigated by immunofluorescence and shown to be heterogeneously expressed in spheres. These receptors could potentially serve as new markers for the identification and characterisation of neural stem- and progenitor cells or as targets for manipulation of cellular fate. PMID

  12. Postmortem Adult Human Microglia Proliferate in Culture to High Passage and Maintain Their Response to Amyloid-β

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ling; Rezvanian, Aras; Kukreja, Lokesh; Hoveydai, Ramez; Bigio, Eileen H.; Mesulam, M.-Marsel; El Khoury, Joseph; Geula, Changiz

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are immune cells of the brain that display a range of functions. Most of our knowledge about microglia biology and function is based on cells from the rodent brain. Species variation in the complexity of the brain and differences in microglia response in the primate when compared with the rodent, require use of adult human microglia in studies of microglia biology. While methods exist for isolation of microglia from postmortem human brains, none allow culturing cells to high passage. Thus cells from the same case could not be used in parallel studies and multiple conditions. Here we report a method, which includes use of growth factors such as granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor, for successful culturing of adult human microglia from postmortem human brains up to 28 passages without significant loss of proliferation. Such cultures maintained their phenotype, including uptake of the scavenger receptor ligand acetylated low density lipoprotein and response to the amyloid-β peptide, and were used to extend in vivo studies in the primate brain demonstrating that inhibition of microglia activation protects neurons from amyloid-β toxicity. Significantly, microglia cultured from brains with pathologically confirmed Alzheimer’s disease displayed the same characteristics as microglia cultured from normal aged brains. The method described here provides the scientific community with a new and reliable tool for mechanistic studies of human microglia function in health from childhood to old age, and in disease, enhancing the relevance of the findings to the human brain and neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:27567845

  13. Evaluation of algorithm methods for fluorescence spectra of cancerous and normal human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    The paper focus on the various algorithms on to unravel the fluorescence spectra by unmixing methods to identify cancerous and normal human tissues from the measured fluorescence spectroscopy. The biochemical or morphologic changes that cause fluorescence spectra variations would appear earlier than the histological approach; therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy holds a great promise as clinical tool for diagnosing early stage of carcinomas and other deceases for in vivo use. The method can further identify tissue biomarkers by decomposing the spectral contributions of different fluorescent molecules of interest. In this work, we investigate the performance of blind source un-mixing methods (backward model) and spectral fitting approaches (forward model) in decomposing the contributions of key fluorescent molecules from the tissue mixture background when certain selected excitation wavelength is applied. Pairs of adenocarcinoma as well as normal tissues confirmed by pathologist were excited by selective wavelength of 340 nm. The emission spectra of resected fresh tissue were used to evaluate the relative changes of collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and Flavin by various spectral un-mixing methods. Two categories of algorithms: forward methods and Blind Source Separation [such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA), and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF)] will be introduced and evaluated. The purpose of the spectral analysis is to discard the redundant information which conceals the difference between these two types of tissues, but keep their diagnostically significance. The facts predicted by different methods were compared to the gold standard of histopathology. The results indicate that these key fluorophores within tissue, e.g. tryptophan, collagen, and NADH, and flavin, show differences of relative contents of fluorophores among different types of human cancer and normal tissues. The

  14. Auditory function in normal-hearing, noise-exposed human ears

    PubMed Central

    Stamper, Greta C.; Johnson, Tiffany A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine if supra-threshold measures of auditory function, such as distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), are correlated with noise exposure history in normal-hearing human ears. Recent data from animal studies have revealed significant deafferentation of auditory nerve fibers following full recovery from temporary noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Furthermore, these data report smaller ABR wave I amplitudes in noise-exposed animal ears when compared to non-noise exposed control animals or pre-noise exposure amplitudes in the same animal. It is unknown if a similar phenomenon exists in the normal-hearing, noise-exposed human ear. Design Thirty normal-hearing human subjects with a range of noise exposure backgrounds (NEBs) participated in this study. NEB was quantified by the use of a noise exposure questionnaire that extensively queried loud sound exposure over the previous 12 months. DPOAEs were collected at three f2’s (1, 2, and 4 kHz) over a range of L2’s. DPOAE stimulus level began at 80 dB FPL (forward-pressure level) and decreased in 10 dB steps. Two-channel ABRs were collected in response to click stimuli and 4 kHz tone bursts; one channel utilized an ipsilateral mastoid electrode and the other an ipsilateral tympanic membrane (TM) electrode. ABR stimulus level began at 90 dB nHL and was decreased in 10 dB steps. Amplitudes of waves I and V of the ABR were analyzed. Results A statistically significant relationship between ABR wave I amplitude and NEB was found for clicked-evoked ABRs recorded at a stimulus level of 90 dB nHL using a mastoid recording electrode. For this condition, ABR wave I amplitudes decreased as a function of NEB. Similar systematic trends were present for ABRs collected in response to clicks and 4 kHz tone bursts at additional supra-threshold stimulation levels (≥ 70 dB nHL). The relationship weakened and disappeared with decreases in stimulation level (≤ 60 dB n

  15. Human leukemia and normal leukocytes contain a species of immunoreactive but nonfunctional dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, S P; Iqbal, M P

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative radioimmunoassay has been developed for human dihydrofolate reductase (tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase; 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate:NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) by using antiserum raised in rabbits against the active enzyme purified from calf liver. An immunoreactive protein could be identified in the cytoplasm of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, which contained no functional dihydrofolate reductase activity. Its concentration was stoichiometric to the volume of cytoplasm assayed and paralleled the standard curve obtained with purified enzyme, indicating that this protein in the human cells is antigenically similar to the homologous antigen. The concentration of this immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm of human leukemia and normal leukocytes in all instances greatly exceeded the concentration of functional dihydrofolate reductase, which was measured by the binding of [3H]methotrexate. This nonfunctional immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm and cytosol from two different samples of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells analyzed by gel filtration had an apparent molecular weight of 41,000, which is twice the molecular weight of the functional enzyme. Images PMID:6952216

  16. Lactobacillus sakei lipoteichoic acid inhibits MMP-1 induced by UVA in normal dermal fibroblasts of human.

    PubMed

    You, Ga-Eun; Jung, Bong-Jun; Kim, Hye-Rim; Kim, Han-Geun; Kim, Tae-Rahk; Chung, Dae-Kyun

    2013-10-28

    Human skin is continuously exposed to ultraviolet (UV)-induced photoaging. UVA increases the activity of MMP-1 in dermal fibroblasts through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), p38, signaling. The irradiation of keratinocytes by UVA results in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the stimulation of MMP-1 in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is a component of the cell wall of gram-positive Lactobacillus spp. of bacteria. LTA is well known as an anti-inflammation molecule. LTA of the bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum has an anti-photoaging effect, but the potential anti-photoaging effect of the other bacteria has not been examined to date. The current study showed that L. sakei LTA (sLTA) has an immune modulating effect in human monocyte cells. Our object was whether inhibitory effects of sLTA on MMP-1 are caused from reducing the MAPK signal in NHDFs. It inhibits MMP-1 and MAPK signaling induced by UVA in NHDFs. We also confirmed effects of sLTA suppressing TNF-α inducing MMP-1 in NHDFs. PMID:23851272

  17. Transfection of normal human bronchial epithelial cells with the bcl-2 oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.H.; Kenyon, K.D.; Tesfaigzi, J.

    1995-12-01

    In vitro, studies examining the transformation of virus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells after exposure to chemical and physical carcinogens have contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the development of lung cancer. Virus-immortalized HBE cells have been used because of both the limited life span of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells in culture (approximately 30-35 population doublins) and their resistance to in vitro malignant transformation. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV)-immortalized HBE cells have been used to study the genetic changes that occur after exposure to {alpha}-particles in vitro. Although this model may prove to be useful for studying the 18% or less of bronchogenic carcinomas found to contain HPV sequences, it is not an appropriate model for studying the majority of lung epithelial malignancies in which HPV DNA is not detected. This view is supported by the fact that HPV-immortalized cell lines commonly exhibit aneuploidy. This results of this study suggest that: (1) NHBE cells can be transiently transfected with the pCMV{Beta} vector; and (2) the antibiotic hygromycin-resistant transfected cells.

  18. The susceptibility of Campylobacter concisus to the bactericidal effects of normal human serum.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Karina Frahm; Nielsen, Hans Linde; Nielsen, Henrik

    2015-03-01

    Campylobacter concisus is an emerging pathogen of the gastrointestinal tract that has been associated with Barrett's oesophagus, enteritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite having invasive potential in intestinal epithelial cells in-vitro, bacteraemic cases with C. concisus are extremely scarce, having only been reported once. Therefore, we conducted a serum resistance assay to investigate the bactericidal effects of human complement on C. concisus in comparison to some other Campylobacter species. In total, 22 Campylobacter strains were tested by incubation with normal human serum and subsequent cultivation in microaerobic conditions for 48 hours. Killing time was evaluated by decrease in total CFU over time for incubation with different serum concentrations. Faecal isolates of C. concisus showed inoculum reduction to less than 50% after 30 min. Campylobacter jejuni was sensitive to serum, but killing was delayed and a bacteraemic Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus isolate was completely serum resistant. Interestingly, sensitivity of enteric C. concisus to human serum was not associated to different faecal-calprotectin levels. We find that faecal isolates of C. concisus are sensitive to the bactericidal effects of serum, which may explain why C. concisus is not associated to bacteraemia.

  19. Global differential expression of genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region in normal human brain

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Julio Cesar; Fajardo, Dianora; Peña, Angela; Sánchez, Adalberto; Domínguez, Martha C; Satizábal, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background: The information of gene expression obtained from databases, have made possible the extraction and analysis of data related with several molecular processes involving not only in brain homeostasis but its disruption in some neuropathologies; principally in Down syndrome and the Alzheimer disease. Objective: To correlate the levels of transcription of 19 genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region (DSCR) with their expression in several substructures of normal human brain. Methods: There were obtained expression profiles of 19 DSCR genes in 42 brain substructures, from gene expression values available at the database of the human brain of the Brain Atlas of the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences", (http://human.brain-map.org/). The co-expression patterns of DSCR genes in brain were calculated by using multivariate statistical methods. Results: Highest levels of gene expression were registered at caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens and putamen among central areas of cerebral cortex. Increased expression levels of RCAN1 that encode by a protein involved in signal transduction process of the CNS were recorded for PCP4 that participates in the binding to calmodulin and TTC3; a protein that is associated with differentiation of neurons. That previously identified brain structures play a crucial role in the learning process, in different class of memory and in motor skills. Conclusion: The precise regulation of DSCR gene expression is crucial to maintain the brain homeostasis, especially in those areas with high levels of gene expression associated with a remarkable process of learning and cognition. PMID:25767303

  20. [Isolation of a gamma heavy chain fragment from normal human serum].

    PubMed

    Irurzun, P L; Miranda, M P

    1976-01-01

    Several components of catodic electrophoretic migration in serum and urine are present in normal individuals and in rabbit serum. There also exists in man and in some animals, serum fractions of low molecular weight. These types of serum components may be or may not be related with the IgG. In a previous study we have isolated two components in the slow catodic electrophoretic area of the normal human serum (NHS). One of them was identified as an IgG subclass and the other component presented a clear line of precipitation to gamma heavy chain specific immuno-serum. This latter component was found in the post gamma-globulin area crossing the IgG arc in the I.E. analysis. Its molecular weight was variable from 3700 to 9500. In this paper a differential analysis of the gamma fragment isolated for us, is made and its relationship with Fc subfragments of pepsin-digested IgG is studied. In order to obtain this comparative study, the electrophoresis, gel diffusion immunoelectrophoresis gel chromatography and analytic ultracentrifugation techniques are employed. The post-gammaglobulin fraction has been isolated from total normal human serum without previous manipulation, or with the gammaglobulin fraction precipitated with saturated ammonium sulphate, in Sephadex G-200 chromatography. These two fractions present similar immunelectrophoretical characteristics. The constant sedimentation is 0.90 S and the approximated molecular weight is 7000. Since the pepsin digestion of IgG produced Fc subfragments of low molecular weight, we have isolated and submitted this immunoglobulin to peptic digestion. The G-75 Sephadex filtration shows an isolated post-gamma-globulin of I.E. sedimentation constant and molecular weight whose characteristics are similar to the isolated serum post-gammaglobulin fraction. The antigenical analysis in I.D. shows a total identity between the pepsin digested post-gammaglobulin and the fragment obtained for us from the human serum to an anti-heavy gamma

  1. Specific combinations of the chromatin-modifying enzyme modulators significantly attenuate glioblastoma cell proliferation and viability while exerting minimal effect on normal adult stem cells growth.

    PubMed

    Alexanian, Arshak R; Huang, Yi-Wen

    2015-11-01

    The discoveries of recent decade showed that all critical changes in cancer cells, such as silencing of tumor-suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes, are caused not only by genetic but also by epigenetic mechanisms. Although epigenetic changes are somatically heritable, in contrast to genetic changes, they are potentially reversible, making them good targets for therapeutic intervention. Covalent modifications of chromatin such as methylation and acetylation of histones and methylation of DNA are the important components of epigenetic machinery. In this study, we investigated the effect of different modulators of DNA and histone covalent-modifying enzymes on the proliferation and viability of normal adult stem cells, such as human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), and on malignant tumor cells, such as glioblastoma (GB) D54 cells. Results demonstrated that specific combinations of histone methyltransferases and deacetylases inhibitors significantly attenuated D54 cells viability but having only a small effect on hMSCs growth. Taken together, these studies suggest that specific combinations of histone covalent modifiers could be an effective treatment option for the most aggressive type of primary brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme.

  2. Sphingosine 1-phosphate, a bioactive sphingolipid abundantly stored in platelets, is a normal constituent of human plasma and serum.

    PubMed

    Yatomi, Y; Igarashi, Y; Yang, L; Hisano, N; Qi, R; Asazuma, N; Satoh, K; Ozaki, Y; Kume, S

    1997-05-01

    Although sphingosine 1-phosphate (Sph-1-P) is reportedly involved in diverse cellular processes and the physiological roles of this bioactive sphingolipid have been strongly suggested, few studies have revealed the presence of Sph-1-P in human samples, including body fluids and cells, under physiological conditions. In this study, we identified Sph-1-P as a normal constituent of human plasma and serum. The Sph-1-P levels in plasma and serum were 191+/-79 and 484+/-82 pmol/ml (mean+/-SD, n=8), respectively. Furthermore, when Sph-1-P was measured in paired plasma and serum samples obtained from 6 healthy adults, the serum Sph-1-P/plasma Sph-1-P ratio was found to be 2.65+/-1.26 (mean+/-SD). It is most likely that the source of discharged Sph-1-P during blood clotting is platelets, because platelets abundantly store Sph-1-P compared with other blood cells, and release part of their stored Sph-1-P extracellularly upon stimulation. We also studied Sph-1-P-related metabolism in plasma. [3H]Sph was stable and not metabolized at all in plasma, but was rapidly incorporated into platelets and metabolized mainly to Sph-1-P in platelet-rich plasma. [3H]Sph-1-P was found to be unchanged in plasma, revealing that plasma does not contain the enzymes needed for Sph-1-P degradation. In summary, platelets can convert Sph into Sph-1-P, and are storage sites for the latter in the blood. In view of the diverse biological effects of Sph-1-P, the release of Sph-1-P from activated platelets may be involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes, including thrombosis, hemostasis, atherosclerosis and wound healing.

  3. Effects of age on contralateral suppression of distortion product otoacoustic emissions in human listeners with normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Kim, SungHee; Frisina, D Robert; Frisina, Robert D

    2002-01-01

    The auditory efferent system presumably plays a role in enhancing signals in noise and, in particular, speech perception in background noise. This study measured the age-related changes of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) system by comparing distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) with and without contralateral white noise stimulation. Otoacoustic emissions were typically reduced in level (magnitude) when white noise was presented to the contralateral ear. This contralateral suppression (CS) is attributed to activation of the MOC system, which has an inhibitory effect on the outer hair cell (OHC) system. By studying CS on cochlear output in human listeners of different ages, it is possible to describe aging effects on the MOC system. Human subjects were young adult, middle aged and old (n = 10/group). All subjects had normal hearing and middle-ear function based upon standard audiometric criteria. The present study recorded 2f(1)-f(2) DPOAE-grams in response to moderate primary tones (L1 = 75, L2 = 65 dB SPL), from 1 to 6.3 kHz. The principal findings were that DPOAE levels were smaller in the old compared to the young group and that CS declined with age for the middle-aged and old groups. In addition, CS in the 1- to 2-kHz range was greater than in the 4- to 6-kHz range for all ages, but especially for the old group. These findings suggest that a functional decline of the MOC system with age precedes OHC degeneration. Moreover, the MOC system maintains better function in the 1- to 2-kHz range than in the 4- to 6-kHz range as a function of age.

  4. Long-term influence of normal variation in neonatal characteristics on human brain development

    PubMed Central

    Walhovd, Kristine B.; Fjell, Anders M.; Brown, Timothy T.; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Chung, Yoonho; Hagler, Donald J.; Roddey, J. Cooper; Erhart, Matthew; McCabe, Connor; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Amaral, David G.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J.; Darst, Burcu F.; Casey, B. J.; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M.; Frazier, Jean; Gruen, Jeffrey R.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Murray, Sarah S.; van Zijl, Peter; Mostofsky, Stewart; Dale, Anders M.; Jernigan, Terry L.; McCabe, Connor; Chang, Linda; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Newman, Erik; Dale, Anders M.; Ernst, Thomas; Dale, Anders M.; Van Zijl, Peter; Kuperman, Joshua; Murray, Sarah; Bloss, Cinnamon; Schork, Nicholas J.; Appelbaum, Mark; Gamst, Anthony; Thompson, Wesley; Bartsch, Hauke; Jernigan, Terry L.; Dale, Anders M.; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas; Keating, Brian; Amaral, David; Sowell, Elizabeth; Kaufmann, Walter; Van Zijl, Peter; Mostofsky, Stewart; Casey, B.J.; Ruberry, Erika J.; Powers, Alisa; Rosen, Bruce; Kenet, Tal; Frazier, Jean; Kennedy, David; Gruen, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    It is now recognized that a number of cognitive, behavioral, and mental health outcomes across the lifespan can be traced to fetal development. Although the direct mediation is unknown, the substantial variance in fetal growth, most commonly indexed by birth weight, may affect lifespan brain development. We investigated effects of normal variance in birth weight on MRI-derived measures of brain development in 628 healthy children, adolescents, and young adults in the large-scale multicenter Pediatric Imaging, Neurocognition, and Genetics study. This heterogeneous sample was recruited through geographically dispersed sites in the United States. The influence of birth weight on cortical thickness, surface area, and striatal and total brain volumes was investigated, controlling for variance in age, sex, household income, and genetic ancestry factors. Birth weight was found to exert robust positive effects on regional cortical surface area in multiple regions as well as total brain and caudate volumes. These effects were continuous across birth weight ranges and ages and were not confined to subsets of the sample. The findings show that (i) aspects of later child and adolescent brain development are influenced at birth and (ii) relatively small differences in birth weight across groups and conditions typically compared in neuropsychiatric research (e.g., Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders) may influence group differences observed in brain parameters of interest at a later stage in life. These findings should serve to increase our attention to early influences. PMID:23169628

  5. Quantitative sodium MRI of the human brain at 9.4 T provides assessment of tissue sodium concentration and cell volume fraction during normal aging.

    PubMed

    Thulborn, Keith; Lui, Elaine; Guntin, Jonathan; Jamil, Saad; Sun, Ziqi; Claiborne, Theodore C; Atkinson, Ian C

    2016-02-01

    Sodium ion homeostasis is a fundamental property of viable tissue, allowing the tissue sodium concentration to be modeled as the tissue cell volume fraction. The modern neuropathology literature using ex vivo tissue from selected brain regions indicates that human brain cell density remains constant during normal aging and attributes the volume loss that occurs with advancing age to changes in neuronal size and dendritic arborization. Quantitative sodium MRI performed with the enhanced sensitivity of ultrahigh-field 9.4 T has been used to investigate tissue cell volume fraction during normal aging. This cross-sectional study (n = 49; 21-80 years) finds that the in vivo tissue cell volume fraction remains constant in all regions of the brain with advancing age in individuals who remain cognitively normal, extending the ex vivo literature reporting constant neuronal cell density across the normal adult age range. Cell volume fraction, as measured by quantitative sodium MRI, is decreased in diseases of cell loss, such as stroke, on a time scale of minutes to hours, and in response to treatment of brain tumors on a time scale of days to weeks. Neurodegenerative diseases often have prodromal periods of decades in which regional neuronal cell loss occurs prior to clinical presentation. If tissue cell volume fraction can detect such early pathology, this quantitative parameter may permit the objective measurement of preclinical disease progression. This current study in cognitively normal aging individuals provides the basis for the pursuance of investigations directed towards such neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Cardiac mechanics in patients with human immunodeficiency virus: a study of systolic myocardial deformation in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Al-Naami, Ghassan; Kiblawi, Fuad; Kest, Helen; Hamdan, Ayman; Myridakis, Dorothy

    2014-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes dysfunction of different organ systems. Myocardial diastolic dysfunction has been reported previously in an adult HIV population. Our aim was to study myocardial strain in children and young adults infected by HIV who have apparently normal ejection fraction. Forty HIV-infected patients (mean age 20.6 ± 1.5 years) with normal ejection fraction and 55 matched normal controls (mean age 17 ± 1.5 years) were studied by two-dimensional echocardiogram. The images were stored then exported to velocity vector imaging software for analysis. Measures considered were left-ventricular peak global systolic strain (LV S) and strain rate (LV SR) as well as right-ventricular peak global systolic strain (RV S) and strain rate (RV SR). Circumferential measures of the left ventricle included the following: LV circumferential peak global systolic strain (LV circ S), strain rate (LV circ SR), radial velocity (LV rad vel), and rotational velocity (LV rot vel) at the level of the mitral valve. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. The means of all longitudinal deformation parameters were significantly lower in HIV patients compared with normal controls: LV S (-14.15 vs. -19.31), LV SR (-0.88 vs. -1.30), RV S (-19.58 vs. -25.09), and RV SR (-1.34 vs. -2.13), respectively (p < 0.05). LV rot vel was lower in patients compared with controls (43.23 vs. 51.71, p = 0.025). LV circ S, LV circ SR, and LV rad vel showed no significant difference between the two groups (p ≥ 0.05). HIV infection affects longitudinal systolic cardiac strain and strain rate in children and young adults. Normal ejection fraction might be attributed to preserved circumferential myocardial deformation. Strain and strain rate may help identify HIV patients at high risk for cardiac dysfunction and allow early detection of silent myocardial depression.

  7. A comparison of erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase activity from human foetuses and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Strange, R C; Johnston, J D; Coghill, D R; Hume, R

    1980-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity was measured in partially purified haemolysates of erythrocytes from human foetuses and adults. Enzyme activity was present in erythrocytes obtained between 12 and 40 weeks of gestation. The catalytic properties of the enzyme from foetal cells were similar to those of the enzyme from adult erythrocytes, indicating that probably only one form of the erythrocytes enzyme exists throughout foetal and adult life. PMID:7396875

  8. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  9. Electrocortical Measures during a Lexical Decision Task: A Comparison between Elementary School-Aged Normal and Dyslexic Readers and Adult Normal and Dyslexic Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Shaul, Shelley; Breznitz, Zvia

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the differences in performance between 30 dyslexic readers in 4th grade, 30 dyslexic readers attending university, and age-matched normal readers for both groups on a lexical decision task to evaluate the underlying factors of dyslexia that persist into adulthood. In both age groups, the dyslexic readers were significantly…

  10. Biochemical and metabolic abnormalities in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, J.; Treadwell, B.V.; Mankin, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    Incorporation of radioactive precursors into macromolecules was studied with human normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage organ culture. Analysis of the salt extracted matrix components separated by cesium chloride buoyant density gradient centrifugation showed an increase in the specific activities of all gradient fractions prepared from the osteoarthritic cartilage. Further analysis of these fractions showed the osteoarthritic cartilage contained 5 times as much sulfate incorporated into proteoglycans, and an even greater amount of 3H-glucosamine incorporated into material sedimenting to the middle of the gradient. Greater than half of this radioactive middle fraction appears to be hyaluronate, as judged by the position it elutes from a DEAE column and its susceptibility to hyaluronidase digestion. This study supports earlier findings showing increased rates of macromolecular synthesis in osteoarthritis, and in addition, an even greater synthetic rate for hyaluronic acid is demonstrated.

  11. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Patient

    PubMed Central

    Regeti, Kalyani; Khan, Rafay; Jehangir, Waqas; Zafar, Shoaib; Yousif, Abdalla; Sen, Shuvendu

    2016-01-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a relatively common disease of adulthood characterized by a typical combination of clinical and radiological findings. In this report, we discuss a 54-year-old female presenting with symptoms suggestive of NPH and found to have a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1. She was not treated as she was in denial state and developed NPH as a possible complication. In the literature, there has only been one reported case of HIV type 2 causing NPH; however, no relationship has been properly documented with HIV type 1. These findings bring about a question on whether NPH is associated or a complication of HIV with awareness of this association. Earlier screening of HIV can be done in patients presenting with such symptoms, thus to prevent further progression of its complications. PMID:27222676

  12. Expression of the retinoblastoma protein is regulated in normal human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Cordon-Cardo, C.; Richon, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the retinoblastoma gene (pRB) appears to play a central role in control of cell division and differentiation. It is generally accepted that pRB is ubiquitously expressed. We investigated the expression of pRB in normal human tissues using immunochemical techniques to determine the expression of pRB in specific cell types. Maturing cells, both proliferating and nonproliferating, rather than their progenitors possess the highest levels of pRB. Cells of stratified epithelia, such as those from cervix, display strong immunostaining in the nondividing maturing suprabasal layer, whereas basal cells showed low to undetectable levels of pRB. Similar patterns of expression were observed in simple epithelia and hematopoietic cells contained within distinguishable proliferating compartments and in germ cell development. These studies are crucial to our understanding of processes involved in control of differentiation (tumorigenesis) as well as tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8129035

  13. Anatomy and metabolism of the normal human brain studied by magnetic resonance at 1. 5 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Bottomley, P.A.; Hart, H.R. Jr.; Edelstein, W.A.; Schenck, J.F.; Smith, L.S.; Leue, W.M.; Mueller, O.M.; Redington, R.W.

    1984-02-01

    Proton magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained of the human head in magnetic fields as high as 1.5 Tesla (T) using slotted resonator high radio-frequency (RF) detection coils. The images showed no RF field penetration problems and exhibited an 11 (+/-1)-fold improvement in signal-to-noise ratio over a .12-T imaging system. The first localized phosphorus 31, carbon 13, and proton MR chemical shift spectra recorded with surface coils from the head and body in the same instrument showed relative concentrations of phosphorus metabolites, triglycerides, and, when correlated with proton images, negligible lipid (-CH/sub 2/-) signal from brain tissue on the time scale of the imaging experiment. Sugar phosphate and phosphodiester concentrations were significantly elevated in the head compared with muscle. This method should allow the combined assessment of anatomy, metabolism, and biochemistry in both the normal and diseased brain.

  14. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Patient.

    PubMed

    Regeti, Kalyani; Khan, Rafay; Jehangir, Waqas; Zafar, Shoaib; Yousif, Abdalla; Sen, Shuvendu

    2016-06-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a relatively common disease of adulthood characterized by a typical combination of clinical and radiological findings. In this report, we discuss a 54-year-old female presenting with symptoms suggestive of NPH and found to have a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1. She was not treated as she was in denial state and developed NPH as a possible complication. In the literature, there has only been one reported case of HIV type 2 causing NPH; however, no relationship has been properly documented with HIV type 1. These findings bring about a question on whether NPH is associated or a complication of HIV with awareness of this association. Earlier screening of HIV can be done in patients presenting with such symptoms, thus to prevent further progression of its complications. PMID:27222676

  15. Effects of vasopressin administration on diuresis of water immersion in normal humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Denunzio, A. G.; Loutzenhiser, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of vasopressin suppression on the diuresis encountered during water immersion is investigated in studies on normal humans immersed to the neck. Six hydrated male subjects were studied on two occasions while undergoing 6 h of immersion without or during the administration of aqueous vasopressin for the initial 4 h. Neck immersion is found to result in a significant increase in urinary flow rate beginning in the first hour and persisting throughout the immersion. The administration of vasopressin markedly attenuated the diuretic response throughout the period of infusion, while cessation of vasopressin administration during the final 2 h of immersion resulted in a marked offset of the antidiuresis. Results thus support the view that the suppression of antidiuretic hormone contributes to the immersion diuresis of hydrated subjects.

  16. Chemical carcinogen-induced decreases in genomic 5-methyldeoxycytidine content of normal human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, V L; Smith, R A; Longoria, J; Liotta, M A; Harper, C M; Harris, C C

    1987-01-01

    The genomic content of DNA 5-methyldeoxycytidine (m5dC) was measured in dividing normal human bronchial epithelial cells treated with a broad range of chemical carcinogens. At noncytotoxic concentrations, all of the carcinogenic agents tested significantly reduced cellular DNA m5dC content whereas the weakly carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic agents, benzo[e]pyrene and phenanthrene (respectively), did not. These reductions varied from 8% to 31% depending on the agent and the donor cells. The reductions in genomic m5dC levels were concentration dependent for the carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene. We speculate that carcinogen-induced perturbation of DNA m5dC patterns may lead to heritable changes in gene expression and contribute to the molecular alterations involved in the initiation and the subsequent steps of the carcinogenesis process. PMID:3472209

  17. A monoclonal antibody reactive with normal and leukemic human myeloid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J D; Linch, D; Sabbath, K; Larcom, P; Schlossman, S F

    1984-01-01

    Anti-MY9 is an IgG2b murine monoclonal antibody selected for reactivity with immature normal human myeloid cells. The MY9 antigen is expressed by blasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes in the bone marrow, and by monocytes in the peripheral blood. Erythrocytes, lymphocytes and platelets are MY9 negative. All myeloid colony-forming cells (CFU-GM), a fraction of erythroid burst-forming cells (BFU-E) and multipotent progenitors (CFU-GEMM) are MY9 positive. This antigen is further expressed by the leukemic cells of a majority of patients with AML and myeloid CML-BC. Leukemic stem cells (leukemic colony-forming cells, L-CFC) from most patients tested were also MY9 positive. In contrast, MY9 was not detected on lymphocytic leukemias. Anti-MY9 may be a valuable reagent for the purification of hematopoietic colony-forming cells and for the diagnosis of myeloid-lineage leukemias.

  18. Normality and naturalness: a comparison of the meanings of concepts used within veterinary medicine and human medicine.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Henrik; Hofmann, Bjørn

    2011-12-01

    This article analyses the different connotations of "normality" and "being natural," bringing together the theoretical discussion from both human medicine and veterinary medicine. We show how the interpretations of the concepts in the different areas could be mutually fruitful. It appears that the conceptions of "natural" are more elaborate in veterinary medicine, and can be of value to human medicine. In particular they can nuance and correct conceptions of nature in human medicine that may be too idealistic. Correspondingly, the wide ranging conceptions of "normal" in human medicine may enrich conceptions in veterinary medicine, where the discussions seem to be sparse. We do not argue that conceptions from veterinary medicine should be used in human medicine and vice versa, but only that it could be done and that it may well be fruitful. Moreover, there are overlaps between some notions of normal and natural, and further conceptual analysis on this overlap is needed.

  19. Quantitative Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Normal Human Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Christopher C.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Zerhouni, Elias A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging with tissue tagging is a noninvasive technique for measuring three-dimensional motion and deformation in the human heart. Tags are regions of tissue whose longitudinal magnetization has been altered before imaging so that they appear dark in subsequent magnetic resonance images. They then move with the underlying tissue and serve as easily identifiable landmarks within the heart for the detailed detection of motion. Many different motion and strain parameters can be determined from tagged magnetic resonance imaging. Strain components that are based on a high density of tag data, such as circumferential and longitudinal shortening, or parameters that are combinations of multiple strain components, have highest measurement precision and tightest normal ranges. The pattern of three-dimensional motion and strain in the heart is important clinically, because it reflects the basic mechanical function of the myocardium at both local and global levels. Localized abnormalities can be detected and quantified if the pattern of deformation in a given heart is compared to the normal range for that region, because normal motion and strain in the left ventricle is spatially heterogeneous. Contraction strains typically are greatest in the anterior and lateral walls and increase toward the apex. The direction of greatest contraction lies along a counter clockwise helix from base to apex (viewed from the base) and approximates the epicardial muscle fiber direction. This fiber geometry also results in long-axis torsion during systole. Ejection is accomplished primarily by radially inward motion of the endocardium and by descent of the base toward the apex during systole. PMID:11153703

  20. Band 3/complement-mediated recognition and removal of normally senescent and pathological human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Arese, Paolo; Turrini, Franco; Schwarzer, Evelin

    2005-01-01

    Band 3 modifications that normally occur during physiological red blood cell (RBC) senescence in humans, and occasionally in pathological conditions are described in the context of their role in enhancing RBC recognition and phagocytic removal. Band 3 modifications are mostly due to oxidative insults that gradually accumulate during the RBC lifespan or impact massively in a shorter time period in pathological conditions. The oxidative insults that impact on the RBC, the protective mechanisms that counteract those damages and the phenotypic modifications that accumulate during the RBC lifespan are described. It is shown how specific oxidative as well as non-oxidative band 3 modifications enhance RBC membrane affinity for normally circulating anti-band 3 antibodies, and how membrane-bound anti-band 3 antibodies bring about a limited complement activation and membrane deposition of complement C3 fragments. The partially covalent complexes between anti-band 3 antibodies and complement C3 fragments are very powerful opsonins readily recognized by the CR1 complement receptor on the phagocyte. Band 3 modifications typically encountered in old RBCs have crystallized to a number of band 3-centered models of RBC senescence. One of those band 3-centered models, the so-called 'band 3/complement RBC removal model' first put up by Lutz et al. is discussed in more detail. Finally, it is shown how the genetic deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) plus fava bean consumption, and a widespread RBC parasitic disease, P. falciparum malaria, may lead to massive and rapid destruction of RBCs by a mechanism comparable to a dramatic, time-compressed enhancement of normal RBC senescence. PMID:16301814

  1. Normal and cancer stem cells of the human female reproductive system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The female reproductive system (FRS) has a great capacity for regeneration. The existence of somatic stem cells (SSC) that are likely to reside in distinct tissue compartments of the FRS is anticipated. Normal SSC are capable of regenerating themselves, produce a progeny of cells that differentiate and maintain tissue architecture and functional characteristics, and respond to homeostatic controls. Among those SSC of the FRS that have been identified are: a) undifferentiated cells capable of differentiating into thecal cells and synthesizing hormones upon transplantation, b) ovarian surface epithelium stem cells, mitotically responsive to ovulation, c) uterine endometrial and myometrial cells, as clonogenic epithelial and stromal cells, and d) epithelial and mesenchymal cells with self-renewal capacity and multipotential from cervical tissues. Importantly, these cells are believed to significantly contribute to the development of different pathologies and tumors of the FRS. It is now widely accepted that cancer stem cells (CSC) are at the origin of many tumors. They are capable of regenerating themselves, produce a progeny that will differentiate aberrantly and do not respond adequately to homeostatic controls. Several cell surface antigens such as CD44, CD117, CD133 and MYD88 have been used to isolate ovarian cancer stem cells. Clonogenic epithelial and stromal endometrial and myometrial cells have been found in normal and cancer tissues, as side population, label-retaining cells, and CD146/PDGF-R beta-positive cells with stem-like features. In summary, here we describe a number of studies supporting the existence of somatic stem cells in the normal tissues and cancer stem cells in tumors of the human female reproductive system. PMID:23782518

  2. Localization of 5'-ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase in regenerating (and normal) limb tissues of the adult newt Notophthalmus viridescens.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A J; Woerthwein, K F

    1975-08-11

    The regenerating forelimb of the adult newt, Notophthalmus viridescens was investigated for 5'-nucleotidase (5' ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase, 3.1.3.5) acitivity. The newt's humeri were surgically removed, and after a twenty-one-day recovery period, the forelimbs amputated above the elbows. Regenerates were sampled at predetermined times for specific phases in the progress of regeneration, frozen, sectioned in a cryostat, and the sections fixed in 10% cold formol calcium. The Wachstein and Meisel [25] lead procedure at neutral pH was used predominately in these experiments, although tests were also conducted with Gomori's [14] calcium, Allen's [21] highly alkaline procedures. The substrates used to obtain specific enzyme reactions were adenine, cytosine, guanine, uracil and inosine 5'-monophosphate nucleotides. Sodium beta-glycerophosphate served as a non-specific phosphomonoesterase substrate, distilled water replaced substrate, and inhibitors such as zinc and cyanide ions were used as control measures to assist in increasing the precision in interpreting the results obtained. The most reactive 5'-nucleotidase (5'-Nase) loci were in the walls of the blood vascular system, mysial and neural sheaths, dermis, and periosteum: the principal cells involved were macrophages, endothelium of blood vessels, and fibrocytes of connective tissues. A moderate enzyme response was elicited from secretory cells of some of the subcutaneous glands, hypertrophied chondrocytes and osteogenic centers, chondrocytes in the articular regions and within red blood cells and leucocytes. Normal, injured and degenerating, or regenerating striated muscle and nerve fibers were judged unreactive for 5'-Nase. The epidermis and wound epithelium displayed negative responses for 5'-Nase. Cells forming the regeneration blastema were 5'-Nase reactive during the early formative phase, but with growth and development of the blastema into bulb and conic forms, these cells did not respond for this enzyme

  3. Better Visuospatial Working Memory in Adults Who Report Profound Deafness Compared to Those With Normal or Poor Hearing: Data From the UK Biobank Resource.

    PubMed

    Rudner, Mary; Keidser, Gitte; Hygge, Staffan; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2016-01-01

    Experimental work has shown better visuospatial working memory (VSWM) in profoundly deaf individuals compared to those with normal hearing. Other data, including the UK Biobank resource shows poorer VSWM in individuals with poorer hearing. Using the same database, the authors investigated VSWM in individuals who reported profound deafness. Included in this study were 112 participants who were profoundly deaf, 1310 with poor hearing and 74,635 with normal hearing. All participants performed a card-pair matching task as a test of VSWM. Although variance in VSWM performance was large among profoundly deaf participants, at group level it was superior to that of participants with both normal and poor hearing. VSWM in adults is related to hearing status but the association is not linear. Future study should investigate the mechanism behind enhanced VSWM in profoundly deaf adults. PMID:27232076

  4. Glucagon Receptor Blockade With a Human Antibody Normalizes Blood Glucose in Diabetic Mice and Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Haruka; Kim, Jinrang; Aglione, JohnPaul; Lee, Joseph; Cavino, Katie; Na, Erqian; Rafique, Ashique; Kim, Jee Hae; Harp, Joyce; Valenzuela, David M; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J; Gromada, Jesper

    2015-08-01

    Antagonizing glucagon action represents an attractive therapeutic option for reducing hepatic glucose production in settings of hyperglycemia where glucagon excess plays a key pathophysiological role. We therefore generated REGN1193, a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds and inhibits glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling in vitro. REGN1193 administration to diabetic ob/ob and diet-induced obese mice lowered blood glucose to levels observed in GCGR-deficient mice. In diet-induced obese mice, REGN1193 reduced food intake, adipose tissue mass, and body weight. REGN1193 increased circulating levels of glucagon and glucagon-like peptide 1 and was associated with reversible expansion of pancreatic α-cell area. Hyperglucagonemia and α-cell hyperplasia was observed in fibroblast growth factor 21-deficient mice treated with REGN1193. Single administration of REGN1193 to diabetic cynomolgus monkeys normalized fasting blood glucose and glucose tolerance and increased circulating levels of glucagon and amino acids. Finally, administration of REGN1193 for 8 weeks to normoglycemic cynomolgus monkeys did not cause hypoglycemia or increase pancreatic α-cell area. In summary, the GCGR-blocking antibody REGN1193 normalizes blood glucose in diabetic mice and monkeys but does not produce hypoglycemia in normoglycemic monkeys. Thus, REGN1193 provides a potential therapeutic modality for diabetes mellitus and acute hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:26020795

  5. Se status in normal and pathological human individuals before and after Se supplementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellisola, G.; Cinque, G.; Galassini, S.; Guidi, G. C.; Liu, N. Q.; Moschini, G.

    1996-04-01

    The determination of selenium in plasma and in urine samples has been suggested for the assessment of Se status in human individuals. The kidney is of fundamental importance in Se homeostasis: with low Se intake its excretion will be decreased and with high Se intake it will be increased. In 21 patients with kidney disease (8 with normal kidney function and 13 with moderate renal failure) Se was measured in 1 ml of urine by PIXE after preconcentration of the sample. The total urine volume was measured to calculate total daily Se excretion. The same procedure was applied to 14 normal individuals for comparison. All individuals were then supplemented orally with selenite for 8 weeks (Se = 600 μg/day) and the procedure was repeated. The behaviour of the major selenoproteins was also investigated by measuring glutathione peroxidase activities in plasma, in platelets and in erythrocyte samples. For renal function, serum and urine creatinine concentrations were utilised and creatinine clearances were calculated. Results obtained were compared before and after Se treatment and between groups. Some correlation studies were carried out between Se and kidney functions and/or selenoperoxidase activities.

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Raffensperger, Zachary D.; Heike, Carrie L.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Kau, Chung How; Moreno, Lina M.; Wehby, George L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A.; Marazita, Mary L.; Weinberg, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10−8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis. PMID:27560520

  7. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, John R; Orlova, Ekaterina; Lee, Myoung Keun; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Raffensperger, Zachary D; Heike, Carrie L; Cunningham, Michael L; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Kau, Chung How; Nidey, Nichole L; Moreno, Lina M; Wehby, George L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Laurie, Cathy C; Cole, Joanne; Ferrara, Tracey; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Mio, Washington; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A; Marazita, Mary L; Weinberg, Seth M

    2016-08-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10-8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis.

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, John R; Orlova, Ekaterina; Lee, Myoung Keun; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Raffensperger, Zachary D; Heike, Carrie L; Cunningham, Michael L; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Kau, Chung How; Nidey, Nichole L; Moreno, Lina M; Wehby, George L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Laurie, Cathy C; Cole, Joanne; Ferrara, Tracey; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Mio, Washington; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A; Marazita, Mary L; Weinberg, Seth M

    2016-08-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10-8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis. PMID:27560520

  9. Cytosolic dsDNA triggers apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in normal human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suiquan; Liu, Dongyin; Ning, Weixuan; Xu, Aie

    2015-04-01

    Considerable evidence implicates that viral infection might be a participant factor in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. However, it is still unclear how viral infection leads to the melanocyte destruction. To elucidate the effects of viral dsDNA on the viability and cytokine synthesis of normal human melanocytes and to explore the underlying mechanisms, primary cultured normal human melanocytes were transfected with poly(dA:dT). The results demonstrated that poly(dA:dT) triggered apoptosis instead of pyroptosis in melanocytes. Knocking down AIM2 or RIG-I by RNA interference partially reduced the poly(dA:dT)-induced LDH release, suggesting the involvement of both nucleic acid sensors in the process of melanocyte death. Poly(dA:dT) induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes including IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 as well, whereas the pro-inflammatory cytokine production was suppressed by RIG-I siRNA, but not by AIM2 siRNA. Poly(dA:dT) treatment increased the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and NFκB. Accordingly, NFκB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 and JNK inhibitor SP600125 blocked the induction of the cytokine genes except IFN-β. The production of IL6 and IL8 was also suppressed by p38 inhibitor SB203580. On the contrary, the Poly(dA:dT)-induced melanocyte death was only decreased by SP600125. This study provides the possible mechanism of melanocyte destruction and immuno-stimulation in vitiligo by innate immune response following viral infection.

  10. Adult Continuing Education and Human Resource Development: Present Competitors, Potential Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas H.

    2006-01-01

    Adult Continuing Education (ACE) and Human Resource Development (HRD) have grown tremendously in the last quarter century. ACE experienced tremendous growth in the 60s and 70s, with over 17 million attending colleges and universities, and local school and community adult education programs by the end of the 1970s. More ACE programs were started…

  11. Reaching beyond the United States: Adventures in International Adult Education and Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henschke, John A.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his experience of how travel and adult education merged, for him, into a major emphasis in international adult education (AE) and human resource development (HRD). International ventures have been some of the most exciting and learning-filled aspects of the author's career in AE and HRD. His involvement in…

  12. Tissue-specific mutation accumulation in human adult stem cells during life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokzijl, Francis; de Ligt, Joep; Jager, Myrthe; Sasselli, Valentina; Roerink, Sophie; Sasaki, Nobuo; Huch, Meritxell; Boymans, Sander; Kuijk, Ewart; Prins, Pjotr; Nijman, Isaac J.; Martincorena, Inigo; Mokry, Michal; Wiegerinck, Caroline L.; Middendorp, Sabine; Sato, Toshiro; Schwank, Gerald; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Vries, Robert G.; van de Wetering, Marc; Stratton, Michael R.; Clevers, Hans; Cuppen, Edwin; van Boxtel, Ruben

    2016-10-01

    The gradual accumulation of genetic mutations in human adult stem cells (ASCs) during life is associated with various age-related diseases, including cancer. Extreme variation in cancer risk across tissues was recently proposed to depend on the lifetime number of ASC divisions, owing to unavoidable random mutations that arise during DNA replication. However, the rates and patterns of mutations in normal ASCs remain unknown. Here we determine genome-wide mutation patterns in ASCs of the small intestine, colon and liver of human donors with ages ranging from 3 to 87 years by sequencing clonal organoid cultures derived from primary multipotent cells. Our results show that mutations accumulate steadily over time in all of the assessed tissue types, at a rate of approximately 40 novel mutations per year, despite the large variation in cancer incidence among these tissues. Liver ASCs, however, have different mutation spectra compared to those of the colon and small intestine. Mutational signature analysis reveals that this difference can be attributed to spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine residues in the colon and small intestine, probably reflecting their high ASC division rate. In liver, a signature with an as-yet-unknown underlying mechanism is predominant. Mutation spectra of driver genes in cancer show high similarity to the tissue-specific ASC mutation spectra, suggesting that intrinsic mutational processes in ASCs can initiate tumorigenesis. Notably, the inter-individual variation in mutation rate and spectra are low, suggesting tissue-specific activity of common mutational processes throughout life.

  13. Hippocampal volume is as variable in young as in older adults: implications for the notion of hippocampal atrophy in humans.

    PubMed

    Lupien, S J; Evans, A; Lord, C; Miles, J; Pruessner, M; Pike, B; Pruessner, J C

    2007-01-15

    Previous studies in humans have shown the presence of an age-related reduction of hippocampal (HC) volume, as well as the presence of reduced HC volume in psychiatric populations suffering from schizophrenia, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. Altogether, these data suggested that aging or psychiatric disease can have neurotoxic effects on the hippocampus, and lead to HC atrophy. However, these two sets of findings imply that HC volume in young healthy adults should present less variability than HC volume in older adults and psychiatric populations. In the present study, we assessed HC volume in 177 healthy men and women aged from 18 to 85 years of age. We show that the dispersion around the mean of HC volume is not different in young and older adults, so that 25% of young healthy adults present HC volume as small as the average participants aged 60 to 75 years. This shows that HC volume is as variable in young as in older adults and suggests that smaller HC volume attributed to the aging process in previous studies could in fact represent HC volume determined early in life. We also report that within similar age groups, the percentage of difference in HC volume between the individuals with the smallest HC volume (smallest quartile) and the group average is greater than the percentage of difference reported to exist between psychiatric populations and normal control in recent meta-analyses. Taken together, these results confront the notion of hippocampal atrophy in humans and raise the possibility that pre-determined inter-individual differences in HC volume in humans may determine the vulnerability for age-related cognitive impairments or psychopathology throughout the lifetime.

  14. The potent oncogene NPM-ALK mediates malignant transformation of normal human CD4(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wei, Fang; Wang, Hong Yi; Liu, Xiaobin; Roy, Darshan; Xiong, Qun-Bin; Jiang, Shuguang; Medvec, Andrew; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Watt, Christopher; Tomczak, Ewa; Kalos, Michael; Riley, James L; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2013-12-01

    With this study we have demonstrated that in vitro transduction of normal human CD4(+) T lymphocytes with NPM-ALK results in their malignant transformation. The transformed cells become immortalized and display morphology and immunophenotype characteristic of patient-derived anaplastic large-cell lymphomas. These unique features, which are strictly dependent on NPM-ALK activity and expression, include perpetual cell growth, proliferation, and survival; activation of the key signal transduction pathways STAT3 and mTORC1; and expression of CD30 (the hallmark of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma) and of immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 and cell-surface protein PD-L1/CD274. Implantation of NPM-ALK-transformed CD4(+) T lymphocytes into immunodeficient mice resulted in formation of tumors indistinguishable from patients' anaplastic large-cell lymphomas. Our findings demonstrate that the key aspects of human carcinogenesis closely recapitulating the features of the native tumors can be faithfully reproduced in vitro when an appropriate oncogene is used to transform its natural target cells; this in turn points to the fundamental role in malignant cell transformation of potent oncogenes expressed in the relevant target cells. Such transformed cells should permit study of the early stages of carcinogenesis, and in particular the initial oncogene-host cell interactions. This experimental design could also be useful for studies of the effects of early therapeutic intervention and likely also the mechanisms of malignant progression.

  15. Formation of bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in tetraploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu; Seyama, Atsushi

    2012-09-01

    Tetraploid cells with unstable chromosomes frequently arise as an early step in tumorigenesis and lead to the formation of aneuploid cells. The mechanisms responsible for the chromosome instability of polyploid cells are not fully understood, although the supernumerary centrosomes in polyploid cells have been considered the major cause of chromosomal instability. The aim of this study was to examine the integrity of mitotic spindles and centrosomes in proliferative polyploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts. TIG-1 human fibroblasts were treated with demecolcine (DC) for 4 days to induce polyploidy, and the change in DNA content was monitored. Localization of centrosomes and mitotic spindles in polyploid mitotic cells was examined by immunohistochemistry and laser scanning cytometry. TIG-1 cells treated with DC became almost completely tetraploid at 2 weeks after treatment and grew at the same rate as untreated diploid cells. Most mitotic cells with 8C DNA content had only two centrosomes with bipolar spindles in established tetraploid cells, although they had four or more centrosomes with multipolar spindles at 3 days after DC treatment. The frequency of aneuploid cells increased as established tetraploid cells were propagated. These results indicate that tetraploid cells that form bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in mitosis can proliferate as diploid cells. These cells may serve as a useful model for studying the chromosome instability of polyploid cells. PMID:22696268

  16. The role of the basal stem cell of the human breast in normal development and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Jose; Russo, Irma H.

    2011-01-01

    MCF-10F a spontaneously immortalized ERα negative human breast epithelial cell line derived from breast tissues containing Lobules type 1, is able to form normal ductal structures in a tridimensional collagen matrix system. MCF-10F cells that are Estrogen-transformed [trMCF cells] progressively express phenotypes of in vitro cell transformation, including colony formation in agar methocel, and loss of the ductulogenic capacity. Further selection of these trMCF cells for invasiveness in a Matrigel invasion system identified cells [bcMCF] that formed tumors in severe combined immunodeficient [SCID] mice. The cell lines derived from those tumors [caMCF] were poorly differentiated ERα, PR and ERBB2 negative adenocarcinomas. These characteristics are similar to the human basal cell-like carcinomas. This in vitro in vivo model demonstrates the importance of the basal cell type as a stem cell that reconstitute the branching pattern of the breast and that is also target of a carcinogenic insult leading to transformation and cancer. PMID:21901623

  17. Q-switched ruby laser irradiation of normal human skin. Histologic and ultrastructural findings.

    PubMed

    Hruza, G J; Dover, J S; Flotte, T J; Goetschkes, M; Watanabe, S; Anderson, R R

    1991-12-01

    The Q-switched ruby laser is used for treatment of tatoos. The effects of Q-switched ruby laser pulses on sun-exposed and sun-protected human skin, as well as senile lentigines, were investigated with clinical observation, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. A pinpricklike sensation occurred at radiant exposures as low as 0.2 J/cm2. Immediate erythema, delayed edema, and immediate whitening occurred with increasing radiant exposure. The threshold for immediate whitening varied inversely with skin pigmentation, ranging from a mean of 1.4 J/cm2 in lentigines to 3.1 J/cm2 in sun-protected skin. Transmission electron microscopy showed immediate alteration of mature melanosomes and nuclei within keratinocytes and melanocytes, but stage I and II melanosomes were unaffected. Histologically, immediate injury was confined to the epidermis. There was minimal inflammatory response 1 day after exposure. After 1 week, subthreshold exposures induced hyperpigmentation, with epidermal hyperplasia and increased melanin staining noted histologically. At higher radiant exposures, hypopigmentation occurred with desquamation of a pigmented scale/crust. All sites returned to normal skin color and texture without scarring within 3 to 6 months. These observations suggest that the human skin response to selective photothermolysis of pigmented cells is similar to that reported in animal models, including low radiant exposure stimulation of melanogenesis and high radiant exposure lethal injury to pigmented epidermal cells. PMID:1845279

  18. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from human normal and hyperplastic gingiva.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Li, Nan; Xie, Han; Jin, Yan

    2011-03-01

    Human gingiva plays an important role in the maintenance of oral health and shows unique fetal-like scarless healing process after wounding. Here we isolate and characterize mesenchymal stem cells from human normal and hyperplastic gingival tissues (N-GMSC and H-GMSC, respectively). Immunocytochemical staining indicated that gingival lamina propria contained Stro-1 and SSEA-4 positive cells, implying existence of putative gingival MSC. Under attachment-based isolating and culturing condition, gingival MSC displayed highly clonogenic and long-term proliferative capability. By using single colony isolation and expansion approaches, we found both N-GMSC and H-GMSC possessed self-renewal and multipotent differentiation properties. N-GMSC and H-GMSC showed distinct immunoregulatory functions in a murine skin allograft setting via up-regulation of putative systemic regulatory T cells (Tregs). N-GMSC and H-GMSC were capable of regenerating collagenous tissue following in vivo transplantation, in which H-GMSC exhibited more robust regenerative capability. These findings suggest that gingival tissue contains tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cell population and is an ideal resource for immunoregulatory therapy due to its substantial availability and accessibility. In addition, gingival MSC over-activation may contribute to gingival hyperplastic phenotype.

  19. Modulation of Melanogenesis by Heme Oxygenase-1 via p53 in Normal Human Melanocytes.

    PubMed</