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Sample records for adult onset diabetes

  1. Effects of diabetes mellitus on bone mass in juvenile and adult-onset diabetes.

    PubMed

    Levin, M E; Boisseau, V C; Avioli, L V

    1976-01-29

    To assess the influence of diabetes mellitus on bone metabolism, we measured skeletal mass in the forearms of 35 patients with juvenile diabetes on insulin and 101 stable patients with adult-onset diabetes, on diet alone, insulin, or oral hypoglycemic agents. There was a significant loss of bone mass in both juvenile and adult-onset diabetes (P less than 0.01) as compared to controls matched for age and sex. The decrease was already present in patients with diabetes of less than five years' duration. Bone loss and duration of the diabetes did not correlate; the greatest decrease in bone mass was observed in the patients receiving oral agents. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the loss of skeletal tissue in diabetes reflects the underlying disease since it occurs early and is not related to severity as evidenced by the need for insulin, to duration, or to treatment with insulin or diet alone.

  2. Adult-onset autoimmune diabetes: current knowledge and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Buzzetti, Raffaella; Zampetti, Simona; Maddaloni, Ernesto

    2017-09-08

    Adult-onset autoimmune diabetes is a heterogeneous disease that is characterized by a reduced genetic load, a less intensive autoimmune process and a mild metabolic decompensation at onset compared with young-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The majority of patients with adult-onset autoimmune diabetes do not require insulin treatment for at least 6 months after diagnosis. Such patients are defined as having latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), which is distinct from classic adult-onset T1DM. The extensive heterogeneity of adult-onset autoimmune diabetes is apparent beyond the distinction between classic adult-onset T1DM and LADA. LADA is characterized by genetic, phenotypic and humoral heterogeneity, encompassing different degrees of insulin resistance and autoimmunity; this heterogeneity is probably a result of different pathological mechanisms, which have implications for treatment. The existence of heterogeneous phenotypes in LADA makes it difficult to establish an a priori treatment algorithm, and therefore, a personalized medicine approach is required. In this Review, we discuss the current understanding and gaps in knowledge regarding the pathophysiology and clinical features of adult-onset autoimmune diabetes and highlight the similarities and differences with classic T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  3. Adult-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: A Qualitative Study of Decision-Making Needs.

    PubMed

    Jull, Janet; Witteman, Holly O; Ferne, Judi; Yoganathan, Manosila; Stacey, Dawn

    2016-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease resulting from insulin deficiency and must be carefully managed to prevent serious health complications. Diabetes education and management strategies usually focus on meeting the decision-making needs of children and their families, but little is known about the decisional needs of people with adult-onset type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to explore the diabetes-related decision-making needs of people diagnosed with adult-onset type 1 diabetes. An interpretive descriptive qualitative study was conducted. Participants who self-identified as having adult-onset type 1 diabetes were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide. Transcripts were coded to identify needs, supports and barriers using thematic analysis. Participating in the study were 8 adults (2 men, 6 women), ages 33 to 57, with type 1 diabetes for durations of 1 to 20 or more years. Their decision-making needs are summarized in 6 broad themes: 1) people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are launched into a process of decision-making; 2) being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes means you will always have to make decisions; 3) knowledge is crucial; 4) personal preferences matter; 5) support is critical for decisions about self-care in type 1 diabetes; 6) living with type 1 diabetes means making very individualized decisions about daily life. The findings describe the sudden and ubiquitous nature of type 1 diabetes decision-making and the need to tailor approaches for making care decisions in type 1 diabetes. People diagnosed with adult-onset type 1 diabetes require access to reliable information, support and opportunities for participation in decision-making. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Adult-onset diabetes among Arabs and Jews in Israel: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Kalter-Leibovici, O; Chetrit, A; Lubin, F; Atamna, A; Alpert, G; Ziv, A; Abu-Saad, K; Murad, H; Eilat-Adar, S; Goldbourt, U

    2012-06-01

    To study the age at presentation and factors associated with adult-onset diabetes (≥ 20 years) among Arabs and Jews in Israel. Participants (n = 1100) were randomly selected from the urban population of the Hadera District in Israel. The study sample was stratified into equal groups according to sex, ethnicity (Arabs and Jews) and age. Information on age at diabetes presentation, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes, socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics was obtained through personal interviews. Self reports of diabetes were compared with medical records and were found reliable (κ = 0.87). The risk for diabetes was calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Factors associated with diabetes in both ethnic groups were studied using Cox proportional hazard model. The prevalence of adult-onset diabetes was 21% among Arabs and 12% among Jews. Arab participants were younger than Jews at diabetes presentation. By the age of 57 years, 25% of Arabs had diagnosed diabetes; the corresponding age among Jews was 68 years, a difference of 11 years (P < 0.001). The greater risk for diabetes among Arabs was independent of lifestyle factors, family history of diabetes and, among women, history of gestational diabetes; adjusted hazard ratio 1.70; 95% confidence interval 1.19-2.43. Arabs in Israel are at greater risk for adult-onset diabetes than Jews and are younger at diabetes presentation. Culturally sensitive interventions aimed at maintaining normal body weight and active lifestyle should be targeted at this population. Possible genetic factors and gene-environmental interactions underlying the high risk for diabetes among Arabs should be investigated. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  5. Clinical and Metabolic Features of Adult-Onset Diabetes Caused by ABCC8 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Rousseau, Elise; Reznik, Yves; Fetita, Sabrina; Philippe, Julien; Dechaume, Aurélie; Hartemann, Agnès; Polak, Michel; Petit, Catherine; Charpentier, Guillaume; Gautier, Jean-François; Froguel, Philippe; Vaxillaire, Martine

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Gain-of-function ABCC8/sulfonylurea (SU) receptor 1 mutations cause neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) or late-onset diabetes in adult relatives. Given the effectiveness of SU treatment in ABCC8-NDM patients, we further characterized late-onset ABCC8-associated diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Seven adult subjects from three NDM families and one family with type 2 diabetes were studied. Insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity were assessed using clamp techniques. We screened 139 type 2 diabetic patients who were well controlled by SU for ABCC8 mutations. RESULTS ABCC8 mutation carriers exhibited glucose intolerance, frank diabetes, or insulin-requiring diabetes since diagnosis. HbA1c improved in five SU-treated patients. Insulin secretion capacity was impaired in three patients compared with adult control subjects but was restored after a 4-week SU trial in two patients. Cohort screening revealed four SU-treated patients with ABCC8 mutations, two of which are likely causal. CONCLUSIONS Although of rare occurrence, recognition of adult-onset ABCC8-associated diabetes may help in targeting patients for SU therapy. PMID:22210575

  6. Diabetes distress in adult type 1 diabetes mellitus men and women with disease onset in childhood and in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lašaitė, Lina; Ostrauskas, Rytas; Žalinkevičius, Rimantas; Jurgevičienė, Nijolė; Radzevičienė, Lina

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether or not diabetes distress varies by age of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) onset and/or gender. A total of 700 adult T1DM patients were randomly selected from the Lithuanian Diabetes Registry; 214 of them (30.6%) agreed to participate and were recruited for the study. Diabetes distress (emotional burden, physician-related distress, regimen-related distress, interpersonal distress) was compared in 105 (42 men and 63 women) patients with T1DM diagnosed during 0-18years of life, and in 109 (61 men and 48 women) with T1DM diagnosed in adulthood, using Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS). Adult childhood-onset T1DM women have higher regimen-related distress (36.3±21.3 vs 26.6±16.2, p=0.016) than adulthood-onset women. Adult childhood-onset T1DM women experience higher diabetes distress (higher emotional burden (27.0±22.0 vs 15.6±16.4, p=0.006), physician-related distress (34.4±33.9 vs 20.7±29.4, p=0.024), total diabetes distress (41.2±13.6 vs 34.8±10.9, p=0.011)) than childhood-onset men. Adulthood-onset T1DM women experience higher physician-related distress (39.2±37.6 vs 23.4±32.5, p=0.013), but lower regimen-related distress (26.6±16.2 vs 35.8±21.6, p=0.014) than adulthood-onset men. In conclusion our findings reinforce the interdependence of psychological and biomedical factors in influencing health outcomes and support the need to provide psychological assessment and support to patients with T1DM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Correlates of Age Onset of Type 2 Diabetes Among Relatively Young Black and White Adults in a Community

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quoc Manh; Xu, Ji-Hua; Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Berenson, Gerald S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The risk factors for middle-age onset of type 2 diabetes are well known. However, information is scant regarding the age onset of type 2 diabetes and its correlates in community-based black and white relatively young adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This prospective cohort study consisted of normoglycemic (n = 2,459) and type 2 diabetic (n = 144) adults aged 18–50 years who were followed for an average of 16 years. RESULTS The incidence rate of the onset of type 2 diabetes was 1.6, 4.3, 3.9, and 3.4 per 1,000 person-years for age-groups 18–29, 30–39, and 40–50 and total sample, respectively. Incidences of diabetes increased with age by race and sex groups (P for trend ≤0.01); higher in black females versus white females and blacks versus whites in total sample (P < 0.05). In a multivariable Cox model, baseline parental diabetes (hazard ratio [HR] 5.24) and plasma insulin were significantly associated with diabetes incidence at the youngest age (18–29 years); black race, BMI, and glucose at age 30–39 years; female sex, parental diabetes (HR 2.44), BMI, ratio of triglycerides and HDL cholesterol (TG/HDL-C ratio), and glucose at age 40–50 years; and black race, parental diabetes (HR 2.44), BMI, TG/HDL-C ratio, and glucose in whole cohort. Further, patients with diabetes, regardless of age onset, displayed a significantly higher prevalence of maternal history of diabetes at baseline (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS In relatively young adults, predictability of baseline cardiometabolic risk factors along with race, sex, and parental history of diabetes for the onset of type 2 diabetes varied by age-group. These findings have implications for early prevention and intervention in relatively young adults. PMID:22399694

  8. Demonstration of insulin resistance in untreated adult onset diabetic subjects with fasting hyperglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, H; Kimmerling, G; Olefsky, J M; Reaven, G M

    1975-01-01

    We have used a continuous intravenous infusion of glucose (6 mg/kg/min), insulin (80 mU/min), epinephrine (6 mug/min), and propranolol (0.08 mg/min) to directly assess insulin resistance in 14 untreated adult onset diabetics with a mean (plus or minus SE) fasting plasma glucose level of 217 plus or minus 17 mg/100 ml. During the infusion endogenous insulin secretion is inhibited and steady-state plasma glucose and insulin levels are achieved after 90 min. Since similar steady-state levels of plasma insulin are achieved in all subjects, the plasma glucose concentration observed during the steady-state period is a measure of an individual's insulin resistance. Under these conditions, the mean (plus or minus SE) steady-state plasma glucose level of the 14 diabetic patients was 350 plus or minus 16 mg/100 ml, while that of 12 normal subjects was 121 plus or minus 4 mg/100 ml. Additional studies were performed in which control subjects and patients with diabetes had their fasting plasma glucose levels acutely raised or lowered to comparable levels before receiving the basic infusion mixture of glucose, insulin, epinephrine, and propranolol. The results of these studies indicated that differences in initial plasma glucose levels could not account for the different glucose responses of the two groups to the basic infusion. Finally, the mean (plus or minus SE) steady-state plasma glucose level of 104 plus or minus 17 mg/100 ml observed during the same basic infusion in five patients with fasting hyperglycemia (mean plus or minus SE, 142 plus or minus 12 mg/100 ml) secondary to chronic pancreatitis suggested that neither chronic hyperglycemia nor hypoinsulinemia per se necessarily lead to insulin resistance. These results demonstrate that marked insulin resistance exists in adult onset diabetics with fasting hyperglycemia. Since previous studies have documented the presence of insulin resistance in patients with chemical diabetes, the possibility exists that insulin

  9. Lifestyle Risk Factors and New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Kamineni, Aruna; Carnethon, Mercedes; Djoussé, Luc; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Siscovick, David

    2010-01-01

    Background The combined impact of lifestyle factors on incidence of diabetes mellitus later in life is not well established. The objective of this study was to determine how lifestyle factors, assessed in combination, relate to new-onset diabetes in a broad and relatively unselected population of older adults. Methods We prospectively examined associations of lifestyle factors, measured using repeated assessments later in life, with incident diabetes mellitus during a 10-year period (1989–1998) among 4883 men and women 65 years or older (mean [SD] age at baseline, 73[6] years) enrolled in the Cardiovascular Health Study. Low-risk lifestyle groups were defined by physical activity level (leisure-time activity and walking pace) above the median; dietary score (higher fiber intake and polyunsaturated to saturated fat ratio, lower trans-fat intake and lower mean glycemic index) in the top 2 quintiles; never smoked or former smoker more than 20 years ago or for fewer than 5 pack-years; alcohol use (predominantly light or moderate); body mass index less than 25 (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared); and waist circumference of 88 cm for women or 92 cm for men. The main outcome measure was incident diabetes defined annually by new use of insulin or oral hypoglycemic medications. We also evaluated fasting and 2-hour postchallenge glucose levels. Results During 34 539 person-years, 337 new cases of drug-treated diabetes mellitus occurred (9.8 per 1000 person-years). After adjustment for age, sex, race, educational level, and annual income, each lifestyle factor was independently associated with incident diabetes. Overall, the rate of incident diabetes was 35% lower (relative risk, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.59–0.71) for each 1 additional lifestyle factor in the low-risk group. Participants whose physical activity level and dietary, smoking, and alcohol habits were all in the low-risk group had an 82% lower incidence of diabetes

  10. A new structural approach to genomic discovery of disease: example of adult-onset diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sirovich, Lawrence

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of disease discovery from genomic data, by methods which depart substantially from customary practices found in the investigation of genome-wide association studies. Such data in general are composed of the genomic content from two contrasting phenotypes, e.g., disease versus control populations, and the analysis proceeds under the hypothesis that populational dissimilarities might reveal disease risk alleles. The proposed suite of new methods is in part based on information theory (Shannon in Bell Syst Tech J 27:379-423, 1948a; Bell Syst Tech J 27:623-656, 1948b; Jaynes in Phys Rev 106:620-630, 1957), and strong evidence will be given of the effectiveness of this new approach. The methodology extends naturally and successfully to predicting genomic disposition to disease arising from large collections of weakly contributing genomic loci. Evidence will be advanced that the example of adult-onset diabetes ("type 2 diabetes") is such a candidate disease, and in this case, probably for the first time, it can be demonstrated that disease prediction is possible. Another novel element of this study is the search and identification of potential beneficial genomic loci that may counter a disease. The generality of the methodology suggests that it might extend to other diseases.

  11. Clinically Relevant Cognitive Impairment in Middle-Aged Adults With Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nunley, Karen A.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Jennings, J. Richard; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Zgibor, Janice C.; Costacou, Tina; Boudreau, Robert M.; Miller, Rachel; Orchard, Trevor J.; Saxton, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the presence and correlates of clinically relevant cognitive impairment in middle-aged adults with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS During 2010–2013, 97 adults diagnosed with T1D and aged <18 years (age and duration 49 ± 7 and 41 ± 6 years, respectively; 51% female) and 138 similarly aged adults without T1D (age 49 ± 7 years; 55% female) completed extensive neuropsychological testing. Biomedical data on participants with T1D were collected periodically since 1986–1988. Cognitive impairment status was based on the number of test scores ≥1.5 SD worse than demographically appropriate published norms: none, mild (only one test), or clinically relevant (two or more tests). RESULTS The prevalence of clinically relevant cognitive impairment was five times higher among participants with than without T1D (28% vs. 5%; P < 0.0001), independent of education, age, or blood pressure. Effect sizes were large (Cohen d 0.6–0.9; P < 0.0001) for psychomotor speed and visuoconstruction tasks and were modest (d 0.3–0.6; P < 0.05) for measures of executive function. Among participants with T1D, prevalent cognitive impairment was related to 14-year average A1c >7.5% (58 mmol/mol) (odds ratio [OR] 3.0; P = 0.009), proliferative retinopathy (OR 2.8; P = 0.01), and distal symmetric polyneuropathy (OR 2.6; P = 0.03) measured 5 years earlier; higher BMI (OR 1.1; P = 0.03); and ankle-brachial index ≥1.3 (OR 4.2; P = 0.01) measured 20 years earlier, independent of education. CONCLUSIONS Clinically relevant cognitive impairment is highly prevalent among these middle-aged adults with childhood-onset T1D. In this aging cohort, chronic hyperglycemia and prevalent microvascular disease were associated with cognitive impairment, relationships shown previously in younger populations with T1D. Two additional potentially modifiable risk factors for T1D-related cognitive impairment, vascular health and BMI

  12. Trans-Palmitoleic Acid, Metabolic Risk Factors, and New-Onset Diabetes in US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Cao, Haiming; King, Irena B.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Song, Xiaoling; Siscovick, David S.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Palmitoleic acid (cis-16:1n-7), produced by endogenous fat synthesis, has been linked to both beneficial and deleterious metabolic effects, potentially confounded by diverse determinants and tissue sources of endogenous production. Trans-palmitoleate (trans-16:1n-7) represents a distinctly exogenous source of 16:1n-7, unconfounded by endogenous synthesis or its determinants, that may be uniquely informative. Objective We investigated whether circulating trans-palmitoleate was independently related to lower metabolic risk and incident type2 diabetes. Design Prospective cohort study (1992–2006). Setting Four US communities. Patients 3,736 adults in the Cardiovascular Health Study. Measurements Plasma phospholipid fatty acids, anthropometry, blood lipids, inflammatory markers, and glucose-insulin levels were measured at baseline in 1992; and diet, 3 years earlier. In multivariable-adjusted models, we investigated how demographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors independently related to trans-palmitoleate; how trans-palmitoleate related to major metabolic risk factors; and how trans-palmitoleate related to new-onset diabetes (304 incident cases). We validated findings for metabolic risk factors in an independent cohort of 327 women. Results In multivariable-analyses, whole-fat dairy consumption was most strongly associated with higher trans-palmitoleate. Higher trans-palmitoleate was associated with slightly lower adiposity and, independently, higher high-density-lipoprotein(HDL)-cholesterol (across quintiles: +1.9%, P=0.04), lower triglycerides (−19.0%, P<0.001), lower total:HDL-cholesterol (−4.7%, P<0.001), lower C-reactive protein (−13.8%, P=0.05), and lower insulin resistance (−16.7%, P<0.001). Trans-palmitoleate was associated with substantially lower incidence of diabetes, with multivariable-hazard-ratios=0.41 (95%CI=0.27–0.64) and 0.38 (95%CI=0.24–0.62) in quintile-4 and quintile-5, versus quintile-1 (P-trend<0.001). Findings were

  13. Posttraumatic stress disorder and new-onset diabetes among adult survivors of the World Trade Center disaster.

    PubMed

    Miller-Archie, Sara A; Jordan, Hannah T; Ruff, Ryan R; Chamany, Shadi; Cone, James E; Brackbill, Robert M; Kong, Joanne; Ortega, Felix; Stellman, Steven D

    2014-09-01

    To explore the temporal relationship between 9/11-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and new-onset diabetes in World Trade Center (WTC) survivors up to 11 years after the attack in 2001. Three waves of surveys (conducted from 2003 to 2012) from the WTC Health Registry cohort collected data on physical and mental health status, sociodemographic characteristics, and 9/11-related exposures. Diabetes was defined as self-reported, physician-diagnosed diabetes reported after enrollment. After excluding prevalent cases, there were 36,899 eligible adult enrollees. Logistic regression and generalized multilevel growth models were used to assess the association between PTSD measured at enrollment and subsequent diabetes. We identified 2143 cases of diabetes. After adjustment, we observed a significant association between PTSD and diabetes in the logistic model [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-1.44]. Results from the growth model were similar (AOR 1.37, 95% CI 1.23-1.52). This exploratory study found that PTSD, a common 9/11-related health outcome, was a risk factor for self-reported diabetes. Clinicians treating survivors of both the WTC attacks and other disasters should be aware that diabetes may be a long-term consequence. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Profile of mood states in adult type 1 diabetes mellitus men and women with disease onset in childhood and in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lašaitė, Lina; Ostrauskas, Rytas; Žalinkevičius, Rimantas; Jurgevičienė, Nijolė; Radzevičienė, Lina

    2015-03-01

    Although diabetes may not be associated with psychopathology, it may be associated with less severe disturbances in psychosocial functioning. Emotional problems in relation to type 1 diabetes are usually analysed as symptoms of psychiatric conditions but not as states of mood. The aim was to compare profiles of mood states in adult patients with childhood-onset and adulthood-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus and to outline possible gender-specific differences. A total of 214 adult type 1 diabetic patients were randomly selected from the Lithuanian Diabetes Registry. The mood states were compared in 105 (42 men and 63 women) patients with type 1 diabetes diagnosed during 0-18 years of life and in 109 (61 men and 48 women) diagnosed in adulthood. The scores of tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, anger-hostility, vigour-activity, fatigue-inertia and confusion-bewilderment were evaluated using the Profile of Mood States. Depression-dejection was higher in adulthood-onset diabetic women than in childhood-onset (p=0.005) diabetic patients. In childhood-onset diabetic patients depression-dejection (p=0.046) and confusion-bewilderment (p=0.033) were higher in women than in men. Adulthood-onset women with diabetes had higher tension-anxiety (p=0.027), depression-dejection (p=0.001), and confusion-bewilderment (p=0.004) scores than men. Multiple logistic analyses showed that adulthood-onset period of type 1 diabetes is associated with higher levels of depression-dejection [OR=1.1; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.01-1.19, p=0.025], longer diabetes duration (OR=2.00; 95% CI 1.27-2.03, p=0.012), higher HbA1c level (OR=1.15; 95% CI 1.02-1.3, p=0.023), and female gender (OR=2.51; 95% CI 1.29-2.90, p=0.021). Profile of mood states in adult women with type 1 diabetes is worse than in men. Adulthood-onset type 1 diabetic women have higher depression-dejection than do childhood-onset diabetic patients. Adulthood-onset period of type 1 diabetes is associated with higher levels of

  15. Sex-specific associations of low birth weight with adult-onset diabetes and measures of glucose homeostasis: Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health

    PubMed Central

    Yarmolinsky, James; Mueller, Noel T; Duncan, Bruce B; Chor, Dóra; Bensenor, Isabela M; Griep, Rosane H; Appel, Lawrence J; Barreto, Sandhi M; Schmidt, Maria Inês

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests sex differences in the early origins of adult metabolic disease, but this has been little investigated in developing countries. We investigated sex-specific associations between low birth weight (LBW; <2.5 kg) and adult-onset diabetes in 12,525 participants from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Diabetes was defined by self-reported information and laboratory measurements. In confounder-adjusted analyses, LBW (vs. 2.5–4 kg) was associated with higher prevalence of diabetes in women (Prevalence Ratio (PR) 1.54, 95% CI: 1.32–1.79), not in men (PR 1.06, 95% CI: 0.91–1.25; Pheterogeneity = 0.003). The association was stronger among participants with maternal diabetes (PR 1.60, 95% CI: 1.35–1.91), than those without (PR 1.15, 95% CI: 0.99–1.32; Pheterogeneity = 0.03). When jointly stratified by sex and maternal diabetes, the association was observed for women with (PR 1.77, 95% CI: 1.37–2.29) and without (PR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.20–1.75) maternal diabetes. In contrast, in men, LBW was associated with diabetes in participants with maternal diabetes (PR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.15–1.83), but not in those without (PR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.74–1.14). These sex-specific findings extended to continuous measures of glucose homeostasis. LBW was associated with higher diabetes prevalence in Brazilian women, and in men with maternal diabetes, suggesting sex-specific intrauterine effects on adult metabolic health. PMID:27845438

  16. Adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients display decreased IGRP-specific Tr1 cells in blood.

    PubMed

    Chujo, Daisuke; Nguyen, Thien-Son; Foucat, Emile; Blankenship, Derek; Banchereau, Jacques; Nepom, Gerald T; Chaussabel, Damien; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    The breakdown of immune tolerance against islet antigens causes type 1 diabetes (T1D). The antigens associated with adult-onset T1D (AT1D) remain largely undefined. It is possible that AT1D patients display a unique type of CD4(+) T cells specific for a certain islet antigen. Here we analyzed the cytokine production profiles of CD4(+) helper T (Th) cells that are specific for three islet antigens; GAD65, preproinsulin, and IGRP in patients with AT1D, juvenile-onset T1D (JT1D), and age-, gender- and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched control adults. While IGRP-specific Th cells in AT1D patients were dominantly Th1 cells, IGRP-specific Th cells in control adults and JT1D patients were dominantly Th2 and T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells. Notably, the frequency of IGRP-specific Tr1 cells was significantly lower in AT1D patients than in control adults and JT1D patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that IGRP-specific Th cells play a unique pathogenic role in AT1D.

  17. Identifying Early Onset of Hearing Loss in Young Adults With Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Using High Frequency Audiometry.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, S S; Jaya, V; Moses, Anand; Muraleedharan, A

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder caused by hyperglycemia which leads to dysfunction of various organs. Hearing acuity is equally hindered by this disorder. Among individuals with DM audiological characteristics of DM type 1 are of great concern in the literature. This study aims at establishing high frequency audiometry (HFA) as a useful tool in identifying early onset of hearing loss in individuals with DM type 2. 20 non-diabetic participants and 20 individuals with DM type 2 in the age range of 20-40 years were considered for the study. Subjects in both groups underwent otoscopic examination, PTA at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 kHz and HFA at 9, 10, 11.2, 12.5, 14 and 16 kHz. Results revealed statistically significant difference in thresholds of both PTA and HFA at all frequencies across the group, but the mean threshold difference between the diabetic and non-diabetic group was marked in HFA than in PTA. In the diabetic subjects the thresholds of PTA was within 25 dBHL at all frequencies when compared to the thresholds of HFA. Individuals with DM type 2 showed bilateral symmetrical mild hearing loss in HFA and the hearing loss increased with ascending test frequencies from 9,000 to 16,000 Hz. Mild hearing loss in HFA is an indicator for early onset of hearing loss in DM type 2. Hence this present study emphasis the clinical utility of HFA in young adults with DM type 2.

  18. Relative contribution of type 1 and type 2 diabetes loci to the genetic etiology of adult-onset, non-insulin-requiring autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rajashree; Chesi, Alessandra; Cousminer, Diana L; Hawa, Mohammad I; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Hodge, Kenyaita M; Guy, Vanessa C; Hakonarson, Hakon; Mauricio, Didac; Schloot, Nanette C; Yderstræde, Knud B; Voight, Benjamin F; Schwartz, Stanley; Boehm, Bernhard O; Leslie, Richard David; Grant, Struan F A

    2017-04-25

    In adulthood, autoimmune diabetes can present as non-insulin-requiring diabetes, termed as 'latent autoimmune diabetes in adults' (LADA). In this study, we investigated established type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) genetic loci in a large cohort of LADA cases to assess where LADA is situated relative to these two well-characterized, classic forms of diabetes. We tested the association of T1D and T2D GWAS-implicated loci in 978 LADA cases and 1057 non-diabetic controls of European ancestry using a linear mixed model. We then compared the associations of T1D and T2D loci between LADA and T1D and T2D cases, respectively. We quantified the difference in genetic risk between each given disease at each locus, and also calculated genetic risk scores to quantify how genetic liability to T1D and T2D distinguished LADA cases from controls. Overall, our results showed that LADA is genetically more similar to T1D, with the exception of an association at the T2D HNF1A locus. Several T1D loci were associated with LADA, including the major histocompatibility complex region, as well as at PTPN22, SH2B3, and INS. Contrary to previous studies, the key T2D risk allele at TCF7L2 (rs7903146-T) had a significantly lower frequency in LADA cases, suggesting that this locus does not play a role in LADA etiology. When constrained on antibody status, the similarity between LADA and T1D became more apparent; however, the HNF1A and TCF7L2 observations persisted. LADA is genetically closer to T1D than T2D, although the genetic load of T1D risk alleles is less than childhood-onset T1D, particularly at the major histocompatibility complex region, potentially accounting for the later disease onset. Our results show that the genetic spectrum of T1D extends into adult-onset diabetes, where it can clinically masquerade as T2D. Furthermore, T2D genetic risk plays a small role in LADA, with a degree of evidence for the HNF1A locus, highlighting the potential for genetic risk scores to

  19. Fractures associated with neuropathic arthropathy in adults who have juvenile-onset diabetes.

    PubMed

    Clohisy, D R; Thompson, R C

    1988-09-01

    Eighteen patients, twenty-five to fifty-two years old, who had juvenile-onset diabetes, had neuropathic arthropathy and fractures at the ankle or tarsus, most of which were bilateral. After a minimum follow-up of one year, four patients could not walk and fourteen were dependent on orthoses. In nine patients, the lesions produced fixed skeletal deformities that caused severe malum perforans, which in three patients was so severe that a below-the-knee amputation had to be done. In patients who had bilateral lesions, when the extremity that was initially involved was prevented from bearing weight, involvement of the contralateral limb became evident after an average of 4.5 months, compared with an average of twelve months in the patients who were allowed weight-bearing on the extremity that was initially involved. Our current treatment protocol is non-weight-bearing immobilization of the involved extremity, and we recommend prophylactic immobilization of the contralateral extremity with a protective cast or orthosis. All of the patients who had this treatment regimen could walk; in contrast, of the eleven patients who were not so treated, four could not walk.

  20. Adult onset retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Pan, Utsab; Khetan, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor of childhood presenting usually before 5 years of age. RB in adults older than 20 years is extremely rare. A literature search using PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases revealed only 45 cases till date. Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of such reports, indicating heightened level of suspicion among ophthalmologists. Compared to its pediatric counterpart, adult onset RB poses unique challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This article summarizes available literature on adult onset RB and its clinical and pathologic profile, genetics, association with retinocytoma, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes. PMID:27609158

  1. Adult-onset Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Amrinder Jit

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset atopic dermatitis is still an under recognized condition as there are only few studies regarding this entity. As compared to childhood onset atopic dermatitis, clinical features of adult onset atopic dermatitis are still not categorized. Adult atopic dermatitis can present for the first time in adult age with atypical morphology or may progress from childhood onset. This article reviews the characteristic clinical features of adult atopic dermatitis, associated risk factors and management. PMID:27904186

  2. Primary treatment regimen and diabetes insipidus as predictors of health outcomes in adults with childhood-onset craniopharyngioma.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Kevin C J; Kołtowska-Häggström, Maria; Cook, David M; Fox, Janet L; Jönsson, Peter J; Geffner, Mitchell E; Abs, Roger

    2014-04-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are often associated with significant morbidity due to their location and treatment effects. Little is known of the effects of primary treatment regimen and diabetes insipidus (DI), a clinical surrogate of hypothalamic obesity, on health outcomes in adults with childhood-onset craniopharyngioma (COCP). The objective of the study was to examine health outcomes of adults with COCP based on primary treatment regimens and the presence of DI. This study included a retrospective KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database) data analysis of 180 adults with COCP according to the primary treatment regimen [one surgery (1Surg) vs complex treatment regimen (CTrR) of more than 1Surg and/or radiotherapy] and the presence of DI. The majority of COCP patients underwent transcranial surgery (77%) without receiving radiotherapy (84%). Compared with the 1Surg group, more CTrR patients developed visual field defects and ophthalmoplegia (all P < .01). Compared with patients without DI, those with DI had higher rates of anterior pituitary hormone deficits, body mass index, and fat mass (all P < .01). By contrast, fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, lipid panel, and quality of life were comparable among 1Surg vs CTrR patients, and patients with vs without DI. Regardless of primary treatment received, the presence of DI in either group was associated with higher rates of anterior pituitary hormone deficits and obesity. CTrR and DI predicted health outcomes differently. CTrR predisposed to the development of visual dysfunction, whereas DI was associated with higher rates of anterior pituitary dysfunction and weight gain. Higher body mass index and fat mass in patients with DI further implicate the role of hypothalamic damage as an important causal factor of obesity in these patients.

  3. [Early onset diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Busiah, K; Vaivre-Douret, L; Yachi, C; Cavé, H; Polak, M

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus is a rare condition (1/90,000 to 1/260,000 live births) defined as mild-to-severe hyperglycemia within the first year of life. Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus requires lifelong therapy, whereas transient form resolves early in life but may relapse later on. Two main physiopathological mechanisms may explain this disease: β cell functional impairment or absence (pancreas agenesis or β cells destruction). The main genetic causes of β cells impairment are 6q24 abnormalities and mutations in ABCC8 or KCNJ11 potassium channel (KATP channel) genes. Compared to the KATP subtype, the 6q24 subtype had specific features: developmental defects involving the heart, kidneys, or urinary tract, intrauterine growth restriction, and early diagnosis. Remission of neonatal diabetes mellitus occurred in 51% of probands at a median age of 17 weeks. Recurrence was common at pubertal age, with no difference between the 6q24 and KATP-channel groups (82% vs 86%, p=0.36, respectively). Patients with mutations in ABCC8 or KCNJ11 genes had developmental delay with or without epilepsy but also developmental coordination disorder (particularly visual-spatial dyspraxia) or attention deficits in all of those who underwent in-depth neuropsychomotor investigations.

  4. Brief report: depression and history of suicide attempts in adults with new-onset Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Myers, Alyson K; Grannemann, Bruce D; Lingvay, Ildiko; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2013-11-01

    To assess past suicide attempts in a cohort of adults with Type 2 Diabetes diagnosed within the prior 24 months. Outpatients were recruited from diabetes education classes or diabetes shared medical appointment. Participants aged 18 or over with a self-reported diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM) in the prior 24 months completed questionnaires about medical (including diabetes), psychiatric, and social history. Participants also completed two screening questionnaires for depression: Patient Health Questionnaire 9 and the Questionnaire Inventory for Depressive Symptoms-Self Report. Those who screened positive for depression had confirmatory testing with a clinician administered Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) checklist. In this convenience sample of 145 patients with Type 2 Diabetes, 9.7% of patients had history of a suicide attempt and 38.2% met diagnosis for major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients with MDD were more likely to have a history of suicide attempts than those without MDD (p=0.0002). Of the patients with prior suicide attempts, 50% screened positive for MDD at the time of the survey. In patients with newly-diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes the rate of past suicide attempts was nearly 10%, which is twice the rate seen in the general population. The rate of past suicide attempts in currently depressed patients with diabetes is 21.8%. These findings suggest the need for monitoring patients with diabetes and depression for future suicide risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychogenic Stuttering of Adult Onset.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahr, Greg; Leith, William

    1992-01-01

    The characteristic features of psychogenic stuttering of adult onset are reviewed, and four cases of this disorder are presented. Psychogenic stuttering of adult onset is classified as a conversion reaction, and tentative criteria for this diagnosis are proposed. (Author/JDD)

  6. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: Different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, M.G.; Nelson, I.; Sweeney, M.G.; Cooper, J.M.; Watkins, P.J.; Morgan-Hughes, J.A.; Harding, A.E.

    1995-05-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Socioeconomic factors, rather than diabetes mellitus per se, contribute to an excessive use of antidepressants among young adults with childhood onset type 1 diabetes mellitus: a register-based study.

    PubMed

    Lind, T; Waernbaum, I; Berhan, Y; Dahlquist, G

    2012-03-01

    Mood disorders, including depression, are suggested to be prevalent in persons with type 1 diabetes and may negatively affect self-management and glycaemic control and increase the risk of diabetic complications. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of antidepressant (AD) use in adults with childhood onset type 1 diabetes and to compare risk determinants for AD prescription among diabetic patients and a group of matched controls. Young adults ≥ 18 years on 1 January 2006 with type 1 diabetes (n = 7,411) were retrieved from the population-based Swedish Childhood Diabetes Registry (SCDR) and compared with 30,043 age- and community-matched controls. Individual level data were collected from the Swedish National Drug Register (NDR), the Hospital Discharge Register (HDR) and the Labor Market Research database (LMR). ADs were prescribed to 9.5% and 6.8% of the type 1 diabetes and control subjects, respectively. Female sex, having received economic or other social support, or having a disability pension were the factors with the strongest association with AD prescription in both groups. Type 1 diabetes was associated with a 44% (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.32, 1.58) higher risk of being prescribed ADs in crude analysis. When adjusting for potential confounders including sex, age and various socioeconomic risk factors, this risk increase was statistically non-significant (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.99, 1.21). The risk factor patterns for AD use are similar among type 1 diabetic patients and controls, and socioeconomic risk factors, rather than the diabetes per se, contribute to the increased risk of AD use in young adults with type 1 diabetes.

  8. Adult-onset food allergy.

    PubMed

    Kivity, Shmuel

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of food allergy is increasing in both the pediatric and adult populations. While symptom onset occurs mostly during childhood, there are a considerable number of patients whose symptoms first begin to appear after the age of 18 years. The majority of patients with adult-onset food allergy suffer from the pollen-plant allergy syndromes. Many of them manifest their allergy after exercise and consuming food to which they are allergic. Eosinophilic esophagitis, an eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus affecting individuals of all ages, recently emerged as another allergic manifestation, with both immediate and late response to the ingested food. This review provides a condensed update of the current data in the literature on adult-onset allergy.

  9. Impact of birth weight on adult-onset diabetes mellitus in relation to current body mass index: The Japan Nurses' Health Study.

    PubMed

    Katanoda, Kota; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Goto, Atsushi; Mizunuma, Hideki; Lee, Jung Su; Hayashi, Kunihiko

    2017-09-01

    Although birth weight is considered as a fetal determinant of the development of adult-onset diabetes mellitus (DM), its public health importance relative to adult body mass index (BMI) remains unclear. We aimed to examine the association between adult-onset DM and birth weight in relation to adult BMI. We conducted a self-administered questionnaire as a baseline survey of the Japanese Nurses' Health Study cohort between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria were applied to the volunteer sample of 49,927 female nurses (age <30 years or unknown, current pregnancy, development of DM before the age of 30 years, unknown core variables), and data from 26,949 female nurses aged 30 years or older were used. The association between history of DM diagnosis and birth weight was analyzed using logistic regression. A linear inverse association was observed between birth weight and DM, after adjustment for age, BMI, and parental history of DM. The odds ratio for developing DM per 100 g increase in birth weight was 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90-0.96). The association was unchanged when birth weight was converted to percentile for gestational age. In the BMI-stratified analysis, the odds ratio for DM in the <2500 g birth weight group reached 4.75 (95% CI, 1.22-18.44, compared to the reference 3000-3499 g group) among women with normal low BMI (18.5-20.9). Birth weight and its percentile for gestational age were associated with adult-onset DM. Attention should be paid to the risk of DM among women born with low weight, even when their current BMI is normal. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. HLA DRB1, DQB1 and insulin promoter VNTR polymorphisms: interactions and the association with adult-onset diabetes mellitus in Czech patients.

    PubMed

    Cejkova, P; Novota, P; Cerna, M; Kolostova, K; Novakova, D; Kucera, P; Novak, J; Andel, M; Weber, P; Zdarsky, E

    2008-04-01

    leads to T1DM and LADA development as well as a more diverse genetic predisposition in juvenile- and adult-onset diabetes. The simultaneous effect of HLA and INS-VNTR alleles/genotypes predispose individuals to an increased risk of diabetes development.

  11. Treating young adults with type 2 diabetes or monogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Owen, Katharine R

    2016-06-01

    It is increasingly recognised that diabetes in young adults has a wide differential diagnosis. There are many monogenic causes, including monogenic beta-cell dysfunction, mitochondrial diabetes and severe insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes in the young is becoming more prevalent, particularly after adolescence. It's important to understand the clinical features and diagnostic tools available to classify the different forms of young adult diabetes. Classic type 1 diabetes is characterised by positive β-cell antibodies and absence of endogenous insulin secretion. Young type 2 diabetes is accompanied by metabolic syndrome with obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Monogenic β-cell dysfunction is characterised by non-autoimmune, C-peptide positive diabetes with a strong family history, while mitochondrial diabetes features deafness and other neurological involvement. Severe insulin resistance involves a young-onset metabolic syndrome often with a disproportionately low BMI. A suspected diagnosis of monogenic diabetes is confirmed with genetic testing, which is widely available in specialist centres across the world. Treatment of young adult diabetes is similarly diverse. Mutations in the transcription factors HNF1A and HNF4A and in the β-cell potassium ATP channel components cause diabetes which responds to low dose and high dose sulfonylurea agents, respectively, while glucokinase mutations require no treatment. Monogenic insulin resistance and young-onset type 2 diabetes are both challenging to treat, but first line management involves insulin sensitisers and aggressive management of cardiovascular risk. Outcomes are poor in young-onset type 2 diabetes compared to both older onset type 2 and type 1 diabetes diagnosed at a similar age. The evidence base for treatments in monogenic and young-onset type 2 diabetes relies on studies of moderate quality at best and largely on extrapolation from work conducted in older type 2 diabetes subjects. Better quality

  12. Adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sola, J.; Casademont, J.; Grau, J. M.; Graus, F.; Cardellach, F.; Pedrol, E.; Urbano-Marquez, A.

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are polymorphic entities which may affect many organs and systems. Skeletal muscle involvement is frequent in the context of systemic mitochondrial disease, but adult-onset pure mitochondrial myopathy appears to be rare. We report 3 patients with progressive skeletal mitochondrial myopathy starting in adult age. In all cases, the proximal myopathy was the only clinical feature. Mitochondrial pathology was confirmed by evidence of ragged-red fibres in muscle histochemistry, an abnormal mitochondrial morphology in electron microscopy and by exclusion of other underlying diseases. No deletions of mitochondrial DNA were found. We emphasize the need to look for a mitochondrial disorder in some non-specific myopathies starting in adult life. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1589382

  13. Islet autoantibodies can discriminate maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) from Type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    McDonald, T J; Colclough, K; Brown, R; Shields, B; Shepherd, M; Bingley, P; Williams, A; Hattersley, A T; Ellard, Sian

    2011-09-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young is a monogenic form of familial, young-onset diabetes. It is rare (∼1% diabetes) and may be misdiagnosed as Type 1 diabetes and inappropriately treated with insulin. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the presence of islet autoantibodies, including glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and islet antigen-2 (IA-2) antibodies. The prevalence of islet autoantibodies is unknown in maturity-onset diabetes of the young and may have the potential to differentiate this form of diabetes from Type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of GAD and IA-2 antibodies in patients with maturity-onset diabetes of the young and Type 1 diabetes. We measured plasma GAD and IA-2 antibodies in 508 patients with the most common forms of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (GCK: n = 227; HNF1A: n = 229; HNF4A: n = 52) and 98 patients with newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes (diagnosed < 6 months). Autoantibodies were considered positive if ≥ 99th centile of 500 adult control subjects. GAD and/or IA-2 antibodies were present in 80/98 (82%) patients with Type 1 diabetes and 5/508 (< 1%) patients with maturity-onset diabetes of the young. In the cohort with Type 1 diabetes, both GAD and IA-2 antibodies were detected in 37.8% of patients, GAD only in 24.5% and IA-2 only in 19.4%. All five patients with maturity-onset diabetes of the young with detectable antibodies had GAD antibodies and none had detectable IA-2 antibodies. The prevalence of GAD and IA-2 antibodies in maturity-onset diabetes of the young is the same as in control subjects (< 1%). The finding of islet autoantibodies, especially IA-2 antibodies, makes the diagnosis of maturity-onset diabetes of the young very unlikely and genetic testing should only be performed if other clinical characteristics strongly suggest this form of diabetes rather than Type 1 diabetes. This supports routine islet autoantibody testing before proceeding to more expensive molecular genetic testing

  14. Adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    van de Putte, L B; Wouters, J M

    1991-08-01

    Adult onset Still's disease seems to be the adult form of Still's disease in children. The key symptoms of the disease are high spiking fever, arthritis and a macular or maculopapular, salmon-pink evanescent rash, almost always accompanied by neutrophilic leukocytosis and frequently by sore throat, intense myalgias, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and signs of serositis. Tests for IgM rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody are characteristically negative. With respect to haematologic abnormalities, the disease may give rise to several problems. First, there is a neutrophilic leukocytosis, which currently is unexplained, and often a normocytic normochromic anaemia, that may be profound. The anaemia has the characteristics of anaemia of chronic inflammatory disease. Both abnormalities disappear after effective treatment of the disease or at spontaneous remission. Secondly, there might be a problem to differentiate AOSD from malignant haematological disorders, including malignant lymphoma and leukaemia, especially when the picture is dominated by lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, fever and leukocytosis. Although in rare cases the differential diagnosis is extremely difficult, diagnosis can mostly be made or excluded by peripheral blood smear staining, bone marrow biopsies and occasionally lymph node biopsy. Finally, like the juvenile counterpart, AOSD is occasionally complicated by sometimes life-threatening diffuse intravascular coagulation. Factors that might be important in the development of this complication include severe disease activity, liver abnormalities and particular drugs including salicylates, other NSAIDs and some slow-acting antirheumatic drugs. Prompt therapy, including withdrawal of the drug, corticosteroids and sometimes anticoagulant therapy have been successfully applied to most patients.

  15. The association of childhood adversities and early onset mental disorders with adult onset chronic physical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kate M.; Von Korff, Michael; Angermeyer, Matthias C.; Benjet, Corina; Bruffaerts, Ronny; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Haro, Josep Maria; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Ormel, Johan; Posada-Villa, José; Tachimori, Hisateru; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Context The physical health consequences of childhood psychosocial adversities may be as substantial as the mental health consequences but whether this is the case remains unclear because much prior research has involved unrepresentative samples and a selective focus on particular adversities or physical outcomes. The association between early onset mental disorders and subsequent poor physical health in adulthood has not been investigated. Objective To investigate whether childhood adversities and early onset mental disorders are independently associated with increased risk of a range of adult onset chronic physical conditions in culturally diverse samples spanning the full adult age range. Design Cross-sectional community surveys of adults in ten countries. Setting General population. Participants Adults (>= 18 years; n = 18,303), with diagnostic assessment and determination of age of onset of DSM-IV mental disorders; assessment of childhood familial adversities; and age of diagnosis/onset of chronic physical conditions. Main Outcome Measures Risk (hazard ratios) of adult onset (> age 20) heart disease, asthma, diabetes, arthritis, chronic spinal pain, and chronic headache as a function of specific childhood adversities and early onset (< age 21) DSM-IV depressive and anxiety disorders, with mutual adjustment. Results A history of three or more childhood adversities was independently associated with onset of all six physical conditions (hazard ratios from 1.44–2.19). Controlling for current mental disorder made little difference to these associations. Early onset mental disorders were independently associated with onset of five physical conditions (hazard ratios from 1.43–1.66). Conclusions These results are consistent with the hypothesis that childhood adversities and early onset mental disorders have independent, broad spectrum effects that increase risks of diverse chronic physical conditions in later life. They require confirmation in a prospective design

  16. Refraction in adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Klein, Barbara E K; Lee, Kristine E; Klein, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    To examine refraction, change in refraction, and risk factors for change in refraction in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Population-based study. Modified Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study refractions and a standard history were obtained for all participants. Baseline and 10-year follow-up data were available. Age and education were significantly associated with refraction in persons with younger-onset diabetes (T1D) and in those with older-onset diabetes (T2D); refractions were similar for both groups. Persons of similar age with T1D were likely to be more myopic than were those with T2D (P < .01). In those with T1D, on average, there was a -0.28-diopter (D) change in refraction in 10 years. Those with longer duration of diabetes and proliferative retinopathy were more likely to have hyperopic shifts in refraction. In persons with T2D, there was, on average, a +0.48-D change in refraction during the 10 years, but there was little consistency in the amount of change by age at baseline. In persons of similar age, those with T1D were likely to be slightly more myopic than were those with T2D. Overall, mean refraction and the important risk factors of age and education were similar to those reported in nondiabetic populations.

  17. Adult-Onset Still Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Hot, Arnaud; Iwaz, Jean; Ninet, Jacques; Durieu, Isabelle; Broussolle, Christiane; Sève, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We conducted a retrospective observational study to describe a cohort and identify the prognostic factors in adult-onset Still disease (AOSD). Patients enrolled in this retrospective chart review fulfilled either Yamaguchi or Fautrel criteria. Candidate variables were analyzed with logistic unadjusted and adjusted regression models. Fifty-seven patients were seen in the internal medicine (75%) and rheumatology (25%) departments over a mean period of 8.4 years. The median time to diagnosis was 4 months. The course of AOSD was monocyclic in 17 patients, polycyclic in 25, and chronic in 15. The assessment of glycosylated ferritin (GF) in 37 patients was correlated with early diagnosis. Nine 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18FDG-PET) scans identified the lymph nodes and glands as the main sites of hypermetabolism. Complications were frequent (n = 19), including reactive hemophagocytic syndrome (n = 8). None of the 3 deaths could be attributed to AOSD. Corticosteroid dependence, as predicted by a low GF level, occurred in 23 patients (45%). A quarter of the patients received tumor necrosis factor-α blockers or anakinra with good tolerance. Fever >39.5°C was predictive of monocyclic AOSD, while arthritis and thrombocytopenia were associated with chronic and complicated AOSD, respectively. The youngest patients had the highest risks of resistance to first-line treatments. AOSD remains difficult to diagnose. Mortality is low despite frequent complications. GF and 18FDG-PET scans were of value in the diagnostic approach. The condition in highly symptomatic patients evolved to systemic AOSD, whereas more progressive patterns with arthritis predicted chronic AOSD. PMID:24646465

  18. Social relationships among young adults with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: ten-year follow-up of an onset cohort.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, A M; Hauser, S T; Cole, C; Willett, J B; Wolfsdorf, J I; Dvorak, R; Wolpert, H; Herman, L; de Groot, M

    1997-01-01

    Past cross-sectional studies have suggested that young adults with insulin-dependent (Type 1) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) may experience problems in their close peer relationships. For 10 years, we have followed an onset cohort of children and adolescents with IDDM (n = 57) and an age-matched group who were originally recruited after an acute illness, accident, or injury (n = 54). Now aged 19-26 years, these two groups were compared in terms of their friendship patterns, dating and love experiences, and sense of loneliness. All subjects in both groups had at least one friend. However, the IDDM group reported fewer friendships overall. The difference was accounted for by the number of less intimate friends. The two groups had similar frequencies of current romantic partners (IDDM = 63%; comparison group = 64%). While dating attitude and dating assertiveness did not differ between groups, some differences were found in terms of experiences of a primary love relationship. IDDM patients experienced less trust and sense of intimate friendship in these love relationships. No differences in loneliness were found. The preponderance of our findings indicate that the two groups had similar patterns and experiences of close peer relationships. Thus, the study does not suggest that IDDM leads to serious problems in forming social relationships for these patients during the transition to young adulthood. On the other hand, the IDDM patients' lower level of trust and intimacy within love relationships are consistent with other findings from this study suggesting specific areas of lowered self-worth that appear in social relationships.

  19. Refraction in Adults with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Barbara E. K.; Lee, Kristine E.; Klein, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Objective(s) Examine refraction, change in refraction, and risk factors for change in refraction in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Methods Population based study. Modified Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study refractions and a standard history were obtained for all participants. Baseline and ten-year follow-up data were available. Results Age was significantly associated with refraction in persons with younger-onset diabetes (T1D) and those with older-onset diabetes (T2D); refractions were similar for both groups. Persons of similar age with T1D were likely to be more myopic than those with T2D (P<.01). Years of education were significantly associated with more myopic refraction (P<.0001). In those with T1D on average there was a −.35 diopter (D) change in refraction over 10 years. However, there was a systematic decrease in myopic shift with increasing age at baseline. Those with longer duration of diabetes and with proliferative retinopathy were more likely to have hyperopic shifts in refraction. In those with T2D there was, on average, a +.25D change in refraction over the 10 years but there was little consistency in the amount of change by age at baseline. There were no other significant effects on change in refraction in this group. Conclusions In persons of similar age, those with T1D are likely to be slightly more myopic than those with T2D. Overall, mean refractions and the important risk factors of age and education are similar to those reported in non-diabetic populations. PMID:21220629

  20. Specific Intellectual Deficits in Children with Early Onset Diabetes Mellitus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovet, Joanne F.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Compares 27 children with early onset diabetes (EOD) with 24 children with late onset diabetes (LOD) and 30 sibling controls in performance on tests of intellectual functioning and school achievement. Results revealed that duration of illness, age of onset, and hypoglycemic convulsions significantly predicted spatial ability. (Author/RWB)

  1. [Adult-onset rare diseases].

    PubMed

    Pfliegler, György; Kovács, Erzsébet; Kovács, György; Urbán, Krisztián; Nagy, Valéria; Brúgós, Boglárka

    2014-03-02

    The present paper is focusing on rare diseases manifesting in late childhood or adulthood. A part of these syndromes are not of genetic origin, such as relatively or absolutely rare infections, autoimmune diseases, tumours, or diseases due to rare environmental toxic agents. In addition, even a large proportion of genetic disorders may develop in adulthood or may have adult forms as well, affecting are almost each medical specialization. Examples are storage disorders (e.g. adult form of Tay-Sachs disease, Gaucher-disease), enzyme deficiencies (e.g. ornithin-transcarbamylase deficiency of the urea cycle disorders), rare thrombophilias (e.g. homozygous factor V. Leiden mutation, antithrombin deficiency), or some rare monogenic disorders such as Huntington-chorea and many others. It is now generally accepted that at least half of the 6-8000 "rare diseases" belong either to the scope of adult-care (e.g. internal medicine, neurology), or to "age-neutral" specialities such as ophtalmology, dermatology etc.).

  2. Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Page Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Ravi V. Shah , Allison B. Goldfine Download ... initiation in at-risk patients. Can Statins Cause Diabetes Mellitus? Careful review of findings from many trials ...

  3. Type 2 diabetes in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Lascar, Nadia; Brown, James; Pattison, Helen; Barnett, Anthony H; Bailey, Clifford J; Bellary, Srikanth

    2017-08-25

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in adolescents and young adults is dramatically increasing. Similar to older-onset type 2 diabetes, the major predisposing risk factors are obesity, family history, and sedentary lifestyle. Onset of diabetes at a younger age (defined here as up to age 40 years) is associated with longer disease exposure and increased risk for chronic complications. Young-onset type 2 diabetes also affects more individuals of working age, accentuating the adverse societal effects of the disease. Furthermore, evidence is accumulating that young-onset type 2 diabetes has a more aggressive disease phenotype, leading to premature development of complications, with adverse effects on quality of life and unfavourable effects on long-term outcomes, raising the possibility of a future public health catastrophe. In this Review, we describe the epidemiology and existing knowledge regarding pathophysiology, risk factors, complications, and management of type 2 diabetes in adolescents and young adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of Adult Onset Seizures.

    PubMed

    Crepeau, Amy Z; Sirven, Joseph I

    2017-02-01

    Epilepsy is a common yet heterogeneous disease. As a result, management often requires complex decision making. The ultimate goal of seizure management is for the patient to have no seizures and no considerable adverse effects from the treatment. Antiepileptic drugs are the mainstay of therapy, with more than 20 medications currently approved in the United States. Antiepileptic drug selection requires an understanding of the patient's epilepsy, along with consideration of comorbidities and potential for adverse events. After a patient has failed at least 2 appropriate antiepileptic drugs, they are determined to be medically refractory. At this time, additional therapy, including dietary, device, or surgical treatments, need to be considered, typically at a certified epilepsy center. All these treatments require consideration of the potential for seizure freedom, balanced against potential adverse effects, and can have a positive effect on seizure control and quality of life. This review article discussed the treatment options available for adults with epilepsy, including medical, surgical, dietary, and device therapies. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Diabetes: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke Urinary Incontinence Related Documents PDF Choosing Wisely: Diabetes Tests and Treatments Download Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Diabetes Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ...

  6. Adult onset tics after peripheral injury.

    PubMed

    Erer, Sevda; Jankovic, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    We describe a case with adult onset motor tics after peripheral trauma. A 43-year-old man suffered a left shoulder dislocation during a motorcycle accident 21 years ago. Within 2 weeks after the injury, he noticed the gradual onset of involuntary jerking movements of his left shoulder, which was markedly exacerbated after second left shoulder injury 2 years later. The involuntary movements are phenomenologically identical to tics typically associated with Tourette syndrome (TS), but without the involvement of any other body part and without phonic tics or the typical TS co-morbidities, such as attention deficit or obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  7. Onset of autoimmune type 1 diabetes during pregnancy: Prevalence and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wucher, Hélène; Lepercq, Jacques; Timsit, José

    2010-08-01

    Although this has been recently challenged, gestational diabetes mellitus (gestational diabetes) is still defined as an "impairment of glucose tolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy". According to this definition, all pathophysiological conditions leading to beta cell deficiency may reveal as gestational diabetes, due to the physiological insulin resistance associated with pregnancy. In rare patients, gestational diabetes is associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies and with a high risk of progression to overt type 1 diabetes after delivery. This condition has often been compared to the Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults. The frequency of islet autoantibodies in gestational diabetes has been assessed in many studies, but data about the clinical presentation of this subtype and about its prognosis are few. We review these studies and discuss the links of autoimmune gestational diabetes with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Early onset type 2 diabetes in Jamaica and in Mexico. Opportunities derived from an interethnic study.

    PubMed

    Irving, Rachael; Tusié-Luna, Ma Teresa; Mills, James; Wright-Pascoe, Rosemarie; McLaughlin, Wayne; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A

    2011-01-01

    Populations with Amerindian or African heritages are the one with the highest prevalence of diabetes worldwide. A large percentage of these individuals survived famine. However, the survival effect has become detrimental to their descendents living in an environment of caloric surplus. In countries, like Mexico and Jamaica, in which diabetes is highly prevalent, the onset of the disease happens at earlier ages. Our objective is to summarize diabetes data from Mexico and Jamaica and to discuss the opportunities that can result from an interethnic study. On one hand, the prevalence of diabetes in Jamaica is 17.9% in the 15+ age group. Jamaican researchers have built a cohort of families with early onset type 2 diabetes. In this population, this form of the disease is unrelated to MODY genes. On the other hand, the prevalence of diabetes in adult Mexicans is 14.4%. The group in which the greater percentual changes have occurred is the adults who are below the age of 40. More than two thirds of the early onset cases studied have a body mass index that is >25 kg/m2 and the clinical characteristics of metabolic syndrome. A minority of them has mutations in the MODY genes. The joint study of Mexican and Jamaican cohorts of early onset type 2 diabetes cases will be useful to identify new genetic and environmental players in the pathogenesis of this entity.

  9. Labor market consequences of childhood onset type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Persson, Sofie; Gerdtham, Ulf-G; Steen Carlsson, Katarina

    2016-12-01

    This paper examines the effect of the onset of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) before 15 years of age on labor market outcomes and contributes to the literature on effects of childhood health on adult socioeconomic status. Using national Swedish socioeconomic register data 1991-2010 for 2485 individuals born 1972-1978 with onset of T1DM in 1977-1993, we find that T1DM in childhood has a negative effect on labor market outcomes later in life. Part of the T1DM effect is channeled through occupational field which may be related to both choice and opportunities. Although the magnitude of the effect is only directly generalizable to illnesses with similar attributes as T1DM, the results suggest that causality in the often observed correlation between health and socioeconomic status, at least partly, is explained by an effect running from health to earnings. This has implications for research and policy on strategies to reduce socioeconomic-related health inequality. Our findings also shed light on productivity losses, measured by employment status and earnings due to childhood onset T1DM, which have implications for both the individual and society. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Infantile onset diabetes mellitus in developing countries - India.

    PubMed

    Varadarajan, Poovazhagi

    2016-03-25

    Infantile onset diabetes mellitus (IODM) is an uncommon metabolic disorder in children. Infants with onset of diabetes mellitus (DM) at age less than one year are likely to have transient or permanent neonatal DM or rarely type 1 diabetes. Diabetes with onset below 6 mo is a heterogeneous disease caused by single gene mutations. Literature on IODM is scanty in India. Nearly 83% of IODM cases present with diabetic keto acidosis at the onset. Missed diagnosis was common in infants with diabetes (67%). Potassium channel mutation with sulphonylurea responsiveness is the common type in the non-syndromic IODM and Wolcott Rallison syndrome is the common type in syndromic diabetes. Developmental delay and seizures were the associated co-morbid states. Genetic diagnosis has made a phenomenal change in the management of IODM. Switching from subcutaneous insulin to oral hypoglycemic drugs is a major clinical breakthrough in the management of certain types of monogenic diabetes. Mortality in neonatal diabetes is 32.5% during follow-up from Indian studies. This article is a review of neonatal diabetes and available literature on IODM from India.

  11. Infantile onset diabetes mellitus in developing countries - India

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, Poovazhagi

    2016-01-01

    Infantile onset diabetes mellitus (IODM) is an uncommon metabolic disorder in children. Infants with onset of diabetes mellitus (DM) at age less than one year are likely to have transient or permanent neonatal DM or rarely type 1 diabetes. Diabetes with onset below 6 mo is a heterogeneous disease caused by single gene mutations. Literature on IODM is scanty in India. Nearly 83% of IODM cases present with diabetic keto acidosis at the onset. Missed diagnosis was common in infants with diabetes (67%). Potassium channel mutation with sulphonylurea responsiveness is the common type in the non-syndromic IODM and Wolcott Rallison syndrome is the common type in syndromic diabetes. Developmental delay and seizures were the associated co-morbid states. Genetic diagnosis has made a phenomenal change in the management of IODM. Switching from subcutaneous insulin to oral hypoglycemic drugs is a major clinical breakthrough in the management of certain types of monogenic diabetes. Mortality in neonatal diabetes is 32.5% during follow-up from Indian studies. This article is a review of neonatal diabetes and available literature on IODM from India. PMID:27022444

  12. Adult-onset opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klaas, James P; Ahlskog, J Eric; Pittock, Sean J; Matsumoto, Joseph Y; Aksamit, Allen J; Bartleson, J D; Kumar, Rajeev; McEvoy, Kathleen F; McKeon, Andrew

    2012-12-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about adult-onset opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) outside of individual case reports. OBJECTIVE To describe adult-onset OMS. DESIGN Review of medical records (January 1, 1990, through December 31, 2011), prospective telephone surveillance, and literature review (January 1, 1967, through December 31, 2011). SETTING Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. PATIENTS Twenty-one Mayo Clinic patients and 116 previously reported patients with adult-onset OMS. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Clinical course and longitudinal outcomes. RESULTS The median age at onset of the 21 OMS patients at the Mayo Clinic was 47 years (range, 27-78 years); 11 were women. Symptoms reported at the first visit included dizziness, 14 patients; balance difficulties, 14; nausea and/or vomiting, 10; vision abnormalities, 6; tremor/tremulousness, 4; and altered speech, 2. Myoclonus distribution was extremities, 15 patients; craniocervical, 8; and trunk, 4. Cancer was detected in 3 patients (breast adenocarcinoma, 2; and small cell lung carcinoma, 1); a parainfectious cause was assumed in the remainder of the patients. Follow-up of 1 month or more was available for 19 patients (median, 43 months; range, 1-187 months). Treatment (median, 6 weeks) consisted of immunotherapy and symptomatic therapy in 16 patients, immunotherapy alone for 2, and clonazepam alone for 1. Of these 19 patients, OMS remitted in 13 and improved in 3; 3 patients died (neurologic decline, 1; cancer, 1; and myocardial infarction, 1). The cause of death was of paraneoplastic origin in 60 of 116 literature review patients, with the most common carcinomas being lung (33 patients) and breast (7); the most common antibody was antineuronal nuclear antibody type 2 (anti-Ri, 15). Other causes were idiopathic in origin, 38 patients; parainfectious, 15 (human immunodeficiency virus, 7); toxic/metabolic, 2; and other autoimmune, 1. Both patients with N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody had

  13. Osteoporosis in juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus: morphometric and comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Soejima, K; Landing, B H

    1986-01-01

    Ribs and vertebrae of 8 children and young adults aged from 17 months to 24 years with juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, 4 with diabetes secondary to cystic fibrosis and 2 with diabetes secondary to thalassemia major, were analyzed for osteoporosis by a point-count morphometric method. The mean ratio of bone spicule to marrow space in cancellous bone of ribs of patients with juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus or with diabetes mellitus secondary to cystic fibrosis or thalassemia was 55% that of 10 control patients. The lengths of the zones of proliferating and mature cartilage cells in costal epiphyses of patients with juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus were also below normal. The ratio of bone spicule to marrow space of vertebrae of the diabetic patients was not significantly different from control values. The data confirm clinical reports that osteoporosis is a regular feature of juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and suggest that the degree of bone matrix and mineral deficiency in such patients is greater than is usually considered.

  14. Diabetic emergencies in adults.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tina

    In this article the author discusses three diabetic emergencies: diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar non-ketotic syndrome and hypoglycaemia, which all require prompt recognition and appropriate intervention.

  15. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Type 2 Diabetes Widespread in Adults Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table ... pre-diabetes have an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, and for ...

  16. Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  17. Adult-onset offenders: Is a tailored theory warranted?

    PubMed Central

    Beckley, Amber L.; Caspi, Avshalom; Harrington, Honalee; Houts, Renate M.; Mcgee, Tara Renae; Morgan, Nick; Schroeder, Felix; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe official adult-onset offenders, investigate their antisocial histories and test hypotheses about their origins. Methods We defined adult-onset offenders among 931 Dunedin Study members followed to age 38, using criminal-court conviction records. Results Official adult-onset offenders were 14% of men, and 32% of convicted men, but accounted for only 15% of convictions. As anticipated by developmental theories emphasizing early-life influences on crime, adult-onset offenders’ histories of antisocial behavior spanned back to childhood. Relative to juvenile-offenders, during adolescence they had fewer delinquent peers and were more socially inhibited, which may have protected them from conviction. As anticipated by theories emphasizing the importance of situational influences on offending, adult-onset offenders, relative to non-offenders, during adulthood more often had schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and alcohol-dependence, had weaker social bonds, anticipated fewer informal sanctions, and self-reported more offenses. Contrary to some expectations, adult-onset offenders did not have high IQ or high socioeconomic-status families protecting them from juvenile conviction. Conclusions A tailored theory for adult-onset offenders is unwarranted because few people begin crime de novo as adults. Official adult-onset offenders fall on a continuum of crime and its correlates, between official non-offenders and official juvenile-onset offenders. Existing theories can accommodate adult-onset offenders. PMID:27134318

  18. Diabetes mellitus in older adults.

    PubMed

    Mooradian, Arshag D; Chehade, Joe M

    2012-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus increases with age and causes significant morbidity and poor quality of life in older adults. To review the current literature on the diagnosis and management of diabetes in the elderly, the relevant manuscripts were identified through a MEDLINE (2000-September 1, 2010) search of the English literature. The key phrase used was diabetes in older adults or diabetes in the elderly. The literature search was limited to core clinical journals that have accessible full texts. A total of 480 manuscripts were reviewed. Managing diabetes in older adults is a challenging task. Some features of the disease are unique to the older patient. Several new antidiabetic agents are now available for clinical use, and yet very few clinical trials have been carried out in this age group. For many older adults, maintaining independence is more important than adherence to published guidelines to prevent diabetes complications. The goals of diabetes care in older adults are to enhance quality of life without subjecting the residents to inappropriate interventions.

  19. Phenotypes, Risk Factors, and Mechanisms of Adult-Onset Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ilmarinen, Pinja; Tuomisto, Leena E.; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with many phenotypes, and age at disease onset is an important factor in separating the phenotypes. Genetic factors, atopy, and early respiratory tract infections are well-recognized factors predisposing to childhood-onset asthma. Adult-onset asthma is more often associated with obesity, smoking, depression, or other life-style or environmental factors, even though genetic factors and respiratory tract infections may also play a role in adult-onset disease. Adult-onset asthma is characterized by absence of atopy and is often severe requiring treatment with high dose of inhaled and/or oral steroids. Variety of risk factors and nonatopic nature of adult-onset disease suggest that variety of mechanisms is involved in the disease pathogenesis and that these mechanisms differ from the pathobiology of childhood-onset asthma with prevailing Th2 airway inflammation. Recognition of the mechanisms and mediators that drive the adult-onset disease helps to develop novel strategies for the treatment. The aim of this review was to summarize the current knowledge on the pathogenesis of adult-onset asthma and to concentrate on the mechanisms and mediators involved in establishing adult-onset asthma in response to specific risk factors. We also discuss the involvement of these mechanisms in the currently recognized phenotypes of adult-onset asthma. PMID:26538828

  20. Age at Transition from Pediatric to Adult Care Has No Relationship with Mortality for Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes in Japan: Diabetes Epidemiology Research International (DERI) Mortality Study

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Yoshiko; Nishimura, Rimei; Morimoto, Aya; Sano, Hironari; Utsunomiya, Kazunori; Tajima, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    Objective To follow up Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes for a maximum of 40 years to examine when they transitioned from pediatric care to adult care and to explore whether the attending physician, i.e., pediatrician or internist, was associated with prognosis. Methods Participants consisted of 1,299 patients who had been diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes at less than 15 years old between 1965 and 1979 identified through two nationwide surveys. Patients were classified as having received either pediatric care or adult care at the age of 15 and 30, and were compared for differences in mortality associated with the attending physician. Results The attending physicians were confirmed for a total of 1,093 patients at the age of 15. Of these patients, 43.8% and 40.3% received pediatric care and adult care, respectively. Of the 569 patients receiving pediatric care, 74.2%, 56.6%, 53.4%, and 51.3% continued with pediatric care at 20, 30, 40, and 50 years old, respectively. The attending physicians (pediatrician or internist) at the age of 15 and 30 had no significant impact on their survival (P = 0. 892, 0.411, respectively). Conclusions More than half of the patients who had received pediatric care at the age of 15 continued to receive pediatric care even after the age of 30, suggesting that their transition was far from smooth, while the attending physician at the age of both 15 and 30 was not a prognostic factor for mortality. Thus, the timing for transition to adult care in these patients has no relationship with mortality in Japan. PMID:26937952

  1. Antihypertensive therapy, new-onset diabetes, and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Basile, J N

    2009-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a worldwide epidemic with considerable health and economic consequences. Diabetes is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death in diabetic patients, and decreasing the incidence of diabetes may potentially reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease. This article discusses the clinical trial evidence for modalities associated with a reduction in the risk of new-onset diabetes, with a focus on the role of antihypertensive agents that block the renin–angiotensin system. Lifestyle interventions and the use of antidiabetic, anti-obesity, and lipid-lowering drugs are also reviewed. An unresolved question is whether decreasing the incidence of new-onset diabetes with non-pharmacologic or pharmacologic intervention will also lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. A large ongoing study is investigating whether the treatment with an oral antidiabetic drug or an angiotensin-receptor blocker will reduce the incidence of new-onset diabetes and cardiovascular disease in patients at high risk for developing diabetes. PMID:19220522

  2. Psychological Conditions in Adults With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Mary; Golden, Sherita Hill; Wagner, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 (T1D) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) represent a demanding set of biopsychosocial challenges for patients and their families, whether the age of disease onset occurs in childhood, adolescence, or adulthood. Psychological conditions, defined as syndromes, disorders, and diabetes-specific psychological issues affect a larger proportion of individuals with T1D and T2D compared to the general population. In this review, we summarize the prevalence, impact and psychological treatments associated with the primary categories of psychological conditions that affect adults with T1D and T2D: depressive symptoms and syndromes, anxiety disorders, eating behaviors and disorders and serious mental illness. The implications of the literature for psychologists are discussed, and priorities for future research to advance the science of psychological conditions for adults with T1D and T2D are identified. PMID:27690484

  3. Refractory Coats’ Disease of Adult Onset

    PubMed Central

    Beselga, D.; Campos, A.; Mendes, S.; Carvalheira, F.; Castro, M.; Castanheira, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We present the case of an 18-year-old Caucasian male with a unilateral macular star and retinal vascular anomalies compatible with adult onset Coats’ disease. Methods Diagnosis was based on fundoscopic, fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography findings. Results The patient presented to our emergency department with complaints of low vision in his left eye (LE) detected 10 days before. The best-corrected visual acuity in the LE was 20/50. Fundoscopy of the LE evidenced a complete macular star. Optical coherence tomography showed increased retinal thickness, infiltration of the retinal wall, and detachment of the neuroepithelium. Angiography revealed no appreciable diffusion in the macula. Above the superior temporal (ST) arcade, anomalies in the retinal vasculature were found, with interruption of the peripheral vessels and vessels which were ‘sausage’-like. After 1 month, the LE vision evolved to hand movements. Laser photocoagulation was performed in the ST quadrant. Intravitreal injection of bevacizumab 1.25 mg/0.05 ml and photodynamic therapy were performed without any significant changes, progression of ST serous detachment of the neuroepithelium, and finally progression to macular fibrosis. Discussion Coats’ disease is usually diagnosed in childhood, but rare cases may occur in adults. Those cases usually have a more indolent course which was not observed in our patient. When there is macular involvement, prognosis is more guarded, despite treatment. PMID:22548045

  4. Similarity of HLA-DQ profiles in adult-onset type 1 insulin-dependent diabetic patients with and without extra-pancreatic auto-immune disease.

    PubMed

    Gu, X F; Larger, E; Clauser, E; Assan, R

    1992-01-01

    Some insulin-dependent diabetic patients present with auto-immune diseases involving extra pancreatic tissues (type 1b diabetes mellitus). The genetic specificity of this syndrome, as opposed to insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) free of such associations (Type 1a IDDM) is not clearly established. We have analyzed the HLA-DQB1 and DQA1, loci, after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, in 44 Type 1b IDDM patients, 78 Type 1a IDDM patients and 105 control subjects. No essential difference in HLA-DQ profiles appeared between Type 1b and Type 1a IDDM patients. Both diabetic groups displayed a significant enrichment in DQB1 alleles negative for aspartate at position 57 (Type 1b: 83%; Type 1a: 89%; controls 48%; p < 0.001 vs both patient groups) and in DQB1 Asp 57 negative homozygosity: 71% of Type 1b; 80% of Type 1a; 25% of controls (p < 0.01). This enrichment in DQB1 Asp 57 negative alleles was accounted for by DQB1* 0201 in the Type 1b group, and by DQB1 % 0201 and 0302 in the Type 1a patients. Conversely, alleles DQB1* 0602 and 0301 (DQB1 Asp 57 positive) were protective. Both diabetic groups also displayed a significant enrichment in DQA1 alleles positives for arginine at position 52 (65% of Type 1b; 76% of Type 1a; 50% of control subjects; p < 0.01 and 0.001, respectively, vs controls), and in DQA1 Arg 52 positive homozygotes (48% of Type 1b, 58% of Type 1a, 22% of control subjects; p < 0.01). All differences between diabetic groups and the control group were more pronounced in the case of Type 1a than of Type 1b patients. The HLA-DQ genes shared by Type 1a and Type 1b patients must therefore be closely associated with islet autoimmunity. Genetic differences between Type 1a and Type 1b syndromes, if any, must be investigated in other MHC and non-MHC regions of the genome.

  5. Myocarditis in adult-onset still disease.

    PubMed

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Sève, Pascal; Iwaz, Jean; Gagnard, Anne; Broussolle, Christiane; Durieu, Isabelle; Ninet, Jacques; Hot, Arnaud

    2014-10-01

    This study highlights the clinical features, treatments, and outcomes of the rare myocarditis in adult-onset Still disease (AOSD). Among a case series of 57 patients fulfilling either Yamaguchi or Fautrel AOSD criteria and seen between 1998 and 2010, we identified 4 cases of myocarditis. From a comprehensive literature review, we collected 20 additional cases of myocarditis-complicated AOSD. The characteristics of patients with myocarditis were compared with those of AOSD patients without myocarditis.In these 24 myocarditis-complicated AOSD cases, myocarditis occurred early and was present at AOSD onset in 54% of the cases. Myocarditis was often symptomatic (96% of patients) with nonspecific electrocardiographic abnormalities (79% of patients) and a left ventricle ejection fraction ≤50% (67% of patients). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsies showed features consistent with myocarditis in 4 patients and a mononuclear interstitial inflammatory infiltrate in 4 others. Steroids alone were effective in 50% of patients with myocarditis. Intravenous immunoglobulins, methotrexate, and tumor necrosis factor-α-blockers were also prescribed and often found effective. Only 1 patient died from cardiogenic shock. Patients with myocarditis-complicated AOSD were younger and more frequently male than patients with AOSD alone. Pericarditis was more frequent in the myocarditis group; white blood cell count, polymorphonuclear cell count, and serum ferritin levels were also higher.Myocarditis is a potentially life-threatening complication of AOSD but responds positively to steroids and other immunomodulatory drugs. Its prognosis remains good (only 1 death occurred), but the condition requires close monitoring of heart function.

  6. Myocarditis in Adult-Onset Still Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Sève, Pascal; Iwaz, Jean; Gagnard, Anne; Broussolle, Christiane; Durieu, Isabelle; Ninet, Jacques; Hot, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study highlights the clinical features, treatments, and outcomes of the rare myocarditis in adult-onset Still disease (AOSD). Among a case series of 57 patients fulfilling either Yamaguchi or Fautrel AOSD criteria and seen between 1998 and 2010, we identified 4 cases of myocarditis. From a comprehensive literature review, we collected 20 additional cases of myocarditis-complicated AOSD. The characteristics of patients with myocarditis were compared with those of AOSD patients without myocarditis. In these 24 myocarditis-complicated AOSD cases, myocarditis occurred early and was present at AOSD onset in 54% of the cases. Myocarditis was often symptomatic (96% of patients) with nonspecific electrocardiographic abnormalities (79% of patients) and a left ventricle ejection fraction ≤50% (67% of patients). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsies showed features consistent with myocarditis in 4 patients and a mononuclear interstitial inflammatory infiltrate in 4 others. Steroids alone were effective in 50% of patients with myocarditis. Intravenous immunoglobulins, methotrexate, and tumor necrosis factor-α-blockers were also prescribed and often found effective. Only 1 patient died from cardiogenic shock. Patients with myocarditis-complicated AOSD were younger and more frequently male than patients with AOSD alone. Pericarditis was more frequent in the myocarditis group; white blood cell count, polymorphonuclear cell count, and serum ferritin levels were also higher. Myocarditis is a potentially life-threatening complication of AOSD but responds positively to steroids and other immunomodulatory drugs. Its prognosis remains good (only 1 death occurred), but the condition requires close monitoring of heart function. PMID:25398063

  7. Update on differences between childhood-onset and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease and occurs worldwide in both children and adults. The estimated annual incidence among children is 2.22/100,000 and among adults is 23.2/100,000 in the United States. There is increasing understanding about differences in disease manifestations, medication use, and disease severity between those with childhood-onset SLE as compared with adult-onset SLE. Children have a more fulminant disease onset and course than adults with SLE, resulting in two to three times higher mortality. In future years, we anticipate more insight into the genetics between childhood-onset SLE and adult-onset SLE to help delineate the best therapies for both subsets of patients. PMID:23998441

  8. Obstetric Outcome in Early and Late Onset Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Easmin, S; Chowdhury, T A; Islam, M R; Beg, A; Jahan, M K; Latif, T; Dhar, S; Alam, M N; Akhter, M

    2015-07-01

    Obstetric outcome in early onset and late onset GDM was compared in a prospective study conducted at the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology in BIRDEM, Dhaka, Bangladesh. A total 120 pregnant women were recruited purposively for the study in which 60 were early onset GDM and 60 were late onset GDM during study period of January 2008 to December 2009. Patients were followed up in different periods of gestation, during delivery and early postpartum period & findings were compared between two groups. BMI & family history of diabetes were significantly higher in early GDM group (p<0.05). Evidence of increased glycaemia was observed in early GDM group & difference of glycaemic status was statistically significant (p<0.05). Insulin was needed in 85% of early onset GDM and 55% in late onset GDM. There was also significant difference (p<0.05). In this study, 23.3% of early onset GDM group developed pre-eclampsia while in late onset GDM it was 10% and was statistically significant (p<0.05). Regarding intrapartum & postpartum complications - perineal tear, PPH wound infection, puerperal sepsis were more in early onset than late onset GDM group with no significant difference. Regarding foetal outcome, 8.3% early GDM group delivered asphyxiated baby in comparison to 3.3% in late GDM group. Twenty percent (20%) of early onset GDM group had to admit their babies in neonatal unit while in late onset group it was 5%. There was significant difference between two groups (p<0.05). Neonatal hypoglycaemia was also statistically significantly (p<0.05) higher in early GDM group. Neonatal hyper-bilirubinaemia, RDS, perinatal death was more in early onset GDM subjects. Early onset GDM subjects are high risk subgroup & have significant deleterious effect on maternal and perinatal outcome than late GDM groups.

  9. Fetal origins of adult diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina

    2010-09-01

    According to the fetal origin of adult diseases hypothesis, the intrauterine environment through developmental plasticity may permanently influence long-term health and disease. Therefore, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), due either to maternal, placental, or genetic factors, may permanently alter the endocrine-metabolic status of the fetus, driving an insulin resistance state that can promote survival at the short term but that facilitates the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome in adult life, especially when the intrauterine nutrient restriction is followed by a postnatal obesogenic environment. Furthermore, an energy-rich environment during fetal programming may also drive the development of excess abdominal fat and type 2 diabetes in later life, demonstrating that both intrauterine nutrient restriction as well as intrauterine nutrient excessive supply may predispose for the development of adult diabetes. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Childhood Onset Schizophrenia: Cortical Brain Abnormalities as Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Deanna; Lerch, Jason; Shaw, Philip; Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay; Gochman, Peter; Rapoport, Judith; Gogtay, Nitin

    2006-01-01

    Background: Childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) is a rare but severe form of the adult onset disorder. While structural brain imaging studies show robust, widespread, and progressive gray matter loss in COS during adolescence, there have been no longitudinal studies of sufficient duration to examine comparability with the more common adult onset…

  11. Childhood Onset Schizophrenia: Cortical Brain Abnormalities as Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Deanna; Lerch, Jason; Shaw, Philip; Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay; Gochman, Peter; Rapoport, Judith; Gogtay, Nitin

    2006-01-01

    Background: Childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) is a rare but severe form of the adult onset disorder. While structural brain imaging studies show robust, widespread, and progressive gray matter loss in COS during adolescence, there have been no longitudinal studies of sufficient duration to examine comparability with the more common adult onset…

  12. Skin microvascular function in patients with type 1 diabetes: An observational study from the onset of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Santesson, Pia; Lins, Per-Eric; Kalani, Majid; Adamson, Ulf; Lelic, Isak; von Wendt, Gunvor; Fagrell, Bengt; Jörneskog, Gun

    2017-05-01

    The development of disturbances in skin microcirculation in type 1 diabetes is not well characterised. We assessed skin microcirculation longitudinally from the onset of diabetes up to 29 years of duration to investigate when such disturbances start. Seventeen adult patients with type 1 diabetes participated. Skin microvascular function in digit IV of the left hand was investigated by laser Doppler fluxmetry (LDF, arbitrary units [AU]). LDF was carried out at rest and following one-min arterial occlusion. Time to peak LDF (s) and percentage increase of LDF (post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia, PRH%) were determined. Retinopathy was assessed from fundus photographs or ophthalmoscopic recordings. Skin microvascular function remained normal during the first five years. Compared with baseline and a non-diabetic reference group, time to peak LDF was prolonged after 7-9 years of diabetes ( p < 0.01). PRH% was lower than in the reference group after 7-9 years ( p < 0.01), and lower than baseline after 24-29 years of diabetes ( p < 0.05). All but one patient developed retinopathy and the first signs were found after 10 years of diabetes. Functional disturbances in total skin microcirculation were observed after seven years in patients with type 1 diabetes and preceded diabetic complications such as retinopathy.

  13. Comparison of Age of Onset and Frequency of Diabetic Complications in the Very Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in elderly people has increased dramatically in the last few decades. This study was designed to clarify the clinical characteristics of type 2 diabetes in patients aged ≥80 years according to age of onset. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 289 patients aged ≥80 years with type 2 diabetes at the outpatient diabetes clinics of Kangwon National University Hospital from September 2010 to June 2014. We divided the patients into middle-age-onset diabetes (onset before 65 years of age) and elderly-onset diabetes (onset at 65+ years of age). Results There were 141 male and 148 female patients. The patients had a mean age of 83.2±2.9 years and the mean duration of diabetes was 14.3±10.4 years. One hundred and ninety-nine patients had elderly-onset diabetes. The patients with elderly-onset diabetes had a significantly lower frequency of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, lower serum creatinine levels, lower glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, and similar coronary revascularization and cerebral infarction rates compared to those with middle-age-onset diabetes. There was no frequency difference in coronary revascularization and cerebral infarction and HbA1c levels between three subgroups (<5, 5 to 15, and ≥15 years) of diabetes duration in elderly onset diabetes. However, both in the elderly onset diabetes and middle-age-onset diabetes, the cumulative incidence of retinopathy was increasing rapidly according to the duration of diabetes. Conclusion We report that individuals with elderly-onset diabetes have a lower frequency of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy and similar cardiovascular complications compared to those with middle-age-onset diabetes. PMID:27586451

  14. Is Adolescent-Onset First-Episode Psychosis Different from Adult Onset?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballageer, Trevor; Malla, Ashok; Manchanda, Rahul; Takhar, Jatinder; Haricharan, Raj

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether first-episode psychosis patients with onset during adolescence (ages 15-18) differ significantly from those with young-adult onset (ages 19-30). Method: Consecutive patients presenting with first-episode psychosis (N = 242) were assessed for demographic and illness characteristics such as duration of untreated…

  15. Is Adolescent-Onset First-Episode Psychosis Different from Adult Onset?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballageer, Trevor; Malla, Ashok; Manchanda, Rahul; Takhar, Jatinder; Haricharan, Raj

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether first-episode psychosis patients with onset during adolescence (ages 15-18) differ significantly from those with young-adult onset (ages 19-30). Method: Consecutive patients presenting with first-episode psychosis (N = 242) were assessed for demographic and illness characteristics such as duration of untreated…

  16. Predictability and Risk Factors for Development of New-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus After Transplant in the Saudi Population.

    PubMed

    Alshamsi, Shaikha; Basri, Nawal; Flaiw, Ahmed; Ghamdi, Ghormullah; Hejaili, Fayez; Shaheen, Faissal A M; Sheayria, Foud; Jaradat, Maha; Al Sayyari, Abdulla

    2016-06-01

    The study objective was to investigate the predictability and risk factors for the development of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after transplant in the Saudi population. This was a retrospective observational cohort study in adult kidney transplant recipients who developed new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after transplant. Patients with and without new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after transplant were compared for demographic factors, blood glucose levels at 4-hour intervals for 24 hours after transplant, and serum creatinine levels at 6 and 12 months after transplant. Of 279 patients included in our study, 15.5% developed new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after a mean follow-up of 4.6 ± 2.1 years after transplant. Patients with new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after transplant were significant older (P = .001), had a higher body mass index (P = .001), and had higher fasting blood glucose levels 24 hours after transplant (P = .03). No significant differences were observed regarding sex, transplant type, or serum creatinine levels at 6 and 12 months. Risk factors for new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after transplant are body mass index (P = .001; relative risk of 1.26), fasting blood glucose at 24 hours (P = .001; relative risk of 1.3), age (P = .001; relative risk of 1.44), and family history of diabetes mellitus (P = .001; relative risk of 31.3). Risk factors for developing new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus were age, heavier weight, body mass index, family history of diabetes mellitus, and having higher fasting blood glucose levels 24 hours after transplant, with family history of diabetes mellitus being an especially very high significant risk factor.

  17. Morphea in Adults and Children Cohort VI: A cross-sectional comparison of outcomes between adults with pediatric-onset and adult-onset morphea

    PubMed Central

    Condie, Daniel; Grabell, Daniel; Jacobe, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Few studies have looked at outcomes of adults with pediatric-onset morphea. The objective of the present study was to compare clinical outcomes and health-related quality of life in adults with pediatric-onset morphea to those of patients with adult-onset morphea. Methods Participants in the study were drawn from the Morphea in Adults and Children Cohort and included 68 adults with pediatric-onset morphea and 234 patients with adult-onset morphea. Outcome measures included the Localized Scleroderma Cutaneous Assessment Tool (LoSCAT), physical exam findings, and quality of life questionnaires. Results Adults with pediatric-onset morphea were younger, had longer disease duration, and were more likely to have the linear subtype of morphea. Patients with pediatric-onset disease were less likely to have active disease. Among patients with active disease, those with pediatric-onset morphea had less disease activity as measured by the LoSCAT. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had higher disease damage as measured by the Physician Global Assessment of Damage, but similar disease damage as measured by the Localized Scleroderma Skin Damage Index. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had more favorable quality of life scores for all measures that reached statistical significance. Conclusion Adults with pediatric-onset morphea differ from patients with adult-onset disease with respect to subtype, disease activity, disease damage, and health-related quality of life. PMID:25156342

  18. Dimethyl sulfoxide modulation of diabetes onset in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Chirra, A R; DeGruccio, A; Girman, D J

    1989-02-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a hydroxyl radical scavenger, is known as an immunosuppressive agent and can reduce autoantibody levels in experimental autoimmune diseases. Because classic diabetogens damage the DNA and membrane of the beta-cell by the generation of free radicals, the purpose of these investigations was to determine whether the intake of DMSO or its derivatives methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) could prevent the expression of autoimmune diabetes in the spontaneously diabetic NOD mouse. DMSO (2.5%), MSM (2.5%), and DMS (0.25%) were added to the drinking water of female NOD mice immediately after weaning. Control animals were maintained on regular drinking water. The presence of overt diabetes was monitored from the age of 2 mo by weekly urinary glucose testing until the animals either became overtly glucosuric or were greater than 240 days of age. In contrast to what we expected, DMSO (2.5%) markedly increased the rate at which the animals expressed overt diabetes (P less than .0004, log-rank test). MSM had no effect, whereas DMS reduced the incidence and rate of diabetes onset. When DMSO (2.5%) was administered to male NOD mice and control strains of mice (BALB/c and ICR), the control group did not develop glucosuria or insipidus, whereas DMSO increased the incidence of diabetes in the male NOD mice from 21 to 79%. In contrast, when DMSO was fed to female NOD mice on a purified AIN-76 diet, diabetes onset was reduced to 36%. We conclude that DMSO accelerates the uptake of dietary diabetogens into the beta-cell of genetically susceptible animals (NOD mice). The protective effect of the purified diet in such animals may be due to a lack of putative diabetogens in purified diet, or alternatively, the diet itself contains factor(s) that protect the beta-cell from autoimmune attack and/or destruction.

  19. Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Langille, Megan M; Islam, Talat; Burnett, Margaret; Amezcua, Lilyana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect pediatric patients. Our aim was to compare characteristics between pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanic Americans. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 363 Hispanic American multiple scleroses cases; demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. A total of 110 Hispanic patients presented with multiple sclerosis before age 18 and 253 as adult multiple sclerosis. The most common presenting symptoms for both was optic neuritis. Polyfocal symptoms, seizures, and cognitive symptoms at presentation were more prevalent in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Transverse myelitis was more frequent in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Using multivariable analysis, pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3OR 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.71, P = .004) and being US born (adjusted odds ratio, 0.553, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.03, P = .006) were less likely to have severe ambulatory disability. Results suggest that pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanics have differences that could be important for treatment and prognosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Diabetes knowledge among older adults with diabetes in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Gruber, Kenneth J; Liu, Huaping; Zhao, Hong; Garcia, Alexandra A

    2013-01-01

    To explore the relationships of demographic and clinical variables and attendance at diabetes educational programmes with diabetes knowledge among a community sample of older Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes residing in Beijing. Knowledge of diabetes is an important component of diabetes self-management. Level of education, duration of diabetes, visits to a dietician and diabetes self-management are associated with diabetes knowledge. A few studies have examined these relationships in older Chinese with diabetes. A descriptive correlational study. The study was conducted in face-to-face interviews with 108 older adults with type 2 diabetes and an average age of 68 (SD = 8·41) years residing in six residential apartment complexes in Beijing. Along with the assessment of diabetes knowledge and diabetes self-management, assessments of glucose, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were obtained. Age and systolic blood pressure were negatively associated with diabetes knowledge. Diabetes knowledge was not related to diabetes self-care activities or glucose level. A regression model with age, education and clinical variables significantly predicted diabetes knowledge, explaining 29% of the variance in knowledge. Participants who had a family history of diabetes, visited traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) doctors and ophthalmologists and attended diabetes educational programmes were more likely to have high scores on diabetes knowledge. Age, education, a family history of diabetes, visits to TCM providers and ophthalmologists and attending diabetes class are factors associated with increased levels of diabetes knowledge. Healthcare providers need to provide age-specific, low literacy and family-focused diabetes education programmes and consider integrating principles and holistic perspectives of TCM in diabetes educational programmes for older Chinese with diabetes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Youth-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus: lessons learned from the TODAY study.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Sumana; Weinstock, Ruth S

    2014-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasingly diagnosed in obese children and adolescents. Evidence suggests that this disease commonly progresses more rapidly in youth compared with adults and is associated with high rates of early microalbuminuria, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) study was the first multiethnic, multicenter randomized trial in the United States to compare 3 treatment approaches in obese youth with new-onset type 2 diabetes (n=699; ages 10-17 years): monotherapy with metformin, metformin with rosiglitazone, and metformin with an intensive lifestyle intervention. The primary outcome was glycemic control. Diabetes-related complications and cardiovascular risk factors were also examined. Approximately half of the participants could not maintain glycemic control by using metformin alone. Combination therapy with metformin and rosiglitazone resulted in better durability of glycemic control, and metformin plus intensive lifestyle intervention was intermediate but not superior to metformin alone. Deterioration in glycemic control was associated with rapid loss of beta cell function, not worsened insulin sensitivity, and could not be explained by differences in adherence or body mass index. After 3.9 years, 236 (33.8%) of participants had hypertension and 116 participants (16.6%) had microalbuminuria. Only 55.9% of participants had a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level less than 100 mg/dL (to convert to mmol/L, multiply by 0.0259) after 3 years, and 71 of 517 participants (13.7%) had retinopathy. The significance of the findings from this important trial for the management of youth and young adults with youth-onset type 2 diabetes and its complications is discussed. An aggressive multifaceted approach is needed to prevent or forestall premature microvascular and macrovascular complications in youth-onset type 2 diabetes.

  2. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diabetes Monogenic Forms of Diabetes Monogenic Forms of Diabetes The most common forms of diabetes, type 1 ... is inherited from each parent. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes Some rare forms of diabetes result from mutations ...

  3. Cerebellar pathology in childhood-onset vs. adult-onset essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Louis, Elan D; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Tate, William J; Kelly, Geoffrey C; Faust, Phyllis L

    2017-09-01

    Although the incidence of ET increases with advancing age, the disease may begin at any age, including childhood. The question arises as to whether childhood-onset ET cases manifest the same sets of pathological changes in the cerebellum as those whose onset is during adult life. We quantified a broad range of postmortem features (Purkinje cell [PC] counts, PC axonal torpedoes, a host of associated axonal changes [PC axonal recurrent collateral count, PC thickened axonal profile count, PC axonal branching count], heterotopic PCs, and basket cell rating) in 60 ET cases (11 childhood-onset and 49 adult-onset) and 30 controls. Compared to controls, childhood-onset ET cases had lower PC counts, higher torpedo counts, higher heterotopic PC counts, higher basket cell plexus rating, and marginally higher PC axonal recurrent collateral counts. The median PC thickened axonal profile count and median PC axonal branching count were two to five times higher in childhood-onset ET than controls, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. Childhood-onset and adult-onset ET had similar PC counts, torpedo counts, heterotopic PC counts, basket cell plexus rating, PC axonal recurrent collateral counts, PC thickened axonal profile count and PC axonal branching count. In conclusion, we found that childhood-onset and adult-onset ET shared similar pathological changes in the cerebellum. The data suggest that pathological changes we have observed in the cerebellum in ET are a part of the pathophysiological cascade of events in both forms of the disease and that both groups seem to reach the same pathological endpoints at a similar age of death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Glycemic control and insulin requirements in type 1 diabetic patients depending on the clinical characteristics at diabetes onset.

    PubMed

    Beato-Víbora, Pilar Isabel; Tormo-García, M Ángeles

    2014-01-01

    The long-term prognosis of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) was evaluated in relation to the clinical characteristics at the time of diabetes onset. We examined retrospectively the clinical and laboratory characteristics present at the time of diagnosis in 301 adult patients (187 men) consecutively admitted to hospital with T1DM onset and evaluated the clinical outcome of T1DM during 6 ± 4.8 years following diagnosis. Women needed a greater insulin dose per kg of body weight over the first 2 years following diagnosis. Younger patients at diagnosis had greater insulin requirements during follow-up. Patients with at least one positive pancreatic antibody needed a greater insulin dose 2 years after diagnosis and developed poorer glycemic control during follow-up than patients with no detectable pancreatic antibodies at onset. Diabetic ketoacidosis at onset was associated with greater insulin requirements over the first 2 years of follow-up and with poorer glycemic control during the course of the illness. C-peptide levels at diagnosis correlated with insulin requirements during the first 2 years of follow-up. Patients with higher HbA1c levels at diagnosis had greater insulin requirements in the first year of follow-up. A correlation was found between the HbA1c levels at the consecutive years of follow-up. Female sex, younger age, humoral pancreatic autoimmunity, diabetic ketoacidosis, lower pancreatic reserve and higher HbA1c levels at onset could predict a poor long-term clinical outcome of T1DM in terms of insulin requirements and glycemic control.

  5. Association between mental disorders and subsequent adult onset asthma.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jordi; de Jonge, Peter; Lim, Carmen C W; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Liu, Zhaorui; O'Neill, Siobhan; Stein, Dan J; Viana, Maria Carmen; Al-Hamzawi, Ali Obaid; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Borges, Guilherme; Ciutan, Marius; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Fiestas, Fabian; Haro, Josep Maria; Hu, Chiyi; Kessler, Ronald C; Lépine, Jean Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Posada-Villa, Jose; Wojtyniak, Bogdan J; Scott, Kate M

    2014-12-01

    Associations between asthma and anxiety and mood disorders are well established, but little is known about their temporal sequence. We examined associations between a wide range of DSM-IV mental disorders with adult onset of asthma and whether observed associations remain after mental comorbidity adjustments. During face-to-face household surveys in community-dwelling adults (n = 52,095) of 19 countries, the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Asthma was assessed by self-report of physician's diagnosis together with age of onset. Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent adult onset asthma, without and with comorbidity adjustment. 1860 adult onset (21 years+) asthma cases were identified, representing a total of 2,096,486 person-years of follow up. After adjustment for comorbid mental disorders several mental disorders were associated with subsequent adult asthma onset: bipolar (OR = 1.8; 95%CI 1.3-2.5), panic (OR = 1.4; 95%CI 1.0-2.0), generalized anxiety (OR = 1.3; 95%CI 1.1-1.7), specific phobia (OR = 1.3; 95%CI 1.1-1.6); post-traumatic stress (OR = 1.5; 95%CI 1.1-1.9); binge eating (OR = 1.8; 95%CI 1.2-2.9) and alcohol abuse (OR = 1.5; 95%CI 1.1-2.0). Mental comorbidity linearly increased the association with adult asthma. The association with subsequent asthma was stronger for mental disorders with an early onset (before age 21). A wide range of temporally prior mental disorders are significantly associated with subsequent onset of asthma in adulthood. The extent to which asthma can be avoided or improved among those with early mental disorders deserves study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Glucose Intolerance and Hyperlipidemia Prior to Diabetes Onset in Female Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) Rats

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Toshihiro; Sato, Kahei; Kanazawa, Yasunori

    2004-01-01

    The Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) rat, a newly established animal model for diabetes mellitus, presents nonobese type 2 diabetes with ocular complications. In the present study, oral glucose tolerance tests and biochemical and histopathological examinations were performed in female SDT rats at 16 and/or 25 weeks of age, before the onset of diabetes. At 25 weeks of age, glucose tolerance was significantly impaired, and plasma immunoreactive insulin levels at 120 min after glucose loading were significantly higher (P < 0.05). Body weight and fasting levels of plasma triglycerides and nonesterified fatty acids were significantly higher than those in control animals. Histopathologically, inflammatory cell infiltration and fibrosis were observed in and around the pancreatic islets. These results strongly suggest that female SDT rats are useful as a model to investigate impairment of glucose tolerance and hyperlipidemia prior to the onset of diabetes. PMID:15763939

  7. Age of Childhood Onset in Type 1 Diabetes and Functional Brain Connectivity in Midlife.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John P; Aizenstein, Howard J; Orchard, Trevor J; Ryan, Christopher M; Saxton, Judith A; Fine, David F; Nunley, Karen A; Rosano, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    The development of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) within the first 7 years of life has been linked to poorer cognitive performance. Adults with T1DM have altered functional brain connectivity, but no studies have examined whether earlier age of T1DM onset is associated with functional connectivity later in life. Accordingly, we tested the relationship between age of onset and resting state functional connectivity in a cohort of middle-aged adults with childhood-onset T1DM. Participants were from a subsample of the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications cohort and included 66 adults (mean age = 47.54 years, 32 men). Resting state blood oxygen level-dependent activity was used to calculate mean connectivity for eight functional brain networks. A multivariate analysis of variance examined associations between age of onset and network connectivity. Diffusion tensor and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images were analyzed to identify microstructural alterations and white-matter hyperintensity volumes. Later childhood onset of T1DM was associated with lower connectivity (F(8,57) = 2.40, p = .026). A significant interaction was present for current age such that an inverse association with age of onset for functional connectivity was present in older individuals (F(8,55) = 2.88, p = .035). Lower connectivity was associated with older age, increased white-matter hyperintensity volume, and lower microstructural integrity. Diagnosis of T1DM later in childhood may be associated with lower brain functional connectivity, particularly in those surviving into older ages. These alterations may be an early marker for subsequent cognitive decrements. Future studies are warranted to understand the pathways underlying these associations.

  8. Age of Childhood Onset in Type 1 Diabetes and Functional Brain Connectivity in Midlife

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John P.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Orchard, Trevor J.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Saxton, Judith A.; Fine, David F.; Nunley, Karen A.; Rosano, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Objective The development of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) within the first 7 years of life has been linked to poorer cognitive performance. Adults with T1DM have altered functional brain connectivity, but no studies have examined whether earlier age of T1DM onset is associated with functional connectivity later in life. Accordingly, we tested the relationship between age of onset and resting state functional connectivity in a cohort of middle-aged adults with childhood-onset T1DM. Methods Subjects were from a subsample of the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications cohort and included 66 adults (mean age = 47.54 years; 32 Male). Resting state blood oxygen level dependent activity was used to calculate mean connectivity for eight functional brain networks. A multivariate analysis of variance examined associations between age of onset and network connectivity. Diffusion tensor and fluid attenuated inversion recovery images were analyzed to identify microstructural alterations and white matter hyperintensity volumes. Results Later childhood onset of T1DM was associated with lower connectivity (F (8,57) = 2.40, p = .026). A significant interaction was present for current age such that an inverse association with age of onset for functional connectivity was present in older individuals (F (8,55) = 2.88, p = .035). Lower connectivity was associated with older age, increased white matter hyperintensity volume, and lower microstructural integrity. Conclusions Diagnosis of T1DM later in childhood may be associated with lower brain functional connectivity, particularly in those surviving into older ages. These alterations may be an early marker for subsequent cognitive decrements. Future studies are warranted to understand the pathways underlying these associations. PMID:26163816

  9. Reduced beta cell function in offspring of mothers with young-onset type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Pearson, E; Avery, P J; McCarthy, M I; Levy, J C; Hitman, G A; Sampson, M; Walker, M; Hattersley, A T

    2006-08-01

    Animal models indicate that even exposure to mild maternal hyperglycaemia in utero is detrimental to the beta cell function of the offspring, but evidence of this in humans is limited. In Europids who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes before the age of 50 years, the risk of diabetes in the offspring of the diabetic mothers is greatly increased compared with the risk in those born to diabetic fathers. We hypothesised that offspring born to mothers with young-onset type 2 diabetes would have been exposed to mild hyperglycaemia in utero, so we studied the impact of this on their beta cell function. We measured beta cell function using early insulin response (EIR) after oral glucose; insulin resistance using HOMA; and HbA(1c) in 568 non-diabetic adult offspring born to parents with type 2 diabetes (mean age 55.8 years), split according to which parent was affected (in 327 it was the mother) and parental age of diagnosis: <50 years (n=117) or > or =50 years. To reduce the impact of genetic susceptibility, the offspring of affected fathers were used as control subjects. Offspring of mothers with young-onset type 2 diabetes had lower EIR (log EIR 4.32, 95% CI [4.14-4.51] vs 4.63 [4.43-4.83] p=0.02) and higher HbA(1c) (4.89% [4.79-4.99] vs 4.68% [4.57-4.79] p=0.02) than the offspring of fathers with young-onset type 2 diabetes. Insulin sensitivity was similar in the two groups. There were no differences in EIR or HbA(1c) between the offspring born to mothers and fathers who were diagnosed after the age of 50 years. We conclude that the offspring of mothers with young-onset type 2 diabetes have a reduction in beta cell function. This is consistent with exposure to mild maternal hyperglycaemia programming beta cell function.

  10. Markers of fetal onset adult diseases.

    PubMed

    Nair, Latha; Nair, M K C; Chacko, D S

    2009-01-01

    The fetal origins hypothesis, proposes that non-communicable diseases including coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes and hypertension originate through the responses of a fetus to undernutrition, that permanently change the structure and function of the body. Associations between low birthweight and disease in later life have been widely studied in Europe and the USA. Studies in southern India have shown that babies who are short and fat tend to become insulin deficient and have high rates of non-insulin dependent diabetes. These findings have important public health implications as it suggests that associations with body size at birth underestimate the contribution of intrauterine development to later disease, and also, that while the primary prevention of coronary heart disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes may ultimately depend on changing the body composition and diets of young women. Therefore, more immediate benefit may come from preventing imbalances between prenatal and postnatal growth among children. The basic premise of the thrifty gene hypothesis is that certain populations may have genes that determine increased fat storage, which in times of famine represent a survival advantage, but in a modern environment result in obesity and type 2 diabetes. The fetal origins theory is of greatest relevance to the developing world and the implications of this work for global health are enormous. To reduce chronic diseases, we need to understand how the human fetus is nourished and how malnutrition changes its physiology and metabolism, so that interventions be implemented to limit the damage. The challenge for the next decade must be to discover the cellular and molecular mechanisms giving rise to these associations. If this aim is accomplished, it might be possible to devise strategies to reduce the impact of these disabling chronic and expensive diseases.

  11. Fetal programming, epigenetics, and adult onset disease.

    PubMed

    Lane, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    How early life events program adult disease is undergoing a transition from the broad field of maternal malnutrition to the current relevant issues of food deserts and prematurity. Although many adult diseases and morbidities associate with various early life events and programming, the morbidities of insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and obesity seem to be common end points of many early life events despite potential confounders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Adult-onset idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Yapp, Liam Z; McClymont, Liusaidh; Beggs, Ian; Gaston, Paul; Salter, Donald M

    2017-05-01

    We report the case of a 23-year-old man diagnosed with adult-onset idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip. Chondrolysis of the hip is a disorder most frequently seen in children who have suffered with slipped capital femoral epiphyses. Idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip is extremely rare and to our knowledge, its onset has never been documented in adults aged over 20. With reference to the available medical literature, we summarise the current clinical management of this unusual but important cause of young adult hip pain.

  13. Adult Onset Still's Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    Persad, Paul; Patel, Rajendrakumar; Patel, Niki

    2010-01-01

    Adult Still's Disease was first described in 1971 by Bywaters in fourteen adult female patients who presented with symptoms indistinguishable from that of classic childhood Still's Disease (Bywaters, 1971). George Still in 1896 first recognized this triad of quotidian (daily) fevers, evanescent rash, and arthritis in children with what later became known as juvenile inflammatory arthritis (Still, 1990). Adult Onset Still's Disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory condition of unknown etiology characterized by an evanescent rash, quotidian fevers, and arthralgias. Numerous infectious agents have been associated with its presentation. This case is to our knowledge the first presentation of AOSD in the setting of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Although numerous infectious agents have been suggested, the etiology of this disorder remains elusive. Nevertheless, infection may in fact play a role in triggering the onset of symptoms in those with this disorder. Our case presentation is, to our knowledge, the first case of Adult Onset Still's Disease associated with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF).

  14. Juvenile and adult-onset psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Emami, Mehrdad

    2013-09-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) tend to begin in adolescence and young adulthood, although the seizures can occur in a wide range of ages. In the current study, we investigated the age of onset in patients with PNES and tried to determine the correlation between the age of onset and the demographic and clinical characteristics and factors potentially predisposing to PNES. In this cross-sectional study, all patients with a clinical diagnosis of PNES were recruited at the outpatient epilepsy clinic at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from 2008 to 2012. We dichotomized the patients into two groups; those with age of onset below 18 years (juvenile), and those with age of onset at 18-55 years (adult-onset). We studied the demographic and clinical characteristics and factors potentially predisposing to PNES between these two groups. Statistical analyses were performed using Chi square and Fisher's Exact tests and Mann-Whitney U test. Fifty-seven patients with juvenile and 129 people with adult-onset PNES were studied. Demographic characteristics of these two groups were not different significantly. Seizure characteristics and semiology in these two groups were not significantly different either. However, factors potentially predisposing to PNES were significantly different between these two groups. History of being abused, academic failure, epilepsy or family history of epilepsy were more frequently observed in juvenile PNES, while medical comorbidities were more frequent among patients with adult-onset PNES. Age of onset of PNES is not correlated with the clinical manifestations; however, factors potentially predisposing to PNES are significantly different in patients with juvenile compared to those with adult-onset PNES. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Childhood onset systemic sclerosis: classification, clinical and serologic features, and survival in comparison with adult onset disease.

    PubMed

    Scalapino, Kenneth; Arkachaisri, Thaschawee; Lucas, Mary; Fertig, Noreen; Helfrich, David J; Londino, Aldo V; Steen, Virginia D; Medsger, Thomas A

    2006-05-01

    To describe the differences between patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) having childhood versus adult onset evaluated at a single medical center. Patients were divided into those with childhood onset (first SSc symptom or finding before age 16 yrs) and those with early adult and late adult onset. The 3 groups were compared with respect to disease classification, clinical, laboratory and serologic data, and survival. One hundred eleven childhood onset SSc cases seen between 1960 and 2003 were compared with 2559 adult onset SSc cases (1087 with onset age 16-40 and 1472 with onset after age 40 yrs) first evaluated between 1972 and 2001. Age distribution at onset was unimodal, suggesting that childhood disease is part of the spectrum of adult onset SSc. A significantly greater proportion of childhood onset patients had overlap syndromes, most frequently with polymyositis-dermatomyositis (PM-DM), and skeletal muscle involvement. Children with diffuse cutaneous (dc) SSc had significantly lower maximum mean total skin thickness scores than adult patients with dcSSc. Renal involvement was uncommon in childhood onset cases, and the frequency increased with age of onset. Serum anti-PM-Scl and anti-U1RNP antibodies were detected significantly more frequently in childhood than in adult onset cases. In contrast, anti-RNA polymerase III and anticentromere antibodies were found significantly more frequently in adults. Survival was significantly better among childhood than all adult onset cases combined, but similar to survival in young adult onset SSc cases. Scleroderma heart disease was a frequent cause of death among children with SSc. Patients with juvenile onset SSc more frequently have an overlap syndrome with PM-DM, higher frequency of skeletal muscle involvement, serum anti-PM-Scl and anti-U1RNP antibody, fatal cardiac disease, and improved survival compared with adult onset SSc cases.

  16. Verbal and Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Basic verbal and academic skills can be adversely affected by early-onset diabetes, although these skills have been studied less than other cognitive functions. This study aimed to explore the mechanism of learning deficits in children with diabetes by assessing basic verbal and academic skills in children with early-onset diabetes and in…

  17. Verbal and Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Basic verbal and academic skills can be adversely affected by early-onset diabetes, although these skills have been studied less than other cognitive functions. This study aimed to explore the mechanism of learning deficits in children with diabetes by assessing basic verbal and academic skills in children with early-onset diabetes and in…

  18. New-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Goldmannova, Dominika; Karasek, David; Krystynik, Ondrej; Zadrazil, Josef

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a very common metabolic disease with a rising incidence. It is both a leading cause of chronic renal disease and one of the most serious comorbidities in renal transplant recipients. New-onset diabetes after renal transplantation (NODAT) is associated with poor graft function, higher rates of cardiovascular complications and a poor prognosis. The aim of this paper is to review current knowledge of NODAT including risk factors, diagnosis and management. A MEDLINE search was performed to retrieve both original and review articles addressing the epidemiology, risk factors, screening and management of NODAT. We also focused on microRNAs as potential biomarkers of NODAT. Understanding the risk factors (both modifiable-e.g. obesity, viruses, and unmodifiable-e.g. age, genetics) may help reduce the incidence and impact of NODAT using pre- and post-transplant management. This can lead to better long-term graft function and general transplant success.

  19. Sarcopenia, Frailty, and Diabetes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Populations are aging and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing tremendously. The number of older people with diabetes is increasing unexpectedly. Aging and diabetes are both risk factors for functional disability. Thus, increasing numbers of frail or disabled older patients with diabetes will increase both direct and indirect health-related costs. Diabetes has been reported as an important risk factor of developing physical disability in older adults. Older people with diabetes have lower muscle mass and weaker muscle strength. In addition, muscle quality is poorer in diabetic patients. Sarcopenia and frailty have a common soil and may share a similar pathway for multiple pathologic processes in older people. Sarcopenia is thought to be an intermediate step in the development of frailty in patients with diabetes. Thus, early detection of sarcopenia and frailty in older adults with diabetes should be routine clinical practice to prevent frailty or to intervene earlier in frail patients. PMID:27098509

  20. Adult-onset acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Dainari; Ueda, Kohei; Tsukuda, Kyozo; Utsu, Noriaki; Kohki, Shimazu; Fushimi, Hiroaki; Miyakoshi, Kazuho

    2012-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was hospitalized for acute rheumatic fever. He had previously suffered from rheumatic fever at 15 years of age. The rheumatic fever was complicated by carditis, which caused valve disease that required surgical treatment. The incidence of rheumatic fever has decreased in most developed countries with improvements in sanitary conditions. The low incidence of this disease makes a timely and accurate diagnosis difficult. Due to the fact that both the first occurrence and recurrence of acute rheumatic fever can occur in the elderly and adults, this potential disease should not be overlooked when making a differential diagnosis.

  1. Adult-onset amenorrhea: a study of 262 patients.

    PubMed

    Reindollar, R H; Novak, M; Tho, S P; McDonough, P G

    1986-09-01

    A series of 262 patients with amenorrhea of adult onset are reported. Hypothalamic suppression followed by inappropriate positive feedback, and then hyperprolactinemia and ovarian failure are the most frequently encountered etiologies. Other etiologies are diverse and numerically less frequent. Amenorrhea after use of oral contraceptives, or postpill amenorrhea, occurred in 77 (29%) of all patients. The average age of presentation, prior menstrual history, associated morbidity, and subsequent reproductive potential of each diagnostic group are reported. Adult-onset amenorrhea has a less significant impact on future wellbeing than was reported for a similar-sized group of patients whose amenorrhea developed as a result of pubertal aberrancy.

  2. Metabolic profiles and treatment gaps in young-onset type 2 diabetes in Asia (the JADE programme): a cross-sectional study of a prospective cohort.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Roseanne O; Zhang, Yuying; Luk, Andrea; Yang, Wenying; Sobrepena, Leorino; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Aravind, S R; Sheu, Wayne; Nguyen, Thy Khue; Ozaki, Risa; Deerochanawong, Chaicharn; Tsang, Chiu Chi; Chan, Wing-Bun; Hong, Eun Gyoung; Do, Trung Quan; Cheung, Yu; Brown, Nicola; Goh, Su Yen; Ma, Ronald C; Mukhopadhyay, Monojitketan; Ojha, Arvind Kumar; Chakraborty, Shaibal; Kong, Alice P; Lau, Winnie; Jia, Weiping; Li, Wenhui; Guo, Xiaohui; Bian, Rongwen; Weng, Jianping; Ji, Linong; Reyes-dela Rosa, Mercedes; Toledo, Ronaldo M; Himathongkam, Thep; Yoo, Soon-Jib; Chow, C C; Ho, Larry L T; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Tutino, Greg; Tong, Peter C; So, Wing-Yee; Wolthers, Troels; Ko, Gary; Lyubomirsky, Greg; Chan, Juliana C N

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing in young adults in Asia, but little is known about metabolic control or the burden of associated complications in this population. We assessed the prevalence of young-onset versus late-onset type 2 diabetes, and associated risk factors and complication burdens, in the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation (JADE) cohort. JADE is an ongoing prospective cohort study. We enrolled adults with type 2 diabetes from 245 outpatient clinics in nine Asian countries or regions. We classified patients as having young-onset diabetes if they were diagnosed before the age of 40 years, and as having late-onset diabetes if they were diagnosed at 40 years or older. Data for participants' first JADE assessment was extracted for cross-sectional analysis. We compared clinical characteristics, metabolic risk factors, and the prevalence of complications between participants with young-onset diabetes and late-onset diabetes. Between Nov 1, 2007, and Dec 21, 2012, we enrolled 41,029 patients (15,341 from Hong Kong, 9107 from India, 7712 from Philippines, 5646 from China, 1751 from South Korea, 705 from Vietnam, 385 from Singapore, 275 from Thailand, 107 from Taiwan). 7481 patients (18%) had young-onset diabetes, with age at diagnosis of mean 32·9 years [SD 5·7] versus 53·9 years [9·0] with late-onset diabetes (n=33,548). Those with young-onset diabetes had longer disease duration (median 10 years [IQR 3-18]) than those with late-onset diabetes (5 years [2-11]). Fewer patients with young-onset diabetes achieved HbA1c concentrations lower than 7% compared to those with late-onset diabetes (27% vs 42%; p<0·0001) Patients with young-onset diabetes had higher mean concentrations of HbA1c (mean 8·32% [SD 2·03] vs 7·69% [1·82]; p<0·0001), LDL cholesterol (2·78 mmol/L [0·96] vs 2·74 [0·93]; p=0·009), and a higher prevalence of retinopathy (1363 [20%] vs 5714 (18%); p=0·011) than those with late-onset diabetes, but were less likely to receive statins

  3. Association between mental disorders and subsequent adult onset asthma

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Jordi; de Jonge, Peter; Lim, Carmen C. W.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Liu, Zhaorui; O'Neill, Siobhan; Stein, Dan J.; Viana, Maria Carmen; Al-Hamzawi, Ali Obaid; Angermeyer, Matthias C.; Borges, Guilherme; Ciutan, Marius; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Fiestas, Fabian; Haro, Josep Maria; Hu, Chiyi; Kessler, Ronald C.; Lépine, Jean Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Posada-Villa, Jose; Wojtyniak, Bogdan J; Scott, Kate M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Associations between asthma and anxiety and mood disorders are well established, but little is known about their temporal sequence. We examined associations between a wide range of DSM-IV mental disorders with adult onset of asthma and whether observed associations remain after mental comorbidity adjustments. Methods During face-to-face household surveys in community-dwelling adults (n = 52,095) of 19 countries, the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Asthma was assessed by self-report of physician’s diagnosis together with age of onset. Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent adult onset asthma, without and with comorbidity adjustment. Results 1,860 adult onset (21 years+) asthma cases were identified, representing a total of 2,096,486 person-years of follow up. After adjustment for comorbid mental disorders several mental disorders were associated with subsequent adult asthma onset: bipolar (OR=1.8; 95%CI 1.3–2.4), panic (OR=1.4; 95%CI 1.0–2.0), generalized anxiety (OR=1.3; 95%CI 1.1–1.7), specific phobia (OR=1.4; 95%CI 1.2–1.6); post-traumatic stress (OR=1.5; 95%CI 1.1–2.0); binge eating (OR=1.9; 95%CI 1.2–2.9) and alcohol abuse (OR=1.5; 95%CI 1.2–2.0). Mental comorbidity linearly increased the association with adult asthma. The association with subsequent asthma was stronger for mental disorders with an early onset (before age 21). Conclusions A wide range of temporally prior mental disorders are significantly associated with subsequent onset of asthma in adulthood. The extent to which asthma can be avoided or improved among those with early mental disorders deserves study. PMID:25263276

  4. [SERUM LEVEL OF ENDOTHELIAL MONOCYTE ACTIVATING POLYPEPTIDE-II IN CHILDHOOD-ONSET TYPE 1 DIABETIC PATIENTS AND OBESE ADOLESCENTS].

    PubMed

    Mogylnytska, L A

    2015-01-01

    The atherosclerotic process begins in adolescence, and its progression is determined by the same risk factors as in adults. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II) is a multifunctional cytokine with proinflammatory and antiangiogenetic activity that may play a pathogenic role in the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. The aim of our study was to determine the serum level of EMAP-II in childhood-onset type 1 diabetic patients and obese adolescents. We found increased of serum level of EMAP-II in childhood-onset type 1 diabetic patients and in patients with obesity that do not suffer from diabetes. Also, the level of EMAP-II correlated with the serum level of glycosylated hemoglobin and blood glucose, and key markers of lipid metabolism, body mass index. Increased serum level of EMAP-II may be one of the pathway of endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes.

  5. Etiopathogenesis and Therapeutic Approach to Adult Onset Acne

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Verma, Poonam; Sangwan, Ankita; Dayal, Surabhi; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is usually considered as a skin disorder that primarily affects adolescents reaching a peak at the age of 14–17 years in females and 16–19 years in males. However, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that a significant number of female patients aged >25 years experience acne. As it is regarded as a disease of teenagers, adults are more apprehensive and experience social anxiety. Hence, adult onset acne has become a matter of concern. PMID:27512185

  6. Late onset of familial neurogenic diabetes insipidus in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Cizmarova, M; Nagyova, G; Janko, V; Pribilincova, Z; Virgova, D; Ilencikova, D; Kovacs, L

    2013-10-01

    Autosomal dominant familial diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is a rare disease characterized by polydipsia and polyuria due to deficiency of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). We report the first Slovak family with the disease. Noteworthy is the concordantly belated debut of the disease symptoms in two monozygotic twin proband girls in the age of 17 years. Because of inconclusive results of water deprivation test consistent with partial diabetes insipidus (DI), missing "bright spot" of posterior pituitary gland in T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and family occurrence of polyuria and polydipsia on anamnestic evaluation. Molecular genetic testing of the AVP gene was proceeded, because of the inconclusive results of water deprivation test consistent with partial diabetes insipidus, missing "bright spot" of posterior pituitary gland in T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and family occurrence of polyuria and polydipsia on anamnestic evaluation. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous g.279G>A substitution that predicts a p.Ala19Thr substitution in the signal peptide of the AVP prohormone. The wide intrafamiliar variations (3 to 17 years) in disease onset together with the concordantly delayed debut of polyuria in two monozygotic twin girls suggest that individual differences in genetic influences family environmental factors may modify the penetrance of the mutation of the AVP gene. The present paper supports the notion that molecular genetic evaluation should be performed in all patients with familial occurrence of DI regardless of the clinical results.

  7. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Jantina C; Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H; Bel, Elisabeth H D; Ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-04-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×10(9) L(-1)) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×10(9) L(-1)) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7-8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1-8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3-4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice.

  8. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B.; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H.; Bel, Elisabeth H.D.; ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×109 L−1) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×109 L−1) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7–8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1–8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice. PMID:27730197

  9. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  10. Adult-onset Nemaline Myopathy Coexisting With Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingling; Wang, Yanling; Liu, Xiaofeng; Hu, Yanxia; Li, Nianchun; Qiu, Guoping; Luo, Yun; Li, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular junction disorder which is characterized by fluctuating muscle fatigue. However, the association of MG with nemaline myopathy is rarely reported. Here we report a case of MG coexisting with adult-onset nemaline myopathy. A 55-year-old man endured fluctuating muscle weakness with positive acetylcholine receptor and titin antibodies. After the patient was administrated cholinergic drugs and immunosuppression, the muscle weakness of the patient had mildly been alleviated. Electromyography showed a progressive decrement in the amplitude of muscle action potential at low frequency. Muscle biopsy showed numerous nemalines in the muscle fibers. This is the first reported case of nemalines present in the muscle fibers of adult patient with MG. The pathogenesis of nemaline may be related to titin antibody in adult-onset nemaline myopathy with MG. PMID:26825889

  11. Psychosocial Response to New-Onset Diabetes as a Long-Term Effect of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Olausson, Jill M; Clark, Lauren; Morse, Janice M; Hammer, Marilyn; Allen, Nancy; Grant, Marcia

    2017-10-01

    Currently, little information is available to guide health care practitioners on how to facilitate positive outcomes in individuals who develop new-onset diabetes after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo HSCT) for treatment of hematological cancers. Results from this constructivist grounded theory study provide a theoretical framework explaining the psychosocial process of change that middle-age and older adults experience when developing new-onset diabetes in this context. Two predominant factors influenced this change: treatment burden and perception of diabetes. Key findings were that participants with ongoing complications, primarily graft-versus-host disease, experienced a high degree of treatment-related burden and unclear perceptions of diabetes when compared with those with no or few post-allo-HSCT complications. These factors limited their capacity to positively respond to and self-manage their condition. Implications for practice are to thoroughly consider these two factors when developing patient-centered interventions for middle-age and older adults with new-onset diabetes after allo HSCT.

  12. Serum irisin levels in new-onset type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeon-Kyung; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Bae, Kwi Hyun; Seo, Hyun-Ae; Jeong, Ji-Yun; Lee, Won-Kee; Kim, Jung-Guk; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Keun-Gyu

    2013-04-01

    Irisin has been identified as a novel myokine that drives brown-fat-like conversion of white adipose tissue. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated whether serum irisin levels are decreased in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with control subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), and assessed the association between serum irisin levels and various metabolic parameters. The study population was selected from a population-based study and included 104 subjects with NGT and 104 subjects with new-onset T2D. Serum irisin and adiponectin levels and metabolic parameters were measured. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the association between irisin levels and newly diagnosed T2D. Serum irisin levels were significantly decreased in the new-onset T2D group compared with the NGT control group (p=0.003). In a multivariable model adjusted for various metabolic parameters, increased irisin levels were associated with reduced odds (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.47-0.88, p=0.006) of prevalent newly diagnosed T2D. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis showed that 2 h plasma glucose was an independent variable influencing serum irisin levels (p=0.004). In the present study, we found that serum irisin levels were decreased in T2D patients and inversely associated with newly diagnosed T2D, suggesting that irisin may play a crucial role in glucose intolerance and T2D. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-Esteem in Diabetic Adolescents: Relationship Between Age at Onset and Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Christopher M.; Morrow, Lisa A.

    1986-01-01

    The self-esteem of 125 diabetic and 82 nondiabetic adolescents was examined with the Piers-Harris scale. Girls who developed diabetes before five years of age had poorer self-concept scores than early onset boys, whereas boys and girls in the later onset or control groups had equivalent scores. This interaction was restricted to Physical…

  14. New onset diabetes mellitus induced by statins: current evidence.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2017-05-01

    The hydroxyl-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors of statin action are very effective and safe drugs, and they are widely used for the treatment of hyperlipidemia and the prevention of primary and secondary cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, recent meta-analyses of previous studies done with statins have shown that these drugs could induce new onset diabetes mellitus (NODM), especially in subjects prone to diabetes: obese, females, older age, Asian descent, and those with pre-diabetes or the metabolic syndrome. Several meta-analyses of randomized, controlled trials with statins and population-based studies of subjects taking statins have shown different incidence of NODM ranging from 28% in the JUPITER study to 43% in the UK clinical practice cohort. The exact cause of statin-induced NODM is not clearly known and several pathophysiologic mechanisms have been proposed, which include modification of the lipoprotein particle size, inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase, decreased expression of GLUT 4, and decreased adiponectin and ubiquinone levels, including others, which all lead to either increase in insulin resistance or decrease in insulin secretion. Based on the current evidence, the use of statins should not be withheld from subjects at high cardiovascular risk, even if they are prone to NODM, because their benefits outweigh their risks. However, in persons prone to the development of NODM, vigilance is required and periodic measurements of plasma glucose or HbA1c should be performed. If NODM develops, statin treatment should not be stopped, but a switch to administration of a more favorable statin, administration of statin on alternate days, or reduction of the dose should be considered, or antidiabetic therapy added.

  15. Clinicopathological features of adult-onset neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease

    PubMed Central

    Sone, Jun; Mori, Keiko; Inagaki, Tomonori; Katsumata, Ryu; Takagi, Shinnosuke; Yokoi, Satoshi; Araki, Kunihiko; Kato, Toshiyasu; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Koike, Haruki; Takashima, Hiroshi; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Kohno, Yutaka; Kurashige, Takashi; Kuriyama, Masaru; Takiyama, Yoshihisa; Tsuchiya, Mai; Kitagawa, Naoyuki; Kawamoto, Michi; Yoshimura, Hajime; Suto, Yutaka; Nakayasu, Hiroyuki; Uehara, Naoko; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Makoto; Kokubun, Norito; Konno, Takuya; Katsuno, Masahisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Yoshida, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease (NIID) is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by eosinophilic hyaline intranuclear inclusions in the central and peripheral nervous system, and also in the visceral organs. NIID has been considered to be a heterogeneous disease because of the highly variable clinical manifestations, and ante-mortem diagnosis has been difficult. However, since we reported the usefulness of skin biopsy for the diagnosis of NIID, the number of NIID diagnoses has increased, in particular adult-onset NIID. In this study, we studied 57 cases of adult-onset NIID and described their clinical and pathological features. We analysed both NIID cases diagnosed by post-mortem dissection and by ante-mortem skin biopsy based on the presence of characteristic eosinophilic, hyaline and ubiquitin-positive intanuclear inclusion: 38 sporadic cases and 19 familial cases, from six families. In the sporadic NIID cases with onset age from 51 to 76, dementia was the most prominent initial symptom (94.7%) as designated ‘dementia dominant group’, followed by miosis, ataxia and unconsciousness. Muscle weakness and sensory disturbance were also observed. It was observed that, in familial NIID cases with onset age less than 40 years, muscle weakness was seen most frequently (100%), as designated ‘limb weakness group’, followed by sensory disturbance, miosis, bladder dysfunction, and dementia. In familial cases with more than 40 years of onset age, dementia was most prominent (100%). Elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein and abnormal nerve conduction were frequently observed in both sporadic and familial NIID cases. Head magnetic resonance imaging showed high intensity signal in corticomedullary junction in diffusion-weighted image in both sporadic and familial NIID cases, a strong clue to the diagnosis. All of the dementia dominant cases presented with this type of leukoencephalopathy on head magnetic resonance imaging. Both sporadic and

  16. Adult onset pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy with ovarian dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Verghese, J; Weidenheim, K; Malik, S; Rapin, I

    2002-11-01

    Pigmentary type of orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) is an adult-onset leukodystrophy, characterized pathologically by the presence of glial and microglial cytoplasmic pigment inclusions. The complete phenotype, genotype and pathogenetic mechanisms in POLD have not been elucidated. We followed for 18 years a woman with autopsy-proven POLD, who presented with 'frontal' dementia and spasticity. Her further course was marked by progressive mutism, apraxia and seizures. Her sister had died of the same disease after a much more rapidly progressing course. These sisters had primary infertility with pathologic evidence of streak ovaries. Diagnosis was confirmed in both cases by post-mortem examination. POLD is a rare cause of adult-onset leukodystrophy presenting with dementia. Ovarian dysgenesis is extremely rare in the absence of demonstrable chromosomal abnormalities and extends the clinical spectrum of POLD.

  17. Adult stature and diabetes complications in patients with type 1 diabetes: the FinnDiane Study and the diabetes control and complications trial.

    PubMed

    Wadén, Johan; Forsblom, Carol; Thorn, Lena M; Saraheimo, Markku; Rosengård-Bärlund, Milla; Heikkilä, Outi; Hietala, Kustaa; Ong, Ken; Wareham, Nicholas; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2009-08-01

    Short adult stature has previously been associated with cardiovascular disease, but its relationship with the microvascular complications of diabetes is uncertain. Therefore, we evaluated the association between adult stature and prevalence and incidence of diabetic microvascular complications. This cross-sectional and longitudinal study comprises 3,968 adult patients with type 1 diabetes from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study and 1,246 adult patients from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT). In FinnDiane, diabetic nephropathy was defined as urinary albumin excretion > or = 300 mg/24 h, dialysis, or renal transplantation. Retinopathy was divided into background and proliferative (laser-treated) retinopathy. In the DCCT, original nephropathy (class 1-6) and retinopathy (Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study) classifications were used. In the FinnDiane study, patients in the lowest quartile of adult height had increased risks of prevalent diabetic nephropathy (odds ratio [OR] 1.71, 95% CI 1.44-2.02) and prevalent laser-treated retinopathy (1.66, 1.43-1.93) compared with other patients. Similarly, in the DCCT, patients in the lowest quartile of adult height had increased risks of incident diabetic nephropathy class 4-6 (hazard ratio 2.70, 95% CI 1.59-4.59) and incident proliferative retinopathy (2.06, 1.15-3.71). In the FinnDiane study, the associations were largely explained by childhood exposure to diabetes. However, in the DCCT, where a greater proportion of patients had diabetes onset >18 years, the association with nephropathy was independent of childhood diabetes exposure. Short adult stature is associated with microvascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes. These findings are compatible with either childhood diabetes exposure or "common soil" or both as potential explanations.

  18. Season of Birth and Risk for Adult Onset Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.

    2010-01-01

    Adult onset glioma is a rare cancer which occurs more frequently in Caucasians than African Americans, and in men than women. The etiology of this disease is largely unknown. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only well established environmental risk factor, and this factor explains only a small percentage of cases. Several recent studies have reported an association between season of birth and glioma risk. This paper reviews the plausibility of evidence focusing on the seasonal interrelation of farming, allergies, viruses, vitamin D, diet, birth weight, and handedness. To date, a convincing explanation for the occurrence of adult gliomas decades after a seasonal exposure at birth remains elusive. PMID:20623001

  19. "Petrified ears" with idiopathic adult-onset pituitary insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Yashpal; Gangadhar, Prathosh; Walia, Rama R; Bhansali, Anil

    2012-09-01

    "Petrified ears" or calcification of auricular cartilage is an uncommonly reported condition. The most common causes of this phenomenon are local trauma, frost bite, and inflammation. Adrenal insufficiency is the most frequent systemic disease associated with auricular calcification. We present a case of idiopathic adult-onset pituitary insufficiency with hypocortisolism and bilateral auricular calcification. Recognition of the association between auricular calcification and adrenal insufficiency can be an important step toward the identification of a life-threatening cortisol deficiency.

  20. Diabetes Resources for Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... can occur when you have the disease. Common diabetes problems include Heart Disease and Stroke Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathy) Foot Problems Gum Disease and Other Dental Problems Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) ...

  1. Pregnancy outcomes in women with childhood-onset and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Miranda-Hernández, Dafhne; Sánchez, Antonio; Morales, Sara; Cruz-Domínguez, Pilar; Medina, Gabriela; Jara, Luis Javier

    2016-10-01

    To compare the maternal and fetal outcomes between childhood-onset and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we reviewed the medical records of SLE pregnant women treated from January 2005 to August 2013. For comparison, patients were allocated to one of the two groups, those pregnant patients with SLE onset before 18 years of age (childhood-onset) and ≥18 years (adult-onset). The patients were evaluated at least once in each trimester and postpartum. Relevant maternal and fetal outcomes were extracted, such as lupus flare, preeclampsia/eclampsia, rate of liveborns, fetal loss (spontaneous abortion and stillbirth), term delivery, preterm birth, neonatal death, low birth weight, low birth weight at term, and congenital malformations. We studied 186 pregnancies (in 180 women), 58 of them had childhood-onset SLE, and the remaining 128 had adult-onset SLE. The rate of maternal and fetal complications was similar in both groups. Multivariate analysis showed that active SLE before pregnancy, primigravida, renal flare, preeclampsia, lupus flare, anticardiolipin antibodies, and low serum complement were associated with an increased risk of poor maternal and fetal outcomes. The diagnosis of childhood-onset had no impact on maternal-fetal outcome. The maternal and fetal outcome in women with childhood-onset SLE is similar to that reported in women with adult-onset SLE. Pregnancy in women with childhood-onset SLE should not be contraindicated if the disease is well controlled.

  2. Characterization of peripheral regulatory CD4+ T cells that prevent diabetes onset in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lepault, F; Gagnerault, M C

    2000-01-01

    The period that precedes onset of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus corresponds to an active dynamic state in which pathogenic autoreactive T cells are kept from destroying beta cells by regulatory T cells. In prediabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, CD4+ splenocytes were shown to prevent diabetes transfer in immunodeficient NOD recipients. We now demonstrate that regulatory splenocytes belong to the CD4+ CD62Lhigh T cell subset that comprises a vast majority of naive cells producing low levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma and no IL-4 and IL-10 upon in vitro stimulation. Consistently, the inhibition of diabetes transfer was not mediated by IL-4 and IL-10. Regulatory cells homed to the pancreas and modified the migration of diabetogenic to the islets, which resulted in a decreased insulitis severity. The efficiency of CD62L+ T cells was dose dependent, independent of sex and disease prevalence. Protection mechanisms did not involve the CD62L molecule, an observation that may relate to the fact that CD4+ CD62Lhigh lymph node cells were less potent than their splenic counterparts. Regulatory T cells were detectable after weaning and persist until disease onset, sustaining the notion that diabetes is a late and abrupt event. Thus, the CD62L molecule appears as a unique marker that can discriminate diabetogenic (previously shown to be CD62L-) from regulatory T cells. The phenotypic and functional characteristics of protective CD4+ CD62L+ cells suggest they are different from Th2-, Tr1-, and NK T-type cells, reported to be implicated in the control of diabetes in NOD mice, and may represent a new immunoregulatory population.

  3. Adults with childhood-onset chronic conditions admitted to US pediatric and adult intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jeffrey D; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Yoo, Erika J; Houtrow, Amy J; Boscardin, W John; Dudley, R Adams; Okumura, Megumi J

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare demographics, intensive care unit (ICU) admission characteristics, and ICU outcomes among adults with childhood-onset chronic conditions (COCCs) admitted to US pediatric and adult ICUs. Retrospective cross-sectional analyses of 6088 adults aged 19 to 40 years admitted in 2008 to 70 pediatric ICUs that participated in the Virtual Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Performance Systems and 50 adult ICUs that participated in Project IMPACT. Childhood-onset chronic conditions were present in 53% of young adults admitted to pediatric units, compared with 9% of those in adult units. The most common COCC in both groups were congenital cardiac abnormalities, cerebral palsy, and chromosomal abnormalities. Adults with COCC admitted to pediatric units were significantly more likely to be younger, have lower functional status, and be nontrauma patients than those in adult units. The median ICU length of stay was 2 days, and the intensive care unit mortality rate was 5% for all COCC patients with no statistical difference between pediatric or adult units. There are marked differences in characteristics between young adults with COCC admitted to pediatric ICUs and adult ICUs. Barriers to accommodating these young adults may be reasons why many such adults have not transitioned from pediatric to adult critical care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Type 2 diabetes and late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, D; Noble, J; Tang, M X; Schupf, N; Mayeux, R; Luchsinger, J A

    2011-01-01

    To confirm in a cohort recruited in 1999-2001 our finding in a cohort recruited in 1992-1994 relating type 2 diabetes (T2D) to late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Participants were 1,488 persons aged 65 years and older without dementia at baseline from New York City. T2D was ascertained by self-report. Dementia and LOAD were ascertained by standard research procedures. Proportional hazard regression was used for analyses relating T2D and LOAD. The prevalence of T2D was 17%. There were 161 cases of dementia and 149 cases of LOAD. T2D was related to dementia (hazard ratio = 1.7; 95% confidence interval = 1.4-2.9) and LOAD (1.6; 1.0-2.6) after adjustment for age, sex, education, ethnic group and apolipoprotein E ε4. This association was weaker when only AD - excluding cases of mixed dementia - was considered (hazard ratio = 1.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.8-2.2). T2D is associated with LOAD. Cerebrovascular disease may be an important mediator. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Type II diabetes of early onset: a distinct clinical and genetic syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    O'Rahilly, S; Spivey, R S; Holman, R R; Nugent, Z; Clark, A; Turner, R C

    1987-01-01

    The inheritance of non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes was studied by a continuous infusion of glucose test in all available first degree relatives of 48 diabetic probands of various ages and with differing severity of disease. In an initial study of 38 type II diabetic subjects and their first degree relatives six islet cell antibody negative patients with early onset disease (aged 25-40 at diagnosis) were found to have a particularly high familial prevalence of diabetes or glucose intolerance. Nine of 10 parents available for study either had type II diabetes or were glucose intolerant. A high prevalence of diabetes or glucose intolerance was also found in their siblings (11/16;69%). In a second study of the families of a further 10 young diabetic probands (presenting age 25-40) whose islet cell antibody state was unknown a similar high prevalence of diabetes or glucose intolerance was found among parents of the five islet cell antibody negative probands (8/9; 89%) but not among parents of the five islet cell antibody positive probands (3/8;38%). Islet cell antibody negative diabetics with early onset type II disease may have inherited a diabetogenic gene or genes from both parents. They commonly need insulin to maintain adequate glycaemic control and may develop severe diabetic complications. Early onset type II diabetes may represent a syndrome in which characteristic pedigrees, clinical severity, and absence of islet autoimmunity make it distinct from either type I diabetes, maturity onset diabetes of the young, or late onset type II diabetes. PMID:3107658

  6. New onset of idiopathic bilateral ear tics in an adult.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Amit; Shrestha, Rabin

    2009-04-01

    Tic disorders are commonly considered to be childhood syndromes. Newly presenting tic disorders during adulthood are uncommon and mostly described in relation to an acquired brain lesion or as incidental tics, particularly in context with other neurological or psychiatric diseases. Tic disorder involving the ears is extremely uncommon with only few studies in English literature. In the present case, we describe an adult patient with new-onset idiopathic tics disorder involving both ears, causing social embarrassment. In addition, our patient had recent onset of the tics without any childhood or family history of tic disorders. The single most important component of management is an accurate diagnosis. At the same time, tics should be differentiated from other movement disorders such as chorea, stereotypy, and dystonias.

  7. Association of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus in Older People and Mortality in Taiwan: A 10-Year Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Chi, M-J; Liang, C-K; Lee, W-J; Peng, L-N; Chou, M-Y; Chen, L-K

    2017-01-01

    Older patients with diabetes mellitus are at a higher risk of developing diabetic macro- and micro-vascular complications and cardiovascular diseases than younger diabetes mellitus patients. However, older diabetes mellitus patients are very heterogeneous in their clinical characteristics, diabetes mellitus-related complications and age at disease onset. This study aimed to evaluate the all-cause mortality rates and adverse health outcomes among older adults with new-onset diabetes mellitus through a nationwide population-based study. A retrospective cohort study. 2001-2011 data of the National Health Insurance database. Nationally representative sample of Taiwanese adults aged 65 years and older with propensity score-matched controls. All-cause mortality and adverse health outcomes. During the study period, 45.3% of patients in the diabetes mellitus cohort and 38.8% in the non-diabetes mellitus cohort died. The adjusted relative risk for mortality in the diabetes mellitus cohort compared to the non-diabetes mellitus cohort was 1.23 (95% Confidence Interval [CI]=1.16-1.30) for males and 1.27 (95%CI=1.19-1.35) for females. During the follow-up period, 8.9% of the diabetes mellitus cohort and 5.8% of the non-diabetes mellitus cohort developed cardiovascular diseases; the diabetes mellitus cohort had an adjusted relative risk of cardiovascular complications compared to the non-diabetes mellitus cohort of 1.54 (95%CI=1.36-1.75) for men and 1.70 (95%CI=1.43-2.02) for women. The adjusted relative risk of mortality in the patients with hypoglycemia compared to non-hypoglycemia patients in the diabetes mellitus cohort was 2.33 (95%CI=1.81-3.01) for men and 2.73 (95%CI=2.10-3.52) for women after adjustment for age, Charlson comorbidity index, acute coronary syndrome, respiratory disease, cancer, infectious disease and nervous system disease at baseline. New-onset diabetes in older adults is associated with an increased risk of mortality, and hypoglycemia is an important

  8. Duodenal neuroendocrine tumor and the onset of severe diabetes mellitus in a US veteran

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Lauren; Haley, Chelsey; Berry-Cabán, Cristóbal S; Toledo, Almond

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Neuroendocrine tumors are neoplasms derived from endocrine cells, most commonly occurring in the gastrointestinal tract. Duodenal neuroendocrine tumors are rare tumors averaging 1.2–1.5 cm, and most are asymptomatic. Common presentation is abdominal pain, upper gastrointestinal bleed, constipation, anemia, and jaundice. Methods: An adult, Black, male patient with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus presented to the emergency department with elevated liver function test and fatigue. Results: Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography demonstrated a large obstructing mass (3.6 cm × 4.4 cm × 3 cm) within the second and third portions of the duodenum at the ampulla. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated an ulcerated duodenal mass that was biopsied. Immunohistochemical stains were positive for synaptophysin, chromogranin B, and CK7. Chromogranin A was in normal range. Post-Whipple procedure demonstrated a 5.5 cm × 4.1 cm × 2.9 cm duodenal mass with invasion of the subserosal tissue of the small intestine, a mitotic rate of 2 per high-power field, and antigen Ki-67 of 2%–5%. Conclusion: This case raises the question as to if the patient developed diabetes mellitus due to the tumor size and location or if the new onset of diabetes was coincidental. This case also demonstrates the importance of a proficient history and physical. PMID:27489708

  9. Relationship between inpatient hyperglycemia and insulin treatment after kidney transplantation and future new onset diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chakkera, Harini A; Knowler, William C; Devarapalli, Yugandhara; Weil, E Jennifer; Heilman, Raymond L; Dueck, Amylou; Mulligan, David C; Reddy, Kunam S; Moss, Adyr A; Mekeel, Kristin L; Mazur, Marek J; Hamawi, Khaled; Castro, Janna C; Cook, Curtiss B

    2010-09-01

    Approximately two-thirds of kidney transplant recipients with no previous history of diabetes experience inpatient hyperglycemia immediately after kidney transplant surgery; whether inpatient hyperglycemia predicts future new onset diabetes after transplant (NODAT) is not established. A retrospective study was conducted to determine the risk conferred by inpatient hyperglycemia on development of NODAT within 1 year posttransplant. All adult nondiabetic kidney transplant recipients between June 1999 and January 2008 were included. Posttransplant inpatient hyperglycemia was defined as any bedside capillary blood glucose > or = 200 mg/dl or insulin therapy during hospitalization. NODAT was defined as HbA1C > or = 6.5%, fasting venous serum glucose > or = 126 mg/dl, or prescribed diet or medical therapy for diabetes mellitus. The study cohort included 377 patients. NODAT developed in 1 (4%) of the 28 patients without inpatient hyperglycemia, 4 (18%) of the 22 patients with inpatient hyperglycemia but not treated with insulin, and in 98 (30%) of the 327 of the patients who were diagnosed with inpatient hyperglycemia and were treated with insulin. In adjusted analyses, requirement of insulin therapy during hospitalization posttransplant was associated with a 4-fold increase in NODAT (relative risk 4.01; confidence interval, 1.49 to 10.7; P = 0.006). Development of inpatient hyperglycemia after kidney transplantation in nondiabetic patients significantly increased the risk of NODAT. Additionally, we observed a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients who developed NODAT.

  10. Relationship between Inpatient Hyperglycemia and Insulin Treatment after Kidney Transplantation and Future New Onset Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Knowler, William C.; Devarapalli, Yugandhara; Weil, E. Jennifer; Heilman, Raymond L.; Dueck, Amylou; Mulligan, David C.; Reddy, Kunam S.; Moss, Adyr A.; Mekeel, Kristin L.; Mazur, Marek J.; Hamawi, Khaled; Castro, Janna C.; Cook, Curtiss B.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Approximately two-thirds of kidney transplant recipients with no previous history of diabetes experience inpatient hyperglycemia immediately after kidney transplant surgery; whether inpatient hyperglycemia predicts future new onset diabetes after transplant (NODAT) is not established. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A retrospective study was conducted to determine the risk conferred by inpatient hyperglycemia on development of NODAT within 1 year posttransplant. All adult nondiabetic kidney transplant recipients between June 1999 and January 2008 were included. Posttransplant inpatient hyperglycemia was defined as any bedside capillary blood glucose ≥ 200 mg/dl or insulin therapy during hospitalization. NODAT was defined as HbA1C ≥ 6.5%, fasting venous serum glucose ≥ 126 mg/dl, or prescribed diet or medical therapy for diabetes mellitus. Results: The study cohort included 377 patients. NODAT developed in 1 (4%) of the 28 patients without inpatient hyperglycemia, 4 (18%) of the 22 patients with inpatient hyperglycemia but not treated with insulin, and in 98 (30%) of the 327 of the patients who were diagnosed with inpatient hyperglycemia and were treated with insulin. In adjusted analyses, requirement of insulin therapy during hospitalization posttransplant was associated with a 4-fold increase in NODAT (relative risk 4.01; confidence interval, 1.49 to 10.7; P = 0.006). Conclusion: Development of inpatient hyperglycemia after kidney transplantation in nondiabetic patients significantly increased the risk of NODAT. Additionally, we observed a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients who developed NODAT. PMID:20558559

  11. Successful treatment of refractory adult onset Still's disease with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Belfeki, N; Smiti Khanfir, M; Said, F; Hamzaoui, A; Ben Salem, T; Ben Ghorbel, I; Lamloum, M; Houman, M H

    2016-12-16

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon inflammatory condition of unknown origin. In chronic disease, joint involvement is often predominant and erosions are noted in one third of patients. Therapeutic strategies derive from observational data. Corticosteroids are usually the first-line treatment. With inadequate response to corticosteroids, methotrexate appears the best choice to control disease activity and allow for tapering of steroid use. For refractory disease, biological therapy seems the most promising. We report here the case of a 38-year-old female patient with AOSD refractory to cytotoxic agents, treated by rituximab infusion therapy with favorable outcome.

  12. Hepatitis A infection mimicking adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, S; Mossad, S; Hoffman, G

    2000-07-01

    Fever, rash, and arthritis may be components of the prodrome of viral hepatitis. In the absence of jaundice and abnormal liver function tests, this form of polyarthritis is easily confused with primary autoimmune diseases. Whereas the association of systemic illness with musculoskeletal symptoms and numerous viral infections is well known, such an association with hepatitis A has only been rarely reported. We describe a case of hepatitis A infection mimicking adult onset Still's disease, and review the pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of Still's disease and the extraarticular manifestations of hepatitis.

  13. Diabetes Onset at 31–45 Years of Age is Associated with an Increased Risk of Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wenjun; Ni, Lisha; Lu, Qianyi; Zou, Chen; Zhao, Minjie; Xu, Xun; Chen, Haibing; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    This hospital-based, cross-sectional study investigated the effect of age of diabetes onset on the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR) among Chinese type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. A total of 5,214 patients with type 2 DM who were referred to the Department of Ophthalmology at the Shanghai First People’s Hospital from 2009 to 2013 was eligible for inclusion. Diabetic retinopathy status was classified using the grading system of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS). Logistic and hierarchical regression analyses were used to identify independent variables affecting the development of DR. Upon multiple logistic regression analysis, patient age at the time of diabetes onset was significantly associated with development of DR. Further, when the risk of retinopathy was stratified by patient age at the onset of diabetes, the risk was highest in patients in whom diabetes developed at an age of 31–45 years (odds ratio [OR] 1.815 [1.139–2.892]; p = 0.012). Furthermore, when patients were divided into four groups based on the duration of diabetes, DR development was maximal at a diabetes onset age of 31–45 years within each group. A diabetes onset age of 31–45 years is an independent risk factor for DR development in Chinese type 2 DM patients. PMID:27897261

  14. Predicting abscesses in adults with community-onset monomicrobial Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia: microorganisms matters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Hsun; Lee, Ching-Chi; Hsieh, Chih-Chia; Hong, Ming-Yuan; Chi, Chih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae is a leading pathogen of community-onset bacteremia. This study aims to establish a predictive scoring algorithm to identify adults with community-onset Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia who are at risk for abscesses. Of the total 1262 adults, 152 (12.0%) with abscess occurrence were noted. The 6 risk factors significantly associated with abscess occurrence-liver cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, thrombocytopenia and high C-reactive protein (>100 mg/L) at bacteremic onset, delayed defervescence, and bacteremia-causing Klebsiella pneumoniae-were each assigned +1 point to form the scoring algorithm. In contrast, the elderly, fatal comorbidity (McCabe classification), and bacteremia-causing Escherichia coli were each assigned -1 point, owing to their negative associations with abscess occurrence. Using the proposed scoring algorithm, a cut-off value of +1 yielded a high sensitivity (85.5%) and an acceptable specificity (60.4%). Although the proposed predictive model needs further validation, this simple scoring algorithm may be useful for the early identification of abscesses by clinicians.

  15. Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: The Effects of Diabetes-Related Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Keskinen, Paivi; Nuuja, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia, on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Method: The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9y 11mo, SD 4mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40…

  16. Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: The Effects of Diabetes-Related Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Keskinen, Paivi; Nuuja, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia, on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Method: The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9y 11mo, SD 4mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40…

  17. Lifetime Increased Risk of Adult Onset Atopic Dermatitis in Adolescent and Adult Patients with Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hsu-Sheng; Tu, Hung-Pin; Hong, Chien-Hui; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis. Atopic dermatitis (AD) causes intense itching and impaired quality of life. Previous studies have shown that patients with classical early-onset AD tend to develop food allergy and that 10% of adults with food allergies have concomitant AD. However, it is not known whether late-onset food allergy leads to adult-onset AD, a recently recognized disease entity. Using an initial cohort of one-million subjects, this study retrospectively followed-up 2851 patients with food allergy (age > 12 years) for 14 years and compared them with 11,404 matched controls. While 2.8% (81) of the 2851 food allergy patients developed AD, only 2.0% (227) of the 11,404 controls developed AD. Multivariate regression analysis showed that food allergy patients were more likely to develop AD (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.49, p < 0.0001). Controls had a 1.99% risk of developing AD, while food allergy patients had a significantly higher risk (7.18% and 3.46% for patients with ≥3 and <3 food allergy claims, respectively) of developing adult-onset AD. This is the first study to describe the chronological and dose-dependent associations between food allergy in adolescence and the development of adult-onset AD. PMID:28035995

  18. Acute Versus Progressive Onset of Diabetes in NOD Mice: Potential Implications for Therapeutic Interventions in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Clayton E; Xue, Song; Posgai, Amanda; Lightfoot, Yaima L; Li, Xia; Lin, Andrea; Wasserfall, Clive; Haller, Michael J; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    Most natural history models for type 1 diabetes (T1D) propose that overt hyperglycemia results after a progressive loss of insulin-secreting β-cell mass and/or function. To experimentally address this concept, we prospectively determined morning blood glucose measurements every other day in multiple cohorts (total n = 660) of female NOD/ShiLtJ mice starting at 8 weeks of age until diabetes onset or 26 weeks of age. Consistent with this notion, a majority of mice that developed diabetes (354 of 489 [72%]) displayed a progressive increase in blood glucose with transient excursions >200 mg/dL, followed by acute and persistent hyperglycemia at diabetes onset. However, 135 of the 489 (28%) diabetic animals demonstrated normal glucose values followed by acute (i.e., sudden) hyperglycemia. Interestingly, diabetes onset occurred earlier in mice with acute versus progressive disease onset (15.37 ± 0.3207 vs. 17.44 ± 0.2073 weeks of age, P < 0.0001). Moreover, the pattern of onset (i.e., progressive vs. acute) dramatically influenced the ability to achieve reversal of T1D by immunotherapeutic intervention, with increased effectiveness observed in situations of a progressive deterioration in euglycemia. These studies highlight a novel natural history aspect in this animal model, one that may provide important guidance for the selection of subjects participating in human trials seeking disease reversal.

  19. Education and health: evidence on adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ayyagari, Padmaja; Grossman, Daniel; Sloan, Frank

    2011-03-01

    Although the education-health relationship is well documented, pathways through which education influences health are not well understood. This study uses data from a 2003-2004 cross sectional supplemental survey of respondents to the longitudinal Health and Retirement Study (HRS) who had been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus to assess effects of education on health and mechanisms underlying the relationship. The supplemental survey provides rich detail on use of personal health care services (e.g., adherence to guidelines for diabetes care) and personal attributes which are plausibly largely time invariant and systematically related to years of schooling completed, including time preference, self-control, and self-confidence. Educational attainment, as measured by years of schooling completed, is systematically and positively related to time to onset of diabetes, and conditional on having been diagnosed with this disease on health outcomes, variables related to efficiency in health production, as well as use of diabetes specialists. However, the marginal effects of increasing educational attainment by a year are uniformly small. Accounting for other factors, including child health and child socioeconomic status which could affect years of schooling completed and adult health, adult cognition, income, and health insurance, and personal attributes from the supplemental survey, marginal effects of educational attainment tend to be lower than when these other factors are not included in the analysis, but they tend to remain statistically significant at conventional levels.

  20. Reversal of new-onset type 1 diabetes in mice by syngeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yanting; Ouyang, Jian; Yang, Rong; Chen, Junhao; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xiaojun; Burt, Richard K

    2008-09-19

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has recently been performed as a novel strategy to treat patients with new-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, the mechanism of autologous HSCT-induced remission of diabetes remains unknown. In order to help clarify the mechanism of remission-induction following autologous HSCT in patients with T1D, mice treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin to induce diabetes were used as both donors (n=20) and recipients (n=20). Compared to streptozocin-treated mice not receiving transplantation, syngeneic bone marrow transplantation (syn-BMT) from a streptozocin-treated diabetic donor, if applied during new-onset T1D (day 10 after diabetes onset), can reverse hyperglycemia without relapse (P<0.001), maintain normal blood insulin levels (P<0.001), and preserve islet cell mass. Compared to diabetic mice not undergoing HSCT, syn-BMT, results in restoration of Tregs in spleens (P<0.01), increased Foxp3 mRNA expression (P<0.01) and increased Foxp3 protein expression (P<0.05). This diabetic-remission-inducing effect occurred in mice receiving bone marrow from either streptozocin-treated diabetic or non-diabetic normal donors. We conclude that autologous HSCT remission of diabetes is more than transient immune suppression, and is capable of prolonged remission-induction via regeneration of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs.

  1. Pre-pubertal onset of type 1 diabetes and appearance of retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Porta, M; Dalmasso, P; Grassi, G; Marena, S; Maurino, M; Passera, P; Trento, M

    2004-06-01

    It was suggested that the years of diabetes preceding puberty may not contribute to the development of retinopathy but evidence for this is conflicting. To verify the influence of pre-pubertal diabetes, we compared the correlations between prevalence of retinopathy and diabetes duration in patients who developed type 1 diabetes before and after puberty. Six hundred and twenty-eight patients with diabetes onset at age< or =29, on insulin treatment and aged< or =60 at the time of screening for retinopathy were considered retrospectively. Pre-pubertal age was defined as 0-12 in males and 0-11 in females. Two hundred patients had developed diabetes before puberty and 428 after puberty. Screening was by ophthalmoscopy + 35 mm photography or digital photography. Prevalence of retinopathy was lower among patients with pre-pubertal onset and diabetes durations 10-14 and 15-19 years (p=0.006 and p=0.003, respectively) but prevalence rates became similar after 20 yrs duration. That retinopathy is infrequent and mild during childhood, is probably due to the short duration of diabetes rather than a specific protective effect of pre-puberty. After 20 years' duration, however, the prevalence of retinopathy is no longer influenced by age at onset, suggesting that, in the longer term, pre-pubertal years do contribute to the onset of retinopathy.

  2. Youth-onset type 2 diabetes among american indians and alaska natives.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Youth-onset type 2 diabetes has emerged as a significant public health concern for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Data from the National Institutes of Health longitudinal epidemiological study among the Pima Indians of southern Arizona and the Indian Health Service continue to document a rising incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes among American Indian and Alaska Native youth. Although national trends related to lack of physical activity and to unhealthy nutrition behaviors have contributed to the epidemic, the adverse conditions created by poverty, social injustice, trauma, and cultural disruption are also important in understanding the underlying causes for this public health crisis. This adverse environment is likely to provide little support for healthy nutrition and physical activity behaviors as well as other diabetes self-care behaviors. Known risk factors from the Pima Indian studies, such as intrauterine exposure to diabetes, bottle-feeding, and obesity, provide a basis for worthwhile intervention strategies. In this article, the author will review the current literature on the epidemiology of youth-onset type 2 diabetes among American Indians and Alaska Natives, discuss causes for the diabetes epidemic among American Indians and Alaska Natives, review risk factors for youth-onset type 2 diabetes in this population, and share promising youth physical activity promotion programs created and implemented specifically for American Indian and Alaska Native youth. However, more research on interventions to address the Native communities' psychosocial issues and concerns around youth-onset type 2 diabetes is urgently needed.

  3. Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young: What Do Clinicians Need to Know?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a monogenic form of diabetes that is characterized by an early onset, autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and a primary defect in pancreatic β-cell function. MODY represents less than 2% of all diabetes cases and is commonly misdiagnosed as type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. At least 13 MODY subtypes with distinct genetic etiologies have been identified to date. A correct genetic diagnosis is important as it often leads to personalized treatment for those with diabetes and enables predictive genetic testing for their asymptomatic relatives. Next-generation sequencing may provide an efficient method for screening mutations in this form of diabetes as well as identifying new MODY genes. In this review, I discuss a current update on MODY in the literatures and cover the studies that have been performed in Korea. PMID:26706916

  4. Adult Onset Vitiligo: Multivariate Analysis Suggests the Need for a Thyroid Screening.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, L; Colucci, R; Cammi, A; Dragoni, F; Moretti, S

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are limited epidemiological studies evaluating the effect of age at onset on disease features in vitiligo. Objectives. To identify factors associated with adult onset vitiligo in comparison with childhood onset vitiligo. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively collected medical records of 191 patients. Such records included clinical examination, personal and familial medical history, laboratory evaluations, concomitant vitiligo treatment and drug assumption. Results. 123 patients with a disease onset after the age of 40 (adult onset vitiligo) were compared with 68 patients who developed vitiligo before the age of 12 (childhood onset vitiligo). Multivariate analysis revealed that personal history of thyroid diseases (P = 0.04; OR 0.4), stress at onset (P = 0.002; OR = 0.34), personal history of autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) (P = 0.003; OR = 0.23), and thyroid nodules (P = 0.001; OR 0.90) were independently associated with adult onset vitiligo, whereas family history of dermatological diseases (P = 0.003; OR = 2.87) and Koebner phenomenon (P < 0.001; OR = 4.73) with childhood onset vitiligo. Moreover, in the adult onset group, concomitant thyroid disease preceded vitiligo in a statistically significant number of patients (P = 0.014). Conclusions. Childhood onset and adult onset vitiligo have different clinical features. In particular, ATD and thyroid nodules were significantly associated with adult onset vitiligo, suggesting that a thyroid screening should be recommended in this group of patients.

  5. Adult Onset Vitiligo: Multivariate Analysis Suggests the Need for a Thyroid Screening

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, L.; Cammi, A.; Dragoni, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are limited epidemiological studies evaluating the effect of age at onset on disease features in vitiligo. Objectives. To identify factors associated with adult onset vitiligo in comparison with childhood onset vitiligo. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively collected medical records of 191 patients. Such records included clinical examination, personal and familial medical history, laboratory evaluations, concomitant vitiligo treatment and drug assumption. Results. 123 patients with a disease onset after the age of 40 (adult onset vitiligo) were compared with 68 patients who developed vitiligo before the age of 12 (childhood onset vitiligo). Multivariate analysis revealed that personal history of thyroid diseases (P = 0.04; OR 0.4), stress at onset (P = 0.002; OR = 0.34), personal history of autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) (P = 0.003; OR = 0.23), and thyroid nodules (P = 0.001; OR 0.90) were independently associated with adult onset vitiligo, whereas family history of dermatological diseases (P = 0.003; OR = 2.87) and Koebner phenomenon (P < 0.001; OR = 4.73) with childhood onset vitiligo. Moreover, in the adult onset group, concomitant thyroid disease preceded vitiligo in a statistically significant number of patients (P = 0.014). Conclusions. Childhood onset and adult onset vitiligo have different clinical features. In particular, ATD and thyroid nodules were significantly associated with adult onset vitiligo, suggesting that a thyroid screening should be recommended in this group of patients. PMID:27747240

  6. Statins and risk for new-onset diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dukyong; Sheen, Seung Soo; Lee, Sukhyang; Choi, Yong Jun; Park, Rae Woong; Lim, Hong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although concern regarding the increased risk for new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) after statin treatment has been raised, there has been a lack of evidence in real-world clinical practice, particularly in East Asians. We investigated whether statin use is associated with risk for NODM in Koreans. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the clinical research database from electronic health records. The study cohort consisted of 8265 statin-exposed and 33,060 matched nonexposed patients between January 1996 and August 2013. Matching at a 1:4 ratio was performed using a propensity score based on age, gender, baseline glucose levels (mg/dL), and hypertension. The comparative risks for NODM with various statins (atorvastatin, fluvastatin, pitavastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and simvastatin) were estimated by both statin exposure versus matched nonexposed and within-class comparisons. The incidence of NODM among the statin-exposed group (6.000 per 1000 patient-years [PY]) was higher than that of the nonexposed group (3.244 per 1000 PY). The hazard ratio (HR) of NODM after statin exposure was 1.872 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.432–2.445). Male gender (HR, 1.944; 95% CI, 1.497–2.523), baseline glucose per mg/dL (HR, 1.014; 95% CI, 1.013–1.016), hypertension (HR, 2.232; 95% CI, 1.515–3.288), and thiazide use (HR, 1.337; 95% CI, 1.081–1.655) showed an increased risk for NODM, while angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker showed a decreased risk (HR, 0.774; 95% CI, 0.668–0.897). Atorvastatin-exposed patients showed a higher risk for NODM than their matched nonexposed counterparts (HR, 1.939; 95% CI, 1.278–2.943). However, the risk for NODM was not significantly different among statins in within-class comparisons. In conclusion, an increased risk for NODM was observed among statin users in a practical healthcare setting in Korea. PMID:27861386

  7. Influenza immunization in adults with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Feery, B J; Hartman, L J; Hampson, A W; Proietto, J

    1983-01-01

    The antibody responses to influenza vaccination of a group of adult diabetic patients were compared with responses in a healthy group of regular volunteer vaccinees. The initial and final geometric mean hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titers were lower in the patient group, but the relative increase in titers was greater for each of the vaccine components. The percentage of fourfold rises in individual titers was greater in the diabetic group than in the control group. It was concluded that patients with diabetes mellitus responded normally to influenza vaccination. This was confirmed in an additional study. There was no significant difference in the antibody responses of patients treated with insulin or oral antidiabetic agents. There was no impairment of diabetic control as a result of influenza vaccination when this was evaluated by measuring the concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin, or by random blood glucose estimations. There was no significant change in the serum insulin level after immunization in patients on oral diabetic agents. It was concluded that influenza vaccination was safe and effective in adult diabetic patients.

  8. Endocrine disruptor vinclozolin induced epigenetic transgenerational adult-onset disease.

    PubMed

    Anway, Matthew D; Leathers, Charles; Skinner, Michael K

    2006-12-01

    The fetal basis of adult disease is poorly understood on a molecular level and cannot be solely attributed to genetic mutations or a single etiology. Embryonic exposure to environmental compounds has been shown to promote various disease states or lesions in the first generation (F1). The current study used the endocrine disruptor vinclozolin (antiandrogenic compound) in a transient embryonic exposure at the time of gonadal sex determination in rats. Adult animals from the F1 generation and all subsequent generations examined (F1-F4) developed a number of disease states or tissue abnormalities including prostate disease, kidney disease, immune system abnormalities, testis abnormalities, and tumor development (e.g. breast). In addition, a number of blood abnormalities developed including hypercholesterolemia. The incidence or prevalence of these transgenerational disease states was high and consistent across all generations (F1-F4) and, based on data from a previous study, appears to be due in part to epigenetic alterations in the male germ line. The observations demonstrate that an environmental compound, endocrine disruptor, can induce transgenerational disease states or abnormalities, and this suggests a potential epigenetic etiology and molecular basis of adult onset disease.

  9. Diabetes and Adult Day Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabelko, Holly I.; DeCoster, Vaughn A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a profile of individuals with diabetes who receive services in adult day centers. This exploratory study uses an administrative data set (N = 280) from five programs in central Ohio to examine four areas: demographics, health and mental health, financial and social resources, and disenrollment status. Older…

  10. Diabetes and Adult Day Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabelko, Holly I.; DeCoster, Vaughn A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a profile of individuals with diabetes who receive services in adult day centers. This exploratory study uses an administrative data set (N = 280) from five programs in central Ohio to examine four areas: demographics, health and mental health, financial and social resources, and disenrollment status. Older…

  11. Efficacy of Anakinra in Refractory Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Blanco, Ricardo; Riancho-Zarrabeitia, Leyre; Castañeda, Santos; Olivé, Alejandro; Riveros, Anne; Velloso-Feijoo, María.L.; Narváez, Javier; Jiménez-Moleón, Inmaculada; Maiz-Alonso, Olga; Ordóñez, Carmen; Bernal, José A.; Hernández, María V.; Sifuentes-Giraldo, Walter A.; Gómez-Arango, Catalina; Galíndez-Agirregoikoa, Eva; Blanco-Madrigal, Juan; Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; del Blanco-Barnusell, Jordi; De Dios, Juan R.; Moreno, Mireia; Fiter, Jordi; Riscos, Marina de los; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Valls, María J.; González-Vela, M. Carmen; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Pina, Trinitario; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is often refractory to standard therapy. Anakinra (ANK), an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, has demonstrated efficacy in single cases and small series of AOSD. We assessed the efficacy of ANK in a series of AOSD patients. Multicenter retrospective open-label study. ANK was used due to lack of efficacy to standard synthetic immunosuppressive drugs and in some cases also to at least 1 biologic agent. Forty-one patients (26 women/15 men) were recruited. They had a mean age of 34.4 ± 14 years and a median [interquartile range (IQR)] AOSD duration of 3.5 [2–6] years before ANK onset. At that time the most common clinical features were joint manifestations 87.8%, fever 78%, and cutaneous rash 58.5%. ANK yielded rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement. After 1 year of therapy, the frequency of joint and cutaneous manifestations had decreased to 41.5% and to 7.3% respectively, fever from 78% to 14.6%, anemia from 56.1% to 9.8%, and lymphadenopathy from 26.8% to 4.9%. A dramatic improvement of laboratory parameters was also achieved. The median [IQR] prednisone dose was also reduced from 20 [11.3–47.5] mg/day at ANK onset to 5 [0–10] at 12 months. After a median [IQR] follow-up of 16 [5–50] months, the most important side effects were cutaneous manifestations (n = 8), mild leukopenia (n = 3), myopathy (n = 1), and infections (n = 5). ANK is associated with rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement, even in nonresponders to other biologic agents. However, joint manifestations are more refractory than the systemic manifestations. PMID:26426623

  12. Refractory Genital HPV Infection and Adult-Onset Still Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Zheng, Heyi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a systemic autoimmune disease (AIID) that can develop after exposure to infectious agents. Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been reported to induce or exacerbate AIIDs, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). No guidelines are available for the management of genital warts in AOSD. Case report and literature review. We report a patient who was diagnosed AOSD in the setting of refractory and recurrent genital HPV infection, demonstrating a possible link between HPV infection and AOSD. In addition, we also discuss the management of genital warts in patients with AOSD. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of AOSD with genital HPV infection have been reported in literature. We then conclude that the patient AOSD may be triggered by primary HPV infection. Larger number of patient samples is needed to confirm whether HPV could trigger AOSD. PMID:27082556

  13. Coexistence of sarcoidosis and adult onset Still disease.

    PubMed

    Semiz, Huseyin; Kobak, Senol

    2017-05-19

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic, inflammatory disease with unknown cause characterized by non-caseating granuloma formations. It can be presented with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, skin lesions, eye involvement and locomotor system findings. Adult onset Still disease (AOSD) is a chronic inflammatory disease which presents with fever, arthritis and typical skin rashes. The disease is rare and can be misdiagnosed due to the absence of typical clinical and laboratory findings. The association of sarcoidosis and AOSD has not been previously reported in the literature. Herein we reported the development of AOSD in a patient followed by the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. The patient did not respond to high-dose corticosteroids and methotrexate therapy, and the disease was under control with anti-IL-6 (Tocilizumab) drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  14. Autoimmune diabetes not requiring insulin at diagnosis (latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult): definition, characterization, and potential prevention.

    PubMed

    Pozzilli, P; Di Mario, U

    2001-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by the immune-mediated destruction of islet insulin-secreting beta-cells. This chronic destructive process is associated with both cellular and humoral immune changes in the peripheral blood that can be detected months or even years before the onset of clinical diabetes. Throughout this prediabetic period, metabolic changes, including altered glucose tolerance and reduced insulin secretion, deteriorate at variable rates and eventually result in clinical diabetes. A fraction of individuals with humoral immunological changes have clinical diabetes that initially is not insulin-requiring. The onset of diabetes in these patients is usually in adult life, and because their diabetes is at least initially not insulin-requiring, they appear clinically to be affected by type 2 diabetes. Such patients probably have the same disease process as patients with type 1 diabetes in that they have similar HLA genetic susceptibility as well as autoantibodies to islet antigens, low insulin secretion, and a higher rate of progression to insulin dependency. These patients are defined as being affected by an autoimmune type of diabetes not requiring insulin at diagnosis, which is also named latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA). Special attention should be paid to diagnose such patients because therapy may influence the speed of progression toward insulin dependency, and in this respect, efforts should be made to protect residual C-peptide secretion. LADA can serve as a model for designing new strategies for prevention of type 1 diabetes but also as a target group for prevention in its own right.

  15. New-onset diabetes mellitus after living-donor liver transplantation: association with graft synthetic function.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Shintaro; Kaido, Toshimi; Iida, Taku; Yoshizawa, Atsushi; Okajima, Hideaki; Uemoto, Shinji

    2017-06-01

    It is now known that post-transplant graft function after deceased-donor liver transplantation and living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) differ; however, there is no report assessing the relationship between graft function and the development of new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation (NODAT). We conducted this study to identify the predictive risk factors for NODAT, including graft function after LDLT. The subjects of this study were 175 adult recipients who underwent LDLT at Kyoto University Hospital between 2006 and 2010, and survived for more than 3 months (median observation period, 1046 days). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year incidences of NODAT after LDLT were 26.1, 32.0, and 33.4%, respectively. Pre-transplant diabetes was associated with poor survival (p = 0.0048), whereas NODAT was not associated with patient survival. In the multivariate analysis, recipient age ≥40, a tacrolimus trough level ≥8 ng/mL 3 months after LDLT, and cholinesterase (ChE) <185 IU/L 3 months after LDLT were the independent risk factors for NODAT. Poor graft synthetic function 3 months after LDLT as well as older age of the recipient and a higher tacrolimus concentration were strongly associated with NODAT development after LDLT.

  16. Stroke after adult-onset epilepsy: a population-based retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wannamaker, Braxton B; Wilson, Dulaney A; Malek, Angela M; Selassie, Anbesaw W

    2015-02-01

    older warrants consideration for occult cerebrovascular disease as an etiology of the epilepsy, which may also increase the risk of subsequent stroke. Somatic comorbidities frequently associated with epilepsy include comorbid conditions that share the same underlying pathology with stroke (i.e., hypertension, hyperlipidemia, myocardial infarction, diabetes, and arteriosclerosis). This increased risk of stroke in patients with adult-onset epilepsy should dictate the evaluation and management of stroke risk factors to prevent stroke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Evaluation of the transition from pediatric to adult diabetic unit for adolescents with type 1 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Martín-Frías, M; Alvarez, M A; Yelmo, R; Alonso, M; Barrio, R

    2014-12-01

    The transition between pediatric and adult care for young people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is often poorly managed, with adverse consequences for health, as well as a decrease in the follow-up. To analyze the metabolic control and the degree of satisfaction in a group of patients with T1D after being transferred from the Pediatric Diabetes Unit (PDU) to Adult Diabetes Unit (ADU). Retrospective study in a cohort of 49 patients (43% female) with T1D. The age at diagnosis and transfer to ADU, time of onset of the disease, metabolic control (HbA1c), presence of diabetic complications and characteristics of medical follow-up were analysed using the statistics program: SPSS, version 17.0. Mean age at diagnosis 8.3±4.6 years and transfer to ADU 19.2±1.8 years. Mean time since onset of T1D in pediatrics, adults and overall: 10.8±5.0, 4.1±2.6 and 15.0±5.7 years, respectively. The 6% of adult patients were not being medically tracked. Among adults, 25% did not provide data about chronic complications, and 6% did not know their last HbA1c. The metabolic control after their transfer to the ADU worsened in 52% of the patients (HbA1c +0.79±0.70%). No correlation was found between the time since onset and the HbA1c value. Degree of satisfaction was either good or very good in 96% of patients in the PDU and 74% in ADU. Better planning for the transfer of pediatric patients with T1D to ADU is highly recommended, in order to avoid deterioration of control and/or loss of follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Type-2 diabetes family history delays the onset of type-1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zalloua, P A; Shbaklo, H; Halaby, G; Terwedow, H; Xu, X; Azar, S T

    2002-07-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease leading to insulin deficiency. Its occurrence is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region on chromosome 6 accounts for 45% of the genetic susceptibility for the disease, mainly the HLA-DQB1*0201 and HLA-DQB1*0302 alleles. Among the environmental factors involved, early exposure to cow's milk seems to be a trigger. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of T1D in 253 Lebanese Caucasian patients, in relation to HLA-DQB1*0201, HLA-DQB1*0302, HLA-DQB1*0602, gender, and early exposure to cow's milk, as well as to family history of T1D and type-2 diabetes (T2D). Our genetic analysis results show that in the patients studied, 77% and 40% were positive for BQ1*0201 and BQ1*0302, respectively. As for BQ1*0602, only 0.8% of patients were positive for this T1D protective allele, compared with 24% among the controls. Furthermore, our results did not show any gender preference of the disease or any effects of early intake of cow's milk on the age at onset of T1D. When family history of T2D or T1D was studied, our results show a novel finding whereby an immediate family history of T2D, but not T1D, delays the age at onset of T1D.

  19. Impulse Control, Diabetes-Specific Self-Efficacy, and Diabetes Management Among Emerging Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Kathleen M.; Slaven, James E.; Weaver, Michael T.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationships among impulse control, diabetes-specific self-efficacy, and diabetes management behaviors among emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods A total of 204 high school seniors (M = 18.25 years, SD = .45, 55.9% females) with type 1 diabetes self-reported on impulse control, diabetes-specific self-efficacy, and diabetes management behaviors during the past 3 months. Mediation and path analyses were used to address aims. Results Greater impulse control was associated with better diabetes management among these emerging adults. In addition, diabetes-specific self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between impulse control and diabetes management. Conclusions Impulse control and diabetes-specific self-efficacy may be important in the management of type 1 diabetes among emerging adults. Diabetes-specific self-efficacy may play an important role in successful diabetes management among youth with lower impulse control. PMID:23115219

  20. Acute-Onset Type 1 Diabetes that Developed During the Administration of Olanzapine

    PubMed Central

    Iwaku, Kenji; Otuka, Fumiko; Taniyama, Matsuo

    2017-01-01

    The patient was 32-year-old man, who received olanzapine for schizophrenia and developed polyuria and thirst without drinking soft-drinks after 4 months. Five months after the initiation of treatment, he developed diabetic ketoacidosis (blood glucose: 490 mg/dL, HbA1c: 15.5%). He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-Ab: 5.6 U/mL, IA-2 Ab: 5.9 U/mL, fasting C-peptide: 0.12 ng/mL) and was put on intensive insulin therapy. At four months after the onset of 1A diabetes, he experienced a honeymoon phase that was sustained until the 40th month of treatment. We hypothesize that the administration of olanzapine to a patient with pre-type 1A diabetes induced marked hyperglycemia and accelerated the onset of type 1A diabetes. PMID:28154279

  1. Two Sides of the Same Coin: Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Common Variable Immune Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Lauren A; Maggadottir, Solrun Melkorka; Pantell, Matthew S; Lugar, Patricia; Rundles, Charlotte Cunningham; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2017-07-28

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a complex, heterogeneous immunodeficiency characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections, and poor antibody response to vaccination. While antibiotics and immunoglobulin prophylaxis have significantly reduced infectious complications, non-infectious complications of autoimmunity, inflammatory lung disease, enteropathy, and malignancy remain of great concern. Previous studies have suggested that CVID patients diagnosed in childhood are more severely affected by these complications than adults diagnosed later in life. We sought to discern whether the rates of various infectious and non-infectious conditions differed between pediatric-diagnosed (ages 17 or younger) versus adult-diagnosed CVID (ages 18 or older). Using the United States Immunodeficiency Network (USIDNET) database, we performed a retrospective analysis of 457 children and adults with CVID, stratified by age at diagnosis. Chi-squared testing was used to compare pediatric versus adult groups. After correcting for multiple comparisons, we identified few statistically significant differences (p ≤ 0.0004) between pediatric and adult groups. Pediatric-onset CVID patients had more frequent diagnoses of otitis media, developmental delay, and failure to thrive compared with adult-onset CVID patients. Adult CVID patients were more frequently diagnosed with bronchitis, arthritis, depression, and fatigue. Diagnoses of autoimmunity, lymphoma, and other malignancies were higher in adults but not to a significant degree. Serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM) and lymphocyte subsets did not differ significantly between the two groups. When complications of infections and co-morbid conditions were viewed categorically, there were few differences between pediatric-onset and adult-onset CVID patients. These results suggest that pediatric CVID is not a distinct phenotype. Major features were comparable across the groups. This study underscores the need for

  2. [Adult-onset Still's disease. An underdiagnosed condition?].

    PubMed

    Stenstad, T

    1995-11-30

    Adult onset Still's disease is a variant of systemic juvenile chronic arthritis in adulthood. The clinical picture is characterized by high spiking fever, arthralgia/arthritis, transient erythema, acute-phase reaction including elevated ESR, CRP and neutrophilia, resembling acute bacterial infections. Hyperferritinaemia and hepatic dysfunction are usually present, and the patients frequently have a sore throat. Extraarticular features, such as splenomegalia, serositis and pericarditis may be parts of this disease as well. Two cases are described, who were admitted to the Department of Internal Medicine of a small Norwegian hospital. Both patients were subjected to exhaustive and laborious investigations for the purpose of disclosing malignancy and/or septicaemia. Following adequate glucocorticoid therapy, both were asymptomatic after less than a week's treatment and after five months' follow-up. Two sets of diagnostic criteria are presented, having different sensitivity, although almost equal specificity. Still's disease in the adult may be an underdiagnosed clinical entity, but should definitely be considered to be a possible differential diagnosis when investigating suspected malignancy, including lymphoma and febrile conditions suspected of septicaemia.

  3. Delayed onset diabetic striatopathy: Hemichorea-hemiballism one month after a hyperglycemic episode.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiu-Jung; Huang, Poyin

    2017-02-05

    Diabetic striatopathy is an uncommon and life threatening manifestation of diabetes mellitus. It has a tendency to occur in the elderly, female and people of Asian descent. Patients usually present with hemichorea-hemiballism caused by non-ketotic hyperglycemia. However, patients could develop diabetic striatopathy weeks after the hyperglycemic event, even when blood sugar has been well controlled. Herein, we report a case of delayed onset diabetic striatopathy and discuss the importance of detailed history and brain magnetic resonance imaging for making prompt and accurate diagnosis.

  4. Diabetes in Utah among adults: interaction between diabetes and other risk factors for microvascular and macrovascular complications.

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, M C; Smith, K R

    1988-01-01

    From a telephone survey of the health status of a random sample of the general population of Utah, we identified 255 people with adult onset diabetes. We compared them to 622 non-diabetic controls, matched for age, sex, and urban/rural country of residence. We examined diabetes as a risk factor for heart diseases, stroke, and blindness and its interaction with other known risk factors. Diabetes interacted with smoking history so as to increase the risk of stroke, heart disease, and blindness. Diabetes also interacted with hypertension in their effect on the prevalence of blindness and, to a small extent, heart disease. Among the diabetics, duration of diabetes was associated with macrovascular and microvascular complications developing after the diagnosis of diabetes. Those with longer duration of disease showed an increase in risk for microvascular (kidney disease, blindness) and macrovascular (heart disease, stroke, amputations) complications. Although the estimates were imprecise, the effect of duration on macrovascular complications was greater among diabetics with a history of hypertension; the effect on microvascular complications was greater among smokers. The findings are compared to previous studies and the utility of diabetes prevalence data is discussed. PMID:3407819

  5. Prophylactic fenbendazole therapy does not affect the incidence and onset of type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Franke, Deanna D H; Shirwan, Haval

    2006-03-01

    Fenbendazole (FBZ) is a common, highly efficacious broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug used to treat and limit rodent pinworm infections. However, the effect of its prophylactic use on the immune response of rodents is largely undefined. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a model commonly used to study type 1 diabetes (T1D). Parasitic infections will inhibit diabetes development in NOD mice; thus, in the presence of contamination, prophylactic treatment with anthelmintics must be considered to maintain experimental research. Herein, we investigated the prophylactic use of FBZ in NOD mice to determine its effect on the incidence and onset of diabetes, lymphocyte sub-populations and T cell proliferative responses. NOD mice were separated into control and treatment groups. The treatment group received a diet containing FBZ. Animals were monitored for the incidence and onset of T1D. At matched time points, diabetic and non-diabetic mice were killed and splenic lymphocytes analyzed for various cell sub-populations and mitogen-induced proliferative responses using flow cytometry. Treated and control mice were monitored >23 weeks with no detectable effects on the incidence or onset of diabetes. Moreover, no significant differences were detected in lymphocyte sub-populations and mitogen-induced CD4(+) and CD8(+) proliferative responses between control and treatment groups. These results suggest that prophylactic FBZ treatment does not significantly alter the incidence or onset of diabetes in NOD mice. The prophylactic use of FBZ, therefore, presents a viable approach for the prevention of pinworm infection in precious experimental animals with substantial scientific and economic benefits.

  6. New-Onset Diabetes After Acute and Critical Illness: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jivanji, Chirag J; Asrani, Varsha M; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-03-13

    Hyperglycemia is commonly observed during acute and critical illness. Recent studies have investigated the risk of developing diabetes after acute and critical illness, but the relationship between degree of in-hospital hyperglycemia and new-onset diabetes has not been investigated. This study examines the evidence for the relationship between in-hospital hyperglycemia and prevalence of new-onset diabetes after acute and critical illness. A literature search was performed of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Scopus databases for relevant studies published from January 1, 2000, through August 4, 2016. Patients with no history of diabetes before hospital discharge were included in the systematic review. In-hospital glucose concentration was classified as normoglycemia, mild hyperglycemia, or severe hyperglycemia for the meta-analysis. Twenty-three studies were included in the systematic review, and 18 of these (111,078 patients) met the eligibility criteria for the meta-analysis. The prevalence of new-onset diabetes was significantly related to in-hospital glucose concentration and was 4% (95% CI, 2%-7%), 12% (95% CI, 9%-15%), and 28% (95% CI, 18%-39%) for patients with normoglycemia, mild hyperglycemia, and severe hyperglycemia, respectively. The prevalence of new-onset diabetes was not influenced by disease setting, follow-up duration, or study design. In summary, this study found stepwise growth in the prevalence of new-onset diabetes with increasing in-hospital glucose concentration. Patients with severe hyperglycemia are at the highest risk, with 28% developing diabetes after hospital discharge.

  7. Effects of valsartan on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in high-risk hypertensive patients with new-onset diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shinzo; Sawada, Takahisa; Shiraishi, Jun; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

     The KYOTO HEART Study demonstrated that Valsartan Add-on treatment was effective to reduce new-onset diabetes in high-risk hypertensive patients. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of Valsartan Add-on treatment on cardiovascular (CV) events in patients with or without diabetes.  A total of 3,031 patients were divided at baseline: Baseline Diabetes (n=807) and Baseline Non-Diabetes (n=2,224). Among the Non-Diabetes patients, 144 developed diabetes (New-Onset Diabetes) and the remaining patients did not throughout the study (Final Non-Diabetes, n=2,080). Baseline Diabetes showed significantly higher CV event rates than Baseline Non-Diabetes (10.3% vs. 7.0%, P=0.00400). Valsartan Add-on treatment significantly reduced CV event rates than Non-angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) treatment both in Baseline Diabetes (6.7% vs. 13.8%, P=0.00274) and in Baseline Non-Diabetes (5.0% vs. 8.9%, P=0.00036), respectively. New-Onset Diabetes showed a similar CV event rate (12.5%) to Baseline Diabetes (10.3%) but the event rate was significantly higher than that of Final Non-Diabetes (6.6%, P=0.0065). In the New-Onset Diabetes, Valsartan add-on treatment significantly reduced CV event rate than Non-ARB treatment (5.2% vs. 17.4%, P=0.04601).  CV event risk in New-Onset Diabetes was relatively equivalent to Baseline Diabetes. Valsartan Add-on treatment was effective for the reduction of CV events not only in Baseline Diabetes but also in New-Onset Diabetes.

  8. Parenchymal lung involvement in adult-onset Still disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Cottin, Vincent; Jamilloux, Yvan; Hot, Arnaud; Gaillard-Coadon, Agathe; Durieu, Isabelle; Broussolle, Christiane; Iwaz, Jean; Sève, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Parenchymal lung involvement (PLI) in adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) has seldom, if ever, been studied. We examine here retrospective cohort AOSD cases and present a review of the literature (1971–2014) on AOSD-related PLI cases. Patients with PLI were identified in 57 AOSD cases. For inclusion, the patients had to fulfill Yamaguchi or Fautrel classification criteria, show respiratory symptoms, and have imaging evidence of pulmonary involvement, and data allowing exclusion of infectious, cardiogenic, toxic, or iatrogenic cause of PLI should be available. This AOSD + PLI group was compared with a control group (non–PLI-complicated AOSD cases from the same cohort). AOSD + PLI was found in 3 out of the 57 patients with AOSD (5.3%) and the literature mentioned 27 patients. Among these 30 AOSD + PLI cases, 12 presented an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the remaining 18 another PLI. In the latter, a nonspecific interstitial pneumonia computed tomography pattern prevailed in the lower lobes, pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive lung function, the alveolar differential cell count was neutrophilic in half of the cases, and the histological findings were consistent with bronchiolitis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Corticosteroids were fully efficient in all but 3 patients. Ten out of 12 ARDS cases occurred during the first year of the disease course. All ARDS-complicated AOSD cases received corticosteroids with favorable outcomes in 10 (2 deceased). Most PLIs occurred during the systemic onset of AOSD. PLI may occur in 5% of AOSDs, of which ARDS is the most severe. Very often, corticosteroids are efficient in controlling this complication. PMID:27472698

  9. Direct Diabetes-Related Costs in Young Patients with Early-Onset, Long-Lasting Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Straßburger, Klaus; Flechtner-Mors, Marion; Hungele, Andreas; Beyer, Peter; Placzek, Kerstin; Hermann, Ulrich; Schumacher, Andrea; Freff, Markus; Stahl-Pehe, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate diabetes-related direct health care costs in pediatric patients with early-onset type 1 diabetes of long duration in Germany. Research Design and Methods Data of a population-based cohort of 1,473 subjects with type 1 diabetes onset at 0–4 years of age within the years 1993–1999 were included (mean age 13.9 (SD 2.2) years, mean diabetes duration 10.9 (SD 1.9) years, as of 31.12.2007). Diabetes-related health care services utilized in 2007 were derived from a nationwide prospective documentation system (DPV). Health care utilization was valued in monetary terms based on inpatient and outpatient medical fees and retail prices (perspective of statutory health insurance). Multiple regression models were applied to assess associations between direct diabetes-related health care costs per patient-year and demographic and clinical predictors. Results Mean direct diabetes-related health care costs per patient-year were €3,745 (inter-quartile range: 1,943–4,881). Costs for glucose self-monitoring were the main cost category (28.5%), followed by costs for continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (25.0%), diabetes-related hospitalizations (22.1%) and insulin (18.4%). Female gender, pubertal age and poor glycemic control were associated with higher and migration background with lower total costs. Conclusions Main cost categories in patients with on average 11 years of diabetes duration were costs for glucose self-monitoring, insulin pump therapy, hospitalization and insulin. Optimization of glycemic control in particular in pubertal age through intensified care with improved diabetes education and tailored insulin regimen, can contribute to the reduction of direct diabetes-related costs in this patient group. PMID:23967077

  10. Young-onset parkinsonism in a Hong Kong Chinese man with adult-onset Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chloe Miu; Sheng, Bun; Lee, Hencher Han-chih; Lau, Kwok-kwong; Chan, Wing-tak; Lam, Ching-wan; Chan, Yan-wo

    2011-04-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a heterogeneous group of disorders varied in genetic etiologies, clinical presentations, and radiological features. NBIA is an iron homeostasis disorder with progressive iron accumulation in the central nervous systems and is clinically characterized by extrapyramidal movement abnormalities, retinal pigmentary changes, and cognitive impairment. Panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (Hallervorden-Spatz disease) is the commonest disorder of NBIA with a prevalence of one-three per million. Clinically, it is classified into early-onset childhood, atypical late-onset, and adult-onset type. Adult-onset type is rarer. We report the first case of adult-onset panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration in Hong Kong in a 28-year-old Chinese man who presented with pure young-onset parkinsonism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed the presence of eye-of-the-tiger sign. Two compound heterozygous mutations PANK2 NM_153638.2: c.445G > T; NP_705902.2: p.E149X and PANK2 NM_153638.2: c.1133A > G; NP_705902.2: p.D378G were detected. Parkinsonism per se is a very heterogeneous phenotypic group. In view of the readily available genetic analysis of PANK2, panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration should be considered in adult patients with young-onset parkinsonism with or without the eye-of-the-tiger sign. The exact diagnosis offers a different management approach and genetic counseling. NBIA is likely under- or misdiagnosed in Hong Kong Chinese.

  11. Juvenile-onset OCD: clinical features in children, adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Mancebo, M C; Garcia, A M; Pinto, A; Freeman, J B; Przeworski, A; Stout, R; Kane, J S; Eisen, J L; Rasmussen, S A

    2008-08-01

    To examine clinical correlates of juvenile-onset OCD across the lifespan. Data collected at the intake interview from 257 consecutive participants with juvenile-onset OCD (20 children, 44 adolescents and 193 adults) in a naturalistic study of the clinical course of OCD were examined. Participants and parents of juvenile participants completed a structured diagnostic interview, rater-administered severity measures and self-report questionnaires. Children and adolescents (i.e. juveniles) shared similar features with the exception of age at onset and OCD symptom expression. Clinically meaningful differences between juvenile and adult participants were also found. Compared with adults, juveniles were more likely to be male, recall an earlier age at OCD onset and have different lifetime comorbidity patterns. Juvenile-onset OCD symptom expression is remarkably similar across the lifespan. However, findings also suggest clinically meaningful differences between juveniles and adults. Future work using a prospective design will improve our understanding of course patterns of juvenile-onset OCD.

  12. Youth-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Consensus Report: Current Status, Challenges, and Priorities

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Kristen J.; Anderson, Barbara J.; Berg, Erika G.; Chiang, Jane L.; Chou, Hubert; Copeland, Kenneth C.; Hannon, Tamara S.; Huang, Terry T.-K.; Lynch, Jane L.; Powell, Jeff; Sellers, Elizabeth; Tamborlane, William V.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a significant and increasing burden in adolescents and young adults. Clear strategies for research, prevention, and treatment of the disease in these vulnerable patients are needed. Evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes in children is different not only from type 1 but also from type 2 diabetes in adults. Understanding the unique pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in youth, as well as the risk of complications and the psychosocial impact, will enable industry, academia, funding agencies, advocacy groups, and regulators to collectively evaluate both current and future research, treatment, and prevention approaches. This Consensus Report characterizes type 2 diabetes in children, evaluates the fundamental differences between childhood and adult disease, describes the current therapeutic options, and discusses challenges to and approaches for developing new treatments. PMID:27486237

  13. The IL-1β Receptor Antagonist SER140 Postpones the Onset of Diabetes in Female Nonobese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cucak, Helena; Hansen, Gitte; Vrang, Niels; Skarsfeldt, Torben; Steiness, Eva; Jelsing, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is known to stimulate proinflammatory immune responses and impair β-cell function and viability, all critical events in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Here we evaluate the effect of SER140, a small peptide IL-1β receptor antagonist, on diabetes progression and cellular pancreatic changes in female nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Eight weeks of treatment with SER140 reduced the incidence of diabetes by more than 50% compared with vehicle, decreased blood glucose, and increased plasma insulin. Additionally, SER140 changed the endocrine and immune cells dynamics in the NOD mouse pancreas. Together, the data suggest that SER140 treatment postpones the onset of diabetes in female NOD mice by interfering with IL-1β activated pathways. PMID:26953152

  14. Treatment of adult-onset still's disease: up to date.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae Hyun

    2017-09-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology, and approximately 60-70% of patients may develop a chronic polyphasic form of the disease or a chronic polyarthritis. Due to rarity of disease, treatment of AOSD is not based on controlled study, but on case based experiences. Areas covered: Recently, the application of anti-cytokine therapy based on pathophysiology has resulted in significant progress in the treatment of AOSD. Here, we review current knowledge of the pathogenesis, disease progression, currently available biomarkers of disease activity, standard therapeutic agents, utility of biologic agents, future perspectives for treatment and treatment of macrophage activation syndrome. Expert commentary: Accumulated clinical data suggest that chronic disease can be classified into two subsets: dominant systemic disease, and the arthritis subgroup. IL-1 inhibitors may be more efficient for systemic manifestations and IL-6 inhibitor for both joint involvement and systemic manifestations. TNF inhibitors must be reserved for patients with purely chronic articular manifestations. For ideal management of patients, it is very important to measure disease activity accurately during follow up, but no single biomarker has been classified as ideal. New therapeutic agents and composite biomarkers are needed to improve the outcome of patients with AOSD by identifying disease activity properly.

  15. Adult onset Still’s disease with dermatopathic lymphadenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Ahmad Z.; AlSheef, Mohammad; Qureshi, Waqas T.; Amjad, Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still’s disease (AOSD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder involving multiple systems. The symptoms mimic those of lymphomas, therefore, the diagnosis of lymphoma needs to be excluded prior to establishing the diagnosis of AOSD. Another similar condition is dermatopathic lymphadenopathy (DL). In DL, the histopathological appearance of lymph node biopsy may also mimic AOSD. The DL is associated with several systemic pathologies, such as malignant lymphomas, and rarely AOSD. We present a case of a 43-year-old male presented with 3 months history of fatigue, fever, and lymphadenopathy. Initial work-up satisfactorily met the criteria for diagnosis of AOSD. But considering the well-known association of DL with hematological malignancies, detailed pathological studies were considered, including tumor markers to rule out the possibility of malignancy. The patient was started on steroids and showed remarkable recovery within 2 weeks. Evaluation of malignant lymphomas in a patient with DL is important, in order to diagnose AOSD and rule out hematological malignancy. PMID:27761568

  16. Adult-onset hypophosphatemic osteomalacia associated with Sjogren syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guohua; Zhang, Yuwei; Hu, Shuang; Liu, Bin; Kuang, Anren

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Hypophosphatemic osteomalacia (HO) is a metabolic bone disease, exhibiting different etiologies such as genetic mutation, tumor induction, dysimmunity, or renal disease. Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is a connective tissue disorder commonly involving exocrine glands; however kidney involvement is also encountered, leading to abnormal phosphorus metabolism, even HO. Patient concerns: A 47-year-old female patient presented progressively worsening pain in the chest wall, back and bilateral lower extremities as well as muscle weakness was referred to our department. Diagnoses, interventions and outcomes: Due to the laboratory test results, radiographic findings and pathologic results, she was diagnosed with adult-onset HO associated with SS. She was then treated with alkalinization, steroids, neutral phosphate, calcium supplements together with activated vitamin D. So far, she recovered uneventfully with relieved pain and increased serum phosphorus level. Lessons: HO may be secondary to renal tubular acidosis of SS patients, and it might be a diagnostic challenge when the kidney involvement in SS is latent and precede the typical sicca symptoms. PMID:28353596

  17. Epigenetics and developmental programming of adult onset diseases.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Lee; Combes, Alexander N; Moritz, Karen M

    2012-12-01

    Maternal perturbations or sub-optimal conditions during development are now recognized as contributing to the onset of many diseases manifesting in adulthood. This "developmental programming" of disease has been explored using animal models allowing insights into the potential mechanisms involved. Impaired renal development, resulting in a low nephron number, has been identified as a common outcome that is likely to contribute to the development of hypertension in the offspring as adults. Changes in other organs and systems, including the heart and the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, have also been found. Evidence has recently emerged suggesting that epigenetic changes may occur as a result of developmental programming and result in permanent changes in the expression patterns of particular genes. Such epigenetic modifications may be responsible not only for an increased susceptibility to disease for an individual, but indirectly for the establishment of a disease state in a subsequent generation. Further research in this field, particularly examination as to whether epigenetic changes to genes affecting kidney development do occur, are essential to understanding the underlying mechanisms of developmental programming of disease.

  18. Periocular xanthogranulomas associated with severe adult-onset asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobiec, F A; Mills, M D; Hidayat, A A; Dallow, R L; Townsend, D J; Brinker, E A; Charles, N C

    1993-01-01

    This article describes six patients who presented, usually bilaterally, with yellow-orange, elevated, indurated, and nonulcerated xanthomatous eyelid lesions, typically extending into the anterior orbital fat, and sometimes involving the extraocular muscles and the lacrimal gland. Because the eyelids remained intact and because the process did not reach the deep orbital and perioptic connective tissues, visual acuity was well preserved. There is cosmetic morbidity and occasionally motility restriction with advancing involvement of the extraocular muscles. All patients had variably severe adult-onset asthma that required treatment with systemic prednisone and inhalants. No evidence of Erdheim-Chester disease was found in any patient, but the appearance in one patient, after 25 years of follow-up, of a separate subcutaneous necrobiotic xanthogranulomatous lesion in the mandibular region with an associated paraproteinemia, suggests that at least some of our cases might be a mild form of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. For this reason, we would suggest repeated periodic serum protein immunoelectrophoretic studies as well as evaluation for lymphoma. Therapy probably should consist of low doses of periorbital radiotherapy coupled with high doses of corticosteroids. Should this not be successful, then systemic administration of corticosteroids with chemotherapeutic agents might be efficacious, as in necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:8140711

  19. Characteristics in youth indicative of adult-onset Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Paffenbarger, R S; Wing, A L; Hyde, R T

    1977-05-01

    From the college entrance health data of 50,000 male former students, the records of 45 who eventually died of Hodgkin's disease were compared with those of 180 surviving classmates with reference to certain indicator characteristics. Risk ratios of Hodgkin's disease tended to be lower for men who had experienced various common contagious diseases in childhood. This reduced incidence of clinical contagions may signify that: 1) Inadequate early challenge of immune mechanisms left subjects more susceptible to later Hodgkin's disease, whether or not it is of infectious origin; 2) heightened immune mechanisms that led to subclinical attacks of early contagious diseases promoted an autoimmune response that evolved as Hodgkin's disease; or 3) early childhood infections eliminated some subjects who otherwise would have attended college and ultimately developed adult-onset Hodgkin's disease. Also, Hodgkin's disease risk was higher for students who had reported early death of a parent, particularly from cancer. Moreover, the risk tended to be increased among collegians who were obese, heavy cigarette smokers, and coffee drinkers. None of these indicator characteristics was associated with 89 fatal lymphomas of other types that occurred in the same study population.

  20. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  1. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  2. Obesity's Effects on the Onset of Functional Impairment among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Kristi Rahrig

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study has two purposes. First, it determines if there is a relationship between body weight and the onset of functional impairment across time among this sample of older adults. More specifically, it examines if obese older adults are more likely to experience the onset of functional impairment. Second, it explores how health…

  3. Effect of repeated stress in early childhood on the onset of diabetes mellitus in male Spontaneously Diabetic Torii rats.

    PubMed

    Ookawa, Katumasa; Mochizuki, Kazuo; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2008-02-01

    Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) rats were discovered from SD rats and represent a confirmed spontaneous type 2 diabetes mellitus model. We investigated the effect of repeated stress in early childhood on SDT rats fed a high-fat diet, on locomotor activity and on the onset of diabetes mellitus. Regarding stress, a water immersion-restraint stress (WIRS) burden was applied 10 times every other day from 4 weeks of age. The results of the study showed, that the locomotor activity of the young SDT rats was clearly lower than that of the SD rats, and their locomotor activity was inferred to be congenitally low. In addition, the stress-burdened SDT rats showed delayed onset of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance compared with the rats not receiving stress burden. The locomotor activity of SDT rats is less than that of SD rats, and they SDT rats are thought to have poor at spontaneous energy expenditure. On the other hand, the feeding efficiency of the WIRS-burdened SDT rats was reduced, and in comparison with the SDT rats with no WIRS burden, energy expenditure was increased; this is suggested to influence the onset of diabetes mellitus.

  4. Cardiovascular Disease Among Survivors of Adult-Onset Cancer: A Community-Based Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Armenian, Saro H; Xu, Lanfang; Ky, Bonnie; Sun, Canlan; Farol, Leonardo T; Pal, Sumanta Kumar; Douglas, Pamela S; Bhatia, Smita; Chao, Chun

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), including ischemic heart disease, stroke, and heart failure, are well-established late effects of therapy in survivors of childhood and young adult (< 40 years at diagnosis) cancers; less is known regarding CVD in long-term survivors of adult-onset (≥ 40 years) cancer. A retrospective cohort study design was used to describe the magnitude of CVD risk in 36,232 ≥ 2-year survivors of adult-onset cancer compared with matched (age, sex, and residential ZIP code) noncancer controls (n = 73,545) within a large integrated managed care organization. Multivariable regression was used to examine the impact of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs; hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia) on long-term CVD risk in cancer survivors. Survivors of multiple myeloma (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.70; P < .01), carcinoma of the lung/bronchus (IRR, 1.58; P < .01), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (IRR, 1.41; P < .01), and breast cancer (IRR, 1.13; P < .01) had significantly higher CVD risk when compared with noncancer controls. Conversely, prostate cancer survivors had a lower CVD risk (IRR, 0.89; P < .01) compared with controls. Cancer survivors with two or more CVRFs had the highest risk of CVD when compared with noncancer controls with less than two CVRFs (IRR, 1.83 to 2.59; P < .01). Eight-year overall survival was significantly worse among cancer survivors who developed CVD (60%) when compared with cancer survivors without CVD (81%; P < .01). The magnitude of subsequent CVD risk varies according to cancer subtype and by the presence of CVRFs. Overall survival in survivors who develop CVD is poor, emphasizing the need for targeted prevention strategies for individuals at highest risk of developing CVD. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy as a rare cause of slowly progressive muscle weakness with young adult onset.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Meiko Hashimoto; Ohta, Hikari; Izutsu, Koji; Shimizu, Jun; Uesaka, Yoshikazu

    2015-05-01

    Sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy (SLONM) is a rare intractable acquired myopathy characterized by progressive muscle weakness and atrophy, usually with middle to late adult onset. Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT) has been reported to be a promising treatment for SLONM. In this study we performed clinical characterization, muscle histopathological analysis, and muscle power monitoring after auto-PBSCT in a 27-year-old HIV-negative man with monoclonal gammopathy. He showed improved muscle strength after treatment with high-dose melphalan and auto-PBSCT. Considering the recent reports of successful treatment of SLONM, early and correct diagnosis of this condition in association with monoclonal gammopathy is important. SLONM should be added to the list of diseases to consider in the differential diagnosis of progressive muscle weakness with young adult onset. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Separation Anxiety Disorder Across Countries in the World Mental Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Silove, Derrick; Alonso, Jordi; Bromet, Evelyn; Gruber, Mike; Sampson, Nancy; Scott, Kate; Andrade, Laura; Benjet, Corina; de Almeida, Jose Miguel Caldas; De Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Demyttenaere, Koen; Fiestas, Fabian; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; He, Yanling; Karam, Elie; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Murphy, Sam; Villa-Posada, Jose; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The age-at-onset criterion for separation anxiety disorder was removed in DSM-5, making it timely to examine the epidemiology of separation anxiety disorder as a disorder with onsets spanning the life course, using cross-country data. Method The sample included 38,993 adults in 18 countries in the World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health Surveys. The WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to assess a range of DSM-IV disorders that included an expanded definition of separation anxiety disorder allowing onsets in adulthood. Analyses focused on prevalence, age at onset, comorbidity, predictors of onset and persistence, and separation anxiety-related role impairment. Results Lifetime separation anxiety disorder prevalence averaged 4.8% across countries (interquartile range [25th–75th percentiles]=1.4%–6.4%), with 43.1% of lifetime onsets occurring after age 18. Significant time-lagged associations were found between earlier separation anxiety disorder and subsequent onset of internalizing and externalizing DSM-IV disorders and conversely between these disorders and subsequent onset of separation anxiety disorder. Other consistently significant predictors of lifetime separation anxiety disorder included female gender, retrospectively reported childhood adversities, and lifetime traumatic events. These predictors were largely comparable for separation anxiety disorder onsets in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood and across country income groups. Twelve-month separation anxiety disorder prevalence was considerably lower than lifetime prevalence (1.0% of the total sample; interquartile range=0.2%–1.2%). Severe separation anxiety-related 12-month role impairment was significantly more common in the presence (42.4%) than absence (18.3%) of 12-month comorbidity. Conclusions Separation anxiety disorder is a common and highly comorbid disorder that can have onset across the lifespan. Childhood adversity and lifetime trauma are

  7. Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Separation Anxiety Disorder Across Countries in the World Mental Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Silove, Derrick; Alonso, Jordi; Bromet, Evelyn; Gruber, Mike; Sampson, Nancy; Scott, Kate; Andrade, Laura; Benjet, Corina; Caldas de Almeida, Jose Miguel; De Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Demyttenaere, Koen; Fiestas, Fabian; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; He, Yanling; Karam, Elie; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Murphy, Sam; Villa-Posada, Jose; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C

    2015-07-01

    The age-at-onset criterion for separation anxiety disorder was removed in DSM-5, making it timely to examine the epidemiology of separation anxiety disorder as a disorder with onsets spanning the life course, using cross-country data. The sample included 38,993 adults in 18 countries in the World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health Surveys. The WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to assess a range of DSM-IV disorders that included an expanded definition of separation anxiety disorder allowing onsets in adulthood. Analyses focused on prevalence, age at onset, comorbidity, predictors of onset and persistence, and separation anxiety-related role impairment. Lifetime separation anxiety disorder prevalence averaged 4.8% across countries (interquartile range [25th-75th percentiles]=1.4%-6.4%), with 43.1% of lifetime onsets occurring after age 18. Significant time-lagged associations were found between earlier separation anxiety disorder and subsequent onset of internalizing and externalizing DSM-IV disorders and conversely between these disorders and subsequent onset of separation anxiety disorder. Other consistently significant predictors of lifetime separation anxiety disorder included female gender, retrospectively reported childhood adversities, and lifetime traumatic events. These predictors were largely comparable for separation anxiety disorder onsets in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood and across country income groups. Twelve-month separation anxiety disorder prevalence was considerably lower than lifetime prevalence (1.0% of the total sample; interquartile range=0.2%-1.2%). Severe separation anxiety-related 12-month role impairment was significantly more common in the presence (42.4%) than absence (18.3%) of 12-month comorbidity. Separation anxiety disorder is a common and highly comorbid disorder that can have onset across the lifespan. Childhood adversity and lifetime trauma are important antecedents, and adverse effects on

  8. Molecular and phenotypic characteristics of maturity-onset diabetes of the young compared with early onset type 2 diabetes in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Manna; Zhou, Jiao Jiao; Cui, Wenjie; Li, Yan; Yang, Peng; Chen, Xiaoyun; Sheng, Chunjun; Li, Hong; Qu, Shen

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) genes to the etiology of 14 Chinese MODY families and to assess phenotypic differences between patients with MODY but without a known genetic cause of diabetes (MODYX) and those with early onset type 2 diabetes (T2D). The study included 14 MODY probands from unrelated families and 59 patients (age of onset ≤35 years) diagnosed as early onset T2D. A standard meal test and metabolic studies were performed to characterize the clinical features of all patients. All probands with MODY were analyzed for nucleotide variations in promoters, exons, and exon-intron boundaries of 13 known MODY genes by direct DNA sequencing. Mutations in 13 known MODY genes were not present in the 14 Chinese families and they were classified as MODYX. However, different polymorphisms were identified, with I27L (42.9%; 12/28) and S487N (46.4%; 13/28) of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF1α/MODY3) being two most frequent polymorphisms. Two new polymorphisms, namely T412I and D504H, were detected in carboxyl ester lipase (CEL/MODY8). Compared with patients with early onset T2D, patients with MODYX were diagnosed with diabetes at a younger age (28.3 ± 6.5 vs 24.3 ± 6.5 years; P < 0.05) and had a lower body mass index (BMI; 28.3 ± 6.1 vs 24.1 ± 4.3 kg/m(2) ; P < 0.01) and homeostatic model assessment of β-cell function (47.6 [22.2-89.4] vs 18.5 [6.5-33.7]; P < 0.05). Herein we report on 14 Chinese families with MODYX and describe its phenotype. Compared with early onset T2D, MODYX is characterized by lower BMI and decreased insulin-secreting capacity. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Breast-Feeding and Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cardwell, Chris R.; Stene, Lars C.; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Rosenbauer, Joachim; Cinek, Ondrej; Svensson, Jannet; Perez-Bravo, Francisco; Memon, Anjum; Gimeno, Suely G.; Wadsworth, Emma J.K.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Goldacre, Michael J.; Radon, Katja; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Parslow, Roger C.; Chetwynd, Amanda; Karavanaki, Kyriaki; Brigis, Girts; Pozzilli, Paolo; UrbonaitĖ, Brone; Schober, Edith; Devoti, Gabriele; Sipetic, Sandra; Joner, Geir; Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin; de Beaufort, Carine E.; Harrild, Kirsten; Benson, Victoria; Savilahti, Erkki; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Salem, Mona; Rabiei, Samira; Patterson, Chris C.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate if there is a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes in children breastfed or exclusively breastfed by performing a pooled analysis with adjustment for recognized confounders. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Relevant studies were identified from literature searches using MEDLINE, Web of Science, and EMBASE. Authors of relevant studies were asked to provide individual participant data or conduct prespecified analyses. Meta-analysis techniques were used to combine odds ratios (ORs) and investigate heterogeneity between studies. RESULTS Data were available from 43 studies including 9,874 patients with type 1 diabetes. Overall, there was a reduction in the risk of diabetes after exclusive breast-feeding for >2 weeks (20 studies; OR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.64–0.88), the association after exclusive breast-feeding for >3 months was weaker (30 studies; OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.75–1.00), and no association was observed after (nonexclusive) breast-feeding for >2 weeks (28 studies; OR = 0.93, 95% CI 0.81–1.07) or >3 months (29 studies; OR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.78–1.00). These associations were all subject to marked heterogeneity (I2 = 58, 76, 54, and 68%, respectively). In studies with lower risk of bias, the reduced risk after exclusive breast-feeding for >2 weeks remained (12 studies; OR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.75–0.99), and heterogeneity was reduced (I2 = 0%). Adjustments for potential confounders altered these estimates very little. CONCLUSIONS The pooled analysis suggests weak protective associations between exclusive breast-feeding and type 1 diabetes risk. However, these findings are difficult to interpret because of the marked variation in effect and possible biases (particularly recall bias) inherent in the included studies. PMID:22837371

  10. Elevations in Circulating Methylated and Unmethylated Preproinsulin DNA in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Marisa M.; Watkins, Renecia A.; Blum, Janice; Evans-Molina, Carmella; Chalasani, Naga; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Mather, Kieren J.; Tersey, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated ratios of circulating unmethylated to methylated preproinsulin (INS) DNA have been suggested to reflect β-cell death in type 1 diabetes (T1D). We tested the hypothesis that absolute levels (rather than ratios) of unmethylated and methylated INS DNA differ between subjects with new-onset T1D and control subjects and assessed longitudinal changes in these parameters. We used droplet digital PCR to measure levels of unmethylated and methylated INS DNA in serum from subjects at T1D onset and at 8 weeks and 1 year post-onset. Compared with control subjects, levels of both unmethylated and methylated INS DNA were elevated at T1D onset. At 8 weeks post-onset, methylated INS DNA remained elevated, but unmethylated INS DNA fell. At 1 year postonset, both unmethylated and methylated INS DNA returned to control levels. Subjects with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and autoimmune hepatitis exhibited lower levels of unmethylated and methylated INS compared with subjects with T1D at onset and no differences compared with control subjects. Our study shows that elevations in both unmethylated and methylated INS DNA occurs in new-onset T1D and that levels of these DNA species change during T1D evolution. Our work emphasizes the need to consider absolute levels of differentially methylated DNA species as potential biomarkers of disease. PMID:26216854

  11. New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus After Heart Transplantation - Incidence, Risk Factors and Impact on Clinical Outcome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho Jin; Jung, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Joong; Yun, Tae-Jin; Kim, Joon Bum; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

    2017-05-25

    New-onset diabetes mellitus (DM) can occur as a serious complication after heart transplantation, but the comparative data on its clinical impact on survival and on transplant-related adverse events are limited.Methods and Results:We reviewed a total of consecutive 391 patients aged ≥17 years undergoing isolated orthotopic heart transplantation at the present institution from 1992 to 2013. The entire cohort was divided into 3 groups: (1) no diabetes (n=257); (2) pre-existing DM (n=46); and (3) new-onset DM (n=88). Early and long-term clinical outcomes were compared across the 3 groups. Early death occurred in 8 patients (2.0%). Of the 345 non-diabetic patients before transplantation, 88 (25.5%) developed new-onset DM postoperatively. During follow-up, 83 (21.2%) died. On time-varying Cox analysis, new-onset DM was associated with increased risk for overall death (HR, 2.11; 95% CI: 1.26-3.55) and tended to have a greater risk for severe chronic kidney disease (HR, 1.77; 95% CI: 0.94-3.44). Compared with the no-diabetes group, the new-onset DM group had a worse survival rate (P=0.035), but a similar survival rate to that of the pre-existing DM group (P=0.364). New-onset DM has a negative effect on long-term survival and kidney function after heart transplantation. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the relevance of early diagnosis and timely control of new-onset DM to improve long-term survival.

  12. Interleukin 6 SNP rs1800797 associates with the risk of adult-onset asthma.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, T K; Jaakkola, J J K; Jaakkola, M S

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL6) is an inflammatory cytokine that has been suggested to have an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. IL6 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with levels of IL6, and with childhood and prevalent adult asthma. A recent study also suggested that IL6 SNPs associate especially with atopic asthma. However, association of IL6 SNPs with adult-onset asthma has not been studied. In a population-based study of 467 incident adult-onset asthma cases and 613 disease-free controls from South Finland, we analyzed association of 6 tagging SNPs of the IL6 locus with the risk of adult-onset asthma and with atopy. Asthma was clinically diagnosed, and atopy was defined based on Phadiatop test. IL6 SNP rs1800797 associated with the risk of adult-onset asthma in a log additive model, with adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.31 (95% confidence interval 1.09-1.57), and especially with the risk of atopic adult-onset asthma when compared with non-atopic controls, aOR 1.46 (95% CI 1.12-1.90). This is the first study to show an association of IL6 with adult-onset asthma, and especially with atopic adult-onset asthma.

  13. The effect of genetic counseling for adult offspring of patients with type 2 diabetes on attitudes toward diabetes and its heredity: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, M; Tokunaga-Nakawatase, Y; Nishida, J; Kazuma, K

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of diabetes genetic counseling on attitudes toward diabetes and its heredity in relatives of type 2 diabetes patients. This study was an unmasked, randomized controlled trial at a medical check-up center in Japan. Subjects in this study are healthy adults between 30 and 60 years of age who have a family history of type 2 diabetes in their first degree relatives. Participants in the intervention group received a brief genetic counseling session for approximately 10 min. Genetic counseling was structured based on the Health Belief Model. Both intervention and control groups received a booklet for general diabetes prevention. Risk perception and recognition of diabetes, and attitude towards its prevention were measured at baseline, 1 week and 1 year after genetic counseling. Participants who received genetic counseling showed significantly higher recognition about their sense of control over diabetes onset than control group both at 1 week and 1 year after the session. On the other hand, anxiety about diabetes did not change significantly. The findings show that genetic counseling for diabetes at a medical check center helped adults with diabetes family history understand they are able to exert control over the onset of their disease through lifestyle modification.

  14. Adult onset Still's disease: review of 41 cases.

    PubMed

    Riera, E; Olivé, Al; Narváez, J; Holgado, S; Santo, P; Mateo, L; Bianchi, M M; Nolla, J M

    2011-01-01

    To describe the clinical, laboratory and radiological features, treatment and prognosis of patients with adult onset Still's disease (AOSD). Specific clinical features were retrospectively recorded in 41 patients fulfilling the Yamaguchi criteria. Patients were reviewed in two academic hospitals with a referral area of 700,000-1,000,000 inhabitants. Laboratory tests including haemogram, ferritin, biochemistry and autoimmunity were reviewed. Radiological studies, treatment and ACR functional class were determined. Forty-one patients with AOSD were identified, 25 of whom were female. Mean age at diagnosis: 38.19 years (range 17-68). Feverish polyarthritis was the most common clinical presentation. Acute phase reactants were invariably high in all patients. Serum ferritin levels were elevated in 86% of patients. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies) were negative in all patients except one. The course of the disease was monocyclic in 44% of the patients, polycyclic in 26%, and chronic articular in 30%. ACR class was as follows: 29 (72.5%) class I, 7 (17.5%) class II, 2 (5%) class III and 2 (5%) class IV. As for the treatment received, aspirin or NSAIDs controlled the disease in eight patients (19.5%) and high-dose corticosteroids (0.5-1 mg/kg/day) in 32 (78%). Almost half of the patients (49%) required an additional diseasemodifying agent, usually methotrexate. Finally, in seven of them (17%) a biological treatment with TNF-α or specially anti-IL-1 had to be added to control the disease. The clinical and laboratory findings were similar to previous studies. Anti-CCP antibodies were almost always negative. A monocyclic course was associated with a good prognosis. Most of the patients were in ACR functional class I and II. Biological agents were required in 7 patients (17%).

  15. Childhood abuse and adult-onset asthma among Peruvian women.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Dipti; Gelaye, Bizu; Zhong, Qiu-Yue; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2017-06-26

    Childhood abuse has been found to be associated with adult-onset asthma; however, this association has not been studied in low- and middle-income countries with a high burden of gender-based violence, including childhood abuse. We examined the odds of asthma diagnosed at age 18 or older in relation to history of physical and sexual abuse among Peruvian pregnant women. This cross-sectional study collected demographic characteristics, history of abuse and asthma diagnoses from 3081 pregnant women. Logistic regression procedures estimated adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (aOR, [95% CI]) for asthma diagnoses in relation to abuse. Overall, 71% of the women reported a history of abuse (<18 years), and asthma was diagnosed among 2.6% of the cohort participants. The prevalence of physical only, sexual only and both physical and sexual childhood abuse was 38, 8 and 25%, respectively. The history of physical only (1.16, [0.63-2.17]), sexual only (2.11, [0.92-4.84]) or both physical and sexual childhood abuse (1.75, [0.94-3.29]) was positively associated with increased odds of asthma, although the associations were not statistically significant in the multivariate analysis. However, the odds of asthma increased with increasing numbers of abuse events (ptrend = 0.01). Women who reported ≥3 abuse events had an increased odds of asthma (1.88, [1.06-3.34]). Our results do not provide convincing evidence that childhood abuse is associated with asthma among pregnant Peruvian women; however, we were able to demonstrate that an increased number of abuse events are associated with asthma. Further research is required to better understand the effects of abuse on asthma.

  16. The relationships among health functioning indicators and depression in older adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Amoako, Emelia P; Gruber, Kenneth J; Rossen, Eileen K

    2007-02-01

    A common health problem among the elderly with diabetes is the onset of depressive symptoms that can adversely affect self-care and control of diabetes. The study examined the relationships of gender, race, comorbid conditions, symptom distress, and functional status with depression in a sample (N = 55) of older adults with diabetes. Most participants were female and black; mean age was 73 years. Gender and symptom distress were the strongest predictors of depression, accounting for 53% of the variance in depression. Although the sample was reasonably high functioning with only moderate levels of symptom distress, these findings serve as an important reminder for nurses that even moderate levels of symptom distress may be an indicator of depressive symptomatology among older diabetic adults.

  17. Comparison of outcomes in adults with pediatric-onset morphea and those with adult-onset morphea: a cross-sectional study from the morphea in adults and children cohort.

    PubMed

    Condie, Daniel; Grabell, Daniel; Jacobe, Heidi

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have examined outcomes in adults with pediatric-onset morphea. The objective of the present study was to compare clinical outcomes and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adults with onset of morphea in childhood to those in patients with adult onset of morphea. Participants in the study were drawn from the Morphea in Adults and Children cohort and included 68 adults with pediatric-onset morphea and 234 patients with adult-onset morphea. Outcome measures included the Localized Scleroderma Cutaneous Assessment Tool (LoSCAT), physical examination findings, and HRQOL questionnaires. Adults with pediatric-onset morphea were younger, had longer disease duration, and were more likely to have the linear subtype of morphea. Patients with pediatric-onset disease were less likely to have active disease. Among patients with active disease, those with pediatric-onset morphea had less disease activity as measured by the LoSCAT. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had higher severity of disease damage when measured by the physician's global assessment of damage, but had similar levels of disease damage when measured by the Localized Scleroderma Skin Damage Index. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had more favorable HRQOL scores for all measures, all of which were statistically significantly different from those in patients with adult-onset morphea. Adults with pediatric-onset morphea differ from patients with adult-onset disease with respect to disease subtype, severity of disease activity and damage, and levels of HRQOL. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Decreased complexity of glucose dynamics preceding the onset of diabetes in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas; Pechter, David; Yang, Liming; Ping, Xiaoli; Yao, Zuliang; Zhang, Rumin; Shen, Xiaolan; Li, Nina Xiaoyan; Connick, Jonathan; Nawrocki, Andrea R; Chakravarthy, Manu; Li, Cai

    2017-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is a platform to measure blood glucose (BG) levels continuously in real time with high enough resolution to document their underlying fluctuations. Multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis has been proposed as a measure of time-series complexity, and when applied to clinical CGM data, MSE analysis revealed that diabetic patients have lower MSE complexity in their BG time series than healthy subjects. To determine if the clinical observations on complexity of glucose dynamics can be back-translated to relevant preclinical species used routinely in diabetes drug discovery, we performed CGM in both mouse (ob/ob) and rat (Zucker Diabetic Fatty, ZDF) models of diabetes. We demonstrate that similar to human data, the complexity of glucose dynamics is also decreased in diabetic mice and rats. We show that low complexity of glucose dynamics is not simply a reflection of high glucose values, but rather reflective of the underlying disease state (i.e. diabetes). Finally, we demonstrate for the first time that the complexity of glucose fluctuations in ZDF rats, as probed by MSE analysis, is decreased prior to the onset of overt diabetes, although complexity undergoes further decline during the transition to frank diabetes. Our study suggests that MSE could serve as a novel biomarker for the progression to diabetes and that complexity studies in preclinical models could offer a new paradigm for early differentiation, and thereby, selection of appropriate clinical candidate molecules to be tested in human clinical trials.

  19. Initiating Characteristics of Early-onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Chinese Patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Xie, Li-Fang; Chen, Kang; Yang, Gang-Yi; Xing, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Jia-Jun; Hong, Tian-Pei; Shan, Zhong-Yan; Li, Hong-Mei; Chen, Bing; Tang, Xu-Lei; Qi, Ling; Yang, Jing; Fang, Yuan; Li, Ting; Wang, Shuang-Shuang; Liang, Xue; Yin, Ya-Qi; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2016-04-05

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has traditionally been considered to affect mainly the elderly; however, the age at diagnosis has gradually reduced in recent years. Although the incidence of young-onset T2DM is increasing, it is still not fully clear the onset characteristics and risk factors of early-onset T2DM. The aim of this study was to describe the initiating characteristics of early-onset T2DM in Chinese patients and evaluate the risk factors for diabetes mellitus. This cross-sectional controlled study was performed using a questionnaire survey method in outpatients of multiple centers in China. A total of 1545 patients with T2DM with an age at onset of <40 years were included, and the control group consisted of subjects aged <40 years with normal blood glucose level. In patients with young-onset T2DM, the mean age and initial hemoglobin 1Ac at diagnosis were 32.96 ± 5.40 years and 9.59 ± 2.71%, respectively. Most of the patients were obese, followed irregular diet pattern and sedentary lifestyle, had life or work pressure, and had a family history of diabetes mellitus. Compared with subjects with normal blood glucose level, logistic regression analysis showed that waist-to-hip ratio (odds ratio [OR] 446.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 42.37-4714.87), family history of diabetes mellitus (OR 23.46, CI 14.47-38.03), dyslipidemia (OR 2.65, CI 1.54-4.56), diastolic blood pressure (OR 1.02, CI 1.00-1.04), and body mass index (OR 0.95, CI 0.92-0.99) are independent factors for early-onset T2DM. We observed that abdominal obesity, family history of diabetes mellitus, and medical history of hypertension and dyslipidemia are independent risk factors for early-onset T2DM. It is, therefore, necessary to apply early lifestyle intervention in young people with risk of diabetes mellitus.

  20. Initiating Characteristics of Early-onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui; Xie, Li-Fang; Chen, Kang; Yang, Gang-Yi; Xing, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Jia-Jun; Hong, Tian-Pei; Shan, Zhong-Yan; Li, Hong-Mei; Chen, Bing; Tang, Xu-Lei; Qi, Ling; Yang, Jing; Fang, Yuan; Li, Ting; Wang, Shuang-Shuang; Liang, Xue; Yin, Ya-Qi; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has traditionally been considered to affect mainly the elderly; however, the age at diagnosis has gradually reduced in recent years. Although the incidence of young-onset T2DM is increasing, it is still not fully clear the onset characteristics and risk factors of early-onset T2DM. The aim of this study was to describe the initiating characteristics of early-onset T2DM in Chinese patients and evaluate the risk factors for diabetes mellitus. Methods: This cross-sectional controlled study was performed using a questionnaire survey method in outpatients of multiple centers in China. A total of 1545 patients with T2DM with an age at onset of <40 years were included, and the control group consisted of subjects aged <40 years with normal blood glucose level. Results: In patients with young-onset T2DM, the mean age and initial hemoglobin 1Ac at diagnosis were 32.96 ± 5.40 years and 9.59 ± 2.71%, respectively. Most of the patients were obese, followed irregular diet pattern and sedentary lifestyle, had life or work pressure, and had a family history of diabetes mellitus. Compared with subjects with normal blood glucose level, logistic regression analysis showed that waist-to-hip ratio (odds ratio [OR] 446.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 42.37–4714.87), family history of diabetes mellitus (OR 23.46, CI 14.47–38.03), dyslipidemia (OR 2.65, CI 1.54–4.56), diastolic blood pressure (OR 1.02, CI 1.00–1.04), and body mass index (OR 0.95, CI 0.92–0.99) are independent factors for early-onset T2DM. Conclusions: We observed that abdominal obesity, family history of diabetes mellitus, and medical history of hypertension and dyslipidemia are independent risk factors for early-onset T2DM. It is, therefore, necessary to apply early lifestyle intervention in young people with risk of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26996471

  1. Chotosan, a Kampo formula, ameliorates hippocampal LTD and cognitive deficits in juvenile-onset diabetes rats.

    PubMed

    Sasaki-Hamada, Sachie; Tamaki, Keita; Otsuka, Hayuma; Ueno, Tatsuto; Sacai, Hiroaki; Niu, Yimin; Matsumoto, Kinzo; Oka, Junichiro

    2014-01-01

    Childhood-onset type 1 diabetes is associated with modest impairments in cognition and has an elevated risk of cognitive decline. Our previous study showed that working memory and hippocampal long-term depression (LTD) were impaired in juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus (JDM) rats. In this study, we investigated the effect of chotosan (CTS), a traditional herbal formula called a Kampo medicine, which has been clinically demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of vascular dementia, on JDM rats. The repeated treatment with CTS (1 g/kg per day) for 3 - 7 days restored spatial working memory and hippocampal LTD in JDM rats. The expression level of NR2B glutamate receptor subunits, but not other glutamate receptor subunits was enhanced in the hippocampus of JDM rats, and repeated treatment with CTS reversed these changes. These results suggest that CTS improves diabetes-induced cognitive deficits by modulating NMDA-receptor subunit expression.

  2. Risk of microalbuminuria and progression to macroalbuminuria in a cohort with childhood onset type 1 diabetes: prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To describe independent predictors for the development of microalbuminuria and progression to macroalbuminuria in those with childhood onset type 1 diabetes. Design Prospective observational study with follow-up for 9.8 (SD 3.8) years. Setting Oxford regional prospective study. Participants 527 participants with a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes at mean age 8.8 (SD 4.0) years. Main outcome measures Annual measurement of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and assessment of urinary albumin:creatinine ratio. Results Cumulative prevalence of microalbuminuria was 25.7% (95% confidence interval 21.3% to 30.1%) after 10 years of diabetes and 50.7% (40.5% to 60.9%) after 19 years of diabetes and 5182 patient years of follow-up. The only modifiable adjusted predictor for microalbuminuria was high HbA1c concentrations (hazard ratio per 1% rise in HbA1c 1.39, 1.27 to 1.52). Blood pressure and history of smoking were not predictors. Microalbuminuria was persistent in 48% of patients. Cumulative prevalence of progression from microalbuminuria to macroalbuminuria was 13.9% (12.9% to 14.9%); progression occurred at a mean age of 18.5 (5.8) years. Although the sample size was small, modifiable predictors of macroalbuminuria were higher HbA1c levels and both persistent and intermittent microalbuminuria (hazard ratios 1.42 (1.22 to 1.78), 27.72 (7.99 to 96.12), and 8.76 (2.44 to 31.44), respectively). Conclusion In childhood onset type 1 diabetes, the only modifiable predictors were poor glycaemic control for the development of microalbuminuria and poor control and microalbuminuria (both persistent and intermittent) for progression to macroalbuminuria. Risk for macroalbuminuria is similar to that observed in cohorts with adult onset disease but as it occurs in young adult life early intervention in normotensive adolescents might be needed to improve prognosis. PMID:18349042

  3. Educational and vocational outcomes of adults with childhood- and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: nine years of followup.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Erica F; Hersh, Aimee O; Trupin, Laura; von Scheven, Emily; Okumura, Megumi J; Yazdany, Jinoos; Yelin, Edward H

    2014-05-01

    To compare educational and vocational outcomes among adults with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and adult-onset SLE. We used data derived from the 2002–2010 cycles of the Lupus Outcomes Study, a longitudinal cohort of 1,204 adult subjects with SLE. Subjects ages 18–60 years living in the US (n = 929) were included in the analysis and were classified as childhood-onset SLE if age at diagnosis was <18 years (n = 115). Logistic regression was used to assess the unadjusted and adjusted effect of childhood-onset SLE, sex, race/ethnicity, baseline age, urban or rural location, and US region on the likelihood of completing a bachelor's degree. Generalized estimating equations were used to assess the effect of childhood-onset SLE, demographics, education, and disease-related factors on the odds of employment, accounting for multiple observations over the study period. Subjects with childhood-onset SLE were on average younger (mean ± SD 29 ± 10 years versus 44 ± 9 years), with longer disease duration (mean ± SD 15 ± 10 years versus 11 ± 8 years). Subjects with adult-onset SLE and childhood-onset SLE subjects were equally likely to complete a bachelor's degree. However, subjects with childhood-onset SLE were significantly less likely to be employed, independent of demographic and disease characteristics (odds ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.42–0.91). While subjects with SLE are just as likely as those with adult-onset SLE to complete college education, childhood-onset SLE significantly increases the risk of not working in adulthood, even when controlling for disease and demographic factors. Exploring reasons for low rates of employment and providing vocational support may be important to maximize long-term functional outcomes in patients with childhood-onset SLE.

  4. Differences in clinical features observed between childhood-onset versus adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bundhun, Pravesh Kumar; Kumari, Alka; Huang, Feng

    2017-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) affects people in childhood (childhood onset) or in adulthood (adult onset). Observational studies that have previously compared childhood-onset versus adult-onset SLE were often restricted to 1 ethnic group, or to a particular area, with a small sample size of patients. We aimed to systematically compare childhood-onset versus adult-onset SLE through a meta-analysis. Electronic databases were searched for relevant publications comparing childhood-onset with adult-onset SLE. Adverse clinical features were considered as the endpoints. The Newcastle Ottawa Scale (NOS) was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies and RevMan software (version 5.3) was used to carry out this analysis whereby risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used as the statistical parameters. A total number of 10,261 participants (1560 participants with childhood-onset SLE and 8701 participants with adult-onset SLE) were enrolled. Results of this analysis showed that compared with childhood-onset SLE, pulmonary involvement was significantly higher with adult-onset SLE (RR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.18-1.93; P = .001), whereas renal involvement was significantly higher with childhood-onset SLE (RR: 0.65, 95% CI: 0.55-0.77; P = .00001). Raynaud phenomenon and photosensitivity were significantly higher in adult-onset SLE (RR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.04-1.60; P = .02) and (RR: 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01-1.17; P = .03), respectively. Malar rash significantly favored adult-onset SLE (RR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.75-0.94; P = .002). Childhood-onset SLE was associated with significantly higher hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukocytopenia, and lymphopenia. Seizure and ocular manifestations were significantly higher with childhood-onset SLE (RR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.47-0.70; P = .00001) and (RR: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.21-0.55; P = .00001), respectively, whereas pleuritis was significantly higher with adult-onset SLE (RR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1

  5. Long-Term Blood Pressure Variability, New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus, and New-Onset Chronic Kidney Disease in the Japanese General Population.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yuichiro; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Kramer, Holly; Sato, Yuji; Konta, Tsuneo; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Iseki, Chiho; Moriyama, Toshiki; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Narita, Ichiei; Kondo, Masahide; Kimura, Kenjiro; Asahi, Koichi; Kurahashi, Issei; Ohashi, Yasuo; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2015-07-01

    Whether long-term blood pressure (BP) variability among individuals without diabetes mellitus is associated with new-onset chronic kidney disease (CKD) risk, independently of other BP parameters (eg, mean BP, cumulative exposure to BP) and metabolic profile changes during follow-up, remains uncertain. We used data from a nationwide study of 48 587 Japanese adults aged 40 to 74 years (mean age, 61.7 years; 39% men) without diabetes mellitus or CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 or proteinuria by dipstick). BP was measured at baseline and during 3 annual follow-up visits (4 visits). BP variability was defined as standard deviation (SD) and average real variability during the 4 visits. At the year 3 follow-up visit, 6.3% of the population had developed CKD. In multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models, 1 SD increases in SDSBP (per 5 mmHg), SDDBP (per 3 mmHg), average real variabilitySBP (per 6 mmHg), and average real variabilityDBP (per 4 mmHg) were associated with new-onset CKD (odds ratios [ORs] and 95% confidence intervals, 1.15 [1.11-1.20], 1.08 [1.04-1.12], 1.13 [1.09-1.17], 1.06 [1.02-1.10], respectively; all P<0.01) after adjustment for clinical characteristics, and with mean BP from year 0 to year 3. The associations of SDBP and average real variabilityBP with CKD remained significant after additional adjustments for metabolic parameter changes during follow-up (ORs, 1.06-1.15; all P<0.01). Sensitivity analyses by sex, antihypertensive medication use, and the presence of hypertension showed similar conclusions. Among those in the middle-aged and elderly general population without diabetes mellitus, long-term BP variability during 3 years was associated with new-onset CKD risk, independently of mean or cumulative exposure to BP and metabolic profile changes during follow-up. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. The Adult Diabetic Patient: An Education Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    finding that he/she, too, must care for sicker patients. To better prepare these patients for life after discharge, patient education must be initiated as...admitted, patient education often begins at the physicians’ office. This paper explores diabetes mellitus in relation to concepts of self-care and adult...betting foj.L eduuation and iio.w, wore ofteni, patient education and follow-up sercvices- a:leL beiny p~rovided on ani outpatient bcdtsis" (p. 36) . Thet

  7. The Keap1-Nrf2 system prevents onset of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Uruno, Akira; Furusawa, Yuki; Yagishita, Yoko; Fukutomi, Toshiaki; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Negishi, Takaaki; Sugawara, Akira; Kensler, Thomas W; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2013-08-01

    Transcription factor Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) regulates a broad cytoprotective response to environmental stresses. Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1) is an adaptor protein for cullin3-based ubiquitin E3 ligase and negatively regulates Nrf2. Whereas the Keap1-Nrf2 system plays important roles in oxidative stress response and metabolism, the roles Nrf2 plays in the prevention of diabetes mellitus remain elusive. Here we show that genetic activation of Nrf2 signaling by Keap1 gene hypomorphic knockdown (Keap1flox/-) markedly suppresses the onset of diabetes. When Keap1flox/- mice were crossed with diabetic db/db mice, blood glucose levels became lower through improvement of both insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Keap1flox/- also prevented high-calorie-diet-induced diabetes. Oral administration of the Nrf2 inducer CDDO-Im {oleanolic acid 1-[2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oyl] imidazole} also attenuated diabetes in db/db mice. Nrf2 induction altered antioxidant-, energy consumption-, and gluconeogenesis-related gene expression in metabolic tissues. Thus, the Keap1-Nrf2 system is a critical target for preventing the onset of diabetes mellitus.

  8. Adult-onset Still's disease with atypical cutaneous manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Narváez Garcia, Francisco Javier; Pascual, María; López de Recalde, Mercè; Juarez, Pablo; Morales-Ivorra, Isabel; Notario, Jaime; Jucglà, Anna; Nolla, Joan M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) can be very difficult. There are no specific tests available, and diagnosis is usually based on a symptom complex and the well-described typical evanescent rash seen in the majority of patients. However, in recent years, other atypical cutaneous manifestations of AOSD have been reported. These atypical skin eruptions often present in addition to the typical evanescent rash but may also be the only skin manifestation, resulting in delayed diagnosis because of under-recognition. In this study, we present 3 new cases of AOSD with atypical cutaneous manifestations diagnosed during a 30-year period in our department and review 78 additional cases previously reported (PubMed 1990–2016). These 81 patients form the basis of the present analysis. The overall prevalence of atypical cutaneous manifestations in our AOSD population was 14%. These manifestations may appear at any time over the course of the disease, and usually occur in patients who have persistent and severe disease, with a considerable frequency of clinical complications (23%), including serositis, myopericarditis, lung involvement, abdominal pain, neurologic involvement, and reactive hemophagocytic syndrome. The most representative and frequent lesion among the nonclassical skin rashes is the development of persistent pruritic papules and/or plaques. Interestingly, these lesions show a distinctive histological pattern. Other, less frequently observed lesions include urticaria and urticaria-like eruptions, generalized or widespread non-pruritic persistent erythema, vesiculopustular eruptions, a widespread peau d’orange appearance of the skin, and edema of the eyelids mimicking dermatomyositis without any accompanying skin lesion. The great majority of these patients required medium or high doses of glucocorticoids (including intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy in some cases) and, in nearly 40%, a more potent or maintenance immunotherapy

  9. Delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Irons, Brian K; Mazzolini, Timothy A; Greene, Ronald Shane

    2004-03-01

    The frequency of type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing at an alarming rate. Prediabetes, also referred to as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and/or impaired fasting glucose, is a major risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, IGT has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Several studies have measured the effects of various interventions in patients with IGT on the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Intensive lifestyle modifications through alterations in diet and improvement in exercise have delayed the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus by 58% in patients with IGT. Therapy with metformin, troglitazone, or acarbose also has reduced the progression of IGT to diabetes mellitus by 31%, 49% and 25%, respectively. The mechanisms by which lifestyle interventions and drugs reduce the progression may be through alterations in insulin sensitivity. The American Diabetes Association recommends screening for prediabetes in patients who are 45 years or older and those with a body mass index of 25 kg/m2 or greater who have additional diabetes mellitus risk factors. Pharmacists can promote awareness, counsel patients on intervention strategies to delay the onset of diabetes mellitus, and screen high-risk patients.

  10. [Epidemiologic profile of juvenile-onset compared to adult-onset spondyloarthritis in a large Brazilian cohort].

    PubMed

    Duarte, Angela P; Marques, Cláudia D L; Bortoluzzo, Adriana B; Gonçalves, Célio R; da Silva, José Antonio Braga; Ximenes, Antonio Carlos; Bértolo, Manoel B; Ribeiro, Sandra Lúcia E; Keiserman, Mauro; Skare, Thelma L; Carneiro, Sueli; Menin, Rita; Azevedo, Valderilio F; Vieira, Walber P; Albuquerque, Elisa N; Bianchi, Washington A; Bonfiglioli, Rubens; Campanholo, Cristiano; Carvalho, Hellen M S; Costa, Izaias P; Kohem, Charles L; Leite, Nocy; Lima, Sonia A L; Meirelles, Eduardo S; Pereira, Ivânio A; Pinheiro, Marcelo M; Polito, Elizandra; Resende, Gustavo G; Rocha, Francisco Airton C; Santiago, Mittermayer B; Sauma, Maria de Fátima L C; Valim, Valéria; Sampaio-Barros, Percival D; Barros, Percival D Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of juvenile-onset spondyloarthritis (SpA) (< 16 years) and compare them with a group of adult-onset (≥ 16 years) SpA patients. Prospective, observational and multicentric cohort with 1,424 patients with the diagnosis of SpA according to the European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) submitted to a common protocol of investigation and recruited in 29 reference centers participants of the Brazilian Registry of Spondyloarthritis (RBE - Registro Brasileiro de Espondiloartrites). Patients were divided in two groups: age at onset<16 years (JOSpA group) and age at onset ≥ 16 years (AOSpA group). Among the 1,424 patients, 235 presented disease onset before 16 years (16.5%). The clinical and epidemiologic variables associated with JOSpA were male gender (p<0.001), lower limb arthritis (p=0.001), enthesitis (p=0.008), anterior uveitis (p=0.041) and positive HLA-B27 (p=0.017), associated with lower scores of disease activity (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index - BASDAI; p=0.007) and functionality (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index - BASFI; p=0.036). Cutaneous psoriasis (p<0.001), inflammatory bowel disease (p=0.023), dactylitis (p=0.024) and nail involvement (p=0.004) were more frequent in patients with adult-onset SpA. Patients with JOSpA in this large Brazilian cohort were characterized predominantly by male gender, peripheral involvement (arthritis and enthesitis), positive HLA-B27 and lower disease scores. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Pediatric diabetes consortium type 1 diabetes new onset (NeOn) study: Factors associated with HbA1c levels one year after diagnosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To identify determinants of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels 1 yr after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in participants in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) T1D New Onset (NeOn) Study. Diabetes-specific as well as socioeconomic factors during the first year following diagnosis were analyze...

  12. Early onset symptomatic neuropathy in a child with Type 1 Diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Obeid Mohammad; Latief, Muzamil

    2017-04-05

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a major complication of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM). It is usually subclinical in childhood, but can cause significant impairment with its progression through to adulthood. Current guidelines vary in their recommendation regarding screening for DN in children with T1DM, with some advocating starting screening 5 years after the diagnosis of T1DM. Clinical assessment comprising of history and neurological examination is the most commonly used method for screening, though Nerve Conduction Studies (NCS) provide better sensitivity in picking up early subclinical diabetic neuropathy. We describe an adolescent female with poorly controlled T1DM, presenting with symptomatic diabetic neuropathy within 2 years of disease onset and as the initial long term complication. Thus, guidelines regarding screening for DN may need revision, to start screening earlier than presently recommended, and NCS could play a prominent role in screening children with significant risk factors for developing DN.

  13. New-onset diabetic ketoacidosis in a 13-months old african toddler: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Katte, Jean-Claude; Djoumessi, Romance; Njindam, Gisele; Fetse, Gerard Tama; Dehayem, Mesmin; Kengne, Andre-Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is very rare in infants and toddlers and is usually associated with high mortality when complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Toddlers in DKA are often missed in our typical African setting where there is low index of suspicion. Usually, the classical symptoms are not usually at the forefront and many infants and toddlers who develop DKA are mistreated for infections. The case of a 13-months old toddler with new-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus, complicated with DKA at diagnosis is reported in view of its rarity and elevated mortality even when diagnosed in our African setting. She was subsequently treated with intravenous insulin and was passed over to subcutaneous insulin after the eradication of ketones in urine. She continues follow-up at the out-patient children diabetes clinic at the Bafoussam Regional Hospital. PMID:26966489

  14. Insulin Gene Mutations Resulting in Early-Onset Diabetes: Marked Differences in Clinical Presentation, Metabolic Status, and Pathogenic Effect Through Endoplasmic Reticulum Retention

    PubMed Central

    Meur, Gargi; Simon, Albane; Harun, Nasret; Virally, Marie; Dechaume, Aurélie; Bonnefond, Amélie; Fetita, Sabrina; Tarasov, Andrei I.; Guillausseau, Pierre-Jean; Boesgaard, Trine Welløv; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Polak, Michel; Gautier, Jean-François; Froguel, Philippe; Rutter, Guy A.; Vaxillaire, Martine

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Heterozygous mutations in the human preproinsulin (INS) gene are a cause of nonsyndromic neonatal or early-infancy diabetes. Here, we sought to identify INS mutations associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) or nonautoimmune diabetes in mid-adult life, and to explore the molecular mechanisms involved. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The INS gene was sequenced in 16 French probands with unexplained MODY, 95 patients with nonautoimmune early-onset diabetes (diagnosed at <35 years) and 292 normoglycemic control subjects of French origin. Three identified insulin mutants were generated by site-directed mutagenesis of cDNA encoding a preproinsulin–green fluorescent protein (GFP) (C-peptide) chimera. Intracellular targeting was assessed in clonal β-cells by immunocytochemistry and proinsulin secretion, by radioimmunoassay. Spliced XBP1 and C/EBP homologous protein were quantitated by real-time PCR. RESULTS A novel coding mutation, L30M, potentially affecting insulin multimerization, was identified in five diabetic individuals (diabetes onset 17–36 years) in a single family. L30M preproinsulin-GFP fluorescence largely associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in MIN6 β-cells, and ER exit was inhibited by ∼50%. Two additional mutants, R55C (at the B/C junction) and R6H (in the signal peptide), were normally targeted to secretory granules, but nonetheless caused substantial ER stress. CONCLUSIONS We describe three INS mutations cosegregating with early-onset diabetes whose clinical presentation is compatible with MODY. These led to the production of (pre)proinsulin molecules with markedly different trafficking properties and effects on ER stress, demonstrating a range of molecular defects in the β-cell. PMID:20007936

  15. Differential diagnosis of sporadic adult-onset ataxia: The role of REM sleep behavior disorder.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio A G; Arruda, Walter O; Moro, Adriana; Moscovich, Mariana; Munhoz, Renato P

    2015-06-01

    Sporadic adult-onset ataxia encompasses a group of degenerative, non-hereditary disorders, including idiopathic adult-onset ataxia and the cerebellar form of multiple system atrophy. Our objective was to analyze the diagnosis at follow-up of 50 sporadic adult-onset ataxia patients. Clinical and laboratory findings of 50 adult patients with sporadic adult-onset ataxia were analyzed. Diagnosis of probable REM sleep behavior disorder was based predominantly on clinically accepted criteria. Multiple system atrophy was diagnosed in 48% of cases, the remaining 52% received a diagnosis of sporadic adult-onset ataxia. REM sleep behavior disorder was diagnosed in 46% of the patients. However, among patients with probable multiple system atrophy, the corresponding figure was 83.34% versus 11.53% among those with sporadic ataxia (p < 0.001). REM sleep behavior disorder is an important aid to the differentiation of multiple system atrophy from sporadic adult-onset ataxia and its use for this purpose should be encouraged. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Environmental enrichment protects the retina from early diabetic damage in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Damián; Aranda, Marcos L; González Fleitas, María Florencia; Chianelli, Mónica S; Fernandez, Diego C; Sande, Pablo H; Rosenstein, Ruth E

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of reduced visual acuity and acquired blindness. Available treatments are not completely effective. We analyzed the effect of environmental enrichment on retinal damage induced by experimental diabetes in adult Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Three days after vehicle or streptozotocin injection, animals were housed in enriched environment or remained in a standard environment. Retinal function (electroretinogram, and oscillatory potentials), retinal morphology, blood-retinal barrier integrity, synaptophysin, astrocyte and Müller cell glial fibrillary acidic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor necrosis factor-α, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, as well as lipid peroxidation were assessed in retina from diabetic animals housed in standard or enriched environment. Environmental enrichment preserved scotopic electroretinogram a-wave, b-wave and oscillatory potential amplitude, avoided albumin-Evan's blue leakage, prevented the decrease in retinal synaptophysin and astrocyte glial fibrillary acidic protein levels, the increase in Müller cell glial fibrillary acidic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-α levels, as well as oxidative stress induced by diabetes. In addition, enriched environment prevented the decrease in retinal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels induced by experimental diabetes. When environmental enrichment started 7 weeks after diabetes onset, retinal function was significantly preserved. These results indicate that enriched environment could attenuate the early diabetic damage in the retina from adult rats.

  17. Diabetes Mellitus-Associated Functional Hypercortisolism Impairs Sexual Function in Male Late-Onset Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Tirabassi, G; Corona, G; Lamonica, G R; Lenzi, A; Maggi, M; Balercia, G

    2016-01-01

    Functional hypercortisolism is generated by conditions able to chronically activate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and has been proven to have a negative role in several complications. However, no study has evaluated the possible influence of diabetes mellitus-associated functional hypercortisolism on male hypogonadism and sexual function. We aimed to identify any association of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation measures with testosterone and sexual function in men simultaneously affected by diabetes mellitus and late-onset hypogonadism. Fifteen diabetes mellitus and late-onset hypogonadism subjects suffering from functional hypercortisolism and fifteen diabetes mellitus and late-onset hypogonadism subjects who were free of functional hypercortisolism were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical, hormonal, and sexual parameters were considered. Hypercortisolemic subjects showed higher values of body mass index, waist, and glycated hemoglobin and lower ones of testosterone compared to normocortisolemic ones. All sexual parameters, except for orgasmic function, were significantly worse in hypercortisolemic than in normocortisolemic subjects. Hypercortisolemic patients showed higher values of cortisol after dexamethasone and urinary free cortisol as well as a lesser ACTH response after corticotropin releasing hormone test (ACTH area under curve) compared to normocortisolemic ones. No significant association was found at Poisson regression analysis between hormonal and sexual variables in normocortisolemic patients. In hypercortisolemic subjects, negative and significant associations of cortisol response after corticotropin releasing hormone (cortisol area under curve) with erectile function (β: -0.0008; p: 0.015) and total international index of erectile function score (β: -0.0006; p: 0.001) were evident. This study suggests for the first time the impairing influence of the dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on sexual function in

  18. Genetics Home Reference: adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia

    MedlinePlus

    ... it causes a severe decline in thinking and reasoning abilities (dementia). Over time, motor skills are affected, ... Schmahmann JD. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids: clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathologic observations. Brain Pathol. 2009 Jan; ...

  19. Emerging Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: A Comparison to Peers Without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Helgeson, Vicki S.; Reynolds, Kerry A.; Becker, Dorothy J.; Siminerio, Linda M.; Escobar, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Objective This longitudinal study compared emerging adults with and without type 1 diabetes on life path decisions, health behaviors, and psychological well-being during the transition out of high school. Methods Administered questionnaires during the senior year of high school and 1 year later to 117 emerging adults with diabetes and 122 emerging adults without diabetes. Comparisons were conducted with respect to health status, sex, and school status. Results Those with and without diabetes chose similar life paths and engaged in similar levels of risky behaviors, but disturbed sleep increased for males with diabetes only. Having diabetes was not associated with depressive symptoms, loneliness, or bulimic symptoms, but was associated with lower life satisfaction and lower life purpose over time. Conclusions Emerging adults with and without diabetes fare similarly on most dimensions studied during the first year out of high school. PMID:23475831

  20. Peripheral blood monocyte gene expression profile clinically stratifies patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Katharine M; Gallego, Patricia; An, Xiaoyu; Best, Shannon E; Thomas, Gethin; Wells, Christine; Harris, Mark; Cotterill, Andrew; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2012-05-01

    Novel biomarkers of disease progression after type 1 diabetes onset are needed. We profiled peripheral blood (PB) monocyte gene expression in six healthy subjects and 16 children with type 1 diabetes diagnosed ∼3 months previously and analyzed clinical features from diagnosis to 1 year. Monocyte expression profiles clustered into two distinct subgroups, representing mild and severe deviation from healthy control subjects, along the same continuum. Patients with strongly divergent monocyte gene expression had significantly higher insulin dose-adjusted HbA(1c) levels during the first year, compared with patients with mild deviation. The diabetes-associated expression signature identified multiple perturbations in pathways controlling cellular metabolism and survival, including endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress (e.g., induction of HIF1A, DDIT3, DDIT4, and GRP78). Quantitative PCR (qPCR) of a 9-gene panel correlated with glycemic control in 12 additional recent-onset patients. The qPCR signature was also detected in PB from healthy first-degree relatives. A PB gene expression signature correlates with glycemic control in the first year after diabetes diagnosis and is present in at-risk subjects. These findings implicate monocyte phenotype as a candidate biomarker for disease progression pre- and postonset and systemic stresses as contributors to innate immune function in type 1 diabetes.

  1. [Kimura's disease: an unrecognized cause of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease].

    PubMed

    Shehwaro, N; Langlois, A-L; Gueutin, V; Debchi, L; Charlotte, F; Rouvier, P; Rottembourg, J; Izzedine, H

    2014-02-01

    Kimura's disease (KD) is an angiolymphoid proliferative disorder of soft tissue with eosinophilia, with a predilection for head and neck regions in young Oriental men. Kidney disease is thought to be rare in KD. About a case of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease, we comment Kimura's disease and its associated kidney damage. Kimura disease should be suspected and included in the diagnosis of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease.

  2. Predisposition to essential hypertension and renal hemodynamics in recent-onset insulin-dependent diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Hannedouche, T P; Marques, L P; Guicheney, P; Lacour, B; Boitard, C; Grünfeld, J P

    1992-10-01

    The offspring of essential hypertensive parents have been found to exhibit abnormalities in renal hemodynamics and sodium handling before the eventual occurrence of hypertension. The reported abnormalities represent a wide spectrum of changes including increased GFR, normal or decreased RPF, slight increase in blood pressure (although within the normal range), and an exaggerated natriuresis response to a sodium load. The heterogeneity of these abnormalities may reflect the specific conditions of the studies, the lability of the changes, or different subgroups of subjects with genetic predisposition to essential hypertension. Several lines of evidence have suggested a relationship between hypertension and the development of diabetic nephropathy in insulin-dependent diabetics. This laboratory has found that recent-onset insulin-dependent diabetics can exhibit renal hemodynamics abnormalities very early in the course of diabetes according to a positive or negative family history of essential hypertension. These changes include increased GFR and mean arterial pressure, but no differences in renal sodium and lithium handling in diabetics with a genetic predisposition to essential hypertension. In addition, diabetics with a positive family history of essential hypertension exhibited a more-marked vasodilative response to an acute interruption of the renin-angiotensin system, further suggesting inadequate angiotensin modulation of renal vascular tone. The significance of these abnormalities in relation to the development of diabetic nephropathy requires further investigation.

  3. Vaccination Coverage Among Adults With Diagnosed Diabetes: United States, 2015.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Maria A; Vahratian, Anjel

    2016-12-01

    Data from the National Health Interview Survey •Among adults aged 18 and over with diagnosed diabetes, 61.6% had an influenza vaccine in the past year. •A total of 52.6% of adults with diagnosed diabetes had a pneumococcal vaccine and 17.1% had the 3-dose vaccination schedule for hepatitis B at some point in the past. •Among adults aged 60 and over with diagnosed diabetes, 27.2% had ever had a shingles vaccine. •Among those with diagnosed diabetes, the vaccination coverage for influenza, pneumococcal, and shingles was lowest among poor adults, increased with age, and varied by race and ethnicity. •Hepatitis B vaccination coverage was lowest among poor adults, and it decreased with age. Persons with diabetes are at an increased risk for complications from vaccine-preventable infections (1-3). Several vaccines are recommended for adults with diabetes, including annual vaccination for influenza and at least a one-time dose of pneumococcal vaccine, regardless of age; a shingles vaccine starting at age 60; and a hepatitis B vaccine soon after diabetes diagnosis among those aged 19-59, and based on clinical discretion thereafter (4). This report describes the receipt of select vaccinations among adults with diagnosed diabetes by sex, age, race and ethnicity, and poverty status. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  4. Type 2 Diabetes and Spina Bifida

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood sugars can Also called adult onset or non-insulin dependent diabet , es damage the kidneys, heart, and eyes; and predispose type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects how diabetics ...

  5. Abnormalities in chromosome 6q24 as a cause of early-onset, non-obese, non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus without history of neonatal diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, T; Matsubara, K; Sakakibara, A; Hashimoto, Y; Kawakita, R; Hosokawa, Y; Fujimaru, R; Murakami, A; Tamagawa, N; Hatake, K; Nagasaka, H; Suzuki, J; Urakami, T; Izawa, M; Kagami, M

    2015-07-01

    Abnormalities in the imprinted locus on chromosome 6q24 are the most common causes of transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (6q24-related transient neonatal diabetes). 6q24-Related transient neonatal diabetes is characterized by the patient being small-for-gestational age, diabetes mellitus at birth, spontaneous remission within the first few months and frequent recurrence of diabetes after childhood. However, it is not clear whether individuals with 6q24 abnormalities invariably develop transient neonatal diabetes. This study explored the possibility that 6q24 abnormalities might cause early-onset, non-autoimmune diabetes without transient neonatal diabetes. The 6q24 imprinted locus was screened for abnormalities in 113 Japanese patients with early-onset, non-obese, non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus who tested negative for mutations in the common maturation-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) genes and without a history of transient neonatal diabetes. Positive patients were further analysed by combined loss of heterozygosity / comparative genomic hybridization analysis and by microsatellite analysis. Detailed clinical data were collected through the medical records of the treating hospitals. Three patients with paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 6q24 were identified. None presented with hyperglycaemia in the neonatal period. Characteristically, these patients were born small-for-gestational age, representing 27.2% of the 11 patients whose birth weight standard deviation score (SDS) for gestational age was below -2.0. Abnormalities in the imprinted locus on chromosome 6q24 do not necessarily cause transient neonatal diabetes. Non-penetrant 6q24-related diabetes could be an underestimated cause of early-onset, non-autoimmune diabetes in patients who are not obese and born small-for-gestational age. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  6. Adolescent-onset substance use disorders predict young adult mortality

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Duncan B.; Martin, Christopher S.; Cornelius, Jack R.

    2009-01-01

    This study determined whether adolescent-onset substance use disorders (SUDs) prospectively predicted early mortality. Among 870 adolescents, 21 young adulthood deaths were observed. Adolescent SUDs, as well as gender, ethnic group, hazardous substance use, and drug trafficking, predicted these deaths. Among African American males with SUDs, 23% died by age 25. PMID:18486875

  7. Commissioning specialist diabetes services for adults with diabetes: summary of a Diabetes UK Task and Finish group report.

    PubMed

    Goenka, N; Turner, B; Vora, J

    2011-12-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes, the drive to develop community services for diabetes and the Quality and Outcomes Framework for diabetes have led to improvements in the management of diabetes in primary care settings, with services traditionally provided only in specialist care now provided for many patients with diabetes by non-specialists. Consequently, there is a need to redefine roles, responsibilities and components of a specialist diabetes service to provide for the needs of patients in the National Health Service (NHS) today. The delivery of diabetes care is complex and touches on almost every aspect of the health service. It is the responsibility of those working within commissioning and specialist provider roles to work together with people with diabetes to develop, organize and deliver a full range of integrated diabetes care services. The local delivery model agreed within the local diabetes network, comprising specialist teams, primary care teams, commissioners and people with diabetes, should determine how the diabetes specialist services are organizsed. It should identify the roles and responsibilities of provider organizations to ensure that the right person provides the right care, at the right time, and in the right place. We summarize a report entitled 'Commissioning Diabetes Specialist Services for Adults with Diabetes', which has been produced, as a 'Task and Finish' group activity within Diabetes UK, to assist managers, commissioners and healthcare professionals to provide advice on the structure, roles and components of specialist diabetes services for adults.

  8. Diabetes alert study: weight history and upper body obesity in diabetic and non-diabetic Mexican American adults.

    PubMed

    Joos, S K; Mueller, W H; Hanis, C L; Schull, W J

    1984-01-01

    History of adult weight gain and fat patterning is compared in Mexican American diabetics and age and sex matched non-diabetics. Diabetics differed little from non-diabetics in overall body fatness at the time of the examination. However, history of adult weight gain and current fat patterning were very different. Diabetics were heavier than non-diabetics at age 18. They subsequently gained weight faster and attained a substantially higher weight, at an earlier age, than non-diabetics. Discriminant function analysis was used to test for differences in patterning. Diabetics tend to have more trunk fat, as reflected particularly in the subscapular skinfold, and less lower extremity (leg) fat. Fat patterning in this population does not appear to be influenced by age when weight gain occurred, but is related to diabetic status, especially in women.

  9. Mediterranean style diet is associated with low risk of new-onset diabetes after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Osté, Maryse C J; Corpeleijn, Eva; Navis, Gerjan J; Keyzer, Charlotte A; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S; van den Berg, Else; Postmus, Douwe; de Borst, Martin H; Kromhout, Daan; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2017-01-01

    Objective The incidence of new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) and premature mortality is high in renal transplant recipients (RTR). We hypothesized that a Mediterranean Style diet protects against NODAT and premature mortality in RTR. Research design and methods A prospective cohort study of adult RTR with a functioning graft for >1 year. Dietary intake was assessed with a 177-item validated food frequency questionnaire. Patients were divided based on a 9-point Mediterranean Style Diet Score (MDS): low MDS (0–4 points) versus high MDS (5–9 points). A total of 468 RTR were eligible for analyses. Logistic multivariable regression analyses were used to study the association of MDS with NODAT and Cox multivariable regression models for the association with all-cause mortality. Results Mean±SD age was 51.3±13.2 years and 56.6% were men. About 50% of the patients had a high MDS. During median follow-up of 4.0 (IQR, 0.4–5.4) years, 22 (5%) RTR developed NODAT and 50 (11%) died. High MDS was significantly associated with both a lower risk of NODAT (HR=0.23; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.64; p=0.004) and all-cause mortality (HR=0.51; 95% CI 0.29 to 0.89, p=0.02) compared to low MDS, independent of age and sex. Adjustment for other potential confounders, including total energy intake, physical activity and smoking status, did not materially change the results of the analyses. Conclusions Dietary habits leading to high MDS were associated with lower risk of NODAT. These results suggest that healthy dietary habits are of paramount importance for RTR. PMID:28123752

  10. Age at asthma onset and asthma self-management education among adults in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mirabelli, Maria C.; Beavers, Suzanne F.; Shepler, Samantha H.; Chatterjee, Arjun B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Asthma self-management education improves asthma-related outcomes. We conducted this analysis to evaluate variation in the percentages of adults with active asthma reporting components of asthma self-management education by age at asthma onset. Methods Data from 2011 to 2012 Asthma Call-back Surveys were used to estimate percentages of adults with active asthma reporting six components of asthma self-management education. Components of asthma self-management education include having been taught to what to do during an asthma attack and receiving an asthma action plan. Differences in the percentages of adults reporting each component and the average number of components reported across categories of age at asthma onset were estimated using linear regression, adjusted for age, education, race/ethnicity, sex, smoking status, and years since asthma onset. Results Overall, an estimated 76.4% of adults with active asthma were taught what to do during an asthma attack and 28.7% reported receiving an asthma action plan. Percentages reporting each asthma self-management education component declined with increasing age at asthma onset. Compared with the referent group of adults whose asthma onset occurred at 5–14 years of age, the percentage of adults reporting being taught what to do during an asthma attack was 10% lower among those whose asthma onset occurred at 65–93 years of age (95% CI: −18.0, −2.5) and the average number of components reported decreased monotonically across categories of age at asthma onset of 35 years and older. Conclusions Among adults with active asthma, reports of asthma self-management education decline with increasing age at asthma onset. PMID:26291134

  11. How Much Do We Know about Adult-onset Primary Tics? Prevalence, Epidemiology, and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Robakis, Daphne

    2017-01-01

    Background Tic disorders are generally considered to be of pediatric onset; however, reports of adult-onset tics exist in the literature. Tics can be categorized as either primary or secondary, with the latter being the larger group in adults. Primary or idiopathic tics that arise in adulthood make up a subset of tic disorders whose epidemiologic and clinical features have not been well delineated. Methods Articles to be included in this review were identified by searching PubMed, SCOPUS, and Web of Science using the terms adult- and late-onset tics, which resulted in 120 unique articles. Duplicates were removed. Citing references were identified using Google Scholar; all references were reviewed for relevance. Results The epidemiologic characteristics, clinical phenomenology, and optimal treatment of adult-onset tics have not been ascertained. Twenty-six patients with adult-onset, primary tics were identified from prior case reports. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities may be lower in adults than in children, and obsessive compulsive disorder was the most common comorbidity. Adult-onset primary tics tend to wax and wane, occur predominantly in males, are often both motor and phonic in the same individual, and are characterized by a poor response to treatment. Discussion We know little about adult-onset tic disorders, particularly ones without a secondary association or cause. They are not common, and from the limited data available, appear to share some but not all features with childhood tics. Further research will be important in gaining a better understanding of the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of this disorder. PMID:28546883

  12. How Much Do We Know about Adult-onset Primary Tics? Prevalence, Epidemiology, and Clinical Features.

    PubMed

    Robakis, Daphne

    2017-01-01

    Tic disorders are generally considered to be of pediatric onset; however, reports of adult-onset tics exist in the literature. Tics can be categorized as either primary or secondary, with the latter being the larger group in adults. Primary or idiopathic tics that arise in adulthood make up a subset of tic disorders whose epidemiologic and clinical features have not been well delineated. Articles to be included in this review were identified by searching PubMed, SCOPUS, and Web of Science using the terms adult- and late-onset tics, which resulted in 120 unique articles. Duplicates were removed. Citing references were identified using Google Scholar; all references were reviewed for relevance. The epidemiologic characteristics, clinical phenomenology, and optimal treatment of adult-onset tics have not been ascertained. Twenty-six patients with adult-onset, primary tics were identified from prior case reports. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities may be lower in adults than in children, and obsessive compulsive disorder was the most common comorbidity. Adult-onset primary tics tend to wax and wane, occur predominantly in males, are often both motor and phonic in the same individual, and are characterized by a poor response to treatment. We know little about adult-onset tic disorders, particularly ones without a secondary association or cause. They are not common, and from the limited data available, appear to share some but not all features with childhood tics. Further research will be important in gaining a better understanding of the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of this disorder.

  13. WFS1 mutations are frequent monogenic causes of juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Zalloua, Pierre A; Azar, Sami T; Delépine, Marc; Makhoul, Nadine J; Blanc, Hervé; Sanyoura, May; Lavergne, Anne; Stankov, Karmen; Lemainque, Arnaud; Baz, Patrick; Julier, Cécile

    2008-12-15

    Most cases of juvenile-onset diabetes (JOD) are diagnosed as type 1 diabetes (T1D), for which genetic studies conducted in outbred Caucasian populations support the concept of multifactorial inheritance. However, this view may be partly challenged in particular population settings. In view of the suggestive evidence for a high prevalence of Wolfram syndrome (WFS) in Lebanon, the phenotypic variability associated with WFS1 mutations, and the high consanguinity rate in Lebanon, we aimed to evaluate the contribution of WFS1 mutations as monogenic determinants to JOD in Lebanon. We performed a family-based genetic study, with linkage analysis followed by systematic mutation screening of WFS1 exons in all JOD probands. The study population consisted of an unbiased recruitment of all juvenile-onset insulin-dependent diabetic patients from a specialized diabetes pediatric clinic in Beirut, Lebanon. Homozygous or compound heterozygous WFS1 mutations were found in 22 of the 399 JOD probands (5.5%), resulting in WFS (17 probands) or in non-syndromic non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus (DM, five probands). These accounted for 12.1% (21/174) of probands in consanguineous families, compared with 0.4% (1/225) in non-consanguineous families. Of the 38 patients identified with homozygous or compound heterozygous WFS1 mutations, 11 (29%) had non-syndromic DM, all of whom carried a particular WFS1 mutation, WFS1(LIB), encoding a protein with an extended C-terminal domain. This mutation resulted in a delayed onset or absence of extrapancreatic features. These results underscore the major impact of population-specific factors, such as population-specific mutations and founder effects, and family structure in the genetic determinism of JOD.

  14. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha mutation in normal glucose-tolerant subjects and early-onset type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dong Mee; Huh, Nam; Park, Keun Yong

    2008-12-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in Korea is reported to be approximately 10%, but cases of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) are rare in Korea. A diagnostic technique for autosomal dominant MODY is being actively sought. In this regard, we used a DNA chip to investigate the frequency of mutations of the MODY3 gene (hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha) in Korean patients with early-onset type 2 diabetes. The genomic DNA of 30 normal individuals [age, 24.9+/-8.6 years] and 25 patients with early-onset type 2 diabetes (age, 27+/-5.9 years) was extracted, and the MODY3 gene was amplified. The amplified DNA was hybridized onto a MODY3 chip, which has oligonucleotides of 15-25 bases, representing wild-type and mutant MODY3 sequences in both forward and reverse orientations, immobilized on its surface. Among the normal subjects, there was no mutation of MODY3. Among those with early-onset type 2 diabetes, there was one case of MODY3 mutation. Our results indicate that MODY3 mutations are not rare in Korean early-onset type 2 diabetes patients in Korea and suggest that MODY3 mutations in patients with early-onset type 2 diabetes need to be further evaluated.

  15. Raloxifene prevents skeletal fragility in adult female Zucker Diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Hill Gallant, Kathleen M; Gallant, Maxime A; Brown, Drew M; Sato, Amy Y; Williams, Justin N; Burr, David B

    2014-01-01

    Fracture risk in type 2 diabetes is increased despite normal or high bone mineral density, implicating poor bone quality as a risk factor. Raloxifene improves bone material and mechanical properties independent of bone mineral density. This study aimed to determine if raloxifene prevents the negative effects of diabetes on skeletal fragility in diabetes-prone rats. Adult Zucker Diabetic Sprague-Dawley (ZDSD) female rats (20-week-old, n = 24) were fed a diabetogenic high-fat diet and were randomized to receive daily subcutaneous injections of raloxifene or vehicle for 12 weeks. Blood glucose was measured weekly and glycated hemoglobin was measured at baseline and 12 weeks. At sacrifice, femora and lumbar vertebrae were harvested for imaging and mechanical testing. Raloxifene-treated rats had a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes compared with vehicle-treated rats. In addition, raloxifene-treated rats had blood glucose levels significantly lower than both diabetic vehicle-treated rats as well as vehicle-treated rats that did not become diabetic. Femoral toughness was greater in raloxifene-treated rats compared with both diabetic and non-diabetic vehicle-treated ZDSD rats, due to greater energy absorption in the post-yield region of the stress-strain curve. Similar differences between groups were observed for the structural (extrinsic) mechanical properties of energy-to-failure, post-yield energy-to-failure, and post-yield displacement. These results show that raloxifene is beneficial in preventing the onset of diabetes and improving bone material properties in the diabetes-prone ZDSD rat. This presents unique therapeutic potential for raloxifene in preserving bone quality in diabetes as well as in diabetes prevention, if these results can be supported by future experimental and clinical studies.

  16. A clinical path for adult diabetes.

    PubMed

    Courtney, L; Gordon, M; Romer, L

    1997-01-01

    The use of clinical paths for patient care management was explored by this development team as a mechanism to provide consistent, high-quality care to hospitalized patients in high-volume, high-risk diagnostic categories. Reviewing the historical aspects and importance of clinical paths helped expand the team's perspective to incorporate pre- and posthospitalization phases of patient care into the clinical path being developed. A multidisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, health educators, and dietitians from both inpatient and outpatient departments of Kaiser-Santa Teresa Medical Center in San Jose, California, devised and implemented an Adult Diabetes Mellitus care path. Staff education preceded the implementation of the care paths. Measurements of quality indicators showed improvements in patient satisfaction, patient education, patient knowledge, and nutrition assessments.

  17. Anterior hypopituitarism is rare and autoimmune disease is common in adults with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Hannon, M J; Orr, C; Moran, C; Behan, L A; Agha, A; Ball, S G; Thompson, C J

    2012-05-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is a rare clinical condition with a heterogenous aetiology. Up to 40% of cases are classified as idiopathic, although many of these are thought to have an autoimmune basis. Published data have suggested that anterior hypopituitarism is common in childhood-onset idiopathic diabetes insipidus. We aimed to assess the incidence of anterior hypopituitarism in a cohort of adult patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. We performed a retrospective review of the databases of two pituitary investigation units. This identified 39 patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. All had undergone magnetic resonance imaging scanning and dynamic pituitary testing (either insulin tolerance testing or GHRH/arginine and short synacthen testing) to assess anterior pituitary function. One patient had partial growth hormone deficiency; no other anterior pituitary hormonal deficits were found. Thirty-three percent had at least one autoimmune disease in addition to central diabetes insipidus. Our data suggest that anterior hypopituitarism is rare in adult idiopathic diabetes insipidus. Routine screening of these patients for anterior hypopituitarism may not, therefore, be indicated. The significant prevalence of autoimmune disease in this cohort supports the hypothesis that idiopathic diabetes insipidus may have an autoimmune aetiology. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Protective connections and educational attainment among young adults with childhood-onset chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Gary; Haydon, Abigail A; McRee, Annie-Laurie; Halpern, Carolyn T

    2012-08-01

    Youth with childhood-onset chronic illness (COCI) are at risk of poor educational attainment. Specific protective factors that promote college graduation in this population have not been studied previously. In this study, we examine the role protective factors during adolescence play in promoting college graduation among young adults with COCI. Data were collected from 10,925 participants in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Protective factors present before 18 years of age included mentoring, parent relationship quality, school connectedness, and religious attendance. College graduation was the outcome of interest assessed when participants had a mean age of 28 years. Analysis was stratified by presence of COCI. About 2% of participants (N = 230) had 1 of 4 COCIs (cancer, diabetes, epilepsy, or heart disease). All 4 protective factors were associated with college graduation for youth without COCI. In the final multivariate model, only school connectedness was associated with college graduation for youth with COCI. School connectedness is of particular importance in promoting educational attainment for youth with COCI. © 2012, American School Health Association.

  19. Adult-Onset Offending: A Neglected Reality? Findings From a Contemporary British General Population Cohort.

    PubMed

    Sapouna, Maria

    2017-09-01

    There is disagreement in the literature as to whether there are any true adult-onset offenders. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and correlates of adult-onset offenders in a contemporary British general population cohort consisting of 739 individuals aged between 18 and 25 years. Sixteen percent of participants reported offending for the first time after the age of 18. It is concluded that adult-onset exists and deserves to be studied further. Adult-onset offenders were more likely to report using drugs, associating with deviant peers, and having mental health problems in adulthood than non-offenders. Compared with early-onset offenders, the adult-onset offenders were people with a stronger attachment to school, which may have protected them from the risk of offending in adolescence. It is possible that when that protection was removed in adulthood and they were exposed to negative life events, such as drug use and mental illness, they became involved in crime for the first time.

  20. Management of hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state in adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scott, A R

    2015-06-01

    Hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) is a medical emergency, which differs from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and requires a different approach. The present article summarizes the recent guidance on HHS that has been produced by the Joint British Diabetes Societies for Inpatient Care, available in full at http://www.diabetologists-abcd.org.uk/JBDS/JBDS_IP_HHS_Adults.pdf. HHS has a higher mortality rate than DKA and may be complicated by myocardial infarction, stroke, seizures, cerebral oedema and central pontine myelinolysis and there is some evidence that rapid changes in osmolality during treatment may be the precipitant of central pontine myelinolysis. Whilst DKA presents within hours of onset, HHS comes on over many days, and the dehydration and metabolic disturbances are more extreme. The key points in these HHS guidelines include: (1) monitoring of the response to treatment: (i) measure or calculate the serum osmolality regularly to monitor the response to treatment and (ii) aim to reduce osmolality by 3-8 mOsm/kg/h; (2) fluid and insulin administration: (i) use i.v. 0.9% sodium chloride solution as the principal fluid to restore circulating volume and reverse dehydration, (ii) fluid replacement alone will cause a fall in blood glucose (BG) level, (iii) withhold insulin until the BG level is no longer falling with i.v. fluids alone (unless ketonaemic), (iv) an initial rise in sodium level is expected and is not itself an indication for hypotonic fluids and (v) early use of insulin (before fluids) may be detrimental; and (3) delivery of care: (i) The diabetes specialist team should be involved as soon as possible and (ii) patients should be nursed in areas where staff are experienced in the management of HHS.

  1. Transition to Adult Care for Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Katharine C.; Markowitz, Jessica T.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adults with type 1 diabetes are at risk for poor glycemic control, gaps in medical care, and adverse health outcomes. With the increasing incidence in type 1 diabetes in the pediatric population, there will be an increase in the numbers of teens and young adults transferring their care from pediatric providers to adult diabetes services in the future. In recent years, the topic of transitioning pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes to adult diabetes care has been discussed at length in the literature and there have been many observational studies. However, there are few interventional studies and, to date, no randomized clinical trials. This paper discusses the rationale for studying this important area. We review both observational and interventional literature over the past several years, with a focus on new research. In addition, important areas for future research are outlined. PMID:22922877

  2. Characterization of the MODY3 phenotype. Early-onset diabetes caused by an insulin secretion defect.

    PubMed Central

    Lehto, M; Tuomi, T; Mahtani, M M; Widén, E; Forsblom, C; Sarelin, L; Gullström, M; Isomaa, B; Lehtovirta, M; Hyrkkö, A; Kanninen, T; Orho, M; Manley, S; Turner, R C; Brettin, T; Kirby, A; Thomas, J; Duyk, G; Lander, E; Taskinen, M R; Groop, L

    1997-01-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) type 3 is a dominantly inherited form of diabetes, which is often misdiagnosed as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Phenotypic analysis of members from four large Finnish MODY3 kindreds (linked to chromosome 12q with a maximum lod score of 15) revealed a severe impairment in insulin secretion, which was present also in those normoglycemic family members who had inherited the MODY3 gene. In contrast to patients with NIDDM, MODY3 patients did not show any features of the insulin resistance syndrome. They could be discriminated from patients with IDDM by lack of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-Ab). Taken together with our recent findings of linkage between this region on chromosome 12 and an insulin-deficient form of NIDDM (NIDDM2), the data suggest that mutations at the MODY3/NIDDM2 gene(s) result in a reduced insulin secretory response, that subsequently progresses to diabetes and underlines the importance of subphenotypic classification in studies of diabetes. PMID:9045858

  3. Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY): Making the Right Diagnosis to Optimize Treatment.

    PubMed

    Amed, Shazhan; Oram, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a rare but increasingly recognized cause of diabetes in young people. It is a monogenic disorder that typically presents at <25 years of age, is non-insulin dependent and is familial, with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The most common forms of MODY are caused by mutations in glucokinase and hepatic nuclear factor 1 alpha or 4 alpha genes and account for almost 80% of cases of MODY. MODY is commonly misdiagnosed as type 1 or type 2 diabetes and, as a result, patients are often inappropriately managed with insulin when they can be more effectively managed with oral sulfonylureas. Therefore, making the right diagnosis is critical for effective treatment as well as for genetic counselling and, more important, for patients' quality of life. In this review, we aim to raise awareness about MODY among diabetes clinicians by describing key clinical and laboratory features of the most common forms of MODY, outlining features that might help to differentiate MODY from type 1 and type 2 diabetes and providing information about clinical tests and tools that might assist in identifying patients who are most likely to benefit from molecular genetic testing. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS): is there a difference based on onset of symptoms - pediatric versus adult?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS) is a well-recognized functional gastrointestinal disorder in children but its presentation is poorly understood in adults. Genetic differences in pediatric-onset (presentation before age 18) and adult-onset CVS have been reported recently but their clinical features and possible differences in response to therapy have not been well studied. Methods This was a retrospective review of 101 CVS patients seen at the Medical College of Wisconsin between 2006 and 2008. Rome III criteria were utilized to make the diagnosis of CVS. Results Our study population comprised of 29(29%) pediatric-onset and 72 (71%) adult-onset CVS patients. Pediatric-onset CVS patients were more likely to be female (86% vs. 57%, p = 0.005) and had a higher prevalence of CVS plus (CVS + neurocognitive disorders) as compared to adult-onset CVS patients (14% vs. 3%, p = 0.05). There was a longer delay in diagnosis (10 ± 7 years) in the pediatric-onset group when compared to (5 ± 7 years) adult-onset CVS group (p = 0.001). Chronic opiate use was less frequent in the pediatric-onset group compared to adult-onset patients (0% vs. 23%, p = 0.004). Aside from these differences, the two groups were similar with regards to their clinical features and the time of onset of symptoms did not predict response to standard treatment. The majority of patients (86%) responded to treatment with tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants (topiramate), coenzyme Q-10, and L-carnitine. Non-response to therapy was associated with coalescence of symptoms, chronic opiate use and more severe disease as characterized by longer episodes, greater number of emergency department visits in the year prior to presentation, presence of disability and non-compliance on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, only compliance to therapy was associated with a response. (88% vs. 38%, Odds Ratio, OR 9.6; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.18-77.05). Conclusion Despite reported genetic

  5. Parental History of Diabetes, Positive Affect, and Diabetes Risk in Adults: Findings from MIDUS.

    PubMed

    Tsenkova, Vera K; Karlamangla, Arun S; Ryff, Carol D

    2016-12-01

    Family history of diabetes is one of the major risk factors for diabetes, but significant variability in this association remains unexplained, suggesting the presence of important effect modifiers. To our knowledge, no previous work has examined whether psychological factors moderate the degree to which family history of diabetes increases diabetes risk. We investigated the relationships among parental history of diabetes, affective states (positive affect, negative affect, and depressed affect), and diabetes in 978 adults from the MIDUS 2 national sample. As expected, parental history of diabetes was associated with an almost threefold increase in diabetes risk. We found a significant interaction between positive affect and parental history of diabetes on diabetes (p = .009): higher positive affect was associated with a statistically significant lower relative risk for diabetes in participants who reported having a parental history of diabetes (RR = .66 per unit increase in positive affect; 95 % CI = .47; .93), but it did not influence diabetes risk for participants who reported no parental history of diabetes (p = .34). This pattern persisted after adjusting for an extensive set of health and sociodemographic covariates and was independent of negative and depressed affect. These results suggest that psychological well-being may protect individuals at increased risk from developing diabetes. Understanding such interactions between non-modifiable risk factors and modifiable psychological resources is important for delineating biopsychosocial pathways to diabetes and informing theory-based, patient-centered interventions to prevent the development of diabetes.

  6. Adult onset Hallervorden-Spatz disease with psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    del Valle-López, Pilar; Pérez-García, Rosa; Sanguino-Andrés, Rosa; González-Pablos, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz disease is a rare neurological disorder characterized by pyramidal and extrapyramidal manifestations, dysarthria and dementia. Its onset is usually in childhood and most patients have a fatal outcome in few years. A high percentage of cases are hereditary with a recessive autosomal pattern. In the majority of the patients reported, a mutation of the gene that encodes the pantothenate kinase (PANK2) located in the 20p13-p12.3 chromosome that causes iron storage in the basal ganglia of the brain has been found. Its diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms as well as specific MRI imaging findings. The most common psychiatric features are cognitive impairment as well as depressive symptoms. There are few documented cases with psychotic disorders. We present the case of a patient with late onset Hallervorden-Spatz disease and psychotic symptoms that preceded the development of neurological manifestations. The pathophysiology and the treatment of psychotic symptomatology are presented and discussed. Key words: Psicosis, Hallervorden-Spatz, late onset, Basal ganglia.

  7. Beverage intake, diabetes, and glucose control of adults in America.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Todd; Brooks, Blair; O'Connor, Gerry

    2006-09-01

    Beverages are important components of diet and a route for the intake of caffeine, ethanol, and other bioactive substances. The aim of the study is to examine the association between type of beverages consumed and glucose control in American adults with and without diabetes. Diabetes status, glycosylated hemoglobin (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c]) level, and 1-month recall food frequency questionnaires were all collected in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988 to 1994), based on a nationally representative sample of the noninstitutionalized civilian US population. We used regression and other methods for clustered data to examine the association of HbA1c levels with self-reported intake of carbonated drinks, alcohol, coffee, tea, juices, and milk in participants aged 18 to 75 years with and without diabetes. Adults with diabetes reported drinking half the amount of alcohol as adults without diabetes. Compared with nondrinkers, subjects who had 30 or more drinks per month of alcohol had mean HbA1c levels 1.2 units less (p < 0.001) in persons with diabetes and 0.2% less (p < 0.001) in persons without diabetes. Adults with diabetes reported drinking three times as much diet soda as adults without diabetes. However, in adults with diabetes who had one or more drinks of diet soda per day, HbA1c level was 0.7 units greater (p < 0.001) compared with those who drank none. Alcohol consumption, at least in moderate amounts, correlates with better glucose control. There is a correlation between drinking diet soda and glucose control in adults with diabetes.

  8. Increased urinary angiotensinogen precedes the onset of albuminuria in normotensive type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhen; Bai, Qiong; A, Lata; Liang, Yaoxian; Zheng, Danxia; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    It was previously reported that intrarenal renin angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Urinary angiotensinogen (UAGT) was employed as a special index of the intrarenal RAS status and enhanced significantly at a very early stage of chronic kidney disease and type 1 diabetes. On the basis of these findings, the present study was performed to test the hypothesis that UAGT levels are increase even before the development of DN in type 2 diabetic patients without hypertension. 102 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and 18 healthy volunteers were studied cross-sectionally. Clinical data were collected and morning spot urine samples were obtained from all participants. UAGT levels were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). As a result, UAGT to creatinine ratio (UAGT/Cr) was significantly enhanced in T2DM patients before the appearance of urinary albumin (UALB) and further increased to a greater degree in albuminuric patients. UAGT/Cr levels were positively correlated with Log (UALB to creatinine ratio) and diastolic blood pressure, but negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate. These data indicate that elevated UAGT levels precede the onset of albuminuria in normotensive T2DM patients. UAGT might potentially serve as an early marker to determine intrarenal RAS activity and predict progressive kidney disease in T2DM patients without hypertension. PMID:26617876

  9. [Identifying different susceptibility loci associated with early onset diabetes and cardiovascular disease in Mexican families].

    PubMed

    Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; Riba-Ramírez, Laura; Monroy-Guzmán, Adriana; Domínguez-López, Aarón; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Tusié-Luna, María Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Coronary artery disease and diabetes mellitus are among the primary mortality and morbidity causes in Mexico. Genetic factors play a fundamental role in the development of these entities. In the past few years due to the recognition and study of families with monogenic forms of diabetes and dislipidemias associated with development of atherosclerosis, several genes and loci have been associated with these conditions through genetic linkage studies. These studies have provided evidence of the genetic heterogeneity that exists and the type of genes involved in different ethnic groups. The study of Mexican families with early-onset diabetes and combined familial hyperlipidemia showed the participation of different genetic loci associated with these conditions in the Mexican population. These findings show the value of gene mapping strategies in the identification of the genetic component in these entities in our population.

  10. Incretin hormones and maturity onset diabetes of the young--pathophysiological implications and anti-diabetic treatment potential.

    PubMed

    Østoft, Signe Harring

    2015-09-01

    Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) designates monogenic forms of non-autoimmune diabetes characterised by autosomal dominant inheritance, non-insulin dependent diabetes at onset and diagnosis often before 25 years of age. MODY constitutes genetically and clinically heterogeneous forms of diabetes. More than 8 different genes are known to cause MODY, among which hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF1A) (MODY3) and glucokinase (GCK) (MODY2) mutations are the most common. Both forms of MODY are characterised by specific beta cell dysfunction, with patients with HNF1A-diabetes having a reduced insulin secretory capacity, while patients with GCK-diabetes have a glucose-sensing defect, but preserved insulin secretory capacity. Patients with MODY are effectively treated with sulphonylurea (SU) due to very high sensitivity to these drugs, but they are also prone to develop hypoglycaemia. The objectives of this thesis were to study the pathophysiology of GCK-diabetes and HNF1A-diabetes by investigating the incretin effect, the physiological response to food ingestion and to estimate the treatment potential of a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) in patients with HNF1A-diabetes. In Study I we investigated the incretin effect and the responses of islet hormones and incretin hormones to oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and isoglycaemic IV glucose infusion (IIGI) in patients with GCK-diabetes, in patients with HNF1A-diabetes, and in BMI and age matched healthy individuals (CTRLs). In Study II we investigated responses of islet hormones and incretin hormones to a more physiological stimulus consisting of a standardised meal test in patients with GCK-diabetes, in patients with HNF1A--diabetes, and in BMI and age matched CTRLs. In Study III we conducted a randomised, double-blind, crossover trial investigating the glucose lowering effect and risk of hypoglycaemia during 6 weeks of treatment with the GLP-1RA, liraglutide compared to the SU, glimepiride

  11. Geriatric conditions develop in middle-aged adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cigolle, Christine T; Lee, Pearl G; Langa, Kenneth M; Lee, Yuo-Yu; Tian, Zhiyi; Blaum, Caroline S

    2011-03-01

    Geriatric conditions, collections of symptoms common in older adults and not necessarily associated with a specific disease, increase in prevalence with advancing age. These conditions are important contributors to the complex health status of older adults. Diabetes mellitus is known to co-occur with geriatric conditions in older adults and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of some conditions. To investigate the prevalence and incidence of geriatric conditions in middle-aged and older-aged adults with diabetes. Secondary analysis of nationally-representative, longitudinal health interview survey data (Health and Retirement Study waves 2004 and 2006). Respondents 51 years and older in 2004 (n=18,908). Diabetes mellitus. Eight geriatric conditions: cognitive impairment, falls, incontinence, low body mass index, dizziness, vision impairment, hearing impairment, pain. Adults with diabetes, compared to those without, had increased prevalence and increased incidence of geriatric conditions across the age spectrum (p< 0.01 for each age group from 51-54 years old to 75-79 years old). Differences between adults with and without diabetes were most marked in middle-age. Diabetes was associated with the two-year cumulative incidence of acquiring new geriatric conditions (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 1.8, 1.6-2.0). A diabetes-age interaction was discovered: as age increased, the association of diabetes with new geriatric conditions decreased. Middle-aged, as well as older-aged, adults with diabetes are at increased risk for the development of geriatric conditions, which contribute substantially to their morbidity and functional impairment. Our findings suggest that adults with diabetes should be monitored for the development of these conditions beginning at a younger age than previously thought.

  12. Seasonality at the clinical onset of type 1 diabetes-Lessons from the SWEET database.

    PubMed

    Gerasimidi Vazeou, A; Kordonouri, O; Witsch, M; Hermann, J M; Forsander, G; de Beaufort, C; Veeze, H J; Maffeis, C; Cherubini, V; Cinek, O; Piccini, B; Holl, R W; Danne, T

    2016-10-01

    Seasonality at the clinical onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been suggested by different studies, however, the results are conflicting. This study aimed to evaluate the presence of seasonality at clinical onset of T1D based on the SWEET database comprising data from 32 different countries. The study cohort included 23 603 patients (52% males) recorded in the international multicenter SWEET database (48 centers), with T1D onset ≤20 years, year of onset between 1980 and 2015, gender, year and month of birth and T1D-diagnosis documented. Data were stratified according to four age groups (<5, 5-<10, 10-<15, 15-20 years) at T1D onset, the latitude of European center (Northern ≥50°N and Southern Europe <50°N) and the year of onset ≤ or >2009. Analysis by month revealed significant seasonality with January being the month with the highest and June with the lowest percentage of incident cases (P < .001). Winter, early spring and late autumn months had higher percentage of incident cases compared with late spring and summer months. Stratification by age showed similar seasonality patterns in all four age groups (P ≤ .003 each), but not in children <24 months of age. There was no gender or latitude effect on seasonality pattern, however, the pattern differed by the year of onset (P < .001). Seasonality of diagnosis conformed to a sinusoidal model for all cases, females and males, age groups, northern and southern European countries. Seasonality at T1D clinical onset is documented by the large SWEET database with no gender or latitude (Europe only) effect except from the year of manifestation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Differential effects of low-dose fenofibrate treatment in diabetic rats with early onset nephropathy and established nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kadian, Supriya; Mahadevan, Nanjaian; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2013-01-05

    We have previously shown that low-dose fenofibrate treatment has an ability to prevent diabetes-induced nephropathy in rats. We investigated here the comparative pre- and post-treatment effects of low-dose fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day p.o.) in diabetes-induced onset of nephropathy. Rats were made diabetics by single administration of streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg i.p.). The development of diabetic nephropathy was assessed biochemically and histologically. Moreover, lipid profile and renal oxidative stress were assessed. Diabetic rats after 8 weeks of STZ-administration developed apparent nephropathy by elevating serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and microproteinuria, and inducing glomerular-capsular wall distortion, mesangial expansion and tubular damage and renal oxidative stress. Fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day p.o., 4 weeks) pretreatment (4 weeks after STZ-administration) markedly prevented diabetes-induced onset of diabetic nephropathy, while the fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day p.o., 4 weeks) post-treatment (8 weeks after STZ-administration) was less-effective. However, both pre-and post fenofibrate treatments were effective in preventing diabetes-induced renal oxidative stress and lipid alteration in diabetic rats though the pretreatment was slightly more effective. Conversely, both pre-and post fenofibrate treatments did not alter elevated glucose levels in diabetic rats. It may be concluded that diabetes-induced oxidative stress and lipid alteration, in addition to a marked glucose elevation, play a detrimental role in the onset of nephropathy in diabetic rats. The pretreatment with low-dose fenofibrate might be a potential therapeutic approach in preventing the onset of nephropathy in diabetic subjects under the risk of renal disease induction. However, low-dose fenofibrate treatment might not be effective in treating the established nephropathy in diabetic subjects.

  14. Precipitation of new onset diabetes by H1N1 infection.

    PubMed

    Krishna, S V S; Sunil, K; Prasad, R Devi; Modi, K D

    2012-12-01

    Infectious diseases in type 2 diabetes can complicate diabetic ketoacidosis, derange hyperglycemia, or precipitate new onset diabetes. Pulmonary tuberculosis being the most common. High index of clinical suspicion is required for co-existing H1N1 virus, which if present has high mortality if not treated. A 63-year-old female, with no known chronic illness, was hospitalized in month of Aug 2010 with influenza-like symptoms and diabetes. Quick evaluation revealed tachycardia, tachypnea, p02 90% at room air, and normotensive. Clinical chest examination was normal. Further evaluation revealed NHO in both lung fields on chest X-ray, hyperglycemia 325 mg/dl, detected for first time. Her signs and symptoms were out of proportion to clinical findings and chest X-ray findings. Patient was managed with insulin infusion and empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage in ICU. As her condition worsened over next 12 hrs, infection with H1N1 was suspected and empirically started on oseltamavir after taking throat swab for H1N1 test and later, the sample was tested positive for H1N1 influenza by RT-PCR. Clinical course in the hospital was complicated by oxygen dependence requiring 10-12 ltr/hr by nasal mask. She made an uneventful recovery. In a known diabetic, infection with H1N1 quadruples ICU hospitalization, and only few cases of new onset diabetes with H1N1 were reported. Two reported from Iran had fatal outcome. This case emphasis on clinical acumen in recognition, and prompt institution of therapy will reduce associated mortality.

  15. A Microsphere-Based Vaccine Prevents and Reverses New-Onset Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Brett; Nylander, Karen; Harnaha, Jo; Machen, Jennifer; Lakomy, Robert; Styche, Alexis; Gillis, Kimberly; Brown, Larry; Gallo, Michael; Knox, Janet; Hogeland, Kenneth; Trucco, Massimo; Giannoukakis, Nick

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study was aimed at ascertaining the efficacy of antisense oligonucleotide-formulated microspheres to prevent type 1 diabetes and to reverse new-onset disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Microspheres carrying antisense oligonucleotides to CD40, CD80, and CD86 were delivered into NOD mice. Glycemia was monitored to determine disease prevention and reversal. In recipients that remained and/or became diabetes free, spleen and lymph node T-cells were enriched to determine the prevalence of Foxp3+ putative regulatory T-cells (Treg cells). Splenocytes from diabetes-free microsphere-treated recipients were adoptively cotransferred with splenocytes from diabetic NOD mice into NOD-scid recipients. Live animal in vivo imaging measured the microsphere accumulation pattern. To rule out nonspecific systemic immunosuppression, splenocytes from successfully treated recipients were pulsed with β-cell antigen or ovalbumin or cocultured with allogeneic splenocytes. RESULTS The microspheres prevented type 1 diabetes and, most importantly, exhibited a capacity to reverse clinical hyperglycemia, suggesting reversal of new-onset disease. The microspheres augmented Foxp3+ Treg cells and induced hyporesponsiveness to NOD-derived pancreatic β-cell antigen, without compromising global immune responses to alloantigens and nominal antigens. T-cells from successfully treated mice suppressed adoptive transfer of disease by diabetogenic splenocytes into secondary immunodeficient recipients. Finally, microspheres accumulated within the pancreas and the spleen after either intraperitoneal or subcutaneous injection. Dendritic cells from spleen of the microsphere-treated mice exhibit decreased cell surface CD40, CD80, and CD86. CONCLUSIONS This novel microsphere formulation represents the first diabetes-suppressive and reversing nucleic acid vaccine that confers an immunoregulatory phenotype to endogenous dendritic cells. PMID:18316361

  16. Depression among older adults with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mijung; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Depression is among the leading causes of decreased disability-adjusted life years in the world1 and a serious public health problem.2 Older adults with DM experience greater risk for comorbid depression compared to those who do not have DM.3 Having DM increases the risk of subsequent development or recurrence of depression. Conversely, history of depression increases the risk for new onset DM.4 As an unwanted co-traveler of DM, undetected, untreated or undertreated depression impinges an individual’s ability to manage their DM successfully, hindering their adherence to treatment regime.5 It also undermines the effectiveness of provider-patient communication and decays therapeutic relationships. Thus, in the context of caring for older adults with DM, comorbid depression presents special challenges and opportunities for clinicians. Moreover, recent studies have suggested that co-occurring depression and DM may accelerate cognitive decline, highlighting the importance of treating depression and DM. Several treatment modalities are available, which can be used to treat and manage depression in primary care settings: pharmaceutical, brief psychotherapeutic, behavioral and life style interventions, and combination therapies. An evidence-based health care delivery model is also available for treating depression in primary care settings. In this article, we summarize the clinical presentation of late-life depression, potential mechanisms of comorbidity of depression and DM, importance of depression in the successful management of DM, and available best practice models for depression treatment. PMID:25453305

  17. Health care expenditure burdens among adults with diabetes in 2001.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Didem M; Banthin, Jessica S; Encinosa, William E

    2006-03-01

    High out-of-pocket costs can pose a significant burden on patients with chronic conditions such as diabetes and contribute to decreased treatment adherence. We examined financial burdens among adults with diabetes using nationally representative data. estimated how frequently adults with diabetes live in families in which spending on health insurance premiums and health care services exceed a specified percentage of family-level after-tax disposable income. We found that adults with diabetes face greater risks of high burdens compared with adults with any other highly prevalent medical condition. Adults with diabetes have lower incomes and pay a higher share of total expenditures out-of-pocket compared with adults with heart disease, hypertension, and cancer. Among adults with diabetes, women, those who live in poverty, and those with coexisting conditions are more likely to bear high burdens. Among nonelderly adults, those with public coverage and the uninsured have greater risk of high burdens compared with those with private insurance. More than 23% of the uninsured and more than 20% of those with public coverage spend more than half of their disposable income on health care. Among the elderly, those with private nonemployment related insurance have the greatest risk of high burdens followed by those with Medicare only, those with private employment-related coverage, and those enrolled in Medicaid. Prescription medications and diabetic supplies account for 63% to 70% of out-of-pocket expenditures among the nonelderly and 62% to 69% among the elderly. Our study identifies the subpopulations among adults with diabetes who are more likely to have high burdens, so that intervention measures can be targeted to help reduce treatment noncompliance. Our analysis also emphasizes the role of medications and diabetic supplies in contributing to high out-of-pocket burdens.

  18. Early-Onset, Coexisting Autoimmunity and Decreased HLA-Mediated Susceptibility Are the Characteristics of Diabetes in Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Rachel J.; Mehers, Kay L.; Williams, Alistair J.; Brown, Jamie; Bingley, Polly J.; Holl, Reinhard W.; Rohrer, Tilman R.; Schober, Edith; Abdul-Rasoul, Majedah M.; Shield, Julian P.H.; Gillespie, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Down syndrome (DS) is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, particularly in young children. HLA-mediated risk is however decreased in children with DS and diabetes (DSD). We hypothesized that early-onset diabetes in children with DS is etiologically different from autoimmune diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Clinical and immunogenetic markers of autoimmune diabetes were studied in 136 individuals with DSD and compared with 194 age- and sex-matched individuals with type 1 diabetes, 222 with DS, and 671 healthy controls. HLA class II was analyzed by sequence-specific primed PCR. Islet autoantibodies were measured by radioimmunoassay. RESULTS Age at onset of diabetes was biphasic, with 22% of DS children diagnosed before 2 years of age, compared with only 4% in this age-group with type 1 diabetes in the general population (P < 0.0001). The frequency of the highest-risk type 1 diabetes–associated HLA genotype, DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8, was decreased in both early- and later-onset DSD compared with age-matched children with type 1 diabetes (P < 0.0001), although HLA DR3-DQ2 genotypes were increased (P = 0.004). Antibodies to GAD were observed in all five samples tested from children diagnosed at ≤2 years of age, and persistent islet autoantibodies were detected in 72% of DSD cases. Thyroid and celiac disease were diagnosed in 74 and 14%, respectively, of the DSD cohort. CONCLUSIONS Early-onset diabetes in children with DS is unlikely to be etiologically different from autoimmune diabetes occurring in older DS children. Overall, these studies demonstrate more extreme autoimmunity in DSD typified by early-onset diabetes with multiple autoimmunity, persistent islet autoantibodies, and decreased HLA-mediated susceptibility. PMID:23275362

  19. Germinal centre frequency is decreased in pancreatic lymph nodes from individuals with recent-onset type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Abby; Richardson, Sarah J; Walker, Lucy S K; Kent, Sally C; Morgan, Noel G; Gillespie, Kathleen M

    2017-07-01

    Pancreatic lymph nodes (PLNs) are critical sites for the initial interaction between islet autoantigens and autoreactive lymphocytes, but the histology of PLNs in tissue from individuals with type 1 diabetes has not been analysed in detail. The aim of this study was to examine PLN tissue sections from healthy donors compared with those at risk of, or with recent-onset and longer-duration type 1 diabetes. Immunofluorescence staining was used to examine PLN sections from the following donor groups: non-diabetic (n=15), non-diabetic islet autoantibody-positive (n=5), recent-onset (≤1.5 years duration) type 1 diabetes (n=13), and longer-duration type 1 diabetes (n=15). Staining for CD3, CD20 and Ki67 was used to detect primary and secondary (germinal centre-containing) follicles and CD21 and CD35 to detect follicular dendritic cell networks. The frequency of secondary follicles was lower in the recent-onset type 1 diabetes group compared with the non-diabetic control group. The presence of insulitis (as evidence of ongoing beta cell destruction) and diagnosis of type 1 diabetes at a younger age, however, did not appear to be associated with a lower frequency of secondary follicles. A higher proportion of primary B cell follicles were observed to lack follicular dendritic cell networks in the recent-onset type 1 diabetes group. Histological analysis of rare PLNs from individuals with type 1 diabetes suggests a previously unrecognised phenotype comprising decreased primary B cell follicle frequency and fewer follicular dendritic cell networks in recent-onset type 1 diabetes.

  20. Searching for Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY): When and What for?

    PubMed

    Timsit, José; Saint-Martin, Cécile; Dubois-Laforgue, Danièle; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a group of monogenic diseases that results in primary defects in insulin secretion and dominantly inherited forms of nonautoimmune diabetes. Although many genes may be associated with monogenic diabetes, heterozygous mutations in 6 of them are responsible for the majority of cases of MODY. Glucokinase (GCK)-MODY is due to mutations in the glucokinase gene, 3 MODY subtypes are associated with mutations in the hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) transcription factors, and 2 others with mutations in ABCC8 and KCNJ11, which encode the subunits of the ATP-dependent potassium channel in pancreatic beta cells. GCK-MODY and HNF1A-MODY are the most common subtypes. The clinical presentation of MODY subtypes has been reported to differ according to the gene involved, and the diagnosis of MODY may be considered in various clinical circumstances. However, except in patients with GCK-MODY whose phenotype is very homogeneous, in most cases the penetrance and expressivity of a given molecular abnormality vary greatly among patients and, conversely, alterations in various genes may lead to similar phenotypes. Moreover, differential diagnosis among more common forms of diabetes may be difficult, particularly with type 2 diabetes. Thus, careful assessment of the personal and family histories of patients with diabetes is mandatory to select those in whom genetic screening is worthwhile. The diagnosis of monogenic diabetes has many consequences in terms of prognosis, therapeutics and family screening. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sandhoff disease mimicking adult-onset bulbospinal neuronopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P K; Young, E; King, R H

    1989-01-01

    A 32 year old male is described with an onset of upper limb postural tremor in adolescence followed by muscle cramps. Progressive proximal amyotrophy and weakness in the limbs developed late in the third decade. Examination disclosed, in addition, bilateral facial weakness and mild dysarthria. Enzyme studies revealed hexosaminidase A and B deficiency, indicating a diagnosis of Sandhoff disease. Intra-axonal membranocytoplasmic bodies were present in a rectal biopsy. The presentation, which resembled that of X-linked bulbospinal neuronopathy, widens the clinical spectrum for disorders related to G(M2) gangliosidosis. Images PMID:2795083

  2. Peripubertal-onset but not adult-onset obesity increases IGF-I and drives development of lean mass, which may lessen the metabolic impairment in adult obesity.

    PubMed

    Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Gahete, Manuel D; Pozo-Salas, Ana I; Moreno-Herrera, Antonio; Castaño, Justo P; Kineman, Rhonda D; Luque, Raúl M

    2012-11-01

    It has been suggested that adult metabolic dysfunction may be more severe in individuals who become obese as children compared with those who become obese later in life. To determine whether adult metabolic function differs if diet-induced weight gain occurs during the peripubertal age vs. if excess weight gain occurs after puberty, male C57Bl/6J mice were fed a low-fat (LF; 10% kcal from fat) or high-fat (HF; 60% kcal from fat) diet starting during the peripubertal period (pHF; 4 wk of age) or as adults (aHF; 12 wk of age). Both pHF and aHF mice were hyperinsulinemic and hyperglycemic, and both showed impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance compared with their LF-fed controls. However, despite a longer time on diet, pHF mice were relatively more insulin sensitive than aHF mice, which was associated with higher lean mass and circulating IGF-I levels. In addition, HF feeding had an overall stimulatory effect on circulating corticosterone levels; however, this rise was associated only with elevated plasma ACTH in the aHF mice. Despite the belief that adult metabolic dysfunction may be more severe in individuals who become obese as children, data generated using a diet-induced obese mouse model suggest that adult metabolic dysfunction associated with peripubertal onset of obesity is not worse than that associated with adult-onset obesity.

  3. Niemann-Pick type C: focus on the adolescent/adult onset form.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Marano, Massimo; Florio, Lucia; De Santis, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is an inherited sphingolipidosis characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and early mortality. The symptomatology and disease progression of NP-C are markedly affected by the age at onset of neurological manifestations, and categorization into early-infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adolescent/adult neurological onset forms can aid evaluation of disease course and responses to therapy. Here, we review current information on the detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of NP-C, with a focus on the adolescent/adult-onset form. A recent analysis indicated that the combined incidence of NP-C related to NPC1 gene mutations (NPC1) and NP-C related to NPC2 gene mutations (NPC2) is approximately 1 case in every 89 000 live births. In particular, late-onset phenotypes might well provide a greater contribution to the overall incidence than has previously been reported. Some neuropathological features in NP-C are held in common with other advanced age-onset diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Visceral symptoms such as splenomegaly are frequently asymptomatic in patients with adolescent/adult-onset NP-C, and are only occasionally detected during routine ultrasound assessments. In contrast, most patients with adolescent/adult-onset exhibit some degree of slowly progressive, non-disease-specific movement disorders (e.g. cerebellar ataxia), and/or more pathognomonic neurological signs such as vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. An increasing number of adolescent/adult-onset cases have been reported following initial recognition of cognitive impairment and/or psychiatric signs. The recent development and implementation of new clinical screening tools (e.g. the NP-C suspicion index) and biomarkers (e.g. plasma oxysterols) should help identify patients who warrant further investigation and possible treatment.

  4. Statin treatment and new-onset diabetes: a review of proposed mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Brault, Marilyne; Ray, Jessica; Gomez, Yessica-Haydee; Mantzoros, Christos S; Daskalopoulou, Stella S

    2014-06-01

    New-onset diabetes has been observed in clinical trials and meta-analyses involving statin therapy. To explain this association, three major mechanisms have been proposed and discussed in the literature. First, certain statins affect insulin secretion through direct, indirect or combined effects on calcium channels in pancreatic β-cells. Second, reduced translocation of glucose transporter 4 in response to treatment results in hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Third, statin therapy decreases other important downstream products, such as coenzyme Q10, farnesyl pyrophosphate, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, and dolichol; their depletion leads to reduced intracellular signaling. Other possible mechanisms implicated in the effect of statins on new-onset diabetes are: statin interference with intracellular insulin signal transduction pathways via inhibition of necessary phosphorylation events and reduction of small GTPase action; inhibition of adipocyte differentiation leading to decreased peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein which are important pathways for glucose homeostasis; decreased leptin causing inhibition of β-cells proliferation and insulin secretion; and diminished adiponectin levels. Given that the magnitude of the risk of new-onset diabetes following statin use remains to be fully clarified and the well-established beneficial effect of statins in reducing cardiovascular risk, statins remain the first-choice treatment for prevention of CVD. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the development of diabetes in association with statin use may help identify novel preventative or therapeutic approaches to this problem and/or help design a new generation statin without such side-effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Adult-onset Still's disease associated with collapsing glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Arulkumaran, Nishkantha; Reitbock, Pablo; Halliday, Kirsty; Onwubalili, James; Jayasena, Dakshina; Dupont, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    A young woman of African descent presented with fevers, arthralgia, lymphadenopathy and a skin rash. Modest proteinuria was also noted. The clinical picture suggested an acute HIV sero-conversion illness, and a renal biopsy showed a collapsing glomerulopathy compatible with that diagnosis. However, HIV serology proved persistently negative and a diagnosis of Adult Still's disease was subsequently made (by Yamaguchi criteria). Following steroid treatment, the patient's fever abated and her inflammatory markers returned to normal. Collapsing glomerulopathy is a rare but important complication of Adult Still's disease. Immunosuppressive treatment may be effective in improving renal outcome. PMID:25949406

  6. Coffee consumption and the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults--results from a Swedish case-control study.

    PubMed

    Löfvenborg, J E; Andersson, T; Carlsson, P-O; Dorkhan, M; Groop, L; Martinell, M; Rasouli, B; Storm, P; Tuomi, T; Carlsson, S

    2014-07-01

    Coffee consumption is associated with a reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes. Our aim was to investigate if coffee intake may also reduce the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, an autoimmune form of diabetes with features of Type 2 diabetes. We used data from a population-based case-control study with incident cases of adult onset (≥ 35 years) diabetes, including 245 cases of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positive), 759 cases of Type 2 diabetes (glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody negative), together with 990 control subjects without diabetes, randomly selected from the population. Using questionnaire information on coffee consumption, we estimated the odds ratio of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults and Type 2 diabetes adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoking, physical activity, alcohol, education and family history of diabetes. Coffee intake was inversely associated with Type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 0.92, 95% CI 0.87-0.98 per cup/day). With regard to latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, the general trend was weak (odds ratio 1.04, 95% CI 0.96-1.13), but stratification by degree of autoimmunity (median glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody levels) suggested that coffee intake may be associated with an increased risk of high glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 1.00-1.23 per cup/day). Furthermore, for every additional cup of coffee consumed per day, there was a 15.2% (P = 0.0268) increase in glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody levels. Our findings confirm that coffee consumption is associated with a reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, the findings suggest that coffee may be associated with development of autoimmunity and possibly an increased risk of more Type 1-like latent autoimmune diabetes in adults. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  7. Early Onset of Type 1 Diabetes and Educational Field at Upper Secondary and University Level: Is Own Experience an Asset for a Health Care Career?

    PubMed Central

    Steen Carlsson, Katarina

    2017-01-01

    Ill health in early life has a significant negative impact on school grades, grade repetition, educational level, and labor market outcomes. However, less is known about qualitative socio-economic consequences of a health shock in childhood or adolescence. We investigate the relationship between onset of type 1 diabetes up to age 15 and the probability of choosing and completing a health-oriented path at upper secondary and university level of education. We analyze the Swedish Childhood Diabetes Register, the National Educational Register, and other population registers in Sweden for 2756 people with type 1 diabetes and 10,020 matched population controls. Educational decisions are modeled as unsorted series of binary choices to assess the choice of educational field as a potential mechanism linking early life health to adult outcomes. The analyses reject the hypothesis of no systematic differences in choice of educational field between people with and without type 1 diabetes at both levels. The results are robust to selection on ability proxies and across sensitivity analysis. We conclude that the observed pro health-oriented educational choices among people with type 1 diabetes in our data are consistent with disease onset in childhood and adolescence having qualitative impact on life-course choices. PMID:28665347

  8. De Novo Advanced Adult-Onset Offending: New Evidence from a Population of Federal Correctional Clients.

    PubMed

    DeLisi, Matt; Tahja, Katherine N; Drury, Alan J; Elbert, Michael J; Caropreso, Daniel E; Heinrichs, Timothy

    2017-05-11

    Adult antisocial behavior is almost always predated by delinquency during childhood or adolescence; however, there is also evidence of adult-onset criminal offending. This study examined this controversial subgroup of offenders using self-reported and official data from a total population of federal correctional clients selected from the Midwestern United States. Difference of means t-tests, chi-square tests, and logistic regression models found that 11.7% of clients had an adult onset of offending and 2.7% of clients (n = 23) had an onset occurring at age 60 years or older. This group-introduced as de novo advanced adult-onset offenders-had high socioeconomic status, mixed evidence of adverse childhood experiences, and virtually no usage of drugs with the exception of alcohol. These offenders were primarily convicted of social security and white-collar crimes and evinced remarkably low psychopathology and criminal risk. More research is needed to replicate the phenomenon of de novo advanced adult-onset offending. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. Maturity onset diabetes of the young: Seek and you will find.

    PubMed

    Heuvel-Borsboom, H; de Valk, H W; Losekoot, M; Westerink, J

    2016-06-01

    Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a monogenic, autosomal dominant form of diabetes characterised by mutations in genes resulting in dysfunction of pancreatic β-cells and subsequent insulin production. We present a family with HNF1A-MODY due to a likely pathogenic mutation in HNF1A (c.59G>A, p.Gly20Glu), diagnosed a long time after the first diagnosis of diabetes. Currently 13 MODY subtypes caused by mutations in 13 genes, are known. We describe the four most prevalent forms in more detail, i.e. HNF4A-MODY, GCK-MODY, HNF1A-MODY and HNF1B-MODY, together responsible for probably 99% of MODY cases. The different forms of MODY vary in prevalence, severity of diabetes, occurrence and severity of diabetic complications and response to treatment. New tools, such as the MODY probability calculator, may be of assistance in finding those patients in whom further genetic testing for possible MODY is warranted. However, as our described family shows, a doctor's clinical eye and taking the time for a detailed family history may be equal to, or even better than, the best prediction rule.

  10. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in juvenile-onset nonketotic and ketotic diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Mårtensson, J; Hermansson, G

    1984-05-01

    Sulfur amino acid metabolism was studied in non-fasting nonketotic and ketotic juvenile-onset diabetic children and the results were compared to age-matched healthy children on an ordinary diet. An increased excretion of total sulfur and inorganic sulfate was found in diabetic children, probably a result of a decreased protein-serum synthesis and/or increased endogenous protein catabolism, although as a result of hyperglycemia a decreased tubular reabsorption may also have contributed. All diabetics showed a normal excretion of methionine. For cyst(e)ine and taurine an increased excretion was seen in ketotic diabetics, probably also a consequence of an increased endogenous protein degradation. As a sign of the latter, an increased output of 3-methylhistidine was also observed, a confirmation of earlier reports. The increased output of mercaptolactate and mercaptoacetate found in ketotic patients, was probably also a result of enhanced endogenous protein degradation. An increased urinary excretion of N-acetylcysteine was seen in diabetic children, which may reflect an enhanced availability to acetyl coenzyme A.

  11. Variation in Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young Genes Influence Response to Interventions for Diabetes Prevention.

    PubMed

    Billings, Liana K; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Warner, A Sofia; Cheng, Yu-Chien; McAteer, Jarred B; Tipton, Laura; Shuldiner, Alan R; Ehrmann, David A; Manning, Alisa K; Dabelea, Dana; Franks, Paul W; Kahn, Steven E; Pollin, Toni I; Knowler, William C; Altshuler, David; Florez, Jose C

    2017-08-01

    Variation in genes that cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) has been associated with diabetes incidence and glycemic traits. This study aimed to determine whether genetic variation in MODY genes leads to differential responses to insulin-sensitizing interventions. This was a secondary analysis of a multicenter, randomized clinical trial, the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), involving 27 US academic institutions. We genotyped 22 missense and 221 common variants in the MODY-causing genes in the participants in the DPP. The study included 2806 genotyped DPP participants randomized to receive intensive lifestyle intervention (n = 935), metformin (n = 927), or placebo (n = 944). Association of MODY genetic variants with diabetes incidence at a median of 3 years and measures of 1-year β-cell function, insulinogenic index, and oral disposition index. Analyses were stratified by treatment group for significant single-nucleotide polymorphism × treatment interaction (Pint < 0.05). Sequence kernel association tests examined the association between an aggregate of rare missense variants and insulinogenic traits. After 1 year, the minor allele of rs3212185 (HNF4A) was associated with improved β-cell function in the metformin and lifestyle groups but not the placebo group; the minor allele of rs6719578 (NEUROD1) was associated with an increase in insulin secretion in the metformin group but not in the placebo and lifestyle groups. These results provide evidence that genetic variation among MODY genes may influence response to insulin-sensitizing interventions.

  12. New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus After Transplantation in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fasicularis).

    PubMed

    Matthews, Kristin A; Tonsho, Makoto; Madsen, Joren C

    2015-08-01

    A 5.5-y-old intact male cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fasicularis) presented with inappetence and weight loss 57 d after heterotopic heart and thymus transplantation while receiving an immunosuppressant regimen consisting of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and methylprednisolone to prevent graft rejection. A serum chemistry panel, a glycated hemoglobin test, and urinalysis performed at presentation revealed elevated blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels (727 mg/dL and 10.1%, respectively), glucosuria, and ketonuria. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed, and insulin therapy was initiated immediately. The macaque was weaned off the immunosuppressive therapy as his clinical condition improved and stabilized. Approximately 74 d after discontinuation of the immunosuppressants, the blood glucose normalized, and the insulin therapy was stopped. The animal's blood glucose and HbA1c values have remained within normal limits since this time. We suspect that our macaque experienced new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation, a condition that is commonly observed in human transplant patients but not well described in NHP. To our knowledge, this report represents the first documented case of new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation in a cynomolgus macaque.

  13. New-onset diabetes after liver transplantation: a national report from China Liver Transplant Registry.

    PubMed

    Ling, Qi; Xu, Xiao; Xie, Haiyang; Wang, Kai; Xiang, Penghui; Zhuang, Runzhou; Shen, Tian; Wu, Jian; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-05-01

    New-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) is a serious complication of liver transplantation (LT). The present study aimed to investigate the risk factors of NODAT by a national survey using the China Liver Transplant Registry database. A total of 10 204 non-pre-existing diabetic patients undergone primary LT between January 2000 and December 2013 were included. Risk factors were identified by logistic regression analysis. NODAT occurred in 24.3% of liver recipients with a median follow-up time of 2.6 years, and was associated with a significantly lower patient survival. NODAT increased not only diabetes related complications (e.g., infection, kidney failure) but also biliary stricture and cholangitis. NODAT patients who received hypoglycaemic treatment had a worse prognosis and a higher hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence compared with those without treatment. New-onset hyperglycaemia (<30 days) was the major predictor of NODAT. Other risk factors included cold ischaemia time >9 h, recipient age >50 years, body mass index >25 kg/m(2) , other hepatitis (mainly hepatitis C), post-transplant intensive care unit stay >15 days, cytomegalovirus infection and corticosteroid at discharge. The incidence of NODAT in China is similar to that in Western countries. However, the NODAT-related complications are more common and severer in China compared with those in Western countries. The major risk factors are different. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Early-Onset Central Diabetes Insipidus due to Compound Heterozygosity for AVP Mutations.

    PubMed

    Bourdet, Karine; Vallette, Sophie; Deladoëy, Johnny; Van Vliet, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Genetic cases of isolated central diabetes insipidus are rare, are mostly due to dominant AVP mutations and have a delayed onset of symptoms. Only 3 consanguineous pedigrees with a recessive form have been published. A boy with a negative family history presented polyuria and failure to thrive in the first months of life and was diagnosed with central diabetes insipidus. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a normal posterior pituitary signal. A molecular genetic analysis of the AVP gene showed that he had inherited a previously reported mutation from his Lebanese father and a novel A>G transition in the splice acceptor site of intron 1 (IVS1-2A>G) from his French-Canadian mother. Replacement therapy resulted in the immediate disappearance of symptoms and in weight gain. The early polyuria in recessive central diabetes insipidus contrasts with the delayed presentation in patients with monoallelic AVP mutations. This diagnosis needs to be considered in infants with very early onset of polyuria-polydipsia and no brain malformation, even if there is no consanguinity and regardless of whether the posterior pituitary is visible or not on imaging. In addition to informing family counseling, making a molecular diagnosis eliminates the need for repeated imaging studies. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. New onset diabetes after kidney transplantation is associated with increased mortality-A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cooper, L; Oz, N; Fishman, G; Shohat, T; Rahamimov, R; Mor, E; Green, H; Grossman, A

    2017-07-21

    Clinical outcomes in individuals with new onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) and the optimal treatment for this complication are poorly characterized. This study was intended to better define these issues. Patients who underwent kidney transplantation and did not have diabetes prior to transplantation were included in the study. Clinical outcomes were compared between those who developed NODAT and those who did not. In those who developed NODAT, oral therapy was compared with insulin based therapy. A total of 266 kidney transplant recipients were included, of which 71 (27%) developed NODAT during the time of the follow-up. Using Cox multivariate analysis adjusted for age and gender, hazard ratio for overall mortality among patients with NODAT versus those without NODAT was 2.69 (95% CI 1.04-7.01). Among patients who developed NODAT, 29 patients (40%) were treated with an insulin-based regimen. At the end of follow-up, no difference was found in mean HbA1c, and therapy regimen was not associated with greater mortality. New onset diabetes in kidney transplanted patients is associated with increased mortality compared with kidney transplanted patients without NODAT. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Adult-Onset Esophageal Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kasarala, George; Durrett, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is an idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease that can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal involvement is rarely seen in adults, especially at the initial diagnosis of CD. Esophageal symptoms as primary manifestations of the disease are extremely rare. We report a case of a CD with esophageal involvement at the time of her initial diagnosis of CD. PMID:27761477

  17. Audiovisual Integration Delayed by Stimulus Onset Asynchrony Between Auditory and Visual Stimuli in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yanna; Yang, Weiping; Nakahashi, Kohei; Takahashi, Satoshi; Wu, Jinglong

    2017-02-01

    Although neuronal studies have shown that audiovisual integration is regulated by temporal factors, there is still little knowledge about the impact of temporal factors on audiovisual integration in older adults. To clarify how stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between auditory and visual stimuli modulates age-related audiovisual integration, 20 younger adults (21-24 years) and 20 older adults (61-80 years) were instructed to perform an auditory or visual stimuli discrimination experiment. The results showed that in younger adults, audiovisual integration was altered from an enhancement (AV, A ± 50 V) to a depression (A ± 150 V). In older adults, the alterative pattern was similar to that for younger adults with the expansion of SOA; however, older adults showed significantly delayed onset for the time-window-of-integration and peak latency in all conditions, which further demonstrated that audiovisual integration was delayed more severely with the expansion of SOA, especially in the peak latency for V-preceded-A conditions in older adults. Our study suggested that audiovisual facilitative integration occurs only within a certain SOA range (e.g., -50 to 50 ms) in both younger and older adults. Moreover, our results confirm that the response for older adults was slowed and provided empirical evidence that integration ability is much more sensitive to the temporal alignment of audiovisual stimuli in older adults.

  18. Marital Adjustment to Adult Diabetes: Interpersonal Congruence and Spouse Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyrot, Mark; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated adjustment to insulin-treated diabetes among 20 adult patients and spouses. Found illness-related perceptions of patients and spouses were positively correlated and discrepancies decreased with increasing duration of marriage after diagnosis. Marital satisfaction of spouses was negatively related to knowledge about diabetes,…

  19. Marital Adjustment to Adult Diabetes: Interpersonal Congruence and Spouse Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyrot, Mark; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated adjustment to insulin-treated diabetes among 20 adult patients and spouses. Found illness-related perceptions of patients and spouses were positively correlated and discrepancies decreased with increasing duration of marriage after diagnosis. Marital satisfaction of spouses was negatively related to knowledge about diabetes,…

  20. Family interventions to improve diabetes outcomes for adults

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Arshiya A.; Benitez, Amanda; Quinn, Michael T.; Burnet, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-care is a critical aspect of disease management for adults with diabetes. Since family members can play a vital role in a patient’s disease management, involving them in self-care interventions may positively influence patients’ diabetes outcomes. We systematically reviewed family-based interventions for adults with diabetes published from 1994 to 2014 and assessed their impact on patients’ diabetes outcomes and the extent of family involvement. We found 26 studies describing family-based diabetes interventions for adults. Interventions were conducted across a range of patient populations and settings. The degree of family involvement varied across studies. We found evidence for improvement in patients’ self-efficacy, perceived social support, diabetes knowledge, and diabetes self-care across the studies. Owing to the heterogeneity of the study designs, types of interventions, reporting of outcomes, and family involvement, it is difficult to determine how family participation in diabetes interventions may affect patients’ clinical outcomes. Future studies should clearly describe the role of family in the intervention, assess quality and extent of family participation, and compare patient outcomes with and without family involvement. PMID:26250784

  1. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q.

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, M K; Samples, J R; Kramer, P L; Rust, K; Topinka, J R; Yount, J; Koler, R D; Acott, T S

    1997-01-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. PMID:9012402

  2. Comparison of different heat modalities for treating delayed-onset muscle soreness in people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Batt, Jennifer; Bollinger, Jennifer N; Jensen, Mark C; Maru, Elyse H; Al-Nakhli, Hani H

    2011-06-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a serious problem for people who do not exercise on a regular basis. Although the best preventive measure for diabetes and for maintaining a low hemoglobin A1c is exercise, muscle soreness is common in people with diabetes. For people with diabetes, DOMS is rarely reported in exercise studies. One hundred twenty subjects participated in three groups (young, older, and type 2 diabetes) and were examined to evaluate the soreness in the abdominal muscles after a matched exercise bout using a p90x exercise video (Beachbody LLC, Los Angeles, CA) for core fitness. Next, three heating modalities were assessed on how well they could reduce muscle soreness: ThermaCare(®) (Pfizer Consumer Healthcare, Richmond, VA) heat wraps, hydrocollator heat wraps, and a chemical moist heat wrap. The results showed that people with diabetes were significantly sorer than age-matched controls (P < 0.05). On a 100-mm VAS (100 mm = sorest), the average soreness for the people with diabetes was 73.3 ± 16.2 mm, for the older group was 56.1 ± 15.1 mm, and for the younger group was 41.5 ± 9.3 mm; these differences were significant (analysis of variance, P < 0.05). The greatest reduction in soreness after applying the modalities was using moist heat, both immediately after the modality and up to 2 days after the exercise. Right after the modality, moist heat reduced pain by 52.3% in the older subjects compared with 30.5% in the subjects with diabetes and 33.3% in the younger subjects. Skin blood flow in the abdominal area before exercise was greatest in the younger subjects and lower in the subjects with diabetes after heat application. Skin temperature at rest and after exercise was greatest in the diabetes group. Muscle soreness following exercise was greatest in people with diabetes, and the best modality of the three studied to reduce this type of soreness was chemical moist heat.

  3. Personality traits among ADHD adults: implications of late-onset and subthreshold diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Faraone, S V; Kunwar, A; Adamson, J; Biederman, J

    2009-04-01

    Diagnosing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults is difficult when diagnosticians cannot establish onset prior to the DSM-IV criterion of age 7 or if the number of symptoms does not achieve the DSM threshold for diagnosis. Previous work has assessed the validity of such diagnoses based on psychiatric co-morbidity, family history and neuropsychological functions but none of these studies have used personality as a validation criterion. We compared four groups of adults: (1) full ADHD subjects who met all DSM-IV criteria for childhood-onset ADHD; (2) late-onset subjects who met all criteria except the age at onset criterion, (3) subthreshold subjects who did not meet full symptom criteria and (4) non-ADHD subjects who did not meet any of the above criteria. Diagnoses were made by using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) was used to assess personality traits. We found that full ADHD and late-onset ADHD showed similar personality profiles with significant deviations on all TCI scales except reward dependence and self-transcendence. By contrast, subthreshold cases only showed deviations on novelty seeking and self-directiveness. These data call into question the stringent age of onset of ADHD symptom criteria for adults when making retrospective diagnoses of ADHD. Subthreshold ADHD seems to be a milder form of the disorder that is consistent with dimensional views of the disorder.

  4. Epidemiological, clinical and genetic aspects of adult onset isolated focal dystonia in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Williams, L; McGovern, E; Kimmich, O; Molloy, A; Beiser, I; Butler, J S; Molloy, F; Logan, P; Healy, D G; Lynch, T; Walsh, R; Cassidy, L; Moriarty, P; Moore, H; McSwiney, T; Walsh, C; O'Riordan, S; Hutchinson, M

    2017-01-01

    Adult onset idiopathic isolated focal dystonia presents with a number of phenotypes. Reported prevalence rates vary considerably; well-characterized cohorts are important to our understanding of this disorder. To perform a nationwide epidemiological study of adult onset idiopathic isolated focal dystonia in the Republic of Ireland. Patients with adult onset idiopathic isolated focal dystonia were recruited from multiple sources. Diagnosis was based on assessment by a neurologist with an expertise in movement disorders. When consent was obtained, a number of clinical features including family history were assessed. On the prevalence date there were 592 individuals in Ireland with adult onset idiopathic isolated focal dystonia, a point prevalence of 17.8 per 100 000 (95% confidence interval 16.4-19.2). Phenotype numbers were cervical dystonia 410 (69.2%), blepharospasm 102 (17.2%), focal hand dystonia 39 (6.6%), spasmodic dysphonia 18 (3.0%), musician's dystonia 17 (2.9%) and oromandibular dystonia six (1.0%). Sixty-two (16.5%) of 375 consenting index cases had a relative with clinically confirmed adult onset idiopathic isolated focal dystonia (18 multiplex and 24 duplex families). Marked variations in the proportions of patients with tremor, segmental spread, sensory tricks, pain and psychiatric symptoms by phenotype were documented. The prevalence of adult onset idiopathic isolated focal dystonia in Ireland is higher than that recorded in many similar service-based epidemiological studies but is still likely to be an underestimate. The low proportion of individuals with blepharospasm may reflect reduced environmental exposure to sunlight in Ireland. This study will serve as a resource for international comparative studies of environmental and genetic factors in the pathogenesis of the disorder. © 2016 EAN.

  5. A comparison between nailfold capillaroscopy patterns in adulthood in juvenile and adult-onset systemic sclerosis: A EUSTAR exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Ingegnoli, Francesca; Boracchi, Patrizia; Gualtierotti, Roberta; Smith, Vanessa; Cutolo, Maurizio; Foeldvari, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    Qualitative capillaroscopy patterns in juvenile- and adult-onset systemic sclerosis (SSc) were studied in adulthood using data from the EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research (EUSTAR) database. Data collected between June 2004 and April 2013 were examined with focus on capillaroscopy. In this retrospective exploratory study, series of patients with juvenile-onset SSc were matched with series of adult-onset SSc having the same gender and autoantibody profile. 30 of 123 patients with juvenile-onset and 2108 of 7133 with adult-onset SSc had data on capillaroscopy. Juvenile-onset SSc showed scleroderma pattern more frequently than adult-onset SSc (93.3% and 88%). The OR was 2.44 and 95% CI 0.57-10.41. An active scleroderma pattern was present in 58% of juvenile- and 61% of adult-onset SSc. The OR was 0.91 and 95% CI 0.28-2.93. The late scleroderma pattern was present in 61% of juvenile- and 55.5% of adult-onset SSc. The OR was 1.06 and 95% CI 0.34-3.56. This is the first exploratory study on the comparison of capillaroscopy between juvenile- and adult-onset SSc in adulthood. Juvenile-onset SSc had an increase prevalence of scleroderma pattern, but a similar distribution of the three patterns was suggested. Further studies are needed to define this issue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Precursors in adolescence of adult-onset bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hiyoshi, Ayako; Sabet, Julia A; Sjöqvist, Hugo; Melinder, Carren; Brummer, Robert J; Montgomery, Scott

    2017-08-15

    Although the estimated contribution of genetic factors is high in bipolar disorder, environmental factors may also play a role. This Swedish register-based cohort study of men examined if physical and psychological characteristics in late adolescence, including factors previously linked with bipolar disorder (body mass index, asthma and allergy), are associated with subsequent bipolar disorder in adulthood. Unipolar depression and anxiety are analysed as additional outcomes to identify bipolar disorder-specific associations. A total of 213,693 men born between 1952 and 1956, who participated in compulsory military conscription assessments in late adolescence were followed up to 2009, excluding men with any psychiatric diagnoses at baseline. Cox regression estimated risk of bipolar disorder, depression and anxiety in adulthood associated with body mass index, asthma, allergy, muscular strength stress resilience and cognitive function in adolescence. BMI, asthma and allergy were not associated with bipolar disorder. Higher grip strength, cognitive function and stress resilience were associated with a reduced risk of bipolar disorder and the other disease outcomes. The sample consisted only of men; even though the characteristics in adolescence pre-dated disease onset, they may have been the consequence of prodromal disease. Associations with body mass index and asthma found by previous studies may be consequences of bipolar disorder or its treatment rather than risk factors. Inverse associations with all the outcome diagnoses for stress resilience, muscular strength and cognitive function may reflect general risks for these psychiatric disorders or intermediary factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sensorineural hearing loss--a common finding in early-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lerman-Garber, Israel; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Valdés, Samantha; Enríquez, Lorena; Lobato, Marlette; Osornio, Melannie; Escobedo, Ana Rosa; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Mehta, Roopa; Ramírez-Anguiano, Jacqueline; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and potential associations of hearing impairment in patients 30 to 50 years old with diabetes diagnosed before age 40 years-early-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The study cohorts consisted of 46 consecutive patients with early-onset T2DM and 47 age-matched control subjects with rheumatoid arthritis. All study subjects completed clinical, serologic, and auditory assessments. The patients with T2DM had a mean age of 42 ± 6 years and a mean disease duration of 11 ± 6 years. Microalbuminuria was present in 26.1%, proliferative retinopathy in 26.1%, and symptomatic peripheral neuropathy in 23.9%. The prevalence of unilateral or bilateral hearing loss was significantly higher in the patients with T2DM than in the patients with rheumatoid arthritis (21.7% versus 6.4%, respectively; P = .01). Most cases of hearing loss were mild and involved high or acute tones. After multivariate analysis with adjustment for age, there was a significant association between hearing loss and hemoglobin A1c (odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.81; P = .035). In the patients with T2DM, the lengthening of the brainstem response was not significantly increased; however, the wave morphologic features were abnormal and the reproducibility was poor in both ears in 11 patients (24%). Patients with early-onset T2DM and poor glycemic control have an increased prevalence of subclinical hearing loss and impaired auditory brainstem responses. Hearing impairment may be an underrecognized complication of diabetes.

  8. Comprehensive Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) Gene Screening in Pregnant Women with Diabetes in India

    PubMed Central

    Hesarghatta Shyamasunder, Asha; Varghese, Deny; Varshney, Manika; Paul, Johan; Inbakumari, Mercy; Christina, Flory; Varghese, Ron Thomas; Kuruvilla, Kurien Anil; V. Paul, Thomas; Jose, Ruby; Regi, Annie; Lionel, Jessie; Jeyaseelan, L.; Mathew, Jiji; Thomas, Nihal

    2017-01-01

    Pregnant women with diabetes may have underlying beta cell dysfunction due to mutations/rare variants in genes associated with Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY). MODY gene screening would reveal those women genetically predisposed and previously unrecognized with a monogenic form of diabetes for further clinical management, family screening and genetic counselling. However, there are minimal data available on MODY gene variants in pregnant women with diabetes from India. In this study, utilizing the Next generation sequencing (NGS) based protocol fifty subjects were screened for variants in a panel of thirteen MODY genes. Of these subjects 18% (9/50) were positive for definite or likely pathogenic or uncertain MODY variants. The majority of these variants was identified in subjects with autosomal dominant family history, of whom five were in women with pre-GDM and four with overt-GDM. The identified variants included one patient with HNF1A Ser3Cys, two PDX1 Glu224Lys, His94Gln, two NEUROD1 Glu59Gln, Phe318Ser, one INS Gly44Arg, one GCK, one ABCC8 Arg620Cys and one BLK Val418Met variants. In addition, three of the seven offspring screened were positive for the identified variant. These identified variants were further confirmed by Sanger sequencing. In conclusion, these findings in pregnant women with diabetes, imply that a proportion of GDM patients with autosomal dominant family history may have MODY. Further NGS based comprehensive studies with larger samples are required to confirm these finding PMID:28095440

  9. Adult-onset Still's disease and cardiac tamponade: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Carrilho-Ferreira, Pedro; Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-06-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity.

  10. Adult-Onset Still's Disease and Cardiac Tamponade: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity. PMID:26175648

  11. [Adult onset Still's disease as a diagnostics challenge in case of fever of unknown origin].

    PubMed

    Debski, Marcin; Stepniewski, Piotr; Wróbel, Michał

    2013-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin is often a diagnostic challenge. Here we present a case of 55-year-old woman with a history of a few months fever, progressing weakness and salmon-coloured, macular skin rash. The differential diagnosis included neoplasmatic conditions, infections and connective tissue disorders. Finally adult onset Still's disease was suspected. Glucocorticosteroid treatment was induced. During the therapy a central nervous system infection occurred, which was fatal for the patient. The presented clinical case shows that among many causes of fever of unknown origin, adult onset Still's disease should be taken into account.

  12. Role of Immunofluorescence in Adult Onset Nephrotic Syndrome-A Study in a Tertiary Care Centre of Western India.

    PubMed

    Rane, Sharada; Mutyal, Prerana; Dcunha, Nicholas; Parkhi, Mayur; Jadhav, Meenal

    2017-05-01

    Study of renal Immunofluorescence (IF) is an ancillary but essential technique in evaluation of renal biopsies in glomerulopathies and also it enlightens on the pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome. To determine the role of IF in evaluating definite subtyping and diagnosis of adult onset nephrotic syndrome and attempting clinicopathological correlation. A total of 52 patients of adult onset nephrotic syndrome were evaluated clinically and with pertinent investigations; and subjected to USG guided percutaneous renal biopsy which was processed and stained for light microscopy and for immunofluorescence by direct method (DIF) using antibodies against IgG, IgM, IgA and C3. The predominant age group affected was 18-47 years (78.85%). Male:female ratio was 1:0.63. The most frequent glomerular lesion encountered was Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, 36.54%) followed by lupus nephritis (26.92%) and IgA nephropathy (9.62%). The most common glomerular lesion in males was FSGS and that in females was lupus nephritis. DIF was mainly coarsely granular whenever present. One case of lupus nephritis and diabetic nephropathy, showed non specific IF. It was negative in all cases of FSGS, Minimal Change Disease (MCD) and renal amyloidosis. The IF helped in differentiating eight cases that were normal on light microscopy as IgA nephropathy (n=5) and authentic MCD (n=3). It helped in endorsing 19 cases of FSGS to be a progression of MCD. It was also of help in sub-typing all cases of Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis (MPGN) (n=3) as MPGN-Type I. IF was of great help in diagnosing exact type of glomerulopathy in adult onset nephrotic syndrome and provided insight in its pathogenesis.

  13. A Deeper Look into Type 1 Diabetes – Imaging Immune Responses during Onset of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Christoffersson, Gustaf; von Herrath, Matthias G.

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes execute the killing of insulin-producing beta cells during onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). The research community has come far in dissecting the major events in the development of this disease, but still the trigger and high-resolved information of the immunological events leading up to beta cell loss are missing. During the past decades, intravital imaging of immune responses has led to significant scientific breakthroughs in diverse models of disease, including T1D. Dynamic imaging of immune cells at the pancreatic islets during T1D onset has been made possible through the development of both advanced microscopes, and animal models that allow long-term immobilization of the pancreas. The use of these modalities has revealed a milling microenvironment at the pancreatic islets during disease onset with a plethora of active players. Clues to answering the remaining questions in this disease may lie in intravital imaging, including how key immune cells traffic to and from the pancreas, and how cells interact at this target tissue. This review highlights and discusses recent studies, models, and techniques focused to understand the immune responses during T1D onset through intravital imaging. PMID:27574523

  14. Role of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in new-onset diabetes after transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Woo; Jin, Ji Zhe; Jin, Long; Jin, Jian; Li, Can

    2015-01-01

    Despite strict pre- and post-transplantation screening, the incidence of new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) remains as high as 60%. This complication affects the risk of cardiovascular events and patient and graft survival rates. Thus, reducing the impact of NODAT could improve overall transplant success. The pathogenesis of NODAT is multifactorial, and both modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors have been implicated. Monitoring and controlling the blood glucose profile, implementing multidisciplinary care, performing lifestyle modifications, using a modified immunosuppressive regimen, administering anti-metabolite agents, and taking a conventional antidiabetic approach may diminish the incidence of NODAT. In addition to these preventive strategies, inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) by the gliptin family of drugs has recently gained considerable interest as therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus and NODAT. This review focuses on the role of DPP4 inhibitors and discusses recent literature regarding management of NODAT. PMID:26552451

  15. A novel ALMS1 splice mutation in a non-obese juvenile-onset insulin-dependent syndromic diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Sanyoura, May; Woudstra, Cédric; Halaby, George; Baz, Patrick; Senée, Valérie; Guillausseau, Pierre-Jean; Zalloua, Pierre; Julier, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-dependent juvenile-onset diabetes may occur in the context of rare syndromic presentations suggesting monogenic inheritance rather than common multifactorial autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Here, we report the case of a Lebanese patient diagnosed with juvenile-onset insulin-dependent diabetes presenting ketoacidosis, early-onset retinopathy with optic atrophy, hearing loss, diabetes insipidus, epilepsy, and normal weight and stature, who later developed insulin resistance. Despite similarities with Wolfram syndrome, we excluded the WFS1 gene as responsible for this disease. Using combined linkage and candidate gene study, we selected ALMS1, responsible for Alström syndrome, as a candidate gene. We identified a novel splice mutation in intron 18 located 3 bp before the intron-exon junction (IVS18-3T>G), resulting in exon 19 skipping and consequent frameshift generating a truncated protein (V3958fs3964X). The clinical presentation of the patient significantly differed from typical Alström syndrome by the absence of truncal obesity and short stature, and by the presence of ketoacidotic insulin-dependent diabetes, optic atrophy and diabetes insipidus. Our observation broadens the clinical spectrum of Alström syndrome and suggests that ALMS1 mutations may be considered in patients who initially present with an acute onset of insulin-dependent diabetes.

  16. A novel ALMS1 splice mutation in a non-obese juvenile-onset insulin-dependent syndromic diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Sanyoura, May; Woudstra, Cédric; Halaby, George; Baz, Patrick; Senée, Valérie; Guillausseau, Pierre-Jean; Zalloua, Pierre; Julier, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-dependent juvenile-onset diabetes may occur in the context of rare syndromic presentations suggesting monogenic inheritance rather than common multifactorial autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Here, we report the case of a Lebanese patient diagnosed with juvenile-onset insulin-dependent diabetes presenting ketoacidosis, early-onset retinopathy with optic atrophy, hearing loss, diabetes insipidus, epilepsy, and normal weight and stature, who later developed insulin resistance. Despite similarities with Wolfram syndrome, we excluded the WFS1 gene as responsible for this disease. Using combined linkage and candidate gene study, we selected ALMS1, responsible for Alström syndrome, as a candidate gene. We identified a novel splice mutation in intron 18 located 3 bp before the intron–exon junction (IVS18-3T>G), resulting in exon 19 skipping and consequent frameshift generating a truncated protein (V3958fs3964X). The clinical presentation of the patient significantly differed from typical Alström syndrome by the absence of truncal obesity and short stature, and by the presence of ketoacidotic insulin-dependent diabetes, optic atrophy and diabetes insipidus. Our observation broadens the clinical spectrum of Alström syndrome and suggests that ALMS1 mutations may be considered in patients who initially present with an acute onset of insulin-dependent diabetes. PMID:23652376

  17. Metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Bonet, Josep; Martinez-Castelao, Albert; Bayés, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of biochemical abnormalities including cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors. The development of diabetes mellitus after renal transplant represents a major posttransplant complication that may adversely affect graft/patient survival. The aim of this study was to assess the role of metabolic syndrome in patients on hemodialysis as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant. Patients and methods This was a prospective observational epidemiologic study carried out in adult nondiabetic patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis and on the renal transplant waiting list between November 2008 and April 2009. Patients were followed up from Visit 1 (baseline) to 6 months after the renal transplant. The analysis of the role of metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant included the estimation of relative risk and its 95% confidence interval (CI). Results A total of 383 evaluable patients were entered into the study (mean age, 52.7 years; male, 57.7%; Caucasian, 90.1%). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome on hemodialysis was 30.4% (95% CI, 25.8%–35.4%). Hypertension was the most prevalent criterion for metabolic syndrome (65.0%), followed by low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (52.7%), abdominal obesity (36.2%), hypertriglyceridemia (32.4%), and impaired glucose (8.9%). After the renal transplant, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was still 25.8%. During the posttransplant period, the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus reached 13.0% (95% CI, 7.8%–20.6%) and patients with pretransplant metabolic syndrome were 2.6 times (95% CI, 1.043–6.608) more likely to develop new-onset diabetes mellitus after the renal transplant than those without metabolic syndrome. Conclusion The presence of metabolic syndrome in patients undergoing hemodialysis represents an independent risk factor

  18. Prevention and management of new-onset diabetes mellitus in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Juan Khong, M; Ping Chong, Ch

    2014-04-01

    New-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation (NODAT) is one of the complications that is increasingly occurring among kidney transplanted patients. It is associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease, graft failure and mortality. The risk of NODAT development increases with time from transplantation. Therefore, early detection and prompt action are essential in reducing the risk of NODAT and its complications. This paper aims to review the screening parameters, prevention and management strategies for NODAT in both pre- and post-transplantation conditions. The pre-transplant patient should be screened for diabetes and cardiometabolic risk factors. Blood glucose evaluation for the pre-transplantation period is important for early detection of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), which are highly associated with the incidence of NODAT. Post-kidney transplant patients should have periodical blood glucose monitoring with more frequent assessment in the initial phase. As early hyperglycaemia development is a strong predictor for NODAT, prompt intervention is needed. When NODAT develops, monitoring and control of blood glucose profile, lipid profile, microalbuminuria, diabetic complications and comorbid conditions is recommended. Immunosuppressive regimen modification may be considered as suggested by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guideline to reverse or to improve the diabetes after weighing the risk of rejection and other potential adverse effects. Strategies for modifying immunosuppressive agents include dose reduction, discontinuation, and selection of calcineurin inhibitor (CNI), anti-metabolite agents, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi), belatacept and corticosteroids. Lifestyle modification and a conventional anti-diabetic approach, as in the type 2 diabetes mellitus guidelines, are also recommended in NODAT management.

  19. Diabetes and Risk of Hospitalized Fall Injury Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Rebecca K.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Resnick, Helaine E.; Sellmeyer, Deborah E.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Cauley, Jane A.; Vittinghoff, Eric; De Rekeneire, Nathalie; Harris, Tamara B.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Cummings, Steven R.; Shorr, Ronald I.; Schwartz, Ann V.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether older adults with diabetes are at increased risk of an injurious fall requiring hospitalization. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The longitudinal Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study included 3,075 adults aged 70–79 years at baseline. Hospitalizations that included ICD-9-Clinical Modification codes for a fall and an injury were identified. The effect of diabetes with and without insulin use on the rate of first fall-related injury hospitalization was assessed using proportional hazards models. RESULTS At baseline, 719 participants had diabetes, and 117 of them were using insulin. Of the 293 participants who were hospitalized for a fall-related injury, 71 had diabetes, and 16 were using insulin. Diabetes was associated with a higher rate of injurious fall requiring hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR] 1.48 [95% CI 1.12–1.95]) in models adjusted for age, race, sex, BMI, and education. In those participants using insulin, compared with participants without diabetes, the HR was 3.00 (1.78–5.07). Additional adjustment for potential intermediaries, such as fainting in the past year, standing balance score, cystatin C level, and number of prescription medications, accounted for some of the increased risk associated with diabetes (1.41 [1.05–1.88]) and insulin-treated diabetes (2.24 [1.24–4.03]). Among participants with diabetes, a history of falling, poor standing balance score, and A1C level ≥8% were risk factors for an injurious fall requiring hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS Older adults with diabetes, in particular those using insulin, are at greater risk of an injurious fall requiring hospitalization than those without diabetes. Among those with diabetes, poor glycemic control may increase the risk of an injurious fall. PMID:24130352

  20. Exploring the role of BCHE in the onset of Diabetes, Obesity and Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rao, Allam Appa; Jyothsna, Gundlapally; Shalini, Pulipati; Kumar, Amit; Bhattacharya, Anupam; Kashyap, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes, Obesity and Neurological disturbances, most often show co-occurrence. There has been an extensive research in this domain, but the exact mechanism underlying the co-occurrence of the three conditions is still an enigma. The current paper is an approach to establish the role of Butyryl cholinesterase (BCHE) in Diabetes, Obesity and Neurological disorders by performing a comparative analysis with Neuroligin (NLGN2) a protein belonging to the same family. BCHE has its role in glucose regulation, Lipid metabolism and nerve signaling. Emphasis is laid on BCHE's diverse functions whose impediment affects the above mentioned metabolic pathways. Insilco techniques were employed to analyze the sequence, structural and functional similarities of the two proteins. A point mutation is focused which is common to both BCHE and Neuroligin. The mutation occurs at the homologous position in both the proteins making them deficient. This affects the three metabolic pathways leading to the respective disorders. The work describes the pathway that describes the role of BCHE in the onset of obesity mediated diabetes. The pathway further explains the association between Diabetes, Obesity and neurological disturbances.

  1. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) deficiency might contribute to the onset of type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rubí, B

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of type I diabetes is rising worldwide, particularly in young children. Type I diabetes is considered a multifactorial disease with genetic predisposition and environmental factors participating. Currently, despite years of research, there is no consensus regarding the factors that initiate the autoimmune response. Type I diabetes is preceded by autoimmunity to islet antigens, among them the protein glutamic acid decarboxylase, GAD-65. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) is formed from vitamin B6 by the action of pyridoxal kinase. Interaction of GAD65 with PLP is necessary for GAD65-mediated synthesis of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). PLP is also a required cofactor for dopamine synthesis by L-aromatic decarboxylase (L-AADC). Both GAD65 and L-AADC are expressed in pancreatic islets. Here it is proposed that lack of the vitamin B6 derivative pyridoxal 5'-phosphate might contribute to the appearance of pancreatic islet autoimmunity and type I diabetes onset. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Administration of pioglitazone alone or with alogliptin delays diabetes onset in UCD-T2DM rats.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Bethany P; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Graham, James L; Stanhope, Kimber; Haj, Fawaz G; Havel, Peter J

    2014-04-01

    There is a need to identify strategies for type 2 diabetes prevention. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of pioglitazone and alogliptin alone and in combination to prevent type 2 diabetes onset in UCD-T2DM rats, a model of polygenic obese type 2 diabetes. At 2 months of age, rats were divided into four groups: control, alogliptin (20 mg/kg per day), pioglitazone (2.5 mg/kg per day), and alogliptin+pioglitazone. Non-fasting blood glucose was measured weekly to determine diabetes onset. Pioglitazone alone and in combination with alogliptin lead to a 5-month delay in diabetes onset despite promoting increased food intake and body weight (BW). Alogliptin alone did not delay diabetes onset or affect food intake or BW relative to controls. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and lipid concentrations were lower and adiponectin concentrations were threefold higher in groups treated with pioglitazone. All treatment groups demonstrated improvements in glucose tolerance and insulin secretion during an oral glucose tolerance test with an additive improvement observed with alogliptin+pioglitazone. Islet histology revealed an improvement of islet morphology in all treatment groups compared with control. Pioglitazone treatment also resulted in increased expression of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue and white adipose tissue, with mild elevations observed in animals treated with alogliptin alone. Pioglitazone markedly delays the onset of type 2 diabetes in UCD-T2DM rats through improvements of glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, islet function, and markers of adipose mitochondrial biogenesis; however, addition of alogliptin at a dose of 20 mg/kg per day to pioglitazone treatment does not enhance the prevention/delay of diabetes onset.

  3. Childhood adversities and adult-onset chronic pain: Results from the World Mental Health Survey, Japan.

    PubMed

    Stickley, A; Koyanagi, A; Kawakami, N

    2015-11-01

    Childhood adversities (CAs) have been associated with adult-onset chronic pain. However, to date, most single country studies on this association have been undertaken in Western countries. This study examined the association in Japan where information is scarce. Data were drawn from the World Mental Health Survey Japan, a population-based cross-sectional survey undertaken in 11 areas of Japan in 2002-2006. We analyzed data from adults aged ≥20 years who provided information on CAs occurring before age 18 years and chronic pain (n = 1740). Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk for different forms of adult-onset chronic pain (arthritis/rheumatism, neck/back pain, headache and any pain) as a function of the presence of 11 different types of CA and the number of CAs. In the adjusted models, significant associations were observed between: physical abuse and neck/back pain (HR 2.55) and any pain (HR 1.88); sexual abuse and any pain (HR 2.84). Significant dose-dependent relationships were also observed between a greater number of CAs and some adult-onset chronic pain conditions (neck/back and any pain). The results of this study suggest that in Japan, some forms of CA may be associated with certain types of adult-onset chronic pain, in particular neck/back pain. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  4. The distinction between juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Haines, J.L.; Damji, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Because of the significant differences between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma, especially with regard to inheritance, prevalence, severity, and age of onset, we read with interest the recent publication by Morissette et al., describing a pedigree with a phenotype that overlaps the distinctive features of juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (usually abbreviated as POAG or COAG). These authors conclude that a gene mapped to human chromosome 1q21-q31 (GLC1A) can be responsible for both juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. The implications of such a result could be extremely important, in light of the high prevalence of the adult form of the disease. However, while the data presented in this report suggest that variable expressivity of the GLC1A gene may lead to a broader range of onset for this form of juvenile glaucoma, these data do not identify the GLC1A gene as an important cause of POAG. To prevent misleading interpretations of this and similar studies, we wish to clarify the distinction between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. 8 refs.

  5. The Need for Improved Detection and Management of Adult-Onset Hearing Loss in Australia

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Catherine M.; Gopinath, Bamini; Schneider, Julie; Reath, Jennifer; Hickson, Louise; Leeder, Stephen R.; Mitchell, Paul; Cowan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Adult-onset hearing loss is insidious and typically diagnosed and managed several years after onset. Often, this is after the loss having led to multiple negative consequences including effects on employment, depressive symptoms, and increased risk of mortality. In contrast, the use of hearing aids is associated with reduced depression, longer life expectancy, and retention in the workplace. Despite this, several studies indicate high levels of unmet need for hearing health services in older adults and poor use of prescribed hearing aids, often leading to their abandonment. In Australia, the largest component of financial cost of hearing loss (excluding the loss of well-being) is due to lost workplace productivity. Nonetheless, the Australian public health system does not have an effective and sustainable hearing screening strategy to tackle the problem of poor detection of adult-onset hearing loss. Given the increasing prevalence and disease burden of hearing impairment in adults, two key areas are not adequately met in the Australian healthcare system: (1) early identification of persons with chronic hearing impairment; (2) appropriate and targeted referral of these patients to hearing health service providers. This paper reviews the current literature, including population-based data from the Blue Mountains Hearing Study, and suggests different models for early detection of adult-onset hearing loss. PMID:23710184

  6. Lost opportunities to prevent early onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Judith A; McCloskey, Lois; Gebel, Christina M; Iverson, Ronald E; Lee-Parritz, Aviva

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) greatly increases the risk of developing diabetes in the decade after delivery, but few women receive appropriately timed postpartum glucose testing (PPGT) or a referral to primary care (PC) for continued monitoring. This qualitative study was designed to identify barriers and facilitators to testing and referral from patient and providers' perspectives. Methods We interviewed patients and clinicians in depth about knowledge, values, priorities, challenges, and recommendations for increasing PPGT rates and PC linkage. Interviews were coded with NVIVO data analysis software, and analyzed using an implementation science framework. Results Women reported motivation to address GDM for the health of the fetus. Most women did not anticipate future diabetes for themselves, and focused on delivery outcomes rather than future health risks. Patients sought and received reassurance from clinicians, and were unlikely to discuss early onset following GDM or preventive measures. PPGT barriers described by patients included provider not mentioning the test or setting it up, transportation difficulties, work responsibilities, fatigue, concerns about fasting while breastfeeding, and timing of the test after discharge from obstetrics, and no referral to PC for follow-up. Practitioners described limited communication among multiple care providers during pregnancy and delivery, systems issues, and separation of obstetrics from PC. Conclusions Patients' barriers to PPGT included low motivation for self-care, structural obstacles, and competing priorities. Providers reported the need to balance risk with reassurance, and identified systems failures related to test timing, limitations of electronic medical record systems (EMR), lack of referrals to PC, and inadequate communication between specialties. Prevention of early onset has great potential for medical cost savings and improvements in quality of life. PMID:27347422

  7. Adult Onset of Xanthelasmoid Mastocytosis: Report of a Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Nafiseh Sadat; Nejad, Masumeh Hosseini; Feli, Shahab; Bakhshoodeh, Behnoosh; Layegh, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Xanthelasmoid or pseudoxanthomatous mastocytosis is an extremely rare variant of diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis. Herein, we describe an adult male with cutaneous mastocytosis showing multiple widespread yellowish ovoid papules like eruptive xanthoma. A 60-year-old male visited our outpatient clinic with a 1-year history of generalized yellowish, ovoid, and skin color papular eruption located on the trunk, groin, extremities, with the modest pruritus. Vital signs were stable, and Darier's sign was negative. No other subjective and objective signs were detected during the examination. No abnormality was detected in his diagnostic laboratory tests. Skin biopsy was taken, and histopathologic examination revealed proliferation of mast cells with ovoid and spindle nuclei with distinct cytoplasm borders around the capillaries, which was compatible with mastocytosis. Antihistamine was prescribed for pruritus control which was successful, but eruptions were persistent, and even 1-year phototherapy was not useful. PMID:27512209

  8. Cortisol Levels in Children With Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Retrospective Review

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kristen M.; Fazzio, Pamela; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Gallagher, Mary P.; Aranoff, Gaya S.

    2017-01-01

    There is little data documenting cortisol levels in children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), despite the fact that untreated adrenal insufficiency (AI) could worsen the outcome of DKA. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed serum cortisol levels in 28 children with DKA and new onset type 1 diabetes mellitus evaluated at our center over a 5-year period. Average duration of diabetes-related symptoms was positively associated with age (P = .002), and significantly lower hemoglobin A1c levels were observed in the youngest children. The mean cortisol level was 40.9 mg/dL, with a range of 7.8 to 119 mg/dL. Cortisol levels were found to be inversely associated with serum pH (P = .007). There was no difference in the clinical outcome of the 4 patients who had cortisol levels less than 18 mg/dL. Overall, we did not find clinical or laboratory evidence of diminished cortisol reserve; however, the possibility of AI must be kept in mind when treating children with DKA. PMID:28145127

  9. Enhanced apoptosis of monocytes from complication-free juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus type 1 may be ameliorated by TNF-α inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Myśliwska, Jolanta; Ryba-Stanisławowska, Monika; Smardzewski, Marcin; Słomiński, Bartosz; Myśliwiec, Małgorzata; Siebert, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 is associated with an enhanced apoptosis of different cells and tissues, accelerating occurrence of diabetic microvascular complications. The aim of our study was to determine spontaneous apoptotic potential of the monocyte subsets in juvenile-onset complication-free diabetes mellitus type 1 and to compare them with the corresponding values of the healthy. Moreover, we wanted to assess effects of TNF-R1 blocking agents and those of general TNF-α blocker (Infliximab) on spontaneous apoptosis of monocytes. Sixty randomly selected DM1 patients (14.5 ± 3.2 years) and 30 healthy (13.5 ± 2.8 years) volunteers were enrolled in the study. Our results indicate that three monocyte subsets are distinguishable in the groups of young diabetic patients and the healthy, similarly to in the blood of adults. DM1 patients were characterized by higher values of apoptotic monocytes than the healthy. The manipulation with drugs inhibiting TNF-R1 expression diminished the pool of CD16(+) apoptotic monocytes. Infliximab reduced the apoptotic CD16(-) cells. In conclusion, diabetes mellitus type 1 is associated with greater apoptosis of three monocyte subsets which may contribute to the development of microvascular complications. TNF-α modifiers appear to ameliorate monocyte apoptosis. They may be useful for controlling excessive monocyte apoptosis in diabetic patients.

  10. Diabetes Self-Care and the Older Adult

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, Katie; Beverly, Elizabeth A.; Smaldone, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is highest in older adults, a population that is increasing. Diabetes self-care is complex with important recommendations for nutrition, physical activity, checking glucose levels, and taking medication. Older adults with diabetes have unique issues which impact self-care. As people age, their health status, support systems, physical and mental abilities, and nutritional requirements change. Furthermore, comorbidities, complications, and polypharmacy complicate diabetes self-care. Depression is also more common among the elderly and may lead to deterioration in self-care behaviors. Because of concerns about cognitive deficits and multiple comorbidities, adults older than 65 years are often excluded from research trials. Thus, little clinical evidence is available and the most appropriate treatment approaches and how to best support older patients’ self-care efforts are unclear. This review summarizes the current literature, research findings, and expert and consensus recommendations with their rationales. PMID:24510969

  11. Risk of New-Onset Diabetes After Long-Term Treatment With Clozapine in Comparison to Other Antipsychotics in Patients With Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Peter F J; Bocxe, Johanna T H; Doodeman, Hieronymus J; van Haelst, Ingrid M M; Cohen, Dan

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that clozapine has one of the largest diabetic effects of all atypical antipsychotics. To confirm these findings, we examined retrospectively the risk of new-onset diabetes in long-term clozapine treatment compared to treatment with other antipsychotics in a matched control population with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Ninety-four adult patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who had been treated with clozapine for 5 years or longer were matched on age, diagnosis, and sex to 94 patients without any use of clozapine. The groups were followed up for as long as 20 years. The cumulative incidence of new detection of diabetes in the clozapine group was 22.3% (mean follow-up, 12.3 years; absolute risk difference, 6.3%; 95% confidence interval, -4.9% to 17.5%). An additional rigorous analysis of the 83 matched pairs with normal glucose measurement before end point showed a significant risk difference between the 2 groups (21.7% compared with 8.4%) but may have been biased against clozapine. We conclude that definitive evidence showing a clinically significant larger risk for new-onset diabetes after long-term treatment with clozapine in comparison to other antipsychotics is lacking.

  12. Comparison of Neuropsychological Functioning Between Adults With Early- and Late-Onset DSM-5 ADHD.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ju; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to compare the visually dependent neuropsychological functioning among adults with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) ADHD who recalled symptom onset by and after age 7 and non-ADHD controls. We divided the participants, aged 17 to 40 years, into three groups-(a) ADHD, onset <7 years (early-onset, n = 142); (b) ADHD, onset between 7 and <12 years (late-onset, n = 41); (c) non-ADHD controls ( n = 148)-and compared their neuropsychological functioning, measured by the Cambridge Neuropsychological Testing Automated Battery. Both ADHD groups had deficits in attention and signal detectability, spatial working memory, and short-term spatial memory, but only the early-onset group showed deficits in alertness, set-shifting, and planning after controlling for age, sex, and psychiatric comorbidities. There was no statistical difference between the two ADHD groups in neuropsychological functioning. DSM-5 criteria for diagnosing adult ADHD are not too lax regarding neuropsychological functioning.

  13. Angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan prevents new-onset diabetes in pre-diabetes OLETF rats on a high-fat diet: evidence of anti-diabetes action.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Qin; Luo, Rong; Li, Lan-Ying; Tian, Feng-Shi; Zheng, Xi-Lan; Xiong, Hai-Liang; Sun, Li-Ting

    2013-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of telmisartan, pioglitazone and metformin administration on the prevention of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus in pre-diabetes Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats fed with a high-fat diet (HFD). OLETF rats 22 weeks of age were treated with pioglitazone (O-P), metformin (O-M), telmisartan (O-T) and low telmisartan starting from their pre-diabetes period. The weight, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were measured. The lipid profiles were obtained. The abdominal subcutaneous (SC) and omental (OM) fat pads were dissected to measure the expression of mRNA and protein levels (adiponectin, proinflammatory cytokines, etc.). Telmisartan significantly reversed glucose tolerance and improved insulin resistance. The incidence rates of impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes in the O-P (χ(2) = 11.025, p=0.001) and O-T (χ(2)=5.495, p=0.019) groups were significantly reduced. The mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines was downregulated by telmisartan. The expression of adiponectin, PPARγ1 and γ2 was markedly improved by telmisartan and pioglitazone compared with the OLETF control (O-C) group. The correlation analysis showed that the systolic and diastolic blood pressures were not correlated with the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (p>0.05). Telmisartan acts beneficially against diabetes-induced inflammation and improves insulin resistance in pre-diabetes OLETF rats fed with HFD. In view of this improved responsiveness to insulin sensitivity, telmisartan may prove to be a promising candidate for the intervention treatment of the pre-diabetes state. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Childhood obesity affects adult metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yajun; Hou, Dongqing; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Liang; Hu, Yuehua; Liu, Junting; Cheng, Hong; Yang, Ping; Shan, Xinying; Yan, Yinkun; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Mi, Jie

    2015-09-01

    We seek to observe the association between childhood obesity by different measures and adult obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and diabetes. Thousand two hundred and nine subjects from "Beijing Blood Pressure Cohort Study" were followed 22.9 ± 0.5 years in average from childhood to adulthood. We defined childhood obesity using body mass index (BMI) or left subscapular skinfold (LSSF), and adult obesity as BMI ≥ 28 kg/m(2). MetS was defined according to the joint statement of International Diabetes Federation and American Heart Association with modified waist circumference (≥ 90/85 cm for men/women). Diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L or blood glucose 2 h after oral glucose tolerance test ≥ 11.1 mmol/L or currently using blood glucose-lowering agents. Multiple linear and logistic regression models were used to assess the association. The incidence of adult obesity was 13.4, 60.0, 48.3, and 65.1 % for children without obesity, having obesity by BMI only, by LSSF only, and by both, respectively. Compared to children without obesity, children obese by LSSF only or by both had higher risk of diabetes. After controlling for adult obesity, childhood obesity predicted independently long-term risks of diabetes (odds ratio 2.8, 95 % confidence interval 1.2-6.3) or abdominal obesity (2.7, 1.6-4.7) other than MetS as a whole (1.2, 0.6-2.4). Childhood obesity predicts long-term risk of adult diabetes, and the effect is independent of adult obesity. LSSF is better than BMI in predicting adult diabetes.

  15. A rare cause of pleural effusion: adult onset Still’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Demirbas, Soner; Kutlu, Orkide; Kandemir, Bahar; Sakin, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Adult onset Still’s disease is a rare systemic inflammatory disorder. At the onset of the disease sore throat, pharyngitis; which does not respond to antibiotics, one or two times peaking febrile episodes, marked salmon-colored rash on the trunk and extremities, arthralgia, arthritis, myalgia, fatigue, loss of appetite with nausea and weight loss; hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy can be seen. Among laboratory examinations levels of ferritin and other acute phase reactants distinctly rise, and neutrophilic leukocytosis; ANA and RF negativity are detected. Pleural and pericardial effusions, transient pulmonary infiltration, and rarely myocarditis can be seen during the course of the disease. Here we report a patient who was examined for fever of unknown origin and diagnosed with adult onset Still’s disease which is a rare etiology of pleural effusion. PMID:28058358

  16. Genetic architecture differences between pediatric and adult-onset inflammatory bowel diseases in the Polish population

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Jerzy; Paziewska, Agnieszka; Lazowska, Izabella; Ambrozkiewicz, Filip; Goryca, Krzysztof; Kulecka, Maria; Rawa, Tomasz; Karczmarski, Jakub; Dabrowska, Michalina; Zeber-Lubecka, Natalia; Tomecki, Roman; Kluska, Anna; Balabas, Aneta; Piatkowska, Magdalena; Paczkowska, Katarzyna; Kierkus, Jaroslaw; Socha, Piotr; Lodyga, Michal; Rydzewska, Grazyna; Klopocka, Maria; Mierzwa, Grazyna; Iwanczak, Barbara; Krzesiek, Elzbieta; Bak-Drabik, Katarzyna; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Klincewicz, Beata; Radwan, Piotr; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Landowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Agnieszka; Korczowski, Bartosz; Starzynska, Teresa; Albrecht, Piotr; Mikula, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Most inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are classic complex disorders represented by common alleles. Here we aimed to define the genetic architecture of pediatric and adult-onset IBDs for the Polish population. A total of 1495 patients were recruited, including 761 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD; 424 pediatric), 734 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC; 390 pediatric), and 934 healthy controls. Allelotyping employed a pooled-DNA genome-wide association study (GWAS) and was validated by individual genotyping. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on 44 IBD patients diagnosed before 6 years of age, 45 patients diagnosed after 40 years of age, and 18 healthy controls. Altogether, out of 88 selected SNPs, 31 SNPs were replicated for association with IBD. A novel BRD2 (rs1049526) association reached significance of P = 5.2 × 10−11 and odds ratio (OR) = 2.43. Twenty SNPs were shared between pediatric and adult patients; 1 and 7 were unique to adult-onset and pediatric-onset IBD, respectively. WES identified numerous rare and potentially deleterious variants in IBD-associated or innate immunity-associated genes. Deleterious alleles in both groups were over-represented among rare variants in affected children. Our GWAS revealed differences in the polygenic architecture of pediatric- and adult-onset IBD. A significant accumulation of rare and deleterious variants in affected children suggests a contribution by yet unexplained genetic components. PMID:28008999

  17. Physical Therapists' Perceptions of Providing Services to Adults with Childhood-Onset Neuromotor Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton-Griffith, Kelsi N.; Cicirello, Nancy A.; Turner, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Adults with childhood-onset neuromotor disabilities face problems accessing health care services. There are often challenges finding primary care providers or specialized providers, such as physical therapists, who are knowledgeable about neuromotor disabilities. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of physical therapists…

  18. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes.

  19. Early-Onset Psychoses: Comparison of Clinical Features and Adult Outcome in 3 Diagnostic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledda, Maria Giuseppina; Fratta, Anna Lisa; Pintor, Manuela; Zuddas, Alessandro; Cianchetti, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of clinical features and adult outcome in adolescents with three types of psychotic disorders: schizophrenic (SPh), schizoaffective (SA) and bipolar with psychotic features (BPP). Subjects (n = 41) were finally diagnosed (DSM-IV criteria) with SPh (n = 17), SA (n = 11) or BPP (n = 13). Clinical evaluation took place at onset and at a…

  20. Adult-Onset Antisocial Behavior Trajectories: Associations with Adolescent Family Processes and Emerging Adulthood Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mata, Andrea D.; van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Guided by conceptual and empirical work on emerging adulthood, this study investigated the role of closeness to mother and father and behavioral autonomy during adolescence on the development of adult-onset antisocial behavior. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we identified four aggressive…

  1. Gastrointestinal Pathologic Abnormalities in Pediatric- and Adult-Onset Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Lougaris, Vassilios; Ravelli, Alberto; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; Soresina, Annarosa; Fuoti, Maurizio; Lanzarotto, Francesco; Lanzini, Alberto; Plebani, Alessandro; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2015-08-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency is the most common form of primary symptomatic immunodeficiency. Gastrointestinal manifestations, such as gastritis, diarrhea, gastrointestinal infections, and malabsorption, may complicate the clinical history in almost 50 % of patients. To evaluate gastrointestinal histopathological findings in pediatric- and in adult-onset common variable immunodeficiency patients. Twenty-two patients with common variable immunodeficiency (13 children, nine adults) were retrospectively studied from a clinical and histopathological point of view. Increased T lymphocyte infiltrate and the absence of plasma cells in duodenal lamina propria and submucosa were the most frequent findings, independently from onset age, whereas follicular lymphoid hyperplasia and polymorphonuclear infiltrate, as well as parasitic and viral infections, were only present in the adult group. Common variable immunodeficiency patients with minor gastrointestinal symptoms also presented pathological findings, mainly the absence of plasma cells, T cell infiltrate, and infections, independently of age. Gastrointestinal pathological abnormalities are common in both pediatric- and adult-onset common variable immunodeficiency patients. Histological alterations may vary depending upon the age of onset, possibly due to duration of disease. Minor gastrointestinal symptoms are also associated with pathological findings; therefore, these should be searched in all symptomatic patients.

  2. Hypothalamic Apelin/Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling Controls Hepatic Glucose Metabolism in the Onset of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Drougard, Anne; Duparc, Thibaut; Brenachot, Xavier; Carneiro, Lionel; Gouazé, Alexandra; Fournel, Audren; Geurts, Lucie; Cadoudal, Thomas; Prats, Anne-Catherine; Pénicaud, Luc; Vieau, Didier; Lesage, Jean; Leloup, Corinne; Benani, Alexandre; Cani, Patrice D.; Valet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: We have previously demonstrated that central apelin is implicated in the control of peripheral glycemia, and its action depends on nutritional (fast versus fed) and physiological (normal versus diabetic) states. An intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of a high dose of apelin, similar to that observed in obese/diabetic mice, increase fasted glycemia, suggesting (i) that apelin contributes to the establishment of a diabetic state, and (ii) the existence of a hypothalamic to liver axis. Using pharmacological, genetic, and nutritional approaches, we aim at unraveling this system of regulation by identifying the hypothalamic molecular actors that trigger the apelin effect on liver glucose metabolism and glycemia. Results: We show that icv apelin injection stimulates liver glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis via an over-activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), leading to fasted hyperglycemia. The effect of central apelin on liver function is dependent of an increased production of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species (ROS). These data are strengthened by experiments using lentiviral vector-mediated over-expression of apelin in hypothalamus of mice that present over-activation of SNS associated to an increase in hepatic glucose production. Finally, we report that mice fed a high-fat diet present major alterations of hypothalamic apelin/ROS signaling, leading to activation of glycogenolysis. Innovation/Conclusion: These data bring compelling evidence that hypothalamic apelin is one master switch that participates in the onset of diabetes by directly acting on liver function. Our data support the idea that hypothalamic apelin is a new potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 557–573. PMID:23879244

  3. Lower urinary pH is useful for predicting renovascular disorder onset in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Susumu; Nako, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Masashi; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-01-01

    A lower urinary pH (UpH) is closely linked to diabetes. However, its relation to diabetic renovascular damage is unclear. This study aimed to identify the relationship between UpH and the exacerbation of diabetic renovascular disorders. This is a 10-year observational study targeting 400 outpatients with diabetes who registered in 2003. We investigated the relationship between UpH in 2003 and renovascular damage from 2003 to 2013. A total of 350 participants were eligible for the analysis. During their 10-year outpatient treatment, a decrease was seen in glycated hemoglobin levels, blood pressure, and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs), and an increase was seen in their urinary albumin-creatinine ratios (ACRs), uric acid (UA) levels, and intima-media thickness (IMT). UpH negatively correlated with urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), body mass index, UA, and ACR, and positively correlated with eGFR. The results of a multiple regression analysis showed that the independent risk factors for UpH were 8-OHdG, UA, eGFR, and ACR. UpH also negatively correlated with the percent change in IMT (%IMT), the percent change in pulse wave velocity (%PWV), and the change in log ACR (Δlog ACR), and positively correlated with the percent change in eGFR. A multiple regression analysis revealed that UpH was an independent risk factor for the %IMT, %PWV and Δlog ACR. Obese patients with low UpH values frequently suffered from sleep apnea syndrome. These results suggest that UpH is a useful marker for predicting the onset of renovascular disorder in patients with diabetes.

  4. Lower urinary pH is useful for predicting renovascular disorder onset in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Susumu; Nako, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Masashi; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives A lower urinary pH (UpH) is closely linked to diabetes. However, its relation to diabetic renovascular damage is unclear. This study aimed to identify the relationship between UpH and the exacerbation of diabetic renovascular disorders. Methods This is a 10-year observational study targeting 400 outpatients with diabetes who registered in 2003. We investigated the relationship between UpH in 2003 and renovascular damage from 2003 to 2013. Results A total of 350 participants were eligible for the analysis. During their 10-year outpatient treatment, a decrease was seen in glycated hemoglobin levels, blood pressure, and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs), and an increase was seen in their urinary albumin–creatinine ratios (ACRs), uric acid (UA) levels, and intima-media thickness (IMT). UpH negatively correlated with urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), body mass index, UA, and ACR, and positively correlated with eGFR. The results of a multiple regression analysis showed that the independent risk factors for UpH were 8-OHdG, UA, eGFR, and ACR. UpH also negatively correlated with the percent change in IMT (%IMT), the percent change in pulse wave velocity (%PWV), and the change in log ACR (Δlog ACR), and positively correlated with the percent change in eGFR. A multiple regression analysis revealed that UpH was an independent risk factor for the %IMT, %PWV and Δlog ACR. Obese patients with low UpH values frequently suffered from sleep apnea syndrome. Conclusions These results suggest that UpH is a useful marker for predicting the onset of renovascular disorder in patients with diabetes. PMID:26157584

  5. Everyday Living with Diabetes Described by Family Members of Adult People with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Paavilainen, Eija; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore family members' experiences of everyday life in families with adult people living with type 1 diabetes. The grounded theory method was used to gather and analyse data from the interviews of nineteen family members. Six concepts describing the family members' views on everyday living with diabetes were generated on the basis of the data. Everyday life with diabetes is described as being intertwined with hypoglycemia. Becoming acquainted with diabetes takes place little by little. Being involved in the management and watching self-management from the sidelines are concepts describing family members' participation in the daily management of diabetes. The family members are also integrating diabetes into everyday life. Living on an emotional roller-coaster tells about the thoughts and feelings that family members experience. Family members of adult people with diabetes are involved in the management of the diabetes in many ways and experience many concerns. The family members' point of view is important to take into consideration when developing education for adults with diabetes. PMID:24455251

  6. Treatment of Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy in Older Adults with Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Scheinberg, Nataliya; Salbu, Rebecca L; Goswami, Gayotri; Cohen, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    To review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, screening and diagnosis, and optimal treatment of diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) and its implications in older adults. A search of PubMed using the Mesh terms "diabetes," "type 1," "insulin-dependent," "T1DM," and "diabetic autonomic neuropathy" was performed to find relevant primary literature. Additional search terms "epidemiology," "geriatric," and "risk" were employed. All English-language articles from 2005 to 2015 appearing in these searches were reviewed for relevance. Related articles suggested in the PubMed search and clinical guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists were reviewed. These uncovered further resources for risk stratification, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of DAN. DAN is highly prevalent in the diabetes population and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in older adults, yet, often goes undiagnosed and untreated. Treatment of DAN is complex in the older adult because of poor tolerability of many pharmacologic treatment options; therefore, great care must be taken when selecting therapy as to avoid unwanted adverse effects. With increasing life-expectancy of patients with diabetes mellitus, awareness of DAN and its implications to older adults is needed in primary care. Consistent screening and appropriate treatment of DAN in older adults with diabetes mellitus is essential in helping to maintain functional status and avoid adverse events.

  7. Childhood-Onset Disease Predicts Mortality in an Adult Cohort of Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, Aimee O.; Trupin, Laura; Yazdany, Jinoos; Panopalis, Peter; Julian, Laura; Katz, Patricia; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Yelin, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine childhood-onset disease as a predictor of mortality in a cohort of adult patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Data were derived from the University of California Lupus Outcomes Study, a longitudinal cohort of 957 adult subjects with SLE that includes 98 subjects with childhood-onset SLE. Baseline and follow-up data were obtained via telephone interviews conducted between 2002-2007. The number of deaths during 5 years of follow-up was determined and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for the cohort, and across age groups, were calculated. Kaplan-Meier life table analysis was used to compare mortality rates between childhood (defined as SLE diagnosis <18 years) and adult-onset SLE. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine predictors of mortality. Results During the median follow-up period of 48 months, 72 deaths (7.5% of subjects) occurred, including 9 (12.5%) among those with childhood-onset SLE. The overall SMR was 2.5 (CI 2.0-3.2). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, after adjusting for age, childhood-onset subjects were at increased risk for mortality throughout the follow-up period (p<0.0001). In a multivariate model adjusting for age, disease duration and other covariates, childhood-onset SLE was independently associated with an increased mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-7.3), as was low socioeconomic status measured by education (HR: 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.2) and end stage renal disease (HR: 2.1; 95% CI 1.1-4.0). Conclusion Childhood-onset SLE was a strong predictor of mortality in this cohort. Interventions are needed to prevent early mortality in this population. PMID:20235215

  8. Obesity and diabetes as accelerators of functional decline: can lifestyle interventions maintain functional status in high risk older adults?

    PubMed

    Anton, Stephen D; Karabetian, Christy; Naugle, Kelly; Buford, Thomas W

    2013-09-01

    Obesity and diabetes are known risk factors for the development of physical disability among older adults. With the number of seniors with these conditions rising worldwide, the prevention and treatment of physical disability in these persons have become a major public health challenge. Sarcopenia, the progressive loss of muscle mass and strength, has been identified as a common pathway associated with the initial onset and progression of physical disability among older adults. A growing body of evidence suggests that metabolic dysregulation associated with obesity and diabetes accelerates the progression of sarcopenia, and subsequently functional decline in older adults. The focus of this brief review is on the contributions of obesity and diabetes in accelerating sarcopenia and functional decline among older adults. We also briefly discuss the underexplored interaction between obesity and diabetes that may further accelerate sarcopenia and place obese older adults with diabetes at particularly high risk of disability. Finally, we review findings from studies that have specifically tested the efficacy of lifestyle-based interventions in maintaining the functional status of older persons with obesity and/or diabetes.

  9. Obesity and Diabetes as Accelerators of Functional Decline; Can Lifestyle Interventions Maintain Functional Status in High Risk Older Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Stephen D.; Karabetian, Christy; Naugle, Kelly; Buford, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are known risk factors for the development of physical disability among older adults. With the number of seniors with these conditions rising worldwide, the prevention and treatment of physical disability in these persons has become a major public health challenge. Sarcopenia, the progressive loss of muscle mass and strength, has been identified as a common pathway associated with the initial onset and progression of physical disability among older adults. A growing body of evidence suggests that metabolic dysregulation associated with obesity and diabetes accelerates the progression of sarcopenia, and subsequently functional decline in older adults. The focus of this brief review is on the contributions of obesity and diabetes in accelerating sarcopenia and functional decline among older adults. We also briefly discuss the underexplored interaction between obesity and diabetes that may further accelerate sarcopenia and place obese older adults with diabetes at particularly high risk of disability. Finally, we review findings from studies that have specifically tested the efficacy of lifestyle-based interventions in maintaining the functional status of older persons with obesity and/or diabetes. PMID:23832077

  10. Niacin therapy and the risk of new-onset diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Goldie, Christina; Taylor, Allen J; Nguyen, Peter; McCoy, Cody; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Preiss, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have suggested that niacin treatment raises glucose levels in patients with diabetes and may increase the risk of developing diabetes. We undertook a meta-analysis of published and unpublished data from randomised trials to confirm whether an association exists between niacin and new-onset diabetes. Methods We searched Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, from 1975 to 2014, for randomised controlled trials of niacin primarily designed to assess its effects on cardiovascular endpoints and cardiovascular surrogate markers. We included trials with ≥50 non-diabetic participants and average follow-up of ≥24 weeks. Published data were tabulated and unpublished data sought from investigators. We calculated risk ratios (RR) for new-onset diabetes with random-effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity between trials was assessed using the I2 statistic. Results In 11 trials with 26 340 non-diabetic participants, 1371 (725/13 121 assigned niacin; 646/13 219 assigned control) were diagnosed with diabetes during a weighted mean follow-up of 3.6 years. Niacin therapy was associated with a RR of 1.34 (95% CIs 1.21 to 1.49) for new-onset diabetes, with limited heterogeneity between trials (I2=0.0%, p=0.87). This equates to one additional case of diabetes per 43 (95% CI 30 to 70) initially non-diabetic individuals who are treated with niacin for 5 years. Results were consistent regardless of whether participants received background statin therapy (p for interaction=0.88) or combined therapy with laropiprant (p for interaction=0.52). Conclusions Niacin therapy is associated with a moderately increased risk of developing diabetes regardless of background statin or combination laropiprant therapy. PMID:26370223

  11. Oral Health Knowledge and Behavior among Adults with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Hon K.; Wolf, Bethany J.; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Magruder, Kathryn M.; Salinas, Carlos F.; London, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine levels of oral health knowledge and factors associated with adequate oral health knowledge in adults with diabetes. A convenience sample of 253 adult US residents with diabetes completed an oral health survey to assess their knowledge. Results showed that only 47% of the participants answered five or more (out of a maximum of seven) oral health knowledge items related to diabetes correctly. Participants who received oral health information related to diabetes have 2.9 times the odds of possessing adequate oral health knowledge (i.e., answered five or more items correctly) compared to participants who did not received that information controlling for education and race (OR = 2.86, 95% CI 1.26–6.24, P = 0.008). Given that oral health information provided by health professionals (dental and/or medical) contributes to improve oral health knowledge among adults with diabetes, health professionals should take the opportunity to educate patients with diabetes about the oral manifestations (e.g., dry mouth) and complications (e.g., periodontitis and oral candidiasis) of diabetes and to promote proper oral health behaviors. PMID:19800143

  12. Associations between recent severe hypoglycemia, retinal vessel diameters, and cognition in adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Christopher M; Klein, Barbara E K; Lee, Kristine E; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Klein, Ronald

    Mild cognitive dysfunction has been identified in children and adults with type 1 diabetes, but most studies have failed to find a relationship between severe hypoglycemia and cognition, despite reports of such associations in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Focusing on older adults with type 1 diabetes, we examined the associations between cognitive performance and recent episodes of severe hypoglycemia, retinal vessel diameters and the presence of micro- and macrovascular complications. Cognitive functioning was assessed in 244 participants enrolled in the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy. The mean (SD; range) age at assessment in 2012-14 was 55.2 (8.3; 37-82) years and the mean (SD) duration of diabetes was 41.1 (5.6) years. Three cognitive domains were assessed in this cross-sectional study: mental efficiency and executive function, nonverbal memory, and verbal memory. Multivariate modeling demonstrated that although age and/or education are most strongly associated with performance on measures of mental efficiency, three diabetes-related variables were also associated with poorer test scores: an episode of severe hypoglycemia in the past year (β=-0.360 [95% CI, -0.672, -0.047]), retinal arteriolar and venular diameters (β=0.140 [95% CI, 0.062, 0.219]; β=-0.127 [95% CI -0.207, -0.047]), and carotid artery plaque (β=-0.372 [95% CI -0.741, -0.003]). In addition, recent severe hypoglycemia was associated with poorer nonverbal memory (β=-0.522 [95% CI, -0.849, -0.194]). For middle-aged and older adults with long-duration type 1 diabetes, poorer cognition was associated with a recent episode of severe hypoglycemia as well as with the presence of micro- and/or macrovascular conditions. Given the increasing numbers of aging adults with type 1 diabetes, future longitudinal studies are needed to identify causality and to determine whether diabetes management techniques that reduce the onset or severity of vascular complications and

  13. Profiling of circulating microRNAs in children with recent onset of type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Erener, Suheda; Marwaha, Ashish; Tan, Rusung; Kieffer, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that is clinically silent until the majority of β cells are destroyed. There is an unmet need for reliable and cost-effective biomarkers to predict and diagnose diabetes at an early stage. A number of stable microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported in serum and plasma and are now being investigated as biomarkers of different diseases. We measured the levels of 745 miRNAs in sera of children with recent-onset T1D and age-matched controls using locked nucleic acid–enhanced (LNA-enhanced) quantitative PCR profiling. Thirty-five miRNAs were significantly different between the groups, and 27 miRNAs were elevated in T1D. Good discriminating power was obtained for 6 miRNAs (miR-454-3p, miR-222-3p, miR-144-5p, miR-345-5p, miR-24-3p, and miR-140-5p), which were not elevated at later stages of diabetes. In silico pathway analysis, based on inferred miRNA target genes, associated glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis as well as PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and Wnt signaling pathways with early stages of T1D. Among the 27 upregulated miRNAs in T1D, 2 miRNAs significantly correlated with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), as did 5 of 8 downregulated miRNAs. A total of 134 miRNAs significantly correlated with HbA1c when stratifying hyperglycemia-induced miRNAs from T1D-specific miRNAs. In conclusion, we have identified a serum miRNA pattern of recent-onset T1D and signaling pathways that may be involved in its pathogenesis. PMID:28239651

  14. Rapid Deterioration of Insulin Secretion in Obese Adolescents Preceding the Onset of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Deborah A.; Hornung, Lindsey N.; Herbers, Patricia M.; Prigeon, Ron; Woo, Jessica G.; D'Alessio, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify pathophysiologic changes that lead to the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in adolescents. Study design Obese adolescents with NGT (n=41) were studied longitudinally over 4 years with serial measure of the acute insulin response to IV glucose (AIRg) as well as proinsulin (PI) concentrations. Insulin resistance was estimated with HOMA modeling, the disposition index (DI) computed as AIRg × 1/HOMA-IR, and IV glucose tolerance estimated as the glucose disappearance constant (kg). Results Four adolescents developed diabetes during the study (DM), and the rest of the cohort remained non-diabetic (NDM). Baseline PI exceeded the interquartile range of the NDM group in 3 of 4 subjects with DM and all had > 85% reduction from baseline AIRg, and DI, within 6 months of diagnosis. All the subjects with DM gained weight over the course of the study but these changes paralleled those for the NDM group. HOMA-IR increased substantially in 1 of the subjects with DM at the time of diagnosis, but was comparable with baseline in the other 3. The DI and kg of the subjects with DM was below the 10th percentile of the NDM group before and after diagnosis. Conclusion Conversion from NGT to T2DM in adolescents can occur rapidly, and T2DM onset is heralded by a substantial decline in AIRg and DI, as well as increased release of PI. These results support loss of beta-cell function as the proximate step in the development of T2DM in this age group. PMID:25557969

  15. Adult-onset Nemaline Myopathy Coexisting With Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lingling; Wang, Yanling; Liu, Xiaofeng; Hu, Yanxia; Li, Nianchun; Qiu, Guoping; Luo, Yun; Li, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular junction disorder which is characterized by fluctuating muscle fatigue. However, the association of MG with nemaline myopathy is rarely reported. Here we report a case of MG coexisting with adult-onset nemaline myopathy. A 55-year-old man endured fluctuating muscle weakness with positive acetylcholine receptor and titin antibodies. After the patient was administrated cholinergic drugs and immunosuppression, the muscle weakness of the patient had mildly been alleviated. Electromyography showed a progressive decrement in the amplitude of muscle action potential at low frequency. Muscle biopsy showed numerous nemalines in the muscle fibers. This is the first reported case of nemalines present in the muscle fibers of adult patient with MG. The pathogenesis of nemaline may be related to titin antibody in adult-onset nemaline myopathy with MG.

  16. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Kramer, P.L.

    1997-02-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-on-set primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. 57 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Postoperative acute respiratory failure caused by adult-onset pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dingyu; Xu, Jun; Yang, Yi; Gu, Ming; Yu, Xuezhong

    2016-06-20

    Pompe disease, which leads to dysfunction of the enzyme acid a-glucosidase, is a genetic disorder seen in 1 in 40000 births. Adult-onset Pompe disease is known as a slowly progressive myasthenia with or without respiratory dysfunction. We herein report two cases of adult-onset Pompe disease, in which postoperative acute respiratory failure was the the initial manifestation. The two patients showed no symptoms of ambulatory and respiratory dysfunction before operation. The diagnosis of Pompe disease was determined by muscle biopsy and acid a-glucosidase assay in the blood. Rapid deterioration of already struggling diaphragmatic function induced by stress of surgery and anesthesia were thought to be the main reason of postoperative acute respiratory failure. Physicians should be aware of the existence of an adult form of Pompe disease which may present with postoperative acute respiratory failure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Prevalence and determinants of diabetes among older adults in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Gatimu, Samwel Maina; Milimo, Benson Williesham; Sebastian, Miguel San

    2016-11-21

    Diabetes is one of the leading non-communicable diseases in Africa, contributing to the increasing disease burden among the old adults. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and determinants of diabetes among adults aged 50 years and above in Ghana. A cross sectional study based on data collected from Study of Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) Wave 1 from 2007 to 2008. Data was collected from 5565 respondents of whom 4135 were aged 50+ years identified using a multistage stratified clusters design. Bivariate and hierarchical multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the association of the determinants and diabetes. The weighted prevalence of diabetes among the adults aged 50 years and above in Ghana was 3.95% (95% Confidence Interval: 3.35-4.55) with the prevalence being insignificantly higher in females than males (2.16%, 95% CI: 1.69-2.76 vs. 1.73%, 95% CI: 1.28-2.33). Low level of physical activity (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 2.11, 95% CI: 1.21-3.69) and obesity (AOR 4.81, 95% CI: 1.92-12.0) were associated with increased odds of diabetes among women while old age (AOR 2.58, 95% CI: 1.29-5.18) and university (AOR 12.8, 95% CI: 4.20-39.1), secondary (AOR 3.61, 95% CI: 1.38-9.47) and primary education (AOR 2.71, 95% CI: 1.02-7.19) were associated with increased the odds of diabetes among men. The prevalence of diabetes among old adults shows a similar trend with that of the general population. However, the prevalence may have been underestimated due to self-reporting and a high rate of undiagnosed diabetes. In addition, the determinants of diabetes among older adults are a clear indication of the need for diabetes prevention programme targeting the young people and that are gender specific to reduce the burden of diabetes at old age. Physical activity and nutrition should be emphasised in any prevention strategy.

  19. The increase of diabetes mortality burden among Brazilian adults.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Passos, Valeria Maria Azeredo; Almeida, Suzanne Kelly Ferreira; Assis, Tiago Duarte

    2007-10-01

    To estimate diabetes-related deaths among Brazilian adults between 1999 and 2003 and to investigate demographic factors associated with reporting diabetes as an associated cause of death. All deaths with diabetes as the underlying or associated cause were identified using the Brazilian Mortality Data System. Analysis was performed by sex, age, year, state of residence, and place of death. Mortality rates were age standardized by the 2000 Brazilian population. A total of 237 946 deaths (8.8%) were related to diabetes; in 4.2% of deaths it was the underlying cause and in 4.6% it was an associated cause. Between 1999 and 2003, age-standardized mortality rates for diabetes as the underlying cause increased 14% among males and 9% among females, while mortality with diabetes as an associated cause increased 22% and 28%, respectively. Diabetes appeared more often as an associated cause in death certificates among older individuals and in those residing in São Paulo State; it appeared less often as an associated cause among women, brown- and black-skinned populations, and in deaths occurring outside hospitals. Cardiovascular diseases accounted for 54.5% of the underlying causes of death when diabetes was an associated cause. Diabetes was related to almost 9% of the deaths in the South and Southeast regions of Brazil. Mortality from diabetes is increasing, especially deaths with diabetes as an associated cause. The probability of having diabetes as the underlying cause of death is greater among women and nonwhite individuals. Our results reinforce the importance of using multiple causes of death to monitor diabetes, because half the individuals with the disease will die of another cause, especially cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus: institutional experience with 2001 patients.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Sun, Hai; Guthikonda, Bharat; Notarianni, Christina; Nanda, Anil

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Adult-onset hydrocephalus is not commonly discussed in the literature, especially regarding its demographic distribution. In contrast to pediatric hydrocephalus, which is related to a primary CSF pathway defect, its development in adults is often secondary to other pathologies. In this study, the authors investigated the epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus as it pertains to different etiologies and in reference to age, sex, and race distributions. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical notes of 2001 patients with adult-onset hydrocephalus who presented to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center within a 25-year span. Significant differences between the groups were analyzed by a chi-square test; p < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS The overall mean (± SEM) incidence of adult hydrocephalus in this population was 77 ± 30 per year, with a significant increase in incidence in the past decade (55 ± 3 [1990-2003] vs 102 ± 6 [2004-2015]; p < 0.0001). Hydrocephalus in a majority of the patients had a vascular etiology (45.5%) or was a result of a tumor (30.2%). The incidence of hydrocephalus in different age groups varied according to various pathologies. The incidence was significantly higher in males with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (p = 0.03) or head injury (p = 0.01) and higher in females with pseudotumor cerebri (p < 0.0001). In addition, the overall incidence of hydrocephalus was significantly higher in Caucasian patients (p = 0.0002) than in those of any other race. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge of the demographic variations in adult-onset hydrocephalus is helpful in achieving better risk stratification and better managing the disease in patients. For general applicability, these results should be validated in a large-scale meta-analysis based on a national population database.

  1. Nephrin mutations cause childhood- and adult-onset focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Santín, Sheila; García-Maset, Rafael; Ruíz, Patricia; Giménez, Isabel; Zamora, Isabel; Peña, Antonia; Madrid, Alvaro; Camacho, Juan A; Fraga, Gloria; Sánchez-Moreno, Ana; Cobo, Maria Angeles; Bernis, Carmen; Ortiz, Alberto; de Pablos, Augusto Luque; Pintos, Guillem; Justa, Maria Luisa; Hidalgo-Barquero, Emilia; Fernández-Llama, Patricia; Ballarín, José; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in the NPHS1 gene cause congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type presenting before the first 3 months of life. Recently, NPHS1 mutations have also been identified in childhood-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome and milder courses of disease, but their role in adults with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis remains unknown. Here we developed an in silico scoring matrix to evaluate the pathogenicity of amino-acid substitutions using the biophysical and biochemical difference between wild-type and mutant amino acid, the evolutionary conservation of the amino-acid residue in orthologs, and defined domains, with the addition of contextual information. Mutation analysis was performed in 97 patients from 89 unrelated families, of which 52 presented with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome after 18 years of age. Compound heterozygous or homozygous NPHS1 mutations were identified in five familial and seven sporadic cases, including one patient 27 years old at onset of the disease. Substitutions were classified as 'severe' or 'mild' using this in silico approach. Our results suggest an earlier onset of the disease in patients with two 'severe' mutations compared to patients with at least one 'mild' mutation. The finding of mutations in a patient with adult-onset focal segmental glomerulosclerosis indicates that NPHS1 analysis could be considered in patients with later onset of the disease.

  2. Prognostic Factors and Outcomes of Adult-Onset Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: A Retrospective Analysis of 34 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Oto, Masafumi; Yoshitsugu, Kanako; Uneda, Shima; Nagamine, Michiko; Yoshida, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) has features that are distinct from that of HLH in pediatric patients. The clinical records at the Japanese Red Cross Kumamoto Hospital were reviewed. We retrospectively analyzed 34 patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of HLH-2004. The median age of patients was 60.0 (range 15-86). Underlying diseases were diagnosed in 17 patients. They consisted of malignant lymphoma (n=3), other neoplastic disease (n=3), viral infection (n=4), collagen vascular disease (n=3), Kikuchi’s disease (n=3) and drug (n=1). Underlying diseases were not diagnosed in 17 patients despite examination. The treatments were steroids (n=18), dexamethasone + cyclosporine A (CSA) + etoposide (n=4), multidrug chemotherapy (n=2), steroids and CSA (n=3). Eleven patients died during observation. In a multivariate analysis, the significant predictor for death was age at onset (hazard ratio, 1.22; 95%CI, 1.02-1.44; P=0.027). Autopsy was performed in 4 cases, but the underlying disease remained unknown in 3 of those cases. Adult-onset HLH has high diversity and various outcomes. The mechanism of adult-onset HLH is not fully understood and further research is required. PMID:26331000

  3. Clinical and demographic risk factors associated with mortality during early adulthood in a population-based cohort of childhood-onset type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M N; de Klerk, N H; Jones, T W; Davis, E A

    2014-12-01

    To calculate standardized mortality ratios and to assess the association between paediatric clinical factors and higher risk of mortality during early adulthood in a population-based cohort of subjects with Type 1 diabetes. Subjects with Type 1 diabetes were identified through the Western Australian Children's Diabetes Database and clinical data for those who reached 18 years of age (n = 1309) were extracted. An age- and sex-matched (without diabetes) comparison cohort (n = 6451) was obtained from the birth registry. Mortality records were obtained from the death registry. Participants were followed up until 31 January 2012. Associations of clinical factors (from clinic visits before 18 years of age) with mortality were assessed using Cox proportional hazard models. The standardized mortality ratio for all-cause mortality was 1.7 (95% CI 0.7-3.3) for male and 10.1 (95% CI 5.2-17.7) for female subjects with Type 1 diabetes (median age at end of study 25.6 years). The adjusted hazard ratio was 1.5 (95% CI 1.1-2.1) for a 1% increase in mean paediatric HbA1c level, 3.8 (95% CI 0.9-15.3) for four episodes of severe hypoglycaemia relative to zero episodes, and 6.21 (95% CI 1.4-28.4) for a low-level socio-economic background relative to a high-level background. People with childhood-onset Type 1 diabetes have higher mortality rates in early adulthood. At particularly high risk are women, those with a history of poor HbA1c levels, those with recurrent severe hypoglycaemia during paediatric management, and those from a low socio-economic background. These groups may benefit from intensified management during transition from paediatric to adult care facilities. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  4. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in type 2 diabetes among Hispanic adults.

    PubMed

    Watson, Amanda L; Hu, Jie; Chiu, Norman H L

    2015-05-01

    In this pilot study, we explore the genetic variation that may relate to type 2 diabetes (T2D) among Hispanic adults. The genotypes of 36 Hispanic adults were analyzed by using the Cardio-Metabochip. The goal is to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated to T2D among Hispanic adults. A total of 26 SNPs were identified to be associated with T2D among Hispanic adults. None of these SNPs have been reported for T2D. By using the principle components analysis to analyze the genotype of 26 SNPs in 36 samples, the samples obtained from diabetic patients could be distinguished from the control samples. The findings support genetic involvement in T2D among Hispanic adults.

  5. Effect of Pioglitazone on the Course of New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tafuri, Kimberly Sue; Godil, Mushtaq Ahmed; Lane, Andrew Harry; Wilson, Thomas Allen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is caused by insulin deficiency resulting from progressive destruction of β cells. The histological hallmark of the diabetic islet is mononuclear cell infiltration. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) activate PPARg and enhance the actions of insulin. Studies in non-obese diabetic and streptocotozin-treated mouse models demonstrated that pretreatment with TZDs prevented the development of T1DM. The purpose of this study was to examine whether pioglitazone, given with insulin, preserved β cell function in patients with new-onset T1DM. Methods: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week study. Subjects received pioglitazone or placebo. Blood sugar, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-peptide, and liver enzymes were measured at baseline. Boost© stimulated C-peptide responses were measured at baseline and at 24 weeks. Blood sugar, insulin dose, height, weight, and liver enzymes were monitored at each visit. HbA1c was performed every 12 weeks. Results: Of the 15 patients, 8 received pioglitazone, and 7 - placebo. There was no clinical improvement in HbA1c between or within groups at the completion of the study. Mean peak C-peptide values were similar between groups at baseline. Mean peak C-peptide level was slightly higher at 24 weeks in the pioglitazone group compared to the placebo (1.8 vs. 1.5 ng/mL) which was considered as clinically insignificant. The interaction of HbA1c and insulin dose (HbA1c* insulin/kg/day), which combines degree of diabetic control and dose of insulin required to achieve this control, showed transient improvement in the pioglitazone group at 12 weeks but was not sustained at 24 weeks. Conclusion: In this pilot study, pioglitazone did not preserve β cell function when compared to placebo. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24379032

  6. Evidence of a relationship between childhood-onset type I diabetes and low groundwater concentration of zinc.

    PubMed

    Haglund, B; Ryckenberg, K; Selinus, O; Dahlquist, G

    1996-08-01

    Zinc deficiency has shown to increase the risk for diabetes in diabetes-prone experimental animals. Low concentrations of zinc have also been shown in serum of recent onset cases with IDDM. The present study examines the hypothesis that exposure to a low concentration of zinc in drinking water could increase the risk for future onset of IDDM. Using the Swedish childhood diabetes registry and data on residence 3 years before the onset of disease, a case-control study was designed comparing cases and control subjects with estimates of groundwater contents of zinc obtained in biogeochemical samples from areas of residence. A high groundwater concentration of zinc was associated with a significant decrease in risk (odds ration [OR] = 0.8; 95% CI = 0.7-0.9). The same OR was obtained when the model included information of other metals that might act as possible confounders (chromium, vanadium, cobalt selenium, cadmium, lead, and mercury). In small rural areas, in which drinking water is taken from local wells and thus is closely associated with the groundwater content within the area, an even stronger association between zinc and diabetes (OR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.4-0.9) was found. It is concluded that this study for the first time provides evidence that a low groundwater content of zinc, which may reflect long-term exposure through drinking water, is associated with later development of childhood onset diabetes.

  7. Thyroid gland diseases in adult patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vondra, K; Vrbikova, J; Dvorakova, K

    2005-12-01

    This review concerns the relation between most frequent thyroid gland diseases and diabetes mellitus in adult patients. Special attention is paid to autoimmune thyroiditis, Graves' disease, thyroid autoimmunity in pregnant diabetic women, and iodine metabolism. We focused on mechanisms leading to coexistence of both endocrine disorders, and on distinctions in the prevalence, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients. The prevalence of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients is 2-3 times higher than in nondiabetic subjects; it raises with age, and is strongly influenced by female gender and autoimmune diabetes. Clinical relevance of thyroid diseases, especially in diabetic patients, significantly increases if it is associated with deteriorated function, which always cause a number problems with metabolic compensation of diabetes. Most serious consequences are increased frequency of hypoglycaemia in hypothyroidism and development of potentially life-threatening ketoacidosis in thyrotoxicosis. In spite of that, little attention is paid to the diagnosis of thyroid diseases in diabetics, as they are diagnosed in only about half of the patients. At the end, we provide recommendations for the thyroid disease screening and diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus based on our experience.

  8. [Adult-onset Still's disease with liver failure requiring liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Terán, Alvaro; Casafont, Fernando; Fábrega, Emilio; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Rodríguez-Valverde, Vicente; Pons-Romero, Fernando

    2009-12-01

    We present the case of a 23-year-old man with fever of unknown origin, who developed acute liver failure 2 months after symptom onset, requiring an urgent liver transplantation. The diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease was established after the reappearance of symptoms after transplantation, and high doses of corticosteroids were used to control disease activity. Subsequently, given the impossibility of tapering the steroid dose, interleukin-1 receptor blocking treatment was started with satisfactory outcome. We also review the published literature.

  9. Familial Adult-onset Alexander Disease: Clinical and Neuroradiological Findings of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    ELMALI, Ayşe Deniz; ÇETİNÇELİK, Ümran; IŞLAK, Civan; UZUN ADATEPE, Nurten; KARAALİ SAVRUN, Feray; YALÇINKAYA, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    The adult-onset Alexander disease (AOAD) dramatically differs from the early onset AD with respect to clinical and neuroradiological findings. Herein we report the detailed clinical and neuroradiological findings of a Turkish family with AOAD. In all three cases, magnetic resonance imaging revealed marked atrophy of the mesencephalon, bulbus, and cervical spinal cord accompanied with signal abnormalities in the same regions along with supratentorial white matter. Basal ganglia were affected in two cases. Molecular genetic analysis revealed heterozygous mutation in the 8th exon of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene M451I (c.1245G>A), leading to the diagnosis of AOAD in all cases. PMID:28360791

  10. Healthcare system supports for young adult patients with pediatric onset chronic conditions: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Szalda, Dava E; Jimenez, Manuel E; Long, Jeremiah E; Ni, Amelia; Shea, Judy A; Jan, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Over 90% of children with chronic conditions survive into adulthood necessitating primary care teams to care for adults with pediatric-onset chronic conditions. This study explores practice supports and barriers to care for this population via qualitative techniques. Using in depth interviews with twenty-two healthcare providers practice supports identified include: formalizing intake processes, interoperable electronic medical records, and leveraging care coordination. Barriers identified included: definition of the medical team, lack of appropriate medical records, time and administrative burden, lack of training, and financial constraints. Themes may be utilized to design interventions and improve care coordination for patients with pediatric-onset chronic conditions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. [Adult-onset Still's disease with pulmonary and cardiac involvement and response to intravenous immunoglobulin].

    PubMed

    Neto, Nilton Salles Rosa; Waldrich, Leandro; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary manifestations of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) include pericarditis, pleural effusion, transient pulmonary infiltrates, pulmonary interstitial disease and myocarditis. Serositis are common but pneumonitis and myocarditis are not and bring elevated risk of mortality. They may manifest on disease onset or flares. Previously reported cases were treated with high-dose glucocorticoids and immunosupressants and, when refractory, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). We report an AOSD patient whose flare presented with severe pleupneumonitis and myopericarditis and, following nonresponse to a methylprednisolone pulse, high dose of prednisone and cyclosporine A, recovered after a 2-day 1g/kg/day IVIG infusion.

  12. Urinary tract infections in adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ronald, A; Ludwig, E

    2001-04-01

    Urinary tract (UTI) is a major disease burden for many patients with diabetes. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is several-fold more common among women and acute plyelonephritis is five to ten times more common in both sexes. The complications of pyelonephritis are also more common in patients with diabetes. These complications include acute papillary necrosis, emphysematous pyelonephritis, and bacteremia with metastatic localization to other sites. The management of urinary infection in patients with diabetes is essentially the same as patients without diabetes. Most infections should be managed as uncomplicated except when they occur in a milieu with obstruction or other factors that merit a diagnosis of complicated UTI. Strategies to prevent these infections and reduce morbidity should be a priority for research.

  13. Decreased Reactivity of Skin Microcirculation in Response to l-Arginine in Later-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer-Geryk, Jolanta; Kozera, Grzegorz M.; Wolnik, Bogumil; Szczyrba, Sebastian; Nyka, Walenty M.; Bieniaszewski, Leszek

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of our study was to evaluate the vasodilatory effect of l-arginine infusion on the skin microcirculation and to assess the relationship between this effect and the presence of microangiopathy in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Capillaroscopy was performed before and after l-arginine infusion in 48 diabetic patients (26 women and 22 men; age, 39.8 ± 6.3 years) and 24 volunteers free of any chronic disease (13 women and 11 men; age, 38.0 ± 6.7 years). The skin microcirculation reactivity, as expressed by the percentage of area covered by capillaries (coverage) and the distance between capillaries (distance), and the relationship between microcirculation reactivity and the presence of microangiopathic complications were assessed. RESULTS The distance before l-arginine infusion was significantly lower in patients than in controls (221 [153–311] vs. 240 [185–356] µm; P = 0.02) and did not differ after l-arginine infusion (223.5 [127–318] vs. 242.5 [181–341] µm; P = 0.27). The difference between the coverage values obtained before and after l-arginine infusion (Δcoverage) was significantly different from zero in the control group but not in the diabetes group. Patients with later onset of diabetes were characterized by decreased skin microcirculation reactivity when compared with patients with earlier onset of diabetes (−1.18 [−5.07 to 11.60] vs. 1.36 [−6.00 to 8.06]; P = 0.02) despite the higher prevalence of retinopathy in patients with earlier onset of diabetes (64% vs. 26%; P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS Skin microvascular reactivity is impaired in patients with later onset of type 1 diabetes. Capillaroscopy with l-arginine infusion is useful for the identification of skin microangiopathy in type 1 diabetes. PMID:23150282

  14. HEALTH CARE TRANSITION IN YOUNG ADULTS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES: BARRIERS TO TIMELY ESTABLISHMENT OF ADULT DIABETES CARE

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Katharine C.; Wolpert, Howard A.; Laffel, Lori M.; Rhodes, Erinn T.; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I.; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine barriers to health care transition reported by young adults with type 1 diabetes and associations between barriers and prolonged gaps between pediatric and adult diabetes care. Methods We surveyed young adults aged 22 to 30 years with type 1 diabetes about their transition experiences, including barriers to timely establishment of adult diabetes care. We evaluated relationships between barriers and gaps in care using multivariate logistic regression. Results The response rate was 53% (258 of 484 eligible subjects). Respondents (62% female) were 26.7 ± 2.4 years old and transitioned to adult diabetes care at 19.5 ± 2.9 years. Reported barriers included lack of specific adult provider referral name (47%) or contact information (27%), competing life priorities (43%), difficulty getting an appointment (41%), feeling upset about leaving pediatrics (24%), and insurance problems (10%). In multivariate analysis, barriers most strongly associated with gaps in care >6 months were lack of adult provider name (odds ratio [OR], 6.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.0–12.7) or contact information (OR, 5.3; 95% CI, 2.0–13.9), competing life priorities (OR, 5.2; 95% CI, 2.7–10.3), and insurance problems (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.2–10.3). Overall, respondents reporting ≥1 moderate/major barrier (48%) had 4.7-fold greater adjusted odds of a gap in care >6 months (95% CI, 2.8–8.7). Conclusion Significant barriers to transition, such as a lack of specific adult provider referrals, may be addressed with more robust preparation by pediatric providers and care coordination. Further study is needed to evaluate strategies to improve young adult self-care in the setting of competing life priorities. PMID:23807526

  15. Genetic causes of maturity onset diabetes of the young may be less prevalent in American pregnant women recently diagnosed with diabetes mellitus than in previously studied European populations.

    PubMed

    Sewell, M F; Presley, L H; Holland, S H; Catalano, P M

    2015-07-01

    There are many causes of impaired glucose tolerance in pregnant women. It is unclear whether genetic etiologies are a source of impaired glucose tolerance in pregnant women. To prospectively determine the prevalence of maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) due to glucokinase (GCK) mutations in an American population of women with recent onset diabetes mellitus and gestational diabetes. We hypothesized that based on America's higher prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 diabetes, there may be an increased prevalence of GK mutations in our population than in previously reported studies from European studies. Over a three-year period, 72 pregnant women with recently diagnosed diabetes mellitus were prospectively assessed for presence of the most common pathogenic GCK mutations. This study was performed in a gestational diabetes clinic in Urban America and a high-risk pregnancy clinic that served the military and their families on an American military base in Germany. Seventy-two women; 65 with diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in this pregnancy (GDM/overt diabetes) and 7 with diagnosis in the last nine years prior to pregnancy were recruited during pregnancy and blood samples were obtained. None. Each study participant's blood sample was analyzed with restriction fragment length polymorphism to assess for mutations in the GCK gene. There were 38 female and 34 male neonates born at 38 weeks gestation ± 1.2 weeks. Mean birth weight was 3351 g ± 450 g. There were no patients with GCK mutations found in our population 0/72. This prevalence is not greater than that seen in previous a similar study in European women with gestational diabetes, but in fact significantly less (p = 0.03). American women with recently diagnosed diabetes mellitus likely have no higher prevalence of MODY than in previously studied European women with diabetes mellitus and may have a lower prevalence.

  16. The incidence of new onset diabetes after transplantation and related factors: Single center experience.

    PubMed

    Sinangil, Ayse; Celik, Vedat; Barlas, Soykan; Koc, Yener; Basturk, Taner; Sakaci, Tamer; Akin, Emin Baris; Ecder, Tevfik

    New-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) is a frequent metabolic complication and is considered a risk factor for patients undergoing renal transplant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and developing duration of new-onset diabetes after transplant (NODAT) and influencing factors. All patients' data was investigated retrospectively. Diabetics, follow-up period<6 months, age<18years were excluded. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data was recorded. Patients were divided into two groups: with/without NODAT. NODAT group was divided into four subgroups according to the time of developing NODAT, which were 0-3, 3-6, 6-12 and 12 months later. Two groups were compared, to investigate the incidence of NODAT and risk factors associated with the occurrence of NODAT. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 570 patients, of which 420 patients were included. Seventy (16.6%) patients had NODAT (36 female, mean age 51.7±8.2 years, mean follow-up 41.6±21.5 months), 52.8% of patients developed NODAT within the first three months of being diagnosed. 350 patients (116 female, mean age 43.2±12.5 years, mean follow-up 41.6±21.5 months) were without NODAT. The incidence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) during the first week after transplant was found to be higher in the patients with NODAT (p<0.001). There was positive correlation between NODAT and older age, obesity, family history of diabetes, presence of IFG, fasting plasma glucose, total and LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, parathormone. Old age, obesity, presence of IFG, pretransplant hypertriglyceridemia and hyperparathyroidism were predictors of development of NODAT. Incidence of NODAT, especially the first six months, was high. All patients should be screened for IFG within the first week. Patients with dyslipidemia, elderly and obese patients should be closely monitored for the risk of development of NODAT. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S

  17. Career readiness, developmental work personality and age of onset in young adult central nervous system survivors.

    PubMed

    Strauser, David; Wagner, Stacia; Wong, Alex W K; O'Sullivan, Deidre

    2013-04-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to undertake foundational research in the area of career readiness, work personality and age of onset with young adult central nervous system (CNS) survivors. Participants for this study consisted of 43 individuals whose age range from 18 to 30 (M = 21.64, SD = 3.46), an average age of brain tumor onset of 9.50 years (SD = 4.73) and average years off of treatment of 7.25 years (SD = 5.80). Packets were distributed to survivors who were participating in a psychosocial cancer treatment program. Participants completed multiple career instruments and a demographic form. Differences between groups and among the variables were examined and size effect sizes were analyzed. Young adult CNS survivors had significantly lower levels of work personality and career readiness when compared to young adult non-cancer survivors with CNS cancer with those between the ages of 6 and 12 reported significantly lower levels when compared to individuals diagnosed before age 6 and after the age of 13. Young adult CNS survivors at an increased risk for having lower levels of work personality and career readiness then a norm group comparison. Age of onset (between 6 and 12) may be at significant risk factor for developing poor or dysfunctional work and career behaviors. • Young adults with central nervous system (CNS) cancer are at particular risk for experiencing difficulties related to career and employment. • Work personality and career readiness are two constructs that have been found to be related to one's ability to meet the demands of work. • Young adult CNS cancer survivors have lower levels of work personality and career readiness. • Individuals diagnosed between the ages of 6 and 12 may be at particular risk and may need specific vocational rehabilitation interventions. • The results of this study point to the need for comprehensive career and vocational services for young adult CNS cancer survivors.

  18. Earlier age at menarche is associated with higher diabetes risk and cardiometabolic disease risk factors in Brazilian adults: Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Early menarche has been linked to higher risk of type 2 diabetes in Western and Asian societies, yet whether age at menarche is associated with diabetes in Latin America, where puberty and diabetes may have different life courses, is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that earlier menarche is associated with higher diabetes risk in Brazilian adults. Methods We used data from 8,075 women aged 35-74 years in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) who had complete information on age at menarche, diabetes status, and covariates. Diabetes was defined based on self-reported physician diagnosis, medication use, and laboratory variables (fasting glucose, 2-hour glucose, and glycated hemoglobin). Poisson regression was used to generate risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Menarche onset < 11 years [vs. 13-14 years (referent)] was associated with higher risk of diabetes (RR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.14-1.57) after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, maternal education, maternal and paternal diabetes, and birth weight. This persisted after further control for BMI at age 20 years and relative leg length. Additionally, among those not taking diabetes medications, earlier menarche [<11 years vs. 13-14 years (referent)] was associated with higher % glycated hemoglobin (p < 0.001), alanine aminotransferase (p < 0.001), triglycerides (p < 0.001), C-reactive protein (p = 0.003), waist circumference (p < 0.001), and BMI measured at baseline exam (p < 0.001). Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that earlier menarche is associated with greater risk for adult diabetes and cardiometabolic disease in the Brazilian context. PMID:24438044

  19. A positive family history of hypertension might be associated with an accelerated onset of type 2 diabetes: Results from the National Center Diabetes Database (NCDD-02).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Mori, Yasumichi; Yamashita, Shigeo; Yoshida, Yoko; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Yanai, Hidekatsu; Mishima, Shuichi; Handa, Nobuhiro; Shimokawa, Kotaro; Yoshida, Akiko; Watanabe, Hiroki; Ohe, Kazuhiko; Shimbo, Takuro; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2017-03-18

    Type 2 diabetes, which is characterized by a combination of decreased insulin secretion and decreased insulin sensitivity, can be delayed or prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviors. Therefore, it is important that the population in general understands their personal risk at an early age to reduce their chances of ever developing the disease. A family history of hypertension is known to be associated with insulin resistance, but the effect of a family history of hypertension on the onset of type 2 diabetes has not well been examined. We performed a retrospective study examining patient age at the time of the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes by analyzing a dataset of 1,299 patients (1,021 men and 278 women) who had been diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes during a health checkup. The mean ± standard deviation of the patient age at the time of the diagnosis of diabetes was 49.1 ± 10.4 years for patients with a family history of hypertension and 51.8 ± 11.4 years for patients without a family history of hypertension (p < 0.001). A multivariate linear regression analysis showed a significant association between a family history of hypertension and a younger age at the time of the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, independent of a family history of diabetes mellitus and a male sex, suggesting that a positive family history of hypertension might be associated with the accelerated onset of type 2 diabetes.

  20. A novel mouse model that recapitulates adult-onset glycogenosis type 4

    PubMed Central

    Orhan Akman, H.; Emmanuele, Valentina; Kurt, Yasemin Gülcan; Kurt, Bülent; Sheiko, Tatiana; DiMauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen-branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic hallmark of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age at onset. Complete loss of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy and affects primarily the muscle and the liver. However, residual enzyme activity as low as 5–20% leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects the central and peripheral nervous system and muscles and in the latter is termed adult polyglucosan body disease (APBD). Here, we describe a mouse model of GSD IV that reflects this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to knock in the most common GBE1 mutation p.Y329S c.986A > C found in APBD patients of Ashkenazi Jewish decent. Mice homozygous for this allele (Gbe1ys/ys) exhibit a phenotype similar to APBD, with widespread accumulation of PG. Adult mice exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. While the onset of symptoms is limited to adult mice, PG accumulates in tissues of newborn mice but is initially absent from the cerebral cortex and heart muscle. Thus, PG is well tolerated in most tissues, but the eventual accumulation in neurons and their axons causes neuropathy that leads to hind limb spasticity and premature death. This mouse model mimics the pathology and pathophysiologic features of human adult-onset branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:26385640

  1. A self-assessment tool for screening young adults at risk of type 2 diabetes using Strong Heart Family Study data

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fengxia; Cha, EunSeok; Lee, Elisa T.; Mayberry, Robert M.; Wang, Wenyu; Umpierrez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to characterize risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes in young adults ages 18–29 in order to develop a non-invasive risk assessment tool for use with younger American populations. Methods The self-assessment tool was developed using the Strong Heart Family Study data. A total of 590 young American Indian adults aged 18–29 (males=242) with normoglycemia and not receiving diabetes treatment were included. Risk factors recommended by the American Diabetes Association were used to assess diabetes risk in these young adults. A logistic regression model was developed to calculate the predicted probability. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) was used to evaluate the model. Results The final model showed that parental history of diabetes, obesity level, alcohol consumption, and high fasting glucose even within normal range were significantly associated with onset of prediabetes or diabetes in 5 years. The AUROC value was 0.68 with original and validated data, indicating the risk assessment tool had reasonably good discrimination ability. Conclusions This new non-invasive screening tool, based on data from American Indian young adults, has potential to screen young adults’ early-onset diabetes risk. Future studies are warranted to test this risk assessment tool in other racial/ethnic young adults. PMID:27480523

  2. [Association of childhood and adolescents obesity with adult diabetes].

    PubMed

    Hou, Dongqing; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Junting; Chen, Fangfang; Yan, Yinkun; Cheng, Hong; Yang, Ping; Shan, Xinying; Mi, Jie

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between obesity in children and diabetes in adults from a cohort study, and further more to explore the necessity of preventing diabetes by controlling obesity in children. In 1987, 3 198 children and adolescents aged 6-18 were recruited from 6 elementary schools and 6 high schools located in 3 districts (Chaoyang, Haidian, and Xicheng) of Beijing using stratified cluster sampling design. The physical examination process included physical development test, blood pressure measurement, and questionnaire investigation. All children were invited to participate in the study, except for those who had history of congenital heart disease, chronic kidney disease, and limb disability. A total of 1,225 adults were enrolled in a prospective follow-up study from March 2010 to July 2012, anthropometric measures and blood sample were obtained. The obesity was defined by the following criteria: for children aged 6, the age-and the gender-specific 95th percentile of BMI from the US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention Growth charts 2000 as the baseline; for children age 7-18, recommendation from Working Group on Obesity in China (WGOC) as the standard; for adults, BMI≥28 kg/m(2) as the diagnosis standard. Diabetes was defined based on fasting plasma glucose(FPG) ≥7.0 mmol/L or 2 hours postprandial blood glucose (2 h PG) ≥11.1 mmol/L or glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥6.5% or current using blood glucose-lowering agents or current using insulin. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association obesity in children with diabetes in adults. The prevalence of diabetes diagnosed by FPG and 2 h PG in adults who were obese children (16.2%, 18/111) was higher than those who were non-obese children (5.6%, 62/1,114)(χ(2)=18.76, P<0.001). The prevalence of diabetes diagnosed by HbA1c in adults who were obese children(18.1%,20/111) was higher than those who were non-obese children (6.9%, 77/1,114) (χ(2)=16.66, P<0.001). With multi

  3. Breakout character of islet amyloid polypeptide hydrophobic mutations at the onset of type-2 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigori, Rafael B.

    2014-11-01

    Toxic fibrillar aggregates of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) appear as the physical outcome of a peptidic phase transition signaling the onset of type-2 diabetes mellitus in different mammalian species. In particular, experimentally verified mutations on the amyloidogenic segment 20-29 in humans, cats, and rats are highly correlated with the molecular aggregation propensities. Through a microcanonical analysis of the aggregation of IAPP20 -29 isoforms, we show that a minimalist one-bead hydrophobic-polar continuum model for protein interactions properly quantifies those propensities from free-energy barriers. Our results highlight the central role of sequence-dependent hydrophobic mutations on hot spots for stabilization, and thus for the engineering, of such biological peptides.

  4. New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus With Exposure to Ledipasvir and Sofosbuvir.

    PubMed

    Premji, Resmi; Roopnarinesingh, Nira; Qazi, Nazia; Nylen, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    The combination therapy of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2014 for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Although hyperglycemia is not well known to occur with its use, we present 2 cases of new-onset diabetes mellitus and a review of the literature suggesting an adverse event association. In the first patient with HIV, we postulate that ledipasvir/sofosbuvir increased the levels of tenofovir and thereby potentiated hyperglycemia. In the second case of a patient with prediabetes, ledipasvir/sofosbuvir appeared to increase insulin resistance. A literature review further supported an association of hyperglycemia and the use of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir. Hence, clinicians should be cautious about worsening of glucose intolerance, and more studies are warranted to explore the underlying mechanism.

  5. Health literacy, diabetes self-care, and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Chandra Y; Bains, Sujeev S; Egede, Leonard E

    2010-11-01

    Although limited health literacy is a barrier to disease management and has been associated with poor glycemic control, the mechanisms underlying the relationships between health literacy and diabetes outcomes are unknown. We examined the relationships between health literacy, determinants of diabetes self-care, and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Patients with diabetes were recruited from an outpatient primary care clinic. We collected information on demographics, health literacy, diabetes knowledge, diabetes fatalism, social support, and diabetes self-care, and hemoglobin A1c values were extracted from the medical record. Structural equation models tested the predicted pathways linking health literacy to diabetes self-care and glycemic control. No direct relationship was observed between health literacy and diabetes self-care or glycemic control. Health literacy had a direct effect on social support (r = -0.20, P < 0.05) and through social support had an indirect effect on diabetes self-care (r = -0.07) and on glycemic control (r = -0.01). More diabetes knowledge (r = 0.22, P < 0.05), less fatalism (r = -0.22, P < 0.05), and more social support (r = 0.27, P < 0.01) were independent, direct predictors of diabetes self-care and through self-care were related to glycemic control (r = -0.20, P < 0.05). Our findings suggest health literacy has an indirect effect on diabetes self-care and glycemic control through its association with social support. This suggests that for patients with limited health literacy, enhancing social support would facilitate diabetes self-care and improved glycemic control.

  6. Health Literacy, Diabetes Self-Care, and Glycemic Control in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Bains, Sujeev S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Although limited health literacy is a barrier to disease management and has been associated with poor glycemic control, the mechanisms underlying the relationships between health literacy and diabetes outcomes are unknown. We examined the relationships between health literacy, determinants of diabetes self-care, and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods Patients with diabetes were recruited from an outpatient primary care clinic. We collected information on demographics, health literacy, diabetes knowledge, diabetes fatalism, social support, and diabetes self-care, and hemoglobin A1c values were extracted from the medical record. Structural equation models tested the predicted pathways linking health literacy to diabetes self-care and glycemic control. Results No direct relationship was observed between health literacy and diabetes self-care or glycemic control. Health literacy had a direct effect on social support (r = −0.20, P < 0.05) and through social support had an indirect effect on diabetes self-care (r = −0.07) and on glycemic control (r = −0.01). More diabetes knowledge (r = 0.22, P < 0.05), less fatalism (r = −0.22, P < 0.05), and more social support (r = 0.27, P < 0.01) were independent, direct predictors of diabetes self-care and through self-care were related to glycemic control (r = −0.20, P < 0.05). Conclusions Our findings suggest health literacy has an indirect effect on diabetes self-care and glycemic control through its association with social support. This suggests that for patients with limited health literacy, enhancing social support would facilitate diabetes self-care and improved glycemic control. PMID:20879964

  7. Effects of Age, Gender, Bolus Volume, Bolus Viscosity, and Gustation on Swallowing Apnea Onset Relative to Lingual Bolus Propulsion Onset in Normal Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiss, Susan G.; Strauss, Monica; Treole, Kathleen; Stuart, Andrew; Boutilier, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the normal relation of swallowing apnea (SA) onset relative to lingual bolus propulsion along with factors that may alter this relation. Forty adults, composed of 10 men and 10 women in each of 2 age groups (i.e., 20-30 and 63-79 years) participated. SA onset was assessed during 5- and 20-ml bolus volumes…

  8. Effects of Age, Gender, Bolus Volume, Bolus Viscosity, and Gustation on Swallowing Apnea Onset Relative to Lingual Bolus Propulsion Onset in Normal Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiss, Susan G.; Strauss, Monica; Treole, Kathleen; Stuart, Andrew; Boutilier, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the normal relation of swallowing apnea (SA) onset relative to lingual bolus propulsion along with factors that may alter this relation. Forty adults, composed of 10 men and 10 women in each of 2 age groups (i.e., 20-30 and 63-79 years) participated. SA onset was assessed during 5- and 20-ml bolus volumes…

  9. Association of TCF7L2 and GCG Gene Variants with Insulin Secretion, Insulin Resistance, and Obesity in New-onset Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Jin Jin; Wang, Chong Jian; Ren, Yong Cheng; Wang, Bing Yuan; Zhang, Hong Yan; Yang, Xiang Yu; Zhao, Yang; Han, Cheng Yi; Zhou, Jun Mei; Pang, Chao; Yin, Lei; Zhao, Jing Zhi; Luo, Xin Ping; Hu, Dong Sheng

    2016-11-01

    This cohort study was designed to evaluate the association of transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) and proglucagon gene (GCG) variants with disordered glucose metabolism and the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a rural adult Chinese population. A total of 7,751 non-T2DM participants ⋝18 years old genotyped at baseline were recruited. The same questionnaire interview and physical and blood biochemical examinations were performed at both baseline and follow-up. During a median 6 years of follow-up, T2DM developed in 227 participants. After adjustment for potential contributory factors, nominally significant associations were seen between TT genotype and the recessive model of TCF7L2 rs7903146 and increased risk of T2DM [hazard ratio (HR)=4.068, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.270-13.026; HR=4.051, 95% CI: 1.268-12.946, respectively]. The TT genotype of rs7903146 was also significantly associated with higher fasting plasma insulin level and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance in case of new-onset diabetes. In addition, the TCF7L2 rs290487 TT genotype was associated with abdominal obesity and the GCG rs12104705 CC genotype was associated with both general obesity and abdominal obesity in case of new-onset diabetes. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  10. Psychiatric comorbidities of adults with early- and late-onset attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ju; Yang, Li-Kuang; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the psychiatric comorbidities in adults who were diagnosed with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental disorders, 5th edition attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as a function of recalled symptom onset before and after the age of 7 years and whether the childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms were associated with psychiatric comorbidities. In all, 214 adults who were diagnosed with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental disorders, 5th edition attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and 174 non-attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder controls (aged 17-40 years) received psychiatric interviews to confirm their previous and current attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder status and other psychiatric diagnoses. Demographics and risks of lifetime psychiatric disorders were compared among three groups: (1) attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, onset <7 years (early-onset); (2) attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, onset between 7 and 12 years (late-onset) and (3) non-attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder controls. We also tested the effects of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms on the risk of later psychiatric comorbidities by Cox regression analyses. Regardless of the age of onset, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder was significantly associated with a wide range of psychiatric comorbidities. There were similar comorbid patterns between early- and late-onset attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Regardless of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnosis, increased severity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms was associated with higher risks of oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, dysthymia and sleep disorder but not major depression, which was associated with the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnosis. Our findings suggest that elevating the threshold of age of onset to 12 years in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental

  11. ADOLESCENT DRINKING ONSET AND ITS ADULT CONSEQUENCES AMONG MEN: A POPULATION BASED STUDY FROM INDIA

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Aravind; Nayak, Madhabika B.; Greenfield, Thomas K.; Bond, Jason C.; Hasin, Deborah S.; Patel, Vikram

    2014-01-01

    Background Few population-based studies from low and middle-income countries have addressed adolescent drinking onset and its association with adult alcohol-related adverse outcomes. The aims of this study were to: (1) estimate the rate of adolescent drinking onset and its trend over time among men (2) describe demographic and socioeconomic factors associated with adolescent drinking onset; and (3) examine the association between adolescent drinking onset and adverse outcomes in later life, including hazardous or harmful alcohol use, heavy episodic drinking, alcohol dependence, injuries, and psychological distress. Methods Population based survey of men (n=1899) from rural and urban communities in northern Goa, India. Analysis addressed age of drinking onset among those who reported ever drinking in their lifetime, and drinking patterns and consequences among current drinkers. Results Adolescent drinking onset showed an increasing trend over time (p<0.001), from 19.5% for those born between 1956 and 1960 to 74.3% for those born between 1981 and 1985. Urban residence, Christian religion and low standard of living were associated with adolescent drinking onset. Adolescent drinking onset was associated with psychological distress (OR 2.82; 95% CI 1.41–5.63), alcohol dependence (OR 2.56; 95% CI 1.79–3.68), lifetime history of alcohol related injuries (OR 3.07; 95% CI 1.16–8.14), alcohol related injuries during the past year (OR 3.04; 95% CI 1.35–6.81), and a Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) score ≥ 8 indicating hazardous or harmful alcohol use (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.17–3.08) in adulthood. Conclusions This study among men in Goa, India suggests a substantial increase in adolescent drinking onset in more recent birth cohorts. Consistent with other countries, adolescent drinking onset increased the likelihood of lifetime alcohol dependence, hazardous or harmful alcohol use, alcohol related injuries, and psychological distress. These findings

  12. Techniques for Exercise Preparation and Management in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pinsker, Jordan E; Kraus, Amy; Gianferante, Danielle; Schoenberg, Benjamen E; Singh, Satbir K; Ortiz, Hallie; Dassau, Eyal; Kerr, David

    2016-12-01

    People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for early- and late-onset hypoglycemia following exercise. Reducing this risk may be possible with strategic modifications in carbohydrate intake and insulin use. We examined the exercise preparations and management techniques used by individuals with type 1 diabetes before and after physical activity and sought to determine whether use of differing diabetes technologies affects these health-related behaviours. We studied 502 adults from the Type 1 Diabetes Exchange's online patient community, Glu, who had completed an online survey focused on diabetes self-management and exercise. Many respondents reported increasing carbohydrate intake before (79%) and after (66%) exercise as well as decreasing their meal boluses before (53%) and after (46%) exercise. Most reported adhering to a target glucose level before starting exercise (77%). Despite these accommodations, the majority reported low blood glucose (BG) levels after exercise (70%). The majority of users of both insulin pump therapy (CSII) and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) (Combined) reported reducing basal insulin around exercise (55%), with fewer participants adjusting basal insulin when using other devices (SMBG only = 20%; CGM = 34%; CSII = 42%; p<0.001). However, CSII and Combined users reported that exercise makes their BG levels harder to control (p<0.05) and makes them feel less able to predict their BG levels while exercising (p<0.001); they show agreement that fear of low BG levels keeps them from exercising (p<0.01). These findings highlight the need for exercise-management strategies tailored to individuals' overall diabetes management, for despite making exercise-specific adjustments for care, many people with type 1 diabetes still report significant difficulties with BG control when it comes to exercise. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Retinopathy among young adults with Diabetes Mellitus from a tertiary care setting in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Katulanda, Prasad; Waniganayake, Yasindu C; Ranasinghe, Priyanga; Wijetunga, Wm Udai Akalanka; Jayaweera, Mahesh; Wijesinghe, Nishantha P; Sheriff, Rezvi; Matthews, David R

    2014-03-04

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the leading causes for complete loss of vision among working-aged adults around the world. The present study aims to evaluate the rate of DR and its risk factors among the adults with young-onset diabetes from a tertiary care setting in Sri Lanka. A consecutive sample of 1,007 individuals referred from multiple centers, were invited for the study. Ophthalmological evaluation was done, with dilated indirect ophthalmoscopy by an Ophthalmologist. Retinopathy was classified according to the International Clinical DR Disease Severity Scale. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic and anthropometric details. Seated blood pressure, Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG), HbA1c and urine microalbumin were also measured. Data were analysed using SPSSv14. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed in all patients, with 'presence of DR' as the dichotomous dependent variable and other independent covariates. Sample size was 684 (response rate-67.9%), mean age was 37.1 ± 5.9 years and 36.0% were males. Mean duration of diabetes was 5.2 ± 4.0 years. Previous retinal screening had been done in 51.0% by a non-specialist doctor and in 41.5% by a consultant ophthalmologist. Rate of any degree of DR in the study population was 18.1% (Males 16.4%, Females 20.0%; P = NS). In patients with DR, majority had mild Non-Proliferative DR (NPDR) (57.2%), while 32.2% had moderate NPDR, 0.8% had severe NPDR and 9.7% had maculopathy. Mean age, duration of diabetes, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), FBG, HbA1c and urine microalbumin levels were significantly higher amongst the patients with DR. The results of the binary logistic regression indicate that the duration of diabetes (OR:1.24), HbA1c (OR:1.19), age (OR:1.11), urine Microalbumin (OR:1.11) and DBP (OR:1.04) all were significantly associated with DR. In this large multi center study, nearly one in five adults with young-onset diabetes

  14. Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus in a birth cohort of First Nation children born to mothers with pediatric-onset type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Michael; Cloutier, Justin; Spence, Louise; Sellers, Elizabeth; Taback, Shayne; Dean, Heather

    2011-05-01

    Children who are born to mothers with pediatric-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus are exposed to a hyperglycemic intra-uterine environment throughout pregnancy. The growth patterns and risk of type 2 diabetes in these offspring may be influenced by unique gene-environment interactions during intra-uterine and postnatal life. We established a cohort of offspring of First Nation mothers with onset of type 2 diabetes before age 18 years in Manitoba, Canada. We measured height or length and weight at study entry and annually thereafter with fasting blood glucose in offspring aged ≥ 7 years. We collected birth and breastfeeding history and determined the population-specific hepatic nuclear factor-1α (HNF-1α) G319S genotype of offspring at age 7 years. From July 2003 to April 2008, we enrolled 76 offspring of 37 mothers. Sixty-four percent (23/36) of the offspring aged 2-19 years were obese at initial assessment. The rates of obesity remained constant throughout the 5 years. As of April 2008, 7/28 (25%) of the offspring aged 7-19 years have diabetes including 6/14 (43%) aged 10-19 years. Most offspring with diabetes (5/7, 71%) were obese at diagnosis. All of the 7 offspring with diabetes have 1 or 2 copies of the G319S polymorphism. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in this cohort of offspring of First Nation women with pediatric-onset type 2 diabetes is the highest ever reported. Obesity is an important postnatal risk factor for type 2 diabetes in this population and may result from a unique gene-environment interaction. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Obesity and onset of depression among U.S. middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xiaoling; An, Ruopeng

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims to examine the relationship between obesity and onset of depression among U.S. middle-aged and older adults. Data came from 1994 to 2010 waves of the Health and Retirement Study. Study sample consisted of 6514 community-dwelling adults born between 1931 and 1941 who were free of clinically relevant depressive symptoms in 1994. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from self-reported height/weight. Body weight status was classified into normal weight (18.5kg/m(2)≤BMI<25kg/m(2)), overweight (25kg/m(2)≤BMI<30kg/m(2)), and obesity (BMI≥30kg/m(2)). A score of ≥3 on the 8-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale was used to define clinically relevant depressive symptoms. Kaplan-Meier estimator and time-dependent Cox proportional hazards model were performed to examine the association between body weight status and onset of clinically relevant depressive symptoms. Unhealthy body weight was associated future onset of depression. Compared with their normal weight counterparts, overweight and obese participants were 13% (hazard ratio [HR]=1.13, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.04-1.23) and 9% (HR=1.09, 95% CI=1.01-1.18) more likely to have onset of clinically relevant depressive symptoms during the 16years of follow-up, respectively. The relationship between obesity and depression onset appeared stronger among females and non-Hispanic whites than their male and racial/ethnic minority counterparts. Health care providers should be aware of the potential risk for depression among obese older adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care: smooth or slippery?

    PubMed

    de Beaufort, Carine; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemyslawa; Frank, Marcia; de Bart, Jennifer; Deja, Grazyna

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the practices of diabetes health care providers concerning the transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care. The information presented here may help increase awareness of the organization of transitional care for young people with diabetes and prevent the loss of follow-up during this vulnerable period in their lives. A questionnaire with an explanatory letter was sent to all members (n = 578) of the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD). A follow-up mailing was sent 4 months later. In total, 92 questionnaires (16%) from members representing 36 countries were included in the analysis. In 76% of the centers, youth are seen until the age of 18 yr; 36% of the pediatric centers see adults > 25 yr; 30% report children under the age of 16 receive follow up from adult diabetologists or internists. About half of the programs already have a structured transition process usually targeting youth 16-25 yr of age. The majority of responders propose that preparation for transition starts at least 1 yr prior to leaving the pediatric center. Youth with type 1 diabetes often struggle to keep diabetes management a priority and find it challenging to maintain optimal metabolic control. When they graduate from pediatric care, some of these young people opt out of care altogether, only to resurface in the medical system when they develop complications which may have been prevented. Our survey of diabetes health care professionals in 36 countries worldwide shows that the actual transition practices in many places are far from optimal and require improvement. Transitional care should start early and strategies should promote uninterrupted, comprehensive, and accessible adult care.

  17. The PTPN22 C1858T gene variant is associated with proinsulin in new-onset type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 2 (PTPN22) has been established as a type 1 diabetes susceptibility gene. A recent study found the C1858T variant of this gene to be associated with lower residual fasting C-peptide levels and poorer glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes. We investigated the association of the C1858T variant with residual beta-cell function (as assessed by stimulated C-peptide, proinsulin and insulin dose-adjusted HbA1c), glycemic control, daily insulin requirements, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and diabetes-related autoantibodies (IA-2A, GADA, ICA, ZnT8Ab) in children during the first year after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Methods The C1858T variant was genotyped in an international cohort of children (n = 257 patients) with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes during 12 months after onset. We investigated the association of this variant with liquid-meal stimulated beta-cell function (proinsulin and C-peptide) and antibody status 1, 6 and 12 months after onset. In addition HbA1c and daily insulin requirements were determined 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after diagnosis. DKA was defined at disease onset. Results A repeated measurement model of all time points showed the stimulated proinsulin level is significantly higher (22%, p = 0.03) for the T allele carriers the first year after onset. We also found a significant positive association between proinsulin and IA levels (est.: 1.12, p = 0.002), which did not influence the association between PTPN22 and proinsulin (est.: 1.28, p = 0.03). Conclusions The T allele of the C1858T variant is positively associated with proinsulin levels during the first 12 months in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes children. PMID:21429197

  18. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy improves glucose and lipid metabolism and delays diabetes onset in UCD-T2DM rats.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Bethany P; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Graham, James L; Stanhope, Kimber L; Kowala, Mark; Haj, Fawaz G; Chouinard, Michael L; Havel, Peter J

    2012-08-01

    Vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) has gained interest as a low morbidity bariatric surgery, which is effective in producing weight loss and causing type 2 diabetes resolution. However, the efficacy of VSG to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes has not been previously investigated. VSG or sham surgery was performed on 2-month-old prediabetic male University of California Davis-type 2 diabetes mellitus rats. Sham-operated animals were either sham-operated ad libitum fed (S-AL) or were weight-matched to VSG-operated animals (S-WM). Diabetes onset was determined by weekly nonfasting blood glucose measurements. Animals underwent oral glucose tolerance tests at 1 and 4 months after surgery and indirect calorimetry at 1.5 months after surgery. VSG surgery significantly delayed diabetes onset compared with both S-AL and S-WM animals. VSG-operated animals ate 23% less and weighed 20% less than S-AL. Energy expenditure did not differ between VSG-operated animals and controls. Results from the oral glucose tolerance tests demonstrate improved glucose tolerance and islet function in VSG-operated animals compared with S-AL and S-WM. Nutrient-stimulated glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, GLP-2, and peptide YY excursions were greater in VSG-operated animals. VSG surgery resulted in decreased fasting plasma insulin, ghrelin and lipid concentrations, and markedly higher fasting plasma adiponectin and bile acid concentrations, independent of body weight. Increases of circulating bile acid concentrations were due to selective increases of taurine-conjugated bile acids. Thus, VSG delays type 2 diabetes onset in the University of California Davis-type 2 diabetes mellitus rat, independent of body weight. This is potentially mediated by increases of circulating bile acids, adiponectin, and nutrient-stimulated GLP-1 secretion and decreased circulating ghrelin concentrations.

  19. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of vinclozolin induced mouse adult onset disease and associated sperm epigenome biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Covert, Trevor R; Haque, Md M; Settles, Matthew; Nilsson, Eric E; Anway, Matthew D; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-12-01

    The endocrine disruptor vinclozolin has previously been shown to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease in the rat. The current study was designed to investigate the transgenerational actions of vinclozolin on the mouse. Transient exposure of the F0 generation gestating female during gonadal sex determination promoted transgenerational adult onset disease in F3 generation male and female mice, including spermatogenic cell defects, testicular abnormalities, prostate abnormalities, kidney abnormalities and polycystic ovarian disease. Pathology analysis demonstrated 75% of the vinclozolin lineage animals developed disease with 34% having two or more different disease states. Interestingly, the vinclozolin induced transgenerational disease was observed in the outbred CD-1 strain, but not the inbred 129 mouse strain. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome identified differential DNA methylation regions that can potentially be utilized as epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational exposure and disease.

  20. [Pathophysiology, subtypes, and treatments of adult-onset Still's disease: An update].

    PubMed

    Gerfaud-Valentin, M; Sève, P; Hot, A; Broussolle, C; Jamilloux, Y

    2015-05-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare and difficult to diagnose multisystemic disorder considered as a multigenic autoinflammatory syndrome. Its immunopathogenesis seems to be at the crossroads between inflammasomopathies and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, the most severe manifestation of the disease. According to recent insights in the pathophysiology and thanks to cohort studies and therapeutic trials, two phenotypes of adult-onset Still's disease may be distinguished: a systemic pattern, initially highly symptomatic and with a higher risk to exhibit life-threatening complications such as reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, where interleukin-1 blockade seems to be very effective, a chronic articular pattern, more indolent with arthritis in the foreground and less severe systemic manifestations, which would threat functional outcome and where interleukin-6 blockade seems to be more effective. This review focuses on these data.

  1. Adult onset Still's disease diagnosed concomitantly with occult papillary thyroid cancer: paraneoplastic manifestation or coincidence?

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Kyong; Oh, Ji-Min; Lee, Jaejoon; Kim, Sun Wook; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Koh, Eun-Mi

    2010-02-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, characterized by spiking fever, evanescent salmon pink maculopapular rash, arthritis, and leukocytosis with neutrophilia. Malignant lymphoma is one of the most important differential diagnoses of AOSD. AOSD has been reported as one of paraneoplastic syndromes associated with breast cancer. We report a rare case of occult papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) diagnosed coincidently with AOSD. A 32-year-old woman was diagnosed with AOSD according to the diagnostic criteria of Yamaguchi as follows: leukocytosis with neutrophilia, high fever with 39 degrees C and above, arthralgia/arthritis, sore throat, liver dysfunctions, and lymphadenopathy. Excisional biopsy of cervical lymph node showed metastatic papillary carcinoma, and immunohistochemical staining for thyroglobulin and thyroid transcription factor-1 was strongly positive. There was no evidence of focal lesion in the thyroid glands. To our knowledge, this is the first report of adult onset Still's disease diagnosed concomitantly with occult PTC.

  2. [Adult-onset Still's disease following severe sore throat and fever. Case report].

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuki; Toriumi, Sayaka; Otake, Rika; Suzuki, Mitsuya

    2008-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is characterized by fever, rash, and joint pain and may lead to chronic arthritis. The cause of AOSD is unknown, and it is rare. In children, Still's Disease is called systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. We encountered a patient with adult-onset Still's disease following a severe sore throat and fever. The patient was a 17-year-old woman who consulted our hospital because of a sore throat and fever. She was admitted and treated with antibiotics, but the fever persisted. Laboratory parameters of inflammatory activity increased at an accelerated rate, and after ruling out sepsis, EBV-associated disease, and malignant lymphoma, a diagnosis of AOSD was made. Steroid therapy was very effective. When acute pharyngitis is observed in association with significant changes in laboratory parameters despite mild local symptoms, or when pharyngitis is observed in association with joint pain, continuous fever, and a rash, it is important to consider AOSI).

  3. Failure of globe conservation in a case of adult onset retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Khetan, Vikas; Bindu, Appukuttan; Kamat, Pradnya; Kumar, S Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Adult onset retinoblastoma is a rare intraocular malignancy. The majority of the cases are treated with enucleation, due to late presentation and advanced-stage tumors. Here we report a case of a 30-year-old female who presented with an intraocular mass with exudative retinal detachment in her right eye. B-scan ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the diagnosis of retinoblastoma. In an attempt to salvage the globe, she was treated with chemotherapy, which resulted in excellent regression of the tumor mass by the end of 8 months follow-up. The patient was followed-up regularly with focal treatment whenever necessary. Two years later, she developed a massive recurrence necessitating enucleation. Histopathologic examination revealed a moderately differentiated retinoblastoma with choroidal invasion. Attempt to salvage the globe in adult onset retinoblastoma with chemoreduction and focal therapy may be possible; however, regular long-term follow-up is necessary for recurrence which warrants timely intervention.

  4. Adult-onset Still's disease as a mask of Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak-Buś, Katarzyna; Leszczyński, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder, which creates difficulties in making a proper diagnosis. Ambiguous symptoms and results of auxiliary tests, lack of unequivocal diagnostic tests and the need to exclude other causes of the disease are major problems in clinical practice. A case of a 22-year-old woman with dominated recurrent fever, significantly elevated inflammation markers and arthritis is presented. Based on clinical signs after exclusion of infection, hematological and other reasons, the patient was diagnosed with adult-onset Still's disease. Standard treatment, with high doses of glucocorticoids and a disease-modifying drug, was applied, without the anticipated effects. The diagnostic tests were conducted again due to the lack of clinical improvement, increase of inflammatory markers and unusual response to treatment. A new symptom of significance, i.e. mediastinal lymphadenopathy, was found. After the histopathological examination of lymph nodes, Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed and targeted therapy for hematological malignancy was applied. PMID:27407236

  5. Adult-onset Still's disease as a mask of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dudziec, Ewa; Pawlak-Buś, Katarzyna; Leszczyński, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder, which creates difficulties in making a proper diagnosis. Ambiguous symptoms and results of auxiliary tests, lack of unequivocal diagnostic tests and the need to exclude other causes of the disease are major problems in clinical practice. A case of a 22-year-old woman with dominated recurrent fever, significantly elevated inflammation markers and arthritis is presented. Based on clinical signs after exclusion of infection, hematological and other reasons, the patient was diagnosed with adult-onset Still's disease. Standard treatment, with high doses of glucocorticoids and a disease-modifying drug, was applied, without the anticipated effects. The diagnostic tests were conducted again due to the lack of clinical improvement, increase of inflammatory markers and unusual response to treatment. A new symptom of significance, i.e. mediastinal lymphadenopathy, was found. After the histopathological examination of lymph nodes, Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed and targeted therapy for hematological malignancy was applied.

  6. Seven mutations in the human insulin gene linked to permanent neonatal/infancy-onset diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Carlo; Porzio, Ottavia; Liu, Ming; Massa, Ornella; Vasta, Mario; Salardi, Silvana; Beccaria, Luciano; Monciotti, Carla; Toni, Sonia; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Federici, Luca; Pesavento, Roberta; Cadario, Francesco; Federici, Giorgio; Ghirri, Paolo; Arvan, Peter; Iafusco, Dario; Barbetti, Fabrizio

    2008-06-01

    Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) is a rare disorder usually presenting within 6 months of birth. Although several genes have been linked to this disorder, in almost half the cases documented in Italy, the genetic cause remains unknown. Because the Akita mouse bearing a mutation in the Ins2 gene exhibits PNDM associated with pancreatic beta cell apoptosis, we sequenced the human insulin gene in PNDM subjects with unidentified mutations. We discovered 7 heterozygous mutations in 10 unrelated probands. In 8 of these patients, insulin secretion was detectable at diabetes onset, but rapidly declined over time. When these mutant proinsulins were expressed in HEK293 cells, we observed defects in insulin protein folding and secretion. In these experiments, expression of the mutant proinsulins was also associated with increased Grp78 protein expression and XBP1 mRNA splicing, 2 markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress, and with increased apoptosis. Similarly transfected INS-1E insulinoma cells had diminished viability compared with those expressing WT proinsulin. In conclusion, we find that mutations in the insulin gene that promote proinsulin misfolding may cause PNDM.

  7. Derivation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with maturity onset diabetes of the young.

    PubMed

    Teo, Adrian K K; Windmueller, Rebecca; Johansson, Bente B; Dirice, Ercument; Njolstad, Pal R; Tjora, Erling; Raeder, Helge; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2013-02-22

    Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is an autosomal dominant disease. Despite extensive research, the mechanism by which a mutant MODY gene results in monogenic diabetes is not yet clear due to the inaccessibility of patient samples. Induced pluripotency and directed differentiation toward the pancreatic lineage are now viable and attractive methods to uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying MODY. Here we report, for the first time, the derivation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from patients with five types of MODY: MODY1 (HNF4A), MODY2 (GCK), MODY3 (HNF1A), MODY5 (HNF1B), and MODY8 (CEL) with a polycistronic lentiviral vector expressing a Cre-excisable human "stem cell cassette" containing the four reprogramming factors OCT4, KLF4, SOX2, and CMYC. These MODY-hiPSCs morphologically resemble human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), express pluripotency markers OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, SSEA-4, and TRA-1-60, give rise to derivatives of the three germ layers in a teratoma assay, and are karyotypically normal. Overall, our MODY-hiPSCs serve as invaluable tools to dissect the role of MODY genes in the development of pancreas and islet cells and to evaluate their significance in regulating beta cell function. This knowledge will aid future attempts aimed at deriving functional mature beta cells from hPSCs.

  8. How does dementia onset in parents influence unmarried adult children's wealth.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kanika

    2016-03-01

    There is a growing concern that long-term care (LTC) needs of older adults lead to negative financial consequences for their family members. This paper examines whether the onset of dementia in parents influences wealth change among unmarried adult children regardless of their status as informal caregivers. Longitudinal data from seven waves (1998-2010) of the Health and Retirement Study (1540 person-wave observations) are used to analyze this question. Unconditional quantile regressions demonstrate that as a result of parental dementia diagnosis, unmarried adult children have lower wealth accumulation above the median of the wealth change distribution. These effects are more pronounced for unmarried adult children without siblings. Further, this response is observed to persist in the subsequent period as well. Both losses in labor income and nursing home expenditures may play a role in leading to wealth declines.

  9. Association of polymorphisms of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors in early and late onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Raj, Resal; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar; Ramteke, Pramod W

    2017-03-06

    Genetic variation of disease susceptible genes is different in different ethnic groups and there is an evidence of association of polymorphisms of Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors (PPARs) in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). This research analyses the association of PPARs in early and late onset of T2DM in North Indian Population (NIP). Total of 703 subjects were recruited from north of India and subjects were further divided into subjects of early onset (less than 25 years of onset, 26 T2DM and 26 controls) and late onset (more than 25 years of onset, 326 T2DM and 325 controls). The onset of T2DM begins from 15 years and continues further to maximum T2DM subjects to the age of 50 (76% of T2DM). High BMI and WHR, high blood pressure leading to early onset of hypertension, early mortality due to T2DM (7% of T2DM is above 75 years and 3% of T2DM has 20 years duration of onset) and high hyperglycemic NIP were the few outcomes of this research. There is a strong association of PPAR γ, PPAR α and PPAR δ genes on the susceptibility of T2DM in late onset but not with the early onset of T2DM subjects in North Indian Population: Dual association of PPAR γ was observed with its genotype G/G (Ala/Ala) favoring protection against T2DM and genotype C/C (Pro/Pro) favoring susceptibility to T2DM. Association of intron7 polymorphism of PPAR α and +T294C polymorphism of PPAR δ on the susceptibility to T2DM requires further analysis. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Non-motor symptoms in patients with adult-onset focal dystonia: Sensory and psychiatric disturbances.

    PubMed

    Conte, Antonella; Berardelli, Isabella; Ferrazzano, Gina; Pasquini, Massimo; Berardelli, Alfredo; Fabbrini, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is characterized by the presence of involuntary muscle contractions that cause abnormal movements and posture. Adult onset focal dystonia include cervical dystonia, blepharospasm, arm dystonia and laryngeal dystonia. Besides motor manifestations, patients with focal dystonia frequently also display non-motor signs and symptoms. In this paper, we review the evidence of sensory and psychiatric disturbances in adult patients with focal dystonia. Clinical studies and neurophysiological investigations consistently show that the sensory system is involved in dystonia. Several studies have also demonstrated that neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression and anxiety, are more frequent in patients with focal dystonia, whereas data on obsessive compulsive disorders are more contrasting.

  11. Cluster Analysis on Longitudinal Data of Patients with Adult-Onset Asthma.

    PubMed

    Ilmarinen, Pinja; Tuomisto, Leena E; Niemelä, Onni; Tommola, Minna; Haanpää, Jussi; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    Previous cluster analyses on asthma are based on cross-sectional data. To identify phenotypes of adult-onset asthma by using data from baseline (diagnostic) and 12-year follow-up visits. The Seinäjoki Adult Asthma Study is a 12-year follow-up study of patients with new-onset adult asthma. K-means cluster analysis was performed by using variables from baseline and follow-up visits on 171 patients to identify phenotypes. Five clusters were identified. Patients in cluster 1 (n = 38) were predominantly nonatopic males with moderate smoking history at baseline. At follow-up, 40% of these patients had developed persistent obstruction but the number of patients with uncontrolled asthma (5%) and rhinitis (10%) was the lowest. Cluster 2 (n = 19) was characterized by older men with heavy smoking history, poor lung function, and persistent obstruction at baseline. At follow-up, these patients were mostly uncontrolled (84%) despite daily use of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) with add-on therapy. Cluster 3 (n = 50) consisted mostly of nonsmoking females with good lung function at diagnosis/follow-up and well-controlled/partially controlled asthma at follow-up. Cluster 4 (n = 25) had obese and symptomatic patients at baseline/follow-up. At follow-up, these patients had several comorbidities (40% psychiatric disease) and were treated daily with ICS and add-on therapy. Patients in cluster 5 (n = 39) were mostly atopic and had the earliest onset of asthma, the highest blood eosinophils, and FEV1 reversibility at diagnosis. At follow-up, these patients used the lowest ICS dose but 56% were well controlled. Results can be used to predict outcomes of patients with adult-onset asthma and to aid in development of personalized therapy (NCT02733016 at ClinicalTrials.gov). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Guinea worm cause of adult onset asthmatic attack, a radiological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Marchie, T T

    1999-01-01

    A case report of a fifty years old Hausa male from Sokoto town, Nigeria an endemic region of guinea worm infestation, who presented with sudden adult onset of asthmatic attack and was evaluated radiologically and the diagnosis of acute obstructive airway disease was confirmed. It was noted, that there were associated calcified chain of guinea worms in the lung parenchyma. A rare association of acute asthmatic attack. Patient responded there-after to an anti-asthmatic regime of management.

  13. Adult-onset Still's disease revealed by perimyocarditis and a concomitant reactivation of an EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Meckenstock, Roderich; Therby, Audrey; Gibault-Genty, Geraldine; Khau, David; Monnier, Sebastien; Greder-Belan, Alix

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 17-year-old patient presenting perimyocarditis as the initial manifestation of the adult-onset Still's disease. Corticotherapy was rapidly successful but induced major acute hepatitis in relation with Epstein-Barr virus reactivation. After 1 year, even if the global outcome is favourable, a slightly lowered ejection fraction still persists. Former case reports and differential diagnosis with reactive haemophagocytic syndrome would be discussed. PMID:23166163

  14. A Case of Adult-Onset Still's Disease Complicated with Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Ismail; Birlik, Merih; Binicier, Omer; Akar, Servet; Yilmaz, Erkan; Onen, Fatos

    2009-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory disease that presents with a variety of clinical symptoms. Pulmonary involvement is well-known in AOSD and is seen in up to 53% of AOSD cases, with the most common pulmonary diseases being pleural effusion and transient pulmonary infiltrates. We present the first case of chronic AOSD complicated with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage during the acute flare of the disease. PMID:19270830

  15. Stabilization in early adult-onset myopia with corneal refractive therapy.

    PubMed

    González-Méijome, José M; Carracedo, Gonzalo; Lopes-Ferreira, Daniela; Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel A; Peixoto-de-Matos, Sofia C; Queirós, António

    2016-02-01

    To describe the stabilization of early adult-onset myopia in three university students after initiating orthokeratology treatment with corneal refractive therapy contact lenses. Three Caucasian early adult-onset progressing myopic subjects (1 male, 2 females) were fitted with corneal refractive therapy lenses to correct myopia between -1.50 and -2.50 D of sphere using Paragon CRT (Paragon Vision Sciences, Mesa, AZ) lenses for overnight orthokeratology. The pre-treatment refractive history from 2005 as well as refraction and axial length after treatment onset are reported over a period of 3 years between December 2009 and January 2013 with an additional year of follow-up after treatment discontinuation (January-December 2013). The peripheral refractive patterns and topographic changes are also reported individually. Treatment was successful in all three subjects achieving uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better monocularly. During a period of 3 years of follow-up the subjects did not experience progression in their refractive error, nor in their axial length (measured during the last 2 years of treatment and 1 year after discontinuation). Furthermore, the subjects recovered to their baseline refraction and did not progressed further over the following year after lens wear discontinuation. We cannot attribute a causative effect to the orthokeratology treatment alone as underlying mechanism for myopia stabilization in this 3 patients. However, the present report points to the possibility of stabilization of early adult-onset myopia progression in young adults using corneal refractive therapy treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bilateral low lobar atelectasis in a young woman with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Ibn Yacoub, Yousra; Amine, Bouchra; Laatiris, Assia; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2010-11-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon inflammatory condition of unknown origin and pathogenesis. Pulmonary manifestations are rare and include pleuritis and transient radiological infiltrations. We report a case of a young woman with AOSD who developed unusual respiratory symptoms, with bilateral lower lobar atelectasis and restrictive syndrome and reviewed the literature on it. We illustrate the difficulties in diagnosis of atypical pulmonary defect with unusual radiological aspects and discuss causality relationship between lung abnormalities and Still's disease.

  17. New-onset diabetes mellitus after heart transplantation in children - Incidence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Swati; Bock, Matthew J; Louks Palac, Hannah; Brickman, Wendy J; Gossett, Jeffrey G; Marino, Bradley S; Backer, Carl L; Pahl, Elfriede

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a recognized complication of SOT in adults and is associated with decreased graft and patient survival. Little is known about NOD in pediatric HT recipients. We aimed to characterize the incidence and describe risk factors for development of NOD after HT in children. Children who developed diabetes after HT were identified from the OPTN database. Demographic and clinical data before and after transplant were compared between patients with and without NOD. A total of 2056 children were included, 56% were male, 54% were Caucasian, and 62% had cardiomyopathy prior to HT. NOD developed in 219 children (11%) after HT. The incidence of NOD was 2.4, 9.0, and 10.4% at one, five, and 10 yr after HT, respectively. Obesity (HR: 4.32), dialysis prior to transplant (HR: 2.38), African American race (HR: 1.86), transplant before year 2000 (HR: 1.82), female gender (HR: 1.68), and older age at transplant (HR: 1.28) were independent predictors of NOD. The major modifiable risk factor for NOD is obesity, imparting the maximum hazard. Improved surveillance for diabetes in high-risk patients and specific prevention and intervention strategies are imperative in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Diabetes empowerment, medication adherence and self-care behaviors in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Tejada, Melba A; Campbell, Jennifer A; Walker, Rebekah J; Smalls, Brittany L; Davis, Kimberly S; Egede, Leonard E

    2012-07-01

    Evidence suggests that empowerment is an important factor to address everyday aspects of dealing with a chronic disease. This study evaluated the effect of diabetes empowerment on medication adherence and self-care behaviors in adults with type 2 diabetes. Data on 378 subjects with type 2 diabetes recruited from two primary care clinics in the southeastern United States were examined. Previously validated scales were used to measure diabetes empowerment, medication adherence, diabetes knowledge, and diabetes self-care behaviors (including diet, physical activity, blood sugar testing, and foot care). Multiple linear regression was used to assess the independent effect of diabetes empowerment on medication adherence and self-care behaviors controlling for relevant covariates. Eighty-three percent were non-Hispanic blacks, 69% were women, 22% were 65 years or older, 68% were not married, 26% had less than high school education, 60% were unemployed, 39% were uninsured, and 47% had a yearly income <$10,000. Empowerment had significant correlations with medication adherence (r=0.17, P<0.003), diabetes knowledge (r=0.16, P=0.007), diet (r=0.24, P<0.001), exercise (r=0.25, P<0.001), blood sugar testing (r=0.12, P=0.043), and foot care (r=0.18, P=0.002). In the regression model, diabetes empowerment was significantly associated with medication adherence (β=-0.04, P=0.001), diabetes knowledge (β=0.09, P=0.012), diet (β=0.09, P<0.001), exercise (β=0.10, P<0.001), blood sugar testing (β=0.07, P=0.016), and foot care (β=0.08, P=0.001). In this sample, diabetes empowerment was related to better diabetes knowledge, medication adherence and improved self-care behaviors. Emphasis on empowerment and self-efficacy is relevant to improve outcomes in the management of diabetes.

  19. Is diabetes-specific health literacy associated with diabetes-related outcomes in older adults?

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takashi; Kart, Cary S

    2011-06-01

     The present study examined the association between a measure of diabetes-specific health literacy and three different Type 2 diabetes outcome indicators in a national sample of older adults. Data were taken from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) 2003 Diabetes module and the HRS 2002 core wave. Analysis was performed on data from 1318 respondents aged 42-96 years [mean (±SD) 67.96 ± 8.65 years] who submitted responses on all relevant independent variable measures along with an HbA1c test kit. The index of diabetes-specific health literacy was constructed from responses to 10 diabetes self-care regimen items (α = 0.927). Using a multivariate regression strategy to analyze weighted data, the diabetes-specific health literacy index was significantly and positively associated with self-graded assessment of diabetes self-care (R2 = 0.231). However, diabetes-specific health literacy was not independently associated with the HbA1c level or the average number of days five recommended self-management behaviors were practiced each week.  No previous single study has focused on the relationship between diabetes-specific health literacy and multiple diabetes-related outcomes. The direct association of diabetes-specific health literacy with patients' assessment of their self-care practice acumen is useful information for the design of effective patient intervention and/or communication strategies. Health literacy is a broad, multidimensional construct that bridges basic literacy skills and various health and illness contexts. Because it is so important to adults engaged in the self-management of chronic illness, indicators of disease-specific knowledge and/or understanding should be included in efforts to measure health literacy. © 2011 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Comparison between New-Onset and Old-Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes with Ketosis in Rural Regions of China.

    PubMed

    Du, Shichun; Yang, Xia; Shi, Degang; Su, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) with ketosis was common because of late diagnosis and lacking adequate treatment in rural regions of China. This study aimed to provide the data of T2D with ketosis among inpatients in a south-west border city of China. Methods. Data of 371 patients of T2D with ketosis who were hospitalized between January 2011 and July 2015 in Baoshan People's Hospital, Yunnan, China, were analyzed. New-onset and old-diagnosed T2D patients presenting with ketosis were compared according to clinical characteristics, laboratory results, and chronic diabetic complications. Results. Overall, the blood glucose control was poor in our study subjects. Male predominated in both groups (male prevalence was 68% in new-onset and 64% in old-diagnosed groups). Overweight and obesity accounted for 50% in new-onset and 46% in old-diagnosed cases. Inducements of ketosis were 13.8% in new-onset and 38.7% in old-diagnosed patients. Infections were the first inducements in both groups. The prevalence of chronic complications of diabetes was common in both groups. Conclusions. More medical supports were needed for the early detection and adequate treatment of diabetes in rural areas of China.

  1. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery outcome in adult transition patients with pediatric-onset hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Kesava; Bollam, Papireddy; Caldito, Gloria; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2012-02-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal shunting remains the most widely used neurosurgical procedure for the management of hydrocephalus, albeit with many complications. To review and assess the long-term clinical outcome of ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery in adult transition patients with pediatric-onset hydrocephalus. Patients 17 years or older who underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement for hydrocephalus during their pediatric years (younger than 17 years) were included. Medical charts, operative reports, imaging studies, and clinical follow- up evaluations were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. A total of 105 adult patients with pediatric-onset hydrocephalus were included. The median age of the patients was 25.9 years. The median age at the time of the initial ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement was 1.0 year. The median follow-up time for all patients was 17.7 years. The incidence of shunt failure at 6 months was 15.2%, and the overall incidence of shunt failure was 82.9%. Single shunt revision occurred in 26.7% of the patients, and 56.2% had multiple shunt revisions. The cause of hydrocephalus was significantly associated with shunt survival for patients who had shunt failure before the age of 17 years. Being pediatric at first shunt revision, infection, proximal shunt complication, and other causes were independently associated with multiple shunt failures. The findings of this retrospective study show that the long-term ventriculoperitoneal shunt survival remains low in adult transition patients with pediatric-onset hydrocephalus.

  2. Ultra-wide field imaging in the diagnosis and management of adult-onset Coats' disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Chandra, Parijat; Kumar, Atul

    2017-01-01

    The conventional fundus imaging covers up to 60 degrees of retina only. Although various montaging techniques can significantly increase the area that can be imaged, it is still difficult to image and document the peripheral retina. The purpose of this study is to describe the use of ultra-wide field imaging in the diagnosis and management of adult-onset Coats' disease. This is a retrospective case series of three patients diagnosed with adult-onset Coats' disease that were treated at the retina clinic of our institute. The case records, conventional and ultra-wide field fluorescein angiograms and optical coherence tomography scans were reviewed. The ultra-wide field pseudo-colour photographs and fluorescein angiograms were able to provide clinically useful information over and above that provided by conventional imaging. In all three patients, ultra-wide field angiography showed the temporal avascular periphery. In addition, it revealed retinal neovascularisation, peripheral vascular leakage and documented peripheral telangiectasia in selected patients. Ultra-wide field imaging provides information that can help in the diagnosis and management of adult-onset Coat's disease. This may lead to better visual outcomes in Coats' disease. © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  3. Dioxin (TCDD) induces epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and sperm epimutations.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, Mohan; Tracey, Rebecca; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-01-01

    Environmental compounds can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in subsequent generations following ancestral exposure during fetal gonadal sex determination. The current study examined the ability of dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo[p]dioxin, TCDD) to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and DNA methylation epimutations in sperm. Gestating F0 generation females were exposed to dioxin during fetal day 8 to 14 and adult-onset disease was evaluated in F1 and F3 generation rats. The incidences of total disease and multiple disease increased in F1 and F3 generations. Prostate disease, ovarian primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovary disease were increased in F1 generation dioxin lineage. Kidney disease in males, pubertal abnormalities in females, ovarian primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovary disease were increased in F3 generation dioxin lineage animals. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome identified 50 differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) in gene promoters. These DMR provide potential epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures. Observations demonstrate dioxin exposure of a gestating female promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and sperm epimutations.

  4. Clinical outcomes in youth beyond the first year of type 1 diabetes: Results of the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) type 1 diabetes new onset (NeOn) study.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Eda; Cheng, Peiyao; Ruedy, Katrina J; Kollman, Craig; Tamborlane, William V; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J; Gal, Robin L; Silverstein, Janet; Lee, Joyce; Redondo, Maria J; Beck, Roy W

    2016-10-19

    Current data are limited on the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children and adolescents through the first few years of diabetes. The Pediatric Diabetes Consortium T1D new onset (NeOn) Study was undertaken to prospectively assess natural history and clinical outcomes in children treated at 7 US diabetes centers from the time of diagnosis. This paper describes clinical outcomes in the T1D NeOn cohort during the first 3 years postdiagnosis. A total of 1048 participants (mean age 9.2 years, 49% female, 65% non-Hispanic White) were enrolled between July 2009 and April 2011. Mean glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (±SD) was 7.2% (55 mmol/mol) at 3 months, followed by a progressive rise to 8.4% (68 mmol/mol) at 36 months postdiagnosis, with only 30% of participants achieving target HbA1c<7.5% (58 mmol/mol). The percentage of participants in partial remission estimated by insulin dose adjusted HbA1c [HbA1c % + (4×insulin dose unit/kg/24 h)] ≤9 sharply declined from 23% at 12 months to 7% at 36 months. The percentage of participants developing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) was 1% in the first year after diagnosis, increasing to 6% in years 2 and 3. These results demonstrate the gradual decline in glycemic control due to waning residual endogenous insulin secretion with increasing duration of T1D in children and adolescents. These data indicate the need to translate recent advances in automated insulin delivery, new insulin analogs, and adjunctive pharmacologic agents into novel treatment strategies to maintain optimal glycemic control even early in the course of T1D. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Ethnicity and alcohol consumption among US adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vaeth, Patrice A C; Caetano, Raul; Durazo, Eva M

    2014-10-01

    The drinking practices of a nationally representative sample of white, black, Mexican American, and other Hispanic adult diabetics are described and compared. Combined years (2005/2006-2011/2012) of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey provided home interview data from 2220 adults with self-reported diabetes of white (n = 875), black (n = 720), Mexican American (n = 402), and other Hispanic (n = 223) ethnicity. Current drinking status, the number of drinks consumed per week, and binge drinking were compared across ethnicity. The multivariate findings for both diabetic men and women showed no statistically significant ethnic differences in current drinking status, and among women, there were no statistically significant ethnic differences in binge drinking. Among male diabetics, Mexican Americans consumed more drinks per week than whites (b = 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.58; P = .002) and were at increased risk for binge drinking (odds ratio, 2.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.30-3.21; P = .002). Binge drinking is prevalent among Mexican American male diabetics. This pattern of drinking may put them at risk for poor diabetes management and control. It is important that health care providers routinely assess their patients' drinking practices and address the health risks associated with alcohol consumption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diabetes Literacy: Health and Adult Literacy Practitioners in Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes pedagogy in a series of "diabetes literacy" programs involving culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. The programs were jointly delivered in local community sites, including neighbourhood centres and public housing halls, by qualified nutritionists from a public health service and adult literacy…

  7. Physical Activity among Rural Older Adults with Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Bell, Ronny A.; Smith, Shannon L.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Wetmore-Arkader, Lindsay K.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This analysis describes physical activity levels and factors associated with physical activity in an ethnically diverse (African American, Native American, white) sample of rural older adults with diabetes. Method: Data were collected using a population-based, cross-sectional stratified random sample survey of 701 community-dwelling…

  8. Body mass index trajectory patterns and changes in visceral fat and glucose metabolism before the onset of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Keisuke; Honda, Toru; Nakagawa, Tohru; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Hayashi, Takeshi; Mizoue, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    We investigated BMI trajectory patterns before diabetes diagnosis and examined associated changes in visceral adiposity and glucose metabolism. 23,978 non-diabetic Japanese participants (2,789 women) aged 30–64 years were assessed with a mean follow-up of 7.6 years. Diabetes was diagnosed via fasting glucose, HbA1c, and self-report. Latent-class trajectory analyses were performed to identify BMI trajectories. Longitudinal changes in BMI, visceral adiposity, and glucose metabolism were estimated using mixed models. 1,892 individuals developed diabetes. Three distinct BMI trajectories were identified in adults developing and not developing diabetes, respectively. Among adults developing diabetes, 47.3% were classified as “medium BMI” (n = 895), and had increased mean BMI within the obesity category before diagnosis. The “low BMI” group (38.4%, n = 726) had an initial mean BMI of 21.9 kg/m2, and demonstrated small weight gain. The “high BMI” group (n = 271) were severely obese and showed greater increase in BMI until diagnosis. All groups which developed diabetes showed absolute and/or relative increase in visceral fat and impaired β-cell compensation for insulin resistance. All groups not developing diabetes showed measured variables were relatively stable during observation. These data suggest that visceral fat gain may induce β-cell failure in compensation for insulin resistance, resulting in diabetes regardless of obesity level. PMID:28266592

  9. Obesity, islet cell autoimmunity, and cardiovascular risk factors in youth at onset of type 1 autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cedillo, Maribel; Libman, Ingrid M; Arena, Vincent C; Zhou, Lei; Trucco, Massimo; Ize-Ludlow, Diego; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Becker, Dorothy J

    2015-01-01

    The current increase in childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D) and obesity has led to two conflicting hypotheses and conflicting reports regarding the effects of overweight on initiation and spreading of islet cell autoimmunity vs earlier clinical manifestation of preexisting autoimmune β-cell damage driven by excess weight. The objective of the study was to address the question of whether the degree of β-cell autoimmunity and age are related to overweight at diabetes onset in a large cohort of T1D youth. This was a prospective cross-sectional study of youth with autoimmune T1D consecutively recruited at diabetes onset. The study was conducted at a regional academic pediatric diabetes center. Two hundred sixty-three consecutive children younger than 19 years at onset of T1D participated in the study. Relationships between body mass index and central obesity (waist circumference and waist to height ratio) and antigen spreading (islet cell autoantibody number), age, and cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors examined at onset and/or 3 months after the diagnosis were measured. There were no significant associations between number of autoantibodies with measures of adiposity. Age relationships revealed that a greater proportion of those with central obesity (21%) were in the youngest age group (0-4 y) compared with those without central obesity (6%) (P = .001). PATIENTS with central obesity had increased CVD risk factors and higher onset C-peptide levels (P < .05). No evidence was found to support the concept that obesity accelerates progression of autoantibody spreading once autoimmunity, marked by standard islet cell autoantibody assays, is present. Central obesity was present in almost one-third of the subjects and was associated with early CVD risk markers already at onset.

  10. Assessing the Dim Light Melatonin Onset in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder and No Comorbid Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Emma K.; Richdale, Amanda L.; Hazi, Agnes; Prendergast, Luke A.

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed melatonin levels and the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) in adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and also investigated the relationships between melatonin and objectively measured sleep parameters. Sixteen adults with ASD (ASD-Only), 12 adults with ASD medicated for comorbid diagnoses of anxiety and/or depression…

  11. Onset aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability associated with primary caregiver depression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Kuo, Meng-Ting; Wu, Jia-Lin; Chu, Cordia; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2014-03-01

    Caregivers of adults with an intellectual disability experience depressive symptoms, but the aging factors of the care recipients associated with the depressive symptoms are unknown. The objective of this study was to analyze the onset aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability that associated with the depression scores of their primary caregivers. A cross-sectional survey was administered to gather information from 455 caregivers of adults with an intellectual disability about their symptoms of depression which assessed by a 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). The 12 aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability include physical and mental health. The results indicate that 78% of adults with an intellectual disability demonstrate aging conditions. Physical conditions associated with aging include hearing decline (66.3%), vision decline (63.6%), incontinence (44%), articulation and bone degeneration (57.9%), teeth loss (80.4), physical strength decline (81.2%), sense of taste and smell decline (52.8%), and accompanied chronic illnesses (74.6%). Mental conditions associated with aging include memory loss (77%), language ability deterioration (74.4%), poor sleep quality (74.2%), and easy onset of depression and sadness (50.3%). Aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability (p<0.001) was one factor that significantly affected the presence of depressive symptom among caregivers after controlling demographic characteristics. Particularly, poor sleep quality of adults with an intellectual disability (yes vs. no, OR=3.807, p=0.002) was statistically correlated to the occurrence of significant depressive symptoms among their caregivers. This study suggests that the authorities should reorient community services and future policies toward the needs of family caregivers to decrease the burdens associated with caregiving.

  12. Self–reported diabetes education among Chinese middle–aged and older adults with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hanzhang; Luo, Jianfeng; Wu, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare self–reported diabetes education among Chinese middle–aged and older adults with diabetes in three population groups: urban residents, migrants in urban settings, and rural residents. Methods We used data from the 2011 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. The sample included 993 participants age 45 and older who reported having diabetes diagnosed from a health professional. We performed multilevel regressions performed to examine the associations between characteristics and different aspects of diabetes education received. Findings Our study shows that 20.24% of the participants received no diabetes education at all. Among those who received information, 46.82% of respondents with diabetes received weight control advice from a health care provider, 90.97% received advice on exercise, 60.37% received diet advice, 35.12% were spoken to smoking control, and only 17.89% of persons were informed of foot care. After controlling socioeconomic factors, life style, number of comorbidities and community factors, we found that compared with migrant population and rural residents, urban residents were more likely to receive diabetes education on diet. Urban residents were also more likely to obtain diabetes education and more aspects of diabetes education comparison with migrants and rural residents. Conclusions Our study suggests diabetes education is a serious concern in China, and a significant proportion of the participants did not receive advice on smoking control and foot care. Rural residents and migrants from rural areas received much less diabetes education compared with urban residents. Efforts to improve diabetes educations are urgently needed in China. PMID:27698998

  13. Text Messaging Intervention for Teens and Young Adults With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cousineau, Tara; Franko, Debra L.; Schultz, Alan T.; Trant, Meredith; Rodgers, Rachel; Laffel, Lori M. B.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults use text messaging as their primary mode of communication, thus providing an opportunity to use this mode of communication for mobile health (mHealth) interventions. Youth with diabetes are an important group for these mHealth initiatives, as diabetes management requires an enormous amount of daily effort and this population has difficulty achieving optimal diabetes management. Goal setting and self-efficacy are 2 factors in the management of diabetes. We examined the feasibility of a healthy lifestyle text messaging program targeting self-efficacy and goal setting among adolescents and young adults with diabetes. Participants, ages 16-21, were assigned to either a text messaging group, which received daily motivational messages about nutrition and physical activity, or a control group, which received paper-based information about healthy lifestyle. Both groups set goals for nutrition and physical activity and completed a measure of self-efficacy. Participants’ mean age was 18.7 ± 1.6 years old, with diabetes duration of 10.0 ± 4.6 years, and A1c of 8.7 ± 1.7%. The text messaging intervention was rated highly and proved to be acceptable to participants. Self-efficacy, glycemic control, and body mass index did not change over the course of the short, 1-month pilot study. Positive, daily, motivational text messages may be effective in increasing motivation for small goal changes in the areas of nutrition and physical activity. These interventions may be used in the future in youth with diabetes to improve diabetes care. Utilizing more targeted text messages is an area for future research. PMID:25172879

  14. Prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults: findings from the Mexican Health and Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Wong, Rebeca; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to examine the prevalence and determinants of prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Methods We examined 2012 participants from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Measures included sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, central obesity, medical conditions, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, and vitamin D. Logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and self-reported diabetes. Results Prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed, and self-reported diabetes in this cohort was 44.2%, 18.0%, and 21.4%, respectively. Participants with high waist-hip ratio (1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05–2.45) and high cholesterol (1.85, 95% CI = 1.36–2.51) had higher odds of prediabetes. Overweight (1.68, 95% CI = 1.07–2.64), obesity (2.38, 95% CI = 1.41–4.02), and high waist circumference (1.60, 95% CI = 1.06–2.40) were significantly associated with higher odds of having undiagnosed diabetes. Those residing in a Mexican state with high U.S. migration had lower odds of prediabetes (0.61, 95% CI = 0.45–0.82) and undiagnosed diabetes (0.53, 95% CI = 0.41–0.70). Those engaged in regular physical activity had lower odds of undiagnosed diabetes (0.74, 95% CI = 0.57–0.97). Conclusions There is a high prevalence of prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes among Mexican adults in this subsample. Findings suggest the need for resources to prevent, identify, and treat persons with prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes. PMID:26872919

  15. Prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults: findings from the Mexican Health and Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Wong, Rebeca; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the prevalence and determinants of prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. We examined 2012 participants from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Measures included sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, central obesity, medical conditions, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, and vitamin D. Logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and self-reported diabetes. Prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed, and self-reported diabetes in this cohort was 44.2%, 18.0%, and 21.4%, respectively. Participants with high waist-hip ratio (1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-2.45) and high cholesterol (1.85, 95% CI = 1.36-2.51) had higher odds of prediabetes. Overweight (1.68, 95% CI = 1.07-2.64), obesity (2.38, 95% CI = 1.41-4.02), and high waist circumference (1.60, 95% CI = 1.06-2.40) were significantly associated with higher odds of having undiagnosed diabetes. Those residing in a Mexican state with high U.S. migration had lower odds of prediabetes (0.61, 95% CI = 0.45-0.82) and undiagnosed diabetes (0.53, 95% CI = 0.41-0.70). Those engaged in regular physical activity had lower odds of undiagnosed diabetes (0.74, 95% CI = 0.57-0.97). There is a high prevalence of prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes among Mexican adults in this subsample. Findings suggest the need for resources to prevent, identify, and treat persons with prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Emergency centre investigation of first-onset seizures in adults in the Western Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Smith, A B; Van Hoving, D J; Wallis, L A

    2013-08-21

    Patients with first-onset seizures commonly present to emergency centres (ECs). The differential diagnosis is broad, potentially life-threatening conditions need to be excluded, and these patients need to be correctly diagnosed and appropriately referred. There are currently no data on adults presenting with first-onset seizures to ECs in South Africa. To review which investigations were performed on adults presenting with first-onset seizures to six ECs in the Western Cape Province. A prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted from 1 July 2011 to 31 December 2011. All adults with first-onset seizures were included; children and trauma patients were excluded. Subgroup analyses were conducted regarding HIV status and inter-facility variation. A total of 309 patients were included. Computed tomography (CT) scans were planned in 218 (70.6%) patients, but only performed in 169; 96 (56.8%) showed abnormalities judged to be causative (infarction, intracerebral haemorrhage and atrophy being the most common). At least 80% of patients (n=247) received a full renal and electrolyte screen, blood glucose testing and a full haematological screen. Lumbar puncture (LP) was performed in 67 (21.7%) patients, with normal cerebrospinal fluid findings in 51 (76.1%). Only 27 (8%) patients had an electroencephalogram, of which 5 (18%) were abnormal. There was a statistically significant difference in the number of CT scans (p=0.002) and LPs (p<0.001) performed in the HIV-positive group (n=49). This study demonstrated inconsistency and wide local variance for all types of investigations done. It emphasises the need for a local guideline to direct doctors to appropriate investigations, ensuring better quality patient care and potential cost-saving.

  17. Antioxidant intake and adult-onset wheeze: a case-control study. Aberdeen WHEASE Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bodner, C; Godden, D; Brown, K; Little, J; Ross, S; Seaton, A

    1999-01-01

    An increase in prevalence of wheezing illness in the UK has coincided with a reduction in the consumption of natural antioxidants, which may modulate the lung's response to oxidant stress, limiting the expression of airway inflammation and respiratory symptoms. The hypothesis that intakes and plasma levels of natural antioxidants would be determinants of adult-onset wheezing illness was tested. A nested case-control study was conducted in 94 cases with adult-onset wheeze and 203 controls aged 39-45 yrs identified in a 30-yr follow-up survey. Antioxidant intake was measured by a food frequency questionnaire, and plasma and red cell measurements of antioxidant status were obtained. Outcome measures were onset of wheeze since age 15 yrs (ever wheeze) and wheeze occurring in the past 12 months (current wheeze). After adjusting for the effects of smoking, socioeconomic status, atopy, family history of atopic disease and total energy intake, intakes of vitamin E (odds ratio (OR) = 4.02 for low compared to high tertile of intake) and plasma levels of ascorbate (OR = 0.98 per unit) and alpha-tocopherol:triglyceride ratio (OR = 0.34 per log(e) unit) were inversely related to adult-onset wheeze. In analyses stratified by social class and smoking, intakes of vitamin C and E and plasma levels of ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol:triglyceride ratio were inversely related to current wheeze in the manual social class and among current smokers. No independent associations of vitamin A, beta-carotene or total plasma antioxidant capacity were found. The results support the hypothesis that deficiencies of vitamins C and E are associated with wheezing symptoms. Smokers in the manual social class are particularly susceptible to these effects.

  18. The History and Timing of Depression Onset as Predictors of Young-Adult Self-Esteem

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Donald A.; Ueno, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Depression often emerges early in the lifecourse and is consistently shown to be associated with poor self-esteem. The three main objectives of the current study are to (1) evaluate the association between a history major depression and self-esteem in young adulthood; (2) assess the relationship between timing of depression onset and young adult self-esteem; and (3) help rule out the alternative interpretation that the relationship between major depression and self-esteem is due to state dependence bias stemming from recent depressive symptoms and stressful life events. To address these objectives we use data from a two-wave panel study based on a community sample of young adults in Miami-Dade County, Florida (n = 1,197). Results indicated a history of major depression during sensitive periods of social development is associated with negative changes in self-esteem over a two-year period during the transition to young adulthood. Among those with a history of depression, earlier onset was more problematic than later onset for young adult self-esteem, although the difference disappeared once the level of self-esteem two years prior was controlled. The linkages between the history and timing of depression onset with self-esteem were observed net of recent depressive symptoms and stressful life events, and thus robust to an alternative interpretation of state dependence. The findings support the argument that major depression, especially if it develops earlier during child-adolescent development, has negative consequences for one’s self-esteem. PMID:21860585

  19. Management of adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.

    PubMed

    Vajro, Pietro; Ferrante, Lorenza; Lenta, Selvaggia; Mandato, Claudia; Persico, Marcello

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology practice. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult practice requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main paediatric-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from paediatric to adult patients. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Chinese new immigrant mothers' perception about adult-onset non-communicable diseases prevention during childhood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linda Dong Ling; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Wu, Joseph Tsz Kei; Fielding, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Many non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are largely preventable via behaviour change and healthy lifestyle, which may be best established during childhood. This study sought insights into Chinese new immigrant mothers' perceptions about adult-onset NCDs prevention during childhood. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were carried out with new immigrant mothers from mainland China who had at least one child aged 14 years or younger living in Hong Kong. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach. The present study identified three major themes: perceived causes of adult NCDs, beliefs about NCDs prevention and everyday health information practices. Unhealthy lifestyle, contaminated food and environment pollution were perceived as the primary causes of adult NCDs. Less than half of the participants recognized that parents had responsibility for helping children establish healthy behaviours from an early age to prevent diseases in later life. Most participants expressed helplessness about chronic diseases prevention due to lack of knowledge of prevention, being perceived as beyond individual control. Many participants experienced barriers to seeking health information, the most common sources of health information being interpersonal conversation and television. Participants' everyday information practice was passive and generally lacked awareness regarding early prevention of adult-onset NCDs. Updated understanding of this issue has notable implications for future health promotion interventions. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Distinguishing adult-onset asthma from COPD: a review and a new approach

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Michael J; Perret, Jennifer L; Dharmage, Shyamali C; McDonald, Vanessa M; McDonald, Christine F

    2014-01-01

    Adult-onset asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major public health burdens. This review presents a comprehensive synopsis of their epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentations; describes how they can be distinguished; and considers both established and proposed new approaches to their management. Both adult-onset asthma and COPD are complex diseases arising from gene–environment interactions. Early life exposures such as childhood infections, smoke, obesity, and allergy influence adult-onset asthma. While the established environmental risk factors for COPD are adult tobacco and biomass smoke, there is emerging evidence that some childhood exposures such as maternal smoking and infections may cause COPD. Asthma has been characterized predominantly by Type 2 helper T cell (Th2) cytokine-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation associated with airway hyperresponsiveness. In established COPD, the inflammatory cell infiltrate in small airways comprises predominantly neutrophils and cytotoxic T cells (CD8 positive lymphocytes). Parenchymal destruction (emphysema) in COPD is associated with loss of lung tissue elasticity, and small airways collapse during exhalation. The precise definition of chronic airflow limitation is affected by age; a fixed cut-off of forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity leads to overdiagnosis of COPD in the elderly. Traditional approaches to distinguishing between asthma and COPD have highlighted age of onset, variability of symptoms, reversibility of airflow limitation, and atopy. Each of these is associated with error due to overlap and convergence of clinical characteristics. The management of chronic stable asthma and COPD is similarly convergent. New approaches to the management of obstructive airway diseases in adults have been proposed based on inflammometry and also multidimensional assessment, which focuses on the four domains of the airways, comorbidity, self-management, and

  2. Tension-type headache in Parma's adult general population: a focus on age of onset.

    PubMed

    Taga, Arens; Russo, Marco; Manzoni, Gian C; Torelli, Paola

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we focus on the age of onset for tension-type headache in a population-based sample in the Parma, distinguishing its different subtypes and considering definite and probable diagnoses. Age of headache onset is a useful clinical feature for differential diagnosis between primary headaches and between primary and secondary headache forms. A total of 904 subjects representative of the Parma's adult general population were interviewed face to face by a physician from the Parma Headache Centre, using a validated questionnaire specially designed for the diagnosis of primary headaches according to the ICHD-II criteria. In the majority of subjects diagnosed with definite tension-type headache, age of onset was 39 years or less, while mean age of onset was 29.7 years (SD 16.3 years, range 5-79 years), the median being 25 years. Both infrequent and frequent episodic definite tension-type headache first occurred in the majority of cases in the second, third and fourth decades. Subjects with chronic definite tension-type headache reported a later onset in life (i.e. fourth, fifth and sixth decades). In our study, mean age of onset for probable tension-type headache was 23.7 years (SD 9.2 years, range 10-40 years) and the median was 22 years. In no case did we find significant gender differences. Our study results are similar to most of those reported in the literature. Further research needs to be done in the Italian epidemiological context, given the lack of literature reports on this topic.

  3. Use of Oral Antidiabetic Drugs in the Treatment of Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY): a minireview.

    PubMed

    Brunerova, Ludmila; Rahelić, Dario; Ceriello, Antonio; Broz, Jan

    2017-08-24

    MODY (Maturity-onset diabetes of the young) is a genetically linked group of clinically heterogeneous subtypes of diabetes. Roughly 5% of people with diabetes mellitus diagnosed prior to age 45 have MODY diabetes, the majority of whom have been erroneously diagnosed as patients with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes and, as a result, have been improperly treated. Genetic identification of MODY diabetes and its subtypes allows proper treatment and enables clinicians to switch many patients to oral antidiabetic agents, mainly sulphonylureas. However, some new classes of oral diabetic drugs have also been tested and found to be effective in MODY patients. We have searched for research articles and case reports written in full-text English or with an English abstract, using the following keywords: MODY and oral antidiabetic* in the databases Cohrane Library, PubMed and Science Direct. Therapeutic options using currently standardized oral antidiabetic drugs (mainly sulphonylureas), as well as more experimental treatment with other classes of oral antidiabetic drugs in different types of MODY are discussed, with special focus on the therapy of the most common MODY subtypes, including specific conditions as pregnancy. This review article summarizes the currently available information about oral antidiabetic treatment available for patients with MODY diabetes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Gut microbial markers are associated with diabetes onset, regulatory imbalance, and IFN-γ level in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Krych, Ł; Nielsen, D S; Hansen, A K; Hansen, C H F

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbiota regulated imbalances in the host's immune profile seem to be an important factor in the etiology of type 1 diabetes (T1D), and identifying bacterial markers for T1D may therefore be useful in diagnosis and prevention of T1D. The aim of the present study was to investigate the link between the early gut microbiota and immune parameters of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice in order to select alleged bacterial markers of T1D. Gut microbial composition in feces was analyzed with 454/FLX Titanium (Roche) pyro-sequencing and correlated with diabetes onset age and immune cell populations measured in diabetic and non-diabetic mice at 30 weeks of age. The early gut microbiota composition was found to be different between NOD mice that later in life were classified as diabetic or non-diabetic. Those differences were further associated with changes in FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, CD11b(+) dendritic cells, and IFN-γ production. The model proposed in this work suggests that operational taxonomic units classified to S24-7, Prevotella, and an unknown Bacteriodales (all Bacteroidetes) act in favor of diabetes protection whereas members of Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcus, and Oscillospira (all Firmicutes) promote pathogenesis.

  5. Pesticide methoxychlor promotes the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease through the female germline.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, Mohan; Haque, M Muksitul; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Nilsson, Eric E; Skinner, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Environmental compounds including fungicides, plastics, pesticides, dioxin and hydrocarbons can promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in future generation progeny following ancestral exposure during the critical period of fetal gonadal sex determination. This study examined the actions of the pesticide methoxychlor to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease and associated differential DNA methylation regions (i.e. epimutations) in sperm. Gestating F0 generation female rats were transiently exposed to methoxychlor during fetal gonadal development (gestation days 8 to 14) and then adult-onset disease was evaluated in adult F1 and F3 (great-grand offspring) generation progeny for control (vehicle exposed) and methoxychlor lineage offspring. There were increases in the incidence of kidney disease, ovary disease, and obesity in the methoxychlor lineage animals. In females and males the incidence of disease increased in both the F1 and the F3 generations and the incidence of multiple disease increased in the F3 generation. There was increased disease incidence in F4 generation reverse outcross (female) offspring indicating disease transmission was primarily transmitted through the female germline. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome of the methoxychlor lineage males identified differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) termed epimutations in a genome-wide gene promoters analysis. These epimutations were found to be methoxychlor exposure specific in comparison with other exposure specific sperm epimutation signatures. Observations indicate that the pesticide methoxychlor has the potential to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and the sperm epimutations appear to provide exposure specific epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures.

  6. Clinical predictors of remission and persistence of adult-onset asthma.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Guus A; Coumou, Hanneke; de Nijs, Selma B; Weersink, Els J; Bel, Elizabeth H

    2017-04-22

    Adult-onset asthma is an important but relatively understudied asthma phenotype and little is known about its natural course and prognosis. The remission rate is believed to be low, and it is still obscure which factors predict remission or persistence of the disease. This study sought to determine the remission rate and identify predictors of persistence and remission of adult-onset asthma. Two hundred adult patients with recently diagnosed (<1 year) asthma were recruited from secondary and tertiary pulmonary clinics and prospectively followed for 5 years. Clinical, functional, and inflammatory parameters were assessed at baseline and at yearly visits. Asthma remission was defined as absence of asthma symptoms for ≥1 year and no asthma medication use for ≥1 year. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis were performed. Five-year follow-up data of 170 patients (85%) was available. Of these, 27 patients (15.9%) experienced asthma remission. Patients with asthma persistence were older, had worse asthma control, required higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids, had more severe airway hyperresponsiveness, more often nasal polyps, and higher levels of blood neutrophils as compared to patients who experienced clinical remission. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, only moderate to severe bronchial hyperresponsiveness and nasal polyps were independent predictors of asthma persistence. Patients with these 2 characteristics had <1% chance of asthma remission. One in 6 patients with adult-onset asthma experiences remission within the first 5 years of the disease. In patients with moderate to severe bronchial hyperresponsiveness and nasal polyposis, the chance of remission is close to zero. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids: Clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathologic observations

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Stefanie H.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Sims, Katherine B.; Hedley-Whyte, E. T.; Vossough, Arastoo; Frosch, Matthew P.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2009-01-01

    Pigmented orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) and Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids HDLS are two adult onset leukodystrophies with neuroaxonal spheroids presenting with prominent neurobehavioral, cognitive, and motor symptoms. These are familial or sporadic disorders characterized by cerebral white matter degeneration including myelin and axonal loss, gliosis, macrophages, and axonal spheroids. We report clinical, neuroimaging and pathological correlations of four women ages 34–50 years with adult onset leukodystrophy. Their disease course ranged from 1.5–8 years. Three patients had progressive cognitive and behavioral changes whereas one had acute onset. Neuroimaging revealed white matter abnormalities characterized by symmetric, bilateral, T2 hyperintense and T1 hypointense MRI signal involving frontal lobe white matter in all patients. Extensive laboratory investigations were negative apart from abnormalities in some mitochondrial enzymes and immunologic parameters. Autopsies demonstrated severe leukodystrophy with myelin and axonal loss, axonal spheroids, and macrophages with early and severe frontal white matter involvement. The extent and degree of changes outside the frontal lobe appeared to correlate with disease duration. The prominent neurobehavioral deficits and frontal white matter disease provides clinical-pathologic support for association pathways linking distributed neural circuits subserving cognition. These observations lend further support to the notion that white matter disease alone can account for dementia. PMID:18422757

  8. The Onset of Depression During the Great Recession: Foreclosure and Older Adult Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Cagney, Kathleen A.; Browning, Christopher R.; Iveniuk, James; English, Ned

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined neighborhood-level foreclosure rates and their association with onset of depressive symptoms in older adults. Methods. We linked data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (2005–2006 and 2010–2011 waves), a longitudinal, nationally representative survey, to data on zip code–level foreclosure rates, and predicted the onset of depressive symptoms using logit-linked regression. Results. Multiple stages of the foreclosure process predicted the onset of depressive symptoms, with adjustment for demographic characteristics and changes in household assets, neighborhood poverty, and visible neighborhood disorder. A large increase in the number of notices of default (odds ratio [OR] = 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14, 2.67) and properties returning to ownership by the bank (OR = 1.62; 95% CI = 1.06, 2.47) were associated with depressive symptoms. A large increase in properties going to auction was suggestive of such an association (OR = 1.45; 95% CI = 0.96, 2.19). Age, fewer years of education, and functional limitations also were predictive. Conclusions. Increases in neighborhood-level foreclosure represent an important risk factor for depression in older adults. These results accord with previous studies suggesting that the effects of economic crises are typically first experienced through deficits in emotional well-being. PMID:24446830

  9. Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency: a rare cause of adult-onset rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Liewluck, Teerin; Mundi, Manpreet S; Mauermann, Michelle L

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation that may be due to mutations in 2 different nuclear genes, HADHA and HADHB. Perturbation of this multienzyme complex compromises the oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, which leads to multiorgan dysfunction. Childhood- or adolescent-onset recurrent rhabdomyolysis is a common muscular manifestation and is preceded frequently by clinically overt peripheral neuropathy. In this report we describe a patient with late adult-onset recurrent rhabdomyolysis. Despite normal sensory examination, nerve conduction studies showed a mild axonal peripheral neuropathy. The acylcarnitine profile showed elevated long-chain and 3-hydroxy long-chain acylcarnitine species. HADHA sequencing revealed known compound heterozygous mutations c.180+3A>G (p.Thr37SerfsX6) and c.1528G>C (p.Glu510Gln). During a 10-month follow-up period, he had no further episodes of rhabdomyolysis after appropriate dietary modifications. Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency should be considered in patients with adult-onset recurrent rhabdomyolysis, especially in those with either clinically overt or subclinical peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Longitudinal associations between changes in physical activity and onset of type 2 diabetes in older British men: the influence of adiposity.

    PubMed

    Jefferis, Barbara J; Whincup, Peter H; Lennon, Lucy; Wannamethee, S Goya

    2012-09-01

    To determine how much physical activity (PA) is needed to protect against diabetes onset in older adults, whether protection is greater among overweight individuals, and whether taking up moderate activity in later life is beneficial. Men (4,252) from a U.K. population-based cohort self-reported usual PA (regular walking and cycling, recreational activity, and sport) in 1996 and in 1998-2000, alongside other health behaviors and medical history. Fasting blood lipids were measured. Median follow-up was 7.1 years, during which 135 cases of type 2 diabetes (validated self-report) occurred. Among 3,012 men free from cardiovascular disease and diabetes in 1998-2000, 9% reported no usual leisure-time PA, 23% occasional PA, and 15% vigorous PA. Compared with men reporting no activity, men reporting occasional, light, moderate, moderately vigorous, and vigorous PA had lower diabetes risks: hazard ratio (HR) 0.58 (95% CI 0.33-1.02), 0.39 (0.20-0.74), 0.38 (0.19-0.73), 0.39 (0.20-0.77), and 0.33 (0.16-0.70), respectively; P (trend) = 0.002, adjusted for age, social class, tobacco, alcohol, diet, and blood lipids. Adjustment for BMI, waist circumference, or fasting insulin attenuated HRs. HRs were stronger in men with BMI ≥28 vs. <28 kg/m(2) (interaction P = 0.02). Compared with men reporting light activity or less in 1996 and 2000, men who became at least moderately active by 2000 or remained at least moderately active at both times had adjusted HRs of 0.62 (0.34-1.12) and 0.51 (0.31-0.82), respectively. Even light PA markedly reduced diabetes risk in older men, especially among the overweight or obese. Taking up or maintaining at least moderate PA in older adulthood strongly protected against diabetes.

  11. Niacin therapy and the risk of new-onset diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Goldie, Christina; Taylor, Allen J; Nguyen, Peter; McCoy, Cody; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Preiss, David

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that niacin treatment raises glucose levels in patients with diabetes and may increase the risk of developing diabetes. We undertook a meta-analysis of published and unpublished data from randomised trials to confirm whether an association exists between niacin and new-onset diabetes. We searched Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, from 1975 to 2014, for randomised controlled trials of niacin primarily designed to assess its effects on cardiovascular endpoints and cardiovascular surrogate markers. We included trials with ≥50 non-diabetic participants and average follow-up of ≥24 weeks. Published data were tabulated and unpublished data sought from investigators. We calculated risk ratios (RR) for new-onset diabetes with random-effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity between trials was assessed using the I(2) statistic. In 11 trials with 26 340 non-diabetic participants, 1371 (725/13 121 assigned niacin; 646/13 219 assigned control) were diagnosed with diabetes during a weighted mean follow-up of 3.6 years. Niacin therapy was associated with a RR of 1.34 (95% CIs 1.21 to 1.49) for new-onset diabetes, with limited heterogeneity between trials (I(2)=0.0%, p=0.87). This equates to one additional case of diabetes per 43 (95% CI 30 to 70) initially non-diabetic individuals who are treated with niacin for 5 years. Results were consistent regardless of whether participants received background statin therapy (p for interaction=0.88) or combined therapy with laropiprant (p for interaction=0.52). Niacin therapy is associated with a moderately increased risk of developing diabetes regardless of background statin or combination laropiprant therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Experimental periodontitis induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis does not alter the onset or severity of diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Yang, H; Ding, Y; Aprecio, R; Zhang, W; Wang, Q; Li, Y

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is believed to increase the risk and severity of periodontitis. However, less evidence is available on the converse effects of periodontitis on diabetes. The objective of the study was to investigate to what degree experimental periodontitis induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis might influence the onset and severity of diabetes in different mouse models. Twenty-eight male Tallyho/JngJ mice (type 2 diabetes), 20 male streptozotocin-induced diabetes C57BL/6J mice (type 1 diabetes) and 20 male C57BL/6J mice at 4 wks of age were evenly divided into two groups: periodontal infection and sham infection. Periodontitis was induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 (P. gingivalis) oral inoculation before the development of diabetes. Sham-infected mice received vehicle as control. P. gingivalis in the oral cavity were identified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Fasting glucose, body weight and food intake levels were monitored and glucose tolerance tests were performed to assess glucose homeostasis for the onset and progression of diabetes. The level of alveolar bone loss and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were determined in week 20 when mice were killed. Mice in the infection groups developed more alveolar bone loss than those in sham-infection groups (Tallyho p = 0.021; C57-STZ p = 0.014; C57 p = 0.035). Hyperglycemic mice exhibited significantly more bone loss compared to those normal glucose mice (Tallyho vs. C57 p = 0.029; C57-STZ vs. C57 p = 0.024). The level of tumor necrosis factor-alpha was consistent with that of periodontal bone loss and hyperglycemia. There was no significant effect of mouse species on the amount of bone loss at the same level of blood glucose. No statistically significant difference or trend in glucose metabolism was found between the infection and sham-infection group. Diabetes enhanced the risk for periodontal disease induced by P. gingivalis. However, no converse impact was found between this periodontal

  13. Juvenile versus adult-onset ankylosing spondylitis -- clinical, radiographic, and social outcomes. a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jadon, Deepak R; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Sengupta, Raj

    2013-11-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has 2 main modes of onset: juvenile-onset AS (JoAS) and adult-onset AS (AoAS). It is not known whether JoAS is a subtype of AS, or AS modulated by early age of onset and longer disease duration. We performed a systematic review of the literature, identifying 12 articles and 1 abstract directly comparing JoAS and AoAS cohorts, with observational study design. Patients with JoAS appear to have more peripheral joint involvement both clinically and radiographically (especially knees and ankles) and more root joint involvement (hips and shoulders); they are more likely to proceed to hip arthroplasty and often initially present with peripheral rather than axial symptoms. Patients with AoAS appear to have more axial symptoms and radiographic disease, particularly in the lumbar spine, and worse axial metrology. In terms of other characteristics, more evidence is needed to confidently state whether JoAS and AoAS are different.

  14. Linkage of type 2 diabetes mellitus and of age at onset to a genetic location on chromosome 10q in Mexican Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Duggirala, R; Blangero, J; Almasy, L; Dyer, T D; Williams, K L; Leach, R J; O'Connell, P; Stern, M P

    1999-01-01

    Since little is known about chromosomal locations harboring type 2 diabetes-susceptibility genes, we conducted a genomewide scan for such genes in a Mexican American population. We used data from 27 low-income extended Mexican American pedigrees consisting of 440 individuals for whom genotypic data are available for 379 markers. We used a variance-components technique to conduct multipoint linkage analyses for two phenotypes: type 2 diabetes (a discrete trait) and age at onset of diabetes (a truncated quantitative trait). For the multipoint analyses, a subset of 295 markers was selected on the basis of optimal spacing and informativeness. We found significant evidence that a susceptibility locus near the marker D10S587 on chromosome 10q influences age at onset of diabetes (LOD score 3.75) and is also linked with type 2 diabetes itself (LOD score 2.88). This susceptibility locus explains 63.8%+/-9.9% (P=. 000016) of the total phenotypic variation in age at onset of diabetes and 65.7%+/-10.9% (P=.000135) of the total variation in liability to type 2 diabetes. Weaker evidence was found for linkage of diabetes and of age at onset to regions on chromosomes 3p, 4q, and 9p. In conclusion, our strongest evidence for linkage to both age at onset of diabetes and type 2 diabetes itself in the Mexican American population was for a region on chromosome 10q. PMID:10090898

  15. The DPP4 inhibitor linagliptin delays the onset of diabetes and preserves β-cell mass in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels; van Witteloostuijn, Søren B; Mark, Michael; Klein, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Recent data indicate that dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors have anti-inflammatory and β-cell-sparing effects in animal models of type 1 diabetes. To evaluate the effects of the DPP4 inhibitor linagliptin on β-cell mass and insulinitis, we examined the progression of diabetes (blood glucose >11  mmol/l) in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice with terminal stereological assessment of cellular pancreatic changes. Female NOD mice were fed a normal chow diet or a diet containing linagliptin 0.083  g/kg chow for 60 days. At study end, the incidence of diabetes in linagliptin-treated mice was reduced by almost 50% compared with vehicle (10 of 31 mice vs 18 of 30 mice, P=0.021). The total islet mass and total β-cell mass, identified by insulin immunoreactivity, were greater in non-diabetic linagliptin-treated mice compared with non-diabetic vehicle-treated mice (P<0.01 for both) but were greatly reduced in diabetic mice irrespective of treatment. No changes were seen in the α, δ and γ endocrine cell pool. Moreover, the total mass of lymphocyte insulinitis was significantly reduced in linagliptin-treated mice compared with vehicle. The data indicate that linagliptin treatment delays the onset of diabetes in NOD mice by protecting β-cell mass.

  16. Reactivation of latent viruses in individuals receiving rituximab for new onset type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Jing Lu; Beam, Craig; Li, Shaobing; Viscidi, Raphael; Dighero, Bonnie; Cho, Alice; Boulware, David; Pescovitz, Mark; Weinberg, Adriana

    2013-06-01

    Rituximab has been successfully used as an experimental therapy in different autoimmune diseases. Recently, a double-blind placebo-controlled phase-2 study in early onset type 1 diabetes showed that rituximab delayed progression of the disease. However, like with any immunosuppressive therapy, there is a concern of opportunistic viral reactivations with the use of rituximab, including herpes and polyomaviruses. To study the incidence of new infections and reactivations with BK, JC, Epstein-Barr and cytomegalovirus (BKV, JCV, EBV and CMV) in T1D participants in the phase-2 rituximab study. Subjects received 4 weekly doses of rituximab (N = 57) or placebo (N = 30) during the first month of study. Blood samples obtained at weeks 0, 12, 26, 56 and 78 were assayed for CMV, EBV, BKV and JCV by real-time DNA PCR and serology. EBV reactivations were diagnosed by PCR in 25% of placebo, but none of rituximab recipients (p < 0.01). There were no episodes of CMV viremia in either treatment group. BKV viremias were significantly more common in the rituximab recipients (9%) compared with placebo controls (0, p < 0.01). No JCV reactivations were detected in this study, but among 6 rituximab and 2 placebo recipients who seroconverted for JCV during the study, only one rituximab recipient had detectable viremia. All infections were asymptomatic. Four doses of rituximab administered to individuals with early onset T1D decreased the incidence of asymptomatic EBV reactivations, as predicted by the rituximab-mediated elimination of memory B-cells, but increased the frequency of asymptomatic viremias caused by polyomaviruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Tetracycline Treatment Retards the Onset and Slows the Progression of Diabetes in Human Amylin/Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Jacqueline F.; Loomes, Kerry M.; Scott, David W.; Reddy, Shivanand; Phillips, Anthony R.J.; Prijic, Gordana; Fernando, Chathurini; Zhang, Shaoping; Broadhurst, Ric; L'Huillier, Phil; Cooper, Garth J.S.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Aggregation of human amylin/islet amyloid polypeptide (hA/hIAPP) into small soluble β-sheet–containing oligomers is linked to islet β-cell degeneration and the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Here, we used tetracycline, which modifies hA/hIAPP oligomerization, to probe mechanisms whereby hA/hIAPP causes diabetes in hemizygous hA/hIAPP-transgenic mice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We chronically treated hemizygous hA/hIAPP transgenic mice with oral tetracycline to determine its effects on rates of diabetes initiation, progression, and survival. RESULTS Homozygous mice developed severe spontaneous diabetes due to islet β-cell loss. Hemizygous transgenic animals also developed spontaneous diabetes, although severity was less and progression rates slower. Pathogenesis was characterized by initial islet β-cell dysfunction followed by progressive β-cell loss. Islet amyloid was absent from hemizygous animals with early-onset diabetes and correlated positively with longevity. Some long-lived nondiabetic hemizygous animals also had large islet-amyloid areas, showing that amyloid itself was not intrinsically cytotoxic. Administration of tetracycline dose-dependently ameliorated hyperglycemia and polydipsia, delayed rates of diabetes initiation and progression, and increased longevity compared with water-treated controls. CONCLUSIONS This is the first report to show that treating hA/hIAPP transgenic mice with a modifier of hA/hIAPP misfolding can ameliorate their diabetic phenotype. Fibrillar amyloid was neither necessary nor sufficient to cause diabetes and indeed was positively correlated with longevity therein, whereas early- to mid-stage diabetes was associated with islet β-cell dysfunction followed by β-cell loss. Interventions capable of suppressing misfolding in soluble hA/hIAPP oligomers rather than mature fibrils may have potential for treating or preventing type 2 diabetes. PMID:19794060

  18. [Proportion of low insulin responders to glucose among the offspring of maturity-onset diabetics (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Vague, P; Ramahandridona, G; Vague, J

    1975-03-01

    The insensitivity of B cells to glucose, a characteristic of mild essential glucose intolerance may be estimated in a given individual by the comparison of the immediate plasma insulin response to glucose (0 to 10' plasma insulin area or iG) with that to Tolbutamide (iT). It was shown that iG/iT clearly differentiates between nondiabetics and diabetics, whatever their body weight. All the diabetics had an iT/iT lower than 0,65. A high proportion of the offspring of diabetics had an iG/iT ratio in the diabetic range, whether or not they were diabetic. Among these subjects aged from 10 to 49 and weighing between 90 and 144% of their ideal body weight, the iG/iT ratio was not correlated with age nor with relative body weight while the K value was negatively correlated with age. We were thus able to look for the frequency of a "diabetic" iG/iT ratio in the offspring of diabetics, For this in sibships in which all the sibs had been tested, one subject was selected by randomisation. A "diabetic" iG/iT ratio was observed in 7 of 41 subjects with no family history of diabetes, in 27 of 50 with one parent having clinical, maturity-onset diabetes melitus, and in 15 of 19 subjects with two diabetic parents. These results are not compatible with the hypothesis of recessive transmission of the "low insulin response to glucose" characteristic.

  19. Stress increases the risk of type 2 diabetes onset in women: A 12-year longitudinal study using causal modelling

    PubMed Central

    Oldmeadow, Christopher; Hure, Alexis; Luu, Judy; Loxton, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Modifiable risk factors have been found to contribute up to 60% of type 2 diabetes risk. However, type 2 diabetes continues to rise despite implementation of interventions based on traditional risk factors. There is a clear need to identify additional risk factors for chronic disease prevention. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between perceived stress and type 2 diabetes onset, and partition the estimates into direct and indirect effects. Methods and findings Women born in 1946–1951 (n = 12,844) completed surveys for the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health in 1998, 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2010. The total causal effect was estimated using logistic regression and marginal structural modelling. Controlled direct effects were estimated through conditioning in the regression model. A graded association was found between perceived stress and all mediators in the multivariate time lag analyses. A significant association was found between hypertension, as well as physical activity and body mass index, and diabetes, but not smoking or diet quality. Moderate/high stress levels were associated with a 2.3-fold increase in the odds of diabetes three years later, for the total estimated effect. Results were only slightly attenuated when the direct and indirect effects of perceived stress on diabetes were partitioned, with the mediators only explaining 10–20% of the excess variation in diabetes. Conclusions Perceived stress is a strong risk factor for type 2 diabetes. The majority of the effect estimate of stress on diabete