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Sample records for adult normal human

  1. Expression of tmp21 in normal adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Yang, Yuan; Li, Jianbo; Hou, Jing; Xia, Kun; Song, Weihong; Liu, Shengchun

    2014-01-01

    TMP21, known as p23 protein, is one important member of the p24 protein families. The degradation of TMP21 is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as with the other presenilin-associated γ-secretase complex members. NFAT plays a very important role in regulation of human TMP21 gene expression. Compared with the function of TMP21, the studies about the distribution of this protein in human tissues are limited. We collected 19 normal adult human tissues from a healthy adult man died in a traffic accident and did examination of all the tissues collected for ICH, western blot and RT-PCR. It was shown that the expression of TMP21 is at high levels in heart, liver, lung, kidney and adrenal gland; moderate levels in brain, pancreas, prostate gland, testicle, small intestine, colon, stomach, gall bladder, thyroid gland and trachea; low levels in skeletal muscle, skin and lymphonodus. TMP21 is widely existed in normal adult human tissues. The current study provided for the first time a comprehensive expression of TMP21 in normal adult human tissues. It will benefit on helping in the design and interpretation of future studies focused on expounding the function of TMP21. PMID:25356171

  2. Fas and Fas ligand expression in fetal and adult human testis with normal or deranged spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Francavilla, S; D'Abrizio, P; Rucci, N; Silvano, G; Properzi, G; Straface, E; Cordeschi, G; Necozione, S; Gnessi, L; Arizzi, M; Ulisse, S

    2000-08-01

    In mice, the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system has been shown to be involved in germ cell apoptosis. In the present study we evaluated the expression of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) in fetal and adult human testis. Semiquantitative RT-PCR demonstrated the expression of Fas and FasL messenger ribonucleic acids in adult testis, but not in fetal testis (20-22 weeks gestation). In situ RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry experiments on adult human testis demonstrated the expression of FasL messenger ribonucleic acid and protein in Sertoli and Leydig cells, whereas the expression of Fas was confined to the Leydig cells and sporadic degenerating spermatocytes. The number of Fas-positive germ cells per 100 Sertoli cell nuclei was increased in 10 biopsies with postmeiotic germ cell arrest compared to 10 normal testis biopsies (mean, 3.82 +/- 0.45 vs. 2.02 +/- 0.29; P = 0.0001), but not in 10 biopsies with meiotic germ cell arrest (mean, 1.56 +/- 1.07). Fas and FasL proteins were not expressed in cases of idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Together, these findings may suggest that Fas/FasL expression in the human testis is developmentally regulated and under gonadotropin control. The increased germ cell expression of Fas in patients with postmeiotic germ cell arrest suggests that the Fas/FasL system may be involved in the quality control mechanism of the produced gametes. PMID:10946867

  3. Expression of gangliosides on glial and neuronal cells in normal and pathological adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Silvia; De Toni, Luca; Lovato, Laura; Tedeschi, Elisa; Gaetti, Luigi; Acler, Michele; Bonetti, Bruno

    2005-12-30

    Few studies have assessed the glycolipid phenotype of glial cells in the human central nervous system (CNS) in situ. We investigated by immunohistochemistry the expression and cellular distribution of a panel of gangliosides (GM1, GM2, acetyl-GM3, GD1a, GD1b, GD2, GD3, GT1b, GQ1b and the A2B5 antibody) in adult, human normal and pathological brain, namely multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurological diseases (OND). In normal conditions, we found diffuse expression in the white matter of most gangliosides tested, with the exception of acetyl-GM3, GT1b and GQ1b. By double immunofluorescence with phenotypic markers, GM1 and GD1b were preferentially expressed on GFAP+ astrocytes, GD1a on NG2+ oligodendrocyte precursors, A2B5 immunostained both populations, while GD2 was selectively present on mature oligodendrocytes. In the gray matter, only GM1, GD2 and A2B5 were present on neuronal cells. Interestingly, those gangliosides present on astrocytes in normal conditions were preferentially expressed on NG2+ cells in chronic MS lesions and in OND. Selective expression of GT1b upon astrocytes and NG2+ cells was instead observed in MS lesions, but not in OND. The definition of the glycolipid phenotype of CNS glial cells may be useful to identify distinct biological glial subsets and provide insights on the potential autoantigenic role of gangliosides in CNS autoimmune diseases. PMID:16313974

  4. Normalizing the environment recapitulates adult human immune traits in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Beura, Lalit K; Hamilton, Sara E; Bi, Kevin; Schenkel, Jason M; Odumade, Oludare A; Casey, Kerry A; Thompson, Emily A; Fraser, Kathryn A; Rosato, Pamela C; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick P; Jenkins, Marc K; Vezys, Vaiva; Haining, W Nicholas; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David

    2016-04-28

    Our current understanding of immunology was largely defined in laboratory mice, partly because they are inbred and genetically homogeneous, can be genetically manipulated, allow kinetic tissue analyses to be carried out from the onset of disease, and permit the use of tractable disease models. Comparably reductionist experiments are neither technically nor ethically possible in humans. However, there is growing concern that laboratory mice do not reflect relevant aspects of the human immune system, which may account for failures to translate disease treatments from bench to bedside. Laboratory mice live in abnormally hygienic specific pathogen free (SPF) barrier facilities. Here we show that standard laboratory mouse husbandry has profound effects on the immune system and that environmental changes produce mice with immune systems closer to those of adult humans. Laboratory mice--like newborn, but not adult, humans--lack effector-differentiated and mucosally distributed memory T cells. These cell populations were present in free-living barn populations of feral mice and pet store mice with diverse microbial experience, and were induced in laboratory mice after co-housing with pet store mice, suggesting that the environment is involved in the induction of these cells. Altering the living conditions of mice profoundly affected the cellular composition of the innate and adaptive immune systems, resulted in global changes in blood cell gene expression to patterns that more closely reflected the immune signatures of adult humans rather than neonates, altered resistance to infection, and influenced T-cell differentiation in response to a de novo viral infection. These data highlight the effects of environment on the basal immune state and response to infection and suggest that restoring physiological microbial exposure in laboratory mice could provide a relevant tool for modelling immunological events in free-living organisms, including humans. PMID:27096360

  5. Calpain proteolysis of alpha II-spectrin in the normal adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Huh, G Y; Glantz, S B; Je, S; Morrow, J S; Kim, J H

    2001-12-01

    The proteolysis of alphaII-spectrin by calpain may be physiologically involved with synaptic remodeling, long-term potentiation, and memory formation. Calpain activation may also mediate neuronal apoptosis, responses to hypoxic insult, and excitotoxic injury. Surprisingly little is known of the activity of these calpain-mediated processes in the adult human brain. Using an antibody that specifically recognizes calpain-cleaved alphaII-spectrin, we have mapped the topographic distribution of the major alphaII-spectrin break-down product (alphaII-bdp1) in six adult brains examined post-mortem. All brains were from patients without evident neurological disease. Focally positive alphaII-bdp1 was consistently detected in the neuropil of the cortical gray matter, in occasional pyramidal neurons, and in rare reactive astrocytes in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Cerebellar Purkinje cells were more frequently, and more intensely, immunopositive. In all fields, staining was most intense in the soma and dendrites of neurons. There was no correlation of the frequency of positive cells with the postmortem interval or clinical condition. While these findings do not rigorously exclude contributions from postmortem calpain activation, they do suggest that a low-level of calpain processing of alphaII-spectrin is likely to be a constitutive process in the adult human brain. PMID:11720774

  6. The SRI24 multichannel atlas of normal adult human brain structure.

    PubMed

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Zahr, Natalie M; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-05-01

    This article describes the SRI24 atlas, a new standard reference system of normal human brain anatomy, that was created using template-free population registration of high-resolution magnetic resonance images acquired at 3T in a group of 24 normal control subjects. The atlas comprises anatomical channels (T1, T2, and proton density weighted), diffusion-related channels (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, longitudinal diffusivity, mean diffusion-weighted image), tissue channels (CSF probability, gray matter probability, white matter probability, tissue labels), and two cortical parcellation maps. The SRI24 atlas enables multichannel atlas-to-subject image registration. It is uniquely versatile in that it is equally suited for the two fundamentally different atlas applications: label propagation and spatial normalization. Label propagation, herein demonstrated using diffusion tensor image fiber tracking, is enabled by the increased sharpness of the SRI24 atlas compared with other available atlases. Spatial normalization, herein demonstrated using data from a young-old group comparison study, is enabled by its unbiased average population shape property. For both propagation and normalization, we also report the results of quantitative comparisons with seven other published atlases: Colin27, MNI152, ICBM452 (warp5 and air12), and LPBA40 (SPM5, FLIRT, AIR). Our results suggest that the SRI24 atlas, although based on 3T MR data, allows equally accurate spatial normalization of data acquired at 1.5T as the comparison atlases, all of which are based on 1.5T data. Furthermore, the SRI24 atlas is as suitable for label propagation as the comparison atlases and detailed enough to allow delineation of anatomical structures for this purpose directly in the atlas. PMID:20017133

  7. The SRI24 Multi-Channel Atlas of Normal Adult Human Brain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Zahr, Natalie M.; Sullivan, Edith V.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the SRI24 atlas, a new standard reference system of normal human brain anatomy, that was created using template-free population registration of high-resolution magnetic resonance images acquired at 3T in a group of 24 normal control subjects. The atlas comprises anatomical channels (T1, T2, and proton density weighted), diffusion-related channels (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, longitudinal diffusivity, mean diffusion-weighted image), tissue channels (CSF probability, gray matter probability, white matter probability, tissue labels), and two cortical parcellation maps. The SRI24 atlas enables multi-channel atlas-to-subject image registration. It is uniquely versatile in that it is equally suited for the two fundamentally different atlas applications: label propagation and spatial normalization. Label propagation, herein demonstrated using DTI fiber tracking, is enabled by the increased sharpness of the SRI24 atlas compared with other available atlases. Spatial normalization, herein demonstrated using data from a young-old group comparison study, is enabled by its unbiased average population shape property. For both propagation and normalization, we also report the results of quantitative comparisons with seven other published atlases: Colin27, MNI152, ICBM452 (warp5 and air12), and LPBA40 (SPM5, FLIRT, AIR). Our results suggest that the SRI24 atlas, although based on 3T MR data, allows equally accurate spatial normalization of data acquired at 1.5T as the comparison atlases, all of which are based on 1.5T data. Furthermore, the SRI24 atlas is as suitable for label propagation as the comparison atlases and detailed enough to allow delineation of anatomical structures for this purpose directly in the atlas. PMID:20017133

  8. Thomsen-Friedenreich-related carbohydrate antigens in normal adult human tissues: a systematic and comparative study.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Stosiek, P; Springer, G F; Karsten, U

    1996-08-01

    A broad variety of normal human tissues were examined for the expression of Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF)-related histo-blood group antigens, TF (Gal beta 1-3GalNAc alpha 1-R), Tn (TF precursor, GalNAc alpha 1-R), sialosyl-Tn (NeuAc alpha 2-6GalNAc alpha 1-R), considered to be useful in cancer diagnosis and immunotherapy, and sialosyl-TF, the cryptic form of TF. These antigens or, more correctly, glycotopes, were determined by immunohistochemistry with at least two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) each (except sialosyl-TF) as well as by lectin histochemistry. For a better dissection of sialosyl-TF and TF glycotopes, tissue sections were pretreated with galactose oxidase or the galactose oxidase-Schiff sequence. Staining with mAbs appeared to be more restricted than with the lectins used. Distribution patterns among normal epithelia were different for all four antigens. These antigens were also detected in some non-epithelial tissues. They can be classified in the following sequence according to the frequency of their occurrence in normal tissues: sialosyl-TF > > sialosyl-Tn > Tn > TF. Most of the positively staining sites for TF, Tn, and sialosyl-Tn are located in immunologically privileged areas. The complex results obtained with anti-TF mAbs (after treatment of the tissue sections with sialidase from Vibrio cholerae) and the lectins amaranthin and jacalin revealed a differential distribution of the subtypes of sialosyl-TF [NeuAc alpha 2-3Gal beta 1-3GalNAc alpha 1-R and Gal beta 1-3 (NeuAc alpha 2-6)GalNAc alpha 1-R] in normal human tissues. From our data it can be inferred that TF, Tn, and sialosyl-Tn are promising targets for a cancer vaccine. PMID:8877380

  9. MRI-based surface area estimates in the normal adult human brain: evidence for structural organisation.

    PubMed Central

    Sisodiya, S; Free, S; Fish, D; Shorvon, S

    1996-01-01

    There are a number of quantitative relationships between geometric parameters describing the structure of the normal human cerebral cortex examined in vivo using volumetric magnetic resonance imaging. A voxel-counting method is used to estimate grey-white interface surface area. The effects of bias associated with the method are considered. In 33 normal controls, the cerebral hemispheres were symmetric in terms of total volume, irrespective of handedness, but not in terms of surface areas for right-handers. The surface area of the grey matter-white matter interface was directly proportional to the cortical grey matter volume, suggesting that growth of the neocortex is primarily tangential, with repetition of a basic structural element rather than gross alterations in the thickness of the cortex. The majority of the surface area of the grey-white interface lies within gyral white matter cores. The mean thickness of the cortex of the right cerebral hemisphere in vivo was 3.0 mm and that of the left 3.3 mm. There was a relationship between the cross-sectional area of the corpus callosum and grey-white interface surface area, suggesting that a fixed proportion and cortical neurons extend interhemispheric axons. These findings suggest that there are general architectural principles governing the organisation of the complex, but ordered, human cerebral cortex. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8621342

  10. A resource of ribosomal RNA-depleted RNA-Seq data from different normal adult and fetal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Jocelyn Y.H.; Boon, Priscilla L.S.; Bertin, Nicolas; Fullwood, Melissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is the most fundamental level at which the genotype leads to the phenotype of the organism. Enabled by ultra-high-throughput next-generation DNA sequencing, RNA-Seq involves shotgun sequencing of fragmented RNA transcripts by next-generation sequencing followed by in silico assembly, and is rapidly becoming the most popular method for gene expression analysis. Poly[A]+ RNA-Seq analyses of normal human adult tissue samples such as Illumina’s Human BodyMap 2.0 Project and the RNA-Seq atlas have provided a useful global resource and framework for comparisons with diseased tissues such as cancer. However, these analyses have failed to provide information on poly[A]−RNA, which is abundant in our cells. The most recent advances in RNA-Seq analyses use ribosomal RNA-depletion to provide information on both poly[A]+ and poly[A]−RNA. In this paper, we describe the use of Illumina’s HiSeq 2000 to generate high quality rRNA-depleted RNA-Seq datasets from human fetal and adult tissues. The datasets reported here will be useful in understanding the different expression profiles in different tissues. PMID:26594381

  11. Effect of Stevia rebaudiana on glucose tolerance in normal adult humans.

    PubMed

    Curi, R; Alvarez, M; Bazotte, R B; Botion, L M; Godoy, J L; Bracht, A

    1986-01-01

    The effect of aqueous extracts of Stevia rebaudiana leaves on a glucose tolerance test was investigated in 16 normal volunteers. Aqueous extracts of 5 grams of leaves were administered to volunteers at regular 6-h intervals for 3 days. Glucose tolerance tests were performed before and after extract administration. A second group of 6 normal volunteers who ingested an aqueous arabinose solution was also studied to eliminate possible stress effects. The extract of Stevia rebaudiana increased glucose tolerance. The extract significantly decreased plasma glucose levels during the test and after overnight fasting in all volunteers. PMID:3651629

  12. Protonation states of histidine and other key residues in deoxy normal human adult hemoglobin by neutron protein crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalevsky, Andrey; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Shibayama, Naoya; Park, Sam-Yong; Ishikawa, Takuya; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, S. Zoe; Langan, Paul; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-11-01

    Using neutron diffraction analysis, the protonation states of 35 of 38 histidine residues were determined for the deoxy form of normal human adult hemoglobin. Distal and buried histidines may contribute to the increased affinity of the deoxy state for hydrogen ions and its decreased affinity for oxygen compared with the oxygenated form. The protonation states of the histidine residues key to the function of deoxy (T-state) human hemoglobin have been investigated using neutron protein crystallography. These residues can reversibly bind protons, thereby regulating the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. By examining the OMIT F{sub o} − F{sub c} and 2F{sub o} − F{sub c} neutron scattering maps, the protonation states of 35 of the 38 His residues were directly determined. The remaining three residues were found to be disordered. Surprisingly, seven pairs of His residues from equivalent α or β chains, αHis20, αHis50, αHis58, αHis89, βHis63, βHis143 and βHis146, have different protonation states. The protonation of distal His residues in the α{sub 1}β{sub 1} heterodimer and the protonation of αHis103 in both subunits demonstrates that these residues may participate in buffering hydrogen ions and may influence the oxygen binding. The observed protonation states of His residues are compared with their ΔpK{sub a} between the deoxy and oxy states. Examination of inter-subunit interfaces provided evidence for interactions that are essential for the stability of the deoxy tertiary structure.

  13. Bender Gestalt Performance of Normal Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacks, Patricia; Storandt, Martha

    1982-01-01

    Provides normative data on the Bender Gestalt Test (BGT) with a sample of 334 normal older adults. Showed that these older adults do not perform on the BGT in a manner that can be called brain damaged. Use of the cut-off score developed with younger persons appears appropriate. (Author)

  14. Anatomical Network Comparison of Human Upper and Lower, Newborn and Adult, and Normal and Abnormal Limbs, with Notes on Development, Pathology and Limb Serial Homology vs. Homoplasy

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Rui; Esteve-Altava, Borja; Smith, Christopher; Boughner, Julia C.; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2015-01-01

    How do the various anatomical parts (modules) of the animal body evolve into very different integrated forms (integration) yet still function properly without decreasing the individual’s survival? This long-standing question remains unanswered for multiple reasons, including lack of consensus about conceptual definitions and approaches, as well as a reasonable bias toward the study of hard tissues over soft tissues. A major difficulty concerns the non-trivial technical hurdles of addressing this problem, specifically the lack of quantitative tools to quantify and compare variation across multiple disparate anatomical parts and tissue types. In this paper we apply for the first time a powerful new quantitative tool, Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), to examine and compare in detail the musculoskeletal modularity and integration of normal and abnormal human upper and lower limbs. In contrast to other morphological methods, the strength of AnNA is that it allows efficient and direct empirical comparisons among body parts with even vastly different architectures (e.g. upper and lower limbs) and diverse or complex tissue composition (e.g. bones, cartilages and muscles), by quantifying the spatial organization of these parts—their topological patterns relative to each other—using tools borrowed from network theory. Our results reveal similarities between the skeletal networks of the normal newborn/adult upper limb vs. lower limb, with exception to the shoulder vs. pelvis. However, when muscles are included, the overall musculoskeletal network organization of the upper limb is strikingly different from that of the lower limb, particularly that of the more proximal structures of each limb. Importantly, the obtained data provide further evidence to be added to the vast amount of paleontological, gross anatomical, developmental, molecular and embryological data recently obtained that contradicts the long-standing dogma that the upper and lower limbs are serial

  15. Human metapneumovirus in adults.

    PubMed

    Haas, Lenneke E M; Thijsen, Steven F T; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  16. Human Metapneumovirus in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Lenneke E. M.; Thijsen, Steven F. T.; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  17. Histological and immunohistochemical study of estrogen and progesterone receptors in normal human breast tissue in adult age groups vulnerable to malignancy.

    PubMed

    Goyal, R; Gupta, T; Gupta, R; Aggarwal, A; Sahni, D; Singh, G

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of receptor status has become standard procedure for assessing breast cancer patients. Estrogen causes epithelial proliferation in breast tissue via the estrogen receptor (ER). The progesterone receptor (PR) is also regulated by the estrogen gene. Analyzing ER and PR together gives information regarding the likely response of carcinoma patients to hormonal therapy. The aim of the present study was to record the expression patterns of ER and PR in normal mammary tissue in different age groups to provide reference data to facilitate histological diagnosis. Breast tissues from the upper outer quadrant of each side of 27 adult female cadavers were examined after H & E staining. ER and PR were identified and examined by immunohistochemistry. The percentage area occupied by parenchyma relative to stromal tissue was calculated in different age groups and was about 4:6, 3.5:6.5, 3:7, 2:8, and 1.5:8.5 in the 3rd, 4th and 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th, and 10th decades of life, respectively. Both ER and PR were present in all age groups and the numbers of both receptors were maximal during the 4th decade. The distribution and staining patterns for both ER and PR were recorded in different age groups. The contiguous pattern of ER, which is considered pathognomonic of breast carcinoma, was not seen except in one case in the 6th decade. Moderately stained ER and PR receptor sites predominated throughout. The study of normal breast tissue of similar age might provide comparisons that will help histopathologists to make clinical diagnoses from breast biopsies. Clin. Anat. 29:729-737, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27038435

  18. Free DNA in serum and plasma from normal adults.

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, C R

    1975-01-01

    Circulating DNA has been associated with several human disorders, including the nephritis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), in which it is thought to play an etiological role. However, it remains unclear whether its appearance in the circulation is truly pathological. Several reports, each generally based on a single assay method, have disagreed as to whether DNA may circulate in normals. Some, but not all, of this disagreement may be explained by the recently described appearance of DNA in serum, but not plasma, apparently as the result of release from leukocytes in vitro. In the present report an attempt is made to clarify this problem. Normal plasma and serum samples were examined by four assays for DNA that were newly modified to enhance their specificity and/or sensitivity. Plasma DNA was undetectable by all four methods, the most sensitive of which could detect 0.05 mug/ml of native DNA (nDNA) or 0.1 mug/ml of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Serum DNA was present in 14 of 16 samples tested in variable concentrations with an estimated mean of 1.9 mug/ml. It is concluded that the appearance of DNA in adult human plasma is a pathological event. Presumably, previous reports describing detection of DNA in normal plasma were based on the measurement of non-DNAase-sensitive interfering substance. Furthermore, it is emphasized that the use of serum in studies dependent on sensitive assays for DNA (or anti-DNA antibody) introduces an ambiguity that may be avoided by substitution of carefully collected plasma for serum. PMID:1150882

  19. Arts & Humanities in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter on lifelong learning focuses on the theme of the arts and humanities in adult literacy education. The following articles are included: (1) "In Defense of a Practical Education" (Earl Shorris); (2) "From the Program Director" (Elizabeth Bryant McCrary); (3) "Vermont Council on the Humanities: Book Discussion…

  20. Binaural Advantage for Younger and Older Adults with Normal Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubno, Judy R.; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Horwitz, Amy R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Three experiments measured benefit of spatial separation, benefit of binaural listening, and masking-level differences (MLDs) to assess age-related differences in binaural advantage. Method: Participants were younger and older adults with normal hearing through 4.0 kHz. Experiment 1 compared spatial benefit with and without head shadow.…

  1. NORMAL HUMAN VARIATION: REFOCUSSING THE ENHANCEMENT DEBATE

    PubMed Central

    Kahane, Guy; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-01-01

    This article draws attention to several common mistakes in thinking about biomedical enhancement, mistakes that are made even by some supporters of enhancement. We illustrate these mistakes by examining objections that John Harris has recently raised against the use of pharmacological interventions to directly modulate moral decision-making. We then apply these lessons to other influential figures in the debate about enhancement. One upshot of our argument is that many considerations presented as powerful objections to enhancement are really strong considerations in favour of biomedical enhancement, just in a different direction. Another upshot is that it is unfortunate that much of the current debate focuses on interventions that will radically transform normal human capacities. Such interventions are unlikely to be available in the near future, and may not even be feasible. But our argument shows that the enhancement project can still have a radical impact on human life even if biomedical enhancement operated entirely within the normal human range. PMID:23906367

  2. Normal human variation: refocussing the enhancement debate.

    PubMed

    Kahane, Guy; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-02-01

    This article draws attention to several common mistakes in thinking about biomedical enhancement, mistakes that are made even by some supporters of enhancement. We illustrate these mistakes by examining objections that John Harris has recently raised against the use of pharmacological interventions to directly modulate moral decision-making. We then apply these lessons to other influential figures in the debate about enhancement. One upshot of our argument is that many considerations presented as powerful objections to enhancement are really strong considerations in favour of biomedical enhancement, just in a different direction. Another upshot is that it is unfortunate that much of the current debate focuses on interventions that will radically transform normal human capacities. Such interventions are unlikely to be available in the near future, and may not even be feasible. But our argument shows that the enhancement project can still have a radical impact on human life even if biomedical enhancement operated entirely within the normal human range. PMID:23906367

  3. Frontal sinus asymmetry: Is it an effect of cranial asymmetry? X-ray analysis of 469 normal adult human frontal sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kanat, Ayhan; Yazar, Ugur; Ozdemir, Bulent; Coskun, Zerrin O.; Erdivanli, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: There is no study in the literature that investigates an asymmetric morphological feature of the frontal sinus (FS). Materials and Methods: Four hundred and sixty-nine consecutive direct X-rays of FSs were analyzed for the asymmetry between the right and left sides. When an asymmetry in the height and contour of the FS existed, this difference was quantified. Results: Of the 469 patients, X-rays of 402 patients (85.7%), there was an asymmetry between right and left sides of the FS. Of these 235 (50.1%) were dominant on the left side, whereas 167 (35.6%) were dominant on the right, the sinuses of remaining 67 patients (14.3%) was symmetric. Statistical Analysis: The comparisons between parameters were performed using Wilkinson signed rank test. The relationship between handedness and sinus asymmetry was also examined by two proportions test. There is statistically significant difference between the dominance of left and right FS. Conclusions: Hemispheric dominance may have some effect (s) of on sinus asymmetry of the human cranium. Surgeons sometimes enter the cranium through the FS and knowledge of asymmetric FS is important to minimize surgical complications. PMID:26752894

  4. Psychosocial Functioning of Adult Epileptic and MS Patients and Adult Normal Controls on the WPSI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Siang-Yang

    1986-01-01

    Psychosocial functioning of adult epileptic outpatients as assessed by the Washington Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (WPSI) was compared to that of adult multiple sclerosis (MS) outpatients and normal subjects. When only valid WPSI profiles were considered, the only significant finding was that the epilepsy group and the MS group had more…

  5. Dynamic mapping of normal human hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Gogtay, Nitin; Nugent, Tom F; Herman, David H; Ordonez, Anna; Greenstein, Deanna; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Clasen, Liv; Toga, Arthur W; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Thompson, Paul M

    2006-01-01

    The hippocampus, which plays an important role in memory functions and emotional responses, has distinct subregions subserving different functions. Because the volume and shape of the hippocampus are altered in many neuropsychiatric disorders, it is important to understand the trajectory of normal hippocampal development. We present the first dynamic maps to reveal the anatomical sequence of normal human hippocampal development. A novel hippocampal mapping technique was applied to a database of prospectively obtained brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans (100 scans in 31 children and adolescents), scanned every 2 yr for 6-10 yr between ages 4 and 25. Our results establish that the structural development of the human hippocampus is remarkably heterogeneous, with significant differences between posterior (increase over time) and anterior (loss over time) subregions. These distinct developmental trajectories of hippocampal subregions may parallel differences in their functional development. PMID:16826559

  6. Heightened airway responsiveness in normal female children compared with adults.

    PubMed

    Tepper, R S; Stevens, J; Eigen, H

    1994-03-01

    Studies have suggested that airway responsiveness declines with maturation; however, studies comparing infants, children, and adults are confounded by differences in size as well as maturation. Therefore, to determine whether maturation has a significant affect on airway responsiveness, we compared normal female children (n = 9; mean age = 13.6 yr) and adults (n = 7; mean age = 42.4 yr) who were matched for body size. Bronchial challenge tests were performed with increasing methacholine concentrations to a maximum of 30 mg/ml. At baseline, there were no significant differences between the two groups in lung volumes (TGV, RV, TLC) or flow-volume curves (FEV1, average forced expiratory flow rate between 25% and 75% of the vital capacity [FEF25-75], FVC). All subjects but one adolescent completed the challenge (30 mg/ml). The children had a greater percentage decline from baseline in FEV1 than the adults (17 versus 7%, p < 0.03). The percentage decline in FEF25-75 was greater for the children than for the adults, but the difference was not statistically significant (35 versus 20%, p < 0.10). Compared with the children, the adults more often demonstrated a plateau in their dose-response curves for FEV1 (22 versus 86%) and for FEF25-75 (33 versus 100%). We conclude that normal female children have a greater airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine than do adults, and that this difference is not related to baseline lung size, airway caliber, or delivered methacholine dose. PMID:8118636

  7. Ankle brachial pressure index of normal, healthy, younger adults.

    PubMed

    Niblo, Jane; Coull, Alison

    Doppler ultrasound and ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) calculations are used in the assessment of lower limb vascularity, specifically to determine arterial deficiency. ABPI is important as it is used as an indicator when deciding management options for the treatment of leg ulceration. This study aimed to investigate the range of ABPI measurement, using Doppler ultrasound and sphygmomanometry in 36 young healthy adults aged 18-55 years. The findings show a mean ABPI in the left leg of 1.19 and a mean ABPI of 1.17 in the right leg which, while within the normal range, are consistently in the upper range and significantly higher than the acknowledged 'normal' midpoint of 1.0. It would appear that younger people will have ABPIs within the upper aspect of the normal range and well above the established norm of 1.0. PMID:24151719

  8. Vowel perception by noise masked normal-hearing young adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richie, Carolyn; Kewley-Port, Diane; Coughlin, Maureen

    2005-08-01

    This study examined vowel perception by young normal-hearing (YNH) adults, in various listening conditions designed to simulate mild-to-moderate sloping sensorineural hearing loss. YNH listeners were individually age- and gender-matched to young hearing-impaired (YHI) listeners tested in a previous study [Richie et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 2923-2933 (2003)]. YNH listeners were tested in three conditions designed to create equal audibility with the YHI listeners; a low signal level with and without a simulated hearing loss, and a high signal level with a simulated hearing loss. Listeners discriminated changes in synthetic vowel tokens /smcapi e ɛ invv æ/ when F1 or F2 varied in frequency. Comparison of YNH with YHI results failed to reveal significant differences between groups in terms of performance on vowel discrimination, in conditions of similar audibility by using both noise masking to elevate the hearing thresholds of the YNH and applying frequency-specific gain to the YHI listeners. Further, analysis of learning curves suggests that while the YHI listeners completed an average of 46% more test blocks than YNH listeners, the YHI achieved a level of discrimination similar to that of the YNH within the same number of blocks. Apparently, when age and gender are closely matched between young hearing-impaired and normal-hearing adults, performance on vowel tasks may be explained by audibility alone.

  9. Acoustic characteristics of vowels by normal Malaysian Malay young adults.

    PubMed

    Ting, Hua Nong; Chia, See Yan; Abdul Hamid, Badrulzaman; Mukari, Siti Zamratol-Mai Sarah

    2011-11-01

    The acoustic characteristics of sustained vowel have been widely investigated across various languages and ethnic groups. These acoustic measures, including fundamental frequency (F(0)), jitter (Jitt), relative average perturbation (RAP), five-point period perturbation quotient (PPQ5), shimmer (Shim), and 11-point amplitude perturbation quotient (APQ11) are not well established for Malaysian Malay young adults. This article studies the acoustic measures of Malaysian Malay adults using acoustical analysis. The study analyzed six sustained Malay vowels of 60 normal native Malaysian Malay adults with a mean of 21.19 years. The F(0) values of Malaysian Malay males and females were reported as 134.85±18.54 and 238.27±24.06Hz, respectively. Malaysian Malay females had significantly higher F(0) than that of males for all the vowels. However, no significant differences were observed between the genders for the perturbation measures in all the vowels, except RAP in /e/. No significant F(0) differences between the vowels were observed. Significant differences between the vowels were reported for all perturbation measures in Malaysian Malay males. As for Malaysian Malay females, significant differences between the vowels were reported for Shim and APQ11. Multiethnic comparisons indicate that F(0) varies between Malaysian Malay and other ethnic groups. However, the perturbation measures cannot be directly compared, where the measures vary significantly across different speech analysis softwares. PMID:21429707

  10. Normal range of spinal mobility for healthy young adult Turkish men.

    PubMed

    Cidem, Muharrem; Karacan, Ilhan; Uludag, Murat

    2012-08-01

    Anthropometric characteristics may vary among human populations, especially with differences in race. The aim of the present study is to find normal values of some measures (chest expansion, Schober's test and modified Schober's test) frequently used in the assessment of patients with ankylosing spondylitis, in young adult Turkish men. Initial recruitment identified 2,925 healthy male participants aged 20-30 years, and the final study sample included 1,982 of them. Participants joined the research from all cities except one in Turkey. The measurements of chest expansion, Schober's test, and modified Schober's test were performed by the same researcher using a plastic measuring tape. The mean (±standard error) values of the chest expansion, Schober's test, and modified Schober's test were 6.11 (±0.02), 5.62 (±0.02), and 7.78 (±0.02) cm, respectively. The estimated normal lower bounds for chest expansion, Schober's test, and modified Schober's test may be between 3.71-3.86 cm, 3.86-3.97 cm, and 5.46-5.60 cm, respectively, for young adult Turkish men. No correlation was found between height and spinal mobility. The normal values for spinal mobility in this sample of healthy young adult Turkish men differed from those reported for other young adult male populations (chest expansion ≥5 cm, Schober's test >5 cm, modified Schober's test >7 cm). It is thus useful to consider nationality in interpreting results of spinal mobility tests. PMID:21544633

  11. Aspartame metabolism in normal adults, phenylketonuric heterozygotes, and diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Filer, L J; Stegink, L D

    1989-01-01

    This study reviews clinical studies testing the effects of various doses of aspartame on blood levels of phenylalanine, aspartate, and methanol in normal subjects and known phenylketonuric heterozygotes. The effect of aspartame on the phenylalanine-to-large neutral amino acid ratio under various feeding situations is shown. The clinical studies of aspartame in diabetic subjects are limited to observations of its effects on blood levels of glucose, lipids, insulin, and glucagon. These studies clearly demonstrate the safety of this high-intensity sweetener for use by humans. PMID:2653751

  12. Novel surface markers directed against adult human gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Galivo, Feorillo H.; Dorrell, Craig S.; Grompe, Maria; Zhong, Yong-Ping; Streeter, Philip; Grompe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Novel cell surface-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated against extrahepatic biliary cells were developed for the isolation and characterization of different cell subsets from normal adult human gallbladder. Eleven antigenically distinct gallbladder subpopulations were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. They were classified into epithelial, mesenchymal, and pancreatobiliary (PDX1+SOX9+) subsets based on gene expression profiling. These antigenically distinct human gallbladder cell subsets could potentially also reflect different functional properties in regards to bile physiology, cell renewal and plasticity. Three of the novel monoclonal antibodies differentially labeled archival sections of primary carcinoma of human gallbladder relative to normal tissue. The novel monoclonal antibodies described herein enable the identification and characterization of antigenically diverse cell subsets within adult human gallbladder and are putative tumor biomarkers. PMID:26079872

  13. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  14. Methylation similarities of two CpG sites within exon 5 of human H19 between normal tissues and testicular germ cell tumours of adolescents and adults, without correlation with allelic and total level of expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, A. J.; Verkerk, A. J.; Dekker, M. C.; van Gurp, R. J.; Oosterhuis, J. W.; Looijenga, L. H.

    1997-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) of adolescents and adults morphologically mimic different stages of embryogenesis. Established cell lines of these cancers are used as informative models to study early development. We found that, in contrast to normal development, TGCTs show a consistent biallelic expression of imprinted genes, including H19, irrespective of histology. Methylation of particular cytosine residues of H19 correlates with inhibition of expression, which has not been studied in TGCTs thus far. We investigated the methylation status of two CpG sites within the 3' region of H19 (exon 5: positions 3321 and 3324) both in normal tissues as well as in TGCTs. To obtain quantitative data of these specific sites, the ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction technique, instead of Southern blot analysis, was applied. The results were compared with the allelic status and the total level of expression of this gene. Additionally, the undifferentiated cells and differentiated derivatives of the TGCT-derived cell line NT2-D1 were analysed. While peripheral blood showed no H19 expression and complete methylation, a heterogeneous but consistent pattern of methylation and level of expression was found in the other normal tissues, without a correlation between the two. The separate histological entities of TGCTs resembled the pattern of their nonmalignant tissues. While the CpG sites remained completely methylated in NT2-D1, H19 expression was induced upon differentiation. These data indicate that methylation of the CpG sites within exon 5 of H19 is tissue dependent, without regulating allelic status and/or total level of expression. Of special note is the finding that, also regarding methylation of these particular sites of H19, TGCTs mimic their non-malignant counterparts, in spite of their consistent biallelic expression. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9310237

  15. Timbral recognition and appraisal by adult cochlear implant users and normal-hearing adults.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, K; Knutson, J F; Woodworth, G; Witt, S; DeBus, B

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the appraisal and recognition of timbre (four different musical instruments) by recipients of Clarion cochlear implants (CIS strategy, 75- or 150-microsec pulse widths) and to compare their performance with that of normal-hearing listeners. Twenty-eight Clarion cochlear implant users and 41 normal-hearing listeners were asked to give a subjective assessment of the pleasantness of each instrument using a visual analog scale with anchors of "like very much" to "dislike very much," and to match each sound with a picture of the instrument they believed had produced it. No significant differences were found between the two different pulse widths for either appreciation or recognition; thus, data from the two pulse widths following 12 months of Clarion implant use were collapsed for further analyses. Significant differences in appraisal were found between normal-hearing listeners and implant recipients for two of the four instruments sampled. Normal-hearing adults were able to recognize all of the instruments with significantly greater accuracy than implant recipients. Performance on timbre perception tasks was correlated with speech perception and cognitive tasks. PMID:9493937

  16. Cephalic phase metabolic responses in normal weight adults.

    PubMed

    Bruce, D G; Storlien, L H; Furler, S M; Chisholm, D J

    1987-08-01

    The presence and physiologic importance of cephalic phase insulin release in humans remains controversial. The aim of these studies was to determine whether cephalic phase insulin release could be demonstrated in normal weight subjects and whether it would be associated with changes in blood glucose, free fatty acid, and pancreatic polypeptide levels. The studies were followed by a hyperglycemic clamp to determine whether cephalic responses would alter overall glucose disposal or glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In all, 17 subjects were studied on two occasions with and without (control study) presentation of food stimuli. Tease-feeding alone (n = 6), or the administration of a sweet taste alone (aspartame, n = 5) failed to stimulate cephalic responses. However, the presentation of the combined stimuli (tease meals plus sweet taste, n = 7) resulted in a significant fall (P less than .005) in blood glucose levels and a variable rise in serum insulin (% insulin rise 38 +/- 15%, P less than .05) and C-peptide levels (7 +/- 6%, NS) within five minutes of the food presentation when compared with control studies, with no change seen in free fatty acid or pancreatic polypeptide levels. The blood glucose fall correlated strongly (r = .90, P less than .01) with a score of the subjective response to the food and taste.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3298939

  17. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Expression in Normal and Diseased Human Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oronzi Scott, M.; Sylvester, J. E.; Heiman-Patterson, T.; Shi, Y.-J.; Fieles, W.; Stedman, H.; Burghes, A.; Ray, P.; Worton, R.; Fischbeck, K. H.

    1988-03-01

    A probe for the 5' end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene was used to study expression of the gene in normal human muscle, myogenic cell cultures, and muscle from patients with DMD. Expression was found in RNA from normal fetal muscle, adult cardiac and skeletal muscle, and cultured muscle after myoblast fusion. In DMD muscle, expression of this portion of the gene was also revealed by in situ RNA hybridization, particularly in regenerating muscle fibers.

  18. Fatty acid uptake in normal human myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Vyska, K.; Meyer, W.; Stremmel, W.; Notohamiprodjo, G.; Minami, K.; Machulla, H.J.; Gleichmann, U.; Meyer, H.; Koerfer, R. )

    1991-09-01

    Fatty acid binding protein has been found in rat aortic endothelial cell membrane. It has been identified to be a 40-kDa protein that corresponds to a 40-kDa fatty acid binding protein with high affinity for a variety of long chain fatty acids isolated from rat heart myocytes. It is proposed that this endothelial membrane fatty acid binding protein might mediate the myocardial uptake of fatty acids. For evaluation of this hypothesis in vivo, influx kinetics of tracer-labeled fatty acids was examined in 15 normal subjects by scintigraphic techniques. Variation of the plasma fatty acid concentration and plasma perfusion rate has been achieved by modulation of nutrition state and exercise conditions. The clinical results suggest that the myocardial fatty acid influx rate is saturable by increasing fatty acid plasma concentration as well as by increasing plasma flow. For analysis of these data, functional relations describing fatty acid transport from plasma into myocardial tissue in the presence and absence of an unstirred layer were developed. The fitting of these relations to experimental data indicate that the free fatty acid influx into myocardial tissue reveals the criteria of a reaction on a capillary surface in the vicinity of flowing plasma but not of a reaction in extravascular space or in an unstirred layer and that the fatty acid influx into normal myocardium is a saturable process that is characterized by the quantity corresponding to the Michaelis-Menten constant, Km, and the maximal velocity, Vmax, 0.24 {plus minus} 0.024 mumol/g and 0.37 {plus minus} 0.013 mumol/g(g.min), respectively. These data are compatible with a nondiffusional uptake process mediated by the initial interaction of fatty acids with the 40-kDa membrane fatty acid binding protein of cardiac endothelial cells.

  19. Age and Gender Effects on Wideband Absorbance in Adults with Normal Outer and Middle Ear Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazlan, Rafidah; Kei, Joseph; Ya, Cheng Li; Yusof, Wan Nur Hanim Mohd; Saim, Lokman; Zhao, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of age and gender on wideband energy absorbance in adults with normal middle ear function. Method: Forty young adults (14 men, 26 women, aged 20-38 years), 31 middle-aged adults (16 men, 15 women, aged 42-64 years), and 30 older adults (20 men, 10 women, aged 65-82 years) were assessed. Energy absorbance…

  20. SOX2+ Cell Population from Normal Human Brain White Matter Is Able to Generate Mature Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oliver-De La Cruz, Jorge; Carrión-Navarro, Josefa; García-Romero, Noemí; Gutiérrez-Martín, Antonio; Lázaro-Ibáñez, Elisa; Escobedo-Lucea, Carmen; Perona, Rosario; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A number of neurodegenerative diseases progress with a loss of myelin, which makes them candidate diseases for the development of cell-replacement therapies based on mobilisation or isolation of the endogenous neural/glial progenitor cells, in vitro expansion, and further implantation. Cells expressing A2B5 or PDGFRA/CNP have been isolated within the pool of glial progenitor cells in the subcortical white matter of the normal adult human brain, all of which demonstrate glial progenitor features. However, the heterogeneity and differentiation potential of this pool of cells is not yet well established. Methods We used diffusion tensor images, histopathology, and immunostaining analysis to demonstrate normal cytoarchitecture and the absence of abnormalities in human temporal lobe samples from patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. These samples were used to isolate and enrich glial progenitor cells in vitro, and later to detect such cells in vivo. Results We have identified a subpopulation of SOX2+ cells, most of them co-localising with OLIG2, in the white matter of the normal adult human brain in vivo. These cells can be isolated and enriched in vitro, where they proliferate and generate immature (O4+) and mature (MBP+) oligodendrocytes and, to a lesser extent, astrocytes (GFAP+). Conclusion Our results demonstrate the existence of a new glial progenitor cell subpopulation that expresses SOX2 in the white matter of the normal adult human brain. These cells might be of use for tissue regeneration procedures. PMID:24901457

  1. Fluorescence Lifetimes of Normal and Carcinomatous Human Nasopharyngeal Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Li, H.; Li, B.; Chen, R.; Zheng, G.; Song, C.

    2016-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of normal and carcinomatous in vitro human nasopharyngeal tissues are compared. By fitting the time-resolved emission with exponential decays, mean lifetimes were obtained. There were marked differences between the lifetimes of the carcinomatous and the normal tissues. Thus, early diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is possible. In general, comprehensive information from human tissue autofluorescence can be acquired via both time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence spectra.

  2. Inhibition of platelet-aggregating activity in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura plasma by normal adult immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Lian, E C; Mui, P T; Siddiqui, F A; Chiu, A Y; Chiu, L L

    1984-01-01

    Plasma from patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) caused the aggregation of autologous and homologous platelets, and effect which was inhibited by normal plasma. IgG purified from seven normal adults at a concentration of 0.7 mg/ml completely inhibited the platelet aggregation induced by plasma obtained from two TTP patients with active disease. The inhibition of platelet aggregation by human adult IgG was concentration dependent, and the inhibitory activity of human IgG was neutralized by rabbit antihuman IgG. Fab fragments inhibited the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation as well as intact IgG, whereas Fc fragments had no effect. Platelet aggregation caused by ADP, collagen, epinephrine, or thrombin was not affected by purified human IgG. The prior incubation of IgG with TTP plasma caused a significantly greater reduction of platelet aggregation by TTP plasma than that of IgG and platelet suspension, suggesting that the IgG inhibits TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation through direct interaction with platelet aggregating factor in TTP plasma. IgG obtained initially from five infants and young children under the age of 4 yr did not possess any inhibitory activity. When one of the children reached 3 yr of age, his IgG inhibited the aggregation induced by one TTP plasma, but not that caused by another plasma. The IgG procured from the same boy at 4 yr of age inhibited the aggregation induced by both TTP plasmas. The IgG purified from the TTP plasma during active disease failed to inhibit the aggregation caused by the same plasma. After recovery, however, the IgG effectively inhibited aggregation. These observations suggest that platelet-aggregating factors present in the TTP plasma are heterogeneous in nature and that the IgG present in the normal adult plasma, which inhibits the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation, may be partially responsible for the success of plasma infusion therapy in TTP. Images PMID:6538207

  3. Epithelial cell cultures from normal and cancerous human tissues.

    PubMed

    Owens, R B; Smith, H S; Nelson-Rees, W A; Springer, E L

    1976-04-01

    Thirty epithelial cell strains were isolated from human carcinomas and normal epithelial tissues by collagenase digestion and selective removal of fibroblasts with trypsin-Versene. Most strains were obtained from metastatic carcinomas or epithelia of the urinary and intestinal tracts. The success rate for growth of both neoplastic and normal tissues (excluding skin) was 38%. Six of these strains showed gross morphologic and chromosome changes typical of malignant cells. Nine resembled normal epithelium. The other 15 exhibited some degree of morphologic change from normal. PMID:176412

  4. DNA amplification is rare in normal human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.A.; Watt, F.M.; Hudson, D.L.; Stark, G.R. ); Smith, H.S.; Hancock, M.C. )

    1990-03-01

    Three types of normal human cells were selected in tissue culture with three drugs without observing a single amplification event from a total of 5 x 10{sup 8} cells. No drug-resistant colonies were observed when normal foreskin keratinocytes were selected with N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate or with hydroxyurea or when normal mammary epithelial cells were selected with methotrexate. Some slightly resistant colonies with limited potential for growth were obtained when normal diploid fibroblast cells derived from fetal lung were selected with methotrexate or hydroxyurea but careful copy-number analysis of the dihydrofolate reductase and ribonucleotide reductase genes revealed no evidence of amplification. The rarity of DNA amplification in normal human cells contrasts strongly with the situation in tumors and in established cell lines, where amplification of onogenes and of genes mediating drug resistance is frequent. The results suggest that tumors and cell lines have acquired the abnormal ability to amplify DNA with high frequency.

  5. Taste perception in normal and overweight Mexican adults.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cordero, Erika; Malacara-Hernandez, Juan Manuel; Martinez-Cordero, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of obesity in Mexico is the highest in the world, with almost 70% of adults being classified as overweight or obese. The increased prevalence of obesity in Mexico, and globally, may be related to the changing food environment, providing increased access to highly palatable, but obesogenic, food products. One potential mechanism for this association is changing food perceptions, an area poorly studied in transitional countries. Thus, we conducted a study to determine the degree to which perception thresholds for four basic tastes are associated with anthropometric variables, hormone levels, and energy intake. Bitter and sweet taste had the lowest and highest thresholds, respectively, and women reported a greater sensitivity to these flavors compared to men. Overall, the perception thresholds to each flavor were not associated with energy intake or body mass index (BMI), while the perception threshold of aspartame was negatively associated with energy intake. Based on the results of our study, in a sample of Mexican adults, sensory taste response to basic flavors is not associated with energy intake or BMI. PMID:25681653

  6. CT appearance of the normal appendix in adults.

    PubMed

    Tamburrini, Stefania; Brunetti, Arturo; Brown, Michèle; Sirlin, Claude B; Casola, Giovanna

    2005-10-01

    The aims of this study were to identify (1) the normal range of the appendix on computed tomography (CT), (2) the correlation of patient age and sex with the visibility and appearance of the appendix on CT, and (3) the normal variations in wall thickness, intraluminal content, and location of the appendix. Three hundred seventy-two outpatients underwent abdominopelvic CT. The scans were reviewed on the picture archiving and communication system and appendiceal outer-to-outer wall diameter, wall thickness, location, content and its correlation with appendix diameter were analyzed. The appendix was visualized in 305/372 patients. Its location relative to the cecum was highly variable. The diameter range was 3-10 mm; in 42% of cases the diameter was greater than 6 mm. When the intraluminal content (185/305) was visualized, the diameter was slightly superior to the mean (p=0.0156). In 329 CT scans in which oral contrast material was given, the appendix was filled by contrast material in 74/329 patients. The appendix wall thickness was measurable in 22/305 patients (average 0.15 cm). There is significant overlap between the normal and abnormal CT appearance of the appendix. Consequently the diagnosis of acute appendicitis should be based not only on the appearance of the appendix but also on the presence of secondary signs. PMID:15912331

  7. The Importance and Perceived Reality of TV for Normal and Deviant Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostman, Ronald E.; And Others

    A total of 155 nonlabeled, normal adults and 28 labeled, schizophrenic adults were interviewed in a study to determine differences in the two groups' perceptions of television utility and reality. Hypotheses were formulated concerning expected differences in the reported importance of television in interpersonal communication, relaxation, and…

  8. Effects of Elicitation Procedures on the Narratives of Normal and Closed Head-Injured Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liles, Betty Z.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-three normal adults and four closed head-injured (CHI) adults with a high level of language recovery retold and generated stories. The two tasks differentially influenced the performance of both groups. The two groups differed in measures of cohesiveness and story grammar only in the story generation task. (Author/JDD)

  9. Human pancreatic polypeptide in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Hanukoglu, A; Chalew, S; Kowarski, A A

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of human pancreatic polypeptide may be useful for assessment of gastrointestinal function, integrity of the parasympathetic nervous system or screening for endocrine neoplasia. In adults hPP levels have been reported to increase with age. However hPP levels throughout childhood have not been well characterized in comparison with the adult range. We studied fasting human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) from 45 pediatric patients, from infancy - 15 years, and 18 older adolescents and adults aged 16-45 years. The mean hPP level of children (233 +/- 147 pg/ml) was significantly higher than that (113 +/- 35 pg/ml) of adults (P less than .0001). There was no difference in mean hPP levels of children with normal growth hormone secretion compared to growth hormone deficient patients. There was no effect of gender or body mass index on hPP levels. We conclude that fasting hPP levels must be interpreted with respect to the age of the subject, children particularly, in that preteens may have higher fasting levels than older teenagers and adults. PMID:2307392

  10. Effects of mental practice on normal adult balance ability

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of mental practice on the balance abilities of normal individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental or control group (n=15 each). Participants in both groups performed balance training in a seated position on a gym ball for 20 minutes per session, five sessions per week, for 4 weeks. Members of the experimental group also performed mental practice for 10 minutes before the balance training. After the intervention, balance measuring equipment (Good Balance, Metitur, Finland) was used to quantitatively measure balance ability. [Results] Significant post-training gains were observed in the mediolateral, index of balance function, and time variables of participants of the experimental group. [Conclusion] The application of mental practice with balance training positively affected balance ability. PMID:27512260

  11. Intermuscular Coherence in Normal Adults: Variability and Changes with Age.

    PubMed

    Jaiser, Stephan R; Baker, Mark R; Baker, Stuart N

    2016-01-01

    We investigated beta-band intermuscular coherence (IMC) in 92 healthy adults stratified by decade of age, and analysed variability between and within subjects. In the dominant upper limb, IMC was estimated between extensor digitorum communis and first dorsal interosseous as well as between flexor digitorum superficialis and first dorsal interosseous. In the ipsilateral lower limb, IMC was measured between medial gastrocnemius and extensor digitorum brevis as well as between tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum brevis. Age-related changes in IMC were analysed with age as a continuous variable or binned by decade. Intrasession variance of IMC was examined by dividing sessions into pairs of epochs and comparing coherence estimates between these pairs. Eight volunteers returned for a further session after one year, allowing us to compare intrasession and intersession variance. We found no age-related changes in IMC amplitude across almost six decades of age, allowing us to collate data from all ages into an aggregate normative dataset. Interindividual variability ranged over two orders of magnitude. Intrasession variance was significantly greater than expected from statistical variability alone, and intersession variance was even larger. Potential contributors include fluctuations in task performance, differences in electrode montage and short-term random variation in central coupling. These factors require further exploration and, where possible, minimisation. This study provides evidence that coherence is remarkably robust to senescent changes in the nervous system and provides a large normative dataset for future applications of IMC as a biomarker in disease states. PMID:26901129

  12. Intermuscular Coherence in Normal Adults: Variability and Changes with Age

    PubMed Central

    Jaiser, Stephan R.; Baker, Mark R.; Baker, Stuart N.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated beta-band intermuscular coherence (IMC) in 92 healthy adults stratified by decade of age, and analysed variability between and within subjects. In the dominant upper limb, IMC was estimated between extensor digitorum communis and first dorsal interosseous as well as between flexor digitorum superficialis and first dorsal interosseous. In the ipsilateral lower limb, IMC was measured between medial gastrocnemius and extensor digitorum brevis as well as between tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum brevis. Age-related changes in IMC were analysed with age as a continuous variable or binned by decade. Intrasession variance of IMC was examined by dividing sessions into pairs of epochs and comparing coherence estimates between these pairs. Eight volunteers returned for a further session after one year, allowing us to compare intrasession and intersession variance. We found no age-related changes in IMC amplitude across almost six decades of age, allowing us to collate data from all ages into an aggregate normative dataset. Interindividual variability ranged over two orders of magnitude. Intrasession variance was significantly greater than expected from statistical variability alone, and intersession variance was even larger. Potential contributors include fluctuations in task performance, differences in electrode montage and short-term random variation in central coupling. These factors require further exploration and, where possible, minimisation. This study provides evidence that coherence is remarkably robust to senescent changes in the nervous system and provides a large normative dataset for future applications of IMC as a biomarker in disease states. PMID:26901129

  13. Tongue Palate Contact Patterns of Velar Stops in Normal Adult English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liker, Marko; Gibbon, Fiona E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a more detailed description of normal tongue palate contact patterns for the occlusion phase of velar stops than currently exists. The study used electropalatography (EPG) to record seven normally speaking adults' contact patterns of voiceless velar stops in nine VkV contexts. A variety of EPG indices measured: per cent…

  14. Decorin and biglycan of normal and pathologic human corneas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Hevelone, N. D.; Roth, M. R.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Rodrigues, M. R.; Nirankari, V. S.; Conrad, G. W.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Corneas with scars and certain chronic pathologic conditions contain highly sulfated dermatan sulfate, but little is known of the core proteins that carry these atypical glycosaminoglycans. In this study the proteoglycan proteins attached to dermatan sulfate in normal and pathologic human corneas were examined to identify primary genes involved in the pathobiology of corneal scarring. METHODS: Proteoglycans from human corneas with chronic edema, bullous keratopathy, and keratoconus and from normal corneas were analyzed using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), quantitative immunoblotting, and immunohistology with peptide antibodies to decorin and biglycan. RESULTS: Proteoglycans from pathologic corneas exhibit increased size heterogeneity and binding of the cationic dye alcian blue compared with those in normal corneas. Decorin and biglycan extracted from normal and diseased corneas exhibited similar molecular size distribution patterns. In approximately half of the pathologic corneas, the level of biglycan was elevated an average of seven times above normal, and decorin was elevated approximately three times above normal. The increases were associated with highly charged molecular forms of decorin and biglycan, indicating modification of the proteins with dermatan sulfate chains of increased sulfation. Immunostaining of corneal sections showed an abnormal stromal localization of biglycan in pathologic corneas. CONCLUSIONS: The increased dermatan sulfate associated with chronic corneal pathologic conditions results from stromal accumulation of decorin and particularly of biglycan in the affected corneas. These proteins bear dermatan sulfate chains with increased sulfation compared with normal stromal proteoglycans.

  15. Human Adult Cortical Reorganization and Consequent Visual Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Dilks, Daniel D.; Serences, John T.; Rosenau, Benjamin J.; Yantis, Steven; McCloskey, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Neural and behavioral evidence for cortical reorganization in the adult somatosensory system after loss of sensory input (e.g., amputation) has been well documented. In contrast, evidence for reorganization in the adult visual system is far less clear: neural evidence is the subject of controversy, behavioral evidence is sparse, and studies combining neural and behavioral evidence have not previously been reported. Here, we report converging behavioral and neuroimaging evidence from a stroke patient (B.L.) in support of cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system. B.L.’s stroke spared the primary visual cortex (V1), but destroyed fibers that normally provide input to V1 from the upper left visual field (LVF). As a consequence, B.L. is blind in the upper LVF, and exhibits distorted perception in the lower LVF: stimuli appear vertically elongated, toward and into the blind upper LVF. For example, a square presented in the lower LVF is perceived as a rectangle extending upward. We hypothesized that the perceptual distortion was a consequence of cortical reorganization in V1. Extensive behavioral testing supported our hypothesis, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) confirmed V1 reorganization. Together, the behavioral and fMRI data show that loss of input to V1 after a stroke leads to cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system, and provide the first evidence that reorganization of the adult visual system affects visual perception. These findings contribute to our understanding of the human adult brain’s capacity to change and has implications for topics ranging from learning to recovery from brain damage. PMID:17804619

  16. Multivariate analysis of somatosensory evoked potential parameters in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Gundel, A

    1983-01-01

    Cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) to median nerve stimulation were recorded in 65 normal subjects. Absolute peak latencies and amplitudes of cervical components N9, P10, N11, N13, P17, and cortical components P16, N20, P25, and N35 were measured. By means of partial correlations the interdependency of SEP-features could be verified in addition to the well-known dependence on arm length and age. In certain respects our results replicate other studies finding significant correlations between age and latency of early SEP-components as well as inverse relations between age and cervical amplitudes. Further analysis disclosed high inter-correlations between the latencies and between the amplitudes of the cervical and cortical components also revealing a certain exceptional position of the positive wave P17. In contrast to an inverse relation of amplitude and latency of the cervical components there were positive correlations between the respective features in the cortical evoked response. The findings are discussed with regard to the current knowledge about the origins of the SEP-components. PMID:6667105

  17. RENAL SUBSTRATE EXCHANGE AND GLUCONEOGENESIS IN NORMAL POSTABSORPTIVE HUMANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Release of glucose by the kidney in postabsorptive normal humans is generally regarded as being wholly due to gluconeogenesis. Although lactate is the most important systemic gluconeogenic precursor and there is appreciable net renal lactate uptake, renal lactate gluconeogenesis has not yet been inv...

  18. Collagen polymorphism in normal and cirrhotic human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, J M; Hutcheson, E T; Kang, A H

    1977-01-01

    Collagens in normal human liver and in alcoholic cirrhotic liver were investigated. Collagens were solubilized by limited proteolysis with pepsin under nondenaturing conditions, and after purification, were fractionated into types I and III by selective precipitation with NaCl. After carboxymethyl cellulose and agarose chromatography, the resulting alpha-chains from each of the collagen types were analyzed with respect to their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions. A comparison of the results obtained from normal liver with those from the diseases organ revealed no significant differences. The isolated human liver alpha1(I) and alpha1(III) chains were digested with CNBr and the generated peptides were separated and purified by a combination of ion-exchange and molecular sieve chromatography. The molecular weight and the amino acid and the carbohydrate compositions of each of the peptides were identical to those of the corresponding human skin peptides except for the slightly higher content of hydroxylysine in some of the peptides. The relative content of type III in relation to type I collagen in both normal anc cirrhotic liver was determined by digesting washed liver homogenates directly with CNBr and quantitating the resultant alpha1(I) and alpha 1(III) peptides after chromatographic separation. The relative quantities of these peptides indicated that normal human liver contained an average of 47% type III, with the remainder being type I. Cirrhotic liver, on the other hand, contained a significantly smaller proportion of type III, ranging from 18 to 34% in different samples, with a corresponding increase in type I. These findings indicate that although the amino acid and carbohydrate compositions of collagens deposited in cirrhotic liver are normal, the fibrotic process of alcoholic liver disease in humans is accompanied by an alteration in tissue collagen polymorphism, and suggest that the observed alterations may have pathogenetic implications. PMID:833273

  19. Self-Monitoring of Listening Abilities in Normal-Hearing Children, Normal-Hearing Adults, and Children with Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Rothpletz, Ann M.; Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-monitoring has been shown to be an essential skill for various aspects of our lives, including our health, education, and interpersonal relationships. Likewise, the ability to monitor one’s speech reception in noisy environments may be a fundamental skill for communication, particularly for those who are often confronted with challenging listening environments, such as students and children with hearing loss. Purpose The purpose of this project was to determine if normal-hearing children, normal-hearing adults, and children with cochlear implants can monitor their listening ability in noise and recognize when they are not able to perceive spoken messages. Research Design Participants were administered an Objective-Subjective listening task in which their subjective judgments of their ability to understand sentences from the Coordinate Response Measure corpus presented in speech spectrum noise were compared to their objective performance on the same task. Study Sample Participants included 41 normal-hearing children, 35 normal-hearing adults, and 10 children with cochlear implants. Data Collection and Analysis On the Objective-Subjective listening task, the level of the masker noise remained constant at 63 dB SPL, while the level of the target sentences varied over a 12 dB range in a block of trials. Psychometric functions, relating proportion correct (Objective condition) and proportion perceived as intelligible (Subjective condition) to target/masker ratio (T/M), were estimated for each participant. Thresholds were defined as the T/M required to produce 51% correct (Objective condition) and 51% perceived as intelligible (Subjective condition). Discrepancy scores between listeners’ threshold estimates in the Objective and Subjective conditions served as an index of self-monitoring ability. In addition, the normal-hearing children were administered tests of cognitive skills and academic achievement, and results from these measures were compared

  20. Audibility-based predictions of speech recognition for children and adults with normal hearing.

    PubMed

    McCreery, Ryan W; Stelmachowicz, Patricia G

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the relationship between audibility and predictions of speech recognition for children and adults with normal hearing. The Speech Intelligibility Index (SII) is used to quantify the audibility of speech signals and can be applied to transfer functions to predict speech recognition scores. Although the SII is used clinically with children, relatively few studies have evaluated SII predictions of children's speech recognition directly. Children have required more audibility than adults to reach maximum levels of speech understanding in previous studies. Furthermore, children may require greater bandwidth than adults for optimal speech understanding, which could influence frequency-importance functions used to calculate the SII. Speech recognition was measured for 116 children and 19 adults with normal hearing. Stimulus bandwidth and background noise level were varied systematically in order to evaluate speech recognition as predicted by the SII and derive frequency-importance functions for children and adults. Results suggested that children required greater audibility to reach the same level of speech understanding as adults. However, differences in performance between adults and children did not vary across frequency bands. PMID:22225061

  1. Expression of 300-kilodalton intermediate filament-associated protein distinguishes human glioma cells from normal astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H Y; Lieska, N; Glick, R; Shao, D; Pappas, G D

    1993-01-01

    The availability of biochemical markers to distinguish glioma cells from normal astrocytes would have enormous diagnostic value. Such markers also may be of value in studying the basic biology of human astrocytomas. The vimentin-binding, 300-kDa intermediate filament (IF)-associated protein (IFAP-300kDa) has recently been shown to be developmentally expressed in radial glia of the central nervous system of the rat. It is not detected in the normal or reactive astrocytes of the adult rat nor in neonatal rat brain astrocytes in primary culture. In the present study, double-label immunofluorescence microscopy using antibodies to IFAP-300kDa and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, an astrocyte-specific IF structural protein) identifies this IFAP in GFAP-containing tumor cells from examples of all three major types of human astrocytomas (i.e., well-differentiated, anaplastic, and glioblastoma multiforme). Astrocytoma cells in primary cultures prepared from all three astrocytomas also express this protein. It is not detectable in normal adult brain tissue. Immunoblot analyses using the IFAP-300kDa antibody confirm the presence of a 300-kDa polypeptide in fresh astrocytoma preparations enriched for IF proteins. These results suggest the utility of IFAP-300kDa as a marker for identification of human glioma cells both in vitro and in situ. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8378327

  2. Brachyury identifies a class of enteroendocrine cells in normal human intestinal crypts and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Filipe; Sammut, Stephen J.; Williams, Geraint T.; Gollins, Simon; McFarlane, Ramsay J.; Reis, Rui Manuel; Wakeman, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Normal homeostasis of adult intestinal epithelium and repair following tissue damage is maintained by a balance of stem and differentiated cells, many of which are still only poorly characterised. Enteroendocrine cells of the gut are a small population of differentiated, secretory cells that are critical for integrating nutrient sensing with metabolic responses, dispersed amongst other epithelial cells. Recent evidence suggests that sub-sets of secretory enteroendocrine cells can act as reserve stem cells. Given the link between cells with stem-like properties and cancer, it is important that we identify factors that might provide a bridge between the two. Here, we identify a sub-set of chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cells that are positive for the developmental and cancer-associated transcription factor Brachyury in normal human small intestinal and colonic crypts. Whilst chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cells are also Brachyury-positive in colorectal tumours, expression of Brachyury becomes more diffuse in these samples, suggesting a more widespread function in cancer. The finding of the developmental transcription factor Brachyury in normal adult human intestinal crypts may extend the functional complexity of enteroendocrine cells and serves as a platform for assessment of the molecular processes of intestinal homeostasis that underpins our understanding of human health, cancer and aging. PMID:26862851

  3. Sialyltransferase activity in normal and atherosclerotic human aorta intima.

    PubMed

    Gracheva, E V; Samovilova, N N; Golovanova, N K; Il'inskaya, O P; Tararak, E M; Prokazova, N V

    2001-04-01

    Sialyltransferase activity has been determined in Golgi membrane fractions isolated from atherosclerotic and normal intima of human aorta by measuring the transfer of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc) from CMP-NeuAc to asialofetuin. The asialofetuin-sialyltransferase activity was found to be twofold higher in the atherosclerotic intima than in the normal intima. The mean value of the apparent Michaelis constant (Km) for the sialylating enzyme in both tissues did not differ and was 57 microM. In contrast, the maximal velocity (Vmax) was 2-fold higher for the atherosclerotic intima than for the normal intima. These results suggest that expression of asialofetuin-sialyltransferases of the aortal intima may be increased in atherosclerosis. PMID:11403646

  4. Autophagy in Normal and Abnormal Early Human Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Avagliano, Laura; Terraneo, Laura; Virgili, Eleonora; Martinelli, Carla; Doi, Patrizia; Samaja, Michele; Bulfamante, Gaetano Pietro; Marconi, Anna Maria

    2015-07-01

    Autophagy is an inducible catabolic process by which cells degrade and recycle materials to survive stress, starvation, and hypoxia. The aim of this study was to evaluate autophagy at the fetal-maternal interface, to assess autophagy involvement during the early phase of human gestation, and to explore autophagic modification in case of early abnormal pregnancy outcome. Specimens were collected from first-trimester normal gestations undergoing legal termination of pregnancy and first-trimester sporadic spontaneous miscarriages. Autophagy was studied in villous and decidual samples by transmission electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting. Autophagy markers were found in cytotrophoblast, syncytiotrophoblast, extravillous trophoblast, and decidual stromal cells. Autophagy is physiologically involved in early normal gestation. Compared with normal pregnancy, spontaneous miscarriage presents an increase in autophagy expression in villous specimens due to an increment in concentration of autophagic vacuole in syncytiotrophoblast, suggesting a cytoprotective mechanism of the cells to respond to microenvironmental challenge. PMID:25544676

  5. Mechanical properties of normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dale L; Kersh, Mariana E; Walsh, Nicole C; Ackland, David C; de Steiger, Richard N; Pandy, Marcus G

    2016-08-01

    Isotropic hyperelastic models have been used to determine the material properties of normal human cartilage, but there remains an incomplete understanding of how these properties may be altered by osteoarthritis. The aims of this study were to (1) measure the material constants of normal and osteoarthritic human knee cartilage using isotropic hyperelastic models; (2) determine whether the material constants correlate with histological measures of structure and/or cartilage tissue damage; and (3) quantify the abilities of two common isotropic hyperelastic material models, the neo-Hookean and Yeoh models, to describe articular cartilage contact force, area, and pressure. Small osteochondral specimens of normal and osteoarthritic condition were retrieved from human cadaveric knees and from the knees of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty and tested in unconfined compression at loading rates and large strains representative of weight-bearing activity. Articular surface contact area and lateral deformation were measured concurrently and specimen-specific finite element models then were used to determine the hyperelastic material constants. Structural parameters were measured using histological techniques while the severity of cartilage damage was quantified using the OARSI grading scale. The hyperelastic material constants correlated significantly with OARSI grade, indicating that the mechanical properties of cartilage for large strains change with tissue damage. The measurements of contact area described anisotropy of the tissue constituting the superficial zone. The Yeoh model described contact force and pressure more accurately than the neo-Hookean model, whereas both models under-predicted contact area and poorly described the anisotropy of cartilage within the superficial zone. These results identify the limits by which isotropic hyperelastic material models may be used to describe cartilage contact variables. This study provides novel data for the

  6. Mutagenic effects of alpha particles in normal human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.; Carpenter, S.; Hanks, T.

    1992-12-31

    Alpha-irradiation to the bronchial airways from inhaled radon progeny increases the risk of developing lung cancer. The molecular mechanism of radon-induced lung cancer is not clear, but one of the most important genetic effects of ionizing radiation is the induction of gene mutation. Mutations, especially those associated with visible chromosome abnormalities in humans, have been associated with cancer. Therefore, our objective is to use a well-defined model system to determine the mutagenic potential of alpha particles in normal human skin cells and to define this action at the molecular level. Normal human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with alpha particles (3.59 MeV, LET 115 keV {mu}m{sup {minus}1}) emitted from the decay of {sup 238}Pu. Mutagenicity was determined at the X-linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus. Results from this study indicate that beta particles were more efficient in mutation induction than gamma rays. Based on the initial slopes of the dose-response curves, the RBE for mutation is about 8 for alpha particles. HPRT-deficient mutants which are resistant to 6-thioguanine have been isolated and analyzed by the Southern blot technique. To date, we have characterized 69 gamma-ray-induced and 195 alpha-particle-induced HPRT-deficient mutants. Our data indicate that more than 50% of all gamma-ray-induced mutants have band patterns identical to that observed for the normal structural HPRT gene, whereas the remaining mutants (45%) contain either a rearrangement, partial deletion, or total deletion of the HPRT gene. In contrast, only 30% of alpha-particle-induced human HPRT mutants contain a normal Southern blot pattern, and about 50% indicate total deletion of the HPRT gene. Our results support the notion that high-LET radiation produces more unrepaired or misrepaired DNA damage than do gamma rays.

  7. Attitudes of Overweight and Normal Weight Adults Regarding Exercise at a Health Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Wayne C.; Miller, Todd A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare attitudes of overweight (OW) and normal weight (NW) adults regarding health club exercise. Design: A 46-item survey (23 pairs of attitude/value statements) measured attitudes toward exercising at a health club 30 minutes, twice a week, for a month. Setting: Survey posted on surveymonkey.com. Respondents (men = 730, women =…

  8. Individual Variability in Delayed Auditory Feedback Effects on Speech Fluency and Rate in Normally Fluent Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chon, HeeCheong; Kraft, Shelly Jo; Zhang, Jingfei; Loucks, Torrey; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed auditory feedback (DAF) is known to induce stuttering-like disfluencies (SLDs) and cause speech rate reductions in normally fluent adults, but the reason for speech disruptions is not fully known, and individual variation has not been well characterized. Studying individual variation in susceptibility to DAF may identify factors…

  9. Low Density Lipoprotein transport in the normal human aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Soulis, JV; Dimitrakopoulou, M; Giannoglou, GD

    2014-01-01

    Background: To understand the genesis and progression of atherosclerosis is essential to elucidate the blood flow and the transport of molecules in the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this computational study is to elucidate the relationship between low wall shear stress (WSS) - high site concentration of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and atherosclerotic sites in the normal human aortic arch under physiological flow and mass transport conditions. Methods: The numerical simulation couples the flow equations with the transport equation applying realistic boundary conditions at the wall in terms of blood-side concentration. The blood is considered to be non-Newtonian fluid obeying to the power law. Suitable mass transport conditions are specified at the wall. Results: Aortic arch walls are exposed to cholesterolemic environment although the applied mass and flow conditions refer to normal human geometry and normal mass-flow conditions. The luminal surface LDL concentration varies inversely with the WSS. Regions of high LDL luminal surface concentration do not necessarily co-locate to the sites of lowest WSS. Concave sides of the aortic arch exhibit, relatively to the convex sides, elevated concentration of the LDL. The area averaged normalized LDL concentration over the entire normal aortic arch is 1.267. The daughter aortic arch vessels exhibit, relatively to the main aorta, elevated LDL concentrations. Conclusions: The near wall paths of the velocities might be the most important factor for the elevated LDL concentration at areas located either at the vicinity of bifurcations regions or at high curvature regions. Hippokratia 2014; 18 (3): 221-225. PMID:25694755

  10. Reaffirming normal: the high risk of pathologizing healthy adults when interpreting the MMPI-2-RF.

    PubMed

    Odland, Anthony P; Lammy, Andrew B; Perle, Jonathan G; Martin, Phillip K; Grote, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were utilized to determine the proportion of the normal population expected to have scale elevations on the MMPI-2-RF when multiple scores are interpreted. Results showed that when all 40 MMPI-2-RF scales are simultaneously considered, approximately 70% of normal adults are likely to have at least one scale elevation at or above 65 T, and as many as 20% will have five or more elevated scales. When the Restructured Clinical (RC) Scales are under consideration, 34% of normal adults have at least one elevated score. Interpretation of the Specific Problem Scales and Personality Psychopathology Five Scales--Revised also yielded higher than expected rates of significant scores, with as many as one in four normal adults possibly being miscategorized as having features of a personality disorder by the latter scales. These findings are consistent with the growing literature on rates of apparently abnormal scores in the normal population due to multiple score interpretation. Findings are discussed in relation to clinical assessment, as well as in response to recent work suggesting that the MMPI-2-RF's multiscale composition does not contribute to high rates of elevated scores. PMID:25643047

  11. Lactotransferrin immunocytochemistry in Alzheimer and normal human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamata, T.; Tooyama, I.; Yamada, T.; Walker, D. G.; McGeer, P. L.

    1993-01-01

    Lactotransferrin (LF) expression was investigated immunocytochemically in postmortem brain tissues of normal controls and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The antibody to LF stained some neurons weakly in young adult brains, but it stained many neurons as well as the glia of all types in elderly brains. LF expression was greatly up-regulated in both neurons and glia in affected AD tissue. It was very strongly associated with such extracellular pathological entities as diffuse and consolidated amyloid deposits and extracellular neurofibrillary tangles. In addition, it was identified in a minority of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads, and degenerative neurites. LF is an iron scavenger and a complement inhibitor. Up-regulation may be a defense mechanism in AD-affected brain tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8494052

  12. Normalizing and scaling of data to derive human response corridors from impact tests.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that variability is inherent in any biological experiment. Human cadavers (Post-Mortem Human Subjects, PMHS) are routinely used to determine responses to impact loading for crashworthiness applications including civilian (motor vehicle) and military environments. It is important to transform measured variables from PMHS tests (accelerations, forces and deflections) to a standard or reference population, termed normalization. The transformation process should account for inter-specimen variations with some underlying assumptions used during normalization. Scaling is a process by which normalized responses are converted from one standard to another (example, mid-size adult male to large-male and small-size female adults, and to pediatric populations). These responses are used to derive corridors to assess the biofidelity of anthropomorphic test devices (crash dummies) used to predict injury in impact environments and design injury mitigating devices. This survey examines the pros and cons of different approaches for obtaining normalized and scaled responses and corridors used in biomechanical studies for over four decades. Specifically, the equal-stress equal-velocity and impulse-momentum methods along with their variations are discussed in this review. Methods ranging from subjective to quasi-static loading to different approaches are discussed for deriving temporal mean and plus minus one standard deviation human corridors of time-varying fundamental responses and cross variables (e.g., force-deflection). The survey offers some insights into the potential efficacy of these approaches with examples from recent impact tests and concludes with recommendations for future studies. The importance of considering various parameters during the experimental design of human impact tests is stressed. PMID:24726322

  13. Human factors of flight-deck checklists: The normal checklist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, Asaf; Wiener, Earl L.

    1991-01-01

    Although the aircraft checklist has long been regarded as the foundation of pilot standardization and cockpit safety, it has escaped the scrutiny of the human factors profession. The improper use, or the non-use, of the normal checklist by flight crews is often cited as the probable cause or at least a contributing factor to aircraft accidents. An attempt is made to analyze the normal checklist, its functions, format, design, length, usage, and the limitations of the humans who must interact with it. The development of the checklist from the certification of a new model to its delivery and use by the customer are discussed. The influence of the government, particularly the FAA Principle Operations Inspector, the manufacturer's philosophy, the airline's culture, and the end user, the pilot, influence the ultimate design and usage of this device. The effects of airline mergers and acquisitions on checklist usage and design are noted. In addition, the interaction between production pressures and checklist usage and checklist management are addressed. Finally, a list of design guidelines for normal checklists is provided.

  14. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  15. Uroplakin Gene Expression by Normal and Neoplastic Human Urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Lobban, E. Dawn; Smith, Barbara A.; Hall, Geoffrey D.; Harnden, Patricia; Roberts, Paul; Selby, Peter J.; Trejdosiewicz, Ludwik K.; Southgate, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    cDNA sequences for human uroplakins UPIa, UPIb, UPII, and UPIII were cloned and used to investigate uroplakin transcription by normal and neoplastic urothelial cells. Normal urothelium expressed mRNA for all four uroplakins, although UPIII could be detected only by ribonuclease protection assay. By in situ hybridization, UPIa and UPII were confined to superficial cells and UPIb was also expressed by intermediate cells. Cultured normal human urothelial cells showed a proliferative basal/intermediate cell phenotype and constitutive expression of UPIb only. Uroplakin expression by transitional cell carcinoma cell lines was related to their differentiated phenotype in vitro. RT4 cells expressed all uroplakins, VM-CUB-3 expressed three uroplakins, RT112 and HT1376 cells expressed only UPIb in high abundance, and COLO232, KK47, and EJ cells had no detectable expression. These results correlated with patterns of uroplakin expression in tumors. UPIa and UPII were detected superficially only in well differentiated transitional cell carcinoma papillae. UPIb was positive in seven of nine and overexpressed in five of nine noninvasive transitional cell carcinomas and was also present in four of eight invasive transitional cell carcinomas. Lymph node metastases retained the same pattern of UPIb expression as the primary tumor. Unlike the three differentiation-regulated uroplakins, UPIb may have an alternative role in urothelial cell/tissue processes. PMID:9846985

  16. Uroplakin gene expression by normal and neoplastic human urothelium.

    PubMed

    Lobban, E D; Smith, B A; Hall, G D; Harnden, P; Roberts, P; Selby, P J; Trejdosiewicz, L K; Southgate, J

    1998-12-01

    cDNA sequences for human uroplakins UPIa, UPIb, UPII, and UPIII were cloned and used to investigate uroplakin transcription by normal and neoplastic urothelial cells. Normal urothelium expressed mRNA for all four uroplakins, although UPIII could be detected only by ribonuclease protection assay. By in situ hybridization, UPIa and UPII were confined to superficial cells and UPIb was also expressed by intermediate cells. Cultured normal human urothelial cells showed a proliferative basal/intermediate cell phenotype and constitutive expression of UPIb only. Uroplakin expression by transitional cell carcinoma cell lines was related to their differentiated phenotype in vitro. RT4 cells expressed all uroplakins, VM-CUB-3 expressed three uroplakins, RT112 and HT1376 cells expressed only UPIb in high abundance, and COLO232, KK47, and EJ cells had no detectable expression. These results correlated with patterns of uroplakin expression in tumors. UPIa and UPII were detected superficially only in well differentiated transitional cell carcinoma papillae. UPIb was positive in seven of nine and overexpressed in five of nine noninvasive transitional cell carcinomas and was also present in four of eight invasive transitional cell carcinomas. Lymph node metastases retained the same pattern of UPIb expression as the primary tumor. Unlike the three differentiation-regulated uroplakins, UPIb may have an alternative role in urothelial cell/tissue processes. PMID:9846985

  17. Hemodynamic aspects of normal human feto-placental (umbilical) circulation.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Ganesh; Sonesson, Sven-Erik; Flo, Kari; Räsänen, Juha; Odibo, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the changes in normal circulatory dynamics that occur during the course of pregnancy is essential for improving our knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms associated with feto-placental diseases. The umbilical circulation is the lifeline of the fetus, and it is accessible for noninvasive assessment. However, not all hemodynamic parameters can be reliably measured in utero using currently available technology. Experimental animal studies have been crucial in validating major concepts related to feto-placental circulatory physiology, but caution is required in directly translating the findings of such studies into humans due to species differences. Furthermore, it is important to establish normal reference ranges and take into account gestational age associated changes while interpreting the results of clinical investigation. Therefore, it is necessary to critically evaluate, synthesize and summarize the knowledge available from the studies performed on human pregnancies to be able to appropriately apply them in clinical practice. This narrative review is an attempt to present contemporary concepts on hemodynamics of feto-placental circulation based on human studies. PMID:27130575

  18. Thyroxine monodeiodination in normal human kidney tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boye, N

    1986-08-01

    The present study deals with thyroxine monodeiodination in normal human kidney. To allow for comparison with previous reports, the present methods are similar to those used by others in rat tissue studies. The microsomal cell fraction of normal human kidney tissue was obtained by differential ultracentrifugation. The microsomes were incubated under various conditions and the deiodination products assayed with radioimmunoassay. A type I 5'-monodeiodinase was demonstrated, pH optimum around 6.5. Competitive inhibition was observed of T3 generation from T4 by rT3 with a Km of 3.0 microM and a Ki of 4 microM. Vmax was 26.1 pmol/min/mg protein. Likewise rT3 was generated from added T4, but it was rapidly degraded, while T3 was relatively stable as is the case in rat tissue preparations. Propylthiouracil inhibited 5'-deiodination in a dose dependent fashion with complete abolishment of deiodination at propylthiouracil concentration of 10(-4) M. Ipodate inhibited the reaction with complete inhibition at 10(-2) M. The data demonstrate that a human kidney particulate cell-fraction contained considerable amounts of T4 deiodinases, very similar to the type I deiodinase of various rat tissue, although the handling of rT3 and the inhibitory action of this iodothyronine on T4 to T3 conversion seem to be slightly different in the two species. PMID:3751464

  19. Effects of water immersion on plasma catecholamines in normal humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Johnson, G.; Denunzio, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in order to determine whether water immersion to the neck (NI) alters plasma catecholamines in normal humans. Eight normal subjects were studied during a seated control study (C) and during 4 hr of NI, and the levels of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) as determined by radioenzymatic assay were measured hourly. Results show that despite the induction of a marked natriuresis and diuresis indicating significant central hypervolemia, NI failed to alter plasma NE or E levels compared with those of either C or the corresponding prestudy 1.5 hr. In addition, the diuresis and natriuresis was found to vary independently of NE. These results indicate that the response of the sympathetic nervous system to acute volume alteration may differ from the reported response to chronic volume expansion.

  20. Optical Properties of Human Cancer and Normal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Christopher; Sun, Nan; Johnson, Jeffrey; Stack, Sharon; Tanner, Carol; Ruggiero, Steven

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of human oral and ovarian cancer and normal cells. Specifically, we have measured the absolute optical extinction for both whole cells and intra-cellular material in aqueous suspension. Measurements were conducted over a wavelength range of 250 to 1000nm with 1 nm resolution using Light Transmission Spectroscopy (LTS). This provides both the absolute extinction of materials under study and, with Mie inversion, the absolute number of particles of a given diameter as a function of diameter in the range of 1 to 3000 nm. Our preliminary studies show significant differences in both the extinction and particle size distributions associated with cancer versus normal cells, which appear to be correlated with differences in the particle size distribution in the range of ~ 50 to 250 nm.

  1. Regulation of p53 during senescence in normal human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Reuben H; Kang, Mo K; Kim, Terresa; Yang, Paul; Bae, Susan; Williams, Drake W; Phung, Samantha; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Hong, Christine; Park, No-Hee

    2015-01-01

    p53, the guardian of the genome, is a tumor suppressor protein and critical for the genomic integrity of the cells. Many studies have shown that intracellular level of p53 is enhanced during replicative senescence in normal fibroblasts, and the enhanced level of p53 is viewed as the cause of senescence. Here, we report that, unlike in normal fibroblasts, the level of intracellular p53 reduces during replicative senescence and oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). We found that the intracellular p53 level was also decreased in age-dependent manner in normal human epithelial tissues. Senescent NHKs exhibited an enhanced level of p16INK4A, induced G2 cell cycle arrest, and lowered the p53 expression and transactivation activity. We found that low level of p53 in senescent NHKs was due to reduced transcription of p53. The methylation status at the p53 promoter was not altered during senescence, but senescent NHKs exhibited notably lower level of acetylated histone 3 (H3) at the p53 promoter in comparison with rapidly proliferating cells. Moreover, p53 knockdown in rapidly proliferating NHKs resulted in the disruption of fidelity in repaired DNA. Taken together, our study demonstrates that p53 level is diminished during replicative senescence and OIS and that such diminution is associated with H3 deacetylation at the p53 promoter. The reduced intracellular p53 level in keratinocytes of the elderly could be a contributing factor for more frequent development of epithelial cancer in the elderly because of the loss of genomic integrity of cells. PMID:26138448

  2. The significance of paired astrocyte nuclei in normal human nervous tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Pittella, J E; Brasileiro-Filho, G

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative study of astrocytes was carried out in 80 microscopic fields and the number of paired nuclei in 100 consecutive astrocytes of the temporo-occipital gyrus cortex was determined in 13 patients with no cerebral or liver disease. No significant correlation was found between astrocyte number and the percentage of paired nuclei. When studies on astrocytes in hepatic encephalopathy, liver cirrhosis and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis are taken into consideration it is suggested that these cells are in continuous variable renewal in normal adult human nervous tissue, as occurs in other animal species. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3654344

  3. Do adults with cochlear implants rely on different acoustic cues for phoneme perception than adults with normal hearing?

    PubMed Central

    Moberly, Aaron C.; Lowenstein, Joanna H.; Tarr, Eric; Caldwell-Tarr, Amanda; Welling, D. Bradley; Shahin, Antoine J.; Nittrouer, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Several acoustic cues specify any single phonemic contrast. Nonetheless, adult, native speakers of a language share weighting strategies, showing preferential attention to some properties over others. Cochlear implant (CI) signal processing disrupts the salience of some cues: in general, amplitude structure remains readily available, but spectral structure less so. This study asked how well speech recognition is supported if CI users shift attention to salient cues not weighted strongly by native speakers. Method 20 adults with CIs participated. The /bɑ/-/wɑ/ contrast was used because spectral and amplitude structure varies in correlated fashion for this contrast. Normal-hearing adults weight the spectral cue strongly, but the amplitude cue negligibly. Three measurements were made: labeling decisions, spectral and amplitude discrimination, and word recognition. Results Outcomes varied across listeners: some weighted the spectral cue strongly, some weighted the amplitude cue, and some weighted neither. Spectral discrimination predicted spectral weighting. Spectral weighting explained the most variance in word recognition. Age of onset of hearing loss predicted spectral weighting, but not unique variance in word recognition. Conclusions The weighting strategies of listeners with normal hearing likely support speech recognition best, so efforts in implant design, fitting, and training should focus on developing those strategies. PMID:24686722

  4. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S; Dipersio, John F; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  5. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  6. Rethinking Adult Literacy Programs: A Humanities-Based Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anania, Joanne

    The Roosevelt University Humanities Enrichment Program tries to acknowledge the adult part of adult literacy. Its instructional materials are of interest and value to the adult student and, therefore, provide incentives for reading and discussion instead of serving merely as skill-building exercises. The materials are drawn from literature,…

  7. Reference values for echocardiographic parameters and indexes of left ventricular function in healthy, young adult sheep used in translational research: comparison with standardized values in humans

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Paola; Olea, Fernanda D; Lorenzi, Andrea De; Salmo, Fabián; Janavel, Gustavo L Vera; Hnatiuk, Anna P; Guevara, Eduardo; Crottogini, Alberto J

    2011-01-01

    Ovine models of ischemic heart disease and cardiac failure are increasingly used in translational research. However, reliable extrapolation of the results to the clinical setting requires knowing if ovine normal left ventricular (LV) function is comparable to that of humans. We thus assessed for echocardiographic LV dimensions and indexes in a large normal adult sheep population and compared them with standardized values in normal human adults. Bidimensional and tissue Doppler echocardiograms were performed in 69 young adult Corriedale sheep under light sedation. LV dimensions and indexes of systolic and diastolic function were measured. Absolute and body surface areanormalized values were compared to those for normal adult humans and their statistical distribution was assessed. Normalized dimensions (except for end diastolic diameter) as well as ejection fraction and fractional shortening fell within the ranges established by the American Society of Echocardiography and European Association of Echocardiography for normal adult humans. Normalized end diastolic diameter exceeded the upper normal limit but got close to it when correcting for the higher heart mass/body surface area ratio of sheep with respect to humans. Diastolic parameters also fell within normal human ranges except for a slightly lower mitral deceleration time. All values exhibited a Gaussian distribution. We conclude that echocardiographic parameters of systolic and diastolic LV performance in young adult sheep can be reliably extrapolated to the adult human, thus supporting the use of ovine models of human heart disease in translational research. PMID:22140597

  8. Hemispheric Lateralization of Bilaterally Presented Homologous Visual and Auditory Stimuli in Normal Adults, Normal Children, and Children with Central Auditory Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellis, Teri James; Billiet, Cassie; Ross, Jody

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine the performance of normal adults, normal children, and children diagnosed with central auditory dysfunction presumed to involve the interhemispheric pathways on a dichotic digits test in common clinical use for the diagnosis of central auditory processing disorder (CAPD) and its corresponding visual…

  9. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination.

    PubMed

    Malik, Astha; Kondratov, Roman V; Jamasbi, Roudabeh J; Geusz, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte proliferation during

  10. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination

    PubMed Central

    Kondratov, Roman V.; Jamasbi, Roudabeh J.

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte proliferation during

  11. Elastic Modulus Determination of Normal and Glaucomatous Human Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Last, Julie A.; Pan, Tingrui; Ding, Yuzhe; Reilly, Christopher M.; Keller, Kate; Acott, Ted S.; Fautsch, Michael P.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Russell, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a risk factor for glaucoma. The principal outflow pathway for aqueous humor in the human eye is through the trabecular meshwork (HTM) and Schlemm's canal (SC). The junction between the HTM and SC is thought to have a significant role in the regulation of IOP. A possible mechanism for the increased resistance to flow in glaucomatous eyes is an increase in stiffness (increased elastic modulus) of the HTM. In this study, the stiffness of the HTM in normal and glaucomatous tissue was compared, and a mathematical model was developed to predict the impact of changes in stiffness of the juxtacanalicular layer of HTM on flow dynamics through this region. Methods. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to measure the elastic modulus of normal and glaucomatous HTM. According to these results, a model was developed that simulated the juxtacanalicular layer of the HTM as a flexible membrane with embedded pores. Results. The mean elastic modulus increased substantially in the glaucomatous HTM (mean = 80.8 kPa) compared with that in the normal HTM (mean = 4.0 kPa). Regional variation was identified across the glaucomatous HTM, possibly corresponding to the disease state. Mathematical modeling suggested an increased flow resistance with increasing HTM modulus. Conclusions. The data indicate that the stiffness of glaucomatous HTM is significantly increased compared with that of normal HTM. Modeling exercises support substantial impairment in outflow facility with increased HTM stiffness. Alterations in the biophysical attributes of the HTM may participate directly in the onset and progression of glaucoma. PMID:21220561

  12. Input clustering in the normal and learned circuits of adult barn owls

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Thomas J; DeBello, William M

    2015-01-01

    Experience-dependent formation of synaptic input clusters can occur in juvenile brains. Whether this also occurs in adults is largely unknown. We previously reconstructed the normal and learned circuits of prism-adapted barn owls and found that changes in clustering of axo-dendritic contacts (putative synapses) predicted functional circuit strength. Here we asked whether comparable changes occurred in normal and prism-removed adults. Across all anatomical zones, no systematic differences in the primary metrics for within-branch or between-branch clustering were observed: 95–99% of contacts resided within clusters (<10–20 microns from nearest neighbor) regardless of circuit strength. Bouton volumes, a proxy measure of synaptic strength, were on average larger in the functionally strong zones, indicating that changes in synaptic efficacy contributed to the differences in circuit strength. Bootstrap analysis showed that the distribution of inter-contact distances strongly deviated from random not in the functionally strong zones but in those that had been strong during the sensitive period (60d ~ 250d), indicating that clusters formed early in life were preserved regardless of current value. While cluster formation in juveniles appeared to require the production of new synapses, cluster formation in adults did not. In total, these results support a model in which high cluster dynamics in juveniles sculpt a potential connectivity map that is refined in adulthood. We propose that preservation of clusters in functionally weak adult circuits provides a storage mechanism for disused but potentially useful pathways. PMID:25701706

  13. Input clustering in the normal and learned circuits of adult barn owls.

    PubMed

    McBride, Thomas J; DeBello, William M

    2015-05-01

    Experience-dependent formation of synaptic input clusters can occur in juvenile brains. Whether this also occurs in adults is largely unknown. We previously reconstructed the normal and learned circuits of prism-adapted barn owls and found that changes in clustering of axo-dendritic contacts (putative synapses) predicted functional circuit strength. Here we asked whether comparable changes occurred in normal and prism-removed adults. Across all anatomical zones, no systematic differences in the primary metrics for within-branch or between-branch clustering were observed: 95-99% of contacts resided within clusters (<10-20 μm from nearest neighbor) regardless of circuit strength. Bouton volumes, a proxy measure of synaptic strength, were on average larger in the functionally strong zones, indicating that changes in synaptic efficacy contributed to the differences in circuit strength. Bootstrap analysis showed that the distribution of inter-contact distances strongly deviated from random not in the functionally strong zones but in those that had been strong during the sensitive period (60-250 d), indicating that clusters formed early in life were preserved regardless of current value. While cluster formation in juveniles appeared to require the production of new synapses, cluster formation in adults did not. In total, these results support a model in which high cluster dynamics in juveniles sculpt a potential connectivity map that is refined in adulthood. We propose that preservation of clusters in functionally weak adult circuits provides a storage mechanism for disused but potentially useful pathways. PMID:25701706

  14. The effects on the pulmonary function of normal adults proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation respiration pattern exercise.

    PubMed

    Seo, KyoChul; Cho, MiSuk

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) respiration exercise increases the pulmonary function of normal adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight normal adults in their 20s were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=14) or control group (n=14). Over the course of four weeks, the experimental group participated in PNF respiration pattern exercises for 30 minutes three times per week. Subjects were assessed pre-test and post-test by measurement of pulmonary function (tidal volume, inspiratory reserve volume, expiratory reserve volume, inspiratory capacity, and vital capacity). [Results] Our findings show that the experimental group had significant improvements in expiratory reserve volume and vital capacity. In the comparison of the two groups, the experimental group had higher pulmonary function than the control group. [Conclusion] In this study, the experimental group showed greater improvement in pulmonary function than the control group, which indicates that the PNF respiration exercise is effective at increasing the pulmonary function of normal adults. PMID:25364117

  15. Have you got any cholesterol? Adults' views of human nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schibeci, Renato; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    1994-12-01

    The general aim of our human nutrition project is to develop a health education model grounded in ‘everyday’ or ‘situated’ cognition (Hennessey, 1993). In 1993, we began pilot work to document adult understanding of human nutrition. We used a HyperCard stack as the basis for a series of interviews with 50 adults (25 university students, and 25 adults from offcampus). The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the NUDIST computer program. A summary of the views of these 50 adults on selected aspects of human nutrition is presented in this paper.

  16. Human cancers overexpress genes that are specific to a variety of normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Joseph; Netanely, Dvir; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression data from three different kinds of samples: normal human tissues, human cancer cell lines, and leukemic cells from lymphoid and myeloid leukemia pediatric patients. We have searched for genes that are overexpressed in human cancer and also show specific patterns of tissue-dependent expression in normal tissues. Using the expression data of the normal tissues, we identified 4,346 genes with a high variability of expression and clustered these genes according to their relative expression level. Of 91 stable clusters obtained, 24 clusters included genes preferentially expressed either only in hematopoietic tissues or in hematopoietic and one to two other tissues; 28 clusters included genes preferentially expressed in various nonhematopoietic tissues such as neuronal, testis, liver, kidney, muscle, lung, pancreas, and placenta. Analysis of the expression levels of these two groups of genes in the human cancer cell lines and leukemias identified genes that were highly expressed in cancer cells but not in their normal counterparts and, thus, were overexpressed in the cancers. The different cancer cell lines and leukemias varied in the number and identity of these overexpressed genes. The results indicate that many genes that are overexpressed in human cancer cells are specific to a variety of normal tissues, including normal tissues other than those from which the cancer originated. It is suggested that this general property of cancer cells plays a major role in determining the behavior of the cancers, including their metastatic potential. PMID:16339305

  17. Adult Education and Human Resource Development: A Symbiotic Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubb, Robert E.; Hemby, K. Virginia; Conerly-Stewart, Donna L.

    1998-01-01

    Top-ranked competencies for graduate education in human resources development (HRD) identified by 55 (of 195) HRD practitioners were adult learning, presentation, facilitation, needs assessment, and human relations. Seven of the top 10 were allied with adult education graduate program content. (SK)

  18. Encephalitis-Associated Human Metapneumovirus Pneumonia in Adult, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Mateevici, Cristina; Lin, Belinda; Chandra, Ronil V.; Chong, Victor H.T.

    2015-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis. This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection, PMID:26488420

  19. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  20. Telocytes of the human adult trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Cretoiu, Dragos; Vrapciu, Alexandra Diana; Hostiuc, Sorin; Dermengiu, Dan; Manoiu, Vasile Sorin; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria; Mirancea, Nicolae

    2016-06-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are typically defined as cells with telopodes by their ultrastructural features. Their presence was reported in various organs, however little is known about their presence in human trigeminal ganglion. To address this issue, samples of trigeminal ganglia were tested by immunocytochemistry for CD34 and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We found that TCs are CD34 positive and form networks within the ganglion in close vicinity to microvessels and nerve fibers around the neuronal-glial units (NGUs). TEM examination confirmed the existence of spindle-shaped and bipolar TCs with one or two telopodes measuring between 15 to 53 μm. We propose that TCs are cells with stemness capacity which might contribute in regeneration and repair processes by: modulation of the stem cell activity or by acting as progenitors of other cells present in the normal tissue. In addition, further studies are needed to establish if they might influence the neuronal circuits. PMID:27147447

  1. [Determination of full blood count normal reference values for adults in France].

    PubMed

    Troussard, Xavier; Vol, Sylviane; Cornet, Edouard; Bardet, Valérie; Couaillac, Jean-Paul; Fossat, Chantal; Luce, Jean-Charles; Maldonado, Eric; Siguret, Virginie; Tichet, Jean; Lantieri, Olivier; Corberand, Joël

    2014-01-01

    The full blood count (FBC) is the most prescribed laboratory test in France. Due to the lack of data, there is a great variability in reference values of the FBC, between medical laboratories. The aim of this work was to provide normal reference values for FBC in adults. These normal values were defined in a population of 33 258 healthy adults, 19 612 men and 13 646 women. These values were determined after excluding subjects having conditions in order to modify, either directly or indirectly, FBC parameters. For each parameter, we provide results for values of standard parameters, by sex and age, from 16 to 69 years. In addition, we present FBC values from a population of 339 subjects aged over 69 years with no comorbidities. These normal values are proposed to be used in everyday practice. They make it possible to distinguish, without ambiguity, a normal situation from a pathological situation. Moreover, they can be applied to the entire metropolitan France. PMID:25336130

  2. Gene Profile Identifies Zinc Transporters Differentially Expressed in Normal Human Organs and Human Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Cui, X.; Yao, W.; Yu, X.; Cen, P.; Hodges, S.E.; Fisher, W.E.; Brunicardi, F.C.; Chen, C.; Yao, Q.; Li, M.

    2013-01-01

    Deregulated expression of zinc transporters was linked to several cancers. However, the detailed expression profile of all human zinc transporters in normal human organs and in human cancer, especially in pancreatic cancer is not available. The objectives of this study are to investigate the complete expression patterns of 14 ZIP and 10 ZnT transporters in a large number of normal human organs and in human pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We examined the expression patterns of ZIP and ZnT transporters in 22 different human organs and tissues, 11 pairs of clinical human pancreatic cancer specimens and surrounding normal/benign tissues, as well as 10 established human pancreatic cancer cell lines plus normal human pancreatic ductal epithelium (HPDE) cells, using real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that human zinc transporters have tissue specific expression patterns, and may play different roles in different organs or tissues. Almost all the ZIPs except for ZIP4, and most ZnTs were down-regulated in human pancreatic cancer tissues compared to the surrounding benign tissues. The expression patterns of individual ZIPs and ZnTs are similar among different pancreatic cancer lines. Those results and our previous studies suggest that ZIP4 is the only zinc transporter that is significantly up-regulated in human pancreatic cancer and might be the major zinc transporter that plays an important role in pancreatic cancer growth. ZIP4 might serve as a novel molecular target for pancreatic cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:23331012

  3. Exploration of the normal human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinzhi; Ryu, Soyoung; Gharib, Sina A.; Goodlett, David R.; Schnapp, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    We obtained insight into normal lung function by proteome analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from six normal human subjects using a “Lyse-N-Go’ shotgun proteomic protocol. Intra-sample variation was calculated using three different label-free methods, (i) protein sequence coverage; (ii) peptide spectral counts and (iii) peptide single-ion current areas (PICA), which generates protein expression data by summation of the area under the curve for a given peptide single-ion current trace and then adding values for all peptides from that same parent protein. PICA gave the least intra-subject variability and was used to calculate differences in protein expression between the six subjects. We observed an average threefold inter-sample variability, which affects analysis of changes in protein expression that occur in different diseases. We detected 167 unique proteins with >100 proteins detected in each of the six individual BAL samples, 42 of which were common to all six subjects. Gene ontology analysis demonstrated enrichment of several biological processes in the lung, reflecting its expected role in gas exchange and host defense as an immune organ. The same biological processes were enriched compared to either plasma or total genome proteome, suggesting an active enrichment of plasma proteins in the lung rather than passive capillary leak. PMID:21136857

  4. Mediating Effect of Executive Function on Memory in Normal Aging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jae; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2013-01-01

    Objective We hypothesize that the effect of aging on memory is mediated by executive function. Methods Two hundred and thirty healthy adults (101 male, 129 female) were recruited for the study. We used a promising, newly developed, computerized neuropsychological test for the measurement of executive function and memory. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling and path analysis. Results The full mediation model showed a good fit to the data. However, chi-squared (χ2) tests for model comparison indicated that the partial mediation model better fits our data. Thus, the partial mediation model was used as the final model. In terms of auditory-verbal memory, the effect of aging on memory was fully mediated by executive function. However, visuo-spatial memory was significantly affected both indirectly (through executive function) and directly (by aging). Gender differences were not significant in this model. Conclusion This study demonstrated the importance of executive function in the memory functioning of normal aging adults. It is noteworthy that modality differences were found between auditory-verbal and visuo-spatial memory. Aging is not the only factor that drives memory decline, and its direct, adverse effect on memory was more prominent in the visuo-spatial memory task than auditory-verbal memory task. Since performance in both modalities is fully or partially mediated by executive function, it is important to train normal aging adults in executive control skills, such as planning, strategy formation, and rapid decision making. PMID:23798957

  5. Differential Intracochlear Sound Pressure Measurements in Normal Human Temporal Bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S.; Merchant, Saumil N.; Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2009-02-01

    We present the first simultaneous sound pressure measurements in scala vestibuli and scala tympani of the cochlea in human cadaveric temporal bones. Micro-scale fiberoptic pressure sensors enabled the study of differential sound pressure at the cochlear base. This differential pressure is the input to the cochlear partition, driving cochlear waves and auditory transduction. Results showed that: pressure of scala vestibuli was much greater than scala tympani except at low and high frequencies where scala tympani pressure affects the input to the cochlea; the differential pressure proved to be an excellent measure of normal ossicular transduction of sound (shown to decrease 30-50 dB with ossicular disarticulation, whereas the individual scala pressures were significantly affected by non-ossicular conduction of sound at high frequencies); the middle-ear gain and differential pressure were generally bandpass in frequency dependence; and the middle-ear delay in the human was over twice that of the gerbil. Concurrent stapes velocity measurements allowed determination of the differential impedance across the partition and round-window impedance. The differential impedance was generally resistive, while the round-window impedance was consistent with a compliance in conjunction with distributed inertia and damping. Our techniques can be used to study inner-ear conductive pathologies (e.g., semicircular dehiscence), as well as non-ossicular cochlear stimulation (e.g., round-window stimulation) - situations that cannot be completely quantified by measurements of stapes velocity or scala-vestibuli pressure by themselves.

  6. Adult Human Neurogenesis: From Microscopy to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases. PMID:21519376

  7. The ROP vesicle release factor is required in adult Drosophila glia for normal circadian behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Fanny S.; Jackson, F. Rob

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that endocytosis and/or vesicle recycling mechanisms are essential in adult Drosophila glial cells for the neuronal control of circadian locomotor activity. In this study, our goal was to identify specific glial vesicle trafficking, recycling, or release factors that are required for rhythmic behavior. From a glia-specific, RNAi-based genetic screen, we identified eight glial factors that are required for normally robust circadian rhythms in either a light-dark cycle or in constant dark conditions. In particular, we show that conditional knockdown of the ROP vesicle release factor in adult glial cells results in arrhythmic behavior. Immunostaining for ROP reveals reduced protein in glial cell processes and an accumulation of the Par Domain Protein 1ε (PDP1ε) clock output protein in the small lateral clock neurons. These results suggest that glia modulate rhythmic circadian behavior by secretion of factors that act on clock neurons to regulate a clock output factor. PMID:26190976

  8. Differentiation in boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain: a BNCT approach.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Samereh; Pazirandeh, Ali; Jameie, Seyed Behnamedin; Khojasteh, Nasrin Baghban

    2012-06-01

    Boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain after boron carrier injection (0.005 g Boric Acid+0.005 g Borax+10 ml distilled water, pH: 7.4) was studied in this research. Coronal sections of control and trial animal tissue samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons. Using alpha autoradiography, significant differences in boron concentration were seen in forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain sections of male and female animal groups with the highest value, four hours after boron compound injection. PMID:22484141

  9. Modulation of retinoblastoma gene in normal adult hematopoiesis: peak expression and functional role in advanced erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Condorelli, G L; Testa, U; Valtieri, M; Vitelli, L; De Luca, A; Barberi, T; Montesoro, E; Campisi, S; Giordano, A; Peschle, C

    1995-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) gene specifies a nuclear phosphoprotein (pRb 105), which is a prototype tumor suppressor inactivated in a variety of human tumors. Recent studies suggest that RB is also involved in embryonic development of murine central nervous and hematopoietic systems. We have investigated RB expression and function in human adult hematopoiesis--i.e., in liquid suspension culture of purified quiescent hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) induced by growth factor stimulus to proliferation and unilinage differentiation/maturation through the erythroid or granulocytic lineage. In the initial HPC differentiation stages, the RB gene is gradually induced at the mRNA and protein level in both erythroid and granulopoietic cultures. In late HPC differentiation and then precursor maturation, RB gene expression is sustained in the erythroid lineage, whereas it is sharply downmodulated in the granulocytic series. Functional studies were performed by treatment of HPC differentiation culture with phosphorothioate antisense oligomer targeting Rb mRNA; coherent with the expression pattern, oligomer treatment of late HPCs causes a dose-dependent and selective inhibition of erythroid colony formation. These observations suggest that the RB gene plays an erythroid- and stage-specific functional role in normal adult hematopoiesis, particularly at the level of late erythroid HPCs. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7761404

  10. Phytoestrogen Metabolism by Adult Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Pilar; Medina, Margarita; Sánchez-Jiménez, Abel; Landete, José Mᵃ

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived polyphenols with a structure similar to human estrogens. The three main groups of phytoestrogens, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans, are transformed into equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively, by bacteria. These metabolites have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activities than their precursors, and they are more bioavailable. The aim of this study was to analyze the metabolism of isoflavones, lignans and ellagitannins by gut microbiota, and to study the possible correlation in the metabolism of these three groups of phytoestrogens. In vitro fermentation experiments were performed with feces samples from 14 healthy adult volunteers, and metabolite formation was measured by HPLC-PAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. Only the microbiota of one subject produced equol, while most of them showed production of O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA). Significant inter-subject differences were observed in the metabolism of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein, while the glucoside isoflavones and their aglycones showed less variability, except for glycitin. Most subjects produced urolithins M-5 and E. Urolithin D was not detected, while uroltithin B was found in half of the individuals analyzed, and urolithins A and C were detected in two and four subjects, respectively. Enterolactone was found in all subjects, while enterodiol only appeared in five. Isoflavone metabolism could be correlated with the metabolism of lignans and ellagitannins. However, the metabolism of ellagitannins and lignans could not be correlated. This the first study where the metabolism of the three groups together of phytoestrogen, isoflavones, lignans, and ellagitannins by gut microbiota is analyzed. PMID:27517891

  11. Seeing the Talker's Face Improves Free Recall of Speech for Young Adults with Normal Hearing but Not Older Adults with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Mary; Mishra, Sushmit; Stenfelt, Stefan; Lunner, Thomas; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Seeing the talker's face improves speech understanding in noise, possibly releasing resources for cognitive processing. We investigated whether it improves free recall of spoken two-digit numbers. Method: Twenty younger adults with normal hearing and 24 older adults with hearing loss listened to and subsequently recalled lists of 13…

  12. Musical hallucinations in normal children and adult non-psychiatric population

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Victor

    2009-01-01

    A descriptive account of musical hallucinations of a series of 19 people is presented. Five people reported the onset of hallucination before adulthood. In this paper we demonstrate that musical hallucinations are not necessarily pathological and can occur as a normal experience in people (children and adults) who have no contact with mental health services and no concurrent mental disorder. This is also the first paper to recognise that children can experience musical hallucinations. Also, we show that musical hallucinations are more common than previously thought, but people do not report their occurrence. It seems plausible that in musical hallucinations there is an insult to the ear or brain that produces a change in quality of these images, converting them to a psychotic experience. Musical hallucinations should be regarded as a continuum with normal experiences and clinical syndromes. PMID:21686956

  13. A quantitative transcriptome reference map of the normal human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Caracausi, Maria; Rigon, Vania; Piovesan, Allison; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara

    2016-01-01

    We performed an innovative systematic meta-analysis of 41 gene expression profiles of normal human hippocampus to provide a quantitative transcriptome reference map of it, i.e. a reference typical value of expression for each of the 30,739 known mapped and the 16,258 uncharacterized (unmapped) transcripts. For this aim, we used the software called TRAM (Transcriptome Mapper), which is able to generate transcriptome maps based on gene expression data from multiple sources. We also analyzed differential expression by comparing the hippocampus with the whole brain transcriptome map to identify a typical expression pattern of this subregion compared with the whole organ. Finally, due to the fact that the hippocampus is one of the main brain region to be severely affected in trisomy 21 (the best known genetic cause of intellectual disability), a particular attention was paid to the expression of chromosome 21 (chr21) genes. Data were downloaded from microarray databases, processed, and analyzed using TRAM software. Among the main findings, the most over-expressed loci in the hippocampus are the expressed sequence tag cluster Hs.732685 and the member of the calmodulin gene family CALM2. The tubulin folding cofactor B (TBCB) gene is the best gene at behaving like a housekeeping gene. The hippocampus vs. the whole brain differential transcriptome map shows the over-expression of LINC00114, a long non-coding RNA mapped on chr21. The hippocampus transcriptome map was validated in vitro by assaying gene expression through several magnitude orders by "Real-Time" reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The highly significant agreement between in silico and experimental data suggested that our transcriptome map may be a useful quantitative reference benchmark for gene expression studies related to human hippocampus. Furthermore, our analysis yielded biological insights about those genes that have an intrinsic over-/under-expression in the hippocampus. PMID

  14. Increasing trends in central obesity among Chinese adults with normal body mass index, 1993–2009

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Central obesity is thought to be more pathogenic than overall obesity and studies have shown that the association between waist circumference (WC) and mortality was strongest in those with a normal body mass index (BMI). The objective of our study was to determine secular trends in the prevalence of central obesity (WC ≥ 90 cm for men and ≥ 80 cm for women) among Chinese adults with normal BMI from 1993 to 2009 and to examine the impact of performance of combined BMI and WC on the prevalence of obesity in Chinese adults. Methods We used data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) conducted from 1993 to 2009. From which we included a total of 52023 participants aged ≥ 18 years. Results The age-standardized prevalence of central obesity among Chinese adults with BMI < 25 kg/m2 increased from 11.9% in 1993 to 21.1% in 2009 (P for linear trend <0.001). The upward trends were noted in both genders, all ages, rural/urban settings, and education groups (all P for linear trend <0.001), with greater increments in men, participants aged 18–64 years, and rural residents (P for interaction terms survey × sex, survey × age, and survey × rural/urban settings were 0.042, 0.003, and < 0.001, respectively). Trends in the prevalence of central obesity were similar when a more stringent BMI < 23 kg/m2 cut point (Asian cut point) was applied. Central obesity is associated with a higher risk of incident hypertension within normal BMI category. More than 65% individuals with obesity would be missed if solely BMI was measured. Conclusions We observed an upward trend in the prevalence of central obesity among participants with normal BMI irrespective of sex, age, rural/urban settings, and education level. Central obesity is associated with a higher risk of incident hypertension within normal BMI category. Approximately two thirds of the individuals with obesity would be missed if WC was not measured. It is, therefore, urgent to emphasize the importance of

  15. Ghrelin modulates testicular germ cells apoptosis and proliferation in adult normal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kheradmand, Arash; Dezfoulian, Omid; Alirezaei, Masoud; Rasoulian, Bahram

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spermatogenesis is closely associated with the balance between germ cells proliferation and apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerous studies have documented the direct action of ghrelin in the modulation of apoptosis in different cell types. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ghrelin may be considered as a modulator of spermatogenesis in normal adult rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ghrelin may be potentially implicated for abnormal spermatogenesis in some testicular germ cell tumors. -- Abstract: Under normal condition in the most mammals, spermatogenesis is closely associated with the balance between germ cells proliferation and apoptosis. The present study was designed to determine the effects of ghrelin treatment on in vivo quality and quantity expression of apoptosis and proliferation specific indices in rat testicular germ cells. Twenty eight adult normal rats were subdivided into equal control and treatment groups. Treatment group received 3 nmol of ghrelin as subcutaneous injection for 30 consecutive days or vehicle to the control animals. The rats from each group (n = 7) were killed on days 10 and 30 and their testes were taken for immunocytochemical evaluation and caspase-3 assay. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that the accumulations of Bax and PCNA peptides are generally more prominent in spermatocytes and spermatogonia of both groups. Likewise, the mean percentage of immunoreactive spermatocytes against Bax increased (P < 0.01) in the ghrelin-treated group on day 10, while despite of 30% increment in the Bax level of spermatocytes in the treated rats on day 30, however, it was not statistically significant. During the experimental period, only a few spermatogonia represented Bax expression and the changes of Bax immunolabling cells were negligible upon ghrelin treatment. Likewise, there were immunostaining cells against Bcl-2 in each germ cell neither in the control nor in the treated animals. In fact

  16. 7Li NMR study of normal human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Post, J. F. M.; Panchalingam, K.; Withers, G.; Woessner, D. E.

    The biological action of lithium is of great interest because of the therapeutic efficacy of the cation in manic-depressive illness. To investigate possible molecular interactions of lithium, 7Li NMR studies were conducted on normal human erythrocytes which had been incubated with lithium chloride. The uptake of lithium ions was followed by 7Li NMR, using a dysprosium, tripolyphosphate shift reagent. Lithium uptake followed single-exponential kinetics with a time constant of 14.7 h. The intracellular lithium relaxation times were T 1 ⋍ 5 s and T 2 ⋍ 0.15 s, which implies a lengthening of the lithium correlation time. It was found that lithium does not interact significantly with hemoglobin, the erythrocyte membrane, or artificial phospholipid membranes. Based on measurements of lithium T1 and T2 in concentrated agar gels, the large difference between T1 and T2 for intracellular lithium ions may be due to diffusion of the hydrated lithium ion through heterogeneous electrostatic field gradients created by the erythrocyte membrane-associated cytoskeletal network. Lithium binding to the membrane-associated cytoskeleton, however, cannot be ruled out. Because of the large differences between T1 and T2 of intracellular lithium ions, 1Li NMR may be a sensitive and promising noninvasive method to probe the intracellular environment.

  17. Developing Resourceful Humans. Adult Education within the Economic Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynn Elen, Ed.

    This book, which explores the shifting paradigm from human resource development to developing resourceful humans, establishes the historical position of adult education within the economic context, discusses human capital propositions, and examines the learning dimensions of economic and educational change. The following chapters are included:…

  18. Expression of interleukin-17RC protein in normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dongxia; You, Zongbing

    2008-01-01

    Background Interleukin-17 (IL-17) cytokines and receptors play an important role in many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. IL-17 receptors IL-17RA and IL-17RC have been found to form a heterodimer for mediating the signals of IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines. While the function and signaling pathway of IL-17RA has been revealed, IL-17RC has not been well characterized. The function and signaling pathway of IL-17RC remain largely unknown. The purpose of the present study was to systematically examine IL-17RC protein expression in 53 human tissues. Results IL-17RC expression in 51 normal human tissues and two benign tumors (i.e., lymphangioma and parathyroid adenoma) on the tissue microarrays was determined by immunohistochemical staining, using two polyclonal antibodies against IL-17RC. IL-17RC protein was expressed in many cell types including the myocardial cells, vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, glandular cells (of the adrenal, parathyroid, pituitary, thyroid, pancreas, parotid salivary, and subepidermal glands), epithelial cells (of the esophagus, stomach, intestine, anus, renal tubule, breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, epididymis, seminal vesicle, prostate, gallbladder, bronchus, lung, and skin), oocytes in the ovary, Sertoli cells in the testis, motor neurons in the spinal cord, autonomic ganglia and nerves in the intestine, skeletal muscle cells, adipocytes, articular chondrocytes, and synovial cells. High levels of IL-17RC protein expression were observed in most vascular and lymphatic endothelium and squamous epithelium. The epithelium of the breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, kidney, bladder and bronchus also expressed high levels of IL-17RC, so did the glandular cells in the adrenal cortex, parotid salivary and subepidermal glands. In contrast, IL-17RC protein was not detectable in the smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, antral mucosa of the stomach, mucosa of the colon, endometrium of the uterus, neurons of the brain, hepatocytes, or lymphocytes

  19. Inspiratory Flow Limitation in a Normal Population of Adults in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Palombini, Luciana O.; Tufik, Sergio; Rapoport, David M.; Ayappa, Indu A.; Guilleminault, Christian; de Godoy, Luciana B. M.; Castro, Laura S.; Bittencourt, Lia

    2013-01-01

    . Inspiratory flow limitation in a normal population of adults in São Paulo, Brazil. SLEEP 2013;36(11):1663-1668. PMID:24179299

  20. Why Teach the Humanities to Adult Basic Education Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mocker, Donald W., Ed.; Jones, William C., Ed.

    The publication contains an article on curriculum selection in adult basic education (ABE), three presentations on the humanities and ABE, and a concluding commentary. An introductory article, "Criteria for Selecting Curriculum in Adult Basic Education" by Donald Mocker, emphasizes the need for broader criteria for selection of ABE curriculum.…

  1. Adult Literacy Education and Human Rights: A View from Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Susan M.; Kooij, Christina S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that adult literacy as part of international development is an issue of both human rights and women's rights. We explore this by presenting a case study of the effects of one innovative adult literacy program in Afghanistan that places men and women, as well as various ethnicities, together in the same classroom as…

  2. Humanizing Adult Education Research: Five Stories from the 1930's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Ronald

    Taken from the author's doctoral dissertation, this award-winning monograph describes a method for humanizing educational research in adult education and provides five stories of adult education efforts in the 1930's as examples of such research. The method described suggests valuing qualitative data as much as quantitative in the field of…

  3. Technology and the Adult Degree Program: The Human Element

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriquez, Frank G.; Nash, Susan Smith

    2004-01-01

    While technology has for many years been a critical component in programs for adults and calls to mind sophisticated gadgetry with expensive price tags, it is often the nexus where technology and humans intersect that proves most critical to the success and quality of adult degree programs.

  4. Parahippocampal white matter volume predicts Alzheimer's disease risk in cognitively normal old adults.

    PubMed

    Stoub, Travis R; Detoledo-Morrell, Leyla; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2014-08-01

    An in vivo marker of the underlying pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is atrophy in select brain regions detected with quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although gray matter changes have been documented to be predictive of cognitive decline culminating in AD among healthy older adults, very little attention has been given to alterations in white matter as a possible MRI biomarker predictive of AD. In this investigation, we examined parahippocampal white matter (PWM) volume derived from baseline MRI scans in 2 independent samples of 65 cognitively normal older adults, followed longitudinally, to determine if it was predictive of AD risk. The average follow-up period for the 2 samples was 8.5 years. Comparisons between the stable participants (N = 50) and those who declined to AD (N = 15) over time revealed a significant difference in baseline PWM volume (p < 0.001). Furthermore, baseline PWM volume was predictive not only of time to AD (hazard ratio = 3.1, p < 0.05), but also of baseline episodic memory performance (p = 0.041). These results demonstrate that PWM atrophy provides a sensitive MRI biomarker of AD dementia risk among those with normal cognitive function. PMID:24656833

  5. Prevalence of Central Obesity among Adults with Normal BMI and Its Association with Metabolic Diseases in Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Rui; Gao, Chunshi; Jiang, Lingling; Lv, Xin; Song, Yuanyuan; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of central obesity among adults with normal BMI and its association with metabolic diseases in Jilin Province, China. Methods A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in Jilin Province of China. Information was collected by face to face interview. Descriptive data analysis and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of prevalence/frequency were conducted. Log-binomial regression analyses were used to find the independent factors associated with central obesity and to explore the adjusted association between central obesity and metabolic diseases among adults with normal BMI. Results Among the adult residents with normal BMI in Jilin Province, 55.6% of participants with central obesity self-assessed as normal weight and 27.0% thought their body weight were above normal. 12.7% of central obesity people took methods to lose weight, while 85.3% didn’t. Female, older people and non-manual worker had higher risk to be central obesity among adults with normal BMI. Hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia were significantly associated with central obesity among adults with normal BMI, the PRs were 1.337 (1.224–1.461), 1.323 (1.193–1.456) and 1.261 (1.152–1.381) separately when adjusted for gender, age and BMI. Conclusions Hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia were significantly associated with central obesity among adults with normal BMI in Jilin Province, China. The low rates of awareness and control of central obesity among adults with normal BMI should be improved by government and health department. PMID:27467819

  6. Zinc protoporphyrin IX concentrations between normal adults and the lead-exposed workers measured by HPLC, spectrofluorometer, and hematofluorometer.

    PubMed

    Roh, Y M; Kim, K; Kim, H

    2000-10-01

    To establish the relationship between Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) concentrations and blood lead (PbB) levels and to identify reliable analytical methods of ZPP and Protoporhyrin (PP), blood samples were obtained from 263 office workers without the history of occupational lead exposure and 49 lead-acid battery workers. The mean concentrations of PbB for the normal adults and the battery workers were 9.26 microg/dl and 42.60 microg/dl, respectively. The geometric mean concentrations of ZPP and PP by HPLC were 18.73 microg/dl and 2.27 microg/dl for normal adults and were 46.99 microg/dl and 5.53 microg/dl for the exposed workers, respectively. The geometric mean concentrations of ZPP and PP by a spectrofluorometer (SF) were 30.27 microg/dl and 5.16 microg/dl for normal adults and were 50.91 microg/dl and 6.69 +/- 1.39 microg/dl for the exposed workers. The geometric mean ZPP concentration measured by a hematofluorometer (HF) was 30.88 microg/dl for normal adults. The results showed that ZPP concentrations measured by HF were consistently higher than those by HPLC and SF for normal adults, and lower for the exposed workers. ZPP concentrations were not correlated with PbB levels for normal adults but a statistically significant correlation was found among the exposed workers. PMID:11061480

  7. Mesenchymal progenitor cell markers in human articular cartilage: normal distribution and changes in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Shawn P; Miyaki, Shigeru; Asahara, Hiroshi; D'Lima, Darryl D; Lotz, Martin K

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Recent findings suggest that articular cartilage contains mesenchymal progenitor cells. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of stem cell markers (Notch-1, Stro-1 and VCAM-1) and of molecules that modulate progenitor differentiation (Notch-1 and Sox9) in normal adult human articular cartilage and in osteoarthritis (OA) cartilage. Methods Expression of the markers was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and flow cytometry. Hoechst 33342 dye was used to identify and sort the cartilage side population (SP). Multilineage differentiation assays including chondrogenesis, osteogenesis and adipogenesis were performed on SP and non-SP (NSP) cells. Results A surprisingly high number (>45%) of cells were positive for Notch-1, Stro-1 and VCAM-1 throughout normal cartilage. Expression of these markers was higher in the superficial zone (SZ) of normal cartilage as compared to the middle zone (MZ) and deep zone (DZ). Non-fibrillated OA cartilage SZ showed reduced Notch-1 and Sox9 staining frequency, while Notch-1, Stro-1 and VCAM-1 positive cells were increased in the MZ. Most cells in OA clusters were positive for each molecule tested. The frequency of SP cells in cartilage was 0.14 ± 0.05% and no difference was found between normal and OA. SP cells displayed chondrogenic and osteogenic but not adipogenic differentiation potential. Conclusions These results show a surprisingly high number of cells that express putative progenitor cell markers in human cartilage. In contrast, the percentage of SP cells is much lower and within the range of expected stem cell frequency. Thus, markers such as Notch-1, Stro-1 or VCAM-1 may not be useful to identify progenitors in cartilage. Instead, their increased expression in OA cartilage implicates involvement in the abnormal cell activation and differentiation process characteristic of OA. PMID:19500336

  8. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal human responses to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Frise, Matthew C.; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Nickol, Annabel H.; Curtis, M. Kate; Pollard, Karen A.; Roberts, David J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Dorrington, Keith L.; Robbins, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Iron bioavailability has been identified as a factor that influences cellular hypoxia sensing, putatively via an action on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. We therefore hypothesized that clinical iron deficiency would disturb integrated human responses to hypoxia. METHODS. We performed a prospective, controlled, observational study of the effects of iron status on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Individuals with absolute iron deficiency (ID) and an iron-replete (IR) control group were exposed to two 6-hour periods of isocapnic hypoxia. The second hypoxic exposure was preceded by i.v. infusion of iron. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was serially assessed with Doppler echocardiography. RESULTS. Thirteen ID individuals completed the study and were age- and sex-matched with controls. PASP did not differ by group or study day before each hypoxic exposure. During the first 6-hour hypoxic exposure, the rise in PASP was 6.2 mmHg greater in the ID group (absolute rises 16.1 and 10.7 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference, 2.7–9.7 mmHg, P = 0.001). Intravenous iron attenuated the PASP rise in both groups; however, the effect was greater in ID participants than in controls (absolute reductions 11.1 and 6.8 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference in change, –8.3 to –0.3 mmHg, P = 0.035). Serum erythropoietin responses to hypoxia also differed between groups. CONCLUSION. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal responses to hypoxia, as evidenced by exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension that is reversed by subsequent iron administration. Disturbed hypoxia sensing and signaling provides a mechanism through which iron deficiency may be detrimental to human health. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01847352). FUNDING. M.C. Frise is the recipient of a British Heart Foundation Clinical Research Training Fellowship (FS/14/48/30828). K.L. Dorrington is supported by the Dunhill Medical Trust (R178/1110). D.J. Roberts was

  9. Mapping of corticotropic cells in the normal human pituitary.

    PubMed

    Trouillas, J; Guigard, M P; Fonlupt, P; Souchier, C; Girod, C

    1996-05-01

    We accomplished the first mapping of corticotropic cells in the whole human adult pituitary. Corticotropic cells were identified by immunocytochemistry (ICC) and quantified by image analysis on 12 pituitaries obtained from people who had died suddenly. An overall view of each pituitary was given by 15-21 sections (mean 18 sections) at 300-micron intervals on six slides. Each section was systematically treated by indirect immunoperoxidase using an anti-ACTH[17-39] polyclonal antiserum. All the measures were done with a x 6.3 objective lens, each field (0. 5 mm2) being considered as the unit area. The mean pituitary density (surface of labeled cells/total surface) of corticotropic cells (9.5 +/- 3.0% per 0. 5 mm2) is significantly higher in men (11.5 +/- 5.1%) than in women (7.0 +/- 1.3%). This difference is due to an inverse relationship between the corticotropic cell density and the weight of the pituitary, which is higher in women than in men. The mean diameter of corticotropic cells is 14.9 micron and their total number per pituitary is approximately 10(7) cells. We confirmed that the spatial distribution of corticotropic cells is nonuniform: they are mainly distributed in the anteromedian part of the anterior lobe. In addition, our results demonstrated that the inferior part of the pituitary contained three times more corticotropic cells than the superior part (mean density 18.0% vs 6.0%) and the anterior part twice as many as the posterior part (mean density 12.3% vs 6.8%). On the horizontal plane, the pituitary was divided into eight zones, in which the mean of area was 2.5-21.0%. The maximal cell density may reach 40-60%. The use of this map should help the pathologist to recognize if there is corticotropic hyperplasia in a small pituitary fragment surgically removed from a patient with Cushing's disease. On the basis of this study, we put forward some criteria for diagnosing corticotropic hyperplasia. PMID:8627004

  10. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults

    PubMed Central

    KHONSARI, Shadi; SUGANTHY, Mayuran; BURCZYNSKA, Beata; DANG, Vu; CHOUDHURY, Manika; PACHENARI, Azra

    2015-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  11. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults.

    PubMed

    Khonsari, Shadi; Suganthy, Mayuran; Burczynska, Beata; Dang, Vu; Choudhury, Manika; Pachenari, Azra

    2016-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  12. Psychiatric and psychosocial problems in adults with normal-intelligence autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hofvander, Björn; Delorme, Richard; Chaste, Pauline; Nydén, Agneta; Wentz, Elisabet; Ståhlberg, Ola; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Stopin, Astrid; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Gillberg, Christopher; Råstam, Maria; Leboyer, Marion

    2009-01-01

    Background Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) often display symptoms from other diagnostic categories. Studies of clinical and psychosocial outcome in adult patients with ASDs without concomitant intellectual disability are few. The objective of this paper is to describe the clinical psychiatric presentation and important outcome measures of a large group of normal-intelligence adult patients with ASDs. Methods Autistic symptomatology according to the DSM-IV-criteria and the Gillberg & Gillberg research criteria, patterns of comorbid psychopathology and psychosocial outcome were assessed in 122 consecutively referred adults with normal intelligence ASDs. The subjects consisted of 5 patients with autistic disorder (AD), 67 with Asperger's disorder (AS) and 50 with pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD NOS). This study group consists of subjects pooled from two studies with highly similar protocols, all seen on an outpatient basis by one of three clinicians. Results Core autistic symptoms were highly prevalent in all ASD subgroups. Though AD subjects had the most pervasive problems, restrictions in non-verbal communication were common across all three subgroups and, contrary to current DSM criteria, so were verbal communication deficits. Lifetime psychiatric axis I comorbidity was very common, most notably mood and anxiety disorders, but also ADHD and psychotic disorders. The frequency of these diagnoses did not differ between the ASD subgroups or between males and females. Antisocial personality disorder and substance abuse were more common in the PDD NOS group. Of all subjects, few led an independent life and very few had ever had a long-term relationship. Female subjects more often reported having been bullied at school than male subjects. Conclusion ASDs are clinical syndromes characterized by impaired social interaction and non-verbal communication in adulthood as well as in childhood. They also carry a high risk for co

  13. Dietary induced subclinical vitamin K deficiency in normal human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ferland, G; Sadowski, J A; O'Brien, M E

    1993-01-01

    A subclinical vitamin K deficiency was induced in 32 healthy subjects (four groups of eight males and females) aged 20-40 and 60-80 yr residing in the Metabolic Research Unit of the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. Volunteers were initially fed (4 d) a baseline-period diet containing the recommended daily allowance for vitamin K which is equivalent to 80 micrograms/d of phylloquinone (vitamin K1). During the baseline period various parameters of vitamin K nutritional status were monitored. The baseline period was followed by a 13-d depletion period during which the subjects were fed a very low vitamin K1 diet (approximately 10 micrograms/d). After depletion, the subjects entered a 16-d repletion period (four stages lasting 4 d each) during which time they were repleted with 5, 15, 25, and 45 micrograms of vitamin K1 per day. Vitamin K1 depletion dramatically and significantly decreased plasma vitamin K1 levels (P < 0.0001) in both elderly and young groups to values 13-18% of day 1 (elderly 0.22 nM, young 0.14 nM). Repleting the subjects with up to 45 micrograms of vitamin K1 per day failed, in the case of the young subjects, to bring plasma vitamin K1 levels back into the normal range. Dietary vitamin K1 restriction induced different responses in the urinary excretion of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid between the young and the elderly subjects with values decreasing significantly (P < 0.03) in the young while remaining unchanged in the elderly. The vitamin K1 depletion period had no significant effect on either prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times, or Factor VII and protein C (as determined by antigenic and functional assays). By using a monoclonal antibody, decarboxy prothrombin was found to increase slightly but significantly in both groups (P < 0.05) as a consequence of the low vitamin K1 diet. This study clearly shows that a diet low in vitamin K1 can result in a functional subclinical deficiency of vitamin K

  14. Aging faces and aging perceivers: young and older adults are less sensitive to deviations from normality in older than in young adult faces.

    PubMed

    Short, Lindsey A; Mondloch, Catherine J

    2013-01-01

    Past studies examining the other-age effect, the phenomenon in which own-age faces are recognized more accurately than other-age faces, are limited in number and report inconsistent results. Here we examine whether the perceptual system is preferentially tuned to differences among young adult faces. In experiment 1 young (18-25 years) and older adult (63-87 years) participants were shown young and older face pairs in which one member of each pair was undistorted and the other had compressed or expanded features. Participants indicated which member of each pair was more normal and which was more expanded. Both age groups were more accurate when tested with young compared with older faces-but only when judging normality. In experiment 2 we tested a separate group of young adults on the same two tasks but with upright and inverted face pairs to examine the differential pattern of results between the normality and discrimination tasks. Inversion impaired performance on the normality task but not the discrimination task and eliminated the young adult advantage in the normality task. Collectively, these results suggest that the face processing system is optimized for young adult faces and that abundant experience with older faces later in life does not reverse this perceptual tuning. PMID:24303745

  15. Plasma and urine diketopiperazine concentrations in normal adults ingesting large quantities of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Cho, E S; Coon, J D; Stegink, L D

    1987-07-01

    In aqueous solution, aspartame can cyclicize to form its corresponding diketopiperazine (3-carboxymethyl-6-benzyl-2,5-diketopiperazine; DKP) and methanol. We measured plasma and urinary concentrations of DKP in samples obtained from six normal adult subjects ingesting 2.2 mg DKP/kg body weight. The DKP was administered as part of a dose of 200 mg aspartame/kg body weight. DKP concentrations in plasma were below the detection limit (less than 1 microgram/ml) of the high-pressure liquid chromatographic method at each time interval after ingestion at which they were measured. Mean (+/- SD) total urinary DKP excreted during the first 24-hr period after dosing was 6.68 +/- 1.30 mg (4.83 +/- 0.23% of the ingested DKP dose). Approximately 44% of the total DKP excreted was excreted in the first 4 hr after dosing. PMID:3623338

  16. Periodontal implications of orthodontic treatment in adults with reduced or normal periodontal tissues versus those of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R L; Leggott, P J; Quinn, R S; Eakle, W S; Chambers, D

    1989-09-01

    This longitudinal study monitored periodontal status in 20 adults and 20 adolescents undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Ten adults had generalized periodontitis and received periodontal treatment, including periodontal surgery, before orthodontic treatment. They also received periodontal maintenance at 3-month intervals during orthodontic treatment. The other 10 adults had normal periodontal tissues. Neither these latter adults nor the adolescents received periodontal maintenance during orthodontic treatment. Periodontal status was determined (1) at six standard sites before fixed appliances were placed (baseline), (2) at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months after appliances had been placed, and (3) 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after appliances had been removed. At each of these visits, these sites were assessed for plaque index, gingival index, bleeding tendency, and pocket depth. Loss of attachment between baseline and 3 months after appliances were removed and tooth loss were also determined. Complete data were obtained for 15 adolescents and 14 adults. During orthodontic treatment the adolescent group showed significantly more (p less than 0.05) periodontal inflammation and supragingival plaque than the adults; after appliances were removed, this pattern was no longer statistically significant. For loss of attachment, there were no significant differences among adolescents, adults with normal periodontal tissues, or adults with reduced but healthy periodontal tissues who had undergone treatment for periodontal disease. For tooth loss, three nonstudy site teeth with pockets deeper than 6 mm and/or furcation involvements were lost because of periodontal abscesses in the adult group treated for periodontal disease. PMID:2773862

  17. Relationship of metabolic and endocrine parameters to brain glucose metabolism in older adults: do cognitively-normal older adults have a particular metabolic phenotype?

    PubMed

    Nugent, S; Castellano, C A; Bocti, C; Dionne, I; Fulop, T; Cunnane, S C

    2016-02-01

    Our primary objective in this study was to quantify whole brain and regional cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRg) in young and older adults in order to determine age-normalized reference CMRg values for healthy older adults with normal cognition for age. Our secondary objectives were to--(i) report a broader range of metabolic and endocrine parameters including body fat composition that could form the basis for the concept of a 'metabolic phenotype' in cognitively normal, older adults, and (ii) to assess whether medications commonly used to control blood lipids, blood pressure or thyroxine affect CMRg values in older adults. Cognition assessed by a battery of tests was normal for age and education in both groups. Compared to the young group (25 years old; n = 34), the older group (72 years old; n = 41) had ~14% lower CMRg (μmol/100 g/min) specifically in the frontal cortex, and 18% lower CMRg in the caudate. Lower grey matter volume and cortical thickness was widespread in the older group. These differences in CMRg, grey matter volume and cortical thickness were present in the absence of any known evidence for prodromal Alzheimer's disease (AD). Percent total body fat was positively correlated with CMRg in many brain regions but only in the older group. Before and after controlling for body fat, HOMA2-IR was significantly positively correlated to CMRg in several brain regions in the older group. These data show that compared to a healthy younger adult, the metabolic phenotype of a cognitively-normal 72 year old person includes similar plasma glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides and TSH, higher hemoglobin A1c and percent body fat, lower CMRg in the superior frontal cortex and caudate, but the same CMRg in the hippocampus and white matter. Age-normalization of cognitive test results is standard practice and we would suggest that regional CMRg in cognitively healthy older adults should also be age-normalized. PMID:26364049

  18. Low Dose Parathyroid Hormone Maintains Normal Bone Formation in Adult Male Rats During Rapid Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2011-01-01

    A persistent negative energy balance results in bone loss. It is not clear whether the bone loss associated with chronic negative energy balance can be prevented. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of intermittent low dose parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment in maintaining normal bone formation during severe energy restriction. Six-month-old male Fisher 344 rats were divided into 4 treatment groups: (1) baseline, (2) ad libitum (ad lib)-fed control, (3) energy-restricted (to consume 40% ad lib caloric intake), or (4) energy-restricted + low dose (1 μg/kg/d) PTH. Severe energy restriction for 14 days decreased body weight and serum leptin levels. Compared to ad lib-fed controls, energy-restricted rats had lower cancellous bone formation, higher osteoclast perimeter/bone perimeter and higher bone marrow adiposity in the proximal tibial metaphysis. Also, the energy-restricted rats had a lower periosteal bone formation rate at the tibia-fibula synostosis. Administration of PTH to energy-restricted rats had no effect on weight loss or osteoclast perimeter/bone perimeter. In contrast, energy-restricted rats treated with PTH had higher rates of cancellous and cortical bone formation compared to energy-restricted rats, and did not differ from the ad lib-fed control animals. Furthermore, PTH treatment maintained normal bone marrow adiposity. In conclusion, rapid weight loss in adult male rats was accompanied by decreased bone formation and increased bone marrow adiposity and these changes were prevented by low dose PTH treatment. Taken together, the results suggest that the energy cost of bone formation in adult rats is low and PTH therapy is effective in preventing the reduced bone formation associated with rapid weight loss. PMID:21215827

  19. Humanities and the Adult Learner in an Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Dale; Kamholtz, Jonathan

    Humanities courses have often been given little attention in continuing education for adults, possibly because they have been viewed as not "practical" or not "job-oriented" enough in our career-oriented, technologically advanced society. However, the humanities should be an integral part of our culture and of the lives of educated persons--a…

  20. Differences of Sagittal Lumbosacral Parameters between Patients with Lumbar Spondylolysis and Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jin; Peng, Bao-Gan; Li, Yong-Chao; Zhang, Nai-Yang; Yang, Liang; Li, Duan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have suggested an association between elevated pelvic incidence (PI) and the development of lumbar spondylolysis. However, there is still lack of investigation for Han Chinese people concerning the normal range of spinopelvic parameters and relationship between abnormal sagittal parameters and lumbar diseases. The objective of the study was to investigate sagittal lumbosacral parameters of adult lumbar spondylolysis patients in Han Chinese population. Methods: A total of 52 adult patients with symptomatic lumbar spondylolysis treated in the General Hospital of Armed Police Force (Beijing, China) were identified as the spondylolysis group. All the 52 patients were divided into two subgroups, Subgroup A: 36 patients with simple lumbar spondylolysis, and Subgroup B: 16 patients with lumbar spondylolysis accompanying with mild lumbar spondylolisthesis (slip percentage <30%). Altogether 207 healthy adults were chosen as the control group. All patients and the control group took lumbosacral lateral radiographs. Seven sagittal lumbosacral parameters, including PI, pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), lumbar lordosis (LL), L5 incidence, L5 slope, and sacral table angle (STA), were measured in the lateral radiographs. All the parameters aforementioned were compared between the two subgroups and between the spondylolysis group and the control group with independent-sample t-test. Results: There were no statistically significant differences of all seven sagittal lumbosacral parameters between Subgroup A and Subgroup B. PI, PT, SS, and LL were higher (P < 0.05) in the spondylolysis group than those in the control group, but STA was lower (P < 0.001) in the spondylolysis group. Conclusions: Current study results suggest that increased PI and decreased STA may play important roles in the pathology of lumbar spondylolysis in Han Chinese population. PMID:27174324

  1. Neuroprotective Pathways: Lifestyle activity, brain pathology and cognition in cognitively normal older adults

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Miranka; Haase, Claudia M.; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Vogel, Jacob; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    This study used path analysis to examine effects of cognitive activity and physical activity on cognitive functioning in older adults, through pathways involving beta-amyloid (Aβ) burden, cerebrovascular lesions, and neural injury within brain regions affected in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Ninety-two cognitively normal older adults (75.2±5.6 years) reported lifetime cognitive activity and current physical activity using validated questionnaires. For each participant, we evaluated cortical Aβ burden (using PIB-PET), cerebrovascular lesions (using MRI-defined white matter lesion (WML)), and neural integrity within AD regions (using a multimodal biomarker). Path models (adjusted for age, gender, and education) indicated that higher lifetime cognitive activity and higher current physical activity was associated with fewer WMLs. Lower WML volumes were in turn related to higher neural integrity and higher global cognitive functioning. As shown previously, higher lifetime cognitive activity was associated with lower PIB retention, which itself moderated the impact of neural integrity on cognitive functioning. Lifestyle activity may thus promote cognitive health in aging by protecting against cerebrovascular pathology and Aβ pathology thought to be relevant to AD development. PMID:24656834

  2. Gray matter network disruptions and amyloid beta in cognitively normal adults.

    PubMed

    Tijms, Betty M; ten Kate, Mara; Wink, Alle Meije; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Ecay, Mirian; Clerigue, Montserrat; Estanga, Ainara; Garcia Sebastian, Maite; Izagirre, Andrea; Villanua, Jorge; Martinez Lage, Pablo; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Sanz Arigita, Ernesto; Barkhof, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Gray matter networks are disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is unclear when these disruptions start during the development of AD. Amyloid beta 1-42 (Aβ42) is among the earliest changes in AD. We studied, in cognitively healthy adults, the relationship between Aβ42 levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and single-subject cortical gray matter network measures. Single-subject gray matter networks were extracted from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans in a sample of cognitively healthy adults (N = 185; age range 39-79, mini-mental state examination >25, N = 12 showed abnormal Aβ42 < 550 pg/mL). Degree, clustering coefficient, and path length were computed at whole brain level and for 90 anatomical areas. Associations between continuous Aβ42 CSF levels and single-subject cortical gray matter network measures were tested. Smoothing splines were used to determine whether a linear or nonlinear relationship gave a better fit to the data. Lower Aβ42 CSF levels were linearly associated at whole brain level with lower connectivity density, and nonlinearly with lower clustering values and higher path length values, which is indicative of a less-efficient network organization. These relationships were specific to medial temporal areas, precuneus, and the middle frontal gyrus (all p < 0.05). These results suggest that mostly within the normal spectrum of amyloid, lower Aβ42 levels can be related to gray matter networks disruptions. PMID:26559882

  3. Judging Normality and Attractiveness in Faces: Direct Evidence of a More Refined Representation for Own-Race, Young Adult Faces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaomei; Short, Lindsey A; Chan, Harmonie S J; Mondloch, Catherine J

    2016-09-01

    Young and older adults are more sensitive to deviations from normality in young than older adult faces, suggesting that the dimensions of face space are optimized for young adult faces. Here, we extend these findings to own-race faces and provide converging evidence using an attractiveness rating task. In Experiment 1, Caucasian and Chinese adults were shown own- and other-race face pairs; one member was undistorted and the other had compressed or expanded features. Participants indicated which member of each pair was more normal (a task that requires referencing a norm) and which was more expanded (a task that simply requires discrimination). Participants showed an own-race advantage in the normality task but not the discrimination task. In Experiment 2, participants rated the facial attractiveness of own- and other-race faces (Experiment 2a) or young and older adult faces (Experiment 2b). Between-rater variability in ratings of individual faces was higher for other-race and older adult faces; reduced consensus in attractiveness judgments reflects a less refined face space. Collectively, these results provide direct evidence that the dimensions of face space are optimized for own-race and young adult faces, which may underlie face race- and age-based deficits in recognition. PMID:27335127

  4. Measures of tactual detection and temporal order resolution in congenitally deaf and normal-hearing adults

    PubMed Central

    Moallem, Theodore M.; Reed, Charlotte M.; Braida, Louis D.

    2010-01-01

    To guide the development of tactile speech aids, tactual detection and temporal order discrimination by congenitally deaf and normal-hearing adults have been examined. Tactual detection thresholds for sinusoidal vibrations between 2 and 300 Hz were measured at the left thumb and index finger using an adaptive paradigm. Temporal onset- and offset-order discrimination were tested using stimuli of 50 Hz at the thumb and 250 Hz at the index finger, delivered asynchronously and varied independently in amplitude and duration. Mean detection thresholds for the deaf and normal-hearing groups did not differ significantly at any frequency tested. Temporal onset-order discrimination thresholds varied widely, particularly among congenitally deaf individuals, but no statistically significant difference was found between group means. Both experimental groups exhibited a broad range of discrimination thresholds for temporal offset-order, and mean thresholds did not differ significantly. On the whole, tactual offset-order thresholds were substantially higher than onset-order thresholds. Differences in the relative levels of paired stimuli systematically affected sensitivity to both onset- and offset-orders in most subjects. Differences in the relative durations of paired stimuli had little effect on onset-order discrimination, but had a robust effect on offset-order discrimination thresholds, which was consistent across all subjects. PMID:20550268

  5. Cervical Pre-Phrenic Interneurons in the Normal and Lesioned Spinal Cord of the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Michael A.; White, Todd E.; Coutts, Marcella A.; Jones, Alex L.; Sandhu, Milapjit S.; Bloom, David C.; Bolser, Donald C.; Yates, Bill J.; Fuller, David D.; Reier, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    While monosynaptic bulbospinal projections to phrenic motoneurons have been extensively described, little is known about the organization of phrenic premotor neurons in the adult rat spinal cord. As interneurons may play an important role in normal breathing and recovery following spinal cord injury, the present study has used anterograde and transneuronal retrograde tracing to study their distribution and synaptic relations. Exclusive unilateral, first-order labeling of the phrenic motoneuron pool with pseudorabies virus demonstrated a substantial number of second-order, bilaterally-distributed cervical interneurons predominantly in the dorsal horn and around the central canal. Combined transneuronal and anterograde tracing revealed ventral respiratory column projections to pre-phrenic interneurons suggesting some propriospinal relays exist between medullary neurons and the phrenic nucleus. Dual-labeling studies with pseudorabies virus recombinants also showed pre-phrenic interneurons integrated with either contralateral phrenic or intercostal motoneuron pools. The stability of interneuronal pseudorabies virus labeling patterns following lateral cervical hemisection was then addressed. Except for fewer infected contralateral interneurons at the level of the central canal, the number and distribution of phrenic-associated interneurons was not significantly altered two weeks post-hemisection (i.e. when the earliest post-injury recovery of phrenic activity has been reported). These results demonstrate a heterogeneous population of phrenic-related interneurons. Their connectivity and relative stability after cervical hemisection raises speculation for potentially diverse roles in modulating phrenic function normally and post-injury. PMID:18924146

  6. Disruption of functional connectivity in clinically normal older adults harboring amyloid burden.

    PubMed

    Hedden, Trey; Van Dijk, Koene R A; Becker, J Alex; Mehta, Angel; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Buckner, Randy L

    2009-10-01

    Amyloid deposition is present in 20-50% of nondemented older adults yet the functional consequences remain unclear. The current study found that amyloid accumulation is correlated with functional disruption of the default network as measured by intrinsic activity correlations. Clinically normal participants (n = 38, aged 60-88 years) were characterized using (11)C-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B positron emission tomography imaging to estimate fibrillar amyloid burden and, separately, underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The integrity of the default network was estimated by correlating rest-state fMRI time courses extracted from a priori regions including the posterior cingulate, lateral parietal, and medial prefrontal cortices. Clinically normal participants with high amyloid burden displayed significantly reduced functional correlations within the default network relative to participants with low amyloid burden. These reductions were also observed when amyloid burden was treated as a continuous, rather than a dichotomous, measure and when controlling for age and structural atrophy. Whole-brain analyses initiated by seeding the posterior cingulate cortex, a region of high amyloid burden in Alzheimer's disease, revealed significant disruption in the default network including functional disconnection of the hippocampal formation. PMID:19812343

  7. Extraction of Vitamin D Metabolites by Bones of Normal Adult Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Olgaard, K.; Schwartz, J.; Finco, D.; Arbelaez, M.; Haddad, J.; Avioli, L.; Klahr, S.; Slatopolsky, E.

    1982-01-01

    Using the isolated perfused canine tibia we examined the extraction of [3H]25(OH)D3, [3H]1,25(OH)2D3 and [3H]24,25(OH)2D3 by bone of normal adult dogs. The studies were performed with and without vitamin D binding protein (DBP) in the perfusate to examine the effect of protein binding on the extraction of the vitamin D metabolites. An average of 48±2% of [3H]25(OH)D3 was extracted by bone, when no DBP was present. However, addition of only a small amount of DBP (∼720 ng/ml of perfusate) nearly completely abolished the extraction of [3H]25(OH)D3 by bone. No degradation and/or transformation of the labeled 25(OH)D3 could be demonstrated during passage through the isolated perfused bone. The extraction of [3H]24,25(OH)2D3 in a DBP-free medium averaged 33±5%. Addition of 720 ng of DBP/ml of perfusate completely inhibited the extraction of this metabolite. The extraction of [3H]1,25(OH)2D3 averaged 30±3% in a DBP free medium and no inhibition of the extraction was demonstrated after addition of DBP (720 ng/ml of perfusate). However, addition of DBP in a concentration of 14.4 μg/ml of perfusate reduced the extraction of 1,25(OH)2D3 to 8±2%, a value still significantly higher than that seen after addition of 20 times less DBP to perfusions with 25(OH)D3 and 24,25(OH)2D3. It is concluded that the isolated perfused bone of normal dogs can extract significant amounts of 25(OH)D3, 1,25(OH)2D3, and 24,25(OH)2D3. Small concentrations of DBP (720 ng/ml) in the perfusate significantly inhibited the extraction of 25(OH)D3 and 24,25(OH)2D3. A carrier role for DBP is suggested and it is proposed that the levels of free vitamin D are important for extraction of the metabolites by bone. Therefore, due to the different affinities of DBP for the various metabolites of vitamin D, only 1,25(OH)2D3 is extracted in vitro in significant amounts by bone of normal adult dogs, in the presence of DBP. PMID:7061707

  8. Posture and Gender Differentially Affect Heart Rate Variability of Symptomatic Mitral Valve Prolapse and Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chien-Jung; Chen, Ya-Chu; Lee, Chih-Hsien; Yang, Ing-Fang; Yang, Ten-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) has been shown to be a useful measure of autonomic activity in healthy and mitral valve prolapsed (MVP) subjects. However, the effects of posture and gender on HRV in symptomatic MVP and normal adults had not been elucidated in Taiwan. Methods A total of 118 MVP patients (7 males, 39 ± 7 years old; and 111 females, 42 ± 13 years old) and 148 healthy control (54 males, 28 ± 4 years old; and 94 females, 26 ± 6 years old) were investigated. The diagnosis of MVP was confirmed by cross-sectional echocardiography. A locally developed Taiwanese machine was used to record the HRV parameters for MVP and control groups in three stationary positions. Thereafter, the HRV time-domain parameters, and the frequency-domain parameters derived from fast Fourier transform or autoregressive methods were analyzed. Results The MVP group showed a decrease in time domain parameters and obtunded postural effects on frequency domain parameters moreso than the control group. Though the parasympathetic tone was dominant in female (higher RMSSD, nHF and lower nLF vs. male), the sympathetic outflow was higher in MVP female (lower SDNN, NN50 and higher nLF vs. normal female). While the parasympathetic activity was lower in male, sympathetic outflow was dominant in MVP male (lower nHF and higher nLF vs. normal male). Conclusions Both MVP female and male subjects had elevated levels of sympathetic outflow. The obtunded postural effects on frequency domain measures testified to the autonomic dysregulation of MVP subjects. PMID:27471360

  9. Normally Occurring Human Anti-GM1 Immunoglobulin M Antibodies and the Immune Response to Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Alaniz, María E.; Lardone, Ricardo D.; Yudowski, Silvia L.; Farace, María I.; Nores, Gustavo A.

    2004-01-01

    Anti-GM1 antibodies of the immunoglobulin M (IgM) isotype are normal components of the antibody repertoire of adult human serum. Using a sensitive high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) immunostaining assay, we found that these antibodies were absent in the umbilical vein and children <1 month of age but could be detected after 1 month of age. Although most of the children older than 6 months of age were positive, there were still a few negative children. The appearance of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies showed a perfect concordance with two well-characterized antibacterial antibodies, anti-Forssman and anti-blood group A, which indicates a similar origin. We also studied IgM reactivity with lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from gram-negative bacteria isolated from stool samples from healthy babies and from Escherichia coli HB101 in serum from individuals of different ages. We found a positive reaction with both LPSs in all the children more than 1 month of age analyzed, even in those that were negative for anti-GM1 antibodies. Anti-GM1 IgM antibodies were purified from adult serum by affinity chromatography and tested for the ability to bind LPSs from different bacteria. This highly specific preparation showed reactivity only with LPS from a strain of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from a patient with diarrhea. We conclude that normally occurring IgM antibodies are generated after birth, probably during the immune defense against specific bacterial strains. PMID:15039337

  10. Cytotoxic effect and mechanism inducing cell death of α-mangostin liposomes in various human carcinoma and normal cells.

    PubMed

    Benjakul, Ruthairat; Kongkaneramit, Lalana; Sarisuta, Narong; Moongkarndi, Primchanien; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2015-09-01

    The aims of this study were to develop α-mangostin liposomes as well as to evaluate their physicochemical properties and cytotoxic activity. α-Mangostin liposomes were prepared using the reverse-phase evaporation method with lipid composition of phosphatidylcholine to cholesterol at 7 : 3 molar ratios; their physicochemical properties and antiproliferative activity were assessed using an MTT assay in four human carcinoma cells [that is, human lung epithelial carcinoma (Calu-3), human colon carcinoma (HT-29), human breast carcinoma (MCF-7), and human colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells], and two human normal cells [that is, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and human adult low-calcium elevated temperature (HaCaT) keratinocytes]. Determinations of morphological changes and oligonucleosomal DNA fragments were also carried out. The liposomal dispersions obtained were unilamellar vesicles as confirmed by cryotransmission and freeze-fracture electron microscopy with a particle size of 114 nm and a ζ potential of -2.56 mV. The P-NMR spectra showed that α-mangostin molecules orientated in the phospholipid bilayer membrane. The α-mangostin could appreciably be entrapped with an efficiency and loading of 81 and 4%, respectively. The antiproliferative activity of α-mangostin liposomes in various cancer and normal cells showed a dose-dependent inhibition in all treated cell lines. The antiproliferative effect of α-mangostin liposomes was found to be associated with apoptosis, with differences in sensitivity among the cell lines treated. PMID:25811966

  11. Damage initiation sites in osteoporotic and normal human cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Soicher, Matthew A; Wang, Xiang; Zauel, Roger R; Fyhrie, David P

    2011-03-01

    Using a finite element (FE) method called biomechanical stereology, Wang et al. previously reported increased microcrack formation and propagation in bone samples from patients with a history of osteoporotic fracture as compared to normal subjects. In this study, we re-analyzed the data from Wang's report to determine the microscopic differences between bone tissue from osteoporotic patients and normal subjects that caused these different patterns of bone tissue damage between the groups. The morphological features examined were the number of "voids" (or osteocyte lacunae) visible and the distance of the lacunae from the initiation of the microcracks. We found that bone samples from patients with a history of osteoporotic fracture contained significantly more lacunae than normal control specimens. We also found a significant correlation (r² = 0.483, p = 0.001) between the number of lacunae visible in the image and the number of microcracks formed. These results help to explain the differences in total microcrack number between the osteoporotic and normal subjects reported in our previous work. PMID:21081188

  12. Identification of Distinct Layers Within the Stratified Squamous Epithelium of the Adult Human True Vocal Fold

    PubMed Central

    Dowdall, Jayme R.; Sadow, Peter M.; Hartnick, Christopher; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Mou, Hongmei; Zhao, Rui; Song, Phillip C.; Franco, Ramon A.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis A precise molecular schema for classifying the different cell types of the normal human vocal fold epithelium is lacking. We hypothesize that the true vocal fold epithelium has a cellular architecture and organization similar to that of other stratified squamous epithelia including the skin, cornea, oral mucosa, and esophagus. In analogy to disorders of the skin and gastrointestinal tract, a molecular definition of the normal cell types within the human vocal fold epithelium and a description of their geometric relationships should serve as a foundation for characterizing cellular changes associated with metaplasia, dysplasia, and cancer. Study Design Qualitative study with adult human larynges. Methods Histologic sections of normal human laryngeal tissue were analyzed for morphology (hematoxylin and eosin) and immunohistochemical protein expression profile, including cytokeratins (CK13 and CK14), cornified envelope proteins (involucrin), basal cells (NGFR/p75), and proliferation markers (Ki67). Results We demonstrated that three distinct cell strata with unique marker profiles are present within the stratified squamous epithelium of the true vocal fold. We used these definitions to establish that cell proliferation is restricted to certain cell types and layers within the epithelium. These distinct cell types are reproducible across five normal adult larynges. Conclusion We have established that three layers of cells are present within the normal adult stratified squamous epithelium of the true vocal fold. Furthermore, replicating cell populations are largely restricted to the parabasal strata within the epithelium. This delineation of distinct cell populations will facilitate future studies of vocal fold regeneration and cancer. Level of Evidence N/A. PMID:25988619

  13. Quantitative analysis of p53 expression in human normal and cancer tissue microarray with global normalization method

    PubMed Central

    Idikio, Halliday A

    2011-01-01

    Tissue microarray based immunohistochemical staining and proteomics are important tools to create and validate clinically relevant cancer biomarkers. Immunohistochemical stains using formalin-fixed tissue microarray sections for protein expression are scored manually and semi-quantitatively. Digital image analysis methods remove some of the drawbacks of manual scoring but may need other methods such as normalization to provide across the board utility. In the present study, quantitative proteomics-based global normalization method was used to evaluate its utility in the analysis of p53 protein expression in mixed human normal and cancer tissue microarray. Global normalization used the mean or median of β-actin to calculate ratios of individual core stain intensities, then log transformed the ratios, calculate a mean or median and subtracted the value from the log of ratios. In the absence of global normalization of p53 protein expression, 44% (42 of 95) of tissue cores were positive using the median of intensity values and 40% (38 of 95) using the mean of intensities as cut-off points. With global normalization, p53 positive cores changed to 20% (19 of 95) when using median of intensities and 15.8%(15 of 95) when the mean of intensities were used. In conclusion, the global normalization method helped to define positive p53 staining in the tissue microarray set used. The method used helped to define clear cut-off points and confirmed all negatively stained tissue cores. Such normalization methods should help to better define clinically useful biomarkers. PMID:21738821

  14. Comparison of human eosinophils from normals and patients with eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Bass, D A; Grover, W H; Lewis, J C; Szejda, P; DeChatelet, L R; McCall, C E

    1980-12-01

    Previous studies of the biochemistry and physiology of eosinophils have relied upon cells obtained from patients with eosinophilia (EE). It is unknown whether such cells might have been activated or partially exhausted by the pathological state causing eosinophilia. We examined cell surface charge, membrane transport of deoxyglucose, activation of lyso-somal acid phosphatase, and oxidative metabolism to provide a profile to compare EE with purified normal eosinophils (NE) and normal neutrophils. Eosinophils or neutrophils were obtained in >95% purity from normal individuals and patients with eosinophilia of diverse etiologies. Cell surface charge was determined by electrophoretic mobility in micromoles per second per volt per centimeter. Normal eosinophils demonstrated a surface charge of 2.46+/-0.03. Stimulation of the cells by zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) reduced the surface charge to 1.82+/-0.02. In contrast, the charge of "resting" EE was already reduced (1.89+/-0.05) and was not altered by ZAS. Resting and stimulated neutrophils had a charge of 1.98+/-0.01 and 1.69+/-0.02, respectively. Uptake of [(3)H]2-deoxyglucose has been shown to reflect carrier-facilitated hexose transport in granulocytes. Deoxyglucose uptake by resting NE and NE stimulated by ZAS was 2.40+/-0.40 and 5.44+/-0.39 (cpm x 10(-3)/2 x 10(5) eosinophils), respectively. Resting and stimulated EE demonstrated deoxyglucose uptake of 7.55+/-0.58 and 15.3+/-0.6, respectively.Lysosomal acid phosphatase was determined by an electron microscopic cytochemical technique. In normal eosinophils and neutrophils, lysosomal acid phosphatase in mature cells is held in a latent form. Normal eosinophils demonstrated weakly positive acid phosphatase activity in 7.8+/-1.2% of the specific granules. Normal eosinophils, stimulated by opsonized staphylococci or the calcium ionophore A23187, develop rapid activation of acid phosphatase in approximately 80% of the granules throughout the cells. Resting EE were

  15. Adult human metapneumonovirus (hMPV) pneumonia mimicking Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Irshad, Nadia; Connolly, James J

    2016-01-01

    In adults hospitalized with viral pneumonias the main differential diagnostic consideration is influenza pneumonia. The respiratory viruses causing viral influenza like illnesses (ILIs), e.g., RSV may closely resemble influenza. Rarely, extrapulmonary findings of some ILIs may resemble Legionnaire's disease (LD), e.g., adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV-3). We present a most unusual case of human metapneumonovirus pneumonia (hMPV) with some characteristic extrapulmonary findings characteristic of LD, e.g., relative bradycardia, as well as mildly elevated serum transaminases and hyphosphatemia. We believe this is the first reported case of hMPV pneumonia in a hospitalized adult that had some features of LD. PMID:26988110

  16. The development of hepatic stellate cells in normal and abnormal human fetuses – an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Christine K C; Pereira, Tamara N; Pozniak, Katarzyna N; Ramsing, Mette; Vogel, Ida; Ramm, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    The precise embryological origin and development of hepatic stellate cells is not established. Animal studies and observations on human fetuses suggest that they derive from posterior mesodermal cells that migrate via the septum transversum and developing diaphragm to form submesothelial cells beneath the liver capsule, which give rise to mesenchymal cells including hepatic stellate cells. However, it is unclear if these are similar to hepatic stellate cells in adults or if this is the only source of stellate cells. We have studied hepatic stellate cells by immunohistochemistry, in developing human liver from autopsies of fetuses with and without malformations and growth restriction, using cellular Retinol Binding Protein-1 (cRBP-1), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and α-Smooth Muscle Actin (αSMA) antibodies, to identify factors that influence their development. We found that hepatic stellate cells expressing cRBP-1 are present from the end of the first trimester of gestation and reduce in density throughout gestation. They appear abnormally formed and variably reduced in number in fetuses with abnormal mesothelial Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) function, diaphragmatic hernia and in ectopic liver nodules without mesothelium. Stellate cells showed similarities to intravascular cells and their presence in a fetus with diaphragm agenesis suggests they may be derived from circulating stem cells. Our observations suggest circulating stem cells as well as mesothelium can give rise to hepatic stellate cells, and that they require normal mesothelial function for their development. PMID:26265759

  17. Effects of cobalt chloride on phenotypes of normal human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wang, Huai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    To explore the cellular adaptations and responses to hypoxia in normal human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and presume what roles phenotypic modulation of normal human saphenous vein SMCs would play in varicose vein of lower extremity, we used cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a hypoxia mimetic, to treat normal human saphenous vein SMCs in vitro. The proliferating ability of cells exposed to serial dilutions of CoCl2 (0, 200, 300, 400 and 500 μM) at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h respectively was detected by MTT assay. Wound healing assay was used to observe the migrating ability of cells under CoCl2 (200 μM) treatment for 8 days continuously. Hoechst 33258 stain was used to determine whether hypoxia induced by CoCl2 could cause apoptosis of normal human saphenous vein SMCs. We found that CoCl2 enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the migration of normal human saphenous vein SMCs. The apparent morphous of normal human saphenous vein SMCs under chronic CoCl2 treatment was significantly changed compared to no CoCl2 treated control, but this process did not relate to cell apoptosis. To conclude, our results support the concept that the phenotypes of normal human saphenous vein SMCs could be influenced by hypoxia stimulus. Cellular structural and functional changes under chronic hypoxia in normal human saphenous vein SMCs might play important roles in the development of varicose veins of lower extremity. PMID:25663990

  18. Effects of cobalt chloride on phenotypes of normal human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Huai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    To explore the cellular adaptations and responses to hypoxia in normal human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and presume what roles phenotypic modulation of normal human saphenous vein SMCs would play in varicose vein of lower extremity, we used cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a hypoxia mimetic, to treat normal human saphenous vein SMCs in vitro. The proliferating ability of cells exposed to serial dilutions of CoCl2 (0, 200, 300, 400 and 500 μM) at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h respectively was detected by MTT assay. Wound healing assay was used to observe the migrating ability of cells under CoCl2 (200 μM) treatment for 8 days continuously. Hoechst 33258 stain was used to determine whether hypoxia induced by CoCl2 could cause apoptosis of normal human saphenous vein SMCs. We found that CoCl2 enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the migration of normal human saphenous vein SMCs. The apparent morphous of normal human saphenous vein SMCs under chronic CoCl2 treatment was significantly changed compared to no CoCl2 treated control, but this process did not relate to cell apoptosis. To conclude, our results support the concept that the phenotypes of normal human saphenous vein SMCs could be influenced by hypoxia stimulus. Cellular structural and functional changes under chronic hypoxia in normal human saphenous vein SMCs might play important roles in the development of varicose veins of lower extremity. PMID:25663990

  19. The weight of nations: an estimation of adult human biomass

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The energy requirement of species at each trophic level in an ecological pyramid is a function of the number of organisms and their average mass. Regarding human populations, although considerable attention is given to estimating the number of people, much less is given to estimating average mass, despite evidence that average body mass is increasing. We estimate global human biomass, its distribution by region and the proportion of biomass due to overweight and obesity. Methods For each country we used data on body mass index (BMI) and height distribution to estimate average adult body mass. We calculated total biomass as the product of population size and average body mass. We estimated the percentage of the population that is overweight (BMI > 25) and obese (BMI > 30) and the biomass due to overweight and obesity. Results In 2005, global adult human biomass was approximately 287 million tonnes, of which 15 million tonnes were due to overweight (BMI > 25), a mass equivalent to that of 242 million people of average body mass (5% of global human biomass). Biomass due to obesity was 3.5 million tonnes, the mass equivalent of 56 million people of average body mass (1.2% of human biomass). North America has 6% of the world population but 34% of biomass due to obesity. Asia has 61% of the world population but 13% of biomass due to obesity. One tonne of human biomass corresponds to approximately 12 adults in North America and 17 adults in Asia. If all countries had the BMI distribution of the USA, the increase in human biomass of 58 million tonnes would be equivalent in mass to an extra 935 million people of average body mass, and have energy requirements equivalent to that of 473 million adults. Conclusions Increasing population fatness could have the same implications for world food energy demands as an extra half a billion people living on the earth. PMID:22709383

  20. Delayed gastric emptying does not normalize after gluten withdrawal in adult celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Usai-Satta, Paolo; Oppia, Francesco; Scarpa, Mariella; Giannetti, Cristiana; Cabras, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Objective Delayed gastric emptying has been frequently detected in patients with untreated celiac disease. According to several studies, gluten withdrawal showed to be effective in normalizing the gastric emptying rate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gastric emptying rate of solids in patients with celiac disease before and after a gluten-free diet. Methods Twelve adult patients with celiac disease (age range 20-57 years) and 30 healthy controls (age range 30-54 years) underwent a (13)C-octanoic acid breath test to measure gastric emptying. Half emptying time (t1/2) and lag phase (tlag) were calculated. After at least 12 months of a gluten-free diet, celiac patients underwent a new (13)C-octanoic acid breath test. A symptom score was utilized to detect dyspeptic and malabsorption symptoms in all the patients. Results The gastric motility parameters, t1/2 and tlag, were significantly longer in patients than in controls. On a gluten-free diet, surprisingly, the gastric emptying did not normalize despite an improvement of symptom score. No significant correlation between abnormal gastric emptying and specific symptom patterns, anthropometric parameters or severity of histological damage was found. Conclusions This finding supports the hypothesis that gluten-driven mucosal inflammation might determine motor abnormalities by affecting smooth muscle contractility or impairing gut hormone function. The persistence of these abnormalities on a gluten free diet suggests the presence of a persistent low-grade mucosal inflammation with a permanent perturbation of the neuro-immunomodulatory regulation. PMID:27161492

  1. Blood glucose levels and cortical thinning in cognitively normal, middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Wennberg, Alexandra M V; Spira, Adam P; Pettigrew, Corinne; Soldan, Anja; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Rebok, George W; Roses, Allen D; Lutz, Michael W; Miller, Michael M; Thambisetty, Madhav; Albert, Marilyn S

    2016-06-15

    Type II diabetes mellitus (DM) increases risk for cognitive decline and is associated with brain atrophy in older demented and non-demented individuals. We investigated (1) the cross-sectional association between fasting blood glucose level and cortical thickness in a sample of largely middle-aged, cognitively normal adults, and (2) whether these associations were modified by genes associated with both lipid processing and dementia. To explore possible modifications by genetic status, we investigated the interaction between blood glucose levels and the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele and the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOMM) 40 '523 genotype on cortical thickness. Cortical thickness measures were based on mean thickness in a subset of a priori-selected brain regions hypothesized to be vulnerable to atrophy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (i.e., 'AD vulnerable regions'). Participants included 233 cognitively normal subjects in the BIOCARD study who had a measure of fasting blood glucose and cortical thickness measures, quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. After adjustment for age, sex, race, education, depression, and medical conditions, higher blood glucose was associated with thinner parahippocampal gyri (B=-0.002; 95% CI -0.004, -0.0004) and temporal pole (B=-0.002; 95% CI -0.004, -0.0001), as well as reduced average thickness over AD vulnerable regions (B=-0.001; 95% CI -0.002, -0.0001). There was no evidence for greater cortical thinning in ε4 carriers of the APOE gene or in APOE ε3/3 individuals carrying the TOMM40 VL/VL genotypes. When individuals with glucose levels in the diabetic range (≥126mg/dL), were excluded from the analysis, the associations between glucose levels and cortical thickness were no longer significant. These findings suggest that glucose levels in the diabetic range are associated with reduced cortical thickness in AD vulnerable regions as early as middle age. PMID:27206882

  2. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20–40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans. PMID:21220336

  3. The Drosophila Couch Potato Gene: An Essential Gene Required for Normal Adult Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bellen, H. J.; Vaessin, H.; Bier, E.; Kolodkin, A.; D'Evelyn, D.; Kooyer, S.; Jan, Y. N.

    1992-01-01

    Through enhancer detection screens we have isolated 14 insertions in an essential gene that is expressed in embryonic sensory mother cells (SMC), in most cells of the mature embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS), and in glial cells of the PNS and the central nervous system (CNS). Embryos homozygote for amorphic alleles die, but show no obvious defects in their cuticle, PNS or CNS. The gene has been named couch potato (cpo) because several insertional alleles alter adult behavior. Homozygous hypomorphic cpo flies recover slowly from ether anaesthesia, show aberrant flight behavior, fail to move toward light and do not exhibit normal negative geotactic behavior. However, the flies are able to groom and walk, and some are able to fly when prodded, indicating that not all processes required for behavior are severely affected. A molecular analysis shows that the 14 insertions are confined to a few hundred nucleotides which probably contain key regulatory sequences of the gene. The orientation of these insertions and their position within this DNA fragment play an important role in the couch potato phenotype. In situ hybridization to whole mount embryos suggest that some insertions affect the levels of transcription of cpo in most cells in which it is expressed. PMID:1644278

  4. Preservation of normal lung regions in the adult respiratory distress syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Maunder, R.J.; Shuman, W.P.; McHugh, J.W.; Marglin, S.I.; Butler, J.

    1986-05-09

    In this report, the authors challenge the commonly held assumption that the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a homogeneous process associated with generalized and relatively uniform damage to the alveolar capillary membrane. They studied 13 patients with ARDS, comparing the pulmonary parenchymal changes seen by standard bedside chest roentgenograms with those seen by computed tomography of the chest. Three patients demonstrated generalized lung involvement by both radiologic techniques. In another eight patients, despite the appearance of generalized involvement on the standard chest x-ray film, the computed tomographic scans showed patchy infiltrates interspersed with areas of normal-appearing lung. Two patients showed patchy involvement by both techniques. The fact that ARDS spares some regions of lung parenchyma is useful knowledge in understanding the gas-exchange abnormalities of ARDS, the variable responsiveness to positive end-expiratory pressure, and the occurrence of oxygen toxicity. The problem of regional inhomogeneity should also be kept in mind when interpreting lung biopsy specimens or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in patients with ARDS.

  5. Greater cortical thinning in normal older adults predicts later cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Jennifer; Goh, Joshua O; Kraut, Michael A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Resnick, Susan M

    2015-02-01

    Cross-sectional studies have shown regional differences in cortical thickness between healthy older adults and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We now demonstrate that participants who subsequently develop cognitive impairment leading to a diagnosis of MCI or AD (n = 25) experience greater cortical thinning in specific neuroanatomic regions compared with control participants who remained cognitively normal (n = 96). Based on 8 years of annual magnetic resonance imaging scans beginning an average of 11 years before onset of cognitive impairment, participants who developed cognitive impairment subsequent to the scanning period had greater longitudinal cortical thinning in the temporal poles and left medial temporal lobe compared with controls. No significant regional cortical thickness differences were found at baseline between the 2 study groups indicating that we are capturing a critical time when brain changes occur before behavioral manifestations of impairment are detectable. Our findings suggest that early events of the pathway that leads to cognitive impairment may involve the temporal lobe and that this increased atrophy could be considered an early biomarker of neurodegeneration predictive of cognitive impairment years later. PMID:25311277

  6. Searching for sources of variance in speech recognition: Young adults with normal hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Charles S.; Kidd, Gary R.

    2005-04-01

    In the present investigation, sensory-perceptual abilities of one thousand young adults with normal hearing are being evaluated with a range of auditory, visual, and cognitive measures. Four auditory measures were derived from factor-analytic analyses of previous studies with 18-20 speech and non-speech variables [G. R. Kidd et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 2641 (2000)]. Two measures of visual acuity are obtained to determine whether variation in sensory skills tends to exist primarily within or across sensory modalities. A working memory test, grade point average, and Scholastic Aptitude Test scores (Verbal and Quantitative) are also included. Preliminary multivariate analyses support previous studies of individual differences in auditory abilities (e.g., A. M. Surprenant and C. S. Watson, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 2085-2095 (2001)] which found that spectral and temporal resolving power obtained with pure tones and more complex unfamiliar stimuli have little or no correlation with measures of speech recognition under difficult listening conditions. The current findings show that visual acuity, working memory, and intellectual measures are also very poor predictors of speech recognition ability, supporting the independence of this processing skill. Remarkable performance by some exceptional listeners will be described. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research, Award No. N000140310644.

  7. Age-Related Gene Expression Differences in Monocytes from Human Neonates, Young Adults, and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Lissner, Michelle M; Thomas, Brandon J; Wee, Kathleen; Tong, Ann-Jay; Kollmann, Tobias R; Smale, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    A variety of age-related differences in the innate and adaptive immune systems have been proposed to contribute to the increased susceptibility to infection of human neonates and older adults. The emergence of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provides an opportunity to obtain an unbiased, comprehensive, and quantitative view of gene expression differences in defined cell types from different age groups. An examination of ex vivo human monocyte responses to lipopolysaccharide stimulation or Listeria monocytogenes infection by RNA-seq revealed extensive similarities between neonates, young adults, and older adults, with an unexpectedly small number of genes exhibiting statistically significant age-dependent differences. By examining the differentially induced genes in the context of transcription factor binding motifs and RNA-seq data sets from mutant mouse strains, a previously described deficiency in interferon response factor-3 activity could be implicated in most of the differences between newborns and young adults. Contrary to these observations, older adults exhibited elevated expression of inflammatory genes at baseline, yet the responses following stimulation correlated more closely with those observed in younger adults. Notably, major differences in the expression of constitutively expressed genes were not observed, suggesting that the age-related differences are driven by environmental influences rather than cell-autonomous differences in monocyte development. PMID:26147648

  8. Distribution of chloride permeabilities in normal human red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Raftos, J E; Bookchin, R M; Lew, V L

    1996-01-01

    1. The rate of dehydration of K+ permeabilized red cells is influenced by their Cl- permeability (PCl). In instances of pathological K+ permeabilization, cell-to-cell differences in PCl may determine which red cells dehydrate most. The present study was designed to investigate whether PCl differed significantly among red cells from a single blood sample. 2. Previously available methods measure only the mean PCl of red cell populations. We describe a 'profile migration' method in which dilute red cell suspensions in low-K+ media were permeabilized to K+ with a high concentration of valinomycin, rendering PCl the main rate-limiting factor for cell dehydration. As the cells dehydrated, samples were processed to obtain full haemolysis curves at precise times. Variations in PCl among cells would have appeared as progressive changes in the profile of their haemolysis curves, as the curves migrated towards lower tonicities. 3. Red cells from five normal volunteers showed no change in profile of the migrating haemolysis curves, suggesting that their PCl distributions were fairly uniform. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that intercell variation in PCl was less than 7.5%. 4. Results obtained with this technique were analysed using the Lew-Bookchin red cell model. The calculated PCl was within the normal range described in earlier studies. PMID:8815210

  9. Characterizing adult human nasal airway dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Guilmette, R.A.; Griffith, W.C.

    1994-11-01

    Respiratory tract models used in calculating radiation dose from exposure to inhaled radioactive aerosols have only recently focused attention on the importance of the nasal airways (NAs). Because the NAs are the first tissues of the respiratory tract available for aerosol deposition in normally nose-breathing people, any deposition of aerosol in this anatomical structure will reduce the amounts available to be deposited in the remainder of the respiratory tract. Thus, uncertainties in estimating the deposition fractions in the NAs will propagate throughout the remainder of the respiratory tract, creating errors in the calculated dose estimates. Additionally, there is evidence that the NAs are also at risk for induction of cancer from exposure to certain occupational aerosols such as wood dust, leather dust, chromium, and nickel. The purpose of this investigation was to conduct an anatomical study to assess the variabilities in NA dimensions.

  10. Human papilloma virus DNAs immortalize normal human mammary epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Band, V.; Zajchowski, D.; Kulesa, V.; Sager, R. )

    1990-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are most commonly associated with cervical carcinoma in patients and induce immortalization of human keratinocytes in culture. HPV has not been associated with breast cancer. This report describes the immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (76N) by plasmid pHPV18 or pHPV16, each containing the linearized viral genome. Transfectants were grown continuously for more than 60 passages, whereas 76N cells senesce after 18-20 passages. The transfectants also differ from 76N cells in cloning in a completely defined medium called D2 and growing a minimally supplemented defined medium (D3) containing epidermal growth factor. All transfectant tested contain integrated HPV DNA, express HPV RNA, and produce HPV E7 protein. HPV transfectants do not form tumors in a nude mouse assay. It is concluded that products of the HPV genome induce immortalization of human breast epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements. This result raises the possibility that HPV might be involved in breast cancer. Furthermore, other tissue-specific primary epithelial cells that are presently difficult to grown and investigate may also be immortalized by HPV.

  11. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26890418

  12. Dendritic cells in humans--from fetus to adult.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Naomi; Chan, Jerry K Y; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-02-01

    The human immune system evolves continuously during development from the embryo into the adult, reflecting the ever-changing environment and demands of our body. This ability of our immune system to sense external cues and adapt as we develop is just as important in the early tolerogenic environment of the fetus, as it is in the constantly pathogen-challenged adult. Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen-sensing and antigen-presenting components of the immune system, play a crucial role in this process where they act as sentinels, both initiating and regulating immune responses. Here, we provide an overview of the human immune system in the developing fetus and the adult, with a focus on DC ontogeny and function during these discrete but intimately linked life stages. PMID:25323843

  13. A normal cumulative conception rate after human pituitary gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Healy, D L; Kovacs, G T; Pepperell, R J; Burger, H G

    1980-10-01

    Forty consecutive women were treated with human pituitary gonadotropin to induce ovulation. Thirty-seven patients (93%) ovulated and thirty (75%) conceived on at least one occasion. The cumulative conception rate for the series equaled that of the general population. Women with a past history of anorexia nervosa had the shortest average time to pregnancy. Of patients who did not conceive, four represented failures of patient selection in that they withdrew from treatment for a variety of psychiatric and social reasons, and six represented failures of treatment, not becoming pregnant despite the induction of ovulation. It is concluded that realistic goals for a contemporary human gonadotropin program include induction of ovulation in all patients and a cumulative conception rate equal to that of the general community. PMID:6252067

  14. Specific binding of beta-endorphin to normal human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chenet, B.; Hollis, V. Jr.; Kang, Y.; Simpkins, C.

    1986-03-05

    Beta-endorphin (BE) exhibits peripheral functions which may not be mediated by interactions with receptors in the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated binding of BE to both opioid and non-opioid receptors on lymphocytes and monocytes. Abood has reported specific binding of /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine in erythrocytes. Using 5 x 10/sup -11/M /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and 10/sup -5/M unlabeled BE, they have detected 50% specific binding to human erythrocytes. This finding is supported by results from immunoelectron microscopy using rabbit anti-BE antibody and biotinylated secondary antibody with avidin-biotin complexes horseradish peroxidase. Binding is clearly observed and is confined to only one side of the cells. Conclusions: (1) BE binding to human erythrocytes was demonstrated by radioreceptor assay and immunoelectron microscopy, and (2) BE binding sites exist on only one side of the cells.

  15. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  16. The adult human brain harbors multipotent perivascular mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gesine; Özen, Ilknur; Christophersen, Nicolaj S; Reinbothe, Thomas; Bengzon, Johan; Visse, Edward; Jansson, Katarina; Dannaeus, Karin; Henriques-Oliveira, Catarina; Roybon, Laurent; Anisimov, Sergey V; Renström, Erik; Svensson, Mikael; Haegerstrand, Anders; Brundin, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Blood vessels and adjacent cells form perivascular stem cell niches in adult tissues. In this perivascular niche, a stem cell with mesenchymal characteristics was recently identified in some adult somatic tissues. These cells are pericytes that line the microvasculature, express mesenchymal markers and differentiate into mesodermal lineages but might even have the capacity to generate tissue-specific cell types. Here, we isolated, purified and characterized a previously unrecognized progenitor population from two different regions in the adult human brain, the ventricular wall and the neocortex. We show that these cells co-express markers for mesenchymal stem cells and pericytes in vivo and in vitro, but do not express glial, neuronal progenitor, hematopoietic, endothelial or microglial markers in their native state. Furthermore, we demonstrate at a clonal level that these progenitors have true multilineage potential towards both, the mesodermal and neuroectodermal phenotype. They can be epigenetically induced in vitro into adipocytes, chondroblasts and osteoblasts but also into glial cells and immature neurons. This progenitor population exhibits long-term proliferation, karyotype stability and retention of phenotype and multipotency following extensive propagation. Thus, we provide evidence that the vascular niche in the adult human brain harbors a novel progenitor with multilineage capacity that appears to represent mesenchymal stem cells and is different from any previously described human neural stem cell. Future studies will elucidate whether these cells may play a role for disease or may represent a reservoir that can be exploited in efforts to repair the diseased human brain. PMID:22523602

  17. Human Service Planning as a Collective Adult Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Joan

    Based on a study by the Department of Community Service Education, Cornell University, to evaluate human service planning (HSP) nationwide, this paper discusses the premises that HSP may be defined as community learning and that the community (according to the Robert Boyd and Jerold Apps model for adult education) is both a beneficiary of and…

  18. The effects of familiarity and complexity on appraisal of complex songs by cochlear implant recipients and normal hearing adults.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, Kate; Christ, Aaron; Knutson, John; Witt, Shelley; Mehr, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (a) to develop a test of complex song appraisal that would be suitable for use with adults who use a cochlear implant (assistive hearing device) and (b) to compare the appraisal ratings (liking) of complex songs by adults who use cochlear implants (n = 66) with a comparison group of adults with normal hearing (n = 36). The article describes the development of a computerized test for appraisal, with emphasis on its theoretical basis and the process for item selection of naturalistic stimuli. The appraisal test was administered to the 2 groups to determine the effects of prior song familiarity and subjective complexity on complex song appraisal. Comparison of the 2 groups indicates that the implant users rate 2 of 3 musical genres (country western, pop) as significantly more complex than do normal hearing adults, and give significantly less positive ratings to classical music than do normal hearing adults. Appraisal responses of implant recipients were examined in relation to hearing history, age, performance on speech perception and cognitive tests, and musical background. PMID:14505444

  19. [The existence vomeronasal organ in adult humans].

    PubMed

    Rapiejko, Piotr; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Wojdas, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Jan; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2007-01-01

    The influence of chemical substances (feromones) on human emotional and physical condition has fascinated psychologists, sexuologists and laryngologists since centurie. Literature conveys inconsistent information on vomeronasal organ (VNO) occurrence in humans. This organ is often called Jacobson's, and 2 symmetrical openings leading into it, located on both sides of septum, are called Ruyasch's ducts. The aim of the study was to analyze vomeronasal organ occurrence in humans in relation to age and sex. The study was conducted in a group of 634 patients, aged 18-80 years. All patients underwent routine ENT examination including rhinoscopy, nasal cavity examination with usage of 2.5x magnification lens (surgical glasses) and surgical microscope with 10x magnification. All persons had nasal cavities examined endoscopically. Every time presence of vomeronasal organ openings, along with localization, size and symmetry of these was noted. Subjects, who presented Jacobson's organ, were asked to fill a questionnaire concerning influence of smells on erotic sensations. Vomeronasal organ was fund in 312 persons, that is 49.21%. In 83.65% of cases vomeronasal organ opening size was smaller than 0.2 mm, what restricted its visibility to usage of magnifying lens, microscope, or endoscope. In 16.34% of cases only vomeronasal organ ducts openings were well visible in routine rhinoscopy without magnification. Vomeronasal organ was found more often in men than women. VNO was significantly more rare in patients with nasal septal deviation. In these cases, vomeronasal organ was usually found unilaterally, in all the cases on the concave side of deviated nasal septum. PMID:18260256

  20. Neurophysiological model of the normal and abnormal human pupil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenz, W.; Robin, M.; Barez, S.; Stark, L.

    1985-01-01

    Anatomical, experimental, and computer simulation studies were used to determine the structure of the neurophysiological model of the pupil size control system. The computer simulation of this model demonstrates the role played by each of the elements in the neurological pathways influencing the size of the pupil. Simulations of the effect of drugs and common abnormalities in the system help to illustrate the workings of the pathways and processes involved. The simulation program allows the user to select pupil condition (normal or an abnormality), specific site along the neurological pathway (retina, hypothalamus, etc.) drug class input (barbiturate, narcotic, etc.), stimulus/response mode, display mode, stimulus type and input waveform, stimulus or background intensity and frequency, the input and output conditions, and the response at the neuroanatomical site. The model can be used as a teaching aid or as a tool for testing hypotheses regarding the system.

  1. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.

  2. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-raymore » fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.« less

  3. Mineral Density Volume Gradients in Normal and Diseased Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations. PMID:25856386

  4. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues.

    PubMed

    Djomehri, Sabra I; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S H; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P

    2015-01-01

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095 mg/cc, bone: 570-1415 mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340 mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590 mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220 mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450 mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740 mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770 mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations. PMID:25856386

  5. Inter-ocular contrast normalization in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Farshad; Heeger, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The brain combines visual information from the two eyes and forms a coherent percept, even when inputs to the eyes are different. However, it is not clear how inputs from the two eyes are combined in visual cortex. We measured fMRI responses to single gratings presented monocularly, or pairs of gratings presented monocularly or dichoptically with several combinations of contrasts. Gratings had either the same orientation or orthogonal orientations (i.e., plaids). Observers performed a demanding task at fixation to minimize top-down modulation of the stimulus-evoked responses. Dichoptic presentation of compatible gratings (same orientation) evoked greater activity than monocular presentation of a single grating only when contrast was low (<10%). A model that assumes linear summation of activity from each eye failed to explain binocular responses at 10% contrast or higher. However, a model with binocular contrast normalization, such that activity from each eye reduced the gain for the other eye, fitted the results very well. Dichoptic presentation of orthogonal gratings evoked greater activity than monocular presentation of a single grating for all contrasts. However, activity evoked by dichoptic plaids was equal to that evoked by monocular plaids. Introducing an onset asynchrony (stimulating one eye 500 ms before the other, which under attentive vision results in flash suppression) had no impact on the results; the responses to dichoptic and monocular plaids were again equal. We conclude that when attention is diverted, inter-ocular suppression in V1 can be explained by a normalization model in which the mutual suppression between orthogonal orientations does not depend on the eye of origin, nor on the onset times, and cross-orientation suppression is weaker than inter-ocular (same orientation) suppression. PMID:19757952

  6. Quantitation of small intestinal permeability during normal human drug absorption

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the quantitative relationship between a drug’s physical chemical properties and its rate of intestinal absorption (QSAR) is critical for selecting candidate drugs. Because of limited experimental human small intestinal permeability data, approximate surrogates such as the fraction absorbed or Caco-2 permeability are used, both of which have limitations. Methods Given the blood concentration following an oral and intravenous dose, the time course of intestinal absorption in humans was determined by deconvolution and related to the intestinal permeability by the use of a new 3 parameter model function (“Averaged Model” (AM)). The theoretical validity of this AM model was evaluated by comparing it to the standard diffusion-convection model (DC). This analysis was applied to 90 drugs using previously published data. Only drugs that were administered in oral solution form to fasting subjects were considered so that the rate of gastric emptying was approximately known. All the calculations are carried out using the freely available routine PKQuest Java (http://www.pkquest.com) which has an easy to use, simple interface. Results Theoretically, the AM permeability provides an accurate estimate of the intestinal DC permeability for solutes whose absorption ranges from 1% to 99%. The experimental human AM permeabilities determined by deconvolution are similar to those determined by direct human jejunal perfusion. The small intestinal pH varies with position and the results are interpreted in terms of the pH dependent octanol partition. The permeability versus partition relations are presented separately for the uncharged, basic, acidic and charged solutes. The small uncharged solutes caffeine, acetaminophen and antipyrine have very high permeabilities (about 20 x 10-4 cm/sec) corresponding to an unstirred layer of only 45 μm. The weak acid aspirin also has a large AM permeability despite its low octanol partition at pH 7.4, suggesting

  7. Does Silent Reading Speed in Normal Adult Readers Depend on Early Visual Processes? Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korinth, Sebastian Peter; Sommer, Werner; Breznitz, Zvia

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship of reading speed and early visual processes in normal readers. Here we examined the association of the early P1, N170 and late N1 component in visual event-related potentials (ERPs) with silent reading speed and a number of additional cognitive skills in a sample of 52 adult German readers utilizing a Lexical…

  8. Digital music exposure reliably induces temporary threshold shift (TTS) in normal hearing human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, C. G.; Dell, S.; Hensley, B.; Hall, J. W.; Campbell, K. C. M.; Antonelli, P. J.; Green, G. E.; Miller, J. M.; Guire, K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives One of the challenges for evaluating new otoprotective agents for potential benefit in human populations is availability of an established clinical paradigm with real world relevance. These studies were explicitly designed to develop a real-world digital music exposure that reliably induces temporary threshold shift (TTS) in normal hearing human subjects. Design Thirty-three subjects participated in studies that measured effects of digital music player use on hearing. Subjects selected either rock or pop music, which was then presented at 93–95 (n=10), 98–100 (n=11), or 100–102 (n=12) dBA in-ear exposure level for a period of four hours. Audiograms and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were measured prior to and after music exposure. Post-music tests were initiated 15 min, 1 hr 15 min, 2 hr 15 min, and 3 hr 15 min after the exposure ended. Additional tests were conducted the following day and one week later. Results Changes in thresholds after the lowest level exposure were difficult to distinguish from test-retest variability; however, TTS was reliably detected after higher levels of sound exposure. Changes in audiometric thresholds had a “notch” configuration, with the largest changes observed at 4 kHz (mean=6.3±3.9dB; range=0–13 dB). Recovery was largely complete within the first 4 hours post-exposure, and all subjects showed complete recovery of both thresholds and DPOAE measures when tested 1-week post-exposure. Conclusions These data provide insight into the variability of TTS induced by music player use in a healthy, normal-hearing, young adult population, with music playlist, level, and duration carefully controlled. These data confirm the likelihood of temporary changes in auditory function following digital music player use. Such data are essential for the development of a human clinical trial protocol that provides a highly powered design for evaluating novel therapeutics in human clinical trials. Care must be

  9. A controlled trial of reduced meal frequency without caloric restriction in healthy, normal-weight, middle-aged adults123

    PubMed Central

    Stote, Kim S; Baer, David J; Spears, Karen; Paul, David R; Harris, G Keith; Rumpler, William V; Strycula, Pilar; Najjar, Samer S; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ingram, Donald K; Longo, Dan L; Mattson, Mark P

    2009-01-01

    Background Although consumption of 3 meals/d is the most common pattern of eating in industrialized countries, a scientific rationale for this meal frequency with respect to optimal health is lacking. A diet with less meal frequency can improve the health and extend the lifespan of laboratory animals, but its effect on humans has never been tested. Objective A pilot study was conducted to establish the effects of a reduced-meal-frequency diet on health indicators in healthy, normal-weight adults. Design The study was a randomized crossover design with two 8-wk treatment periods. During the treatment periods, subjects consumed all of the calories needed for weight maintenance in either 3 meals/d or 1 meal/d. Results Subjects who completed the study maintained their body weight within 2 kg of their initial weight throughout the 6-mo period. There were no significant effects of meal frequency on heart rate, body temperature, or most of the blood variables measured. However, when consuming 1 meal/d, subjects had a significant increase in hunger; a significant modification of body composition, including reductions in fat mass; significant increases in blood pressure and in total, LDL-, and HDL-cholesterol concentrations; and a significant decrease in concentrations of cortisol. Conclusions Normal-weight subjects are able to comply with a 1 meal/d diet. When meal frequency is decreased without a reduction in overall calorie intake, modest changes occur in body composition, some cardiovascular disease risk factors, and hematologic variables. Diurnal variations may affect outcomes. PMID:17413096

  10. Functional mapping of sequence learning in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Grafton, S T; Hazeltine, E; Ivry, R

    1995-01-01

    The brain localization of motor sequence learning was studied in normal subjects with positron emission tomography. Subjects performed a serial reaction time (SRT) task by responding to a series of stimuli that occurred at four different spatial positions. The stimulus locations were either determined randomly or according to a 6-element sequence that cycled continuously. The SRT task was performed under two conditions. With attentional interference from a secondary counting task there was no development of awareness of the sequence. Learning-related increases of cerebral blood flow were located in contralateral motor effector areas including motor cortex, supplementary motor area, and putamen, consistent with the hypothesis that nondeclarative motor learning occurs in cerebral areas that control limb movements. Additional cortical sites included the rostral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex. The SRT learning task was then repeated with a new sequence and no attentional interference. In this condition, 7 of 12 subjects developed awareness of the sequence. Learning-related blood flow increases were present in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right premotor cortex, right ventral putamen, and biparieto-occipital cortex. The right dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal areas have been previously implicated in spatial working memory and right prefrontal cortex is also implicated in retrieval tasks of verbal episodic memory. Awareness of the sequence at the end of learning was associated with greater activity in bilateral parietal, superior temporal, and right premotor cortex. Motor learning can take place in different cerebral areas, contingent on the attentional demands of the task. PMID:23961907

  11. Expression of K+ channels in normal and cancerous human breast.

    PubMed

    Brevet, Marie; Ahidouch, Ahmed; Sevestre, Henri; Merviel, Philippe; El Hiani, Yassine; Robbe, Micheline; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima

    2008-08-01

    Potassium (K+) channels contribute to the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis and are also involved in tumor generation and malignant growth. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we investigated the expression of four K+ channels GIRK1 (G-Protein Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel 1), Ca2+-activated K channel (K Ca 1.1), voltage activated K+ channels (KV 1.1 and KV 1.3) and of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 in normal and cancerous breast tissues and compared their expression with clinicopathological data. GIRK1 was overexpressed in carcinomatous tissues. In contrast, K V 1.1 and K V 1.3 were less expressed in cancerous tissue. The expression of Bcl-2 was similar in both tissues. As to the clinicopathological data, a correlation between K Ca 1.1 channel and estrogen receptor (ER) expression was observed. GIRK1 was overexpressed in breast carcinoma suggesting its involvement in proliferation and oncogenesis and its possible use as a putative pharmaceutical target. The correlation between K Ca 1.1 channel and ER suggests the involvement of this channel in proliferation. The loss of expression of the two channels K V 1.1 and K V 1.3 may correspond to their role in apoptosis. PMID:18498071

  12. Commonality versus specificity among adiposity traits in normal-weight and moderately overweight adults

    PubMed Central

    Raja, GK; Sarzynski, MA; Katzmarzyk, PT; Johnson, WD; Tchoukalova, Y; Smith, SR; Bouchard, C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many adiposity traits have been related to health complications and premature death. These adiposity traits are intercorrelated but their underlying structure has not been extensively investigated. We report on the degree of commonality and specificity among multiple adiposity traits in normal-weight and moderately overweight adult males and females (mean body mass index (BMI) = 22.9 kg m−2, s.d. = 2.4). METHODS A total of 75 healthy participants were assessed for a panel of adiposity traits including leg, arm, trunk, total fat masses and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) derived from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), hepatic and muscle lipids from proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, fat cell volume from an abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsy (n = 36) and conventional anthropometry (BMI and waist girth). Spearman’s correlations were calculated and were subjected to factor analysis. RESULTS Arm, leg, trunk and total fat masses correlated positively (r = 0.78–0.95) with each other. VAT correlated weakly with fat mass indicators (r = 0.24–0.31). Intrahepatic lipids (IHL) correlated weakly with all fat mass traits (r = 0.09–0.34), whereas correlations between DXA depots and intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) were inconsequential. The four DXA fat mass measures, VAT, IHL and IMCL depots segregated as four independent factors that accounted for 96% of the overall adiposity variance. BMI and waist girth were moderately correlated with the arm, leg, trunk and total fat and weakly with VAT, IHL and IMCL. CONCLUSION Adiposity traits share a substantial degree of commonality, but there is considerable specificity across the adiposity variance space. For instance, VAT, IHL and IMCL are typically poorly correlated with each other and are poorly to weakly associated with the other adiposity traits. The same is true for BMI and waist girth, commonly used anthropometric indicators of adiposity. These results do not support the view that it will be

  13. Levodopa: faster and better word learning in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Stefan; Breitenstein, Caterina; Bushuven, Stefan; Wailke, Stefanie; Kamping, Sandra; Flöel, Agnes; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Ringelstein, E Bernd

    2004-07-01

    Dopamine is a potent modulator of learning and has been implicated in the encoding of stimulus salience. Repetition, however, as required for the acquisition and reacquisition of sensorimotor or cognitive skills (e.g., in aphasia therapy), decreases salience. We here tested whether increasing brain levels of dopamine during repetitive training improves learning success. Forty healthy humans took 100mg of the dopamine precursor levodopa or placebo daily for 5 days in a randomized double-blind and parallel-group design. Ninety minutes later on each day, subjects were trained on an artificial vocabulary using a high-frequency repetitive approach. Levodopa significantly enhanced the speed, overall success, and long-term retention of novel word learning in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicate new ways to potentiate learning in a variety of domains if conventional training alone fails. PMID:15236398

  14. Nonlinear time series analysis of normal and pathological human walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingwell, Jonathan B.; Cusumano, Joseph P.

    2000-12-01

    Characterizing locomotor dynamics is essential for understanding the neuromuscular control of locomotion. In particular, quantifying dynamic stability during walking is important for assessing people who have a greater risk of falling. However, traditional biomechanical methods of defining stability have not quantified the resistance of the neuromuscular system to perturbations, suggesting that more precise definitions are required. For the present study, average maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponents were estimated to quantify the local dynamic stability of human walking kinematics. Local scaling exponents, defined as the local slopes of the correlation sum curves, were also calculated to quantify the local scaling structure of each embedded time series. Comparisons were made between overground and motorized treadmill walking in young healthy subjects and between diabetic neuropathic (NP) patients and healthy controls (CO) during overground walking. A modification of the method of surrogate data was developed to examine the stochastic nature of the fluctuations overlying the nominally periodic patterns in these data sets. Results demonstrated that having subjects walk on a motorized treadmill artificially stabilized their natural locomotor kinematics by small but statistically significant amounts. Furthermore, a paradox previously present in the biomechanical literature that resulted from mistakenly equating variability with dynamic stability was resolved. By slowing their self-selected walking speeds, NP patients adopted more locally stable gait patterns, even though they simultaneously exhibited greater kinematic variability than CO subjects. Additionally, the loss of peripheral sensation in NP patients was associated with statistically significant differences in the local scaling structure of their walking kinematics at those length scales where it was anticipated that sensory feedback would play the greatest role. Lastly, stride-to-stride fluctuations in the

  15. Proteomic analysis of a podocyte vesicle-enriched fraction from human normal and pathological urine samples.

    PubMed

    Lescuyer, Pierre; Pernin, Agnès; Hainard, Alexandre; Bigeire, Caty; Burgess, Jennifer A; Zimmermann-Ivol, Catherine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Schifferli, Jürg A; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Moll, Solange

    2008-07-01

    Podocytes (glomerular visceral epithelial cells) release vesicles into urine. Podocyte vesicle-enriched fractions from normal and pathological human urine samples were prepared for proteomic analysis. An immunoadsorption method was applied and enrichment of podocyte vesicles was assessed. We identified 76 unique proteins. One protein, serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 (PON-1), was newly identified in normal human urine sample. We confirmed this result and showed PON-1 expression in normal human kidney. These results demonstrated the potential for using the urine samples enriched in podocyte vesicles as a starting material in studies aimed at discovery of biomarkers for diseases. PMID:21136901

  16. Immunohistochemical studies of neurochemical markers in normal human buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hilliges, M; Hellman, M; Ahlström, U; Johansson, O

    1994-04-01

    The content of various substances, such as regulatory peptides, hormones and structural proteins, was investigated in normal buccal mucosa using indirect immunofluorescence. Thin nerve fibres, which from a morphological point of view were most probably sensory, showed immunoreactivity for substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neuropeptide K (NPK) and neurokinin A (NKA). Also galanin (GAL), gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone (gamma-MSH) and somatostatin (SOM) stained thin fibres were found in the propria, which were, however, few in number and the gamma-MSH staining was weak. CGRP, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), peptide histidine isoleucine amide (PHI) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) immunoreactive nerve fibres were observed in close connection to blood vessels. SOM positive cells with processes were found, mostly scattered, in the connective tissue. A population of cells within the epithelium also showed somatostatin immunoreactivity. Protein S-100 (S-100) stained distinct populations of cells at two separate locations. In the propria, cells with one or two slender processes were seen, being mostly single but sometimes forming groups. In the epithelium, dendritic cells with many processes with or without 'spines' were observed, mainly located to the basal layer of the lamina epithelialis. Single nerve fibres and nerve bundles were also stained. Neurofilament (NF) positive fibres, singly and in bundles, as well as endorgan-like structures were seen. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) both stained the same structures, namely single fibres, nerve bundles, nerves surrounding vessels and innervating muscles and glands (if present in the section), as well as Merkel cells. Also with these two markers endorgan-like structures were seen. No clear innervation of the epithelium could be observed with the markers used. No methionine-enkephalin (ENK) or synaptophysin (SYN) immunoreactive material was found. PMID:7523335

  17. Met signaling in cardiomyocytes is required for normal cardiac function in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Arechederra, María; Carmona, Rita; González-Nuñez, María; Gutiérrez-Uzquiza, Alvaro; Bragado, Paloma; Cruz-González, Ignacio; Cano, Elena; Guerrero, Carmen; Sánchez, Aránzazu; López-Novoa, José Miguel; Schneider, Michael D; Maina, Flavio; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramón; Porras, Almudena

    2013-12-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor, Met, are key determinants of distinct developmental processes. Although HGF exerts cardio-protective effects in a number of cardiac pathologies, it remains unknown whether HGF/Met signaling is essential for myocardial development and/or physiological function in adulthood. We therefore investigated the requirement of HGF/Met signaling in cardiomyocyte for embryonic and postnatal heart development and function by conditional inactivation of the Met receptor in cardiomyocytes using the Cre-α-MHC mouse line (referred to as α-MHCMet-KO). Although α-MHCMet-KO mice showed normal heart development and were viable and fertile, by 6 months of age, males developed cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, associated with interstitial fibrosis. A significant upregulation in markers of myocardial damage, such as β-MHC and ANF, was also observed. By the age of 9 months, α-MHCMet-KO males displayed systolic cardiac dysfunction. Mechanistically, we provide evidence of a severe imbalance in the antioxidant defenses in α-MHCMet-KO hearts involving a reduced expression and activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase, with consequent reactive oxygen species accumulation. Similar anomalies were observed in females, although with a slower kinetics. We also found that Met signaling down-regulation leads to an increase in TGF-β production and a decrease in p38MAPK activation, which may contribute to phenotypic alterations displayed in α-MHCMet-KO mice. Consistently, we show that HGF acts through p38α to upregulate antioxidant enzymes in cardiomyocytes. Our results highlight that HGF/Met signaling in cardiomyocytes plays a physiological cardio-protective role in adult mice by acting as an endogenous regulator of heart function through oxidative stress control. PMID:23994610

  18. Effect of Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test on Bone Turnover Markers in Adults with Normal Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Shou-Kui; Wan, Jing-Bo; Jiang, Xiao-Hong; Zhu, Yong-Hua; Ma, Jin-Hong; Hua, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background It is well known that enteral nutrients result in acute suppression of bone turnover markers (BTMs), and incretin hormones are believed to play a significant role in this physiological skeletal response. However, there is limited research exploring the impact of parenteral nutrients on BTMs. Our aim was to assess the influence of intravenous glucose on BTMs in adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Material/Methods We conducted 1-h intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) in 24 subjects with NGT. Blood samples were collected before and 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60 min after administration of glucose, then serum levels of bone formation marker procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and resorption marker C-terminal cross-linking telopeptides of collagen type I (CTX) were measured. Results During IVGTT, the fasting CTX level fell gradually and reached a nadir of 80.4% of the basal value at 60 min. Conversely, the fasting P1NP level decreased mildly and reached a nadir of 90.6% of the basal value at 15 min, then gradually increased and reached 96.6% at 60 min. The CTX-to-P1NP ratio increased slightly and reached a peak of 104.3% of the basal value at 10 min, then fell gradually and reached a nadir of 83% at 60 min. Conclusions Our study indicates that intravenous glucose results in an acute suppression of BTMs in the absence of incretin hormones. The mechanism responsible for this needs further investigation. PMID:27447783

  19. Effect of Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test on Bone Turnover Markers in Adults with Normal Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shou-Kui; Wan, Jing-Bo; Jiang, Xiao-Hong; Zhu, Yong-Hua; Ma, Jin-Hong; Hua, Fei

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is well known that enteral nutrients result in acute suppression of bone turnover markers (BTMs), and incretin hormones are believed to play a significant role in this physiological skeletal response. However, there is limited research exploring the impact of parenteral nutrients on BTMs. Our aim was to assess the influence of intravenous glucose on BTMs in adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted 1-h intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) in 24 subjects with NGT. Blood samples were collected before and 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60 min after administration of glucose, then serum levels of bone formation marker procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and resorption marker C-terminal cross-linking telopeptides of collagen type I (CTX) were measured. RESULTS During IVGTT, the fasting CTX level fell gradually and reached a nadir of 80.4% of the basal value at 60 min. Conversely, the fasting P1NP level decreased mildly and reached a nadir of 90.6% of the basal value at 15 min, then gradually increased and reached 96.6% at 60 min. The CTX-to-P1NP ratio increased slightly and reached a peak of 104.3% of the basal value at 10 min, then fell gradually and reached a nadir of 83% at 60 min. CONCLUSIONS Our study indicates that intravenous glucose results in an acute suppression of BTMs in the absence of incretin hormones. The mechanism responsible for this needs further investigation. PMID:27447783

  20. Adult human sarcomas. II. Medical oncology.

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2007-02-01

    Human sarcoma cells can be killed by radio- and chemotherapy, but tumor cells acquiring resistance frequently kill the patient. A keen understanding of the intracellular course of oncogenic cascades leads to the discovery of small molecular inhibitors of the involved phosphorylated kinases. Targeted therapy complements chemotherapy. Oncogene silencing is feasible by small interfering RNA. The restoration of some of the mutated or deleted tumor-suppressor genes (p53, Rb, PTEN, hSNF, INK/ARF and WT) by demethylation or reacetylation of their histones has been accomplished. Genetically engineered or naturally oncolytic viruses selectively lyse tumors and leave healthy tissues intact. Adeno- or retroviral vectors deliver genes of immunological costimulators, tumor antigens, chemo- or cytokines and/or tumor-suppressor proteins into tumor (sarcoma) cells. Suicide gene delivery results in apoptosis induction. Genes of enzymes that target prodrugs as their substrates render tumor cells highly susceptible to chemotherapy, with the prodrug to be targeted intracellularly. It will be combinations of sophisticated surgical removal of the nonencapsulated and locally invasive primary sarcomas, advanced forms of radiotherapy to the involved sites and immunotherapy with sarcoma vaccines that will cure primary sarcomas. Adoptive immunotherapy with immune lymphocytes will be operational in metastatic disease only when populations of regulatory T cells are controlled. Targeted therapy with small molecular inhibitors of oncogene cascades, the driving forces of sarcoma cells, alteration of the tumor stroma from a supportive to a tumor-hostile environment, reactivation or replacement of wild-type tumor-suppressor genes, and radio-chemotherapy (with much reduced toxicity) will eventually accomplish the cure of metastatic sarcomas. PMID:17288529

  1. Heterogeneity of serum low density lipoproteins in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, M.M.S.; Krauss, R.M.; Lindgren, F.T.; Forte, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    Equilibrium density gradient ultracentrifugation of serum low density lipoprotein (LDL) from twelve healthy human subjects was used to separate six subfractions with mean dinsity ranging from 1.0268 to 1.0597 g/ml. Mean corrected peak flotation rate (S/sup o//sub f/) measured by analytic ultracentrifugation, and mean particle diameter determined by negative staining electron microscopy, both declined significantly with increasing density of the subfractions. Major differences in chemical composition of the subfractions were noted, including a singnificantly lower triglyceride content and higher ratio of cholesteryl ester to triglyceride in the middle fractions compared with those of highest and lowest density. Concentration of fraction 2 correlated positively with HDL (P < 0.01) and negatively with VLDL (P < 0.001); concentration of fraction 4 correlated negatively with HDL (P < 0.05) and positively with VLDL (P < 0.001) and IDL (P < 0.01). LDL may thus include subspecies of differing structure and composition which might also have different metabolic and atherogenic roles.

  2. Effects of digoxin on muscle reflexes in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Christophe; Lheureux, Olivier; Beloka, Sofia; Adamopoulos, Dionysios; Naeije, Robert; van de Borne, Philippe

    2009-11-01

    Blockade of the skeletal muscle Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pump by digoxin could result in a more marked hyperkaliema during a forearm exercise, which in turn could stimulate the mechano- and metaboreceptors. In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, and cross-over-design study, we measured mean blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), ventilation (V(E)), oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), venous plasma potassium and lactic acid during dynamic handgrip exercises, and local circulatory arrest in 11 healthy subjects. Digoxin enhanced MBP during exercise but not during the post-handgrip ischemia and had no effect on HR, V(E), SpO(2), and MSNA. Venous plasma potassium and lactic acid were also not affected by digoxin-induced skeletal muscle Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase blockade. We conclude that digoxin increased MBP during dynamic exercise in healthy humans, independently of changes in potassium and lactic acid. A modest direct sensitization of the muscle mechanoreceptors is unlikely and other mechanisms, independent of muscle reflexes and related to the inotropic effects of digoxin, might be implicated. PMID:19701647

  3. Low serum levels of vitamin B12 in older adults with normal nutritional status by mini nutritional assessment.

    PubMed

    Araújo, D A; Noronha, M B; Cunha, N A; Abrunhosa, S F; Rocha, A N; Amaral, T F

    2016-07-01

    Undernutrition as well as low levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid are common problems among older adults. However, recommended routine nutritional status assessment tools may result in inadequate vitamin serum levels to go unnoticed. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the inadequacy of serum levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid within Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) classification categories among older adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 97 older adults residing in care homes in Portugal. Undernutrition was identified through the MNA, and serum levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid were measured using chemiluminescence. Cognitive function, depressive symptoms and functional characteristics were also assessed using the Abbreviated Mental Test Score, the Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Barthel Index, respectively. The mean age of older adults was 82.2 (6.3) years; 3.1% were undernourished and 26.8% were at undernutrition risk. In the MNA normal nutritional status group, 11.8% presented vitamin B12 deficiency (<200 pg/ml), 32.4% had low serum levels (200-400 pg/ml) and 4.4% had folic acid deficiency (<3 ng/ml). A high proportion of older adults with low serum levels of vitamin B12 presenting normal nutritional status by MNA was identified. This finding emphasizes the need to evaluate serum vitamin B12 levels, independently of the MNA results. PMID:27004491

  4. Normal Glucagon Signaling and β-Cell Function After Near-Total α-Cell Ablation in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thorel, Fabrizio; Damond, Nicolas; Chera, Simona; Wiederkehr, Andreas; Thorens, Bernard; Meda, Paolo; Wollheim, Claes B.; Herrera, Pedro L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether healthy or diabetic adult mice can tolerate an extreme loss of pancreatic α-cells and how this sudden massive depletion affects β-cell function and blood glucose homeostasis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We generated a new transgenic model allowing near-total α-cell removal specifically in adult mice. Massive α-cell ablation was triggered in normally grown and healthy adult animals upon diphtheria toxin (DT) administration. The metabolic status of these mice was assessed in 1) physiologic conditions, 2) a situation requiring glucagon action, and 3) after β-cell loss. RESULTS Adult transgenic mice enduring extreme (98%) α-cell removal remained healthy and did not display major defects in insulin counter-regulatory response. We observed that 2% of the normal α-cell mass produced enough glucagon to ensure near-normal glucagonemia. β-Cell function and blood glucose homeostasis remained unaltered after α-cell loss, indicating that direct local intraislet signaling between α- and β-cells is dispensable. Escaping α-cells increased their glucagon content during subsequent months, but there was no significant α-cell regeneration. Near-total α-cell ablation did not prevent hyperglycemia in mice having also undergone massive β-cell loss, indicating that a minimal amount of α-cells can still guarantee normal glucagon signaling in diabetic conditions. CONCLUSIONS An extremely low amount of α-cells is sufficient to prevent a major counter-regulatory deregulation, both under physiologic and diabetic conditions. We previously reported that α-cells reprogram to insulin production after extreme β-cell loss and now conjecture that the low α-cell requirement could be exploited in future diabetic therapies aimed at regenerating β-cells by reprogramming adult α-cells. PMID:21926270

  5. Perivascular mesenchymal progenitors in human fetal and adult liver.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Jörg C; Over, Patrick; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Foka, Hubert G; Chen, William C W; Péault, Bruno; Gridelli, Bruno; Schmelzer, Eva

    2012-12-10

    The presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been described in various organs. Pericytes possess a multilineage differentiation potential and have been suggested to be one of the developmental sources for MSCs. In human liver, pericytes have not been defined. Here, we describe the identification, purification, and characterization of pericytes in human adult and fetal liver. Flow cytometry sorting revealed that human adult and fetal liver contains 0.56%±0.81% and 0.45%±0.39% of CD146(+)CD45(-)CD56(-)CD34(-) pericytes, respectively. Of these, 41% (adult) and 30% (fetal) were alkaline phosphatase-positive (ALP(+)). In situ, pericytes were localized around periportal blood vessels and were positive for NG2 and vimentin. Purified pericytes could be cultured extensively and had low population doubling times. Immunofluorescence of cultures demonstrated that cells were positive for pericyte and mesenchymal cell markers CD146, NG2, CD90, CD140b, and vimentin, and negative for endothelial, hematopoietic, stellate, muscle, or liver epithelial cell markers von Willebrand factor, CD31, CD34, CD45, CD144, CD326, CK19, albumin, α-fetoprotein, CYP3A7, glial fibrillary acid protein, MYF5, and Pax7 by gene expression; myogenin and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression were variable. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of cultures confirmed surface expression of CD146, CD73, CD90, CD10, CD13, CD44, CD105, and ALP and absence of human leukocyte antigen-DR. In vitro differentiation assays demonstrated that cells possessed robust osteogenic and myogenic, but low adipogenic and low chondrogenic differentiation potentials. In functional in vitro assays, cells had typical mesenchymal strong migratory and invasive activity. In conclusion, human adult and fetal livers harbor pericytes that are similar to those found in other organs and are distinct from hepatic stellate cells. PMID:22931482

  6. Do Adults with Cochlear Implants Rely on Different Acoustic Cues for Phoneme Perception than Adults with Normal Hearing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moberly, Aaron C.; Lowenstein, Joanna H.; Tarr, Eric; Caldwell-Tarr, Amanda; Welling, D. Bradley; Shahin, Antoine J.; Nittrouer, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Several acoustic cues specify any single phonemic contrast. Nonetheless, adult, native speakers of a language share weighting strategies, showing preferential attention to some properties over others. Cochlear implant (CI) signal processing disrupts the salience of some cues: In general, amplitude structure remains readily available, but…

  7. INTERACTION BETWEEN NORMAL HUMAN DIPLOID CELLS AND CHEMICAL CARCINOGENS/MUTAGENS 'IN VITRO'

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of the present studies were to develop sensitive, reproducible methods for detecting mutations in normal human fibroblast cells and to demonstrate dose-related mutagenesis by known and potential carcinogens. The authors have modified conventional test procedures fo...

  8. Wnt inhibitory factor (WIF)-1 promotes melanogenesis in normal human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Jun; Kim, Misun; Kim, Hyeran; Park, Sun Yi; Park, Kyoung-Chan; Ortonne, Jean-Paul; Kang, Hee Young

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays a role in the differentiation as well as the development of melanocytes. Using a microarray analysis, hyperpigmentary skin of melasma expressed high levels of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) compared with perilesional normal skin. In this study, the expression and functional roles of WIF-1 on melanocytes were investigated. WIF-1 was expressed both in the melanocytes of normal human skin and in cultured melanocytes. The upregulation of WIF-1 on cultured normal human melanocytes significantly induced expressions of MITF and tyrosinase, which were associated with increased melanin content and tyrosinase activity. Consistent with the stimulatory effect of WIF-1, WIF-1 siRNA reduced melanogenesis in the cells. Moreover, WIF-1 increases pigmentation in melanocytes co-cultured with WIF-1-overexpressed fibroblasts and of organ-cultured human skin. These findings suggest that melanocytes express WIF-1 constitutively in vivo and in vitro and that WIF-1 promotes melanogenesis in normal human melanocytes. PMID:24131586

  9. Associations Between Abnormal Rod-Mediated Dark Adaptation and Health and Functioning in Older Adults With Normal Macular Health

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; Huisingh, Carrie; Jackson, Gregory R.; Curcio, Christine A.; Szalai, Alexander J.; Dashti, Nassrin; Clark, Mark; Rookard, Kia; McCrory, Mark A.; Wright, Tyler T.; Callahan, Michael A.; Kline, Lanning B.; Witherspoon, C. Douglas; McGwin, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Delayed rod-mediated dark adaptation (DA) is characteristic of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and also can be observed in some older adults in normal macular health. We examine cross-sectional associations between rod-mediated DA and risk factors for AMD in older adults in normal macular health. Methods. The sample consisted of adults aged ≥60 years old in normal macular health per grading of fundus photos using an established disease classification system. Rod-mediated DA was measured psychophysically following a photobleach using a computer-automated dark adaptometer with targets centered at 5° on the inferior vertical meridian. The speed of DA was characterized by the rod-intercept value, with abnormal DA defined as rod-intercept ≥ 12.3 minutes. We assessed several health and functional characteristics that the literature has suggested increase AMD risk (e.g., smoking, alcohol use, inflammatory markers, apolipoproteins, low luminance visual acuity, chronic medical conditions, body mass, family history). Results. Among 381 participants (mean age, 68.5 years; SD, 5.5), 78% had normal and 22% had abnormal DA, with the prevalence of abnormal DA increasing with age. After age-adjustment, abnormal DA was associated with increased odds of elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), heavy use of or abstention from alcohol, high blood pressure, and drop in visual acuity under mesopic conditions. Conclusions. Despite having normal macular health according to accepted definitions of AMD presence, approximately one-quarter of older adults recruited from primary eye care clinics had abnormal DA, which was associated with known risk factors for AMD, including elevated CRP. PMID:24854857

  10. 14C-labeled substrate catabolism by human diploid fibroblasts derived from infants and adults

    SciTech Connect

    Rhead, W.J.; Moon, A.; Roettger, V.; Henkle, K.

    1985-10-01

    Untransformed diploid skin fibroblasts from eight normal adults, aged 24 to 74 years, catabolized several 14C-labeled substrates less effectively than cells from ten normal male infants. 14C-labeled substrate metabolism was quantitated either by measuring the evolution of 14CO2 from the 14C-labeled compounds or the incorporation of 14C into cellular protein via transamination of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates derived from the 14C-labeled substrates. With these methods, adult cells catabolized (1-14C)butyrate, (1-14C)octanoate, and 1-(2-14C)leucine at rates 44 to 64% of those found in infant cells. The oxidation of (1,4-14C)succinate and (U-14C)malate was identical in both infant and adult cells, while (2,3-14C)succinate catabolism was mildly decreased in adult cells (65-80% of control). These observations parallel those made in rat tissues and confirm that the same phenomenon occurs in cultured human fibroblasts.

  11. Normal for an Asperger: Notions of the Meanings of Diagnoses among Adults with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosqvist, Hanna Bertilsdotter

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the production of a counterhegemonic discourse of "autistic normalcy" among adults with high-functioning autism by analyzing notions of diagnosis. The discourse analyses are based on material from ethnographic fieldwork in a Swedish educational setting. Study participants were 3 male and 9 female adults who had been diagnosed…

  12. Indicated prevention of adult obesity: reference data for weight normalization in overweight children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Pediatric obesity is a major risk factor for adult obesity. Indicated prevention--that is, helping overweight or obese youth attain non-overweight status--has been suggested to prevent adult obesity. This study aimed to support the notion of indicated prevention by demonstrating that rel...

  13. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about…

  14. Cellular localization of type I III and IV procollagen gene transcripts in normal and fibrotic human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Milani, S.; Herbst, H.; Schuppan, D.; Surrenti, C.; Riecken, E. O.; Stein, H.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have determined the cell types producing alpha 1 (I), alpha 2 (I), alpha 1 (III), and alpha 1 (IV) procollagen gene transcripts in adult human liver by in situ hybridization with [35S]-labeled RNA probes. The liver specimens comprised a total of 20 biopsies with normal histology and biopsies with fibrosis or cirrhosis at different clinical stages and of heterogeneous origins. In normal liver, procollagen type I, III, and IV transcripts were detected in stromal and vascular mesenchymal cells of portal tracts and central veins, as well as in some perisinusoidal cells of the lobule. In fibrotic liver, increased levels of these procollagen mRNAs were observed in the same locations, and particularly enhanced in stromal cells of fibrotic septa and portal tracts, as well as in perisinusoidal cells. Expression of alpha 1 (IV) procollagen RNA was additionally found in some vascular endothelial and bile duct epithelial cells. Although previously suggested as the major source of liver collagens, hepatocytes showed no significant procollagen transcript levels in any of our samples. Thus, procollagen synthesis does not appear to be a function of hepatocytes, but rather of mesenchymal, endothelial, and bile duct epithelial cells in adult human liver. These findings may have implications for the development of specifically targeted antifibrotic therapies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2372043

  15. Ultrastructural characteristics of human adult and infant cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, W Y; Garey, L J

    1991-01-01

    Biopsy specimens of human cerebral cortex from three adults and two infants were studied by correlating their light microscopic features in semithin sections with their ultrastructural characteristics. There was good tissue preservation, due to a minimum delay between obtaining the specimens and fixation. Pyramidal cells had a prominent apical dendrite, fine heterochromatin clumps in the nucleus and generally small numbers of cytoplasmic organelles, except for numerous free ribosomes in some of the large pyramids of Layers III to VI. Non-pyramidal cells lacked an apical dendrite and were further classified, on size and ultrastructure, into small, medium and large types. Large numbers of asymmetrical and symmetrical synapses were present in the neuropil but very few axosomatic synapses were found in the human cerebral cortex compared with subhuman primates and other mammals. Some symmetrical synapses were characterised by the presence of wide pre- and postsynaptic densities. The same general features of the adult cortex were also encountered in the infant, with certain exceptions. Many of the infant neurons had less densely packed heterochromatin, but greater numbers of free ribosomes, compared with the adult, and lipofuscin was absent. There was a total absence of myelinated fibres from the infant cortex; more large diameter dendrites were present than in the adult and axosomatic synapses were commoner. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 PMID:2050578

  16. Splanchnic metabolism of dietary arginine in relation to nitric oxide synthesis in normal adult man.

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, L; deRojas, T C; Chapman, T E; Vogt, J; Burke, J F; Tannenbaum, S R; Young, V R

    1993-01-01

    Urinary nitrate (NO3) is the stable end product of nitric oxide, which is formed, in turn, from a guanidino nitrogen of arginine. We have conducted two experiments, each in four healthy adult men receiving a low nitrate diet for 7-10 days, to investigate the in vivo conversion of arginine to nitrate. In the first study [guanidino-15N2, 5,5-2H2]arginine was given on day 7 via a primed continuous intravenous infusion for 8 h. In the second study, the labeled arginine was given for 8 h by the intragastric route on day 7 and by the intravenous route on day 10. Measurement of 15NO3 output in urine collected for 24 h beginning at the time of the arginine tracer infusion revealed a more extensive transfer of 15N when the arginine tracer was given intragastricly. From the comparative labeling of 15NO3 after administration of the tracer arginine via the intragastric and intravenous routes, we estimate that 16% +/- 2% of the daily production of nitrate arises from the metabolism of dietary arginine that is taken up during its "first pass" in the splanchnic region. Hence, nitric oxide production occurs, to a measurable extent, in this area in healthy subjects, raising the question as to how various pathophysiological states might alter the relations between exogenous and endogenous sources of arginine as precursors of NO. and the relative contributions made by various organs to whole body (NO.) NO3 formation. These results also raise important questions about the use of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors in animal and human studies. PMID:8419922

  17. Beta-catenin is elevated in human benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens compared to histologically normal prostate tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Tyler M; Vezina, Chad M; Huang, Wei; Marker, Paul C; Peterson, Richard E; Ricke, William A

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is linked to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as incomplete bladder emptying, urinary frequency and urgency. Mechanisms responsible for BPH are not fully known. Here, we tested whether beta-catenin (CTNNB1) immunostaining intensity and distribution differ in human glandular BPH tissue specimens compared to normal prostate tissue. Multiplex immunostaining of CTNNB1, its putative transcriptional target gene lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (LEF1), and the epithelial marker E-cadherin were examined in clinical human prostate specimens with or without histological BPH (pure epithelial or mixed stromal-epithelial nodules). BPH specimens were obtained from 24 men who experienced LUTS and underwent transurethral resection of the prostate surgery. Control specimens were tumor-adjacent histologically normal prostate tissue from 48 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy. The resulting multispectral images were unmixed and optical densities recorded to quantify staining abundance, cellular (membranous, cytoplasmic, and nuclear) and tissue localization (stromal versus epithelial), and determination of percentage of CTNNB1-positive cells. The following CTNNB1 indices were significantly higher in BPH compared to normal prostate tissue: overall staining intensity, staining intensity in prostate stromal cell membranes, cytoplasm and nuclei, and prostate epithelial cell nuclei. The following LEF1 indices were significantly lower in BPH compared to tumor-adjacent normal prostate tissue: stromal LEF1 staining intensity, percentage of LEF1-positive stromal cells, and intensity of LEF1 staining in stromal cell membranes, cytoplasm, and nuclei. The percentage of stromal cells with CTNNB1+/LEF1- nuclei was higher and percentage of stromal cells with CTNNB1-/LEF1+ nuclei was lower in BPH compared to tumor-adjacent normal prostate tissues. These results support the hypothesis that CTNNB1 expression increases in specific BPH tissue

  18. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-06-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  19. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  20. From The Cover: Reconstruction of functionally normal and malignant human breast tissues in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Chavarria, Tony; Wu, Min; Magrane, Greg; Gray, Joe W.; Carey, Loucinda; Richardson, Andrea; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2004-04-01

    The study of normal breast epithelial morphogenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo has largely used rodent models. Efforts at studying mammary morphogenesis and cancer with xenotransplanted human epithelial cells have failed to recapitulate the full extent of development seen in the human breast. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model in which both the stromal and epithelial components of the reconstructed mammary gland are of human origin. Genetic modification of human stromal cells before the implantation of ostensibly normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in the outgrowth of benign and malignant lesions. This experimental model allows for studies of human epithelial morphogenesis and differentiation in vivo and underscores the critical role of heterotypic interactions in human breast development and carcinogenesis.

  1. Relative-size Magnification versus Relative-distance Magnification: Effect on the Reading Performance of Adults with Normal and Low Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovie-Kitchen, Jan; Whittaker, Steve

    1998-01-01

    This Australian study compared effects of relative-size magnification and relative-distance magnification on the reading rates of 24 adults with normal vision and 22 adults with low vision. For the subjects with low vision, the magnification method did not affect their reading rates, although subjects with normal vision showed slower reading at…

  2. Immuno-localisation of anti-thyroid antibodies in adult human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Kogie; Botha, Julia; Raidoo, Deshandra Munsamy; Naidoo, Strinivasen

    2011-03-15

    Expression of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSH-R) has been demonstrated in adipocytes, lymphocytes, bone, kidney, heart, intestine and rat brain. Immuno-reactive TSH-R has been localised in rat brain and human embryonic cerebral cortex but not in adult human brain. We designed a pilot study to determine whether anti-thyroid auto-antibodies immuno-localise in normal adult human cerebral cortex. Forensic samples from the frontal, motor, sensory, occipital, cingulate and parieto-occipito-temporal association cortices were obtained from five individuals who had died of trauma. Although there were no head injuries, the prior psychiatric history of patients was unknown. The tissues were probed with commercial antibodies against both human TSH-R and human thyroglobulin (TG). Anti-TSH-R IgG immuno-localised to cell bodies and axons of large neurones in all 6 regions of all 5 brains. The intensity and percentage of neurones labelled were similar in all tissue sections. TSH-R immuno-label was also observed in vascular endothelial cells in the cingulate gyrus. Although also found in all 5 brains and all six cortical regions, TG localised exclusively in vascular smooth muscle cells and not on neurones. Although limited by the small sample size and number of brain areas examined, this is the first study describing the presence of antigenic targets for anti-TSH-R IgG on human cortical neurons, and anti-TG IgG in cerebral vasculature. PMID:21196016

  3. Adult cardiac fibroblast proliferation is modulated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in normal and hypertrophied hearts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Tamara P; Lawan, Ahmed; Robinson, Emma; Grieve, David J; Plevin, Robin; Paul, Andrew; Currie, Susan

    2014-02-01

    Increased adult cardiac fibroblast proliferation results in an increased collagen deposition responsible for the fibrosis accompanying pathological remodelling of the heart. The mechanisms regulating cardiac fibroblast proliferation remain poorly understood. Using a minimally invasive transverse aortic banding (MTAB) mouse model of cardiac hypertrophy, we have assessed fibrosis and cardiac fibroblast proliferation. We have investigated whether calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ) regulates proliferation in fibroblasts isolated from normal and hypertrophied hearts. It is known that CaMKIIδ plays a central role in cardiac myocyte contractility, but nothing is known of its role in adult cardiac fibroblast function. The MTAB model used here produces extensive hypertrophy and fibrosis. CaMKIIδ protein expression and activity is upregulated in MTAB hearts and, specifically, in cardiac fibroblasts isolated from hypertrophied hearts. In response to angiotensin II, cardiac fibroblasts isolated from MTAB hearts show increased proliferation rates. Inhibition of CaMKII with autocamtide inhibitory peptide inhibits proliferation in cells isolated from both sham and MTAB hearts, with a significantly greater effect evident in MTAB cells. These results are the first to show selective upregulation of CaMKIIδ in adult cardiac fibroblasts following cardiac hypertrophy and to assign a previously unrecognised role to CaMKII in regulating adult cardiac fibroblast function in normal and diseased hearts. PMID:23881186

  4. Muscle protein analysis. II. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of normal and diseased human skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Barany, M.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1980-07-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the major proteins of normal and pathological human-muscle samples. The normal human-muscle pattern contains four myosin light chains: three that co-migrate with the myosin light chains from rabbit fast muscle (extensor digitorum longus), and one that co-migrates with the light chain 2 from rabbit slow muscle (soleus). Of seven Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples, four yielded patterns with decreased amounts of actin and myosin relative to normal muscle, while three samples gave patterns comparable to that for normal muscle. Six samples from patients with myotonic dystrophy also gave normal patterns. In nemaline rod myopathy, in contrast, the pattern was deficient in two of the fast-type myosin light chains.

  5. A Novel Generalized Normal Distribution for Human Longevity and other Negatively Skewed Data

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Henry T.; Allison, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Negatively skewed data arise occasionally in statistical practice; perhaps the most familiar example is the distribution of human longevity. Although other generalizations of the normal distribution exist, we demonstrate a new alternative that apparently fits human longevity data better. We propose an alternative approach of a normal distribution whose scale parameter is conditioned on attained age. This approach is consistent with previous findings that longevity conditioned on survival to the modal age behaves like a normal distribution. We derive such a distribution and demonstrate its accuracy in modeling human longevity data from life tables. The new distribution is characterized by 1. An intuitively straightforward genesis; 2. Closed forms for the pdf, cdf, mode, quantile, and hazard functions; and 3. Accessibility to non-statisticians, based on its close relationship to the normal distribution. PMID:22623974

  6. Thyroid gland morphology in young adults: normal subjects versus those with prior low-dose neck irradiation in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.A.; Komorowski, R.A.; Cerletty, J.M.; Wilson, S.D.

    1983-12-01

    Thyroid glands obtained at autopsy from young adults were studied to establish more accurately the ''normal'' morphology in the groups 20 to 40 years of age. A total of 56 autopsy specimens (many obtained from trauma victims) were examined in detail by totally embedding and sectioning the thyroid glands. The morphology of these thyroid glands also was compared to that of surgically removed thyroid glands from 47 young adult patients with prior low-dose neck irradiation. The ''normal'' thyroid specimens frequently showed morphologic features, such as thyroid tissue outside the recognizable capsule of the gland (40 of 56 patients) and in the strap muscles of the neck (six of 56 patients), which are conditions commonly considered as evidence for invasive thyroid carcinoma. The thyroid glands from the ''normal'' young adult population were significantly different from those thyroid glands surgically removed from patients who had received irradiation. The irradiated thyroid glands invariably showed multiple nodules of a wide variety of histologic types, extensive lymphocytic infiltrates, and distorting fibrosis as well as a high incidence of malignancy (27 of 47 patients). A single 0.1 cm focus of papillary carcinoma was found in one specimen in the nonirradiated thyroid group. This study suggests that ''occult'' thyroid carcinomas in the group 20 to 40 years of age are rare and are significantly fewer in number than in the older population (P less than 0.02).

  7. Pleiotropic roles of Notch signaling in normal, malignant, and developmental hematopoiesis in the human

    PubMed Central

    Kushwah, Rahul; Guezguez, Borhane; Lee, Jung Bok; Hopkins, Claudia I; Bhatia, Mickie

    2014-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is evolutionarily conserved across species and plays an important role in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. It has been implicated in several different hematopoietic processes including early hematopoietic development as well as adult hematological malignancies in humans. This review focuses on recent developments in understanding the role of Notch signaling in the human hematopoietic system with an emphasis on hematopoietic initiation from human pluripotent stem cells and regulation within the bone marrow. Based on recent insights, we summarize potential strategies for treatment of human hematological malignancies toward the concept of targeting Notch signaling for fate regulation. PMID:25252682

  8. MRI localization of the subthalamic nucleus in normal adults and its relation with age.

    PubMed

    Lv, Huandi; Geng, Zuojun; Zhu, Qingfeng; Wang, Lixin; Song, Zhenhu; Chang, Ruiting; Wang, Ya

    2015-11-11

    The subthalamic nucleus regulates motor and neurocognitive functions. Because of its small size and close proximity to other small subcortical structures, it has been a challenge to localize and visualize it using MRI. Here, we sought to define the optimal MRI scan method and visualization plane for locating the subthalamic nucleus on MRI images and to further delineate the geometric dimensions of the subthalamic nucleus and their correlation with age, laterality, and sex. Healthy volunteers received axial, sagittal, and coronal T2_3D_DRIVE CLEAR, coronal T1-WI, coronal T2FLAIR, coronal T2, and coronal SWI sequence. The coronal T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR images were compared with the Schaltenbrand-Wahren Atlas for Stereotaxy of the Human Brain for localizing the subthalamic nucleus. The best visualization plane with the largest sectional area and the most distinct outline was obtained and region of interest was delineated manually on the basis of the contours of the bilateral subthalamic nuclei in T2-WI images. T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR in the coronal view showed optimal visualization of the subthalamic nucleus and indicated that the subthalamic nucleus showed three morphological types: the double convex lens type (172, 64%), the ram's horn type (62, 23%), and the willow leaf type (34, 13%). There were no statistically significant differences because of laterality, sex, and age in the sectional area, and maximal long and short diameter of the subthalamic nucleus. On the basis of our results, the current study has shown that T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR in the coronal view provides optimal visualization of the subthalamic nucleus, which shows three distinct morphological types on MRI images, and there is no statistically significant difference in the geometric dimensions of the subthalamic nucleus because of laterality, sex, and age in normal individuals. PMID:26379058

  9. What is normal nasal airflow? A computational study of 22 healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Jiang, Jianbo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nasal airflow is essential for functioning of the human nose. Given individual variation in nasal anatomy, there is yet no consensus what constitutes normal nasal airflow patterns. We attempt to obtain such information that is essential to differentiate disease-related variations. Methods Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulated nasal airflow in 22 healthy subjects during resting breathing. Streamline patterns, airflow distributions, velocity profiles, pressure, wall stress, turbulence, and vortical flow characteristics under quasi-steady state were analyzed. Patency ratings, acoustically measured minimum cross-sectional area (MCA), and rhinomanometric nasal resistance (NR) were examined for potential correlations with morphological and airflow-related variables. Results Common features across subjects included: >50% total pressure-drop reached near the inferior turbinate head; wall shear stress, NR, turbulence energy, and vorticity were lower in the turbinate than in the nasal valve region. However, location of the major flow path and coronal velocity distributions varied greatly across individuals. Surprisingly, on average, more flow passed through the middle than the inferior meatus and correlated with better patency ratings (r=-0.65, p<0.01). This middle flow percentage combined with peak post-vestibule nasal heat loss and MCA accounted for >70% of the variance in subjective patency ratings and predicted patency categories with 86% success. Nasal index correlated with forming of the anterior dorsal vortex. Expected for resting breathing, the functional impact for local and total turbulence, vorticity, and helicity was limited. As validation, rhinomanometric NR significantly correlated with CFD simulations (r=0.53, p<0.01). Conclusion Significant variations of nasal airflow found among healthy subjects; Key features may have clinically relevant applications. PMID:24664528

  10. Increased reprogramming of human fetal hepatocytes compared with adult hepatocytes in feeder-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Marc C; Gramignoli, Roberto; Blake, William; Davila, Julio; Skvorak, Kristen; Dorko, Kenneth; Tahan, Veysel; Lee, Brian R; Tafaleng, Edgar; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Fox, Ira J; Strom, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has been used to treat liver disease. The availability of cells for these procedures is quite limited. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) may be a useful source of hepatocytes for basic research and transplantation if efficient and effective differentiation protocols were developed and problems with tumorigenicity could be overcome. Recent evidence suggests that the cell of origin may affect hiPSC differentiation. Thus, hiPSCs generated from hepatocytes may differentiate back to hepatocytes more efficiently than hiPSCs from other cell types. We examined the efficiency of reprogramming adult and fetal human hepatocytes. The present studies report the generation of 40 hiPSC lines from primary human hepatocytes under feeder-free conditions. Of these, 37 hiPSC lines were generated from fetal hepatocytes, 2 hiPSC lines from normal hepatocytes, and 1 hiPSC line from hepatocytes of a patient with Crigler-Najjar syndrome, type 1. All lines were confirmed reprogrammed and expressed markers of pluripotency by gene expression, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and teratoma formation. Fetal hepatocytes were reprogrammed at a frequency over 50-fold higher than adult hepatocytes. Adult hepatocytes were only reprogrammed with six factors, while fetal hepatocytes could be reprogrammed with three (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG) or four factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, LIN28 or OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, C-MYC). The increased reprogramming efficiency of fetal cells was not due to increased transduction efficiency or vector toxicity. These studies confirm that hiPSCs can be generated from adult and fetal hepatocytes including those with genetic diseases. Fetal hepatocytes reprogram much more efficiently than adult hepatocytes, although both could serve as useful sources of hiPSC-derived hepatocytes for basic research or transplantation. PMID:23394081

  11. Attitudes of Korean adults towards human dignity: A Q methodology approach

    PubMed Central

    Kae Hwa, JO; Gyeong-Ju, AN; DOORENBOS, Ardith Z.

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to identify the perceived attitudes of Korean adults towards human dignity in order to determine the relationship of human dignity to its social and cultural background. Methods The Q methodology research technique was used to explore perceived attitude typology on the basis of the respondents’ ranking order for different statements. A convenience sampling method was used to select 40 Korean adults who were interested in human dignity to create statements. From the questionnaires, in-depth interviews, and a literature review, a total of 158 statements was obtained. The final 34 Q samples were selected from a review by two nursing professors and a Q methodology expert. Moreover, 38 respondents participated as P samples by sorting 34 Q statements on a nine-point normal distribution scale. The data were analyzed by using the QUANL software package. Results The following four types of attitudes about human dignity were identified in Korea: a happiness-oriented–self-pursuit type, relationship-oriented–self-recognition type, reflection-oriented–self-unification type, and discrimination-oriented–self-maintenance type. Conclusions The results indicate that approaches to developing human dignity education need to take this typology into account and the characteristics of the participants who fall into each category. These results provide general guidelines to understand Korean values for professional practice in various healthcare settings. PMID:22583944

  12. The nutrition intervention improved adult human capital and economic productivity.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Reynaldo; Melgar, Paul; Maluccio, John A; Stein, Aryeh D; Rivera, Juan A

    2010-02-01

    This article reviews key findings about the long-term impact of a nutrition intervention carried out by the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama from 1969 to 1977. Results from follow-up studies in 1988-89 and 2002-04 show substantial impact on adult human capital and economic productivity. The 1988-89 study showed that adult body size and work capacity increased for those provided improved nutrition through age 3 y, whereas the 2002-04 follow-up showed that schooling was increased for women and reading comprehension and intelligence increased in both men and women. Participants were 26-42 y of age at the time of the 2002-04 follow-up, facilitating the assessment of economic productivity. Wages of men increased by 46% in those provided with improved nutrition through age 2 y. Findings for cardiovascular disease risk factors were heterogeneous; however, they suggest that improved nutrition in early life is unlikely to increase cardiovascular disease risk later in life and may indeed lower risk. In conclusion, the substantial improvement in adult human capital and economic productivity resulting from the nutrition intervention provides a powerful argument for promoting improvements in nutrition in pregnant women and young children. PMID:20032473

  13. Serological survey of normal humans for natural antibody to cell surface antigens of melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, A N; Taormina, M C; Ikeda, H; Watanabe, T; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1980-01-01

    Sera of 106 normal adult men were tested for antibodies reacting with cell surface antigens of three established lines of cultured malignant melanoma. Positive reactions with a protein A assay for IgG antibodies were extremely rare (1-2%). The frequency of positive reactions with assays for IgM antibodies was higher: 5-15% in immune adherence assays and 55-82% in anti-C3 mixed hemadsorption assays. After low-titered sera and sera reacting with fetal calf serum components, conventional alloantigens, and widely distributed class 3 antigens were excluded, sera from seven individuals (one with IgG antibody and six with IgM antibodies) were selected for detailed analysis. The serum containing the IgG antibody came from a healthy 65-year-old Caucasian man; titers of antibody in his serum ranged from < 1/10 to 1/40,000 in tests with different melanoma cell lines. This IgG antibody identifies a differentiation antigen of melanocytes, provisionally designated Mel 1, that distinguishes two classes of melanomas: 22 melanoma cell lines typed Mel 1+ and 17 types Mel 1-. Mel 1 is expressed by fetal fibroblasts but not adult fibroblasts and can be found on a proportion of cultured epithelial cancer cell lines (5 out of 23) but not on glioma or B-cell lines. The melanoma antigens detected by the naturally occurring IgM antibodies are serologically unrelated to Mel 1 but, like Mel 1, appear to be differentiation antigens that distinguish subsets of melanoma. These IgM antibodies detect antigens that are identical or closely related to the AH antigen, a melanoma surface antigen that was initially defined by autologous antibody in a patient with melanoma. In view of the immunogenicity of both Mel 1 and the AH antigens in humans and their occurrence on more than 50% of melanomas, it remains to be seen whether antibody to these antigens can be elicited by specific vaccination of seronegative melanoma patients and whether this will have an influence on the clinical course of the disease

  14. How long have adult humans been consuming milk?

    PubMed

    Gerbault, Pascale; Roffet-Salque, Mélanie; Evershed, Richard P; Thomas, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Lactase is the enzyme that breaks down the milk sugar lactose, and in most mammals, including most humans, lactase activity is down-regulated after the weaning period is completed. However, in about 35% of adults worldwide, lactase continues to be expressed throughout adulthood, a feature termed lactase persistence (LP). Genetic evidence indicates that LP is a recent human adaptation, and its current geographic distribution correlates with the relative historical importance of dairying in different human populations. Investigating archaeological evidence for fresh milk consumption has proved crucial in building an account of the joint evolution of LP and dairying. A powerful technique for investigating food processing, including milk processing, in ancient populations is lipid residue analysis on archaeological pottery. We review here the archaeological and genetic evidence available that have contributed to a better understanding of the gene-culture co-evolution of LP and dairying. PMID:24339181

  15. Detection of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, J.W.; Malan-Shibley, L.B.; Janss, D.H.

    1980-01-28

    Studies were conducted to determine whether normal and/or neoplastic (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells contain the microsomal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) which catalyses the conversion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to carcinogenic intermediates. Low constitutive levels of AHH activity were found in homogenates of both normal human breast epithelial and MCF-7 cells. The addition of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) to the culture medium of either cell type significantly increased AHH activity. Peak induction of hydroxylase activity occurred following the in vitro addition of 10 ..mu..M DMBA. A time course of DMBA-induced AHH activity in both normal human breast epithelium and MCF-7 cells revealed maximal induction 16 hr after 10 ..mu..M DMBA was added to the culture medium. Benzo(a)pyrene (BP), 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) and benz(a)anthracene (BA) also induced AHH activity in normal and MCF-7 cells. For example, the addition of 10 ..mu..M BP to the culture medium of either normal human breast epithelial or MCF-7 cells for 16 hr increased AHH activity 13.8 and 65.3-fold, respectively. For all PAH, the magnitude of AHH induction was substantially greater in MCF-7 than normal breast epithelial cells. Finally, ..cap alpha..-naphthoflavone inhibited BA-induced AHH activity in MCF-7 cells. The study demonstrates the presence of a PAH-inducible AHH enzyme(s) in normal human breast epithelial cells grown in primary culture and in the human breast tumor cell line, MCF-7.

  16. Evaluation of the 3-Dimensional, Weight-bearing Orientation of the Normal Adult Knee

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Denis; Shah, Ritesh R.; Nunley, Ryan M.; Barrack, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use 3-dimensional, weight-bearing images corrected for rotation to establish normative data of limb alignment and joint line orientation in asymptomatic, adult knees. One hundred adults (200 lower extremities) were recruited to receive weight-bearing, simultaneous biplanar imaging of both lower extremities. Multiple radiographic parameters were measured from 3D images, corrected for limb rotation. 70.0% of knees were in neutral, 19.5% in varus, and 10.5% in valgus overall alignment. Only 31 % of knees possessed both a neutral mechanical axis and the absence of joint line obliquity. There was substantial agreement between the 2D and 3D images for overall mechanical alignment (κ=0.77), but only a moderate agreement for joint line obliquity (κ=0.58). A substantial portion of asymptomatic adults possess either a varus or valgus mechanical alignment and joint line obliquity, PMID:24315446

  17. Age- and sex-related changes in the normal human external nose.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Grandi, Gaia; De Menezes, Marcio; Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2011-01-30

    The objective of this study was to measure: (1) normal sex-related dimensions of external nose (linear distances, ratios, angles, volume and surface area); and (2) growth changes between childhood and old age. The three-dimensional coordinates of several soft-tissue landmarks on the external nose were obtained by a non-invasive, computerized digitizer in 519 male and 340 female healthy subjects aged 4-73 years. The subjects were divided into 11 non-overlapping age groups: for children and preadolescent subjects, 2-year spans were used, while larger intervals were used for adolescent and adult subjects. From the landmarks, nasal volume and external surface area; nasal and alar base widths, nasal height, nasal bridge length, philtrum length, nasal tip protrusion, right and left nostril lengths, superior and inferior nostril widths; nasal tip protrusion-to-nasal height, and nasal width-to-nasal height ratios; nasal convexity, alar slope, and nasal tip angles were calculated, and averaged for age and sex. Comparisons were performed by factorial analysis of variance. On average, men had larger nasal external volume and area, linear distances and nasal width-to-height ratio than women (p<0.01); no sex differences were found for the angles and the nasal tip protrusion-to-nasal height ratio. Age significantly influenced all analyzed measurements (p<0.001): nasal volume, area, linear distances increased from childhood to old age, while the nasal tip angle decreased as a function of age. No consistent age related patterns were found for the ratios and the nasal convexity and alar slope angles. Men and women had different age related patterns, with significant sex by age interactions (p<0.001). Overall, in most occasions male increments in nasal dimensions were larger than female ones. Data collected in the present investigation could serve as a database for the quantitative description of human nasal morphology during normal growth, development and aging. Forensic

  18. Quantitative proton MR spectroscopic imaging of normal human cerebellum and brain stem.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M A; Horská, A; van Zijl, P C; Barker, P B

    2001-10-01

    Quantitative, multislice proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) was used to investigate regional metabolite levels and ratios in the normal adult human posterior fossa. Six normal volunteers (36 +/- 3 years, five male, one female) were scanned on a 1.5 T scanner using multislice MRSI at long echo time (TE 280 msec). The entire cerebellum was covered using three oblique-axial slice locations, which also included the pons, mid-brain, insular cortex, and parieto-occipital lobe. Concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr) were estimated using the phantom replacement technique. Regional variations of the concentrations were assessed using ANOVA (P < 0.05). High-resolution MRSI data was obtained in all subjects and brain regions examined. Metabolite concentrations (mM) (mean +/- SD) were as follows: cerebellar vermis: 2.3 +/- 0.4, 8.8 +/- 1.7 and 7.6 +/- 1.0 for Cho, Cr, and NAA respectively; cerebellar hemisphere: 2.2 +/- 0.6, 8.9 +/- 2.1, 7.5 +/- 0.8; pons 2.2 +/- 0.5, 4.3 +/- 1.1, 8.3 +/- 0.9; insular cortex, 1.8 +/- 0.5, 7.8 +/- 2, 8.0 +/- 1.1, parieto-occipital gray matter, 1.3 +/- 0.3, 5.7 +/- 1.1, 7.2 +/- 0.9, and occipital white matter, 1.4 +/- 0.3, 5.3 +/- 1.3, 7.5 +/- 0.8. Consistent with previous reports, significantly higher levels of Cr were found in the cerebellum compared to parieto-occipital gray and occipital white matter, and pons (P < 0.0001). NAA was essentially uniformly distributed within the regions chosen for analysis, with the highest level in the pons (P < 0.04). Cho was significantly higher in the cerebellum and pons than parieto-occipital gray and occipital white matter (P < 0.002) and was also higher in the pons than in the insular cortex (P < 0.05). Quantitative multislice MRSI of the posterior fossa is feasible and significant regional differences in metabolite concentrations were found. PMID:11590646

  19. Human Normal Bronchial Epithelial Cells: A Novel In Vitro Cell Model for Toxicity Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery. PMID:25861018

  20. Human normal bronchial epithelial cells: a novel in vitro cell model for toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenqiang; Guo, Juanjuan; Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery. PMID:25861018

  1. Hesperetin induces melanin production in adult human epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Usach, Iris; Taléns-Visconti, Raquel; Magraner-Pardo, Lorena; Peris, José-Esteban

    2015-06-01

    One of the major sources of flavonoids for humans are citrus fruits, hesperidin being the predominant flavonoid. Hesperetin (HSP), the aglycon of hesperidin, has been reported to provide health benefits such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects. However, the effect of HSP on skin pigmentation is not clear. Some authors have found that HSP induces melanogenesis in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells, which, if extrapolated to in vivo conditions, might protect skin against photodamage. Since the effect of HSP on normal melanocytes could be different to that observed on melanoma cells, the described effect of HSP on murine melanoma cells has been compared to the effect obtained using normal human melanocytes. HSP concentrations of 25 and 50 µM induced melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in human melanocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to control melanocytes, 25 µM HSP increased melanin production and tyrosinase activity 1.4-fold (p < 0.01) and 1.1-fold (p < 0.01), respectively, and the corresponding increases in the case of 50 µM HSP were 1.9-fold (p < 0.001) and 1.3-fold (p < 0.001). Therefore, HSP could be considered a valuable photoprotective substance if its capacity to increase melanin production in human melanocyte cultures could be reproduced on human skin. PMID:25765751

  2. Relationships between performance on the Cogstate Brief Battery, neurodegeneration, and Aβ accumulation in cognitively normal older adults and adults with MCI.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yen Ying; Pietrzak, Robert H; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Ames, David; Ellis, Kathryn A; Rembach, Alan; Harrington, Karra; Salvado, Olivier; Martins, Ralph N; Snyder, Peter J; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher C; Villemagne, Victor L; Maruff, Paul

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the extent to which decline in memory and working memory in beta-amyloid (Aβ) positive non-demented individuals was related to hippocampal atrophy and Aβ accumulation over 36 months. Cognitively normal older adults (CN) (n = 178) and adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n = 49) underwent positron emission tomography neuroimaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and cognitive assessments at baseline, 18- and 36-months. Relative to Aβ- CNs, Aβ+ CNs and Aβ+ MCIs showed greater rates of cognitive decline, Aβ accumulation, and hippocampal atrophy. Analysis of interrelationships between these Alzheimer's disease markers in Aβ+ CNs and MCIs indicated that rate of Aβ accumulation was associated with rate of hippocampal atrophy (β = -0.05, p = .037), which was in turn associated independently with rate of decline in memory (β = -0.03, p = .032). This suggests that Aβ accumulation precedes any neurodegeneration or clinical symptoms, and that the relationship between Aβ and cognitive decline is mediated by hippocampal atrophy. PMID:25467942

  3. Short-Term and Working Memory Differences in Language/Learning Disabled and Normal Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaki, Emi; Plante, Elena

    1997-01-01

    Fifteen adults who reported a childhood history of speech-language and/or learning disability were tested on two verbal memory tasks. Their performance on sentence repetitions and reading span measures was compared to a control group. Results indicated statistically significant group performance differences on both short-term and working memory…

  4. Sensitivity to Word Order Cues by Normal and Language/Learning Disabled Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plante, Elena; Gomez, Rebecca; Gerken, LouAnn

    2002-01-01

    Sixteen adults with language/learning disabilities (L/LD) and 16 controls participated in a study testing sensitivity to word order cues that signaled grammatical versus ungrammatical word strings belonging to an artificial grammar. Participants with L/LD performed significantly below the comparison group, suggesting that this skill is problematic…

  5. Mild Memory Impairment in Healthy Older Adults Is Distinct from Normal Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargin, J. Weaver; Maruff, P.; Collie, A.; Masters, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mild memory impairment was detected in 28% of a sample of healthy community-dwelling older adults using the delayed recall trial of a word list learning task. Statistical analysis revealed that individuals with memory impairment also demonstrated relative deficits on other measures of memory, and tests of executive function, processing speed and…

  6. Foucault, Governmentality, Neoliberalism and Adult Education--Perspective on the Normalization of Social Risks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopecký, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with the relevance of the work of Foucault to critical analysis of the political concept of lifelong learning that currently dominates. This concept relates to the field of adult education and learning. The article makes reference to the relatively late incorporation of Foucault's work within andragogy. It shows the…

  7. Redefining Normal: A Critical Analysis of (Dis)ability in Young Adult Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwood, Jen Scott

    2013-01-01

    This literary analysis examines constructions of normalcy and disability within contemporary young adult literature, including "Jerk," "California" (Friesen, 2008), "Marcelo in the Real World" (Stork, 2009), and "Five Flavors of Dumb" (John, 2010). As recent winners of the Schneider Family Book Award from the American Library Association, these…

  8. The systemizing quotient: an investigation of adults with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism, and normal sex differences.

    PubMed Central

    Baron-Cohen, Simon; Richler, Jennifer; Bisarya, Dheraj; Gurunathan, Nhishanth; Wheelwright, Sally

    2003-01-01

    Systemizing is the drive to analyse systems or construct systems. A recent model of psychological sex differences suggests that this is a major dimension in which the sexes differ, with males being more drawn to systemize than females. Currently, there are no self-report measures to assess this important dimension. A second major dimension of sex differences is empathizing (the drive to identify mental states and respond to these with an appropriate emotion). Previous studies find females score higher on empathy measures. We report a new self-report questionnaire, the Systemizing Quotient (SQ), for use with adults of normal intelligence. It contains 40 systemizing items and 20 control items. On each systemizing item, a person can score 2, 1 or 0, so the SQ has a maximum score of 80 and a minimum of zero. In Study 1, we measured the SQ of n = 278 adults (114 males, 164 females) from a general population, to test for predicted sex differences (male superiority) in systemizing. All subjects were also given the Empathy Quotient (EQ) to test if previous reports of female superiority would be replicated. In Study 2 we employed the SQ and the EQ with n = 47 adults (33 males, 14 females) with Asperger syndrome (AS) or high-functioning autism (HFA), who are predicted to be either normal or superior at systemizing, but impaired at empathizing. Their scores were compared with n = 47 matched adults from the general population in Study 1. In Study 1, as predicted, normal adult males scored significantly higher than females on the SQ and significantly lower on the EQ. In Study 2, again as predicted, adults with AS/HFA scored significantly higher on the SQ than matched controls, and significantly lower on the EQ than matched controls. The SQ reveals both a sex difference in systemizing in the general population and an unusually strong drive to systemize in AS/HFA. These results are discussed in relation to two linked theories: the 'empathizing-systemizing' (E-S) theory of sex

  9. Effect of resveratrol and zinc on intracellular zinc status in normal human prostate epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the influence of resveratrol on cellular zinc status, normal human prostate epithelial (NHPrE) cells were treated with 6 levels of resveratrol (0, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 microM) and 4 levels of zinc [0, 4, 16, and 32 microM for zinc-deficient (ZD), zinc-normal (ZN), zinc-adequate (ZA), an...

  10. Magnetic measurements on human erythrocytes: Normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhnini, Lama

    2003-05-01

    In this article magnetic measurements were made on human erythrocytes at different hemoglobin states (normal and reduced hemoglobin). Different blood samples: normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle were studied. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples were taken from patients receiving lifelong blood transfusion treatment. All samples examined exhibited diamagnetic behavior. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples showed higher diamagnetic susceptibilities than that for the normal, which was attributed to the increase of membrane to hemoglobin volume ratio of the abnormal cells. Magnetic measurements showed that the erythrocytes in the reduced state showed less diamagnetic response in comparison with erythrocytes in the normal state. Analysis of the paramagnetic component of magnetization curves gave an effective magnetic moment of μeff=7.6 μB per reduced hemoglobin molecule. The same procedure was applied to sickle and beta thalassemia major samples and values for μeff were found to be comparable to that of the normal erythrocytes.

  11. Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments using chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hannah; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Park, Sang-Ryoul; Chung, Sun-Ku; Jeong, Sangkyun; Yang, Inchul

    2016-01-01

    Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments employing chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard is reported. Human and chimpanzee RNAs exhibit single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in average 210-bp intervals. Spike-in chimpanzee RNA would behave the same as the human counterparts during the whole NGS procedures owing to the high sequence similarity. After discrimination of species origins of the NGS reads based on SNVs, the chimpanzee reads were used to read-by-read normalize biases and variations of human reads. By this approach, as many as 10,119 transcripts were simultaneously normalized for the entire NGS procedures leading to accurate and reproducible quantification of differential gene expression. In addition, incomparable data sets from different in-process degradations or from different library preparation methods were made well comparable by the normalization. Based on these results, we expect that the normalization approaches using near neighbor genomes as internal standards could be employed as a standard protocol, which will improve both accuracy and comparability of NGS results across different sample batches, laboratories and NGS platforms. PMID:27554056

  12. Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments using chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hannah; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Park, Sang-Ryoul; Chung, Sun-Ku; Jeong, Sangkyun; Yang, Inchul

    2016-01-01

    Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments employing chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard is reported. Human and chimpanzee RNAs exhibit single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in average 210-bp intervals. Spike-in chimpanzee RNA would behave the same as the human counterparts during the whole NGS procedures owing to the high sequence similarity. After discrimination of species origins of the NGS reads based on SNVs, the chimpanzee reads were used to read-by-read normalize biases and variations of human reads. By this approach, as many as 10,119 transcripts were simultaneously normalized for the entire NGS procedures leading to accurate and reproducible quantification of differential gene expression. In addition, incomparable data sets from different in-process degradations or from different library preparation methods were made well comparable by the normalization. Based on these results, we expect that the normalization approaches using near neighbor genomes as internal standards could be employed as a standard protocol, which will improve both accuracy and comparability of NGS results across different sample batches, laboratories and NGS platforms. PMID:27554056

  13. The Association Between Subretinal Drusenoid Deposits in Older Adults in Normal Macular Health and Incident Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Neely, David; Zarubina, Anna; Clark, Mark; Zhang, Yuhua; Curcio, Christine A.; Owsley, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) have been associated with the progression to late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To determine whether SDD in eyes in normal macular health increases risk for early AMD, this study examined the association between presence of SDD at baseline in a cohort of older adults in normal macular health and incident AMD 3 years later. Methods Subjects enrolled in the Alabama Study on Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ALSTAR) were assessed for the presence of SDD using color fundus photos, infrared reflectance and fundus autofluorescence images, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography volumes. The study sample included 799 eyes from 455 participants in normal macular health per grading of color fundus photographs using the 9-step Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) classification system. Age-related macular degeneration was defined as eyes having an AREDS grade ≥2 at the 3-year follow-up. Results Twenty-five percent of participants had SDD in one or both eyes at baseline. At follow-up visit, 11.9% of eyes in the sample developed AMD. Compared to eyes without SDD, those with SDD were 2.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36–3.70) times more likely to have AMD at follow-up. After adjusting for age, C-reactive protein quartile, and family history of AMD, the association persisted. Conclusions Results suggest that SDD in older eyes with normal macular health as defined by the AREDS scale is a risk factor for the development of early AMD. Older adults in seemingly normal macular health yet having SDD may warrant closer clinical monitoring for the possible onset of early AMD. PMID:26906160

  14. Deep sequencing as a probe of normal stem cell fate and preneoplasia in human epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Using deep sequencing technology, methods based on the sporadic acquisition of somatic DNA mutations in human tissues have been used to trace the clonal evolution of progenitor cells in diseased states. However, the potential of these approaches to explore cell fate behavior of normal tissues and the initiation of preneoplasia remain underexploited. Focusing on the results of a recent deep sequencing study of eyelid epidermis, we show that the quantitative analysis of mutant clone size provides a general method to resolve the pattern of normal stem cell fate and to detect and characterize the mutational signature of rare field transformations in human tissues, with implications for the early detection of preneoplasia. PMID:26699486

  15. Isolation and culture of adult epithelial stem cells from human skin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiru; Draheim, Kyle; Lyle, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The homeostasis of all self-renewing tissues is dependent on adult stem cells. As undifferentiated stem cells undergo asymmetric divisions, they generate daughter cells that retain the stem cell phenotype and transit-amplifying cells (TA cells) that migrate from the stem cell niche, undergo rapid proliferation and terminally differentiate to repopulate the tissue. Epithelial stem cells have been identified in the epidermis, hair follicle, and intestine as cells with a high in vitro proliferative potential and as slow-cycling label-retaining cells in vivo (1-3). Adult, tissue-specific stem cells are responsible for the regeneration of the tissues in which they reside during normal physiologic turnover as well as during times of stress (4-5). Moreover, stem cells are generally considered to be multi-potent, possessing the capacity to give rise to multiple cell types within the tissue (6). For example, rodent hair follicle stem cells can generate epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicles (7-9). We have shown that stem cells from the human hair follicle bulge region exhibit multi-potentiality (10). Stem cells have become a valuable tool in biomedical research, due to their utility as an in vitro system for studying developmental biology, differentiation, tumorigenesis and for their possible therapeutic utility. It is likely that adult epithelial stem cells will be useful in the treatment of diseases such as ectodermal dysplasias, monilethrix, Netherton syndrome, Menkes disease, hereditary epidermolysis bullosa and alopecias (11-13). Additionally, other skin problems such as burn wounds, chronic wounds and ulcers will benefit from stem cell related therapies (14,15). Given the potential for reprogramming of adult cells into a pluripotent state (iPS cells)(16,17), the readily accessible and expandable adult stem cells in human skin may provide a valuable source of cells for induction and downstream therapy for a wide range of disease including diabetes and

  16. Changes in cardiopulmonary function in normal adults after the Rockport 1 mile walking test: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Hye-Young; Lee, Do-Youn; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes of cardiopulmonary function in normal adults after the Rockport 1 mile walking test. [Subjects and Methods] University students (13 males and 27 females) participated in this study. Before and after the Rockport 1 mile walking test, pulmonary function, respiratory pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake were measured. [Results] Significant improvements in forced vital capacity and maximal inspiratory pressure were observed after the Rockport 1 mile walking test in males, and significant improvements in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at 1 s, maximal inspiratory pressure, and maximal expiratory pressure were observed after the Rockport 1 mile walking test in females. However, the maximal oxygen uptake was not significantly different. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that the Rockport 1 mile walking test changes cardiopulmonary function in males and females, and that it may improve cardiopulmonary function in middle-aged and older adults and provide basic data on cardiopulmonary endurance. PMID:26356048

  17. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness ( r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores ( r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness.

  18. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan.

    PubMed

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness (r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores (r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness. PMID:26715354

  19. Contractile properties of skinned muscle fibres from young and adult normal and dystrophic (mdx) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D A; Head, S I; Lynch, G S; Stephenson, D G

    1993-01-01

    1. Single muscle fibres were enzymatically isolated from the soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of genetically dystrophic mdx and normal (C57BL/10) mice aged 3-6 or 17-23 weeks. 2. Fibres of both muscles were chemically skinned with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 (2% v/v). Ca(2+)- and Sr(2+)-activated contractile responses were recorded and comparisons were made between several contractile parameters of various fibre types of normal and dystrophic mice of similar age. 3. There were no significant differences in the following contractile parameters of skinned fibres of normal and mdx mice of the same age: sensitivity to activating Ca2+ (pCa50) or Sr2+ (pSr50) and differential sensitivity to the activating ions (pCa50-pSr50). However the maximum isometric tension (Po) and the frequency of myofibrillar force oscillations in EDL fast-twitch fibres of young mdx mice were significantly lower than those of soleus fast-twitch fibres of the same animals, or fast-twitch fibres (EDL or soleus) of normal mice. 4. Age-related differences were apparent in some contractile parameters of both normal and mdx mice. In particular the steepness of force-pCa and force-pSr curves increased with age in normal mice, yet decreased with age in fibres of mdx mice. 5. A fluorescent probe, ethidium bromide, which interchelates with DNA, was used with laser-scanning confocal microscopy to determine the distribution of myonuclei in fibres. Fibres isolated from either muscle type of normal animals displayed a characteristic peripheral spiral of myonuclei. Fibres from muscles of mdx mice displayed three major patterns of nuclear distribution; the normal peripheral spiral, long central strands of nuclei, and a mixture of these two patterns. 6. The contractile characteristics of mdx fibres were not markedly influenced by the nuclear distribution pattern in that there were no discernible differences in the major contractile parameters (the Hill coefficients nCa and nSr, which

  20. Differential gene expression in normal and transformed human mammary epithelial cells in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Diego F; Sha, Wei; Hower, Valerie; Blekherman, Greg; Laubenbacher, Reinhard; Akman, Steven; Torti, Suzy V; Shulaev, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in breast carcinogenesis. To investigate whether normal and malignant breast epithelial cells differ in their responses to oxidative stress, we examined the global gene expression profiles of three cell types, representing cancer progression from a normal to a malignant stage, under oxidative stress. Normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), an immortalized cell line (HMLER-1), and a tumorigenic cell line (HMLER-5), were exposed to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by treatment with glucose oxidase. Functional analysis of the metabolic pathways enriched with differentially expressed genes demonstrates that normal and malignant breast epithelial cells diverge substantially in their response to oxidative stress. While normal cells exhibit the up-regulation of antioxidant mechanisms, cancer cells are unresponsive to the ROS insult. However, the gene expression response of normal HMEC cells under oxidative stress is comparable to that of the malignant cells under normal conditions, indicating that altered redox status is persistent in breast cancer cells, which makes them resistant to increased generation of ROS. This study discusses some of the possible adaptation mechanisms of breast cancer cells under persistent oxidative stress that differentiate them from the response to acute oxidative stress in normal mammary epithelial cells. PMID:21397008

  1. Cohort Programming and Learning: Improving Educational Experiences for Adult Learners. Professional Practices in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltiel, Iris M.; Russo, Charline S.

    This book, which is intended for adult educators and human resource developers, presents guidelines for using the principles of cohort programming and learning to improve adult learners' educational experiences. The following are among the topics covered in the book's eight chapters: (1) cohort programming and learning (cohort programs defined;…

  2. Assessing Adult Learning: A Guide for Practitioners. Revised Edition. Professional Practices in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Joseph J.

    This book, which is intended for adult educators and human resource developers, presents guidelines for assessing adult learning. The following are among the topics covered in the book's eight chapters: (1) basic principles of informal assessment (relationship between learning and assessment activities; sequencing learning and assessment…

  3. Secretion of Unconjugated Androgens and Estrogens by the Normal and Abnormal Human Testis before and after Human Chorionic Gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, R. L.; Kelch, R. P.; Jenner, M. R.; Kaplan, S. L.; Grumbach, M. M.

    1974-01-01

    The secretion of androgens and estrogens by normal and abnormal testes was compared by determining the concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione (Δ4A), testosterone (T), estrone (E1), and 17β-estradiol (E2) in peripheral and spermatic venous plasma samples from 14 normal men and 5 men with unilateral testicular atrophy. Four normal men and one patient with unilateral atrophy of the testis were given human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) before surgery. Plasma estrogens were determined by radioimmunoassay; plasma androgens were measured by the double-isotope dilution derivative technique. Peripheral concentrations of these steroids before and after HCG were similar in both the normal men and the patients with unilateral testicular atrophy. In normal men, the mean ±SE spermatic venous concentrations were DHEA, 73.1±11.7 ng/ml; Δ4A, 30.7±7.9 ng/ml; T, 751±114 ng/ml; E1, 306±55 pg/ml; and E2, 1298±216 pg/ml. Three of four subjects with unilateral testicular atrophy had greatly diminished spermatic venous levels of androgens and estrogens. HCG treatment increased the testicular secretion of DHEA and T fivefold, Δ4A threefold, E1 sixfold, and E2 eightfold in normal men. In the single subject with an atrophic testis who received HCG, the spermatic venous concentrations of androgens and estrogens were much less than in normal men similarly treated. We conclude that: (a) E1 is secreted by the human testis, but testicular secretion of E1 accounts for less than 5% of E1 production in normal men; (b) HCG stimulation produces increases in spermatic venous estrogens equal to or greater than the changes in androgens, including testosterone; and (c) strikingly decreased secretion of androgen and estrogen by unilateral atrophic human tests cannot be appreciated by analyses of peripheral steroid concentrations. PMID:4271572

  4. Innate Immune Responses of Human Neonatal Cells to Bacteria from the Normal Gastrointestinal Flora

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Helen; Hessle, Christina; Rudin, Anna

    2002-01-01

    The hygiene hypothesis postulates that the prevalence of allergy has increased due to decreased microbial stimulation early in life, leading to delayed maturation of the immune system. The aim of this study was to examine the cytokine pattern produced from cord blood mononuclear cells relative to adult cells after stimulation with bacterial strains from the normal flora. Mononuclear cells from cord and adult blood samples were stimulated with the following bacteria: Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus mitis, Corynebacterium minutissimum, Clostridium perfringens, Bacteroides vulgatus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Veillonella parvula, and Neisseria sicca. The levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-10, and IL-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The TNF-α production was also analyzed after blocking CD14, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2), and TLR-4 prior to stimulation with bacteria. The levels of IL-12 and TNF-α were similar in cord and adult cells. Gram-positive bacteria induced considerably higher levels of IL-12 and TNF-α than gram-negative bacteria in both cord and adult cells. The levels of IL-6 were significantly higher in newborns than in adults, whereas the levels of IL-10 were similar in newborns and adults. Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria induced similar levels of IL-6 and IL-10 in cord cells. L. plantarum bound or signaled through CD14, TLR-2, and TLR-4, whereas E. coli acted mainly through CD14 and TLR-4. These results indicate that the innate immune response in newborns to commensal bacteria is strong and also suggest that different bacterial strains may have differential effects on the maturation of the immune system of infants. PMID:12438343

  5. Innate immune responses of human neonatal cells to bacteria from the normal gastrointestinal flora.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Helen; Hessle, Christina; Rudin, Anna

    2002-12-01

    The hygiene hypothesis postulates that the prevalence of allergy has increased due to decreased microbial stimulation early in life, leading to delayed maturation of the immune system. The aim of this study was to examine the cytokine pattern produced from cord blood mononuclear cells relative to adult cells after stimulation with bacterial strains from the normal flora. Mononuclear cells from cord and adult blood samples were stimulated with the following bacteria: Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus mitis, Corynebacterium minutissimum, Clostridium perfringens, Bacteroides vulgatus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Veillonella parvula, and Neisseria sicca. The levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-10, and IL-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The TNF-alpha production was also analyzed after blocking CD14, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2), and TLR-4 prior to stimulation with bacteria. The levels of IL-12 and TNF-alpha were similar in cord and adult cells. Gram-positive bacteria induced considerably higher levels of IL-12 and TNF-alpha than gram-negative bacteria in both cord and adult cells. The levels of IL-6 were significantly higher in newborns than in adults, whereas the levels of IL-10 were similar in newborns and adults. Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria induced similar levels of IL-6 and IL-10 in cord cells. L. plantarum bound or signaled through CD14, TLR-2, and TLR-4, whereas E. coli acted mainly through CD14 and TLR-4. These results indicate that the innate immune response in newborns to commensal bacteria is strong and also suggest that different bacterial strains may have differential effects on the maturation of the immune system of infants. PMID:12438343

  6. Unique multipotent cells in adult human mesenchymal cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yasumasa; Kitada, Masaaki; Wakao, Shohei; Nishikawa, Kouki; Tanimura, Yukihiro; Makinoshima, Hideki; Goda, Makoto; Akashi, Hideo; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Niwa, Akira; Shigemoto, Taeko; Nabeshima, Yoko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Dezawa, Mari

    2010-01-01

    We found adult human stem cells that can generate, from a single cell, cells with the characteristics of the three germ layers. The cells are stress-tolerant and can be isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells, or directly from bone marrow aspirates. These cells can self-renew; form characteristic cell clusters in suspension culture that express a set of genes associated with pluripotency; and can differentiate into endodermal, ectodermal, and mesodermal cells both in vitro and in vivo. When transplanted into immunodeficient mice by local or i.v. injection, the cells integrated into damaged skin, muscle, or liver and differentiated into cytokeratin 14-, dystrophin-, or albumin-positive cells in the respective tissues. Furthermore, they can be efficiently isolated as SSEA-3(+) cells. Unlike authentic ES cells, their proliferation activity is not very high and they do not form teratomas in immunodeficient mouse testes. Thus, nontumorigenic stem cells with the ability to generate the multiple cell types of the three germ layers can be obtained through easily accessible adult human mesenchymal cells without introducing exogenous genes. These unique cells will be beneficial for cell-based therapy and biomedical research. PMID:20421459

  7. Multipotent progenitor cells isolated from adult human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I; Nair, I; Ferreri, K; Rawson, J; Kuroda, A; Pascual, M; Omori, K; Valiente, L; Orr, C; Al-Abdullah, I; Riggs, A; Kandeel, F; Mullen, Y

    2005-10-01

    The supply of islet cells is a limiting factor for the widespread application of islet transplantation of type-1 diabetes. Islets constitute 1% to 2% of pancreatic tissue, leaving approximately 98% as discard after islet isolation and purification. In this report we present our data on the isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from discarded adult human pancreatic tissue. The collected cells from discarded nonislet fractions, after enzymatic digestion and gradient purification of islets, were dissociated for suspension culture in a serum-free medium. The cell clusters grown to a size of 100 to 150 mum contained cells staining for stage-specific embryonic antigens, but not insulin or C-peptide. To direct cell differentiation toward islets, clusters were recultured in a pancreatic differentiation medium. Insulin and C-peptide-positive cells by immunocytochemistry appeared within a week, reaching over 10% of the cell population. Glucagon and somatostatin-positive cells were also detected. The cell clusters were found to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Cells from the same clusters also had the capacity for differentiation into neural cells, as documented by staining for neural and glial cell markers when cultured as monolayers in media containing neurotrophic factors. These data suggest that multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells exist within the human pancreatic tissue that is typically discarded during islet isolation procedures. These adult progenitor cells can be successfully differentiated into insulin-producing cells, and thus they have the potential for treatment of type-1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:16298614

  8. Chromatin defects in normal and malformed human ejaculated and epididymal spermatozoa: a cytochemical ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Francavilla, S; Cordeschi, G; Gabriele, A; Gianaroli, L; Properzi, G

    1996-03-01

    Cytochemical defects in chromatin were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after the staining by alcoholic phosphotungstic acid (PTA) of normal and malformed ejaculated spermatozoa from 35 male partners of infertile couples, and in six sperm samples retrieved from the caput epididymidis of men affected by obstructive azoospermia. PTA staining was also analysed in normal ejaculates of fertile men after incubation of the washed spermatozoa with dithiothreitol (DTT) to reduce disulfides to thiols, or with DTT followed by iodoacetamide, a blocking agent for thiol groups. PTA stained 63 (27-100)% of malformed heads and 25 (10-100)% of normal sperm heads (median (range) n = 35; P = 0.0001, Wilcoxon matched pairs test). The percentage of normal heads stained by PTA was negatively correlated with the percentage of heads of normal form, with condensed chromatin and a normal acrosome (Spearman r = 0.75; P = 0.0001), and positively correlated with the percentage of malformed heads after conventional TEM analysis (Spearman r 0.60; P = 0.0001). Staining with PTA in normal heads was not correlated with the presence of non-condensed chromatin in otherwise normal sperm heads evaluated by conventional TEM analysis. In spermatozoa recovered from the caput epididymidis, 15% of normal heads were stained with PTA, significantly fewer than in ejaculated sperm samples (P = 0.014). The reduction of disulfides to thiols was associated with PTA staining of all normal heads, and this was prevented by incubation with iodoacetamide. We conclude that PTA staining of the nuclei of human ejaculated spermatozoa may indicate a defect of chromatin condensation, owing to an excess of free thiol groups. The lower percentage of normal epididymal sperm heads that stained with PTA in cases of obstructive azoospermia compared with ejaculated sperm may be related to an overoxidation of thils owing to the ageing of spermatozoa. PMID:8699409

  9. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in (Un)aided Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Adults.

    PubMed

    Van Dun, Bram; Kania, Anna; Dillon, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) are influenced by the characteristics of the stimulus, including level and hearing aid gain. Previous studies have measured CAEPs aided and unaided in individuals with normal hearing. There is a significant difference between providing amplification to a person with normal hearing and a person with hearing loss. This study investigated this difference and the effects of stimulus signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and audibility on the CAEP amplitude in a population with hearing loss. Twelve normal-hearing participants and 12 participants with a hearing loss participated in this study. Three speech sounds-/m/, /g/, and /t/-were presented in the free field. Unaided stimuli were presented at 55, 65, and 75 dB sound pressure level (SPL) and aided stimuli at 55 dB SPL with three different gains in steps of 10 dB. CAEPs were recorded and their amplitudes analyzed. Stimulus SNRs and audibility were determined. No significant effect of stimulus level or hearing aid gain was found in normal hearers. Conversely, a significant effect was found in hearing-impaired individuals. Audibility of the signal, which in some cases is determined by the signal level relative to threshold and in other cases by the SNR, is the dominant factor explaining changes in CAEP amplitude. CAEPs can potentially be used to assess the effects of hearing aid gain in hearing-impaired users. PMID:27587919

  10. Confirmation of Correlation between Brain Nerve Conduction Velocity and Intelligence Level in Normal Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. Edward; Vernon, Philip A.; Johnson, Andrew M.

    2004-01-01

    In 1992, Reed and Jensen ["Intelligence" 16 (1992) 259-272] reported a positive correlation (0.26; "p"= 0.002; 0.37 after correcting for restricted intelligence range) between a brain nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and intelligence level in 147 normal male students. In the first follow-up of their study, we report on a study using similar NCV…

  11. Subcategory Learning in Normal and Language Learning-Disabled Adults: How Much Information Do They Need?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Jessica; Harris, Laurel; Plante, Elena; Gerken, LouAnn

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this experiment was to determine if nonreferential morphophonological information was sufficient to facilitate the learning of gender subcategories (i.e., masculine vs. feminine) in individuals with normal language (NL) and those with a history of language-based learning disabilities (HLD). Method: Thirty-two adults…

  12. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  13. Resident aerobic microbiota of the adult human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, T T; Kirkeby, L P; Poulsen, K; Reinholdt, J; Kilian, M

    2000-10-01

    Recent evidence strongly suggests that the microbiota of the nasal cavity plays a crucial role in determining the reaction patterns of the mucosal and systemic immune system. However, little is known about the normal microbiota of the nasal cavity. The purpose of this study was to determine the microbiota in different parts of the nasal cavity and to develop and evaluate methods for this purpose. Samples were collected from 10 healthy adults by nasal washes and by swabbing of the mucosa through a sterile introduction device. Both methods gave results that were quantitatively and qualitatively reproducible, and revealed significant differences in the density of the nasal microbiota between individuals. The study revealed absence of gram-negative bacteria that are regular members of the commensal microbiota of the pharynx. Likewise, viridans type streptococci were sparsely represented. The nasal microbiota was dominated by species of the genera Corynebacterium, Aureobacterium, Rhodococcus, and Staphylococcus, including S. epidermis, S. capitis, S. hominis, S. haemolyticus, S. lugdunensis and S. warneri. These studies show that the microbiota of the nasal cavity of adults is strikingly different from that of the pharynx, and that the nasal cavity is a primary habitat for several species of diphtheroids recognized as opportunistic pathogens. Under special circumstances, single species, including IgA1 protease-producing bacteria, may become predominant in a restricted area of the nasal mucosa. PMID:11200821

  14. Interleukin 4 inhibits in vitro proliferation of leukemic and normal human B cell precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Pandrau, D; Saeland, S; Duvert, V; Durand, I; Manel, A M; Zabot, M T; Philippe, N; Banchereau, J

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the effects of IL-4 on the proliferation and differentiation of leukemic and normal human B cell precursors (BCP). We have demonstrated that IL-4 significantly inhibited spontaneous [3H]thymidine ([3H]-TdR) incorporation by leukemic blasts from some B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) patients (8 of 14). Furthermore, IL-4 was found to suppress the spontaneous and factor-dependent (IL-7 and IL-3) proliferation of normal BCP (CD10+ surface [s] IgM- cells) isolated from fetal bone marrow. Maximum growth inhibition of either leukemic or normal BCP was reached at low IL-4 concentrations (10 U/ml), and the effect was specifically neutralized by anti-IL-4 antibody. IL-4 was further found to induce the expression of CD20 antigen on BCP-ALL cells from a number of the cases examined (5 of 8), but in contrast to leukemic cells, IL-4 failed to induce CD20 antigen on normal BCP. Finally, IL-4 was found to induce neither the expression of cytoplasmic mu chain, nor the appearance of sIgM+ cells in cultures of normal or leukemic BCP. Our data indicate that IL-4 has the potential to inhibit cell proliferation in leukemic and normal human B lymphopoiesis but is unable to drive the transition from BCP to mature B cells. Images PMID:1385474

  15. [A study of mandibular movement velocity and acceleration in young adults with normal people].

    PubMed

    Lu, P J

    1993-09-01

    The velocity and acceleration of mandibular movements including the border movement, habitual movement and functional movement were studied in 25 young adults by using D-SGG measuring instrument. The results showed that the conception of functional velocity and the maximum velocity of mandibular movement were developed. The physiological and clinical significance of the value of mandibular movement acceleration can be explained by Newton's Second law, F = ma. The author pointed out that in order to keep the necessary masticatory efficiency, the masticatory velocity enjoy the priority in matching with the masticatory force in mastication. PMID:8194415

  16. PULMONARY FUNCTION IN NORMAL HUMANS WITH EXERCISE AND TEMPERATURE-HUMIDITY STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fifty-eight normal young male human subjects were exposed for 4 h to comfortable conditions or to heat stress conditions with or without exercise. Heat stress produced significant changes in forced vital capacity, and possibly significant interactions were observed in peak expira...

  17. Imaging of matrix-disorder in normal and pathological human dermis using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen; Zheng, Liqin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2009-11-01

    In dermis, collagen and elastin are important structural proteins of extracellular maxtrix. The matrix-disorder is associated with various physiologic processes, such as localized scleroderma, anetoderma, photoaging. In this work, we demonstrate the capability of nonlinear optical microscopy in imaging structural proteins in normal and pathological human dermis.

  18. Assessing the Toxicities of Regulated and Unregulated Disinfection By-products in Normal Human Colon Cells.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of over six hundred disinfection by-products (DBPs) and less than half of the total organic halides present in finished water has created a need for short-term in vitro assays to address toxicities that might be associated with human exposure. . We are using a normal...

  19. Synergistic action of photosensitizers and normal human serum in a bactericidal process. I. Effect of chlorophylls.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Andrzej; Jankowski, Stanisław; Mirończyk, Agnieszka

    2003-01-01

    Susceptibility of some Gram-negative strains against the bactericidal action of normal human serum (NHS) and of chlorophyll, which induces production of reactive oxygen species by light, was studied. A synergistic bactericidal activity of NHS and chlorophyll against E. coli K1 and Shigella flexneri strains was observed. PMID:15095924

  20. Characterization of human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tălu, Stefan; Vlăduţiu, Cristina; Lupaşcu, Carmen A.

    2015-01-01

    AIM To characterize the human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal geometry and lacunarity parameters. METHODS Multifractal analysis using a box counting algorithm was carried out for a set of 12 segmented and skeletonized human retinal images, corresponding to both normal (6 images) and amblyopia states of the retina (6 images). RESULTS It was found that the microvascular geometry of the human retina network represents geometrical multifractals, characterized through subsets of regions having different scaling properties that are not evident in the fractal analysis. Multifractal analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a higher average of the generalized dimensions (Dq) for q=0, 1, 2 indicating a higher degree of the tree-dimensional complexity associated with the human retinal microvasculature network whereas images of healthy subjects show a lower value of generalized dimensions indicating normal complexity of biostructure. On the other hand, the lacunarity analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a lower average of the lacunarity parameter Λ than the corresponding values for normal images (segmented and skeletonized versions). CONCLUSION The multifractal and lacunarity analysis may be used as a non-invasive predictive complementary tool to distinguish amblyopic subjects from healthy subjects and hence this technique could be used for an early diagnosis of patients with amblyopia. PMID:26558216

  1. Looking at Images with Human Figures: Comparison between Autistic and Normal Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Geest, J. N.; Kemner, C.; Camfferman, G.; Verbaten, M. N.; van Engeland, H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the looking behavior of 16 autistic and 14 non-autistic children toward cartoon-like scenes that included a human figure was measured quantitatively using an infrared eye-tracking device. Fixation behavior of autistic children was similar to that of their age-and IQ-matched normal peers. Results do not support the idea that autistic…

  2. Normal breast tissue implanted into athymic nude mice identifies biomarkers of the effects of human pregnancy levels of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Blance, Rognvald N; Sims, Andrew H; Anderson, Elizabeth; Howell, Anthony; Clarke, Robert B

    2009-03-01

    We have generated a novel model system for the study of estrogen intervention in normal breast tissue. Nulliparous human breast tissue was implanted into immunocompromised nude mice and treated with high-dose estrogen to simulate the effects of pregnancy. Treatment of mice with human mid-pregnancy levels of 17beta-estradiol for a period of 4 weeks was followed by 4 weeks of withdrawal to mimic involution. Gene expression in the xenograft tissue was then analyzed by real-time reverse transcription-PCR to identify differences between treated and control tissues. Ten genes previously identified as altered by pregnancy in rodent models were found to be differentially expressed in human breast tissue with a > or =1.8-fold up-regulation of CDC42, TGFbeta3, DCN, KRT14, LTF, and AREG and a > or =0.7-fold down-regulation of STAT1, CTGF, IGF1, and VAMP1. Immunohistochemical analysis of archival paraffin-embedded adult premenopausal human breast tissue specimens identified a significantly lower level of expression of STAT1 (P < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U test) in parous compared with age-matched nulliparous tissue (median of 24% compared with 42% epithelial cells positive). We conclude that many of the pregnancy-induced breast cancer-protective changes observed in rodent models also occur in human breast tissue following intervention using human pregnancy levels of estrogen and that STAT1 expression is a potential biomarker of parity-induced breast cancer protection in the human breast. PMID:19258541

  3. Cdx2 modulates proliferation in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt cells

    SciTech Connect

    Escaffit, Fabrice; Pare, Frederic; Gauthier, Remy; Rivard, Nathalie; Boudreau, Francois; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois . E-mail: Jean-Francois.Beaulieu@USherbrooke.ca

    2006-03-31

    The homeobox gene Cdx2 is involved in the regulation of the expression of intestine specific markers such as sucrase-isomaltase and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase. Previous studies performed with immortalized or transformed intestinal cell lines have provided evidence that Cdx2 can promote morphological and functional differentiation in these experimental models. However, no data exist concerning the implication of this factor in normal human intestinal cell physiology. In the present work, we have investigated the role of Cdx2 in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt (HIEC) cells that lack this transcription factor. The establishment of HIEC cells expressing Cdx2 in an inducible manner shows that forced expression of Cdx2 significantly alters the proliferation of intestinal crypt cells and stimulates dipeptidylpeptidase IV expression but is not sufficient to trigger intestinal terminal differentiation. These observations suggest that Cdx2 requires additional factors to activate the enterocyte differentiation program in normal undifferentiated cells.

  4. Identification of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) as a potential diagnostic tool is attractive. MPM can effectively provide information about morphological and biochemical changes in biological tissues at the molecular level. In this paper, we attempt to identify normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections (both in transverse and longitudinal sections). The results show that MPM can display different microstructure changes in the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. MPM also can quantitatively describe the alteration of collagen content between normal and cancerous muscle layers. These are important pathological findings that MPM images can bring more detailed complementary information about tissue architecture and cell morphology through observing the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. This work demonstrates that MPM can be better for identifying the microstructural characteristics of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria in different sections.

  5. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor expression in normal and diseased human thyroid and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Waser, Beatrice; Blank, Annika; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Perren, Aurel; Reubi, Jean C

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP1) analogs may induce thyroid or pancreatic diseases in animals, raising questions about their use in diabetic patients. There is, however, controversy regarding expression of GLP1 receptors (GLP1R) in human normal and diseased thyroid and pancreas. Here, 221 human thyroid and pancreas samples were analyzed for GLP1R immunohistochemistry and compared with quantitative in vitro GLP1R autoradiography. Neither normal nor hyperplastic human thyroids containing parafollicular C cells express GLP1R with either method. Papillary thyroid cancer do not, and medullary thyroid carcinomas rarely express GLP1R. Insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells in the normal pancreas express a high density of GLP1R, whereas acinar cells express them in low amounts. Ductal epithelial cells do not express GLP1R. All benign insulinomas express high densities of GLP1R, whereas malignant insulinomas rarely express them. All ductal pancreatic carcinomas are GLP1R negative, whereas 6/20 PanIN 1/2 and 0/12 PanIN 3 express GLP1R. Therefore, normal thyroid, including normal and hyperplastic C cells, or papillary thyroid cancer are not targets for GLP1 analogs in humans. Conversely, all pancreatic insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells are physiological GLP1 targets, as well as most acini. As normal ductal epithelial cells or PanIN 3 or ductal pancreatic carcinomas do not express GLP1R, it seems unlikely that GLP1R is related to neoplastic transformation in pancreas. GLP1R-positive medullary thyroid carcinomas and all benign insulinomas are candidates for in vivo GLP1R targeting. PMID:25216224

  6. TRIM32 regulates skeletal muscle stem cell differentiation and is necessary for normal adult muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, Sarah; Otto, Anthony; Wu, Xiaoli; Miller, Pamela; Stelzer, Sandra; Wen, Yefei; Kuang, Shihuan; Wrogemann, Klaus; Patel, Ketan; Ding, Hao; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2012-01-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H) is an inherited autosomal recessive disease of skeletal muscle caused by a mutation in the TRIM32 gene. Currently its pathogenesis is entirely unclear. Typically the regeneration process of adult skeletal muscle during growth or following injury is controlled by a tissue specific stem cell population termed satellite cells. Given that TRIM32 regulates the fate of mammalian neural progenitor cells through controlling their differentiation, we asked whether TRIM32 could also be essential for the regulation of myogenic stem cells. Here we demonstrate for the first time that TRIM32 is expressed in the skeletal muscle stem cell lineage of adult mice, and that in the absence of TRIM32, myogenic differentiation is disrupted. Moreover, we show that the ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 controls this process through the regulation of c-Myc, a similar mechanism to that previously observed in neural progenitors. Importantly we show that loss of TRIM32 function induces a LGMD2H-like phenotype and strongly affects muscle regeneration in vivo. Our studies implicate that the loss of TRIM32 results in dysfunctional muscle stem cells which could contribute to the development of LGMD2H. PMID:22299041

  7. The urinary proteome and metabonome differ from normal in adults with mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Hall, Andrew M; Vilasi, Annalisa; Garcia-Perez, Isabel; Lapsley, Marta; Alston, Charlotte L; Pitceathly, Robert D S; McFarland, Robert; Schaefer, Andrew M; Turnbull, Doug M; Beaumont, Nick J; Hsuan, Justin J; Cutillas, Pedro R; Lindon, John C; Holmes, Elaine; Unwin, Robert J; Taylor, Robert W; Gorman, Grainne S; Rahman, Shamima; Hanna, Michael G

    2015-03-01

    We studied the extent and nature of renal involvement in a cohort of 117 adult patients with mitochondrial disease, by measuring urinary retinol-binding protein (RBP) and albumin; established markers of tubular and glomerular dysfunction, respectively. Seventy-five patients had the m.3243A>G mutation and the most frequent phenotypes within the entire cohort were 14 with MELAS, 33 with MIDD, and 17 with MERRF. Urinary RBP was increased in 29 of 75 of m.3243A>G patients, whereas albumin was increased in 23 of the 75. The corresponding numbers were 16 and 14, respectively, in the 42 non-m.3243A>G patients. RBP and albumin were higher in diabetic m.3243A>G patients than in nondiabetics, but there were no significant differences across the three major clinical phenotypes. The urine proteome (mass spectrometry) and metabonome (nuclear magnetic resonance) in a subset of the m.3243A>G patients were markedly different from controls, with the most significant alterations occurring in lysosomal proteins, calcium-binding proteins, and antioxidant defenses. Differences were also found between asymptomatic m.3243A>G carriers and controls. No patients had an elevated serum creatinine level, but 14% had hyponatremia, 10% had hypophosphatemia, and 14% had hypomagnesemia. Thus, abnormalities in kidney function are common in adults with mitochondrial disease, exist in the absence of elevated serum creatinine, and are not solely explained by diabetes. PMID:25207879

  8. What component of executive functions contributes to normal and impaired reading comprehension in young adults?

    PubMed

    Georgiou, George K; Das, J P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to examine what component of executive functions (EF) - planning and working memory - predicts reading comprehension in young adults (Study 1), and (b) to examine if less skilled comprehenders experience deficits in the EF components (Study 2). In Study 1, we assessed 178 university students (120 females; mean age=21.82 years) on planning (Planned Connections, Planned Codes, and Planned Patterns), working memory (Listening Span, Digit Span Backward, and Digit Memory), and reading comprehension (Nelson-Denny Reading Test). The results of structural equation modeling indicated that only planning was a significant predictor of reading comprehension. In Study 2, we assessed 30 university students with a specific reading comprehension deficit (19 females; mean age=23.01 years) and 30 controls (18 females; mean age=22.77 years) on planning (Planned Connections and Crack the Code) and working memory (Listening Span and Digit Span Backward). The results showed that less skilled comprehenders performed significantly poorer than controls only in planning. Taken together, the findings of both studies suggest that planning is the preeminent component of EF that is driving its relationship with reading comprehension in young adults. PMID:26704777

  9. Construction of a normalized directionally cloned cDNA library from adult heart and analysis of 3040 clones by partial sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Ogiwara, A; Uchiyama, I; Takagi, T; Yazaki, Y; Nakamura, Y

    1996-07-01

    Large-scale sequencing of clones from cDNA libraries derived from specific tissues is a rapid and efficient way of discovering novel genes expressed in those tissues. However, because the heart is continually contracting and relaxing, it strongly expresses muscle-contractile genes and/or mitochondrial genes, a bias that reduces the efficiency of this method. To improve the efficiency of identifying novel genes expressed in the heart, we constructed a normalized directionally cloned cDNA library from adult heart and partially sequenced 3040 clones. Comparisons of these sequence data with known DNA sequences in the database revealed that 57.1% of the clones matched human genes already known, 23.4% were identical or almost identical to human expressed sequence tags (ESTs), 14.2% bore no significant homology to any sequences in the database, and 1.2% represented repetitive sequences. The remaining 4.1% showed some homology with known genes, and Northern blot analysis of several clones in this category revealed that most of them were expressed mainly in the heart and skeletal muscle. After redundancy was excluded, the 3040 clones accounted for 1395 distinctive ESTs, 446 of which exhibited no match to any known sequence. Our results suggest that our normalized library is less redundant than standard libraries and is a useful resource for cataloging genes expressed in the heart. PMID:8661126

  10. Normalized Metadata Generation for Human Retrieval Using Multiple Video Surveillance Cameras.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Inhye; Lee, Seungwon; Paik, Joonki

    2016-01-01

    Since it is impossible for surveillance personnel to keep monitoring videos from a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an efficient technique is needed to help recognize important situations by retrieving the metadata of an object-of-interest. In a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an object detected in a camera has a different shape in another camera, which is a critical issue of wide-range, real-time surveillance systems. In order to address the problem, this paper presents an object retrieval method by extracting the normalized metadata of an object-of-interest from multiple, heterogeneous cameras. The proposed metadata generation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) generation of a three-dimensional (3D) human model; (ii) human object-based automatic scene calibration; and (iii) metadata generation. More specifically, an appropriately-generated 3D human model provides the foot-to-head direction information that is used as the input of the automatic calibration of each camera. The normalized object information is used to retrieve an object-of-interest in a wide-range, multiple-camera surveillance system in the form of metadata. Experimental results show that the 3D human model matches the ground truth, and automatic calibration-based normalization of metadata enables a successful retrieval and tracking of a human object in the multiple-camera video surveillance system. PMID:27347961

  11. Normalized Metadata Generation for Human Retrieval Using Multiple Video Surveillance Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Inhye; Lee, Seungwon; Paik, Joonki

    2016-01-01

    Since it is impossible for surveillance personnel to keep monitoring videos from a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an efficient technique is needed to help recognize important situations by retrieving the metadata of an object-of-interest. In a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an object detected in a camera has a different shape in another camera, which is a critical issue of wide-range, real-time surveillance systems. In order to address the problem, this paper presents an object retrieval method by extracting the normalized metadata of an object-of-interest from multiple, heterogeneous cameras. The proposed metadata generation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) generation of a three-dimensional (3D) human model; (ii) human object-based automatic scene calibration; and (iii) metadata generation. More specifically, an appropriately-generated 3D human model provides the foot-to-head direction information that is used as the input of the automatic calibration of each camera. The normalized object information is used to retrieve an object-of-interest in a wide-range, multiple-camera surveillance system in the form of metadata. Experimental results show that the 3D human model matches the ground truth, and automatic calibration-based normalization of metadata enables a successful retrieval and tracking of a human object in the multiple-camera video surveillance system. PMID:27347961

  12. Establishment of proliferative tetraploid cells from telomerase-immortalized normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu; Seyama, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Aneuploidy is observed in the majority of human cancers and is considered to be causally related to carcinogenesis. Although malignant aneuploid cells are suggested to develop from polyploid cells formed in precancerous lesions, the mechanisms of this process remain elusive. This is partly because no experimental model is available where nontransformed polyploid human cells propagate in vitro. We previously showed that proliferative tetraploid cells can be established from normal human fibroblasts by treatment with the spindle poison demecolcine (DC). However, the limited lifespan of these cells hampered detailed analysis of a link between chromosomal instability and the oncogenic transformation of polyploid cells. Here, we report the establishment of proliferative tetraploid cells from the telomerase-immortalized normal human fibroblast cell line TIG-1. Treatment of immortalized diploid cells with DC for 4 days resulted in proliferation of cells with tetraploid DNA content and near-tetraploid/tetraploid chromosome counts. Established tetraploid cells had functional TP53 despite growing at almost the same rate as diploid cells. The frequency of clonal and sporadic chromosome aberrations in tetraploid cells was higher than in diploid cells and in one experiment, gradually increased with repeated subculture. This study suggests that tetraploid cells established from telomerase-immortalized normal human fibroblasts can be a valuable model for studying chromosomal instability and the oncogenic potential of polyploid cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917432

  13. Differentiation of normal and transformed human fibroblasts in vitro is influenced by electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rodemann, H.P.; Bayreuther, K.; Pfleiderer, G.

    1989-06-01

    We studied the effect of symmetric, biphasic sinusoidal electromagnetic fields (EMF) (20 Hz, 6 mT) on the differentiation of normal human skin fibroblasts (HH-8), normal human lung fibroblasts (WI38), and SV40-transformed human lung fibroblasts (WI38SV40) in in vitro cultures. Cells were exposed up to 21 days for 2 x 6 h per day to EMF. Normal mitotic human skin and lung fibroblasts could be induced to differentiate into postmitotic cells upon exposure to EMF. Concomitantly, the synthesis of total collagen as well as total cellular protein increased significantly by a factor of 5-13 in EMF-induced postmitotic cells. As analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled polypeptides, EMF-induced postmitotic cells express the same differentiation-dependent and cell type-specific marker proteins as their spontaneously arising counterparts. In SV40-transformed human lung fibroblasts (cell line WI38SV40) the exposure to EMF induced the differentiation of mitotic WI38SV40 cells into postmitotic and degenerating cells in subpopulations of WI38SV40 cell cultures. Other subpopulations of WI38SV40 cells did not show any effect of EMF on cell proliferation and differentiation. These results indicate that long-term EMF exposure of fibroblasts in vitro induces the differentiation of mitotic to postmitotic cells that are characterized by differentiation-specific proteins and differentiation-dependent enhanced metabolic activities.

  14. Evidence of progenitor cells of glandular and myoepithelial cell lineages in the human adult female breast epithelium: a new progenitor (adult stem) cell concept.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Werner; Buerger, Horst

    2003-10-01

    Although experimental data clearly confirm the existence of self-renewing mammary stem cells, the characteristics of such progenitor cells have never been satisfactorily defined. Using a double immunofluorescence technique for simultaneous detection of the basal cytokeratin 5, the glandular cytokeratins 8/18 and the myoepithelial differentiation marker smooth muscle actin (SMA), we were able to demonstrate the presence of CK5+ cells in human adult breast epithelium. These cells have the potential to differentiate to either glandular (CK8/18+) or myoepithelial cells (SMA+) through intermediary cells (CK5+ and CK8/18+ or SMA+). We therefore proceeded on the assumption that the CK5+ cells are phenotypically and behaviourally progenitor (committed adult stem) cells of human breast epithelium. Furthermore, we furnish evidence that most of these progenitor cells are located in the luminal epithelium of the ductal lobular tree. Based on data obtained in extensive analyses of proliferative breast disease lesions, we have come to regard usual ductal hyperplasia as a progenitor cell-derived lesion, whereas most breast cancers seem to evolve from differentiated glandular cells. Double immunofluorescence experiments provide a new tool to characterize phenotypically progenitor (adult stem) cells and their progenies. This model has been shown to be of great value for a better understanding not only of normal tissue regeneration but also of proliferative breast disease. Furthermore, this model provides a new tool for unravelling further the regulatory mechanisms that govern normal and pathological cell growth. PMID:14521517

  15. Effects of Indoor Horseback Riding and Virtual Reality Exercises on the Dynamic Balance Ability of Normal Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong; Park, Jungseo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to determine the effect of indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises on the dynamic balance ability of normal adults. [Subjects] This study enrolled 24 normal adults and divided them into two groups: an indoor horseback riding exercise group (IHREG, n = 12) and a virtual reality exercise group (VREG, n = 12). [Methods] IHREG exercised on indoor horseback riding equipment and VREG exercised using the Nintendo Wii Fit three times a week for six weeks. The Biodex Balance System was used to analyze dynamic balance as measured by the overall stability index (OSI), anteroposterior stability index (APSI), and mediolateral stability index (MLSI). [Results] In the within-group comparison, IHREG and VERG both showed significant decreases in the dynamic balance indexes of OSI, APSI, and MLSI after the intervention, but no significant difference was found between the groups. [Conclusion] Both indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises were effective at improving the subjects’ dynamic balance ability as measured by OSI, APSI, and MLSI, and can be used as additional exercises for patients with conditions affecting postural control. PMID:25540494

  16. Effects of indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises on the dynamic balance ability of normal healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong; Park, Jungseo

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to determine the effect of indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises on the dynamic balance ability of normal adults. [Subjects] This study enrolled 24 normal adults and divided them into two groups: an indoor horseback riding exercise group (IHREG, n = 12) and a virtual reality exercise group (VREG, n = 12). [Methods] IHREG exercised on indoor horseback riding equipment and VREG exercised using the Nintendo Wii Fit three times a week for six weeks. The Biodex Balance System was used to analyze dynamic balance as measured by the overall stability index (OSI), anteroposterior stability index (APSI), and mediolateral stability index (MLSI). [Results] In the within-group comparison, IHREG and VERG both showed significant decreases in the dynamic balance indexes of OSI, APSI, and MLSI after the intervention, but no significant difference was found between the groups. [Conclusion] Both indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises were effective at improving the subjects' dynamic balance ability as measured by OSI, APSI, and MLSI, and can be used as additional exercises for patients with conditions affecting postural control. PMID:25540494

  17. Self-Reported Hearing Difficulties Among Adults With Normal Audiograms: The Beaver Dam Offspring Study

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Kelly L.; Pinto, Alex; Fischer, Mary E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Levy, Sarah; Tweed, Ted S.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Clinicians encounter patients who report experiencing hearing difficulty (HD) even when audiometric thresholds fall within normal limits. When there is no evidence of audiometric hearing loss, it generates debate over possible biomedical and psychosocial etiologies. It is possible that self-reported HDs relate to variables within and/or outside the scope of audiology. The purpose of this study is to identify how often, on a population basis, people with normal audiometric thresholds self-report HD and to identify factors associated with such HDs. Design This was a cross-sectional investigation of participants in the Beaver Dam Offspring Study. HD was defined as a self-reported HD on a four-item scale despite having pure-tone audiometric thresholds within normal limits (<20 dB HL0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 kHz bilaterally, at each frequency). Distortion product otoacoustic emissions and word-recognition performance in quiet and with competing messages were also analyzed. In addition to hearing assessments, relevant factors such as sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, environmental exposures, medical history, health-related quality of life, and symptoms of neurological disorders were also examined as possible risk factors. The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression was used to probe symptoms associated with depression, and the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 mental score was used to quantify psychological stress and social and role disability due to emotional problems. The Visual Function Questionnaire-25 and contrast sensitivity test were used to query vision difficulties. Results Of the 2783 participants, 686 participants had normal audiometric thresholds. An additional grouping variable was created based on the available scores of HD (four self-report questions), which reduced the total dataset to n = 682 (age range, 21–67 years). The percentage of individuals with normal audiometric thresholds who self-reported HD was 12.0% (82 of 682). The

  18. A GROWTH CURVE MODEL OF LEARNING ACQUISITION AMONG COGNITIVELY NORMAL OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard N.; Rosenberg, Adrienne L.; Morris, John N.; Allaire, Jason C.; McCoy, Karin J. M.; Marsiske, Michael; Kleinman, Ken P.; Rebok, George W.; Malloy, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to model recall and learning on the Auditory Verbal Learning Test using latent growth curve techniques. Participants were older adults recruited for the ACTIVE cognitive intervention pilot. A series of nested models revealed that an approximately logarithmic growth curve model provided optimal fit to the data. Although recall and learning factors were statistically uncorrelated, a fitted multivariate model suggested that initial recall was significantly associated with demographic characteristics but unrelated to health factors and cognitive abilities. Individual differences in learning were related to race/ethnicity, speed of processing, verbal knowledge, and global cognitive function level. These results suggest that failing to recognize initial recall and learning as distinct constructs clouds the interpretation of supraspan memory tasks. PMID:16036723

  19. The Biomechanics of the Pediatric and Adult Human Thoracic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J.; Lau, Sabrina; Riley, Patrick; Lamp, John; Kent, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of literature points out the relevance of the thoracic spine dynamics in understanding the thorax-restraint interaction as well as in determining the kinematics of the head and cervical spine. This study characterizes the dynamic response in bending of eight human spinal specimens (4 pediatric: ages 7 and 15 years, 4 adult: ages 48 and 52 years) from two sections along the thoracic spine (T2–T4 and T7–T9). Each specimen consisted of three vertebral bodies connected by the corresponding intervertebral discs. All ligaments were preserved in the preparation with the exception of the inter-transverse ligament. Specimens were exposed to a series of five dynamic bending ramp-and-hold tests with varying amplitudes at a nominal rate of 2 rad/s. After this battery of tests, failure experiments were conducted. The 7-year-old specimen showed the lowest tolerance to a moment (T2–T4: 12.1 Nm; T7–T9: 11.6 Nm) with no significant reduction of the relative rotation between the vertebrae. The 15-year-old failure tolerance was comparable to that of the adult specimens. Failure of the adult specimens occurred within a wide range at the T2–T4 thoracic section (23.3 Nm- 53.0 Nm) while it was circumscribed to the interval 48.3 Nm-52.5 Nm for the T7–T9 section. The series of dynamic ramp-and-hold were used to assess two different scaling methods (mass scaling and SAE scaling). Neither method was able to capture the stiffness, peak moment and relaxation characteristics exhibited by the pediatric specimens. PMID:22105396

  20. Gender specificity of sucrose induced analgesia in human adults.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Manasi; Bhatia, Renu; Mathur, Rashmi

    2007-01-01

    Sweet, palatable substances such as sucrose are reported to calm infants undergoing routine investigative procedures. The analgesic effect persists in pre pubertal children and adults with a hint of gender dependent variation in the analgesic response. The present study was therefore designed to explore gender specificity of sucrose induced analgesia in adult volunteers utilizing the nociceptive flexion reflex, an objective tool for pain assessment. Nociceptive flexion reflex was recorded, both before and after (up to 15 min) ingestion of 100 ml of 25% sucrose solution in 6 male and 6 female volunteers. In the male volunteers the maximum amplitude of the response was 20.8 +/- 7.7 microV before sucrose ingestion and 22.6 +/- 9.1 microV, 6.6 +/- 0.7 microV, 6.2 +/- 1.1 microV, 7.5 +/- 0.9 microV at 0, 5, 10 and 15 minutes post sucrose ingestion respectively. In female volunteers, the maximum amplitude of the response was 33.7 +/- 17.7 microV before sucrose ingestion and 43.6 +/- 17.2 microV, 7.1 +/- 1.2 microV, 25.9 +/- 16.1 microV, 50.6 +/- 16.3 microV at the same time intervals post sucrose ingestion. The maximum amplitude values were significantly lower in the males at 10 and 15 minutes after sucrose ingestion (P < 0.05). This is the first objective report of gender specificity in sucrose induced analgesia in adult humans. The gender dependent variation in sucrose induced analgesia is prolonged in male (15 min) and short lived in female (5 min) volunteers. This knowledge may have important implications in pain management. PMID:18476396

  1. Radioimmunoassay of erythropoietin: circulating levels in normal and polycythemic human beings.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J F; Ebbe, S N; Hollander, L; Cutting, H O; Miller, M E; Cronkite, E P

    1982-05-01

    Techniques are described in detail for the RIA of human Ep in unextracted plasma or serum. With 100 microliters of sample, the essay is sensitive at an Ep concentration of approximately 4 mU/ml, and when required, the sensitivity can be increased to 0.4 mU/ml, a range considerably less than the concentration observed in normal human beings. This is approximately 100 times more sensitive than existing in vivo bioassays for this hormone. Studies concerned with the validation of the Ep RIA show a high degree of correlation with the polycythemic mouse bioassay. Dilutions of a variety of human serum samples show a parallel relationship with the standard reference preparation for Ep. Validation of the RIA is further confirmed by observations of appropriate increases or decreases in circulating Ep levels in physiological and clinical conditions known to be associated with stimulation of suppression of Ep secretion. Significantly different mean serum concentrations of 17.2 mU/ml for normal male subjects and 18.8 mU/ml for normal female subjects were observed. Mean plasma Ep concentrations in patients with polycythemia vera are significantly decreased, and those of patients with secondary polycythemia are significantly increased as compared to plasma levels in normal subjects. These results demonstrate an initial practical value of the Ep RIA inthe hematology clinic, which will most certainly be expanded with its more extensive use. PMID:7069267

  2. Isolation and characterization of human malignant glioma cells from histologically normal brain.

    PubMed

    Silbergeld, D L; Chicoine, M R

    1997-03-01

    Brain invasion prevents complete surgical extirpation of malignant gliomas; however, invasive cells from distant, histologically normal brain previously have not been isolated, cultured, and characterized. To evaluate invasive human malignant glioma cells, the authors established cultures from gross tumor and histologically normal brain. Three men and one woman, with a mean age of 67 years, underwent two frontal and two temporal lobectomies for tumors, which yielded specimens of both gross tumor and histologically normal brain. Each specimen was acquired a minimum of 4 cm from the gross tumor. The specimens were split: a portion was sent for neuropathological evaluation (three glioblastomas multiforme and one oligodendroglioma) and a portion was used to establish cell lines. Morphologically, the specimens of gross tumor and histologically normal brain were identical in three of the four cell culture pairs. Histochemical staining characteristics were consistent both within each pair and when compared with the specimens sent for neuropathological evaluation. Cultures demonstrated anchorage-independent growth in soft agarose and neoplastic karyotypes. Growth rates in culture were greater for histologically normal brain than for gross tumor in three of the four culture pairs. Although the observed increases in growth rates of histologically normal brain cultures do not correlate with in vivo behavior, these findings corroborate the previously reported stem cell potential of invasive glioma cells. Using the radial dish assay, no significant differences in motility between cultures of gross tumor and histologically normal brain were found. In summary, tumor cells were cultured from histologically normal brain acquired from a distance greater than 4 cm from the gross tumor, indicating the relative insensitivity of standard histopathological identification of invasive glioma cells (and hence the inadequacy of frozen-section evaluation of resection margins). Cell lines

  3. Human neural tuning estimated from compound action potentials in normal hearing human volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschooten, Eric; Desloovere, Christian; Joris, Philip X.

    2015-12-01

    The sharpness of cochlear frequency tuning in humans is debated. Evoked otoacoustic emissions and psychophysical measurements suggest sharper tuning in humans than in laboratory animals [15], but this is disputed based on comparisons of behavioral and electrophysiological measurements across species [14]. Here we used evoked mass potentials to electrophysiologically quantify tuning (Q10) in humans. We combined a notched noise forward masking paradigm [9] with the recording of trans tympanic compound action potentials (CAP) from masked probe tones in awake human and anesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta). We compare our results to data obtained with the same paradigm in cat and chinchilla [16], and find that CAP-Q10values in human are ˜1.6x higher than in cat and chinchilla and ˜1.3x higher than in monkey. To estimate frequency tuning of single auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) in humans, we derive conversion functions from ANFs in cat, chinchilla, and monkey and apply these to the human CAP measurements. The data suggest that sharp cochlear tuning is a feature of old-world primates.

  4. Speech Recognition in Real-Life Background Noise by Young and Middle-Aged Adults with Normal Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Tae; Heo, Hye Jeong; Choi, Chul-Hee; Choi, Seong Hee; Lee, Kyungjae

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives People usually converse in real-life background noise. They experience more difficulty understanding speech in noise than in a quiet environment. The present study investigated how speech recognition in real-life background noise is affected by the type of noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and age. Subjects and Methods Eighteen young adults and fifteen middle-aged adults with normal hearing participated in the present study. Three types of noise [subway noise, vacuum noise, and multi-talker babble (MTB)] were presented via a loudspeaker at three SNRs of 5 dB, 0 dB, and -5 dB. Speech recognition was analyzed using the word recognition score. Results 1) Speech recognition in subway noise was the greatest in comparison to vacuum noise and MTB, 2) at the SNR of -5 dB, speech recognition was greater in subway noise than vacuum noise and in vacuum noise than MTB while at the SNRs of 0 and 5 dB, it was greater in subway noise than both vacuum noise and MTB and there was no difference between vacuum noise and MTB, 3) speech recognition decreased as the SNR decreased, and 4) young adults showed better speech recognition performance in all types of noises at all SNRs than middle-aged adults. Conclusions Speech recognition in real-life background noise was affected by the type of noise, SNR, and age. The results suggest that the frequency distribution, amplitude fluctuation, informational masking, and cognition may be important underlying factors determining speech recognition performance in noise. PMID:26185790

  5. Complement Regulatory Activity of Normal Human Intraocular Fluid Is Mediated by MCP, DAF, and CD59

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Kaplan, Henry J.; Suk, Hye-Jung; Bora, Puran S.; Bora, Nalini S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To identify the molecules in normal human intraocular fluid (aqueous humor and vitreous) that inhibit the functional activity of the complement system. Methods Aqueous humor and vitreous were obtained from patients with noninflammatory ocular disease at the time of surgery. Samples were incubated with normal human serum (NHS), and the mixture assayed for inhibition of the classical and alternative complement pathways using standard CH50 and AH50 hemolytic assays, respectively. Both aqueous humor and vitreous were fractionated by microconcentrators and size exclusion column chromatography. The inhibitory molecules were identified by immunoblotting as well as by studying the effect of depletion of membrane cofactor protein (MCP), decay-accelerating factor (DAF), and CD59 on inhibitory activity. Results Both aqueous humor and vitreous inhibited the activity of the classical pathway (CH50). Microcentrifugation revealed the major inhibitory activity resided in the fraction with an Mr ≥ 3 kDa. Chromatography on an S-100-HR column demonstrated that the most potent inhibition was associated with the high-molecular-weight fractions (≥ 19.5 kDa). In contrast to unfractionated aqueous and vitreous, fractions with an Mr ≥ 3 kDa also had an inhibitory effect on the alternative pathway activity (AH50). The complement regulatory activity in normal human intraocular fluid was partially blocked by monoclonal antibodies against MCP, DAF, and CD59. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the presence of these three molecules in normal intraocular fluid. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that normal human intraocular fluid (aqueous humor and vitreous) contains complement inhibitory factors. Furthermore, the high-molecular-weight factors appear to be the soluble forms of MCP, DAF, and CD59. PMID:11095615

  6. Uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 14 in two cases: An abnormal child and a normal adult

    SciTech Connect

    Papenhausen, P.R.; Mueller, O.T.; Sutcliffe, M.; Diamond, T.M.; Kousseff, B.G.; Johnson, V.P.

    1995-11-20

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) of a number of different chromosomes has been found in association with abnormal phenotypes. A growing body of evidence for an imprinting effect involving chromosome 14 has been accumulating. We report on a case of paternal UPD of chromosome 14 studied in late gestation due to polyhydramnios and a ventral wall hernia. A prenatal karyotype documented a balanced Robertsonian 14:14 translocation. The baby was born prematurely with hairy forehead, retrognathia, mild puckering of the lips and finger contractures. Hypotonia has persisted since birth and at age one year, a tracheostomy for laryngomalacia and gastrostomy for feeding remain necessary. Absence of maternal VNTR polymorphisms and homozygosity of paternal polymorphisms using chromosome 14 specific probes at D14S22 and D14S13 loci indicated paternal uniparental isodisomy (pUPID). Parental chromosomes were normal. We also report on a case of maternal LTPD in a normal patient with a balanced Robertsonian 14:14 translocation and a history of multiple miscarriages. Five previous reports of chromosome 14 UPD suggest that an adverse developmental effect may be more severe whenever the UPD is paternal in origin. This is the second reported patient with paternal UPD and the fifth reported with maternal UPD, and only few phenotypic similarities are apparent. Examination of these chromosome 14 UPD cases of maternal and paternal origin suggests that there are syndromic imprinting effects. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Novel Observations From Next-Generation RNA Sequencing of Highly Purified Human Adult and Fetal Islet Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, David M; Nowosielska, Anetta; Afik, Shaked; Pechhold, Susanne; Cura, Anthony J; Kennedy, Norman J; Kim, Soyoung; Kucukural, Alper; Davis, Roger J; Kent, Sally C; Greiner, Dale L; Garber, Manuel G; Harlan, David M; diIorio, Philip

    2015-09-01

    Understanding distinct gene expression patterns of normal adult and developing fetal human pancreatic α- and β-cells is crucial for developing stem cell therapies, islet regeneration strategies, and therapies designed to increase β-cell function in patients with diabetes (type 1 or 2). Toward that end, we have developed methods to highly purify α-, β-, and δ-cells from human fetal and adult pancreata by intracellular staining for the cell-specific hormone content, sorting the subpopulations by flow cytometry, and, using next-generation RNA sequencing, we report the detailed transcriptomes of fetal and adult α- and β-cells. We observed that human islet composition was not influenced by age, sex, or BMI, and transcripts for inflammatory gene products were noted in fetal β-cells. In addition, within highly purified adult glucagon-expressing α-cells, we observed surprisingly high insulin mRNA expression, but not insulin protein expression. This transcriptome analysis from highly purified islet α- and β-cell subsets from fetal and adult pancreata offers clear implications for strategies that seek to increase insulin expression in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25931473

  8. Radiographic Comparison of Human Lung Shape During Normal Gravity and Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, D. B.; Friedman, P. J.; West, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Chest radiographs in five seated normal volunteers at 1 G and 0 G were made with a view toward comparing human lung shape during normal gravity and weightlessness. Lung shape was assessed by measuring lung heights and widths in upper, middle and lower lung regions. No significant differences were found between any of the 1-G and 0-G measurements, although there was a slight tendency for the lung to become shorter and wider at 0 G. The evidence that gravity causes regional differences in ventilation by direct action on the lung is consistent with the theoretical analysis of West and Matthews (1972).

  9. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Murakami, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Okano, Teruo

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. {yields} The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. {yields} Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  10. Native cellular fluorescence characteristics of normal and malignant epithelial cells from human larynx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmeswearan, Diagaradjane; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Nalini, R.; Aruna, Prakasa R.; Veeraganesh, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1997-08-01

    Many applications of native fluorescence spectroscopy of intrinsic biomolecules such as Try, Tyr, Phe, NADH and FAD are reported on both the characterization and the discrimination of malignant tissues from the normal. In the field of diagnostic oncology, extensive studies have been made to distinguish the normal from malignant condition in breast, cervix, colon and bronchus. From the studies made by Alfano and co-workers, it was found that the emission at 340 and 440 nm under UV excitation have shown statistically significant difference between normal and malignant tissues. As tissues are highly complex in nature, it is worth to known whether the changes arise from cells or from other extracellular tissue components, so as to enable us to have better understanding on the transformation mechanism of normal into malignant and to go for an improved approach in the effective optical diagnosis. In this context, the present study addresses the question of whether there are differences in the native cellular fluorescence characteristics between normal and malignant epithelial cells from human larynx. With this aim, the UV fluorescence emission spectra in the wavelength region of excitation between 270 - 310 nm and the excitation spectra for 340 nm emission were measured and analyzed. In order to quantify the altered fluorescence signal between the normal and malignant cells, different ratio parameters were introduced.

  11. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  12. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  13. Chondroadherin Fragmentation Mediated by the Protease HTRA1 Distinguishes Human Intervertebral Disc Degeneration from Normal Aging*

    PubMed Central

    Akhatib, Bashar; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Gawri, Rahul; Ouellet, Jean; Jarzem, Peter; Heinegård, Dick; Mort, John; Roughley, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet

    2013-01-01

    Chondroadherin, a member of the leucine-rich repeat family, has previously been demonstrated to be fragmented in some juveniles with idiopathic scoliosis. This observation led us to investigate adults with disc degeneration. Immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that non-degenerate discs from three different age groups show no chondroadherin fragmentation. Furthermore, the chondroadherin fragments in adult degenerate disc and the juvenile scoliotic disc were compared via immunoblot analysis and appeared to have a similar size. We then investigated whether or not chondroadherin fragmentation increases with the severity of disc degeneration. Three different samples with different severities were chosen from the same disc, and chondroadherin fragmentation was found to be more abundant with increasing severity of degeneration. This observation led us to the creation of a neoepitope antibody to the cleavage site observed. We then observed that the cleavage site in adult degenerate discs and juvenile scoliotic discs was identical as confirmed by the neoepitope antibody. Consequently, investigation of the protease capable of cleaving chondroadherin at this site was necessary. In vitro digests of disc tissue demonstrated that ADAMTS-4 and -5; cathepsins K, B, and L; and MMP-3, -7, -12, and -13 were incapable of cleavage of chondroadherin at this site and that HTRA1 was indeed the only protease capable. Furthermore, increased protein levels of the processed form of HTRA1 were demonstrated in degenerate disc tissues via immunoblotting. The results suggest that chondroadherin fragmentation can be used as a biomarker to distinguish the processes of disc degeneration from normal aging. PMID:23673665

  14. The effect of inhaled bronchoconstrictors on transcutaneous gas tensions in normal adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Gray, B; Barnes, N

    1987-01-01

    The administration of histamine and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) by nebulised aerosol in logarithmically increasing doses to normal subjects resulted in significant bronchoconstriction. Transcutaneous oxygen tension (tcPO2) was monitored during and after the bronchial challenge tests. Following histamine challenge there was significant hypoxaemia in all subjects (mean fall in tcPO2, 20 mmHg). However, following LTD4 administration, there was a small and insignificant fall in tcPO2. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension (tcPCO2) was also monitored throughout bronchial challenge, but showed no significant change. We suggest that the hypoxaemia following histamine challenge was due to increased ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatching in the lung induced by histamine deposition. PMID:3673787

  15. Normal Neurochemistry in the Prefrontal and Cerebellar Brain of Adults with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Dominique; Perlov, Evgeniy; Maier, Simon; Feige, Bernd; Nickel, Kathrin; Goll, Peter; Bubl, Emanuel; Lange, Thomas; Glauche, Volkmar; Graf, Erika; Ebert, Dieter; Sobanski, Esther; Philipsen, Alexandra; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder. In an attempt to extend earlier neurochemical findings, we organized a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study as part of a large, government-funded, prospective, randomized, multicenter clinical trial comparing the effectiveness of specific psychotherapy with counseling and stimulant treatment with placebo treatment (Comparison of Methylphenidate and Psychotherapy Study). We report the baseline neurochemical data for the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the cerebellum in a case–control setting. For the trial, 1,480 adult patients were contacted for participation, 518 were assessed for eligibility, 433 were randomized, and 187 were potentially eligible for neuroimaging. The control group included 119 healthy volunteers. Single-voxel proton MRS was performed. In the patient group, 113 ACC and 104 cerebellar spectra fulfilled all quality criteria for inclusion in statistical calculations, as did 82 ACC and 78 cerebellar spectra in the control group. We did not find any significant neurometabolic differences between the ADHD and control group in the ACC (Wilks’ lambda test: p = 0.97) or in the cerebellum (p = 0.62). Thus, we were unable to replicate earlier findings in this methodologically sophisticated study. We discuss our findings in the context of a comprehensive review of other MRS studies on ADHD and a somewhat skeptical neuropsychiatric research perspective. As in other neuropsychiatric disorders, the unclear nosological status of ADHD might be an explanation for false-negative findings. PMID:26441572

  16. The Whole-Brain N-Acetylaspartate Correlates with Education in Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Glodzik, Lidia; Wu, William E.; Babb, James S.; Achtnichts, Lutz; Amann, Michael; Sollberger, Marc; Monsch, Andreas U.; Gass, Achim; Gonen, Oded

    2012-01-01

    N-acetylaspartate (NAA) is an index of neuronal integrity. We hypothesized that in healthy subjects its whole brain concentration (WBNAA) may be related to formal educational attainment, a common proxy for cognitive reserve. To test this hypothesis 97 middle aged to elderly subjects (51–89 years old, 38% women) underwent brain MRI and non-localizing proton spectroscopy. Their WBNAA was obtained by dividing their whole-head NAA amount with the brain volume. Intracranial volume and fractional brain volume, a metric of brain atrophy, were also determined. Each subject’s educational attainment was the sum of their years of formal education. In the entire group higher education was associated with larger intracranial volume. The relationship between WBNAA and education was observed only in younger (51–70 years old) participants. In this group education explained 21% variance in WBNAA. More WBNAA was related to more years of formal education in adults and younger elders. Prospective studies can determine whether this relationship reflects a true advantage from years of training versus innate characteristic predisposing to higher achievements later in life. We offer that late life WBNAA may be more affected by other like factors acting at midlife and later. PMID:23177924

  17. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism is normal in young adults with Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.L.; Kumar, A.; Herscovitch, P.; Haxby, J.V.; Moore, A.M.; White, B.; Friedland, R.P.; Rapoport, S.I. )

    1990-03-01

    Regional CMRglc (rCMRglc) values were measured with ({sup 18}F)2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET), using a Scanditronix PC-1024-7B scanner, in 14 healthy, noninstitutionalized subjects with trisomy 21 (Down syndrome; DS) (mean age 30.0 years, range 25-38 years) and in 13 sex-matched, healthy volunteers (mean age 29.5 years, range 22-38 years). In the DS group, mean mental age on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test was 7.8 years and dementia was not present. Resting rCMRglc was determined with eyes covered and ears occluded in a quiet, darkened room. Global gray CMRglc equaled 8.76 +/- 0.76 mg/100 g/min (mean +/- SD) in the DS group as compared with 8.74 +/- 1.19 mg/100 g/min in the control group (p greater than 0.05). Gray matter regional measurements also did not differ between groups. The ratio of rCMRglc to global CMRglc, calculated to reduce the variance associated with absolute rCMRglc, and right/left ratios did not show any consistent differences. These results show that healthy young DS adults do not have alterations in regional or global brain glucose metabolism, as measured with 18FDG and PET, prior to an age at which the neuropathological changes in Alzheimer disease are reported to occur.

  18. Hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase 2B1b expression and localization in normal human brain

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Emily D.; Faye-Petersen, Ona; Falany, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    Steroid sulfonation in the human brain has not been well characterized. The major sulfotransferase (SULT) isoforms that conjugate steroids in humans are SULT1E1, SULT2A1, and SULT2B1b. SULT2B1b catalyzes the sulfonation of 3β-hydroxysteroids, including neurosteroids dehydroepiandrosterone and pregnenolone, as well as cholesterol and several hydroxycholesterols. SULT2B1b mRNA and protein expression were detected in adult and fetal human brain sections, whereas neither mRNA, nor protein expression were identified for SULT1E1 or SULT2A1. Using immunohistochemical analysis, SULT2B1b expression was detected in neurons and oligodendrocytes in adult brain and in epithelial tissues in 28-week-old fetal brain. Sulfonation of cholesterol, oxysterols, and neurosteroids in the brain is apparently catalyzed by SULT2B1b since expression of neither SULT2A1 nor SULT1E1 was detected in human brain sections. SULT2B1b mRNA and protein were also detected in human U373-MG glioblastoma cells. Both mRNA and protein expression of liver X receptor (LXR)-β, but not LXR-α, were detected in U373-MG cells, and LXR-β activation resulted in a decrease in SULT2B1b protein expression. Since hydroxycholesterols are important physiological LXR activators, this suggests a role for regulation of sterol metabolism by LXR and SULT2B1b. Therefore, elucidating key enzymes in the metabolism of cholesterol and neurosteroids could help define the properties of steroid conjugation in the human brain. PMID:24683427

  19. Ethanolic Extracts of California Mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana Besser) Are Cytotoxic against Normal and Cancerous Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Somaweera, Himali; Lai, Gary C.; Blackeye, Rachel; Littlejohn, Beverly; Kirksey, Justine; Aguirre, Richard M.; LaPena, Vince; Pasqua, Anna; Hintz, Mary McCarthy

    2013-01-01

    California mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana Besser) is used by many tribes throughout California to treat a variety of conditions, including colds, allergies, and pain. California mugwort is also utilized as women’s medicine. Its use is on the rise outside of Native communities, often without the guidance of a traditional healer or experienced herbalist. Because it has been shown to have antiproliferative activity against plant and animal cells, we investigated whether California mugwort extracts have an effect on normal human cells as well as estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and estrogen receptor negative (ER−) human breast cancer cells. Ethanolic and aqueous extracts of A. douglasiana leaves were tested for cytotoxicity against unstimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC), as well as against an ER+ human breast cancer cell line (BT-474) and an ER− human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). An ethanolic leaf extract killed hPBMC, BT-474, and MDA-MB-231 cells with IC50 values of 23.6 ± 0.3, 27 ± 5, and 37 ± 4 μg/ml, respectively. An aqueous extract killed hPBMC with an IC50 value of 60 ± 10 μg/ml, but had no effect on the two cancer cell lines at concentrations up to 100 μg/ml. The results of this study indicate that the cytotoxicity of California mugwort extends to normal human cells, as well as cancerous cells. Therefore, until further is known about the safety of this medicine, caution should be taken when consuming extracts of California mugwort, whether as a tincture or as a tea. PMID:24073389

  20. Cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase activity role in normal and inflamed human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Ferrante, M; D'Intino, M; Rega, L; Dolci, M; Trentini, P; Ciavarelli, L

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) plays an important role in pulp tissues. High levels of cGMP PDE are found in dental pulp cells. In the present study cGMP PDE activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic cGMP PDE control values for normal healthy pulps were 4.74+/-0.32 nmol/mg of proteins. In reversible pulpitis the cGMP PDE activity increased almost 3 times. In irreversible pulpitis specimens the values increased 4.5 times compared with the normal healthy pulps activity. The differences between the groups (control vs. reversible pulpitis and vs. irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant. These results point to a role of cGMP PDE in the initial pulp response after injury. PMID:16857102

  1. Cyclic Amp phosphodiesterase activity in normal and inflamed human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Menna, V; Serra, E; Santoleri, F; Perfetti, G; Ciavarelli, L; Trentini, P

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (cAMP PDE) seems to be important in pulp tissues. High levels of cAMP PDE have been demonstrated to be in dental pulp cells. In the present study cAMP PDE activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic cAMP PDE control values for normal healthy pulps were 12.14 +/- 3.74 nmols/mg of proteins. In reversible pulpitis the cAMP PDE activity increased almost 2.5 times. In irreversible pulpitis specimens the values increased 4.5 times compared with normal healthy pulps activity. The differences between the groups (control vs. reversible pulpitis and vs. irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant. These results could point to a role of cAMP PDE in the initial pulp response after injury. PMID:16857100

  2. FTIR microscopic comparative study on normal, premalignant, and malignant tissues of human intenstine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordechai, Shaul; Argov, Shmuel; Salman, Ahmad O.; Cohen, Beny; Ramesh, Jagannathan; Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Goldstein, Jed; Sinelnikov, Igor

    2000-07-01

    Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) employs a unique approach to optical diagnosis of tissue pathology based on the characteristic molecular vibrational spectra of the tissue. The architectural changes in the cellular and sub-cellular levels developing in abnormal tissue, including a majority of cancer forms, manifest themselves in different optical signatures, which can be detected in infrared spectroscopy. The biological systems we have studied include normal, premalignant (polyp) and malignant human colonic tissues from three patients. Our method is based on microscopic infrared study (FTIR-microscopy) of thin tissue specimens and a direct comparison with normal histopathological analysis, which serves as a `gold' reference. The normal intestine tissue has a stronger absorption than polyp and cancerous types over a wide region in all three cases. The detailed analysis showed that there is a significant decrease in total phosphate and creatine contents for polyp and cancerous tissue types in comparison to the controls.

  3. Morning and Evening Blue-Enriched Light Exposure Alters Metabolic Function in Normal Weight Adults.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ivy N; Zee, Phyllis C; Shalman, Dov; Malkani, Roneil G; Kang, Joseph; Reid, Kathryn J

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to associations between light-dark exposure patterns, feeding behavior, and metabolism. This study aimed to determine the acute effects of 3 hours of morning versus evening blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light on hunger, metabolic function, and physiological arousal. Nineteen healthy adults completed this 4-day inpatient protocol under dim light conditions (<20lux). Participants were randomized to 3 hours of blue-enriched light exposure on Day 3 starting either 0.5 hours after wake (n = 9; morning group) or 10.5 hours after wake (n = 10; evening group). All participants remained in dim light on Day 2 to serve as their baseline. Subjective hunger and sleepiness scales were collected hourly. Blood was sampled at 30-minute intervals for 4 hours in association with the light exposure period for glucose, insulin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and area under the curve (AUC) for insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR and cortisol were calculated. Comparisons relative to baseline were done using t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs. In both the morning and evening groups, insulin total area, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-IR AUC were increased and subjective sleepiness was reduced with blue-enriched light compared to dim light. The evening group, but not the morning group, had significantly higher glucose peak value during blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light. There were no other significant differences between the morning or the evening groups in response to blue-enriched light exposure. Blue-enriched light exposure acutely alters glucose metabolism and sleepiness, however the mechanisms behind this relationship and its impacts on hunger and appetite regulation remain unclear. These results provide further support for a role of environmental light exposure in the regulation of metabolism. PMID:27191727

  4. Morning and Evening Blue-Enriched Light Exposure Alters Metabolic Function in Normal Weight Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ivy N.; Zee, Phyllis C.; Shalman, Dov; Malkani, Roneil G.; Kang, Joseph; Reid, Kathryn J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to associations between light-dark exposure patterns, feeding behavior, and metabolism. This study aimed to determine the acute effects of 3 hours of morning versus evening blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light on hunger, metabolic function, and physiological arousal. Nineteen healthy adults completed this 4-day inpatient protocol under dim light conditions (<20lux). Participants were randomized to 3 hours of blue-enriched light exposure on Day 3 starting either 0.5 hours after wake (n = 9; morning group) or 10.5 hours after wake (n = 10; evening group). All participants remained in dim light on Day 2 to serve as their baseline. Subjective hunger and sleepiness scales were collected hourly. Blood was sampled at 30-minute intervals for 4 hours in association with the light exposure period for glucose, insulin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and area under the curve (AUC) for insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR and cortisol were calculated. Comparisons relative to baseline were done using t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs. In both the morning and evening groups, insulin total area, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-IR AUC were increased and subjective sleepiness was reduced with blue-enriched light compared to dim light. The evening group, but not the morning group, had significantly higher glucose peak value during blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light. There were no other significant differences between the morning or the evening groups in response to blue-enriched light exposure. Blue-enriched light exposure acutely alters glucose metabolism and sleepiness, however the mechanisms behind this relationship and its impacts on hunger and appetite regulation remain unclear. These results provide further support for a role of environmental light exposure in the regulation of metabolism. PMID:27191727

  5. 3D Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model of Persistent VZV Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  6. System parameters for erythropoiesis control model: Comparison of normal values in human and mouse model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The computer model for erythropoietic control was adapted to the mouse system by altering system parameters originally given for the human to those which more realistically represent the mouse. Parameter values were obtained from a variety of literature sources. Using the mouse model, the mouse was studied as a potential experimental model for spaceflight. Simulation studies of dehydration and hypoxia were performed. A comparison of system parameters for the mouse and human models is presented. Aside from the obvious differences expected in fluid volumes, blood flows and metabolic rates, larger differences were observed in the following: erythrocyte life span, erythropoietin half-life, and normal arterial pO2.

  7. Expression and regulation of normal and polymorphic epithelial sodium channel by human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bubien, J K; Watson, B; Khan, M A; Langloh, A L; Fuller, C M; Berdiev, B; Tousson, A; Benos, D J

    2001-03-16

    Gene expression, protein expression, and function of amiloride-sensitive sodium channels were examined in human lymphocytes from normal individuals and individuals with Liddle's disease. Using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions, expression of all three cloned epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) subunits was detected in lymphocytes. Polyclonal antibodies to bovine alpha-ENaC bound to the plasma membrane of normal and Liddle's lymphocytes. A quantitative analysis of fluorescence-tagged ENaC antibodies indicated a 2.5-fold greater surface binding of the antibodies to Liddle's lymphocytes compared with normal lymphocytes. The relative binding intensity increased significantly (25%; p < 0.001) for both normal and Liddle's cells after treatment with 40 microM 8-CPT-cAMP. Amiloride-sensitive whole cell currents were recorded under basal and cAMP-treated conditions for both cell types. Liddle's cells had a 4.5-fold larger inward sodium conductance compared with normal cells. A specific 25% increase in the inward sodium current was observed in normal cells in response to cAMP treatment. Outside-out patches from both cell types under both treatment conditions revealed no obvious differences in the single channel conductance. The P(open) was 4.2 +/- 3.9% for patches from non-Liddle's cells, and 27.7 +/- 5.4% in patches from Liddle's lymphocytes. Biochemical purification of a protein complex, using the same antibodies used for the immunohistochemistry, yielded a functional sodium channel complex that was inhibited by amiloride when reconstituted into lipid vesicles and incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. These four independent methodologies yielded findings consistent with the hypotheses that human lymphocytes express functional, regulatable ENaC and that the mutation responsible for Liddle's disease induces excessive channel expression. PMID:11113130

  8. The Human Adult Skeletal Muscle Transcriptional Profile Reconstructed by a Novel Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Stefania; d'Alessi, Fabio; Romualdi, Chiara; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2000-01-01

    By applying a novel software tool, information on 4080 UniGene clusters was retrieved from three adult human skeletal muscle cDNA libraries, which were selected for being neither normalized nor subtracted. Reconstruction of a transcriptional profile of the corresponding tissue was attempted by a computational approach, classifying each transcript according to its level of expression. About 25% of the transcripts accounted for about 80% of the detected transcriptional activity, whereas most genes showed a low level of expression. This in silico transcriptional profile was then compared with data obtained by a SAGE study. A fairly good agreement between the two methods was observed. About 400 genes, highly expressed in skeletal muscle or putatively skeletal muscle-specific, may represent the minimal set of genes needed to determine the tissue specificity. These genes could be used as a convenient reference to monitor major changes in the transcriptional profile of adult human skeletal muscle in response to different physiological or pathological conditions, thus providing a framework for designing DNA microarrays and initiating biological studies. PMID:10720575

  9. Polymorphism of the long-wavelength cone in normal human colour vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitz, Jay; Jacobs, Gerald H.

    1986-10-01

    Colour vision is based on the presence of multiple classes of cone each of which contains a different type of photopigment1. Colour matching tests have long revealed that the normal human has three cone types. Results from these tests have also been used to provide estimates of cone spectral sensitivities2. There are significant variations in colour matches made by individuals whose colour vision is classified as normal3-6. Some of this is due to individual differences in preretinal absorption and photopigment density, but some is also believed to arise because there is variation in the spectral positioning of the cone pigments among those who have normal colour vision. We have used a sensitive colour matching test to examine the magnitude and nature of this individual variation and here report evidence for the existence of two different long-wavelength cone mechanisms in normal humans. The different patterns of colour matches made by male and female subjects indicate these two mechanisms are inherited as an X-chromosome linked trait.

  10. Gonococci causing disseminated gonococcal infection are resistant to the bactericidal action of normal human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Schoolnik, G K; Buchanan, T M; Holmes, K K

    1976-01-01

    The susceptibility of strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to the bactericidal action of normal human sera was determined for isolates from patients with disseminated gonococcal infection and uncomplicated gonorrhea. Serum susceptibility was correlated with penicillin susceptibility and auxotype. 38 of 39 strains (97%) of N. gonorrhoeae from Seattle patients with disseminated gonococcal infection were resistant to the complement-dependent bactericidal action of normal human sera. 36 of these were inhibited by less than or equal to mug/ml of penicillin G and required arginine, hypoxanthine, and uracil for growth on chemically defined medium (Arg-Hyx-Ura- auxotype). 12 of 43 isolates from patients with uncomplicated gonorrhea were also of the Arg-Hyx-Ura-auxotype, inhibited by less than or equal to 0.030 mug/ml of penicillin G, and serum resistant. Of the 31 remaining strains of other auxotypes isolated from patients with uncomplicated gonorrhea, 18 (58.1%) were sensitive to normal human sera in titers ranging from 2 to 2,048. The bactericidal action of normal human sera may prevent the dissemination of serum-sensitive gonococci. However, since only a small proportion of individuals infected by serum-resistant strains develop disseminated gonococcal infection, serum resistance appears to be a necessary but not a sufficient virulence factor for dissemination. Host factors such as menstruation and pharyngeal gonococcal infection may favor the dissemination of serum-resistant strains. Since serum-resistant Arg-Hyx-Ura strains are far more frequently isolated from patients with disseminated gonococcal infection than serum-resistant strains of other auxotypes, Arg-Hyx-Ura-strains may possess other virulence factors in addition to serum resistance. PMID:825532

  11. Categorization of common sounds by cochlear implanted and normal hearing adults.

    PubMed

    Collett, E; Marx, M; Gaillard, P; Roby, B; Fraysse, B; Deguine, O; Barone, P

    2016-05-01

    Auditory categorization involves grouping of acoustic events along one or more shared perceptual dimensions which can relate to both semantic and physical attributes. This process involves both high level cognitive processes (categorization) and low-level perceptual encoding of the acoustic signal, both of which are affected by the use of a cochlear implant (CI) device. The goal of this study was twofold: I) compare the categorization strategies of CI users and normal hearing listeners (NHL) II) investigate if any characteristics of the raw acoustic signal could explain the results. 16 experienced CI users and 20 NHL were tested using a Free-Sorting Task of 16 common sounds divided into 3 predefined categories of environmental, musical and vocal sounds. Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA) and Hierarchical Clustering based on Principal Components (HCPC) show that CI users followed a similar categorization strategy to that of NHL and were able to discriminate between the three different types of sounds. However results for CI users were more varied and showed less inter-participant agreement. Acoustic analysis also highlighted the average pitch salience and average autocorrelation peak as being important for the perception and categorization of the sounds. The results therefore show that on a broad level of categorization CI users may not have as many difficulties as previously thought in discriminating certain kinds of sound; however the perception of individual sounds remains challenging. PMID:27050944

  12. Adult hematopoietic stem cells lacking Hif-1α self-renew normally

    PubMed Central

    Vukovic, Milica; Sepulveda, Catarina; Subramani, Chithra; Guitart, Amélie V.; Mohr, Jasmine; Allen, Lewis; Panagopoulou, Theano I.; Paris, Jasmin; Lawson, Hannah; Villacreces, Arnaud; Armesilla-Diaz, Alejandro; Gezer, Deniz; Holyoake, Tessa L.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool is maintained under hypoxic conditions within the bone marrow microenvironment. Cellular responses to hypoxia are largely mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factors, Hif-1 and Hif-2. The oxygen-regulated α subunits of Hif-1 and Hif-2 (namely, Hif-1α and Hif-2α) form dimers with their stably expressed β subunits and control the transcription of downstream hypoxia-responsive genes to facilitate adaptation to low oxygen tension. An initial study concluded that Hif-1α is essential for HSC maintenance, whereby Hif-1α–deficient HSCs lost their ability to self-renew in serial transplantation assays. In another study, we demonstrated that Hif-2α is dispensable for cell-autonomous HSC maintenance, both under steady-state conditions and following transplantation. Given these unexpected findings, we set out to revisit the role of Hif-1α in cell-autonomous HSC functions. Here we demonstrate that inducible acute deletion of Hif-1α has no impact on HSC survival. Notably, unstressed HSCs lacking Hif-1α efficiently self-renew and sustain long-term multilineage hematopoiesis upon serial transplantation. Finally, Hif-1α–deficient HSCs recover normally after hematopoietic injury induced by serial administration of 5-fluorouracil. We therefore conclude that despite the hypoxic nature of the bone marrow microenvironment, Hif-1α is dispensable for cell-autonomous HSC maintenance. PMID:27060169

  13. Adult hematopoietic stem cells lacking Hif-1α self-renew normally.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Milica; Sepulveda, Catarina; Subramani, Chithra; Guitart, Amélie V; Mohr, Jasmine; Allen, Lewis; Panagopoulou, Theano I; Paris, Jasmin; Lawson, Hannah; Villacreces, Arnaud; Armesilla-Diaz, Alejandro; Gezer, Deniz; Holyoake, Tessa L; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Kranc, Kamil R

    2016-06-01

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool is maintained under hypoxic conditions within the bone marrow microenvironment. Cellular responses to hypoxia are largely mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factors, Hif-1 and Hif-2. The oxygen-regulated α subunits of Hif-1 and Hif-2 (namely, Hif-1α and Hif-2α) form dimers with their stably expressed β subunits and control the transcription of downstream hypoxia-responsive genes to facilitate adaptation to low oxygen tension. An initial study concluded that Hif-1α is essential for HSC maintenance, whereby Hif-1α-deficient HSCs lost their ability to self-renew in serial transplantation assays. In another study, we demonstrated that Hif-2α is dispensable for cell-autonomous HSC maintenance, both under steady-state conditions and following transplantation. Given these unexpected findings, we set out to revisit the role of Hif-1α in cell-autonomous HSC functions. Here we demonstrate that inducible acute deletion of Hif-1α has no impact on HSC survival. Notably, unstressed HSCs lacking Hif-1α efficiently self-renew and sustain long-term multilineage hematopoiesis upon serial transplantation. Finally, Hif-1α-deficient HSCs recover normally after hematopoietic injury induced by serial administration of 5-fluorouracil. We therefore conclude that despite the hypoxic nature of the bone marrow microenvironment, Hif-1α is dispensable for cell-autonomous HSC maintenance. PMID:27060169

  14. Human herpesvirus 7 is a constitutive inhabitant of adult human saliva.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, L S; Frenkel, N

    1992-01-01

    We report the frequent isolation of human herpesvirus 7 from the saliva of healthy adults. Virus isolates recovered from different individuals exhibited minimal restriction enzyme polymorphism, which was mostly confined to heterogeneous (het) sequences in the genome. DNAs of isolates recovered from the same individual over a period of several months showed the same characteristic het fragments, indicating the stability of the het sequences upon virus replication and shedding in vivo. In contrast to the results of previous reports, human herpesvirus 6, the causative agent of roseola infantum, could not be isolated from the saliva specimens, raising questions regarding oral transmission of human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 to young children. Images PMID:1348548

  15. Exchange delays and impulsive choice in adult humans.

    PubMed

    Hyten, C; Madden, G J; Field, D P

    1994-09-01

    Choice responding by adult humans in a discrete-trial task was examined as a function of conditions that manipulated either the delay to point delivery or the delay between points and their exchange for money. In point-delay conditions, subjects chose between an "impulsive" alternative that provided a small amount of points immediately and a "self-control" alternative that provided a larger amount of points delayed by 15, 30, or 60 s. Points were exchanged for money immediately following the session. Subjects preferred the self-control alternative. In exchange-delay conditions, subjects chose between a small amount of points exchangeable for money immediately following the session and a larger amount of points exchangeable for money after 1 day, 3 weeks, or 6 weeks. A self-control preference observed for all subjects in the 1-day exchange-delay condition reversed to exclusive impulsive preference for 4 of the 6 subjects when choice conditions involved exchange delays of 3 or 6 weeks. These results show that human choice is sensitive to the manipulation of exchange delays and that impulsive preference can be obtained with exchange delays on the order of weeks. PMID:7964366

  16. Simultaneous characterization of progenitor cell compartments in adult human liver.

    PubMed

    Porretti, Laura; Cattaneo, Alessandra; Colombo, Federico; Lopa, Raffaella; Rossi, Giorgio; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Battiston, Carlo; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Bertolini, Francesco; Rebulla, Paolo; Prati, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    The human liver is a complex tissue consisting of epithelial, endothelial, hematopoietic, and mesenchymal elements that probably derive from multiple lineage-committed progenitors, but no comprehensive study aimed at identifying and characterizing intrahepatic precursors has yet been published. Cell suspensions for this study were obtained by enzymatic digestion of liver specimens taken from 20 patients with chronic liver disease and 13 multiorgan donors. Stem and progenitor cells were first isolated, amplified, and characterized ex vivo according to previously validated methods, and then optimized flow cytometry was used to assess their relative frequencies and characterize their immunophenotypes in the clinical specimens. Stem and progenitor cells committed to hematopoietic, endothelial, epithelial, and mesenchymal lineages were clearly identifiable in livers from both healthy and diseased subjects. Within the mononuclear liver cell compartment, epithelial progenitors [epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)(+)/CD49f(+)/CD29(+)/CD45(-)] accounted for 2.7-3.5% whereas hematopoietic (CD34(+)/CD45(+)), endothelial [vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (KDR)(+)/CD146(+)/CD45(-)], and mesenchymal [CD73(+)/CD105(+)/CD90 (Thy-1)(+)/CD45 (-)] stem cells and progenitors accounted for smaller fractions (0.02-0.6%). The patients' livers had higher percentages of hematopoietic and endothelial precursors than those of the donors. In conclusion, we identified and characterized precursors committed to four different lineages in adult human liver. We also optimized a flow cytometry approach that will be useful in exploring the contribution of these cells to the pathogenesis of liver disease. PMID:19960544

  17. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.

  18. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection.more » Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.« less

  19. Ossified Ligamentum Longitudinale Anterius in Adult Human Dry Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Venumadhav, Nelluri; KS, Siddaraju

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ligamentum longitudinale anterius is a broad and strong band of fibrous tissue that runs along the anterior surfaces of the bodies of the vertebrae. Aim: The study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius in adult dry human vertebra. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 95 sets of dry human vertebral columns irrespective of age and sex at Mayo Institute of Medical Sciences- Barabanki,-UP, Melaka Manipal Medical College-Manipal University and Department of Anatomy, KMCT Medical College, Manassery- Calicut, India. All the sets of vertebral columns were macroscopically inspected for the ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius. Results: It was observed that out of 95 sets of vertebral columns, 27 (28.42%) vertebral columns showed ossification. Out of 27 vertebral columns, 17 (17.89%) vertebral columns showed segmental type of ossification, 2 (2.11%) vertebral columns showed continuous type of ossification and 8 (8.42%) vertebral columns showed mixed type of ossification at different vertebral level. Conclusion: Such type of ossification will affect the biomechanics of the spine and may result in stiff neck, low back pain, dysphagia, odynophagia, compression of the brachial plexus, aphonia, immobility or mucosal thickening of larynx. Hence, knowledge of such abnormalities should be kept in mind to minimise serious complications in any surgical intervention or investigative procedures in the region. PMID:25302180

  20. Audiovisual spoken word training can promote or impede auditory-only perceptual learning: prelingually deafened adults with late-acquired cochlear implants versus normal hearing adults

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Lynne E.; Eberhardt, Silvio P.; Auer, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    Training with audiovisual (AV) speech has been shown to promote auditory perceptual learning of vocoded acoustic speech by adults with normal hearing. In Experiment 1, we investigated whether AV speech promotes auditory-only (AO) perceptual learning in prelingually deafened adults with late-acquired cochlear implants. Participants were assigned to learn associations between spoken disyllabic C(=consonant)V(=vowel)CVC non-sense words and non-sense pictures (fribbles), under AV and then AO (AV-AO; or counter-balanced AO then AV, AO-AV, during Periods 1 then 2) training conditions. After training on each list of paired-associates (PA), testing was carried out AO. Across all training, AO PA test scores improved (7.2 percentage points) as did identification of consonants in new untrained CVCVC stimuli (3.5 percentage points). However, there was evidence that AV training impeded immediate AO perceptual learning: During Period-1, training scores across AV and AO conditions were not different, but AO test scores were dramatically lower in the AV-trained participants. During Period-2 AO training, the AV-AO participants obtained significantly higher AO test scores, demonstrating their ability to learn the auditory speech. Across both orders of training, whenever training was AV, AO test scores were significantly lower than training scores. Experiment 2 repeated the procedures with vocoded speech and 43 normal-hearing adults. Following AV training, their AO test scores were as high as or higher than following AO training. Also, their CVCVC identification scores patterned differently than those of the cochlear implant users. In Experiment 1, initial consonants were most accurate, and in Experiment 2, medial consonants were most accurate. We suggest that our results are consistent with a multisensory reverse hierarchy theory, which predicts that, whenever possible, perceivers carry out perceptual tasks immediately based on the experience and biases they bring to the task. We

  1. Overexpression of wild-type or mutants forms of CEBPA alter normal human hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Bustamante, O; Lan-Lan Smith, S; Griessinger, E; Reyal, Y; Vargaftig, J; Lister, T A; Fitzgibbon, J; Bonnet, D

    2012-07-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α (C/EBPα/CEBPA) is mutated in approximately 8% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in both familial and sporadic AML and, with FLT3 and NPM1, has received most attention as a predictive marker of outcome in patients with normal karyotype disease. Mutations clustering to either the N- or C-terminal (N- and C-ter) portions of the protein have different consequences on the protein function. In familial cases, the N-ter form is inherited with patients exhibiting long latency period before the onset of overt disease, typically with the acquisition of a C-ter mutation. Despite the essential insights murine models provide the functional consequences of wild-type C/EBPα in human hematopoiesis and how different mutations are involved in AML development have received less attention. Our data underline the critical role of C/EBPα in human hematopoiesis and demonstrate that C/EBPα mutations (alone or in combination) are insufficient to convert normal human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells into leukemic-initiating cells, although individually each altered normal hematopoiesis. It provides the first insight into the effects of N- and C-ter mutations acting alone and to the combined effects of N/C double mutants. Our results mimicked closely what happens in CEBPA mutated patients. PMID:22371011

  2. Comprehensive Reference Ranges for Hematology and Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Parameters Derived from Normal Nigerian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Miri-Dashe, Timzing; Osawe, Sophia; Tokdung, Monday; Daniel, Nenbammun; Choji, Rahila Pam; Mamman, Ille; Deme, Kurt; Damulak, Dapus; Abimiku, Alash’le

    2014-01-01

    -pregnant females and during pregnancy. This is the first of such comprehensive study to establish reference values among adult Nigerians and difference observed underscore the need to establish reference values for different populations. PMID:24832127

  3. Extensive Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cell Grafts in Adult Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Xu, Leyan; Welsh, Annie M; Hatfield, Glen; Hazel, Thomas; Johe, Karl; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2007-01-01

    Background Effective treatments for degenerative and traumatic diseases of the nervous system are not currently available. The support or replacement of injured neurons with neural grafts, already an established approach in experimental therapeutics, has been recently invigorated with the addition of neural and embryonic stem-derived precursors as inexhaustible, self-propagating alternatives to fetal tissues. The adult spinal cord, i.e., the site of common devastating injuries and motor neuron disease, has been an especially challenging target for stem cell therapies. In most cases, neural stem cell (NSC) transplants have shown either poor differentiation or a preferential choice of glial lineages. Methods and Findings In the present investigation, we grafted NSCs from human fetal spinal cord grown in monolayer into the lumbar cord of normal or injured adult nude rats and observed large-scale differentiation of these cells into neurons that formed axons and synapses and established extensive contacts with host motor neurons. Spinal cord microenvironment appeared to influence fate choice, with centrally located cells taking on a predominant neuronal path, and cells located under the pia membrane persisting as NSCs or presenting with astrocytic phenotypes. Slightly fewer than one-tenth of grafted neurons differentiated into oligodendrocytes. The presence of lesions increased the frequency of astrocytic phenotypes in the white matter. Conclusions NSC grafts can show substantial neuronal differentiation in the normal and injured adult spinal cord with good potential of integration into host neural circuits. In view of recent similar findings from other laboratories, the extent of neuronal differentiation observed here disputes the notion of a spinal cord that is constitutively unfavorable to neuronal repair. Restoration of spinal cord circuitry in traumatic and degenerative diseases may be more realistic than previously thought, although major challenges remain

  4. Effects of consumption of caloric vs noncaloric sweet drinks on indices of hunger and food consumption in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Canty, D J; Chan, M M

    1991-05-01

    This study examined the effects of aspartame, saccharin, and sucrose on hunger and food intake. Twenty normal adults consumed a standard breakfast followed 3 h later by 200 mL of either water or a sweetened drink. One hour later, subjects' ad libitum consumption of a standardized lunch was measured. Subjects recorded self-assessments of hunger-related indices every half hour on visual analogue scales (VAS). ANOVA with repeated measures showed a significant effect of drink type on VAS scores 15 and 45 min after drinks were consumed but not for other times or for lunch consumption. Hunger-related ratings after drink consumption were generally highest for water, lower for noncaloric sweeteners (NCSs), and lowest for sugar. Pairwise comparisons of means showed that only the ratings for sugar and water were significantly different. The results show that, under the conditions of this study, NCSs do not increase hunger or food intake. PMID:2021127

  5. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as a negative regulator of normal human erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Zamai, L; Secchiero, P; Pierpaoli, S; Bassini, A; Papa, S; Alnemri, E S; Guidotti, L; Vitale, M; Zauli, G

    2000-06-15

    The impact of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) on normal hematopoietic development was investigated using adult peripheral blood CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells, induced to differentiate along the erythroid, megakaryocytic, granulocytic, and monocytic lineages by the addition of specific cytokine cocktails. TRAIL selectively reduced the number of erythroblasts, showing intermediate levels of glycophorin A (glycophorin A(interm)) surface expression, which appeared in liquid cultures supplemented with stem cell factor + interleukin 3 + erythropoietin at days 7-10. However, neither immature (day 4) glycophorin A(dim) erythroid cells nor mature (day 14) glycophorin A(bright) erythroblasts were sensitive to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Moreover, pre-exposure to TRAIL significantly decreased the number and size of erythroid colonies in semisolid assays. These adverse effects of TRAIL were selective for erythropoiesis, as TRAIL did not significantly influence the survival of cells differentiating along the megakaryocytic, granulocytic, or monocytic lineages. Furthermore, TRAIL was detected by Western blot analysis in lysates obtained from normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. These findings indicate that TRAIL acts in a lineage- and stage of differentiation-specific manner, as a negative regulator of normal erythropoiesis. (Blood. 2000;95:3716-3724) PMID:10845902

  6. Antioxidant macromolecules in the epithelial lining fluid of the normal human lower respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, A M; Fells, G A; Hubbard, R C; Crystal, R G

    1990-01-01

    We hypothesized that the alveolar structures may contain extracellular macromolecules with antioxidant properties to defend against oxidants. To evaluate this 51Cr-labeled human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) and cat lung epithelial cells (AKD) were exposed to a H2O2-generating system and alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) from healthy nonsmokers was tested for its ability to protect the lung cells from H2O2-mediated injury. The ELF provided marked antioxidant protection, with most from a H2O-soluble fraction in the 100-300-kD range. Plasma proteins with anti-H2O2 properties were in insufficient concentrations to provide the antioxidant protection observed. However, catalase, a normal intracellular antioxidant, was present in sufficient concentration to account for most of the observed anti-H2O2 properties of ELF. Depletion of ELF with an anticatalase antibody abolished the anti-H2O2 macromolecular defenses of ELF. Since catalase is not normally released by cells, a likely explanation for its presence in high concentrations in normal ELF is that it is released by lung inflammatory and parenchymal cells onto the epithelial surface of the lower respiratory tract during their normal turnover and collects there due to the slow turnover of ELF. It is likely that catalase in the ELF of normal individuals plays a role in protecting lung parenchymal cells against oxidants present in the extracellular milieu. Images PMID:2394842

  7. Expression of IL-10 in human normal and cancerous ovarian tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Alex; Medina, Liat; Piura, Benjamin; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2010-06-01

    IL-10 is an 18-kd polypeptide that has been shown to be secreted by multiple cell types, including T and B cells, monocytes and some human tumors. However, which cell population is responsible for the elevated IL-10 levels in the serum and ascites of ovarian cancer patients, whether ovarian carcinoma cells produce IL-10, and how IL-10 influences the development and progression of ovarian carcinoma are issues that remain unclear. The aim of our study was to examine IL-10 production and secretion by ovarian carcinoma tissues and cells, and to determine its possible role in the cell and tumor micro-environment. The mean IL-10 protein levels expressed in normal ovarian tissue homogenates were significantly higher compared to cancerous ovarian tissue (p = 0.002). Yet, the IL-10 mRNA expression was significantly higher in cancerous ovarian tissues as compared to normal tissues (p = 0.021). The IL-10 receptor mRNA expression levels of the cancerous ovarian tissue homogenates were slightly, but not significantly, higher than the normal tissues. IL-10 immunostaining revealed that in both normal and cancerous ovarian tissues, IL-10 expression could be detected mainly in epithelial cells. In normal ovarian tissues, similar levels of IL-10R were demonstrated in epithelial and stromal cells. However, in cancerous ovarian tissues, epithelial cells expressed higher levels of IL-10R than the stroma. Primary normal and cancerous ovarian cell cultures and SKOV-3 cells secreted similar amounts of IL-10 after 24 hours of incubation. Our results suggest that epithelial cells are the main source of IL-10 in the ovary. Nevertheless, the target cells for IL-10 are different in normal and cancerous ovarian cells. Thus, IL-10 and its receptor could be involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian carcinoma. PMID:20430716

  8. Taste Bud-Derived BDNF Is Required to Maintain Normal Amounts of Innervation to Adult Taste Buds123

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingbin; Ohman-Gault, Lisa; Ma, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gustatory neurons transmit chemical information from taste receptor cells, which reside in taste buds in the oral cavity, to the brain. As adult taste receptor cells are renewed at a constant rate, nerve fibers must reconnect with new taste receptor cells as they arise. Therefore, the maintenance of gustatory innervation to the taste bud is an active process. Understanding how this process is regulated is a fundamental concern of gustatory system biology. We speculated that because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for taste bud innervation during development, it might function to maintain innervation during adulthood. If so, taste buds should lose innervation when Bdnf is deleted in adult mice. To test this idea, we first removed Bdnf from all cells in adulthood using transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Ubiquitin promoter. When Bdnf was removed, approximately one-half of the innervation to taste buds was lost, and taste buds became smaller because of the loss of taste bud cells. Individual taste buds varied in the amount of innervation each lost, and those that lost the most innervation also lost the most taste bud cells. We then tested the idea that that the taste bud was the source of this BDNF by reducing Bdnf levels specifically in the lingual epithelium and taste buds. Taste buds were confirmed as the source of BDNF regulating innervation. We conclude that BDNF expressed in taste receptor cells is required to maintain normal levels of innervation in adulthood. PMID:26730405

  9. Range of motion, muscle length, and balance performance in older adults with normal, pronated, and supinated feet

    PubMed Central

    Justine, Maria; Ruzali, Dhiya; Hazidin, Ezzaty; Said, Aisyah; Bukry, Saiful Adli; Manaf, Haidzir

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the lower limb joint range of motion and muscle length between different types of foot posture, and determine the correlation of range of motion and muscle length with balance performance. [Subjects and Methods] Ninety individuals (age, 65.2±4.6 years) were assessed using the Foot Posture Index to determine their type of foot (Normal [0 to +5], pronated [+6 to +9], and supinated [−1 to −4]; n=30 per group). The range of motion (goniometer), muscle length (goniometer and tape measure), and balance performance (functional reach test and four square step test) were measured for each participant. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman’s rank-order correlation. [Results] No significant differences were found in range of motion, muscle length, and balance performance among different types of foot posture, except for right and left ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. Balance performance was significantly correlated with selected muscle length and range of motion, especially in the supinated foot. [Conclusion] Range of motion and muscle length of the lower limb may be associated with balance performance in older adults with foot deformities. These findings may guide physiotherapists in choosing intervention based on specific assessments for older adults with foot deformity. PMID:27134384

  10. Professional Fulfillment and Satisfaction of US and Canadian Adult Education and Human Resource Development Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Shari L.; Wiesenberg, Faye

    2004-01-01

    This comparative study explored the professional fulfillment and job satisfaction of US and Canadian college and university faculty in the fields of Adult Education and Human Resource Development. In Autumn 2001, we disseminated electronically "The Adult Education and Human Resource Development Faculty Survey" to a selected sample of Canadian and…

  11. Imaging of Keratoconic and normal human cornea with a Brillouin imaging system (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besner, Sebastien; Shao, Peng; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Pineda, Roberto; Yun, Seok-Hyun (Andy)

    2016-03-01

    Keratoconus is a degenerative disorder of the eye characterized by human cornea thinning and morphological change to a more conical shape. Current diagnosis of this disease relies on topographic imaging of the cornea. Early and differential diagnosis is difficult. In keratoconus, mechanical properties are found to be compromised. A clinically available invasive technique capable of measuring the mechanical properties of the cornea is of significant importance for understanding the mechanism of keratoconus development and improve detection and intervention in keratoconus. The capability of Brillouin imaging to detect local longitudinal modulus in human cornea has been demonstrated previously. We report our non-contact, non-invasive, clinically viable Brillouin imaging system engineered to evaluate mechanical properties human cornea in vivo. The system takes advantage of a highly dispersive 2-stage virtually imaged phased array (VIPA) to detect weak Brillouin scattering signal from biological samples. With a 1.5-mW light beam from a 780-nm single-wavelength laser source, the system is able to detect Brillouin frequency shift of a single point in human cornea less than 0.3 second, at a 5μm/30μm lateral/axial resolution. Sensitivity of the system was quantified to be ~ 10 MHz. A-scans at different sample locations on a human cornea with a motorized human interface. We imaged both normal and keratoconic human corneas with this system. Whereas no significantly difference were observed outside keratocnic cones compared with normal cornea, a highly statistically significantly decrease was found in the cone regions.

  12. Normal Proximal Coronary Artery Diameters in Adults from India as Assessed by Computed Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevappa, Manjappa; Math, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The normative data of coronary artery size among Indians are sparse. It is often essential to know the coronary dimensions especially during interventions such as stenting to choose the appropriate size of the stent and to decide the very need for stenting. In current practice it is the luminal angiography which is most widely employed to assess the coronary artery size. However, luminal angiography is not very accurate in estimating the epicardial coronary artery size as it does not take into account the mural thickness of the arterial wall. Hence it is prudent to assess coronary artery size by other methods such as Computed Tomography (CT) coronary angiography, quantitative coronary angiogram, Magnetic Resonanace (MR) angiogram, etc. In this study we chose computed tomography as it demonstrates mural thickness along with lumen of the vessels and hence measures the diameter more accurately. Aim To establish normative data for diameters of the proximal coronary artery segments during life by using MDCT in a cohort of individuals without any structural heart disease. Materials and Methods Between October 2012 and April 2013, 168 consecutive patients who did not have any structural heart disease underwent CT coronary angiography for evaluation of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) with atypical symptoms with low pretest probability. Patients who were found to have no coronary artery disease on CT-CAG were recruited in this study. The baseline clinical status and demographic data were obtained from the hospital records. Results In our study we found that the mean indexed diameter to BSA among females for LMCA 2.32±0.12mm, LAD 1.95±0.15mm, LCX 1.73±0.20mm and RCA 1.84±0.22mm. For males the values were LMCA 2.33±0.13mm, LAD 1.94±0.16mm, LCX 1.74±0.21mm, and RCA 1.79±0.20mm. These values are comparable to other studies. Conclusion We attempted to establish normative data for normal proximal coronary artery dimensions among South Indian population

  13. Effect of the N-terminal residues on the quaternary dynamics of human adult hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shanyan; Mizuno, Misao; Ishikawa, Haruto; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-05-01

    The protein dynamics of human hemoglobin following ligand photolysis was studied by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy. The time-resolved spectra of two kinds of recombinant hemoglobin expressed in Escherichia coli, normal recombinant hemoglobin and the α(V1M)/β(V1M) double mutant, were compared with those of human adult hemoglobin (HbA) purified from blood. A frequency shift of the iron-histidine stretching [ν(Fe-His)] band was observed in the time-resolved spectra of all three hemoglobin samples, indicative of tertiary and quaternary changes in the protein following photolysis. The spectral changes of the α(V1M)/β(V1M) double mutant were distinct from those of HbA in the tens of microseconds region, whereas the spectral changes of normal recombinant hemoglobin were similar to those of HbA isolated from blood. These results demonstrated that a structural change in the N-termini is involved in the second step of the quaternary structure change of hemoglobin. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the allosteric pathway of HbA.

  14. Distribution of somatostatin receptors in normal and neoplastic human tissues: recent advances and potential relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, J. C.; Schaer, J. C.; Markwalder, R.; Waser, B.; Horisberger, U.; Laissue, J.

    1997-01-01

    This short review describes the localization of somatostatin receptors with in vitro receptor autoradiography techniques in several non-classical, normal human somatostatin target tissues as well as in selected human tumors. In addition to brain, gut and neuroendocrine localizations, somatostatin receptors are expressed in most lymphatic tissues, including gut-associated lymphatic tissue, spleen and thymus; in the cortical and medullary area of the kidney; in the stroma of the prostate and in the epithelial cells of the thyroid. Among human tumors, the extremely high density of somatostatin receptors in medulloblastomas should be stressed as well as the favorable prognostic role of the presence of somatostatin receptors in neuroblastomas. Moreover, several types of mesenchymal tumors have somatostatin receptors as well. The receptor subtypes expressed by distinct tumors may vary: Whereas medulloblastomas and neuroblastomas predominantly express sst2, prostate cancers express sst1 rather than sst2. A further emerging somatostatin target is represented by the peritumoral veins, also known to express sst2 receptors. The multiple somatostatin targets in normal and pathological human tissues represents the basis for potential diagnostic and clinical applications of somatostatin analogs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9825475

  15. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shuhei; Murphy, Conleth G.; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Jasin, Maria; Moynahan, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR), a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold) and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold). Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications. PMID:27428646

  16. Greater Corticolimbic Activation to High-Calorie Food Cues after Eating in Obese vs. Normal-Weight Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dimitropoulos, Anastasia; Tkach, Jean; Ho, Alan; Kennedy, James

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research is to identify the neural response to rewarding food cues before and after eating in overweight/obese (OB) and normal-weight (NW) adults. Based on the previous literature, we expected greater differential activation to food cues vs. objects for OB compared to NW participants both prior to eating and after consumption of a typical lunch. Twenty-two overweight/obese (11 male) and 16 normal-weight (6 male) individuals participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging task examining neural response to visual cues of high- and low-calorie foods before and after eating. The OB group demonstrated increased neural response to high- and low-calorie foods after eating in comparison to the NW participants in frontal, temporal, and limbic regions. In addition, greater activation in corticolimbic regions (lateral OFC, caudate, anterior cingulate) to high-calorie food cues was evident in OB vs. NW participants after eating. These findings suggest that for OB individuals, high-calorie food cues show sustained response in brain regions implicated in reward and addiction even after eating. Moreover, food cues did not elicit similar brain response after eating in the NW group suggesting that neural activity in response to food cues diminishes with reduced hunger for these individuals. PMID:22063094

  17. The Adult Learner. The Definitive Classic in Adult Education and Human Resource Development. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Malcolm S.; Holton, Elwood F., III; Swanson, Richard A.

    This book examines the core principles of adult learning and the roots of andragogy, advances in adult learning, and practice in adult learning. The following are among the topics discussed in the book's 17 chapters: importance of learning theory; theories of learning (concept of part and whole models of development, theories based on elemental…

  18. Antigens of human trophoblasts: A working hypothesis for their role in normal and abnormal pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, W. Page; Temple, Anne; Lovins, R. E.; Smith, Nancy

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the preparation and characterization of antisera to human trophoblast membranes. Rabbit antisera were raised to trophoblast microvilli prepared by differential ultracentrifugation. Antibodies to serum proteins were removed by solid-phase immunoabsorption with normal human serum, and indirect immunofluorescence experiments with cryostat sections of human placentas showed that the absorbed anti-trophoblast sera reacted with trophoblasts as well as with stromal cells and endothelium of chorionic villi. The antisera also produced membrane fluorescence when studied on viable lymphocytes and certain human cell lines. These anti-trophoblast sera were also lymphocytotoxic, and this reaction was abolished by prior absorption of the antisera with leukocytes. The leukocyte-absorbed anti-trophoblast sera retained their ability to react with trophoblasts and certain human cell lines, but no longer reacted with lymphocytes or placental stromal cells and endothelium. Two categories of trophoblast membrane antigens are thus defined: one present on trophoblasts and certain human cells lines (tentatively designated TA1), and the other on trophoblasts and lymphocytes, villous fibroblasts, and endothelium (tentatively designated TA2). A working hypothesis is proposed stating that normal pregnancy involves the generation of anti-TA2 subsequent to blastocyst implantation and entrance of trophoblasts into the maternal circulation. This involves a mechanism similar to allogeneic cell stimulation and results in antibodies that block either the recognition or cytotoxicity of TA1. Failure to mount this response allows TA1 recognition and trophoblast immunopathology. Experimental and clinical studies in support of this working hypothesis, particularly involving abortion and toxemia, are cited from published reports. Images PMID:273921

  19. Abdominal Adipose Tissue was Associated with Glomerular Hyperfiltration among Non- Diabetic and Normotensive Adults with a Normal Body Mass Index.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeonghwan; Kim, Hye Jin; Cho, Belong; Park, Jin Ho; Choi, Ho Chun; Lee, Cheol Min; Oh, Seung Won; Kwon, Hyuktae; Heo, Nam Ju

    2015-01-01

    Glomerular hyperfiltration is recognized as an early marker of progressive kidney dysfunction in the obese population. This study aimed to identify the relationship between glomerular hyperfiltration and body fat distribution measured by computed tomography (CT) in healthy Korean adults. The study population included individuals aged 20-64 years who went a routine health check-up including an abdominal CT scan. We selected 4,378 individuals without diabetes and hypertension. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated using the CKD-EPI equation, and glomerular hyperfiltration was defined as the highest quintile of glomerular filtration rate. Abdominal adipose tissue areas were measured at the level of the umbilicus using a 16-detector CT scanner, and the cross-sectional area was calculated using Rapidia 2.8 CT software. The prevalence of glomerular hyperfiltration increased significantly according to the subcutaneous adipose tissue area in men (OR = 1.74 (1.16-2.61), P for trend 0.016, for the comparisons of lowest vs. highest quartile) and visceral adipose tissue area in women (OR = 2.34 (1.46-3.75), P for trend < 0.001) in multivariate analysis. After stratification by body mass index (normal < 23 kg/m2, overweight ≥ 23 kg/m2), male subjects with greater subcutaneous adipose tissue, even those in the normal BMI group, had a higher prevalence of glomerular hyperfiltration (OR = 2.11 (1.17-3.80), P for trend = 0.009). Among women, the significance of visceral adipose tissue area on glomerular hyperfiltration resulted from the normal BMI group (OR = 2.14 (1.31-3.49), P for trend = 0.002). After menopause, the odds ratio of the association of glomerular hyperfiltration with subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue increased (OR = 2.96 (1.21-7.25), P for trend = 0.013). Subcutaneous adipose tissue areas and visceral adipose tissue areas are positively associated with glomerular hyperfiltration in healthy Korean adult men and women, respectively. In post-menopausal women

  20. Human colonic crypts in culture: segregation of immunochemical markers in normal versus adenoma-derived

    PubMed Central

    Dame, Michael K; Jiang, Yan; Appelman, Henry D; Copley, Kelly D; McClintock, Shannon D; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Attili, Durga; Elmunzer, B Joseph; Brenner, Dean E; Varani, James; Turgeon, D Kim

    2014-01-01

    In order to advance a culture model of human colonic neoplasia, we developed methods for the isolation and in vitro maintenance of intact colonic crypts from normal human colon tissue and adenomas. Crypts were maintained in three-dimensional Matrigel culture with a simple, serum-free, low Ca2+ (0.15 mM) medium. Intact colonic crypts from normal human mucosa were viably maintained for 3–5 days with preservation of the in situ crypt-like architecture, presenting a distinct base and apex. Abnormal structures from adenoma tissue could be maintained through multiple passages (up to months), with expanding buds/tubules. Immunohistochemical markers for intestinal stem cells (Lgr5), growth (Ki67), differentiation (E-cadherin, cytokeratin 20 (CK20) and mucin 2 (MUC2)) and epithelial turnover (Bax, cleaved Caspase-3), paralleled the changes in function. The epithelial cells in normal crypts followed the physiological sequence of progression from proliferation to differentiation to dissolution in a spatially and temporally appropriate manner. Lgr5 expression was seen in a few basal cells of freshly isolated crypts, but was not detected after 1–3 days in culture. After 24 h in culture, crypts from normal colonic tissue continued to show strong Ki67 and MUC2 expression at the crypt base, with a gradual decrease over time such that by days 3–4 Ki67 was not expressed. The differentiation marker CK20 increased over the same period, eventually becoming intense throughout the whole crypt. In adenoma-derived structures, expression of markers for all stages of progression persisted for the entire time in culture. Lgr5 showed expression in a few select cells after months in culture. Ki67 and MUC2 were largely associated with the proliferative budding regions while CK20 was localized to the parent structure. This ex vivo culture model of normal and adenomatous crypts provides a readily accessible tool to help understand the growth and differentiation process in human colonic

  1. Regulation of Glucagon Secretion in Normal and Diabetic Human Islets by γ-Hydroxybutyrate and Glycine*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changhong; Liu, Chengyang; Nissim, Itzhak; Chen, Jie; Chen, Pan; Doliba, Nicolai; Zhang, Tingting; Nissim, Ilana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Stokes, David; Yudkoff, Marc; Bennett, Michael J.; Stanley, Charles A.; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Naji, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Paracrine signaling between pancreatic islet β-cells and α-cells has been proposed to play a role in regulating glucagon responses to elevated glucose and hypoglycemia. To examine this possibility in human islets, we used a metabolomic approach to trace the responses of amino acids and other potential neurotransmitters to stimulation with [U-13C]glucose in both normal individuals and type 2 diabetics. Islets from type 2 diabetics uniformly showed decreased glucose stimulation of insulin secretion and respiratory rate but demonstrated two different patterns of glucagon responses to glucose: one group responded normally to suppression of glucagon by glucose, but the second group was non-responsive. The non-responsive group showed evidence of suppressed islet GABA levels and of GABA shunt activity. In further studies with normal human islets, we found that γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a potent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is generated in β-cells by an extension of the GABA shunt during glucose stimulation and interacts with α-cell GHB receptors, thus mediating the suppressive effect of glucose on glucagon release. We also identified glycine, acting via α-cell glycine receptors, as the predominant amino acid stimulator of glucagon release. The results suggest that glycine and GHB provide a counterbalancing receptor-based mechanism for controlling α-cell secretory responses to metabolic fuels. PMID:23266825

  2. Regulation of glucagon secretion in normal and diabetic human islets by γ-hydroxybutyrate and glycine.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Liu, Chengyang; Nissim, Itzhak; Chen, Jie; Chen, Pan; Doliba, Nicolai; Zhang, Tingting; Nissim, Ilana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Stokes, David; Yudkoff, Marc; Bennett, Michael J; Stanley, Charles A; Matschinsky, Franz M; Naji, Ali

    2013-02-01

    Paracrine signaling between pancreatic islet β-cells and α-cells has been proposed to play a role in regulating glucagon responses to elevated glucose and hypoglycemia. To examine this possibility in human islets, we used a metabolomic approach to trace the responses of amino acids and other potential neurotransmitters to stimulation with [U-(13)C]glucose in both normal individuals and type 2 diabetics. Islets from type 2 diabetics uniformly showed decreased glucose stimulation of insulin secretion and respiratory rate but demonstrated two different patterns of glucagon responses to glucose: one group responded normally to suppression of glucagon by glucose, but the second group was non-responsive. The non-responsive group showed evidence of suppressed islet GABA levels and of GABA shunt activity. In further studies with normal human islets, we found that γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a potent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is generated in β-cells by an extension of the GABA shunt during glucose stimulation and interacts with α-cell GHB receptors, thus mediating the suppressive effect of glucose on glucagon release. We also identified glycine, acting via α-cell glycine receptors, as the predominant amino acid stimulator of glucagon release. The results suggest that glycine and GHB provide a counterbalancing receptor-based mechanism for controlling α-cell secretory responses to metabolic fuels. PMID:23266825

  3. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  4. White matter maturation of normal human fetal brain. An in vivo diffusion tensor tractography study

    PubMed Central

    Zanin, Emilie; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Guye, Maxime; Denis, Daniele; Cozzone, Patrick J; Girard, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time the ability to determine in vivo and in utero the transitions between the main stages of white matter (WM) maturation in normal human fetuses using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography. Biophysical characteristics of water motion are used as an indirect probe to evaluate progression of the tissue matrix organization in cortico-spinal tracts (CSTs), optic radiations (OR), and corpus callosum (CC) in 17 normal human fetuses explored between 23 and 38 weeks of gestation (GW) and selected strictly on minimal motion artifacts. Nonlinear polynomial (third order) curve fittings of normalized longitudinal and radial water diffusivities (Z-scores) as a function of age identify three different phases of maturation with specific dynamics for each WM bundle type. These phases may correspond to distinct cellular events such as axonal organization, myelination gliosis, and myelination, previously reported by other groups on post-mortem fetuses using immunostaining methods. According to the DTI parameter dynamics, we suggest that myelination (phase 3) appears early in the CSTs, followed by the OR and by the CC, respectively. DTI tractography provides access to a better understanding of fetal WM maturation. PMID:22399089

  5. Classification of normal and malignant human gastric mucosa tissue with confocal Raman microspectroscopy and wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yaogai; Shen, Aiguo; Jiang, Tao; Ai, Yong; Hu, Jiming

    2008-02-01

    Thirty-two samples from the human gastric mucosa tissue, including 13 normal and 19 malignant tissue samples were measured by confocal Raman microspectroscopy. The low signal-to-background ratio spectra from human gastric mucosa tissues were obtained by this technique without any sample preparation. Raman spectral interferences include a broad featureless sloping background due to fluorescence and noise. They mask most Raman spectral feature and lead to problems with precision and quantitation of the original spectral information. A preprocessed algorithm based on wavelet analysis was used to reduce noise and eliminate background/baseline of Raman spectra. Comparing preprocessed spectra of malignant gastric mucosa tissues with those of counterpart normal ones, there were obvious spectral changes, including intensity increase at ˜1156 cm -1 and intensity decrease at ˜1587 cm -1. The quantitative criterion based upon the intensity ratio of the ˜1156 and ˜1587 cm -1 was extracted for classification of the normal and malignant gastric mucosa tissue samples. This could result in a new diagnostic method, which would assist the early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  6. pH-profile of cystine and glutamate transport in normal and cystinotic human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Forster, S; Lloyd, J B

    1985-04-11

    In the human recessive condition cystinosis, cystine transport has been reported to be normal in the plasma membrane but defective in the lysosome membrane. A possible explanation is that the transport systems at the two cellular sites are identical and that the defect in cystinosis affects the porter's ability to operate at the low pH of the lysosome. To test this hypothesis the uptake of 3H-labelled cystine and glutamate by normal and cystinotic human skin fibroblasts has been measured in vitro at pH 5.8, 6.5, 7.0, 7.4 and 8.0. Uptake of glutamate was more rapid than that of cystine. Uptake of cystine increased with increasing pH, but uptake of glutamate showed no marked pH-dependence. Transport in cystinotic cells was similar to that in normal cells, and similarly affected by pH. This finding is incompatible with the hypothesis proposed above. It is concluded that the cystine porters of the plasma membrane and the lysosome membrane are probably genetically distinct. PMID:2858219

  7. Adult somatic stem cells in the human parasite, Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J.; Wang, Bo; Lambrus, Bramwell G.; Tharp, Marla; Iyer, Harini; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Schistosomiasis is among the most prevalent human parasitic diseases, affecting more than 200 million people worldwide1. The etiological agents of this disease are trematode flatworms (Schistosoma) that live and lay eggs within the vasculature of the host. These eggs lodge in host tissues, causing inflammatory responses that are the primary cause of morbidity. Because these parasites can live and reproduce within human hosts for decades2, elucidating the mechanisms that promote their longevity is of fundamental importance. Although adult pluripotent stem cells, called neoblasts, drive long-term homeostatic tissue maintenance in long-lived free-living flatworms3,4 (e.g., planarians), and neoblast-like cells have been described in some parasitic tapeworms5, little is known about whether similar cell types exist in any trematode species. Here, we describe a population of neoblast-like cells in the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. These cells resemble planarian neoblasts morphologically and share their ability to proliferate and differentiate into derivatives of multiple germ layers. Capitalizing on available genomic resources6,7 and RNAseq-based gene expression profiling, we find that these schistosome neoblast-like cells express a fibroblast growth factor receptor ortholog. Using RNA interference we demonstrate that this gene is required for the maintenance of these neoblast-like cells. Our observations suggest that adaptation of developmental strategies shared by free-living ancestors to modern-day schistosomes likely contributed to the success of these animals as long-lived obligate parasites. We expect that future studies deciphering the function of these neoblast-like cells will have important implications for understanding the biology of these devastating parasites. PMID:23426263

  8. Human colon tissue in organ culture: preservation of normal and neoplastic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Mankey, Cohra; DaSilva, Marissa; Paruchuri, Tejaswi; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Varani, James

    2009-01-01

    Normal and neoplastic human colon tissue obtained at surgery was used to establish conditions for organ culture. Optimal conditions included an atmosphere of 5% CO2 and 95% O2; tissue partially submerged with mucosa at the gas interface; and serum-free medium with 1.5 mM Ca2+ and a number of growth supplements. Histological, histochemical, and immunohistochemical features that distinguish normal and neoplastic tissue were preserved over a 2-d period. With normal tissue, this included the presence of elongated crypts with small, densely packed cells at the crypt base and mucin-containing goblet cells in the upper portion. Ki67 staining, for proliferating cells, was confined to the lower third of the crypt, while expression of extracellular calcium-sensing receptor was seen in the upper third and surface epithelium. E-cadherin and β-catenin were expressed throughout the epithelium and confined to the cell surface. In tumor tissue, the same disorganized, abnormal glandular structures seen at time zero were present after 2 d. The majority of cells in these structures were mucin-poor, but occasional goblet cells were seen and mucin staining was present. Ki67 staining was seen throughout the abnormal epithelium and calcium-sensing receptor expression was weak and variable. E-cadherin was seen at the cell surface (similar to normal tissue), but in some places, there was diffuse cytoplasmic staining. Finally, intense cytoplasmic and nuclear β-catenin staining was observed in cultured neoplastic tissue. PMID:19915935

  9. Metric analysis of basal sphenoid angle in adult human skulls

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Dante Simionato; Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the variations in the angle basal sphenoid skulls of adult humans and their relationship to sex, age, ethnicity and cranial index. Methods The angles were measured in 160 skulls belonging to the Museum of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Department of Morphology. We use two flexible rules and a goniometer, having as reference points for the first rule the posterior end of the ethmoidal crest and dorsum of the sella turcica, and for the second rule the anterior margin of the foramen magnum and clivus, measuring the angle at the intersection of two. Results The average angle was 115.41°, with no statistical correlation between the value of the angle and sex or age. A statistical correlation was noted between the value of the angle and ethnicity, and between the angle and the horizontal cranial index. Conclusions The distribution of the angle basal sphenoid was the same in sex, and there was correlation between the angle and ethnicity, being the proportion of non-white individuals with an angle >125° significantly higher than that of whites with an angle >125°. There was correlation between the angle and the cranial index, because skulls with higher cranial index tend to have higher basiesfenoidal angle too. PMID:25295452

  10. Widespread expression of serum amyloid A in histologically normal human tissues. Predominant localization to the epithelium.

    PubMed

    Urieli-Shoval, S; Cohen, P; Eisenberg, S; Matzner, Y

    1998-12-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an acute-phase reactant whose level in the blood is elevated to 1000-fold as part of the body's responses to various injuries, including trauma, infection, inflammation, and neoplasia. As an acute-phase reactant, the liver has been considered to be the primary site of expression. However, limited extrahepatic SAA expression was described in mouse tissues and in cells of human atherosclerotic lesions. Here we describe nonradioactive in situ hybridization experiments revealing that the SAA mRNA is widely expressed in many histologically normal human tissues. Expression was localized predominantly to the epithelial components of a variety of tissues, including breast, stomach, small and large intestine, prostate, lung, pancreas, kidney, tonsil, thyroid, pituitary, placenta, skin epidermis, and brain neurons. Expression was also observed in lymphocytes, plasma cells, and endothelial cells. RT-PCR analysis of selected tissues revealed expression of the SAA1, SAA2, and SAA4 genes but not of SAA3, consistent with expression of these genes in the liver. Immunohistochemical staining revealed SAA protein expression that co-localized with SAA mRNA expression. These data indicate local production of the SAA proteins in histologically normal human extrahepatic tissues. PMID:9815279

  11. Anti-DNA autoantibody-producing hybridomas of normal human lymphoid cell origin.

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, E; Block, J; Bell, D A

    1984-01-01

    Fusion of human myeloma cell line GM 4672 and tonsillar lymphoid cells from a normal donor resulted in 13 primary hybridomas, which produced IgM anti-single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) antibodies, as determined in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Nine of these primary hybridomas have been cloned and a total of 34 clones were obtained. Supernatants of these cloned hybridomas were tested for binding to ssDNA, native DNA, RNA, low molecular weight supernatant DNA, polydeoxyguanylate-polydeoxycitidylate, polydeoxyadenylate-thymidylate sodium salt, and cardiolipin. Supernatants from all clones but one showed polyspecificity when reacting with the antigens tested. That the clones were true hybridomas rather than transformed lymphoid cells was evidence by IgM anti-DNA antibody secretion, karyotype analysis, and HLA typing. These studies imply that immunoglobulin genes encoding for anti-DNA autoantibodies with a spectrum of nucleic acid specificities similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, exist among normal B lymphocytes. PMID:6470143

  12. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-06-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting.

  13. Expression of neural cell adhesion molecule in normal and neoplastic human neuroendocrine tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Hemperly, J. J.; Lloyd, R. V.

    1991-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) is a group of cell surface glycoproteins involved in direct cell--cell adhesion. N-CAM expression in normal and neoplastic tissues was examined with specific antibodies and oligonucleotide probes by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Most neuroendocrine cells and tumors with secretory granules expressed N-CAM protein and mRNA. Parathyroid adenomas (4) were somewhat unusual, because N-CAM mRNA, but not protein, was detected in some of these benign neoplasms. Most non-neuroendocrine cells and tumors did not express N-CAM, although uterine smooth muscle and an adrenal cortical carcinoma were both positive. Western blots disclosed proteins of 180, 140, and 120 kd in normal adult brain, whereas two pheochromocytomas, a null cell adenoma, and a gastrinoma had proteins of approximately 180 and 140 kd. These results indicate that N-CAM protein and mRNA are widely expressed in neuroendocrine cells and neoplasms. N-CAM oligonucleotide probes as well as antibodies against N-CAM can be used as broad-spectrum neuroendocrine markers. In addition, these molecular probes can be used to examine the role of N-CAM in the development and regulation of neuroendocrine tissues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2012179

  14. Prefrontal GABA(A) receptor alpha-subunit expression in normal postnatal human development and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Carlotta E; Webster, Maree J; Rothmond, Debora A; Bahn, Sabine; Elashoff, Michael; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2010-07-01

    Cortical GABA deficits that are consistently reported in schizophrenia may reflect an etiology of failed normal postnatal neurotransmitter maturation. Previous studies have found prefrontal cortical GABA(A) receptor alpha subunit alterations in schizophrenia, yet their relationship to normal developmental expression profiles in the human cortex has not been determined. The aim of this study was to quantify GABA(A) receptor alpha-subunit mRNA expression patterns in human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during normal postnatal development and in schizophrenia cases compared to controls. Transcript levels of GABA(A) receptor alpha subunits were measured using microarray and qPCR analysis of 60 normal individuals aged 6weeks to 49years and in 37 patients with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder and 37 matched controls. We detected robust opposing changes in cortical GABA(A) receptor alpha1 and alpha5 subunits during the first few years of postnatal development, with a 60% decrease in alpha5 mRNA expression and a doubling of alpha1 mRNA expression with increasing age. In our Australian schizophrenia cohort we detected decreased GAD67 mRNA expression (p=0.0012) and decreased alpha5 mRNA expression (p=0.038) in the DLPFC with no significant change of other alpha subunits. Our findings confirm that GABA deficits (reduced GAD67) are a consistent feature of schizophrenia postmortem brain studies. Our study does not confirm alterations in cortical alpha1 or alpha2 mRNA levels in the schizophrenic DLPFC, as seen in previous studies, but instead we report a novel down-regulation of alpha5 subunit mRNA suggesting that post-synaptic alterations of inhibitory receptors are an important feature of schizophrenia but may vary between cohorts. PMID:20100621

  15. Differential extraction of keratin subunits and filaments from normal human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Eichner, R; Kahn, M

    1990-04-01

    We have investigated keratin interactions in vivo by sequentially extracting water-insoluble proteins from normal human epidermis with increasing concentrations of urea (2, 4, 6, and 9.5 M) and examining each extract by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblot analysis using monoclonal anti-keratin antibodies, and EM. The viable layers of normal human epidermis contain keratins K1, K2, K5, K10/11, K14, and K15, which are sequentially expressed during the course of epidermal differentiation. Only keratins K5, K14, and K15, which are synthesized by epidermal basal cells, were solubilized in 2 M urea. Extraction of keratins K1, K2, and K10/11, which are expressed only in differentiating suprabasal cells, required 4-6 M urea. Negative staining of the 2-M urea extract revealed predominantly keratin filament subunits, whereas abundant intermediate-sized filaments were observed in the 4-urea and 6-M urea extracts. These results indicate that in normal human epidermis, keratins K5, K14, and K15 are more soluble than the differentiation-specific keratins K1, K2, and K10/11. This finding suggests that native keratin filaments of different polypeptide composition have differing properties, despite their similar morphology. Furthermore, the observation of stable filaments in 4 and 6 M urea suggests that epidermal keratins K1, K2, and K10/11, which ultimately form the bulk of the protective, nonviable stratum corneum, may comprise filaments that are unusually resistant to denaturation. PMID:1691188

  16. Surface ultrastructure of the epithelia lining the normal human lower urinary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, J.; Hicks, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The finding of cells with pleomorphic microvilli in urinary sediments has been proposed as an indicator for urothelial neoplasia. Recently, in addition to such cells, others with less bizarre, non-pleomorphic microvilli have also been found in urothelial cancers, and these cells are similar in appearance to others detected in the urinary sediments of healthy people. When using scanning electron microscopy as a diagnostic tool, these cells are a possible source of confusion. The entire lower urinary tracts from people free of urothelial neoplasia have therefore been examined to delineate the normal surface appearance of all cell types which could appear in the urine. There are 4 predominant cell types: the large, flat squamous cells of the urethral meatus which have abundant microridges; cells with mucus-coated, short, stubby microvilli lining the urethra and renal papilla; immature urothelial cells with chains and ridges of bleb-like processes in the ureters and bladder; and, also in the ureters and bladder, mature urothelial cells with microridges or ruffles. The lining epithelia of the normal urethra and renal papilla may thus contribute cells with non-pleomorphic stubby microvilli to urine sediments, which cannot be differentiated by scanning electron microscopy alone from similar cells derived from urothelial neoplasms. However, the normal complement of cells lining the adult lower urinary tract does not include any with prolific, long, pleomorphic microvilli such as characterize transitional-cell carcinomas of the urothelium. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 Fig. 24 Fig. 25 Fig. 26 Fig. 27 Fig. 28 Fig. 29 Fig. 30 Fig. 31 Fig. 32 Fig. 33 Fig. 34 Fig. 35 Fig. 36 Fig. 37 Fig. 38 Fig. 39 Fig. 40 Fig. 41 Fig. 42 Fig. 43 Fig. 44 Fig. 45 PMID:7248168

  17. Autofluorescence of normal and tumor mucosa of human colon: a comprehensive analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottiroli, Giovanni F.; Marchesini, Renato; Croce, Anna C.; Dal Fante, Marco; Cuzzoni, Carolina; Di Palma, Silvana; Spinelli, Pasquale

    1993-08-01

    Both 'in vivo' and 'ex vivo' spectrofluorometric studies of neoplastic and non-neoplastic mucosa of human colon have been carried out, in order to verify the potentials of tissue natural fluorescence as a possible parameter to distinguish normal from diseased tissues, Spectrofluorometric analysis performed at colonoscopy on patients affected by neoplasia, showed that adenocarcinoma, adenoma and non-neoplastic mucosa differ in the fluorescence emissions. The results have been interpreted according to the data obtained on cryostatic sections from biopsies by means of a microspectrofluorometric analysis carried out on each histological component.

  18. Nystagmus responses in a group of normal humans during earth-horizontal axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Conrad, III; Furman, Joseph M. R.

    1989-01-01

    Horizontal eye movement responses to earth-horizontal yaw axis rotation were evaluated in 50 normal human subjects who were uniformly distributed in age (20-69 years) and each age group was then divided by gender. Subjects were rotated with eyes open in the dark, using clockwise and counter-clockwise 60 deg velocity trapezoids. The nystagmus slow component velocity is analyzed. It is shown that, despite large intersubject variability, parameters which describe earth-horizontal yaw axis responses are loosely interrelated, and some of them vary significantly with gender and age.

  19. [Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia after spontaneous normalization of human chorionic gonadotropin in patient with partial hydatidiform mole].

    PubMed

    Matos, Michelle; Ferraz, Leda; Lopes, Patrícia de Fátima; Lozoya, Consuelo; Amim Junior, Joffre; Rezende-Filho, Jorge; Braga, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    We report here a case of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia after spontaneous normalization of human chorionic gonadotropin in a patient with a partial hydatidiform mole. This is the second occurrence of this event to be reported and the first one with proven immunohistochemical evidence. Besides showing the treatment for this pregnancy complication, this case report discusses the possibility of reducing the duration of post-molar follow-up, as well as strategies for early recognition of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia after spontaneous remission of molar pregnancy. PMID:26247255

  20. Ecological Effect of Ceftaroline-Avibactam on the Normal Human Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Rosenborg, Staffan; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Söderberg-Löfdal, Karin; Weintraub, Andrej

    2015-01-01

    Ceftaroline-avibactam is a new combination of the antibiotic ceftaroline with a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor, avibactam. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of ceftaroline-avibactam on the human intestinal microbiota. Fourteen healthy volunteers received ceftaroline-avibactam (600 mg ceftaroline fosamil and 600 mg avibactam) intravenously over 2 h every 8 h on days 1 to 6 and as a single dose on day 7. Fecal samples were collected on day −1 (within 24 h of the first infusion on day 1) and on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, and 21. Escherichia coli numbers decreased during the study and normalized on day 21. An increased number of Klebsiella bacteria appeared on day 14 and normalized on day 21. The number of other enterobacteria decreased during the study, and the number of enterococci decreased from days 2 to 7 and normalized on day 9. Candida numbers increased from days 5 to 9 and normalized after day 14. The number of lactobacilli decreased during the study and recovered on day 14. The number of bifidobacteria decreased on day 2 and normalized on day 21. The number of Bacteroides bacteria was unchanged. Clostridium difficile numbers decreased on days 7 and 9 and increased on days 14 and 21. A toxigenic C. difficile strain was detected in one volunteer on day 21 with no reported adverse events. Plasma samples were collected on days −1, 2, 5, and 7. Ceftaroline and avibactam concentrations were 0 to 34.5 mg/liter and 0 to 61.6 mg/liter, respectively, in plasma and 0 to 35.4 mg/kg and 0 to 98.5 mg/kg, respectively, in feces. (This study is registered in the European Clinical Trials Database [https://eudract.ema.europa.eu/] under number EudraCT 2012 004921-25.) PMID:25987638

  1. Ecological Effect of Ceftaroline-Avibactam on the Normal Human Intestinal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Rosenborg, Staffan; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Söderberg-Löfdal, Karin; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2015-08-01

    Ceftaroline-avibactam is a new combination of the antibiotic ceftaroline with a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor, avibactam. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of ceftaroline-avibactam on the human intestinal microbiota. Fourteen healthy volunteers received ceftaroline-avibactam (600 mg ceftaroline fosamil and 600 mg avibactam) intravenously over 2 h every 8 h on days 1 to 6 and as a single dose on day 7. Fecal samples were collected on day -1 (within 24 h of the first infusion on day 1) and on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, and 21. Escherichia coli numbers decreased during the study and normalized on day 21. An increased number of Klebsiella bacteria appeared on day 14 and normalized on day 21. The number of other enterobacteria decreased during the study, and the number of enterococci decreased from days 2 to 7 and normalized on day 9. Candida numbers increased from days 5 to 9 and normalized after day 14. The number of lactobacilli decreased during the study and recovered on day 14. The number of bifidobacteria decreased on day 2 and normalized on day 21. The number of Bacteroides bacteria was unchanged. Clostridium difficile numbers decreased on days 7 and 9 and increased on days 14 and 21. A toxigenic C. difficile strain was detected in one volunteer on day 21 with no reported adverse events. Plasma samples were collected on days -1, 2, 5, and 7. Ceftaroline and avibactam concentrations were 0 to 34.5 mg/liter and 0 to 61.6 mg/liter, respectively, in plasma and 0 to 35.4 mg/kg and 0 to 98.5 mg/kg, respectively, in feces. (This study is registered in the European Clinical Trials Database [https://eudract.ema.europa.eu/] under number EudraCT 2012 004921-25.). PMID:25987638

  2. Localization of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 in adult and fetal human kidney: implication for renal function.

    PubMed

    Kömhoff, M; Grone, H J; Klein, T; Seyberth, H W; Nüsing, R M

    1997-04-01

    To gain insight into the roles of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 in human kidney, we analyzed their expressions and localization in adult and fetal normal kidney. Immunohistology showed expression of COX-1 in collecting duct cells, interstitial cells, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells of pre- and postglomerular vessels. Expression of COX-2 immunoreactive protein could be localized to endothelial and smooth muscle cells of arteries and veins and intraglomerularly in podocytes. In contrast to the rat, COX isoforms were not detected in the macula densa. These data were confirmed by in situ mRNA analysis using digoxigenin-labeled riboprobes. In fetal kidney, COX-1 was primarily expressed in podocytes and collecting duct cells. Expression levels of COX-1 in both cell types increased markedly from subcapsular to juxtamedullary cortex. Glomerular staining of COX-2 was detectable in podocytes only at the endstage of renal development. In summary, the localization of COX-2 suggests that this enzyme may be primarily involved in the regulation of renal perfusion and glomerular hemodynamics. The expression of COX-1 in podocytes of the fetal kidney and its absence in adult glomeruli suggests that this isoform might be involved in glomerulogenesis. PMID:9140046

  3. Challenging Gait Conditions Predict 1-Year Decline in Gait Speed in Older Adults With Apparently Normal Gait

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Subashan; VanSwearingen, Jessie M.; Hile, Elizabeth S.; Wert, David M.; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mobility often is tested under a low challenge condition (ie, over a straight, uncluttered path), which often fails to identify early mobility difficulty. Tests of walking during challenging conditions may uncover mobility difficulty that is not identified with usual gait testing. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether gait during challenging conditions predicts decline in gait speed over 1 year in older people with apparently normal gait (ie, gait speed of ≥1.0 m/s). Design This was a prospective cohort study. Methods Seventy-one older adults (mean age=75.9 years) with a usual gait speed of ≥1.0 m/s participated. Gait was tested at baseline under 4 challenging conditions: (1) narrow walk (15 cm wide), (2) stepping over obstacles (15.24 cm [6 in] and 30.48 cm [12 in]), (3) simple walking while talking (WWT), and (4) complex WWT. Usual gait speed was recorded over a 4-m course at baseline and 1 year later. A 1-year change in gait speed was calculated, and participants were classified as declined (decreased ≥0.10 m/s, n=18), stable (changed <0.10 m/s, n=43), or improved (increased ≥0.10 m/s, n=10). Analysis of variance was used to compare challenging condition cost (usual − challenging condition gait speed difference) among the 3 groups. Results Participants who declined in the ensuing year had a greater narrow walk and obstacle walk cost than those who were stable or who improved in gait speed (narrow walk cost=0.43 versus 0.33 versus 0.22 m/s and obstacle walk cost=0.35 versus 0.26 versus 0.13 m/s). Simple and complex WWT cost did not differ among the groups. Limitations The participants who declined in gait speed over time walked the fastest, and those who improved walked the slowest at baseline; thus, the potential contribution of regression to the mean to the findings should not be overlooked. Conclusions In older adults with apparently normal gait, the assessment of gait during challenging conditions appears to uncover

  4. Bengt E. Gustafsson memorial lecture. Function of the normal human microflora.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, S L

    1986-01-01

    The normal human microflora maintains a delicate balance between its constituent parts, numbering 10(11) bacteria per gram with over 400 different species. Certain metabolic functions and enzyme activities can be attributed to the microflora, and these play a role in metabolizing nutrients, vitamins, drugs, endogenous hormones and carcinogens. Our laboratory has studied estrogen and cholesterol metabolism and activation of colon carcinogens. Three techniques to change the flora and its enzymatic activities have been used. Switching the diet from an omnivore diet to a vegetarian diet decreases bacterial deconjugating enzymes in the intestine. Administering antibiotics also suppresses the metabolic activity of the microflora. Similar suppressive effects can be achieved by feeding a human strain of Lactobacillus that implants in the gastrointestinal tract. Manipulation of these various modalities can maximize the beneficial activities of the intestinal microflora. PMID:3103209

  5. Light scattering of normal human lens I. Application of random density and orientation fluctuation theory.

    PubMed Central

    Bettelheim, F A; Paunovic, M

    1979-01-01

    Light-scattering intensities in the I parallel and I+ mode were obtained on thin sections of three human lenses. Random density and orientation fluctuation theory, without cross correlation, was employed to evaluate light-scattering parameters. Both the density correlation distances, as well as the orientation correlation distances, were related to structural elements in the lens fiber cell that have been observed by other investigators with different techniques. The magnitude of these fluctuations were evaluated, and it was demonstrated that the density fluctuations are the main contributors to light scattering in normal human lenses. Changes in the light-scattering parameters were evaluated as a function of position within the lens. The changes observed agree with the biochemical data in the literature that reflects that an aging process occurs when one proceeds from the periphery of the lens toward the center. PMID:262413

  6. Expression of splice variants of mts1 gene in normal and neoplastic human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ambartsumyan, N.S. |; Grigorian, M.S.; Lukanidin, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    Data on cloning of cDNA corresponding to human mts1 gene transcripts are presented. By comparing nucleotide sequences of the genomic DNA clone and cDNA of mts1, it was shown that human osteosarcoma OHS cells contain two alternative splice variants of mts1 transcripts. Alternative splicing occurs in the 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mts1 pre-mRNA. Both splice variants, hu-mts1 and hu-mts1(var), demonstrate similar stability in the cells, and each contains one open reading frame for the MTS1 protein. However, the two types of transcripts are translated with different effectiveness. The level of transcription of mts1 splice variants in different normal and neoplastic tissues and cell lines varies significantly. The role of alternative splicing as the mechanism responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of mts1 gene expression is discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Immunohistochemical localization of the epidermal growth factor receptor in normal human tissues.

    PubMed

    Damjanov, I; Mildner, B; Knowles, B B

    1986-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody recognizing an epitope of the external domain of the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor was used to localize this protein in selected normal human tissues. Two patterns of reactivity were recognized: strong linear or granular cell surface staining, and granular cytoplasmic staining. In one tissue, the endometrium, a change in the reaction pattern associated with changes in hormonal stimulation was observed. In some tissues such as epididymis and skin, the antibody showed surface reactivity with cells considered to represent part of the proliferating cell compartment, whereas in liver, pancreas, and prostate, all cells were reactive with the antibody, though the predominant reactivity was localized in the cytoplasm. The differential distribution of the epidermal growth factor receptor to specific cell types and cellular compartments may signify adaptations that permit growth factor responsiveness in a milieu of available ligand. PMID:3534450

  8. Protection of normal human reconstructed epidermis from UV by catalase overexpression.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, H R; Cario-André, M; Pain, C; Ged, C; deVerneuil, H; Taïeb, A

    2007-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are counterbalanced by endogenous antioxidant systems. To test the hypothesis of a novel photoprotective approach, we irradiated epidermis reconstructed with normal human keratinocytes overexpressing sustainably lentivirus-mediated catalase (CAT), copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) or manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) enzymes. We found that following UVB irradiation there was a marked decrease in sunburn cell formation, caspase-3 activation and p53 accumulation in human reconstructed epidermis overexpressing CAT. Moreover, UVA-induced hypertrophy and DNA oxidation (8-oxodeoxyguanosine) were decreased by CAT overexpression. These effects were not achieved by overexpression of CuZnSOD or MnSOD. In conclusion, vector-mediated CAT overexpression could be a promising photoprotective tool against deleterious effects of UV irradiation such skin cancer especially in monogenic/polygenic photosensitive disorders characterized by ROS accumulation. PMID:17053817

  9. Differential responsiveness of normal and simian virus 40-transformed human fibroblast cells to interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Y; Katoh, T; Higashi, K; Gotoh, S

    1992-06-01

    The effect of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) on epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor binding and the proliferation of normal and simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed human fibroblast cells was compared under identical culture conditions. IFN-gamma induced an enhancement of EGF binding to normal cells, whereas it decreased the EGF binding to SV40-transformed cells. Half-maximal enhancement occurred at 72 h after the normal cells were exposed to 10 U/ml of IFN-gamma, and maximal stimulation was obtained at about 10(2) U/ml of IFN-gamma at 72 h. On the other hand, half-maximal reduction was observed for SV40-transformed cells at less than 10 U/ml of IFN-gamma at 72 h, and maximal reduction was obtained at around 10(3) U/ml of IFN-gamma at 72 h. Scatchard analysis indicated that the number of EGF binding sites of normal and SV40-transformed cells was calculated to be 1.6 x 10(5) and 0.88 x 10(5) per cell, respectively, and was little altered by IFN-gamma treatment. The dissociation constant (Kd) of normal cells, however, decreased from 4.5 nM (control) to 2.0 nM (IFN-gamma-treated), while the Kd of SV40-transformed cells increased from 3.6 nM (control) to 17.0 nM (IFN-gamma-treated). The immunoprecipitation of 125I-labeled EGF-bound EGF receptors with anti-receptor antiserum indicated that a 72-h IFN-gamma treatment did not induce a conformational alteration in the EGF receptors of both normal and transformed cells. The DNA synthesis of normal cells was enhanced by EGF, and IFN-gamma treatment potentiated the effect of EGF on DNA synthesis, probably due to the increased binding affinity of EGF to the cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1640119

  10. Differential thioredoxin reductase activity from human normal hepatic and hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jung, Haeng-Im; Lim, Hye-Won; Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Eun-Hee; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2004-04-30

    Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), a component of the thioredoxin system, including thioredoxin (Trx) and NADPH, catalyzes the transfer of electrons from NADPH to Trx, acts as a reductant of disulfide-containing proteins and participates in the defense system against oxidative stresses. In this study, the regulation pattern of TrxR in the presence of various stressful reagents was compared between Chang (human normal hepatic cell) and HepG2 (human hepatoma cell) cell lines. Aluminum chloride (0.5 mM) and zinc chloride (0.5 mM) enhanced the TrxR activity in the Chang cell line to a higher degree than in the HepG2 cell line, but cupric chloride (0.2 mM) and cadmium chloride (0.1 mM) enhanced the TrxR activity in the HepG2 cell line to a greater degree. The TrxR activities in both Chang and HepG2 cell lines were similarly induced by treatment with sodium selenite (0.02 mM) and menadione (0.5 and 1.0 mM). Lipopolysaccharide (2 micro g/m1) increased the TrxR activity upto 4.02- and 2.2-fold in the Chang and HepG2 cell lines, respectively, in time-dependent manners. Hydrogen peroxide (5 mM) markedly enhanced the TrxR activity in the HepG2 cell line, but not in the Chang cell line. NO-generating sodium nitroprusside (3.0 and 6.0 mM) induced TrxR activities in both human liver cell lines. The TrxR activity was also induced in human liver cells under limited growth conditions by serum deprivation. These results imply that the TrxR activities in normal hepatic and hepatoma cell lines are subject to different regulatory responses to various stresses. PMID:15118998

  11. Visual Acuity of Simulated Thalamic Visual Prostheses in Normally Sighted Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Ailsa; Pezaris, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Simulation in normally sighted individuals is a crucial tool to evaluate the performance of potential visual prosthesis designs prior to human implantation of a device. Here, we investigated the effects of electrode count on visual acuity, learning rate and response time in 16 normally sighted subjects using a simulated thalamic visual prosthesis, providing the first performance reports for thalamic designs. A new letter recognition paradigm using a multiple-optotype two-alternative forced choice task was adapted from the Snellen eye chart, and specifically devised to be readily communicated to both human and non-human primate subjects. Validation of the method against a standard Snellen acuity test in 21 human subjects showed no significant differences between the two tests. The novel task was then used to address three questions about simulations of the center-weighted phosphene patterns typical of thalamic designs: What are the expected Snellen acuities for devices with varying numbers of contacts, do subjects display rapid adaptation to the new visual modality, and can response time in the task provide clues to the mechanisms of perception in low-resolution artificial vision? Population performance (hit rate) was significantly above chance when viewing Snellen 20/200 optotypes (Log MAR 1.0) with 370 phosphenes in the central 10 degrees of vision, ranging to Snellen 20/800 (Log MAR 1.6) with 25 central phosphenes. Furthermore, subjects demonstrated learning within the 1–2 hours of task experience indicating the potential for an effective rehabilitation and possibly better visual performance after a longer period of training. Response time differences suggest that direct letter perception occurred when hit rate was above 75%, whereas a slower strategy like feature-based pattern matching was used in conditions of lower relative resolution. As pattern matching can substantially boost effective acuity, these results suggest post-implant therapy should specifically

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the MATP gene are associated with normal human pigmentation variation.

    PubMed

    Graf, Justin; Hodgson, Richard; van Daal, Angela

    2005-03-01

    Human physical pigmentation is determined by the type and amount of melanin and the process of pigmentation production probably involves more than 100 genes. A failure to synthesize melanin results in oculocutaneous albinism (OCA). A recently identified form of OCA results from mutations in the Membrane Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) gene. The role of MATP in human pigmentation is not clear. We investigated the role of two nonpathogenic nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MATP gene to determine if they are associated with normal human skin, hair, and eye color variation. A total of 608 individuals from four different population groups (456 Caucasians, 31 Asians, 70 African-Americans, and 51 Australian Aborigines) were genotyped for c.814G>A (p.Glu272Lys) and c.1122C>G (p.Phe374Leu). Results indicate that the allele frequencies of both polymorphisms are significantly different between population groups. The two alleles, 374Leu and 272Lys, are significantly associated with dark hair, skin, and eye color in Caucasians. The odds ratios (ORs) of the LeuLeu genotype for black hair and olive skin are 25.63 and 28.65, respectively, and for the LysLys genotype are 43.23 and 8.27, respectively. The OR for eye color is lower at 3.48 for the LeuLeu and 6.57 for LysLys genotypes. This is the first report of this highly significant association of MATP polymorphisms with normal human pigmentation variation. PMID:15714523

  13. Distribution of PSA-NCAM in normal, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease human brain.

    PubMed

    Murray, Helen C; Low, Victoria F; Swanson, Molly E V; Dieriks, Birger V; Turner, Clinton; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A

    2016-08-25

    Polysialated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) is a membrane bound glycoprotein widely expressed during nervous system development. While commonly described in the neurogenic niches of the adult human brain, there is limited evidence of its distribution in other brain regions. PSA-NCAM is an important regulator of cell-cell interactions and facilitates cell migration and plasticity. Recent evidence suggests these functions may be altered in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). This study provides a detailed description of the PSA-NCAM distribution throughout the human brain and quantitatively compares the staining load in cortical regions and sub-cortical structures between the control, AD and PD brain. Our results provide evidence of widespread, yet specific, PSA-NCAM expression throughout the human brain including regions devoid of PSA-NCAM in the rodent brain such as the caudate nucleus (CN) and cerebellum (CB). We also detected a significant reduction in PSA-NCAM load in the entorhinal cortex (EC) of cases that was inversely correlated with hyperphosphorylated tau load. These results demonstrate that PSA-NCAM-mediated structural plasticity may not be limited to neurogenic niches and is conserved in the aged brain. We also provide evidence that PSA-NCAM is reduced in the EC, a region severely affected by AD pathology. PMID:27282086

  14. Correlates of perceived health related quality of life in obese, overweight and normal weight older adults: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is a complex multifactorial disease, which also has an impact on quality of life. The aim of this paper is to identify the correlates of perceived health related quality of life in obese, overweight and normal weight Italians older adults. Methods 205 subjects at the age ≥ 60 yrs. were recruited into the Division of Endocrinology of the Polytechnic University of Marche Region, Ancona (Italy). A protocol of questionnaires was constructed for data collection, and included domains such as physical activity, quality of life, socio-psychological aspects. The association of the latter variables with SF-36 Health Survey physical component (PCS-36) were evaluated in the whole sample. Multiple linear regression models were used to assess the effect of independent variables on PCS-36 and the physical subscales of SF-36. Results PCS-36 showed a lower score in the obese and overweight subjects than the normal weight group (post-hoc test, p < 0.001 and p < 0.05 respectively). Age, gender (male), Body Mass Index, years of education, Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) total score, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale anxiety, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression, number of medications prescribed and number of diseases were included in the model. Negative and significant PCS-associated variables included depression (p = 0.009), BMI (p = 0.001), age in years (p = 0.007), whereas positive and significant PCS-associated independent variables were years of education (p = 0.022), physical activity (p = 0.026). BMI was negatively associated with all the physical subscales of SF-36 (p < 0.05). Conclusions Research funding should be invested in the study of the benefits accruing from reducing obesity in the elderly. PMID:24428944

  15. [Normal values of cell distribution and function in the human alveolus. Bronchoalveolar lavage as a diagnostic tool in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Obertacke, U; Joka, T; Pison, U; Riewendt, H D; Stimming, W

    1987-10-01

    The cell distribution and cell function in the normal human alveolar were determined in 23 healthy subjects by obtaining the pulmonary lavage fluid from bronchoalveolar lavage. A uniform alveolar cell spectrum was found. (Alveolar macrophages 95-98%, polymorphonuclear neutrophils 2-3%, lymphocytes 0-2%.) The cell systems reacted reproducibly to a defined phagocytosis stimulation in luminol-enhanced chemoluminescence. The phospholipid lung profile, which is important for the function of the surfactant, was determined by means of high-pressure liquid chromatography. The typical inflammation mediators were not present in the humoral spectrum of the supernatant part of the lavage fluid. Albumin, transferrin, and alpha-1-antitrypsin were regularly seen in healthy adults in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The results supply the basis for the interpretation of the findings in polytraumatised patients in adult respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:2446522

  16. Electrochemically Preadsorbed Collagen Promotes Adult Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Benavidez, Tomás E; Wechsler, Marissa E; Farrer, Madeleine M; Bizios, Rena; Garcia, Carlos D

    2016-01-01

    The present article reports on the effect of electric potential on the adsorption of collagen type I (the most abundant component of the organic phase of bone) onto optically transparent carbon electrodes (OTCE) and its mediation on subsequent adhesion of adult, human, mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). For this purpose, adsorption of collagen type I was investigated as a function of the protein concentration (0.01, 0.1, and 0.25 mg/mL) and applied potential (open circuit potential [OCP; control], +400, +800, and +1500 mV). The resulting substrate surfaces were characterized using spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Adsorption of collagen type I onto OTCE was affected by the potential applied to the sorbent surface and the concentration of protein. The higher the applied potential and protein concentration, the higher the adsorbed amount (Γcollagen). It was also observed that the application of potential values higher than +800 mV resulted in the oxidation of the adsorbed protein. Subsequent adhesion of hMSCs on the OTCEs (precoated with the collagen type I films) under standard cell culture conditions for 2 h was affected by the extent of collagen preadsorbed onto the OTCE substrates. Specifically, enhanced hMSCs adhesion was observed when the Γcollagen was the highest. When the collagen type I was oxidized (under applied potential equal to +1500 mV), however, hMSCs adhesion was decreased. These results provide the first correlation between the effects of electric potential on protein adsorption and subsequent modulation of anchorage-dependent cell adhesion. PMID:26549607

  17. UPRT, a suicide-gene therapy candidate in higher eukaryotes, is required for Drosophila larval growth and normal adult lifespan.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arpan C; Shimell, MaryJane; Leof, Emma R; Haley, Macy J; O'Connor, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) is a pyrimidine salvage pathway enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of uracil to uridine monophosphate (UMP). The enzyme is highly conserved from prokaryotes to humans and yet phylogenetic evidence suggests that UPRT homologues from higher-eukaryotes, including Drosophila, are incapable of binding uracil. Purified human UPRT also do not show any enzymatic activity in vitro, making microbial UPRT an attractive candidate for anti-microbial drug development, suicide-gene therapy, and cell-specific mRNA labeling techniques. Nevertheless, the enzymatic site of UPRT remains conserved across the animal kingdom indicating an in vivo role for the enzyme. We find that the Drosophila UPRT homologue, krishah (kri), codes for an enzyme that is required for larval growth, pre-pupal/pupal viability and long-term adult lifespan. Our findings suggest that UPRT from all higher eukaryotes is likely enzymatically active in vivo and challenges the previous notion that the enzyme is non-essential in higher eukaryotes and cautions against targeting the enzyme for therapeutic purposes. Our findings also suggest that expression of the endogenous UPRT gene will likely cause background incorporation when using microbial UPRT as a cell-specific mRNA labeling reagent in higher eukaryotes. PMID:26271729

  18. Distinct expression patterns of ERα and ERβ in normal human mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Speirs, V; Skliris, G P; Burdall, S E; Carder, P J

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Two oestrogen receptors (ERs) have been identified to date—the “classic” ERα and the more recently described ERβ. Although much is known about ERα at the mRNA and protein levels, our knowledge of the expression and distribution of ERβ protein is much more limited. The aim of this study was to compare the cellular distribution of ERα and ERβ in normal human mammary gland. Methods: Formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded material was obtained from reduction mammoplasty specimens, normal tissue adjacent to breast tumour, or fibroadenoma. Sections were immunohistochemically stained for ERα, ERβ, and the progesterone receptor. The staining pattern for each antibody was evaluated and compared. Results: ERα was restricted to the cell nuclei of epithelial cells lining ducts and lobules. Although ERβ was also seen in these cells, additional strong staining was detected specifically in the cell nuclei of myoepithelial cells. Occasional staining was seen in surrounding stromal and endothelial cell nuclei and in lymphocytes. Conclusions: ER subtypes have distinct distribution patterns in the normal mammary gland. The widespread distribution of ERβ suggests that it may be the dominant ER in the mammary gland where it may be acting as a natural suppressor. PMID:11986344

  19. Vertical normal modes of human ears: Individual variation and frequency estimation from pinna anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Parham; Takemoto, Hironori; Nishimura, Ryouichi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    Beyond the first peak of head-related transfer functions or pinna-related transfer functions (PRTFs) human pinnae are known to have two normal modes with "vertical" resonance patterns, involving two or three pressure anti-nodes in cavum, cymba, and fossa. However, little is known about individual variations in these modes, and there is no established model for estimating their center-frequencies from anthropometry. Here, with geometries of 38 pinnae measured, PRTFs were calculated and vertical modes visualized by numerical simulation. Most pinnae were found to have both Cavum-Fossa and Cavum-Cymba modes, with opposite-phase anti-nodes in cavum and either fossa or cymba, respectively. Nevertheless in both modes, fossa involvement varied substantially across pinnae, dependent on scaphoid fossa depth and cymba shallowness. Linear regression models were evaluated in mode frequency estimation, with 3322 measures derived from 31 pinna landmarks. The Cavum-Fossa normal mode frequency was best estimated [correlation coefficient r = 0.89, mean absolute error (MAE) = 257 Hz or 4.4%] by the distance from canal entrance to helix rim, and cymba horizontal depth. The Cavum-Cymba normal mode frequency was best estimated (r = 0.92, MAE = 247 Hz or 3.2%) by the sagittal-plane distance from concha floor to cymba anterior wall, and cavum horizontal depth. PMID:27586714

  20. Inhibition of phagocytosis and chemiluminescence in human leukocytes by a lipid soluble factor in normal tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, T S; Hurd, R E; Chopra, I J; Stevens, P; Solomon, D H; Young, L S

    1984-01-01

    Homogenates of normal rat tissues inhibited several functional parameters of normal human peripheral blood leukocytes, including luminol-dependent chemiluminescence induced by both soluble (phorbol myristate acetate) and particulate (Escherichia coli) stimuli; in vitro uptake of radiolabeled E. coli; and in vitro phagocytosis and killing of E. coli. The doses of rat tissue protein that caused a 50% inhibition of leukocyte chemiluminescence were ca. 6.2 micrograms for small intestine, 83 micrograms for kidney; 100 micrograms for heart; 132 micrograms for liver, 190 micrograms for skeletal muscle, and 307 micrograms for brain. The putative phagocytosis inhibitor (PI) in rat liver was more plentiful in particulate fractions than in the cytosol. The PI activity in the original or Miranol-solubilized rat liver homogenate was nondialyzable, and it was reduced substantially by heating at 90 degrees C for 30 min but not at 56 degrees C for 30 min. It was unaffected by aprotinin, a potent inhibitor of proteolytic activity. Treatment of tissues with trypsin did not reduce PI activity, whereas treatment with phospholipase A2 clearly increased it. The bulk (up to 88%) of PI in rat liver or small intestine could be extracted by lipid solvents, e.g., diethyl ether. Purified fatty acids were potent inhibitors of leukocyte chemiluminescence; other lipids had little or no inhibiting activity. The various data suggest that (i) normal tissues contain a potent PI and (ii) that the PI is a lipid moiety. PMID:6389349

  1. Influence of free residual chlorine on cultured human epidermal keratinocytes from normal skin and hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Y; Mori, H; Hayakawa, A; Ohashi, M

    1995-07-01

    In Japan, public health regulations state that the water in rinsing pools used before swimming should contain 50-100 mg/l of chlorine. We examined the influence of chlorination at high concentrations in rinsing pools on the skin using cultured human epidermal keratinocytes from normal skin and hypertrophic scars. Chlorination of cell culture for 15 min with 200 mg/l of free residual chlorine proved cytotoxic to both types of keratinocytes as did 100 mg/l of free residual chlorine for 1 or 3 consecutive days. Keratinocytes from hypertrophic scars, when cultivated in 100 mg/l of free residual chlorine, were more vulnerable to chlorine than those from normal skin. Cell characteristics of cultured keratinocytes from hypertrophic scars may be somewhat different from those of normal skin. The phenomena observed in this experimental model of the skin suggest that people exposed to chlorine in rinsing pools at concentrations in excess of 200 mg/l for about 15 min before swimming are at risk of developing cutaneous disorders, especially at sites of injury, e.g. scars. PMID:7577833

  2. An alternatively spliced surfactant protein B mRNA in normal human lung: disease implication.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Z; Wang, G; Demello, D E; Floros, J

    1999-01-01

    We identified an alternatively-spliced surfactant protein B (SP-B) mRNA from normal human lung with a 12 nt deletion at the beginning of exon 8. This deletion causes a loss of four amino acids in the SP-B precursor protein. Sequence comparison of the 3' splice sites reveals only one difference in the frequency of U/C in the 11 predominantly-pyrimidine nucleotide tract, 73% for the normal and 45% for the alternatively-spliced SP-B mRNA (77-99% for the consensus sequence). Analysis of SP-B mRNA in lung indicates that the abundance of the alternatively-spliced form is very low and varies among individuals. Although the relative abundance of the deletion form of SP-B mRNA remains constant among normal lungs, it is found with relatively higher abundance in the lungs of some individuals with diseases such as congenital alveolar proteinosis, respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, alveolar capillary dysplasia and hypophosphatasia. This observation points to the possibility that the alternative splicing is a potential regulatory mechanism of SP-B and may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease under certain circumstances. PMID:10493923

  3. Pulse wave imaging in normal, hypertensive and aneurysmal human aortas in vivo: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ronny X.; Luo, Jianwen; Balaram, Sandhya K.; Chaudhry, Farooq A.; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2013-07-01

    Arterial stiffness is a well-established biomarker for cardiovascular risk, especially in the case of hypertension. The progressive stages of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have also been associated with varying arterial stiffness. Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique that uses the pulse wave-induced arterial wall motion to map the propagation of the pulse wave and measure the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) as an index of arterial stiffness. In this study, the clinical feasibility of PWI was evaluated in normal, hypertensive, and aneurysmal human aortas. Radiofrequency-based speckle tracking was used to estimate the pulse wave-induced displacements in the abdominal aortic walls of normal (N = 15, mean age 32.5 ± 10.2 years), hypertensive (N = 13, mean age 60.8 ± 15.8 years), and aneurysmal (N = 5, mean age 71.6 ± 11.8 years) human subjects. Linear regression of the spatio-temporal variation of the displacement waveform in the anterior aortic wall over a single cardiac cycle yielded the slope as the PWV and the coefficient of determination r2 as an approximate measure of the pulse wave propagation uniformity. The aortic PWV measurements in all normal, hypertensive, and AAA subjects were 6.03 ± 1.68, 6.69 ± 2.80, and 10.54 ± 6.52 m s-1, respectively. There was no significant difference (p = 0.15) between the PWVs of the normal and hypertensive subjects while the PWVs of the AAA subjects were significantly higher (p < 0.001) compared to those of the other two groups. Also, the average r2 in the AAA subjects was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than that in the normal and hypertensive subjects. These preliminary results suggest that the regional PWV and the pulse wave propagation uniformity (r2) obtained using PWI, in addition to the PWI images and spatio-temporal maps that provide qualitative visualization of the pulse wave, may potentially provide valuable information for the clinical characterization of aneurysms

  4. Three-dimensional counting of morphologically normal human red blood cells via digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H.

    2015-01-01

    Counting morphologically normal cells in human red blood cells (RBCs) is extremely beneficial in the health care field. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) classification method of automatically determining the morphologically normal RBCs in the phase image of multiple human RBCs that are obtained by off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM). The RBC holograms are first recorded by DHM, and then the phase images of multiple RBCs are reconstructed by a computational numerical algorithm. To design the classifier, the three typical RBC shapes, which are stomatocyte, discocyte, and echinocyte, are used for training and testing. Nonmain or abnormal RBC shapes different from the three normal shapes are defined as the fourth category. Ten features, including projected surface area, average phase value, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, perimeter, mean corpuscular hemoglobin surface density, circularity, mean phase of center part, sphericity coefficient, elongation, and pallor, are extracted from each RBC after segmenting the reconstructed phase images by using a watershed transform algorithm. Moreover, four additional properties, such as projected surface area, perimeter, average phase value, and elongation, are measured from the inner part of each cell, which can give significant information beyond the previous 10 features for the separation of the RBC groups; these are verified in the experiment by the statistical method of Hotelling's T-square test. We also apply the principal component analysis algorithm to reduce the dimension number of variables and establish the Gaussian mixture densities using the projected data with the first eight principal components. Consequently, the Gaussian mixtures are used to design the discriminant functions based on Bayesian decision theory. To improve the performance of the Bayes classifier and the accuracy of estimation of its error rate, the leaving-one-out technique is applied. Experimental results show that the proposed method can

  5. The Fate of a Normal Human Cell Traversed by a Single Charged Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, C.; Zahnreich, S.; Kraft, D.; Friedrich, T.; Voss, K.-O.; Durante, M.; Ritter, S.

    2012-09-01

    The long-term ``fate'' of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability.

  6. The Fate of a Normal Human Cell Traversed by a Single Charged Particle

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, C.; Zahnreich, S.; Kraft, D.; Friedrich, T.; Voss, K.-O.; Durante, M.; Ritter, S.

    2012-01-01

    The long-term “fate” of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability. PMID:22966418

  7. Wound healing properties of ethyl acetate fraction of Moringa oleifera in normal human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gothai, Sivapragasam; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Tan, Woan Sean; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Wounds are the outcome of injuries to the skin that interrupt the soft tissue. Healing of a wound is a complex and long-drawn-out process of tissue repair and remodeling in response to injury. A large number of plants are used by folklore traditions for the treatment of cuts, wounds and burns. Moringa oleifera (MO) is an herb used as a traditional folk medicine for the treatment of various skin wounds and associated diseases. The underlying mechanisms of wound healing activity of ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves extract are completely unknown. Materials and Methods: In the current study, ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves was investigated for its efficacy on cell viability, proliferation and migration (wound closure rate) in human normal dermal fibroblast cells. Results: Results revealed that lower concentration (12.5 µg/ml, 25 µg/ml, and 50 µg/ml) of ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves showed remarkable proliferative and migratory effect on normal human dermal fibroblasts. Conclusion: This study suggested that ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves might be a potential therapeutic agent for skin wound healing by promoting fibroblast proliferation and migration through increasing the wound closure rate corroborating its traditional use. PMID:27069722

  8. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  9. Deceleration of senescence in normal human fibroblasts by withanone extracted from ashwagandha leaves.

    PubMed

    Widodo, Nashi; Shah, Navjot; Priyandoko, Didik; Ishii, Tetsuro; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2009-10-01

    Ashwagandha is an Ayurvedic shrub that forms a common ingredient of health supplements, tonics, and Indian home remedies designed to promote health and quality of life. Though sustained through experience and history, there are only a limited laboratory studies and experimental evidence to its effects. In our efforts to characterize Ashwagandha activities and their molecular mechanisms, we initially prepared leaf extract of Ashwagandha (i-Extract) that showed tumor-inhibitory activity. In the present study, we demonstrate that a major component of i-Extract and withanone (i-Factor) protected the normal human fibroblasts against the toxicity caused by withaferin A. It increased the in vitro division potential of normal human cells that appeared to be mediated by decreased accumulation of molecular damage, downregulation of the senescence-specific beta-galactosidase activity and the senescence marker protein, p21(WAF-1), protection against oxidative damage, and induction of proteasomal activity. To the best of our knowledge, we provide the first example of phytochemical(s) (i-Extract and withanone) that have both anticancer and antiaging activities and point to the molecular link between aging and cancer. PMID:19587106

  10. Expression of microRNA-370 in human breast cancer compare with normal samples

    PubMed Central

    Mollainezhad, Halimeh; Eskandari, Nahid; Pourazar, Abbasali; Salehi, Mansoor; Andalib, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the second leading cause of deaths from cancer in the woman. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous noncoding RNAs that are known critical player in carcinogenesis. The role of miR-370 in malignancies remains controversial because of its levels varying in different cancers according to its targets while the role of miR-370 in breast cancer has not been addressed so far. The aim of this study was to identify the expression pattern of miR-370 in human breast cancer tissue compared to adjacent healthy tissue. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two fresh frozen tissues (normal and malignant) from patients with breast cancer were examined for miR-370 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction method at 2013. Results: We observed up-regulation (six-fold higher) of miR-370 in breast cancer tissue compared with normal adjacent tissue. Tumor samples in stage III, invasive ductal type, larger tumor size, human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2+, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor−, P53 − status showed significantly increased expression in miR-370. Conclusion: Together, miR-370 may acts as an onco-miRNA, and it may have a novel role in breast cancer. Detection of miR-370 and its targets could be helpful as a diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:27563639

  11. Particle irradiation induces FGF2 expression in normal human lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Bjornstad K, A.; Chang, E.; McNamara, M.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Lin, S. P.; Aragon, G.; Polansky, J. R.; Lui, G. M.; Blakely, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Particle Irradiation Induces FGF2 Expression in Normal Human Lens Cells. Particle radiations, including both proton and helium-ion beams, have been used to successfully treat choroidal melanoma, but with the complication of radiation-induced cataract. We have investigated a role for radiation-induced changes in the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) gene expression as part of the mechanism(s) underlying lens cell injury associated with cataract. Normal human lens epithelial (HLE) cells were cultured in vitro on extracellular matrix (ECM) originated from bovine corneal endothelial cells. This study reports evidence for rapid but transient induction of FGF2 transcripts, an increase of between 5- and 8-fold, within 0.5 h after exposure to particle radiation, followed by another wave of increased transcription at 2-3 h postirradiation. Immunofluorescence results confirm the enhanced levels of FGF2 protein rapidly after exposure to protons or helium ions, followed by another wave of increased activity unique to helium at 6 h postirradiation. This second wave of increased immunoreactivity was not observed in the proton-irradiated samples. Total FGF2 protein analysis after helium-ion exposures shows induced expression of three FGF2 isoforms, with an increase of up to 2-fold in the 18-kDa low-molecular-weight species. Studies of the effects of protons on individual FGF2 protein isoforms are in progress. Several mechanisms involving a role for FGF2 in radiation-induced cataract are discussed.

  12. Using infrared and Raman microspectroscopies to compare ex vivo involved psoriatic skin with normal human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Marie; Lefèvre, Thierry; Pouliot, Roxane; Auger, Michèle; Laroche, Gaétan

    2015-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic dermatosis that affects around 3% of the world's population. The etiology of this autoimmune pathology is not completely understood. The barrier function of psoriatic skin is known to be strongly altered, but the structural modifications at the origin of this dysfunction are not clear. To develop strategies to reduce symptoms of psoriasis or adequate substitutes for modeling, a deep understanding of the organization of psoriatic skin at a molecular level is required. Infrared and Raman microspectroscopies have been used to obtain direct molecular-level information on psoriatic and healthy human skin biopsies. From the intensities and positions of specific vibrational bands, the lipid and protein distribution and the lipid order have been mapped in the different layers of the skin. Results showed a similar distribution of lipids and collagen for normal and psoriatic human skin. However, psoriatic skin is characterized by heterogeneity in lipid/protein composition at the micrometer scale, a reduction in the definition of skin layer boundaries and a decrease in lipid chain order in the stratum corneum as compared to normal skin. A global decrease of the structural organization is exhibited in psoriatic skin that is compatible with an alteration of its barrier properties.

  13. ATP flux through creatine kinase in the normal, stressed, and failing human heart.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robert G; Gerstenblith, Gary; Bottomley, Paul A

    2005-01-18

    The heart consumes more energy per gram than any other organ, and the creatine kinase (CK) reaction serves as its prime energy reserve. Because chemical energy is required to fuel systolic and diastolic function, the question of whether the failing heart is "energy starved" has been debated for decades. Despite the central role of the CK reaction in cardiac energy metabolism, direct measures of CK flux in the beating human heart were not previously possible. Using an image-guided molecular assessment of endogenous ATP turnover, we directly measured ATP flux through CK in normal, stressed, and failing human hearts. We show that cardiac CK flux in healthy humans is faster than that estimated through oxidative phosphorylation and that CK flux does not increase during a doubling of the heart rate-blood pressure product by dobutamine. Furthermore, cardiac ATP flux through CK is reduced by 50% in mild-to-moderate human heart failure (1.6 +/- 0.6 vs. 3.2 +/- 0.9 micromol/g of wet weight per sec, P <0.0005). We conclude that magnetic resonance strategies can now directly assess human myocardial CK energy flux. The deficit in ATP supplied by CK in the failing heart is cardiac-specific and potentially of sufficient magnitude, even in the absence of a significant reduction in ATP stores, to contribute to the pathophysiology of human heart failure. These findings support the pursuit of new therapies that reduce energy demand and/or augment energy transfer in heart failure and indicate that cardiac magnetic resonance can be used to assess their effectiveness. PMID:15647364

  14. ATP flux through creatine kinase in the normal, stressed, and failing human heart

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Robert G.; Gerstenblith, Gary; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2005-01-01

    The heart consumes more energy per gram than any other organ, and the creatine kinase (CK) reaction serves as its prime energy reserve. Because chemical energy is required to fuel systolic and diastolic function, the question of whether the failing heart is “energy starved” has been debated for decades. Despite the central role of the CK reaction in cardiac energy metabolism, direct measures of CK flux in the beating human heart were not previously possible. Using an image-guided molecular assessment of endogenous ATP turnover, we directly measured ATP flux through CK in normal, stressed, and failing human hearts. We show that cardiac CK flux in healthy humans is faster than that estimated through oxidative phosphorylation and that CK flux does not increase during a doubling of the heart rate-blood pressure product by dobutamine. Furthermore, cardiac ATP flux through CK is reduced by 50% in mild-to-moderate human heart failure (1.6 ± 0.6 vs. 3.2 ± 0.9 μmol/g of wet weight per sec, P < 0.0005). We conclude that magnetic resonance strategies can now directly assess human myocardial CK energy flux. The deficit in ATP supplied by CK in the failing heart is cardiac-specific and potentially of sufficient magnitude, even in the absence of a significant reduction in ATP stores, to contribute to the pathophysiology of human heart failure. These findings support the pursuit of new therapies that reduce energy demand and/or augment energy transfer in heart failure and indicate that cardiac magnetic resonance can be used to assess their effectiveness. PMID:15647364

  15. Human pluripotent stem cells as a model of trophoblast differentiation in both normal development and disease.

    PubMed

    Horii, Mariko; Li, Yingchun; Wakeland, Anna K; Pizzo, Donald P; Nelson, Katharine K; Sabatini, Karen; Laurent, Louise Chang; Liu, Ying; Parast, Mana M

    2016-07-01

    Trophoblast is the primary epithelial cell type in the placenta, a transient organ required for proper fetal growth and development. Different trophoblast subtypes are responsible for gas/nutrient exchange (syncytiotrophoblasts, STBs) and invasion and maternal vascular remodeling (extravillous trophoblasts, EVTs). Studies of early human placental development are severely hampered by the lack of a representative trophoblast stem cell (TSC) model with the capacity for self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into both STBs and EVTs. Primary cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) isolated from early-gestation (6-8 wk) human placentas are bipotential, a phenotype that is lost with increasing gestational age. We have identified a CDX2(+)/p63(+) CTB subpopulation in the early postimplantation human placenta that is significantly reduced later in gestation. We describe a reproducible protocol, using defined medium containing bone morphogenetic protein 4 by which human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can be differentiated into CDX2(+)/p63(+) CTB stem-like cells. These cells can be replated and further differentiated into STB- and EVT-like cells, based on marker expression, hormone secretion, and invasive ability. As in primary CTBs, differentiation of hPSC-derived CTBs in low oxygen leads to reduced human chorionic gonadotropin secretion and STB-associated gene expression, instead promoting differentiation into HLA-G(+) EVTs in an hypoxia-inducible, factor-dependent manner. To validate further the utility of hPSC-derived CTBs, we demonstrated that differentiation of trisomy 21 (T21) hPSCs recapitulates the delayed CTB maturation and blunted STB differentiation seen in T21 placentae. Collectively, our data suggest that hPSCs are a valuable model of human placental development, enabling us to recapitulate processes that result in both normal and diseased pregnancies. PMID:27325764

  16. Validation of Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells as a Model for Influenza A Infections in Human Distal Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A. Sally; Chertow, Daniel S.; Moyer, Jenna E.; Suzich, Jon; Sandouk, Aline; Dorward, David W.; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Primary normal human bronchial/tracheal epithelial (NHBE) cells, derived from the distal-most aspect of the trachea at the bifurcation, have been used for a number of studies in respiratory disease research. Differences between the source tissue and the differentiated primary cells may impact infection studies based on this model. Therefore, we examined how well-differentiated NHBE cells compared with their source tissue, the human distal trachea, as well as the ramifications of these differences on influenza A viral pathogenesis research using this model. We employed a histological analysis including morphological measurements, electron microscopy, multi-label immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, lectin histochemistry, and microarray expression analysis to compare differentiated NHBEs to human distal tracheal epithelium. Pseudostratified epithelial height, cell type variety and distribution varied significantly. Electron microscopy confirmed differences in cellular attachment and paracellular junctions. Influenza receptor lectin histochemistry revealed that α2,3 sialic acids were rarely present on the apical aspect of the differentiated NHBE cells, but were present in low numbers in the distal trachea. We bound fluorochrome bioconjugated virus to respiratory tissue and NHBE cells and infected NHBE cells with human influenza A viruses. Both indicated that the pattern of infection progression in these cells correlated with autopsy studies of fatal cases from the 2009 pandemic. PMID:25604814

  17. Enumeration of the colony-forming units–fibroblast from mouse and human bone marrow in normal and pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Mankani, Mahesh H.; Bianco, Paolo; Robey, Pamela G.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell populations, containing a subset of multipotential skeletal stem cells, are increasingly contemplated for use in tissue engineering and stem cell therapy, whereas their involvement in the pathogenetic mechanisms of skeletal disorders is far less recognized. We compared the concentrations of stromal clonogenic cells, colony forming units–fibroblast (CFU-Fs), in norm and pathology. Initially, culture conditions were optimized by demonstrating that fetal bovine serum heat inactivation could significantly repress colony formation. Using non-heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum, the concentration of CFU-Fs (colony-forming efficiency, CFE) ranged from 3.5 ± 1.0 to 11.5 ± 4.0 per 1 × 105 nucleated cells in five inbred mouse strains. In four transgenic lines with profound bone involvement, CFE was either significantly reduced or increased compared to wild-type littermates. In normal human donors, CFE decreased slightly with age and averaged 52.2 ± 4.1 for children and 32.3 ± 3.0 for adults. CFE was significantly altered in patients with several skeletal, metabolic, and hematological disorders: reduced in congenital generalized lipodystrophy, achondroplasia (SADDAN), pseudoachondroplasia, and Paget disease of bone and elevated in alcaptonuria and sickle cell anemia. Our findings indicate that under appropriate culture conditions, CFE values may provide useful insights into bone/bone marrow pathophysiology. PMID:19383412

  18. CSF monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactate in the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (normal pressure hydrocephalus) related to CSF hydrodynamic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Malm, J; Kristensen, B; Ekstedt, J; Adolfsson, R; Wester, P

    1991-01-01

    Monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactic acid in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated on patients with the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (idiopathic normal pressure syndrome; AHS, n = 15), Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 14), multi-infarct dementia (MID, n = 13) and controls (n = 21). Patients had clinical and CSF hydrodynamic investigations. Monoamine concentrations were determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, cholinesterases and lactate were determined photometrically. In the AHS patients, CSF monoamine concentrations were not significantly different compared with controls, AD or MID patients. AHS and AD patients showed a similar reduction of CSF acetylcholinesterase activity compared with controls. Positive correlations were found in concentrations of CSF homovanillic acid, CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and CSF lactic acid versus CSF outflow conductance (that is, resistance against CSF outflow) in the AHS patients. A similar pattern was observed in a subgroup of MID patients characterised by dilated ventricles and disturbed CSF hydrodynamics. These data suggest that a low CSF outflow conductance may facilitate the clearance of acidic substances from the arachnoid space at the probenecid sensitive active transport site. Alternative explanations would be that a pathologically low CSF outflow conductance is accompanied by an inverse caudorostral flow of CSF or a compromised trans-ependymal diffusion. PMID:1709421

  19. Radiographic comparison of human lung shape during normal gravity and weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Michels, D B; Friedman, P J; West, J B

    1979-10-01

    Human lung shape was measured during zero gravity (0 G) to decide whether the normal vertical regional differences in ventilation are due directly to distortion of the elastic lung by its own weight, or instead, due indirectly to the effect of gravity on the shape of the rib cage and diaphragm. This was important because we previously established that weightlessness virtually abolishes the normal topographical inequality of ventilation (J. Appl. Physiol.: Respirat. Environ. Exercise Physiol. 45: 987-998, 1978). Chest radiographs were made after 10 s of a weightless flight trajectory aboard a NASA-Ames Research Center Learjet in both posterior-anterior and left lateral projections on five seated volunteers at residual volume, functional residual capacity, and total lung capacity. Lung shape was assessed by measuring lung heights and widths in upper, middle, and lower lung regions. We found no significant differences between any of the normal gravity (1 G) and o G measurements, although there was a slight tendency for the lung to become shorter and wider at o G (mean changes generally less than 3% or about 0.5 cm). By contrast, Grassino et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 39: 997-1003, 1975) found no change in the vertical distribution of ventilation after voluntarily changing lung dimensions by more than 1 cm by moving the abdomen in or out. We conclude that gravity produces the topographical distribution of ventilation in the upright human lung by distorting the elastic lung tissue within the chest rather than by altering the shape of the rib cage and diaphragm. PMID:511694

  20. Increased effectiveness of carbon ions in the production of reactive oxygen species in normal human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Dettmering, Till; Zahnreich, Sebastian; Colindres-Rojas, Miriam; Durante, Marco; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Fournier, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially superoxide anions (O2·–), is enhanced in many normal and tumor cell types in response to ionizing radiation. The influence of ionizing radiation on the regulation of ROS production is considered as an important factor in the long-term effects of irradiation (such as genomic instability) that might contribute to the development of secondary cancers. In view of the increasing application of carbon ions in radiation therapy, we aimed to study the potential impact of ionizing density on the intracellular production of ROS, comparing photons (X-rays) with carbon ions. For this purpose, we used normal human cells as a model for irradiated tissue surrounding a tumor. By quantifying the oxidization of Dihydroethidium (DHE), a fluorescent probe sensitive to superoxide anions, we assessed the intracellular ROS status after radiation exposure in normal human fibroblasts, which do not show radiation-induced chromosomal instability. After 3–5 days post exposure to X-rays and carbon ions, the level of ROS increased to a maximum that was dose dependent. The maximum ROS level reached after irradiation was specific for the fibroblast type. However, carbon ions induced this maximum level at a lower dose compared with X-rays. Within ∼1 week, ROS decreased to control levels. The time-course of decreasing ROS coincides with an increase in cell number and decreasing p21 protein levels, indicating a release from radiation-induced growth arrest. Interestingly, radiation did not act as a trigger for chronically enhanced levels of ROS months after radiation exposure. PMID:25304329

  1. A comparison of erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase activity from human foetuses and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Strange, R C; Johnston, J D; Coghill, D R; Hume, R

    1980-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity was measured in partially purified haemolysates of erythrocytes from human foetuses and adults. Enzyme activity was present in erythrocytes obtained between 12 and 40 weeks of gestation. The catalytic properties of the enzyme from foetal cells were similar to those of the enzyme from adult erythrocytes, indicating that probably only one form of the erythrocytes enzyme exists throughout foetal and adult life. PMID:7396875

  2. Cellular differentiation hierarchies in normal and culture-adapted human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Enver, Tariq; Soneji, Shamit; Joshi, Chirag; Brown, John; Iborra, Francisco; Orntoft, Torben; Thykjaer, Thomas; Maltby, Edna; Smith, Kath; Abu Dawud, Raed; Jones, Mark; Matin, Maryam; Gokhale, Paul; Draper, Jonathan; Andrews, Peter W

    2005-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (HESC) lines vary in their characteristics and behaviour not only because they are derived from genetically outbred populations, but also because they may undergo progressive adaptation upon long-term culture in vitro. Such adaptation may reflect selection of variants with altered propensity for survival and retention of an undifferentiated phenotype. Elucidating the mechanisms involved will be important for understanding normal self-renewal and commitment to differentiation and for validating the safety of HESC-based therapy. We have investigated this process of adaptation at the cellular and molecular levels through a comparison of early passage (normal) and late passage (adapted) sublines of a single HESC line, H7. To account for spontaneous differentiation that occurs in HESC cultures, we sorted cells for SSEA3, which marks undifferentiated HESC. We show that the gene expression programmes of the adapted cells partially reflected their aberrant karyotype, but also resulted from a failure in X-inactivation, emphasizing the importance in adaptation of karyotypically silent epigenetic changes. On the basis of growth potential, ability to re-initiate ES cultures and global transcription profiles, we propose a cellular differentiation hierarchy for maintenance cultures of HESC: normal SSEA3+ cells represent pluripotent stem cells. Normal SSEA3- cells have exited this compartment, but retain multilineage differentiation potential. However, adapted SSEA3+ and SSEA3- cells co-segregate within the stem cell territory, implying that adaptation reflects an alteration in the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. As this balance is also an essential feature of cancer, the mechanisms of culture adaptation may mirror those of oncogenesis and tumour progression. PMID:16159889

  3. Platelet-derived growth factor gene expression in human atherosclerotic plaques and normal artery wall.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, T B; Benditt, E P

    1988-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the B chain of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-B) is transcribed in human atherosclerotic plaques, indicating that production of growth factors within plaques could occur during atherogenesis. However, since atherosclerotic plaques are composed of several cell types and three of these--macrophages, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells--can express the PDGF genes, the cell type responsible for PDGF gene expression was not clear. In the present study we explore further the expression of PDGF-A and -B and identify transcriptionally active cell types. We assayed PDGF-A and -B mRNA levels in dissected fractions of carotid atherosclerotic plaques and normal artery and then sequentially rehybridized these blots with three cDNA probes that recognize cell type-specific markers: fms for macrophages, von Willebrand factor for endothelial cells, and smooth muscle alpha-actin for smooth muscle cells. In plaques, PDGF-A expression correlated with smooth muscle actin; PDGF-B expression correlated strongly with fms. PDGF-A expression correlated with smooth muscle actin. In normal vessel wall, PDGF-A expression was high in the media and again correlated with smooth muscle actin, whereas PDGF-B expression was high in the adventitia. Since transcripts from both PDGF genes are found in normal artery where cell turnover is very low, we suggest that PDGF gene expression does not necessarily function to produce smooth muscle cell proliferation. We propose that these genes may have an important nonmitogenic, maintenance function in normal arterial tissue and in the atherosclerotic plaque. Images PMID:3282240

  4. Human paraoxonase polymorphism: Hungarian population studies in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Szabó, I; Róna, K; Czinner, A; Gachályi, B

    1991-06-01

    The paraoxonase phenotype distribution pattern was studied in a Hungarian population of 102 children and 100 adults. All the subjects were of Caucasian origin and are not related. The adult population showed the trimodality in phenotype distribution similar to other European population data. The gene frequencies obtained were statistically not significantly different either. There was no correlation between the activity of serum paraoxonase and activity of cholinesterase, sex, age and body weight. The phenotype distribution was trimodal in the children's population too. There was a significant difference in gene frequency, however, compared to data from adult population. PMID:1651288

  5. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  6. Rejoining of isochromatid breaks induced by heavy ions in G2-phase normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Durante, M.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Ito, H.; Wu, H.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    We reported previously that exposure of normal human fibroblasts in G2 phase of the cell cycle to high-LET radiation produces a much higher frequency of isochromatid breaks than exposure to gamma rays. We concluded that an increase in the production of isochromatid breaks is a signature of initial high-LET radiation-induced G2-phase damage. In this paper, we report the repair kinetics of isochromatid breaks induced by high-LET radiation in normal G2-phase human fibroblasts. Exponentially growing human fibroblasts (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays or energetic carbon (290 MeV/nucleon), silicon (490 MeV/nucleon), or iron (200 MeV/nucleon) ions. Prematurely condensed chromosomes were induced by calyculin A after different postirradiation incubation times ranging from 0 to 600 min. Chromosomes were stained with Giemsa, and aberrations were scored in cells at G2 phase. G2-phase fragments, the result of the induction of isochromatid breaks, decreased quickly with incubation time. The curve for the kinetics of the rejoining of chromatid-type breaks showed a slight upward curvature with time after exposure to 440 keV/microm iron particles, probably due to isochromatid-isochromatid break rejoining. The formation of chromatid exchanges after exposure to high-LET radiation therefore appears to be underestimated, because isochromatid-isochromatid exchanges cannot be detected. Increased induction of isochromatid breaks and rejoining of isochromatid breaks affect the overall kinetics of chromatid-type break rejoining after exposure to high-LET radiation.

  7. Antibacterial potential and genetic profile of Enterococcus faecium strains isolated from human normal flora.

    PubMed

    Karimaei, Samira; Sadeghi, Javad; Asadian, Mahla; Esghaei, Maryam; Pourshafie, Mohammad Reza; Talebi, Malihe

    2016-07-01

    Enterococci have a widespread attendance in the circumference and belongs to the enteric commensal microbiota. Most of them produce the antimicrobial compounds and have an inhibition effect on pathogenic microorganisms. The objective of this study was to characterize the enterococcal strains isolated from human normal flora and assess their antibacterial activity. Enterococcal isolates were obtained from the feces of eighteen healthy humans. All enterococcal species were identified by biochemical and species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These isolates were investigated further to examine their ability to inhibit growth of Salmonella typhi, Shigella flexneri and Escherichia coli by well diffusion assay. Furthermore, antibiotic susceptibility test was performed and genetic relatedness of all isolates was evaluated by Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). In all, 432 isolates were obtained from fecal samples. All of the isolates identified as Enterococcus faecium by biochemical and molecular (PCR) methods. Using repetitive element palindromic (REP)-PCR method 54 patterns have been obtained and were selected for further evaluation. The results indicated that 66%, 38% and 24% of our isolates had antimicrobial effect against S. typhi, S flexneri and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), respectively. On the other hand, there was no significant inhibition effect against enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). All isolates were sensitive to vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, ampicillin, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. On the other hand, the resistance rates for erythromycin, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin were 20%, 22%, and 1.8% respectively. In addition, the analysis of PFGE showed forty patterns with eight (40.7%) common types (CT) and thirty two (59.2%) single types (ST). Among eight common types, only one common type (CT5) had similar antimicrobial effect. These results suggested that enterococcal isolates obtained from

  8. Long-term facilitation of genioglossus activity is present in normal humans during NREM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhuri, Susmita; Pierchala, Lisa; Aboubakr, Salah E.; Shkoukani, Mahdi; Badr, M. Safwan

    2008-01-01

    Episodic hypoxia (EH) is followed by increased ventilatory motor output in the recovery period indicative of long-term facilitation (LTF). We hypothesized that episodic hypoxia evokes LTF of genioglossus (GG) muscle activity in humans during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) sleep. We studied 12 normal non-flow limited humans during stable NREM sleep. We induced 10 brief (3 minute) episodes of isocapnic hypoxia followed by 5 minutes of room air. Measurements were obtained during control, hypoxia, and at 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes of recovery, respectively, for minute ventilation (V̇I), supraglottic pressure (PSG), upper airway resistance (RUA) and phasic GG electromyogram (EMGGG). In addition, sham studies were conducted on room air. During hypoxia there was a significant increase in phasic EMGGG (202.7±24.1% of control, p<0.01) and in V̇I (123.0±3.3% of control, p<0.05); however, only phasic EMGGG demonstrated a significant persistent increase throughout recovery (198.9±30.9%, 203.6±29.9% and 205.4±26.4% of control, at 5, 10, and 20 minutes of recovery, respectively, p<0.01). In multivariate regression analysis, age and phasic EMGGG activity during hypoxia were significant predictors of EMGGG at recovery 20 minutes. No significant changes in any of the measured parameters were noted during sham studies. Conclusion: 1) EH elicits LTF of GG in normal non-flow limited humans during NREM sleep, without ventilatory or mechanical LTF. 2) GG activity during the recovery period correlates with the magnitude of GG activation during hypoxia, and inversely with age. PMID:17945544

  9. Reaching beyond the United States: Adventures in International Adult Education and Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henschke, John A.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his experience of how travel and adult education merged, for him, into a major emphasis in international adult education (AE) and human resource development (HRD). International ventures have been some of the most exciting and learning-filled aspects of the author's career in AE and HRD. His involvement in…

  10. Adult Continuing Education and Human Resource Development: Present Competitors, Potential Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas H.

    2006-01-01

    Adult Continuing Education (ACE) and Human Resource Development (HRD) have grown tremendously in the last quarter century. ACE experienced tremendous growth in the 60s and 70s, with over 17 million attending colleges and universities, and local school and community adult education programs by the end of the 1970s. More ACE programs were started…

  11. A balanced view of the cerebrospinal fluid composition and functions: Focus on adult humans.

    PubMed

    Spector, Reynold; Robert Snodgrass, S; Johanson, Conrad E

    2015-11-01

    In this review, a companion piece to our recent examination of choroid plexus (CP), the organ that secretes the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we focus on recent information in the context of reliable older data concerning the composition and functions of adult human CSF. To accomplish this, we define CSF, examine the methodology employed in studying the CSF focusing on ideal or near ideal experiments and discuss the pros and cons of several widely used analogical descriptions of the CSF including: the CSF as the "third circulation," the CSF as a "nourishing liquor," the similarities of the CSF/choroid plexus to the glomerular filtrate/kidney and finally the CSF circulation as part of the "glymphatic system." We also consider the close interrelationship between the CSF and extracellular space of brain through gap junctions and the paucity of data suggesting that the cerebral capillaries secrete a CSF-like fluid. Recently human CSF has been shown to be in dynamic flux with heart-beat, posture and especially respiration. Functionally, the CSF provides buoyancy, nourishment (e.g., vitamins) and endogenous waste product removal for the brain by bulk flow into the venous (arachnoid villi and nerve roots) and lymphatic (nasal) systems, and by carrier-mediated reabsorptive transport systems in CP. The CSF also presents many exogenous compounds to CP for metabolism or removal, indirectly cleansing the extracellular space of brain (e.g., of xenobiotics like penicillin). The CSF also carries hormones (e.g., leptin) from blood via CP or synthesized in CP (e.g., IGF-2) to the brain. In summary the CP/CSF, the third circulation, performs many functions comparable to the kidney including nourishing the brain and contributing to a stable internal milieu for the brain. These tasks are essential to normal adult brain functioning. PMID:26247808

  12. Self-rated driving habits among older adults with clinically-defined mild cognitive impairment, clinically-defined dementia, and normal cognition.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Melissa L; Edwards, Jerri D; Bannon, Yvonne

    2013-12-01

    Older adults with clinically-defined dementia may report reducing their driving more than cognitively normal controls. However, it is unclear how these groups compare to individuals with clinically-defined mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in terms of driving behaviors. The current study investigated self-reported driving habits among adults age 60 and older with clinical MCI (n=41), clinical mild dementia (n=40), and normal cognition (n=43). Participants reported their driving status, driving frequency (days per week), and how often they avoided accessing the community, making left turns, driving at night, driving in unfamiliar areas, driving on high-traffic roads, and driving in bad weather. After adjusting for education, a MANCOVA revealed that participants with MCI and dementia avoided unfamiliar areas and high-traffic roads significantly more than normal participants. Participants with dementia also avoided left turns and accessing the community more than those with normal cognition and MCI (p<0.05 for all). The other driving variables did not significantly differ between groups. Thus, older adults with clinically-defined MCI, as well as those with dementia, avoided some complex driving situations more than cognitively intact adults. However, all diagnostic groups had similar rates of driving cessation and frequency. Future research should examine the safety implications of such findings. PMID:23769114

  13. How Does Reading Performance Modulate the Impact of Orthographic Knowledge on Speech Processing? A Comparison of Normal Readers and Dyslexic Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattamadilok, Chotiga; Nelis, Aubéline; Kolinsky, Régine

    2014-01-01

    Studies on proficient readers showed that speech processing is affected by knowledge of the orthographic code. Yet, the automaticity of the orthographic influence depends on task demand. Here, we addressed this automaticity issue in normal and dyslexic adult readers by comparing the orthographic effects obtained in two speech processing tasks that…

  14. Evaluation of algorithm methods for fluorescence spectra of cancerous and normal human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    The paper focus on the various algorithms on to unravel the fluorescence spectra by unmixing methods to identify cancerous and normal human tissues from the measured fluorescence spectroscopy. The biochemical or morphologic changes that cause fluorescence spectra variations would appear earlier than the histological approach; therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy holds a great promise as clinical tool for diagnosing early stage of carcinomas and other deceases for in vivo use. The method can further identify tissue biomarkers by decomposing the spectral contributions of different fluorescent molecules of interest. In this work, we investigate the performance of blind source un-mixing methods (backward model) and spectral fitting approaches (forward model) in decomposing the contributions of key fluorescent molecules from the tissue mixture background when certain selected excitation wavelength is applied. Pairs of adenocarcinoma as well as normal tissues confirmed by pathologist were excited by selective wavelength of 340 nm. The emission spectra of resected fresh tissue were used to evaluate the relative changes of collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and Flavin by various spectral un-mixing methods. Two categories of algorithms: forward methods and Blind Source Separation [such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA), and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF)] will be introduced and evaluated. The purpose of the spectral analysis is to discard the redundant information which conceals the difference between these two types of tissues, but keep their diagnostically significance. The facts predicted by different methods were compared to the gold standard of histopathology. The results indicate that these key fluorophores within tissue, e.g. tryptophan, collagen, and NADH, and flavin, show differences of relative contents of fluorophores among different types of human cancer and normal tissues. The

  15. Auditory function in normal-hearing, noise-exposed human ears

    PubMed Central

    Stamper, Greta C.; Johnson, Tiffany A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine if supra-threshold measures of auditory function, such as distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), are correlated with noise exposure history in normal-hearing human ears. Recent data from animal studies have revealed significant deafferentation of auditory nerve fibers following full recovery from temporary noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Furthermore, these data report smaller ABR wave I amplitudes in noise-exposed animal ears when compared to non-noise exposed control animals or pre-noise exposure amplitudes in the same animal. It is unknown if a similar phenomenon exists in the normal-hearing, noise-exposed human ear. Design Thirty normal-hearing human subjects with a range of noise exposure backgrounds (NEBs) participated in this study. NEB was quantified by the use of a noise exposure questionnaire that extensively queried loud sound exposure over the previous 12 months. DPOAEs were collected at three f2’s (1, 2, and 4 kHz) over a range of L2’s. DPOAE stimulus level began at 80 dB FPL (forward-pressure level) and decreased in 10 dB steps. Two-channel ABRs were collected in response to click stimuli and 4 kHz tone bursts; one channel utilized an ipsilateral mastoid electrode and the other an ipsilateral tympanic membrane (TM) electrode. ABR stimulus level began at 90 dB nHL and was decreased in 10 dB steps. Amplitudes of waves I and V of the ABR were analyzed. Results A statistically significant relationship between ABR wave I amplitude and NEB was found for clicked-evoked ABRs recorded at a stimulus level of 90 dB nHL using a mastoid recording electrode. For this condition, ABR wave I amplitudes decreased as a function of NEB. Similar systematic trends were present for ABRs collected in response to clicks and 4 kHz tone bursts at additional supra-threshold stimulation levels (≥ 70 dB nHL). The relationship weakened and disappeared with decreases in stimulation level (≤ 60 dB n

  16. Transfection of normal human bronchial epithelial cells with the bcl-2 oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.H.; Kenyon, K.D.; Tesfaigzi, J.

    1995-12-01

    In vitro, studies examining the transformation of virus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells after exposure to chemical and physical carcinogens have contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the development of lung cancer. Virus-immortalized HBE cells have been used because of both the limited life span of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells in culture (approximately 30-35 population doublins) and their resistance to in vitro malignant transformation. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV)-immortalized HBE cells have been used to study the genetic changes that occur after exposure to {alpha}-particles in vitro. Although this model may prove to be useful for studying the 18% or less of bronchogenic carcinomas found to contain HPV sequences, it is not an appropriate model for studying the majority of lung epithelial malignancies in which HPV DNA is not detected. This view is supported by the fact that HPV-immortalized cell lines commonly exhibit aneuploidy. This results of this study suggest that: (1) NHBE cells can be transiently transfected with the pCMV{Beta} vector; and (2) the antibiotic hygromycin-resistant transfected cells.

  17. Propagation of normal human epithelial cell populations using an in vivo culture system. Description and applications.

    PubMed

    Klein-Szanto, A J; Terzaghi, M; Mirkin, L D; Martin, D; Shiba, M

    1982-08-01

    A new model using xenotransplanted human epithelia was developed for the study of toxic and carcinogenic effects of chemicals. Epithelial cells from the respiratory tract of 4 male and 3 female premature and fullterm fetuses were enzymatically removed and inoculated into deepithelialized rat tracheas. These were sealed at both ends and transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice. After 3-4 weeks, a normal mucociliary epithelium covered the tracheal lumen. At this stage the epithelial cells could be isolated again and transplanted into new denuded rat tracheas. This passaging could be repeated up to six times, each permitting an amplification factor of approximately 3. Tracheal transplants containing cells of human origin (in vivo Passages 2-4) were treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene. Hyperplasias, squamous metaplasias, and dysplasias were seen 1-8 weeks after initiation of treatment, indicating that the responses of human and rodent epithelial cells to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are similar. Initial experiments with skin and esophageal epithelia suggest that other covering epithelia could also be used in this fashion for evaluation of toxicants and carcinogens that are likely to come into contact with these tissues. PMID:6821529

  18. Human leukemia and normal leukocytes contain a species of immunoreactive but nonfunctional dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenbery, S.P.; Iqbal, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative radioimmunoassay has been developed for human dihydrofolate reductase (tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase; 5,6,7,8-tetrahdrofolate:NADP/sup +/ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) by using antiserum raised in rabbits against the active enzyme purified from calf liver. An immunoreactive protein could be identified in the cytoplasm of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, which contained no functional dihydrofolate reductase activity. Its concentration was stoichiometric to the volume of cytoplasm assayed and paralleled the standard curve obtained with purified enzyme, indicating that this protein in the human cells is antigenically similar to the homologous antigen. The concentration of this immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm of human leukemia and normal leukocytes in all instances greatly exceeded the concentration of functional dihydrofolate reductase, which was measured by the binding of (/sup 3/H)methotrexate. This nonfunctional immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm and cytosol from two different samples of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells analyzed by gel filtration had an apparent molecular weight of 41,000, which is twice the molecular weight of the functional enzyme.

  19. Global differential expression of genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region in normal human brain

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Julio Cesar; Fajardo, Dianora; Peña, Angela; Sánchez, Adalberto; Domínguez, Martha C; Satizábal, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background: The information of gene expression obtained from databases, have made possible the extraction and analysis of data related with several molecular processes involving not only in brain homeostasis but its disruption in some neuropathologies; principally in Down syndrome and the Alzheimer disease. Objective: To correlate the levels of transcription of 19 genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region (DSCR) with their expression in several substructures of normal human brain. Methods: There were obtained expression profiles of 19 DSCR genes in 42 brain substructures, from gene expression values available at the database of the human brain of the Brain Atlas of the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences", (http://human.brain-map.org/). The co-expression patterns of DSCR genes in brain were calculated by using multivariate statistical methods. Results: Highest levels of gene expression were registered at caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens and putamen among central areas of cerebral cortex. Increased expression levels of RCAN1 that encode by a protein involved in signal transduction process of the CNS were recorded for PCP4 that participates in the binding to calmodulin and TTC3; a protein that is associated with differentiation of neurons. That previously identified brain structures play a crucial role in the learning process, in different class of memory and in motor skills. Conclusion: The precise regulation of DSCR gene expression is crucial to maintain the brain homeostasis, especially in those areas with high levels of gene expression associated with a remarkable process of learning and cognition. PMID:25767303

  20. Microdetermination of chondroitin sulfate in normal human plasma by fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE).

    PubMed

    Volpi, Nicola; Maccari, Francesca

    2005-06-01

    An inexpensive, simple, sensitive and reproducible analytical method for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of chondroitin sulfate (CS) from human blood plasma samples by using fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE) has been developed. After treatment with a nonspecific protease to convert proteins into small peptides, CS from 100 microl of normal human plasma was extracted by using a filter membrane (molecular mass cut-off of 3000 Da) or purification by using an anion-exchange resin. The recovered CS was converted into unsaturated disaccharides through the action of chondroitin ABC lyase, derivatized with 2-aminoacridone by reductive amination in the presence of cyanoborohydride and separated by FACE. The procedure using the purification of plasma CS on the anion-exchange resin produced a cleaner separation and a better resolution of Delta-disaccharides then using microfiltration. The linearity, sensitivity and reproducibility of the method were determined in comparison with HPLC equipped with postcolumn derivatization and fluorescence detection using 2-cyanoacetamide as a fluorogenic reagent. The detection limit was calculated to be 50 ng of CS with a linear response from 50 to 2000 ng. The recovery was found greater than 85% (from 2 to 10 microg CS) with a variation coefficient of approx. 10%. Furthermore, the results obtained from 100 microl plasma were almost identical to those obtained using 20 microl, 50 microl and 200 microl. This method was applied to the characterization of CS in 33 healthy human subjects ageing from 30 to 63 years old. PMID:15936308

  1. Lactobacillus sakei lipoteichoic acid inhibits MMP-1 induced by UVA in normal dermal fibroblasts of human.

    PubMed

    You, Ga-Eun; Jung, Bong-Jun; Kim, Hye-Rim; Kim, Han-Geun; Kim, Tae-Rahk; Chung, Dae-Kyun

    2013-10-28

    Human skin is continuously exposed to ultraviolet (UV)-induced photoaging. UVA increases the activity of MMP-1 in dermal fibroblasts through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), p38, signaling. The irradiation of keratinocytes by UVA results in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the stimulation of MMP-1 in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is a component of the cell wall of gram-positive Lactobacillus spp. of bacteria. LTA is well known as an anti-inflammation molecule. LTA of the bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum has an anti-photoaging effect, but the potential anti-photoaging effect of the other bacteria has not been examined to date. The current study showed that L. sakei LTA (sLTA) has an immune modulating effect in human monocyte cells. Our object was whether inhibitory effects of sLTA on MMP-1 are caused from reducing the MAPK signal in NHDFs. It inhibits MMP-1 and MAPK signaling induced by UVA in NHDFs. We also confirmed effects of sLTA suppressing TNF-α inducing MMP-1 in NHDFs. PMID:23851272

  2. Human leukemia and normal leukocytes contain a species of immunoreactive but nonfunctional dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, S P; Iqbal, M P

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative radioimmunoassay has been developed for human dihydrofolate reductase (tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase; 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate:NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) by using antiserum raised in rabbits against the active enzyme purified from calf liver. An immunoreactive protein could be identified in the cytoplasm of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, which contained no functional dihydrofolate reductase activity. Its concentration was stoichiometric to the volume of cytoplasm assayed and paralleled the standard curve obtained with purified enzyme, indicating that this protein in the human cells is antigenically similar to the homologous antigen. The concentration of this immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm of human leukemia and normal leukocytes in all instances greatly exceeded the concentration of functional dihydrofolate reductase, which was measured by the binding of [3H]methotrexate. This nonfunctional immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm and cytosol from two different samples of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells analyzed by gel filtration had an apparent molecular weight of 41,000, which is twice the molecular weight of the functional enzyme. Images PMID:6952216

  3. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Induce Cytotoxicity, Genotoxicity And Apoptosis In Normal Human Dermal Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Knighten, Brionna; Tchounwou, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Multi walled carbon nanotubes [MWCNT's] have won enormous popularity in nanotechnology. Due to their unusual one dimensional, hollow nanostructure and unique physicochemical properties they are highly desirable for use within the commercial, environmental and medical sectors. Despite their wide application, there is a lack of information concerning their impact on human health and the environment. While nanotechnology looms large with commercial promise and potential benefit, an equally large issue is the evaluation of potential effects on humans and other biological systems. Our research is focused on cellular response to purified MWCNT in normal human dermal fibroblast cells (NHDF). Three doses (40, 200, 400 μg/ml) of MWCNT and control (tween-80 + 0.9% saline) were used in this study. Following exposure to MWCNT, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and apoptosis assays were performed using standard protocols. Our results demonstrated a dose-dependent toxicity with MWCNT. It was found to be toxic and induced massive loss of cell viability through DNA damage and programmed cell-death of all doses compared to control. Our results demonstrate that carbon nanotubes indeed can be very toxic at sufficiently high concentrations and that careful monitoring of toxicity studies is essential for risk assessment. PMID:20521388

  4. Radioprotective Effect of Achillea millefolium L Against Genotoxicity Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Human Normal Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Somayeh; Rostamnezhad, Mostafa; Ghaffari-rad, Vahid; Ghasemi, Arash; Allahverdi Pourfallah, Tayyeb

    2015-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of Achillea millefolium L (ACM) extract was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in human lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers and incubated with the methanolic extract of ACM at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL) for 2 hours. At each dose point, the whole blood was exposed in vitro to 2.5 Gy of X-ray and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cell. Antioxidant capacity of the extract was determined using free radical-scavenging method. The treatment of lymphocytes with the extract showed a significant decrease in the incidence of micronuclei binucleated cells, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without any extract treatment. The maximum protection and decrease in frequency of micronuclei were observed at 200 μg/mL of ACM extract which completely protected genotoxicity induced by IR in human lymphocytes. Achillea millefolium extract exhibited concentration-dependent radical-scavenging activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radicals. These data suggest that the methanolic extract of ACM may play an important role in the protection of normal tissues against genetic damage induced by IR. PMID:26675116

  5. Long-term influence of normal variation in neonatal characteristics on human brain development

    PubMed Central

    Walhovd, Kristine B.; Fjell, Anders M.; Brown, Timothy T.; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Chung, Yoonho; Hagler, Donald J.; Roddey, J. Cooper; Erhart, Matthew; McCabe, Connor; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Amaral, David G.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J.; Darst, Burcu F.; Casey, B. J.; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M.; Frazier, Jean; Gruen, Jeffrey R.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Murray, Sarah S.; van Zijl, Peter; Mostofsky, Stewart; Dale, Anders M.; Jernigan, Terry L.; McCabe, Connor; Chang, Linda; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Newman, Erik; Dale, Anders M.; Ernst, Thomas; Dale, Anders M.; Van Zijl, Peter; Kuperman, Joshua; Murray, Sarah; Bloss, Cinnamon; Schork, Nicholas J.; Appelbaum, Mark; Gamst, Anthony; Thompson, Wesley; Bartsch, Hauke; Jernigan, Terry L.; Dale, Anders M.; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas; Keating, Brian; Amaral, David; Sowell, Elizabeth; Kaufmann, Walter; Van Zijl, Peter; Mostofsky, Stewart; Casey, B.J.; Ruberry, Erika J.; Powers, Alisa; Rosen, Bruce; Kenet, Tal; Frazier, Jean; Kennedy, David; Gruen, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    It is now recognized that a number of cognitive, behavioral, and mental health outcomes across the lifespan can be traced to fetal development. Although the direct mediation is unknown, the substantial variance in fetal growth, most commonly indexed by birth weight, may affect lifespan brain development. We investigated effects of normal variance in birth weight on MRI-derived measures of brain development in 628 healthy children, adolescents, and young adults in the large-scale multicenter Pediatric Imaging, Neurocognition, and Genetics study. This heterogeneous sample was recruited through geographically dispersed sites in the United States. The influence of birth weight on cortical thickness, surface area, and striatal and total brain volumes was investigated, controlling for variance in age, sex, household income, and genetic ancestry factors. Birth weight was found to exert robust positive effects on regional cortical surface area in multiple regions as well as total brain and caudate volumes. These effects were continuous across birth weight ranges and ages and were not confined to subsets of the sample. The findings show that (i) aspects of later child and adolescent brain development are influenced at birth and (ii) relatively small differences in birth weight across groups and conditions typically compared in neuropsychiatric research (e.g., Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders) may influence group differences observed in brain parameters of interest at a later stage in life. These findings should serve to increase our attention to early influences. PMID:23169628

  6. Ecological Effect of Solithromycin on Normal Human Oropharyngeal and Intestinal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Rosenborg, Staffan; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Holm, Johan; Söderberg Löfdal, Karin; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2016-07-01

    Solithromycin is a new fluoroketolide. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of orally administered solithromycin on the human oropharyngeal and intestinal microbiota. Thirteen healthy volunteers (median age, 27.3 years) received oral solithromycin at 800 mg on day 1 followed by 400 mg daily on days 2 to 7. Fecal and saliva samples were collected at baseline and on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, and 21 for pharmacokinetic and microbiological analyses. Plasma samples were collected predose on days 2, 5, and 7 as proof of exposure, and solithromycin concentration ranges were 21.9 to 258 ng/ml, 18.0 to 386 ng/ml, and 16.9 to 417 ng/ml, respectively. The solithromycin concentrations in feces were 15.8 to 65.4 mg/kg, 24.5 to 82.7 mg/kg, 21.4 to 82.7 mg/kg, 12.1 to 72.4 mg/kg, 0.2 to 25.6 mg/kg, and 0 to 0.5 mg/kg on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, and 21, respectively. The numbers of enterobacteria and enterococci decreased and were normalized on day 14. The numbers of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria decreased from day 2 to day 14 and were normalized on day 21. The clostridia decreased on days 2, 7, and 14 and were normalized on day 21. No Clostridium difficile strains or toxins were detected during the study period. The number of Bacteroides strains was not significantly changed. The solithromycin concentrations in saliva were 0 to 1.2 mg/liter, 0 to 0.5 mg/liter, 0 to 0.5 mg/liter, and 0 to 0.1 mg/liter on days 2, 5, 7, and 9, respectively. The numbers of streptococci decreased on day 2 and were normalized on day 5. The numbers of lactobacilli, prevotellae, fusobacteria, and leptotrichiae decreased from day 2 and were normalized on day 21. PMID:27139483

  7. Better Visuospatial Working Memory in Adults Who Report Profound Deafness Compared to Those With Normal or Poor Hearing: Data From the UK Biobank Resource.

    PubMed

    Rudner, Mary; Keidser, Gitte; Hygge, Staffan; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2016-01-01

    Experimental work has shown better visuospatial working memory (VSWM) in profoundly deaf individuals compared to those with normal hearing. Other data, including the UK Biobank resource shows poorer VSWM in individuals with poorer hearing. Using the same database, the authors investigated VSWM in individuals who reported profound deafness. Included in this study were 112 participants who were profoundly deaf, 1310 with poor hearing and 74,635 with normal hearing. All participants performed a card-pair matching task as a test of VSWM. Although variance in VSWM performance was large among profoundly deaf participants, at group level it was superior to that of participants with both normal and poor hearing. VSWM in adults is related to hearing status but the association is not linear. Future study should investigate the mechanism behind enhanced VSWM in profoundly deaf adults. PMID:27232076

  8. Newborn human skin fibroblasts senesce in vitro without acquiring adult growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of human fibroblasts were prepared from chest skin obtained either from newborns (less than 3 months old) or adults (more than 35 years old) and maintained in vitro until they senesced. Adult cells grew logarithmically in medium supplemented with whole blood serum but not with platelet-poor plasma. Early passage cells obtained from newborns grew equally well in either plasma- or serum-supplemented medium. The difference in growth factor requirements between adult and newborn cells persisted through the lifespan of the cells; i.e., newborn cells did not develop adult hormonal requirements when maintained in culture. Thus, in vitro cellular aging can be distinguished from some types of differentiation.

  9. HDAC inhibition radiosensitizes human normal tissue cells and reduces DNA Double-Strand Break repair capacity.

    PubMed

    Purrucker, Jan C; Fricke, Andreas; Ong, Mei Fang; Rübe, Christian; Rübe, Claudia E; Mahlknecht, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are gaining increasing attention in the treatment of cancer, particularly in view of their therapeutic effectiveness and assumed mild toxicity profile. While numerous studies have investigated the role of HDACi in tumor cells, little is known about their effects on normal tissue cells. We studied the effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), MS275, sodium-butyrate and valproic acid in healthy human fibroblasts and found HDACi-treatment to go along with increased radiosensitivity and reduced DSB repair capacity. In view of the potential genotoxic effects of HDACi-treatment, particularly when being administered long-term for chronic disease or when given to children, to women of childbearing age or their partners or in combination with radiotherapy, an extensive education of patients and prescribing physicians as well as a stringent definition of clinical indications is urgently required. PMID:19956891

  10. Imaging normal and cancerous human gastric muscular layer in transverse and longitudinal sections by multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Kang, Deyong; Yang, Zhenrong; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhou, Yongjian; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-07-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) has been widely used for imaging microstructure of biological tissues. In this article, we used MPM to investigate the microstructure changes of normal and cancerous human gastric muscular layer in transverse and longitudinal sections. The results displayed different patterns of microstructure changes of smooth muscular tissue, cell morphology and interstitial fibers in transverse and longitudinal sections, being similar to standard histopathological images but without the need for tissue processing. Our study demonstrated that MPM can bring more detailed complementary information on tissue architecture through observing transverse and longitudinal sections of tissues, which are the important pathological information when the pathologists diagnose the gastrointestinal lesions. These observations indicate that MPM could be an important potential tool to provide real-time pathological diagnosis for gastric cancer in the future. SCANNING 38:357-364, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26435529

  11. Expression of CD44v6 gene in normal human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jian; Zhang, Dong-Sheng; Zheng, Jie

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if CD44v6 could be used as a molecular marker of cancer progression and metastasis through the detection of CD44v6 gene expression in normal human peripheral blood. METHODS: RNA was extracted from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 50 healthy donors, the expression of CD44v6 was investigated using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: CD44v6 mRNA was detected in 58% of healthy volunteers under the proper controls. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the measurement of CD44v6 expression in peripheral blood by RT-PCR is not suitable for detection of circulating tumor cells. PMID:15962382

  12. Effects of vasopressin administration on diuresis of water immersion in normal humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Denunzio, A. G.; Loutzenhiser, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of vasopressin suppression on the diuresis encountered during water immersion is investigated in studies on normal humans immersed to the neck. Six hydrated male subjects were studied on two occasions while undergoing 6 h of immersion without or during the administration of aqueous vasopressin for the initial 4 h. Neck immersion is found to result in a significant increase in urinary flow rate beginning in the first hour and persisting throughout the immersion. The administration of vasopressin markedly attenuated the diuretic response throughout the period of infusion, while cessation of vasopressin administration during the final 2 h of immersion resulted in a marked offset of the antidiuresis. Results thus support the view that the suppression of antidiuretic hormone contributes to the immersion diuresis of hydrated subjects.

  13. Carbohydrate expression and modification during keratinocyte differentiation in normal human and reconstructed epidermis.

    PubMed

    Méhul, Bruno; Corre, Christophe; Capon, Catherine; Bernard, Dominique; Schmidt, Rainer

    2003-10-01

    Using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lectins we were able to demonstrate the presence of specific carbohydrate moieties in normal human and reconstructed epidermis. Evidence is provided that in both cases the strongly reduced lectin staining at the level of the stratum corneum is the result of a hindered accessibility of the lectins in this lipid-rich hydrophobic environment. Isolated corneocytes and purified cornified envelopes (CEs) exhibited clearly glycosylated structures reacting with distinct lectins. The presence of glycosidase activity, particularly in the upper layers of the epidermis characterized by an acidic environment (pH 5.5), indicates that modifications of the sugar residues might be important in epidermal homeostasis, barrier behavior and desquamation. Absent or strongly reduced glycosidase activity in the stratum corneum of reconstructed epidermis with an impaired pH gradient could be in part responsible for the reduced barrier function and the lack of desquamation in this model. PMID:14705793

  14. Molecular basis for discriminating between normal and damaged bases by the human alkyladenine glycosylase, AAG

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Albert Y.; Wyatt, Michael D.; Glassner, Brian J.; Samson, Leona D.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2000-01-01

    The human 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase [alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG)] catalyzes the first step of base excision repair by cleaving damaged bases from DNA. Unlike other DNA glycosylases that are specific for a particular type of damaged base, AAG excises a chemically diverse selection of substrate bases damaged by alkylation or deamination. The 2.1-Å crystal structure of AAG complexed to DNA containing 1,N6-ethenoadenine suggests how modified bases can be distinguished from normal DNA bases in the enzyme active site. Mutational analyses of residues contacting the alkylated base in the crystal structures suggest that the shape of the damaged base, its hydrogen-bonding characteristics, and its aromaticity all contribute to the selective recognition of damage by AAG. PMID:11106395

  15. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Patient

    PubMed Central

    Regeti, Kalyani; Khan, Rafay; Jehangir, Waqas; Zafar, Shoaib; Yousif, Abdalla; Sen, Shuvendu

    2016-01-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a relatively common disease of adulthood characterized by a typical combination of clinical and radiological findings. In this report, we discuss a 54-year-old female presenting with symptoms suggestive of NPH and found to have a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1. She was not treated as she was in denial state and developed NPH as a possible complication. In the literature, there has only been one reported case of HIV type 2 causing NPH; however, no relationship has been properly documented with HIV type 1. These findings bring about a question on whether NPH is associated or a complication of HIV with awareness of this association. Earlier screening of HIV can be done in patients presenting with such symptoms, thus to prevent further progression of its complications. PMID:27222676

  16. VIS-NIR spectrum analysis for distinguishing tumor and normal human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Yu, Yuan; Tuchin, Valery V.; Chen, Yongjun; Wen, Xiang; Liu, Caihua; Wang, Jing; Xue, Xingbo; Zhu, Dan

    2012-03-01

    The high incidence and mortality of breast cancer require an effective method for early breast diagnosis. In order to investigate the optical differences among malignant tumor, benign tumor and normal human breast tissue, a commercial spectrophotometer combined with single integrating sphere was used to measure the optical properties of different types of breast tissue in the wavelength range of 400 nm to 2200 nm in vitro. The hematoxylin and eosin staining (H&E staining) are used as the standard, and to find the find possible optical markers from the corresponding absorption or scattering spectra. This work is not only used for in vitro rapid optical diagnosis, but very helpful to develop innovative optical diagnosis of breast tumor in vivo.

  17. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Patient.

    PubMed

    Regeti, Kalyani; Khan, Rafay; Jehangir, Waqas; Zafar, Shoaib; Yousif, Abdalla; Sen, Shuvendu

    2016-06-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a relatively common disease of adulthood characterized by a typical combination of clinical and radiological findings. In this report, we discuss a 54-year-old female presenting with symptoms suggestive of NPH and found to have a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1. She was not treated as she was in denial state and developed NPH as a possible complication. In the literature, there has only been one reported case of HIV type 2 causing NPH; however, no relationship has been properly documented with HIV type 1. These findings bring about a question on whether NPH is associated or a complication of HIV with awareness of this association. Earlier screening of HIV can be done in patients presenting with such symptoms, thus to prevent further progression of its complications. PMID:27222676

  18. Biochemical and metabolic abnormalities in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, J.; Treadwell, B.V.; Mankin, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    Incorporation of radioactive precursors into macromolecules was studied with human normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage organ culture. Analysis of the salt extracted matrix components separated by cesium chloride buoyant density gradient centrifugation showed an increase in the specific activities of all gradient fractions prepared from the osteoarthritic cartilage. Further analysis of these fractions showed the osteoarthritic cartilage contained 5 times as much sulfate incorporated into proteoglycans, and an even greater amount of 3H-glucosamine incorporated into material sedimenting to the middle of the gradient. Greater than half of this radioactive middle fraction appears to be hyaluronate, as judged by the position it elutes from a DEAE column and its susceptibility to hyaluronidase digestion. This study supports earlier findings showing increased rates of macromolecular synthesis in osteoarthritis, and in addition, an even greater synthetic rate for hyaluronic acid is demonstrated.

  19. Normal Human Pregnancy Results in Maternal Immune Activation in the Periphery and at the Uteroplacental Interface

    PubMed Central

    Yesayan, Maria N.; Kahn, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy poses a unique challenge to the human immune system: the semi-allogeneic fetus must be protected from maternal immune attack while immunity towards pathogens is maintained. Breakdown in maternal-fetal tolerance can lead to pregnancy-specific diseases with potentially high degrees of morbidity and mortality for both the mother and her fetus. Various immune cell-types could mediate these functions, but a comprehensive evaluation of the peripheral and local maternal T cell and regulatory T cell compartments in normal human pregnancy is lacking. In this case-control study, we apply the Human Immunology Project Consortium proposed gating strategies to samples from healthy 3rd trimester human subjects compared with healthy non-pregnant controls. The proportions of HLA-DR+ and CD38+ effector- and effector memory CD8 T cells are significantly increased in the peripheral blood of pregnant women. Utilizing a novel technique that takes advantage of the standard protocol for intrauterine cleanup after cesarean section, we isolate lymphocytes resident at the uteroplacental interface (UPI). At the UPI, the CD4 and CD8 T cell compartments largely mirror the peripheral blood, except that the proportion of HLA-DR+ activated T regulatory cells is significantly increased in direct proportion to an observed increase in the number of activated CD8 T cells. We find that cryopreservation and delayed sample processing (>12 hours) decreases our ability to identify regulatory T cell subsets. Further, the Consortium proposed method for Treg identification underrepresents Resting and Cytokine Tregs compared with Activated Tregs, thus skewing the entire population. Better understanding of the changes in the immune system during pregnancy in the peripheral blood and at the uteroplacental interface are essential for progress in treatment of pregnancy diseases such as pre-eclampsia and recurrent miscarriage. PMID:24846312

  20. Human Papillomavirus in Oral Leukoplakia, Verrucous Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, and Normal Mucous Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Saghravanian, Nasrollah; Ghazi, Narges; Meshkat, Zahra; Mohtasham, Nooshin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common oral malignancy, and verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a less invasive type of SCC. Leukoplakia (LP) is the most frequent premalignant lesion in the oral cavity. The human papillomavirus (HPV) has been recognized as one of the etiologic factors of these conditions. The association of anogenital and cervical cancers with HPV particularly its high-risk subtypes (HPV HR) has been demonstrated. The purpose of our study was to investigate the hypothetical association between HPV and the mentioned oral cavity lesions. Methods One hundred and seventy-three samples (114 SCCs, 21 VCs, 20 LPs) and 18 normal mucosa samples (as a control group) were retrieved from the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology of Mashhad Dental School, Iran. The association of HPV genotypes in LP, VC, and SCC was compared to normal oral mucosa using the polymerase chain reaction. Results The results showed the absence of HPV in normal mucosa and LP lesions. In three samples of VC (14.3%), we observed the presence of HPV HR (types 16 and 18). All VCs were present in the mandibular ridge of females aged over 65 years old. No statistically significant correlation between HPV and VC was observed (p=0.230). Additionally, 15 (13.1%) SCCs showed HPV positivity, but this was not significant (p=0.830). The prevalence of SCC was higher on the tongue with the dominant presence of less carcinogenic species of HPV (types 6 and 11). A statistically significant association was not observed between HPV and SCC or VC in the oral cavity. Conclusion More studies are necessary to better understand the relationship between HPV and malignant/premalignant oral cavity lesions. PMID:26674929

  1. Band 3/complement-mediated recognition and removal of normally senescent and pathological human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Arese, Paolo; Turrini, Franco; Schwarzer, Evelin

    2005-01-01

    Band 3 modifications that normally occur during physiological red blood cell (RBC) senescence in humans, and occasionally in pathological conditions are described in the context of their role in enhancing RBC recognition and phagocytic removal. Band 3 modifications are mostly due to oxidative insults that gradually accumulate during the RBC lifespan or impact massively in a shorter time period in pathological conditions. The oxidative insults that impact on the RBC, the protective mechanisms that counteract those damages and the phenotypic modifications that accumulate during the RBC lifespan are described. It is shown how specific oxidative as well as non-oxidative band 3 modifications enhance RBC membrane affinity for normally circulating anti-band 3 antibodies, and how membrane-bound anti-band 3 antibodies bring about a limited complement activation and membrane deposition of complement C3 fragments. The partially covalent complexes between anti-band 3 antibodies and complement C3 fragments are very powerful opsonins readily recognized by the CR1 complement receptor on the phagocyte. Band 3 modifications typically encountered in old RBCs have crystallized to a number of band 3-centered models of RBC senescence. One of those band 3-centered models, the so-called 'band 3/complement RBC removal model' first put up by Lutz et al. is discussed in more detail. Finally, it is shown how the genetic deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) plus fava bean consumption, and a widespread RBC parasitic disease, P. falciparum malaria, may lead to massive and rapid destruction of RBCs by a mechanism comparable to a dramatic, time-compressed enhancement of normal RBC senescence. PMID:16301814

  2. Normal and cancer stem cells of the human female reproductive system.

    PubMed

    López, Jacqueline; Valdez-Morales, Francisco J; Benítez-Bribiesca, Luis; Cerbón, Marco; Carrancá, Alejandro García

    2013-01-01

    The female reproductive system (FRS) has a great capacity for regeneration. The existence of somatic stem cells (SSC) that are likely to reside in distinct tissue compartments of the FRS is anticipated. Normal SSC are capable of regenerating themselves, produce a progeny of cells that differentiate and maintain tissue architecture and functional characteristics, and respond to homeostatic controls. Among those SSC of the FRS that have been identified are: a) undifferentiated cells capable of differentiating into thecal cells and synthesizing hormones upon transplantation, b) ovarian surface epithelium stem cells, mitotically responsive to ovulation, c) uterine endometrial and myometrial cells, as clonogenic epithelial and stromal cells, and d) epithelial and mesenchymal cells with self-renewal capacity and multipotential from cervical tissues. Importantly, these cells are believed to significantly contribute to the development of different pathologies and tumors of the FRS.It is now widely accepted that cancer stem cells (CSC) are at the origin of many tumors. They are capable of regenerating themselves, produce a progeny that will differentiate aberrantly and do not respond adequately to homeostatic controls. Several cell surface antigens such as CD44, CD117, CD133 and MYD88 have been used to isolate ovarian cancer stem cells. Clonogenic epithelial and stromal endometrial and myometrial cells have been found in normal and cancer tissues, as side population, label-retaining cells, and CD146/PDGF-R beta-positive cells with stem-like features. In summary, here we describe a number of studies supporting the existence of somatic stem cells in the normal tissues and cancer stem cells in tumors of the human female reproductive system. PMID:23782518

  3. Extracellular potentials of human motor myelinated nerve fibers in normal case and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Stephanova, D I; Daskalova, M

    2002-01-01

    The extracellular potentials of human motor myelinated fibres in an unbounded volume conductor, in normal case and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are studied. Using our previous double-cable models of the fibres, the spatial and temporal distributions of the intracellular potentials are obtained. The intracellular potentials are then used as input to a line source model that allows to calculate the corresponding spatial and temporal distributions of the extracellular potentials at various radial distances in the surrounding volume conductor. For the normal and ALS cases, the radial decline of the peak-to-peak amplitude of the extracellular potential depends on the radial distance of the field point and increases with the increase of the distance. For given radial distances, two cases of spatial distributions of the extracellular potentials are investigated: the first case, based on the intracellular potentials at the times of nodal potential maxima and the second case, based on the intracellular potentials at the time interval from 0.2 ms to 1.0 ms at increments of 0.1 ms. For the same radial distances, the temporal distributions of the extracellular potentials are also explored. It is shown that in the case of adaptation, the temporal distributions of the extracellular potentials in the normal and ALS cases correspond well with electromyograms (EMG) from healthy subjects and ALS patients as reported in the literature. Simulation results indicate that the used models are rather promising tools in studying the main properties of compound action potentials in ALS patients which up till now have not been sufficiently well understood. PMID:12395619

  4. Multi-Contrast Human Neonatal Brain Atlas: Application to Normal Neonate Development Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Kenichi; Mori, Susumu; Donohue, Pamela K.; Ernst, Thomas; Anderson, Lynn; Buchthal, Steven; Faria, Andreia; Jiang, Hangyi; Li, Xin; Miller, Michael I.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Chang, Linda

    2011-01-01

    MRI is a sensitive method for detecting subtle anatomic abnormalities in the neonatal brain. To optimize the usefulness for neonatal and pediatric care, systematic research, based on quantitative image analysis and functional correlation, is required. Normalization-based image analysis is one of the most effective methods for image quantification and statistical comparison. However, the application of this methodology to neonatal brain MRI scans is rare. Some of the difficulties are the rapid changes in T1 and T2 contrasts and the lack of contrast between brain structures, which prohibits accurate cross-subject image registration. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which provides rich and quantitative anatomical contrast in neonate brains, is an ideal technology for normalization–based neonatal brain analysis. In this paper, we report the development of neonatal brain atlases with detailed anatomic information derived from DTI and co-registered anatomical MRI. Combined with a diffeomorphic transformation, we were able to normalize neonatal brain images to the atlas space and three-dimensionally parcellate images into 122 regions. The accuracy of the normalization was comparable to the reliability of human raters. This method was then applied to babies of 37 to 53 post-conceptional weeks to characterize developmental changes of the white matter, which indicated a posterior-to-anterior and a central-to-peripheral direction of maturation. We expect that future applications of this atlas will include investigations of the effect of prenatal events and the effects of preterm birth or low birth weights, as well as clinical applications, such as determining imaging biomarkers for various neurological disorders. PMID:21276861

  5. Effect on the human normal microflora of oral antibiotics for treatment of urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Edlund; Nord

    2000-08-01

    Oral administration of antibiotics for treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) can cause ecological disturbances in the normal intestinal microflora. Poorly absorbed drugs can reach the colon in active form, suppress susceptible microorganisms and disturb the ecological balance. Suppression of the normal microflora may lead to reduced colonization resistance with subsequent overgrowth of pre-existing, naturally resistant microorganisms, such as yeasts and Clostridium difficile. New colonization by resistant potential pathogens may also occur and may spread within the body or to other patients and cause severe infections. It is therefore important to learn more about the ecological effects of antibacterial agents on the human microflora. The impact on intestinal microorganisms of oral antibiotics used for the treatment of UTIs is reviewed here. Ampicillin, amoxycillin and co-amoxiclav suppress both the aerobic and anaerobic intestinal microflora with overgrowth of ampicillin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Pivmecillinam also affects the intestinal microflora, suppressing Escherichia coli, but does not have a major effect on the anaerobic microflora. Several orally administered cephalosporins, such as cefixime, cefpodoxime, cefprozil and ceftibuten, reduce the number of Enterobacteriaceae and increase the number of enterococci. Colonization with C. difficile has also been observed. Fluoroquinolones eliminate or strongly suppress intestinal Enterobacteriaceae, but affect enterococci and anaerobic bacteria only slightly. When antimicrobial agents are prescribed for the treatment of UTIs, not only the antimicrobial spectrum of the agent but also the potential ecological disturbances, including the risk of emergence of resistant strains, should be considered. PMID:10969051

  6. Effect on the human normal microflora of oral antibiotics for treatment of urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Edlund, C; Nord, C E

    2000-09-01

    Oral administration of antibiotics for treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) can cause ecological disturbances in the normal intestinal microflora. Poorly absorbed drugs can reach the colon in active form, suppress susceptible microorganisms and disturb the ecological balance. Suppression of the normal microflora may lead to reduced colonization resistance with subsequent overgrowth of pre-existing, naturally resistant microorganisms, such as yeasts and Clostridium difficile. New colonization by resistant potential pathogens may also occur and may spread within the body or to other patients and cause severe infections. It is therefore important to learn more about the ecological effects of antibacterial agents on the human microflora. The impact on intestinal microorganisms of oral antibiotics used for the treatment of UTIs is reviewed here. Ampicillin, amoxycillin and co-amoxiclav suppress both the aerobic and anaerobic intestinal microflora with overgrowth of ampicillin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Pivmecillinam also affects the intestinal microflora, suppressing Escherichia coli, but does not have a major effect on the anaerobic microflora. Several orally administered cephalosporins, such as cefixime, cefpodoxime, cefprozil and ceftibuten, reduce the number of Enterobacteriaceae and increase the number of enterococci. Colonization with C. difficile has also been observed. Fluoroquinolones eliminate or strongly suppress intestinal Enterobacteriaceae, but affect enterococci and anaerobic bacteria only slightly. When antimicrobial agents are prescribed for the treatment of UTIs, not only the antimicrobial spectrum of the agent but also the potential ecological disturbances, including the risk of emergence of resistant strains, should be considered. PMID:11051623

  7. Se status in normal and pathological human individuals before and after Se supplementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellisola, G.; Cinque, G.; Galassini, S.; Guidi, G. C.; Liu, N. Q.; Moschini, G.

    1996-04-01

    The determination of selenium in plasma and in urine samples has been suggested for the assessment of Se status in human individuals. The kidney is of fundamental importance in Se homeostasis: with low Se intake its excretion will be decreased and with high Se intake it will be increased. In 21 patients with kidney disease (8 with normal kidney function and 13 with moderate renal failure) Se was measured in 1 ml of urine by PIXE after preconcentration of the sample. The total urine volume was measured to calculate total daily Se excretion. The same procedure was applied to 14 normal individuals for comparison. All individuals were then supplemented orally with selenite for 8 weeks (Se = 600 μg/day) and the procedure was repeated. The behaviour of the major selenoproteins was also investigated by measuring glutathione peroxidase activities in plasma, in platelets and in erythrocyte samples. For renal function, serum and urine creatinine concentrations were utilised and creatinine clearances were calculated. Results obtained were compared before and after Se treatment and between groups. Some correlation studies were carried out between Se and kidney functions and/or selenoperoxidase activities.

  8. Glucagon Receptor Blockade With a Human Antibody Normalizes Blood Glucose in Diabetic Mice and Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Haruka; Kim, Jinrang; Aglione, JohnPaul; Lee, Joseph; Cavino, Katie; Na, Erqian; Rafique, Ashique; Kim, Jee Hae; Harp, Joyce; Valenzuela, David M; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J; Gromada, Jesper

    2015-08-01

    Antagonizing glucagon action represents an attractive therapeutic option for reducing hepatic glucose production in settings of hyperglycemia where glucagon excess plays a key pathophysiological role. We therefore generated REGN1193, a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds and inhibits glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling in vitro. REGN1193 administration to diabetic ob/ob and diet-induced obese mice lowered blood glucose to levels observed in GCGR-deficient mice. In diet-induced obese mice, REGN1193 reduced food intake, adipose tissue mass, and body weight. REGN1193 increased circulating levels of glucagon and glucagon-like peptide 1 and was associated with reversible expansion of pancreatic α-cell area. Hyperglucagonemia and α-cell hyperplasia was observed in fibroblast growth factor 21-deficient mice treated with REGN1193. Single administration of REGN1193 to diabetic cynomolgus monkeys normalized fasting blood glucose and glucose tolerance and increased circulating levels of glucagon and amino acids. Finally, administration of REGN1193 for 8 weeks to normoglycemic cynomolgus monkeys did not cause hypoglycemia or increase pancreatic α-cell area. In summary, the GCGR-blocking antibody REGN1193 normalizes blood glucose in diabetic mice and monkeys but does not produce hypoglycemia in normoglycemic monkeys. Thus, REGN1193 provides a potential therapeutic modality for diabetes mellitus and acute hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:26020795

  9. Characterization of the human thymic microenvironment: lymphoepithelial interaction in normal thymus and thymoma.

    PubMed

    Müller-Hermelink, H K; Wilisch, A; Schultz, A; Marx, A

    1997-03-01

    Recent advances in tissue culture technology and molecular biology have extended our understanding of the functional morphology of the thymus. The importance of a crosstalk between lymphoid cells and stroma has been appreciated as a prerequisite for the normal development of both. The network of direct cellular interactions and soluble factors comprising part of the microenvironment is far from being elucidated but the highly ordered thymic architecture clearly plays a pivotal role in normal thymic function. Insight into the genetic control of stroma development is only emerging while knowledge on the genetic control of the various steps in T cell development is already advanced and rapidly expanding. The present paper gives an overview on the cellular components and matrix molecules of the human thymic microenvironment and their development during ontogeny. The intrathymic cytokine network is shortly reviewed. Special emphasis is put on molecules mediating lymphoepithelial interactions that are necessary for the expansion and early selection of immature thymocytes from precursor cells and for the generation of an MHC restricted and self tolerant T cell repertoire by positive and negative selection. Considering these physiological mechanisms we summarize the molecular pathology of the microenvironment and lymphocyte/stroma interactions in thymic epithelial tumors (thymomas). Finally, a pathogenetic model for paraneoplastic myasthenia gravis is given. We suggest abnormal auto-antigen-specific positive selection of naive T cells as the essential molecular mechanism by which thymomas contribute to the autoimmunization against the acetylcholine receptor and other muscle proteins. PMID:9161686

  10. Binding of normal human IgG to myelin sheaths, glia and neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Aarli, J A; Aparicio, S R; Lumsden, C E; Tönder, O

    1975-01-01

    The binding of normal human serum, purified IgG and IgG fragments to central nervous tissue was studied by the anti-globulin consumption (AGCT) and immunofluorescence (IF) techniques. In the AGCT, F(ab')2 fragments failed to react, whereas IgG and Fc fragments did so. In IF experiments, the binding was localized to myelin sheaths, glia and neurons; Fab monomers at a protein concentration of 1-3 mg/ml dod not react with the tissue, but purified Fc fragments at 0-0625 mg/ml did. The binding is neither tissue- nor species-specific. Lipid and protein extraction procedures indicated that the factor responsible for binding to myelin was basic protein. It was concluded that the binding of normal IgG to central nervous tissue is medicated by the Fc part of the molecule. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:803915

  11. Assessment of cell surface glycoconjugates in normal, benign and malignant human nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Fang, S Y; Ohyama, M

    1997-12-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of proteins is a common characteristic of neoplastic changes. No reports exist relating cell surface glycoconjugates to normal, benign and malignant human nasal mucosa. Using lectin affinity histochemistry, glycoconjugate reactivities for peanut agglutinin (PNA), concanavalin A (Con A), Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin II (GSA-II), soy bean agglutinin (SBA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin l (UEA-I) were analysed in the following groups: normal, benign (polyp, papilloma, and inverted papilloma) and malignant (squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) alone, SCC arising in inverted papilloma, and adenocarcinoma). The positive rate of lectin staining was evaluated using a quantitative AutoCAD programme. We correlated glycoconjugate expression to clinical features, diagnosis, and malignant transformation. The positive rate of PNA after neuraminidase pre-treatment (NA-PNA) staining was higher in inverted papilloma, while all-negative in polyp and papilloma. NA-PNA staining may be used as a differential diagnostic tool. Both inverted papilloma portions and SCC portions of the SCC synchronized with inverted papilloma subjects showed similar Con A and NA-PNA staining patterns. The biological characteristics define inverted papilloma as a pre-malignant neoplasm. The positive rate of PNA staining was significantly higher in inverted papilloma (inverted papilloma transformed to SCC) compared to inverted papilloma alone. Hence, PNA staining may predict malignant transformation of inverted papilloma. However, further investigations are required to prove this possibly worthwhile prognostic marker. PMID:9532636

  12. Ultrastructural observations on the basal lamina in the normal human breast.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, R J; Eyden, B P; Howell, A; Sellwood, R A

    1988-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the basal lamina of histologically normal human breast tissue was determined in 19 women undergoing operations for removal of a fibroadenoma or reduction mammoplasty. The day of the menstrual cycle was determined by hormone assay and direct questioning. Previously documented ultrastructural appearances were confirmed: in addition, three morphological variants were found. In all tissue examined, there was reduplication of basal lamina in some areas, which has been described previously as a pathological feature. Also, there was complex branching of the basal lamina into the periductular connective tissue. Some projections contained cytoplasmic processes and, in almost all, hemidesmosomes were seen. The third variant consisted of loops of basal lamina thrown up in folds into the collagenous stromal cuff. Reduplication of basal lamina was detected in breast tissue removed at all stages of the menstrual cycle, looping was not and could not be related to any particular phase of the menstrual cycle. However, complex branching was seen predominantly in the periovulatory and early luteal phase. We conclude that these appearances are normal variants of basal lamina. The appearance of branching basal lamina in the luteal phase suggests that this may be produced in response to endocrine stimulation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3417540

  13. Clinically failed eggs as a source of normal human embryo stem cells.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Paul A; Gardner, John; Sneddon, Sharon; Pells, Steve; Tye, Britt Jorgensen; Dand, Pawlina; Collins, Daniel M; Stewart, Karen; Shaw, Lisa; Przyborski, Stefan; Cooke, Michael; McLaughlin, K John; Kimber, Susan J; Lieberman, Brian A; Wilmut, Ian; Brison, Daniel R

    2009-05-01

    The promise of human embryo stem cells (hESCs) for regenerative medicine is offset by the ethical and practical challenges involved in sourcing eggs and embryos for this objective. In this study we sought to isolate an hESC line from clinically failed eggs, the usage of which would not conflict with donor interests to conceive. A total of 8 blastocysts were allocated for hESC derivation from a pool of 579 eggs whose fertilization had been clinically assessed to have occurred abnormally (i.e., three pronuclei) or failed (i.e., no pronuclei) following in vitro insemination or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The latter were subjected to a recovery intervention consisting of either reinsemination by ICSI or parthenogenetic stimulation. One hESC line (RCM1) was obtained from a failed-to-fertilize inseminated egg recovered by parthenogenetic activation. Standard in vitro and in vivo characterization revealed this line to possess all of the properties attributed to a normal euploid hESC line. Whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis further revealed that the line was biparental, indicating that sperm penetration had occurred, although parthenogenetic stimulation was required for activation. Our results demonstrate the viability of an alternative strategy to generate normal hESC lines from clinically failed eggs, thereby further minimizing the potential to conflict with donor reproductive interest to conceive. PMID:19393594

  14. Noncanonical microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in normal and psoriatic human skin

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Joyce, Cailin E.; Bowcock, Anne M.; Zhang, Weixiong

    2013-01-01

    Noncanonical microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) are key gene regulators in eukaryotes. Noncanonical miRNAs, which bypass part of the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway, can originate from a variety of genomic loci, which include small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and introns, whereas endo-siRNAs can arise from repetitive elements, some of which are transposable. The roles of noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs in complex diseases have yet to be characterized. To investigate their potential expression and function in psoriasis, we carried out a comprehensive, genome-wide search for noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs in small RNA deep-sequencing data sets from normal and psoriatic human skin. By analyzing more than 670 million qualified reads from 67 small RNA libraries, we identified 21 novel, noncanonical miRNAs (3 snoRNA-derived and 2 tRNA-derived miRNAs and 16 miRtrons) and 39 novel endo-siRNAs that were expressed in skin. The expression of four novel small RNAs was validated by qRT–PCR in human skin, and their Argonaute association was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation of ectopic small RNAs in HEK293 cells. Fifteen noncanonical miRNAs or endo-siRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in psoriatic-involved versus normal skin, including an Alu-short interspersed element-derived siRNA which was 17-fold up-regulated in psoriatic-involved skin. These and other differentially expressed small noncoding RNAs may function as regulators of gene expression in skin and potentially play a role in psoriasis pathogenesis. PMID:23175445

  15. Noncanonical microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in normal and psoriatic human skin.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Joyce, Cailin E; Bowcock, Anne M; Zhang, Weixiong

    2013-02-15

    Noncanonical microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) are key gene regulators in eukaryotes. Noncanonical miRNAs, which bypass part of the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway, can originate from a variety of genomic loci, which include small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and introns, whereas endo-siRNAs can arise from repetitive elements, some of which are transposable. The roles of noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs in complex diseases have yet to be characterized. To investigate their potential expression and function in psoriasis, we carried out a comprehensive, genome-wide search for noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs in small RNA deep-sequencing data sets from normal and psoriatic human skin. By analyzing more than 670 million qualified reads from 67 small RNA libraries, we identified 21 novel, noncanonical miRNAs (3 snoRNA-derived and 2 tRNA-derived miRNAs and 16 miRtrons) and 39 novel endo-siRNAs that were expressed in skin. The expression of four novel small RNAs was validated by qRT-PCR in human skin, and their Argonaute association was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation of ectopic small RNAs in HEK293 cells. Fifteen noncanonical miRNAs or endo-siRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in psoriatic-involved versus normal skin, including an Alu-short interspersed element-derived siRNA which was 17-fold up-regulated in psoriatic-involved skin. These and other differentially expressed small noncoding RNAs may function as regulators of gene expression in skin and potentially play a role in psoriasis pathogenesis. PMID:23175445

  16. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Raffensperger, Zachary D.; Heike, Carrie L.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Kau, Chung How; Moreno, Lina M.; Wehby, George L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A.; Marazita, Mary L.; Weinberg, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10−8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis. PMID:27560520

  17. Transcriptional profiling in an MPNST-derived cell line and normal human Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    LEE, PHILIP R.; COHEN, JONATHAN E.; TENDI, ELISABETTA A.; FARRER, ROBERT; DE VRIES, GEORGE H.; BECKER, KEVIN G.; FIELDS, R. DOUGLAS

    2005-01-01

    cDNA microarrays were utilized to identify abnormally expressed genes in a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST)-derived cell line, T265, by comparing the mRNA abundance profiles with that of normal human Schwann cells (nhSCs). The findings characterize the molecular phenotype of this important cell-line model of MPNSTs, and elucidate the contribution of Schwann cells in MPNSTs. In total, 4608 cDNA sequences were screened and hybridizations replicated on custom cDNA microarrays. In order to verify the microarray data, a large selection of differentially expressed mRNA transcripts were subjected to semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR (LightCycler). Western blotting was performed to investigate a selection of genes and signal transduction pathways, as a further validation of the microarray data. The data generated from multiple microarray screens, semi-quantitative RT–PCR and Western blotting are in broad agreement. This study represents a comprehensive gene-expression analysis of an MPNST-derived cell line and the first comprehensive global mRNA profile of nhSCs in culture. This study has identified ~900 genes that are expressed abnormally in the T265 cell line and detected many genes not previously reported to be expressed in nhSCs. The results provide crucial information on the T265 cells that is essential for investigation using this cell line in experimental studies in neurofibromatosis type I (NF1), and important information on normal human Schwann cells that is applicable to a wide range of studies on Schwann cells in cell culture. PMID:16429615

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, John R; Orlova, Ekaterina; Lee, Myoung Keun; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Raffensperger, Zachary D; Heike, Carrie L; Cunningham, Michael L; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Kau, Chung How; Nidey, Nichole L; Moreno, Lina M; Wehby, George L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Laurie, Cathy C; Cole, Joanne; Ferrara, Tracey; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Mio, Washington; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A; Marazita, Mary L; Weinberg, Seth M

    2016-08-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10-8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis. PMID:27560520

  19. An evaluation of diphtheria--tetanus (adult) vaccine in unselected human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Harcus, A W; Ward, A E; Roberts, J S; Bryett, K A

    1989-01-01

    One hundred unselected adult volunteers received an adult diphtheria (less than 2 Lf)-tetanus (greater than or equal to 40 IU) adsorbed vaccine without prior Schick testing. No volunteer had a moderate or severe reaction al