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Sample records for adult onset myotonic

  1. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  2. Relationship between neuropsychological impairment and grey and white matter changes in adult-onset myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Baldanzi, Sigrid; Cecchi, Paolo; Fabbri, Serena; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Simoncini, Costanza; Angelini, Corrado; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Cosottini, Mirco; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) has a wide phenotypic spectrum and potentially may affect central nervous system with mild to severe involvement. Our aim was to investigate grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) structural alterations in a sample of adult-onset DM1 patients and to evaluate relationship with clinical and cognitive variables. Thirty DM1 patients underwent neuropsychological investigation and 3T-MRI protocol. GM and WM changes were evaluated calculating brain parenchymal fraction (BPF), voxel-based morphometry (VBM), white matter lesion load (LL% and Fazekas scale) and tract based spatial statistical (TBSS). Patients showed main impairment in tests exploring executive and mnesic domains with visuo-spatial involvement, significantly related to BPF. VBM revealed clusters of widespread GM reduction and TBSS revealed areas of decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD), mean diffusivity (MD) and axial diffusivity (AD) in patients compared to a group of matched healthy controls. Multiple regression analyses showed areas of significant negative relationship between left temporal atrophy and verbal memory, between RD and mnesic and visuo-spatial cognitive domains, and between AD and verbal memory. TBSS results indicate that the involvement of normal appearance WM, beyond the signal changes detected with conventional MR imaging (Fazekas scale and LL%), was associated with neuropsychological deficit. These data suggest that disrupted complex neuronal networks can underlie cognitive-behavioural dysfunctions in DM1. PMID:27437180

  3. Mitochondrial DNA does not appear to influence the congenital onset type of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, J; Harley, H G; Dasmahapatra, J; Brown, G K; Potter, C G; Sykes, B

    1995-01-01

    Neither the maternal inheritance pattern nor the early onset of congenital myotonic dystrophy are fully explained. One possible mechanism is that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations might interact with the DM gene product, producing an earlier onset than would otherwise occur. We have used Southern hybridisation to show that high levels of major rearrangements of mtDNA are not present in muscle of five and in blood of 35 patients with congenital myotonic dystrophy. We used sequence analysis to show that no one particular mtDNA morph appears to cosegregate with congenital onset. A minor degree of depletion of mtDNA compared with nuclear DNA was present in the muscle of five patients with congenital DM, but we propose that this is not the primary cause of the muscle pathology but secondary to it. We have not found evidence that mtDNA is involved in congenital myotonic dystrophy. PMID:8544195

  4. Adult onset retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Pan, Utsab; Khetan, Vikas

    2016-07-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor of childhood presenting usually before 5 years of age. RB in adults older than 20 years is extremely rare. A literature search using PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases revealed only 45 cases till date. Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of such reports, indicating heightened level of suspicion among ophthalmologists. Compared to its pediatric counterpart, adult onset RB poses unique challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This article summarizes available literature on adult onset RB and its clinical and pathologic profile, genetics, association with retinocytoma, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes. PMID:27609158

  5. Adult-Onset Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Khera, Mohit; Broderick, Gregory A; Carson, Culley C; Dobs, Adrian S; Faraday, Martha M; Goldstein, Irwin; Hakim, Lawrence S; Hellstrom, Wayne J G; Kacker, Ravi; Köhler, Tobias S; Mills, Jesse N; Miner, Martin; Sadeghi-Nejad, Hossein; Seftel, Allen D; Sharlip, Ira D; Winters, Stephen J; Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-07-01

    In August 2015, an expert colloquium commissioned by the Sexual Medicine Society of North America (SMSNA) convened in Washington, DC, to discuss the common clinical scenario of men who present with low testosterone (T) and associated signs and symptoms accompanied by low or normal gonadotropin levels. This syndrome is not classical primary (testicular failure) or secondary (pituitary or hypothalamic failure) hypogonadism because it may have elements of both presentations. The panel designated this syndrome adult-onset hypogonadism (AOH) because it occurs commonly in middle-age and older men. The SMSNA is a not-for-profit society established in 1994 to promote, encourage, and support the highest standards of practice, research, education, and ethics in the study of human sexual function and dysfunction. The panel consisted of 17 experts in men's health, sexual medicine, urology, endocrinology, and methodology. Participants declared potential conflicts of interest and were SMSNA members and nonmembers. The panel deliberated regarding a diagnostic process to document signs and symptoms of AOH, the rationale for T therapy, and a monitoring protocol for T-treated patients. The evaluation and management of hypogonadal syndromes have been addressed in recent publications (ie, the Endocrine Society, the American Urological Association, and the International Society for Sexual Medicine). The primary purpose of this document was to support health care professionals in the development of a deeper understanding of AOH, particularly in how it differs from classical primary and secondary hypogonadism, and to provide a conceptual framework to guide its diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. PMID:27343020

  6. Myotonic Dystrophy Family Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy 1; Myotonic Dystrophy 2; Dystrophia Myotonica; Dystrophia Myotonica 1; Dystrophia Myotonica 2; Myotonia Dystrophica; Myotonic Dystrophy, Congenital; Myotonic Myopathy, Proximal; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Proximal Myotonic Myopathy; Steinert Disease; Steinert Myotonic Dystrophy; Steinert's Disease; Myotonia Atrophica

  7. Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy; Muscular Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Steinert's Disease; Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

  8. Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Difference How to Get Involved Donate Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) Share print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) What is myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD)? Myotonic ...

  9. Myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jozefowicz, R F; Griggs, R C

    1988-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, myotonia, and numerous nonmuscular manifestations including frontal balding, cataracts, gonadal dysfunction, cardiac conduction abnormalities, respiratory insufficiency, and hypersomnolence. Although the gene defect in myotonic dystrophy has been mapped to chromosome 19, the exact metabolic abnormalities responsible for this disorder are unknown. Skeletal muscle has been found to be relatively insulin-resistant in myotonic dystrophy, and a decrease in the anabolic action of insulin on skeletal muscle may be related to muscle wasting in this disorder. Laboratory studies, including electromyography, electrocardiography, and muscle biopsy, are helpful in evaluating patients for this disorder, but the clinical aspects and a careful family history remain the mainstays of diagnosis. A number of management strategies preserve function and prevent complications in myotonic dystrophy. PMID:3065594

  10. The juvenile-onset, adolescent-onset and adult-onset obese.

    PubMed

    Garn, S M; Sullivan, T V; Hawthorne, V M

    1991-02-01

    As shown in more than 8000 proband-parent pairs derived from a total-community sample and followed in longitudinal fashion, the 5-year incidence of obesity (new cases per 5-year period) approximates 8 percent for the juvenile-onset, adolescent-onset and adult-onset obese alike. Parents of juvenile-onset (ages 5-9), adolescent-onset (10-19) and adult-onset obese (20-39) tend to be of above-average fatness level, +0.25Z scores, overall, regardless of the age at onset of obesity in their progeny. Except for the parents of the juvenile-onset obese, educational level of the parents tends to be below average for the sample as a whole. These new data acquired in longitudinal context and explored in retrospective-prospective fashion do not substantiate the notion that different onset ages of obesity indicate separate etiologies and different family constellations. PMID:2040547

  11. Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (dystrophia myotonica, DM) is one of the most common lethal monogenic disorders in populations of European descent. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) was first described over a century ago. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG triplet repeat in the 3' non-coding region of DMPK, the gene encoding the DM protein kinase. More recently a second form of the disease, myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) was recognized, which results from repeat expansion in a different gene. The DM2 expansion involves a CCTG repeat in the first intron of Zinc Finger 9 (ZNF9). Both disorders have autosomal dominant inheritance and multisystem features, including myotonic myopathy, cataract, and cardiac conduction disease. Studies suggest that the shared clinical features of DM1 and DM2 involve a novel genetic mechanism in which repetitive RNA exerts a toxic effect. The RNA toxicity stems from the expanded repeat in the transcripts from the mutant DM alleles. This chapter will review the clinical presentation and pathophysiology of DM, and discuss current management and future potential for developing targeted therapies. PMID:25037086

  12. [Adult-onset rare diseases].

    PubMed

    Pfliegler, György; Kovács, Erzsébet; Kovács, György; Urbán, Krisztián; Nagy, Valéria; Brúgós, Boglárka

    2014-03-01

    The present paper is focusing on rare diseases manifesting in late childhood or adulthood. A part of these syndromes are not of genetic origin, such as relatively or absolutely rare infections, autoimmune diseases, tumours, or diseases due to rare environmental toxic agents. In addition, even a large proportion of genetic disorders may develop in adulthood or may have adult forms as well, affecting are almost each medical specialization. Examples are storage disorders (e.g. adult form of Tay-Sachs disease, Gaucher-disease), enzyme deficiencies (e.g. ornithin-transcarbamylase deficiency of the urea cycle disorders), rare thrombophilias (e.g. homozygous factor V. Leiden mutation, antithrombin deficiency), or some rare monogenic disorders such as Huntington-chorea and many others. It is now generally accepted that at least half of the 6-8000 "rare diseases" belong either to the scope of adult-care (e.g. internal medicine, neurology), or to "age-neutral" specialities such as ophtalmology, dermatology etc.). PMID:24566697

  13. Comparison of Pulmonary Functions at Onset of Ventilatory Insufficiency in Patients With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, and Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Han Eol; Lee, Jang Woo; Kang, Seong Woong; Choi, Won Ah; Oh, Hyeonjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate pulmonary functions of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) at the onset of ventilatory insufficiency. Methods This retrospective study included ALS, DMD, and MMD patients with regular outpatient clinic follow-up in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Gangnam Severance Hospital before the application of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). The patients were enrolled from August 2001 to March 2014. If patients experienced ventilatory insufficiency, they were treated with NIPPV, and their pulmonary functions were subsequently measured. Results Ninety-four DMD patients, 41 ALS patients, and 21 MMD patients were included in the study. The mean SpO2 was lower in the MMD group than in the other two groups. The mean forced vital capacity (FVC) in the supine position was approximately low to mid 20% on average in DMD and ALS patients, whereas it was 10% higher in MMD patients. ALS patients showed a significantly lower FVC in the supine position than in the sitting position. Maximal insufflation capacity, unassisted peak cough flow, maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), and maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) were significantly higher in MMD group than in the other groups. MEP was significantly the lowest in DMD patients, followed by in ALS, and MMD patients, in order. Conclusion Disease-specific values of pulmonary function, including FVC, MEP, and MIP, can be accurately used to assess the onset of ventilatory insufficiency in patients with ALS, DMD, and MMD. PMID:26949672

  14. Adult onset xanthogranuloma presenting as laryngeal mass.

    PubMed

    Li, Shawn; Weidenbecher, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Histiocytic disorders can be classified according to the distribution pattern of the lesions and the organs involved. Non-Langerhans-cell histiocytosis is a rare group of diseases that have varied clinical presentations ranging from isolated masses to diffuse systemic eruptions. We discuss a patient who initially presented with a vocal cord lesion and was ultimately diagnosed with adult onset xanthogranuloma. PMID:26954863

  15. Brain MRI abnormalities in the adult form of myotonic dystrophy type 1: A longitudinal case series study.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Renata; de Cristofaro, Mario; Cristofano, Adriana; Brogna, Barbara; Sardaro, Angela; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Cirillo, Sossio; Di Costanzo, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to verify whether brain abnormalities, previously described in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), progressed over time and, if so, to characterize their progression. Thirteen DM1 patients, who had at least two MRI examinations, were retrospectively evaluated and included in the study. The mean duration (± standard deviation) of follow-up was 13.4 (±3.8) years, over a range of 7-20 years. White matter lesions (WMLs) were rated by semi-quantitative method, the signal intensity of white matter poster-superior to trigones (WMPST) by reference to standard images and brain atrophy by ventricular/brain ratio (VBR). At the end of MRI follow-up, the scores relative to lobar, temporal and periventricular WMLs, to WMPST signal intensity and to VBR were significantly increased compared to baseline, and MRI changes were more evident in some families than in others. No correlation was found between the MRI changes and age, onset, disease duration, muscular involvement, CTG repetition and follow-up duration. These results demonstrated that white matter involvement and brain atrophy were progressive in DM1 and suggested that progression rate varied from patient to patient, regardless of age, disease duration and genetic defect. PMID:26755488

  16. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 or Steinert's disease.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 (DM1) is the most common worldwide autosomal dominant muscular dystrophy due to polynucleotide [CTG]( n ) triplet expansion located on the 3'UTR of chromosome 19q13.3. A toxic gain-of-function of abnormally stored RNA in the nuclei of affected cells is assumed to be responsible for several clinical features of the disease. It plays a basic role in deregulating RNA binding protein levels and in several mRNA splicing processes of several genes, thus leading to the multisystemic features typical of DM1. In DM1, the musculoskeletal apparatus, heart, brain, eye, endocrine, respiratory and gastroenteric systems are involved with variable levels of severity. DM1 onset can be congenital, juvenile, adult or late. DM1 can be diagnosed on the grounds of clinical presentation (distal muscular atrophy and weakness, grip and percussion myotonia, ptosis, hatchet face, slurred speech, rhinolalia), EMG myotonic pattern, EKG (such as AV-blocks) or routine blood test abnormalities (such as increased CK values or hypogamma-globulinemia) and history of cataract. Its confirmation can come by DNA analysis. At present, only symptomatic therapy is possible and is addressed at correcting hormonal and glycemic balance, removing cataract, preventing respiratory failure and, above all, major cardiac disturbances. Efficacious therapies targeted at the pathogenic mechanism of DM1 are not yet available, while studies that seek to block toxic RNA intranuclear storage with specific molecules are still ongoing. PMID:22411247

  17. Adult onset retinoblastoma: A diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Raj, Amit; Arya, Sudesh Kumar; Punia, Rajpal Singh; Kohli, Piyush

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor of childhood. About 95% of retinoblastoma cases are diagnosed before the age of 5 years. Not more than 30 cases of Adult-onset retinoblastoma have been reported in literature. A 32 year old male presented with a painful blind eye. There was sudden loss of vision accompanied by severe pain and redness in right eye about 1 year ago, for which some surgery was done with neither a gain in vision nor any relief from pain. Then he was put on maximum tolerable medical therapy, later cyclocryotherapy was done. Now he presented to us with complains of extreme pain and bleeding from right eye since 2 days. There is no history of any ocular trauma. Right eye had no perception of light & showed anterior staphyloma with perforation. Right eye evisceration was done & material sent for histopathological examination, which revealed an adult-onset retinoblastoma. CECT scan revealed thickening of optic nerve throughout its entire length with contrast enhancement. He was further taken up for enucleation of residual sclera with maximum optic nerve stump removal to reconfirm the diagnosis. Histopathological examination revealed tumor deposits present in orbital soft tissue, resection margins and optic nerve cut end.Retinoblastoma presenting in adult age creates a diagnostic dilemma because of its low frequency and atypical features. We want to highlight the importance of high clinical suspicion and imaging modalities before taking any patient for evisceration with unexplained vision loss. One should send the eviscerated material for histopathological examination. PMID:26709674

  18. Paternal transmission of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    de Die-Smulders, C E; Smeets, H J; Loots, W; Anten, H B; Mirandolle, J F; Geraedts, J P; Höweler, C J

    1997-01-01

    We report a rare case of paternally transmitted congenital myotonic dystrophy (DM). The proband is a 23 year old, mentally retarded male who suffers severe muscular weakness. He presented with respiratory and feeding difficulties at birth. His two sibs suffer from childhood onset DM. Their late father had the adult type of DM, with onset around 30 years. Only six other cases of paternal transmission of congenital DM have been reported recently. We review the sex related effects on transmission of congenital DM. Decreased fertility of males with adult onset DM and contraction of the repeat upon male transmission contribute to the almost absent occurrence of paternal transmission of congenital DM. Also the fathers of the reported congenitally affected children showed, on average, shorter CTG repeat lengths and hence less severe clinical symptoms than the mothers of children with congenital DM. We conclude that paternal transmission of congenital DM is rare and preferentially occurs with onset of DM past 30 years in the father. Images PMID:9391889

  19. Phenotypes, Risk Factors, and Mechanisms of Adult-Onset Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ilmarinen, Pinja; Tuomisto, Leena E.; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with many phenotypes, and age at disease onset is an important factor in separating the phenotypes. Genetic factors, atopy, and early respiratory tract infections are well-recognized factors predisposing to childhood-onset asthma. Adult-onset asthma is more often associated with obesity, smoking, depression, or other life-style or environmental factors, even though genetic factors and respiratory tract infections may also play a role in adult-onset disease. Adult-onset asthma is characterized by absence of atopy and is often severe requiring treatment with high dose of inhaled and/or oral steroids. Variety of risk factors and nonatopic nature of adult-onset disease suggest that variety of mechanisms is involved in the disease pathogenesis and that these mechanisms differ from the pathobiology of childhood-onset asthma with prevailing Th2 airway inflammation. Recognition of the mechanisms and mediators that drive the adult-onset disease helps to develop novel strategies for the treatment. The aim of this review was to summarize the current knowledge on the pathogenesis of adult-onset asthma and to concentrate on the mechanisms and mediators involved in establishing adult-onset asthma in response to specific risk factors. We also discuss the involvement of these mechanisms in the currently recognized phenotypes of adult-onset asthma. PMID:26538828

  20. Hypothesis: neoplasms in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, James E.; Martens, William; Thornton, Charles A.; Moxley, Richard T.; Greene, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a multi-step process due to an accumulation of genetic mutations in multiple genes in diverse pathways which ultimately lead to loss of control over cell growth. It is well known that inheritance of rare germline mutations in genes involved in tumorigenesis pathways confer high lifetime risk of neoplasia in affected individuals. Furthermore, a substantial number of multiple malformation syndromes include cancer susceptibility in their phenotype. Studies of the mechanisms underlying these inherited syndromes have added to the understanding of both normal development and the pathophysiology of carcinogenesis. Myotonic dystrophy (DM) represents a group of autosomal dominant, multisystemic diseases that share the clinical features of myotonia, muscle weakness, and early-onset cataracts. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) result from unstable nucleotide repeat expansions in their respective genes. There have been multiple reports of tumors in individuals with DM, most commonly benign calcifying cutaneous tumors known as pilomatricomas. We provide a summary of the tumors reported in DM and a hypothesis for a possible mechanism of tumorigenesis. We hope to stimulate further study into the potential role of DM genes in tumorigenesis, and help define DM pathogenesis, and facilitate developing novel treatment modalities. PMID:19642006

  1. Childhood Onset Schizophrenia: Cortical Brain Abnormalities as Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Deanna; Lerch, Jason; Shaw, Philip; Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay; Gochman, Peter; Rapoport, Judith; Gogtay, Nitin

    2006-01-01

    Background: Childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) is a rare but severe form of the adult onset disorder. While structural brain imaging studies show robust, widespread, and progressive gray matter loss in COS during adolescence, there have been no longitudinal studies of sufficient duration to examine comparability with the more common adult onset…

  2. Late-adult onset Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    McKelvie, Penelope; Infeld, Bernard; Marotta, Rosetta; Chin, Judy; Thorburn, David; Collins, Steven

    2012-02-01

    We report an illustrative case of a 74-year-old man who, in the absence of intercurrent illness, presented with rapid cognitive decline. MRI showed bilateral, symmetrical, high T2-weighted signal in the anterior basal ganglia and medial thalami, extending to the periaqueductal grey matter, basal ganglia and basal frontal lobes. A (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scan showed widespread reduction of metabolism in the cortex of the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes, posterior cingulate gyrus, precuneus and caudate nuclei, with sparing of the sensorimotor cortex, thalami and lentiform nuclei. A mild vitamin B12 deficiency was found and despite normal thiamine levels, intravenous (IV) thiamine and vitamin B therapy was commenced, with a short course of IV methylprednisolone and tetracycline. Repeat neuropsychological assessment four weeks following treatment revealed increased alertness and interactiveness but significant cognitive decline persisted. Unexpectedly, the patient suffered a transmural anterior myocardial infarction six weeks after presentation and died within 24hours. An a autopsy showed: global reduction in cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity in all skeletal muscles examined; bilateral, symmetrical, hypervascular, focally necrotizing lesions in the substantia nigra, periaqueductal grey matter, superior colliculi, medial thalami anteriorly and posteriorly, as well as in the putamena but the mammillary bodies were not affected. Biochemical analysis of fresh muscle confirmed selective deficiency of complex IV of the oxidative phosphorylation chain. A diagnosis of late-adult onset Leigh syndrome was made. Multiple genetic studies failed to identify the specific underlying mutation. The relevant literature is reviewed. PMID:22273117

  3. Myotonic dystrophy: molecular windows on a complex etiology.

    PubMed Central

    Korade-Mirnics, Z; Babitzke, P; Hoffman, E

    1998-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common form of adult onset muscular dystrophy, with an incidence of approximately 1 in 8500 adults. DM is caused by an expanded number of trinucleotide repeats in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (DM protein kinase, DMPK). Although a large number of transgenic animals have been generated with different gene constructions and knock-outs, none of them faithfully recapitulates the multisystemic and often severe phenotype seen in human patients. The transgenic data suggest that myotonic dystrophy is not caused simply by a biochemical deficiency or abnormality in the DM kinase gene product. Emerging studies suggest that two novel pathogenetic mechanisms may play a role in the disease: the expanded repeats appear to cause haploinsufficiency of a neighboring homeobox gene and also abnormal DMPK RNA appears to have a detrimental effect on RNA homeostasis. The complex, multisystemic phenotype may reflect an underlying multifaceted molecular pathophysiology: the facial dysmorphology may be due to pattern defects caused by haploinsufficiency of the homeobox gene, while the muscle disease and endocrine abnormalities may be due to both altered RNA metabolism and deficiency of the cAMP DMPK protein. PMID:9490778

  4. Is Adolescent-Onset First-Episode Psychosis Different from Adult Onset?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballageer, Trevor; Malla, Ashok; Manchanda, Rahul; Takhar, Jatinder; Haricharan, Raj

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether first-episode psychosis patients with onset during adolescence (ages 15-18) differ significantly from those with young-adult onset (ages 19-30). Method: Consecutive patients presenting with first-episode psychosis (N = 242) were assessed for demographic and illness characteristics such as duration of untreated…

  5. Morphea in Adults and Children Cohort VI: A cross-sectional comparison of outcomes between adults with pediatric-onset and adult-onset morphea

    PubMed Central

    Condie, Daniel; Grabell, Daniel; Jacobe, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Few studies have looked at outcomes of adults with pediatric-onset morphea. The objective of the present study was to compare clinical outcomes and health-related quality of life in adults with pediatric-onset morphea to those of patients with adult-onset morphea. Methods Participants in the study were drawn from the Morphea in Adults and Children Cohort and included 68 adults with pediatric-onset morphea and 234 patients with adult-onset morphea. Outcome measures included the Localized Scleroderma Cutaneous Assessment Tool (LoSCAT), physical exam findings, and quality of life questionnaires. Results Adults with pediatric-onset morphea were younger, had longer disease duration, and were more likely to have the linear subtype of morphea. Patients with pediatric-onset disease were less likely to have active disease. Among patients with active disease, those with pediatric-onset morphea had less disease activity as measured by the LoSCAT. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had higher disease damage as measured by the Physician Global Assessment of Damage, but similar disease damage as measured by the Localized Scleroderma Skin Damage Index. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had more favorable quality of life scores for all measures that reached statistical significance. Conclusion Adults with pediatric-onset morphea differ from patients with adult-onset disease with respect to subtype, disease activity, disease damage, and health-related quality of life. PMID:25156342

  6. A 5-year follow-up study of an atypical case of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Macniven, J A B; Graham, N L; Davies, R R; Wilson, B A

    2005-12-20

    This study presents 5-year follow-up data on NG, a woman with adult onset myotonic dystrophy and progressive cognitive decline who was first described by Wilson et al. The extent of the cognitive impairment is atypical of symptom-onset in adulthood and of paternal inheritance, both of which apply to this case. Together, the present and earlier studies report the results of regular neuropsychological assessments over a 16-year period. Severe impairment in executive functioning, episodic and semantic memory were apparent early in the history, while visuospatial skills and working memory were only mildly impaired after 16 years of follow-up. There was also a progressive dyslexia, initially characterized by the regularization errors typical of surface dyslexia, but subsequently dominated by visual/phonological reading errors. This pattern of impairment is not typical of myotonic dystrophy but resembles semantic dementia. Whilst the deficits may be attributable wholly to myotonic dystrophy pathology, the co-existence of a form of semantic dementia is also possible. It is noted that the aggregation of tau protein is a neuropathological feature common to both diseases. PMID:16286337

  7. Adult-onset Satoyoshi syndrome and response to plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Aghoram, Rajeshwari; Srijithesh, P. R.; Kannoth, Sudheeran

    2016-01-01

    Satoyoshi syndrome is a rare disease characterized by alopecia, recurrent muscle spasms, diarrhea, and skeletal abnormalities Adult-onset disease is reported only in five patients. Most of the reports have not characterized the nature of muscle spasm in the disease. In this paper, we report the first case of adult-onset Satoyoshi syndrome from India and the clinical and electrophysiological response to plasmapheresis. PMID:27011647

  8. Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Langille, Megan M; Islam, Talat; Burnett, Margaret; Amezcua, Lilyana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect pediatric patients. Our aim was to compare characteristics between pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanic Americans. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 363 Hispanic American multiple scleroses cases; demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. A total of 110 Hispanic patients presented with multiple sclerosis before age 18 and 253 as adult multiple sclerosis. The most common presenting symptoms for both was optic neuritis. Polyfocal symptoms, seizures, and cognitive symptoms at presentation were more prevalent in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Transverse myelitis was more frequent in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Using multivariable analysis, pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3OR 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.71, P = .004) and being US born (adjusted odds ratio, 0.553, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.03, P = .006) were less likely to have severe ambulatory disability. Results suggest that pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanics have differences that could be important for treatment and prognosis. PMID:27021143

  9. Differences Between Early and Late Onset Adult Depression

    PubMed Central

    Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Bock, Camilla; Vinberg, Maj; Gether, Ulrik; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2011-01-01

    Background: It is unclear, whether age-of-onset identifies subgroups of depression. Aim: To assess the clinical presentation of depression with onset in the early adult age (18-30 years) as compared to depression with later onset (31-70 years). Method: A total number of 301 patients with first episode depression were systematically recruited. Characteristics including psychiatric co-morbidity, personality disorders and traits, stressful life events prior to onset, family history, and treatment outcome were assessed by structured interviews and compared by chi-square tests for categorical data, t-tests for continuous parametric data and Mann-Whitney U-test for continuous nonparametric data. Logistic and multiple regression analyses were used to adjust the analyses for potentially confounding variables. Results: Patients with early onset of depression were characterised by a higher prevalence of co-morbid personality disorders, higher levels of neuroticism, and a lower prevalence of stressful life events preceding onset compared to patients with later age-of-onset. There were no differences in severity of the depressive episode, treatment outcome or family loading of psychiatric illness. Conclusion: Early adult onset of depression is associated with co-morbid personality deviances, whereas late onset is associated with environmental risk factors. PMID:21866230

  10. Fetal programming, epigenetics, and adult onset disease.

    PubMed

    Lane, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    How early life events program adult disease is undergoing a transition from the broad field of maternal malnutrition to the current relevant issues of food deserts and prematurity. Although many adult diseases and morbidities associate with various early life events and programming, the morbidities of insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and obesity seem to be common end points of many early life events despite potential confounders. PMID:25459776

  11. A nursing challenge: adult-onset Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, D

    1991-12-01

    Adult-onset GM2 gangliosidosis (AOG), also labelled Adult-Onset Tay-Sachs disease, is a slowly progressing disease caused by a gradual accumulation of the GM2 ganglioside in neurons due to defective hexosaminidase A. Recent research findings and clinical experiences suggest that AOG may be more widespread than previously believed. Moreover, the diagnosis of AOG is often delayed because patients present with psychotic symptoms that mimic dementia, schizophrenia, mania, and depression. Because AOG patients typically respond poorly to psychiatric drug therapy and the symptomatology is so diverse, nurses must design and implement nursing care that ensures safety, structure, and comfort. PMID:1759864

  12. Alcohol-Induced Developmental Origins of Adult-Onset Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Emilie R; Washburn, Shannon E; Golding, Michael C; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C; Ramadoss, Jayanth

    2016-07-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure may impair growth, development, and function of multiple organ systems and is encompassed by the term fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Research has so far focused on the mechanisms, prevention, and diagnosis of FASD, while the risk for adult-onset chronic diseases in individuals exposed to alcohol in utero is not well explored. David Barker's hypothesis on Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) suggests that insults to the milieu of the developing fetus program it for adult development of chronic diseases. In the 25 years since the introduction of this hypothesis, epidemiological and animal model studies have made significant advancements in identifying in utero developmental origins of chronic adult-onset diseases affecting cardiovascular, endocrine, musculoskeletal, and psychobehavioral systems. Teratogen exposure is an established programming agent for adult diseases, and recent studies suggest that prenatal alcohol exposure correlates with adult onset of neurobehavioral deficits, cardiovascular disease, endocrine dysfunction, and nutrient homeostasis instability, warranting additional investigation of alcohol-induced DOHaD, as well as patient follow-up well into adulthood for affected individuals. In utero epigenetic alterations during critical periods of methylation are a key potential mechanism for programming and susceptibility of adult-onset chronic diseases, with imprinted genes affecting metabolism being critical targets. Additional studies in epidemiology, phenotypic characterization in response to timing, dose, and duration of exposure, as well as elucidation of mechanisms underlying FASD-DOHaD inter relation, are thus needed to clinically define chronic disease associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. These studies are critical to establish interventional strategies that decrease incidence of these adult-onset diseases and promote healthier aging among individuals affected with FASD. PMID:27254466

  13. Etiopathogenesis and Therapeutic Approach to Adult Onset Acne

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Verma, Poonam; Sangwan, Ankita; Dayal, Surabhi; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is usually considered as a skin disorder that primarily affects adolescents reaching a peak at the age of 14–17 years in females and 16–19 years in males. However, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that a significant number of female patients aged >25 years experience acne. As it is regarded as a disease of teenagers, adults are more apprehensive and experience social anxiety. Hence, adult onset acne has become a matter of concern. PMID:27512185

  14. Etiopathogenesis and Therapeutic Approach to Adult Onset Acne.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Verma, Poonam; Sangwan, Ankita; Dayal, Surabhi; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is usually considered as a skin disorder that primarily affects adolescents reaching a peak at the age of 14-17 years in females and 16-19 years in males. However, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that a significant number of female patients aged >25 years experience acne. As it is regarded as a disease of teenagers, adults are more apprehensive and experience social anxiety. Hence, adult onset acne has become a matter of concern. PMID:27512185

  15. Adult-onset laryngomalacia: case reports and review of management.

    PubMed

    Hey, Shi Ying; Oozeer, Nashreen Banon; Robertson, Stuart; MacKenzie, Kenneth

    2014-12-01

    Laryngomalacia is a dynamic airway condition characterised by inward collapse of flaccid supraglottic structures during inspiration. Although the most common cause of stridor in the paediatric population, adult-onset laryngomalacia remains a rare entity and its management, challenging. Two cases of adult-onset laryngomalacia are reported. A review of the English literature is performed and additional publications identified by hand-searching relevant papers; 13 case reports/series comprising 28 cases of adult-onset laryngomalacia were identified, divided into two main groups: idiopathic (6/28) and acquired (22/28). The aetiology of the acquired form includes neurological, traumatic and iatrogenic. Reported therapeutic measures used are laser supraglottoplasty, epiglottopexy, partial epiglottidectomy, defunctioning tracheostomy and intubation whilst correcting the underlying cause. The majority of patients only required one therapeutic procedure (follow-up of 2-24 months). A strong index of suspicion is required to diagnose adult-onset laryngomalacia aided by in-office laryngoscopy. The rarity of this condition prevents management-based randomised controlled trials. PMID:24615649

  16. Season of Birth and Risk for Adult Onset Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.

    2010-01-01

    Adult onset glioma is a rare cancer which occurs more frequently in Caucasians than African Americans, and in men than women. The etiology of this disease is largely unknown. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only well established environmental risk factor, and this factor explains only a small percentage of cases. Several recent studies have reported an association between season of birth and glioma risk. This paper reviews the plausibility of evidence focusing on the seasonal interrelation of farming, allergies, viruses, vitamin D, diet, birth weight, and handedness. To date, a convincing explanation for the occurrence of adult gliomas decades after a seasonal exposure at birth remains elusive. PMID:20623001

  17. Skin features in myotonic dystrophy type 1: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Campanati, A; Giannoni, M; Buratti, L; Cagnetti, C; Giuliodori, K; Ganzetti, G; Silvestrini, M; Provinciali, L; Offidani, A

    2015-05-01

    Poor data regarding skin involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy, also named Dystrophia Myotonica type 1, have been reported. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and types of skin disorders in adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. Fifty-five patients and one hundred age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were referred to a trained dermatologist for a complete skin examination to check for potential cutaneous hallmarks of disease. No difference in prevalence of preneoplastic, neoplastic, and cutaneous lesions was detected between the two groups. Among morphofunctional, proliferative and inflammatory lesions, focal hyperhidrosis (p < 0.0001), follicular hyperkeratosis (p = 0.0003), early androgenic alopecia (p = 0.01), nail pitting (p = 0.003), pedunculus fibromas (p = 0. 01), twisted hair (p = 0.01), seborrheic dermatitis (p = 0.02), macules of hyperpigmentation (p = 0.03) were significantly more frequent in patients compared with controls. In patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 significant differences according to sex were found for: early androgenic alopecia, twisted hair and seborrheic dermatitis, whose prevalence was higher in males (p < 0.0001). Our preliminary results seem to rule out an increased prevalence of pre-neoplastic, and neoplastic skin lesions in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. On the other hand, an increased prevalence of morphofunctional, inflammatory, and proliferative diseases involving adnexal structures seems to characterize adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. PMID:25813338

  18. Office Work Exposures and Adult-Onset Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Maritta S.; Jaakkola, Jouni J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Background Office exposures have been linked to symptoms of sick building syndrome, but their relation to the development of asthma has not been studied previously. These exposures have increasing importance because an increasing proportion of the workforce is working in office environments. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the relations of exposure to carbonless copy paper (CCP), paper dust, and fumes from photocopiers and printers to adult-onset asthma. Methods We conducted a population-based incident case–control study of adults 21–63 years of age living in the Pirkanmaa District in South Finland. All new clinically diagnosed cases (n = 521) of asthma were recruited during a 3-year study period. A random sample of the source population formed the controls (n = 1,016). This part focused on 133 cases and 316 controls who were office workers according to their current occupation classified by the 1988 International Standard Classification of Occupations. All participants answered a questionnaire on health, smoking, occupation, and exposures at work and home. Subjects with previous asthma were excluded. Results Exposures to paper dust [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.97; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25–3.10] and CCP (OR = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.03–2.66) were related to significantly increased risk of adult-onset asthma. An exposure–response relation was observed between exposure to paper dust and risk of asthma. Conclusions This study provides new evidence that exposures to paper dust and CCP in office work are related to increased risk of adult-onset asthma. Reduction of these exposures could prevent asthma in office workers. Clinicians seeing asthma patients should be aware of this link to office exposures. PMID:17637914

  19. Paternal transmission of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Bergoffen, J; Kant, J; Sladky, J; McDonald-McGinn, D; Zackai, E H; Fischbeck, K H

    1994-01-01

    The congenital form of myotonic dystrophy is reported to be almost exclusively, if not exclusively, maternally transmitted. We present a case of congenital myotonic dystrophy which was inherited from a mildly affected father. This family illustrates that the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy can occur without intrauterine or other maternal factors related to the disease. The possibility of paternal transmission of the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy could be considered when counselling myotonic dystrophy patients and their families. Images PMID:7966187

  20. Diagnostic Odyssey of Patients with Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, James E.; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Day, John W.; Luebbe, Elizabeth A.; Martens, William B.; McDermott, Michael P.; Tawil, Rabi; Thornton, Charles A.; Moxley, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    The onset and symptoms of the myotonic dystrophies are diverse, complicating their diagnoses and limiting a comprehensive approach to their clinical care. This report analyzes the diagnostic delay (time from onset of first symptom to diagnosis) in a large sample of myotonic dystrophy (DM) patients enrolled in the US National Registry [679 DM type 1 (DM1) and 135 DM type 2 (DM2) patients]. Age of onset averaged 34.0 ± 14.1 years in DM2 patients compared to 26.1 ± 13.2 years in DM1 (p<0.0001). The most common initial symptom in DM2 patients was leg weakness (32.6%) compared to grip myotonia in DM1 (38.3%). Pain was reported as the first symptom in 11.1% of DM2 and 3.0% of DM1 patients (p<0.0001). Reaching the correct diagnosis in DM2 took 14 years on average (double the time compared to DM1) and a significantly higher percentage of patients underwent extended workup including electromyography, muscle biopsies, and finally genetic testing. DM patients who were index cases experienced similar diagnostic delays to non-index cases of DM. Further evaluation of how to shorten these diagnostic delays and limit their impact on burdens of disease, family planning, and symptom management is needed. PMID:23807151

  1. NIH study shows increased risk for two types of myotonic muscular dystrophy

    Cancer.gov

    Adults with a form of muscular dystrophy called myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) may be at increased risk of developing cancer, according to a study by investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

  2. Myotonic disorders: A review article

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Chris; Salajegheh, Mohammad Kian

    2016-01-01

    The myotonic disorders are a heterogeneous group of genetically determined diseases that are unified by the presence of myotonia, which is defined as failure of muscle relaxation after activation. The presentation of these disorders can range from asymptomatic electrical myotonia, as seen in some forms of myotonia congenita (MC), to severe disability with muscle weakness, cardiac conduction defects, and other systemic features as in myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1). In this review, we describe the clinical features and pathophysiology of the different myotonic disorders, their laboratory and electrophysiologic findings and briefly review the currently available treatments. PMID:27141276

  3. Comparing illness presentation, treatment and functioning between patients with adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Christy Lai-Ming; Li, Adrienne Wing-Yee; Leung, Chung-Ming; Chang, Wing-Chung; Chan, Sherry Kit-Wa; Lee, Edwin Ho-Ming; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai

    2014-12-30

    Studies have shown that early- and adult-onset schizophrenia patients differ in pre-morbid traits, illness presentation, psychopathology, and prognosis. We aimed to compare adult-onset patients (age range 26-55 years) with an adolescent-onset cohort (15-25 years) in demographics, illness presentation and functioning at baseline. Participants were from two territory-wide early intervention services for adolescent-onset (n=671) and adult-onset psychosis patients (n=360) in Hong Kong. The adolescent-onset cohort had their initial psychotic episode from 2001-2003; retrospective data collection was done through systematic case note review. The adult-onset cohort was recruited for a larger interventional study from 2009-2011; information was collected via face-to-face interviews. Adult-onset psychosis was significantly associated with more females, more smokers, more non-local birth, more full-time employment, better functioning, poorer medication adherence, more psychiatric hospitalization and fewer with schizophrenia than adolescent-onset psychosis (mean age: 20.4). The effect sizes were small, except for medication adherence where a robust effect was found. No group difference in DUP was found. The finding that adult-onset patients had better functioning challenges the view that adolescent- and adult-onset psychoses share a similar prognostic trajectory. Implications for adapting intervention processes for adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis are discussed. PMID:25238985

  4. [Macrophage activation syndrome associated with adult-onset Still's disease].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2007-12-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and potentially lethal disease, resulting from uncontrolled activation and proliferation of T lymphocytes and macrophages. Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory disease. AOSD resemble reactive MAS in its symptoms and laboratory data. Moreover, AOSD per se induces MAS. It is, therefore, quite difficult to differentiate these syndrome and disease. The immunodeficiency state induced by treatment in AOSD could reactivate latent viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus, which could potentially lead to MAS. The therapeutic agents for AOSD, such as sulfasalazine, also could provoke reactive MAS. Because multiple factors are involved in inducing MAS to a different degree, the main cause should be searched for and targeted for the therapy. PMID:18174671

  5. Diagnosis of congenital and adult-onset hypothyroidism in cats.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2006-02-01

    Whereas hyperthyroidism is the most common endocrine disorder in the cat, hypothyroidism is the least common feline endocrine disorder. This is a the result of several factors including low index of suspicion, rarity of the naturally occurring hypothyroidism in cats, and a lack of species specific tests for endogenous TSH and antithyroglobulin antibodies. Nonetheless, hypothyroidism does occur in cats, especially in kittens and after radioactive treatment for hyperthyroidism. The clinician should become familiar with the common presentations of congenital and adult-onset hypothyroidism in cats. In addition, some of the tests specific to dogs (such as endogenous canine TSH) may be utilized to diagnose subclinical hypothyroidism in cats. Fortunately, the treatment of feline hypothyroidism with synthetic levothyroxine is both straightforward and effective. PMID:16584030

  6. Refractory Genital HPV Infection and Adult-Onset Still Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Zheng, Heyi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a systemic autoimmune disease (AIID) that can develop after exposure to infectious agents. Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been reported to induce or exacerbate AIIDs, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). No guidelines are available for the management of genital warts in AOSD. Case report and literature review. We report a patient who was diagnosed AOSD in the setting of refractory and recurrent genital HPV infection, demonstrating a possible link between HPV infection and AOSD. In addition, we also discuss the management of genital warts in patients with AOSD. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of AOSD with genital HPV infection have been reported in literature. We then conclude that the patient AOSD may be triggered by primary HPV infection. Larger number of patient samples is needed to confirm whether HPV could trigger AOSD. PMID:27082556

  7. Efficacy of Anakinra in Refractory Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Blanco, Ricardo; Riancho-Zarrabeitia, Leyre; Castañeda, Santos; Olivé, Alejandro; Riveros, Anne; Velloso-Feijoo, María.L.; Narváez, Javier; Jiménez-Moleón, Inmaculada; Maiz-Alonso, Olga; Ordóñez, Carmen; Bernal, José A.; Hernández, María V.; Sifuentes-Giraldo, Walter A.; Gómez-Arango, Catalina; Galíndez-Agirregoikoa, Eva; Blanco-Madrigal, Juan; Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; del Blanco-Barnusell, Jordi; De Dios, Juan R.; Moreno, Mireia; Fiter, Jordi; Riscos, Marina de los; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Valls, María J.; González-Vela, M. Carmen; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Pina, Trinitario; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is often refractory to standard therapy. Anakinra (ANK), an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, has demonstrated efficacy in single cases and small series of AOSD. We assessed the efficacy of ANK in a series of AOSD patients. Multicenter retrospective open-label study. ANK was used due to lack of efficacy to standard synthetic immunosuppressive drugs and in some cases also to at least 1 biologic agent. Forty-one patients (26 women/15 men) were recruited. They had a mean age of 34.4 ± 14 years and a median [interquartile range (IQR)] AOSD duration of 3.5 [2–6] years before ANK onset. At that time the most common clinical features were joint manifestations 87.8%, fever 78%, and cutaneous rash 58.5%. ANK yielded rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement. After 1 year of therapy, the frequency of joint and cutaneous manifestations had decreased to 41.5% and to 7.3% respectively, fever from 78% to 14.6%, anemia from 56.1% to 9.8%, and lymphadenopathy from 26.8% to 4.9%. A dramatic improvement of laboratory parameters was also achieved. The median [IQR] prednisone dose was also reduced from 20 [11.3–47.5] mg/day at ANK onset to 5 [0–10] at 12 months. After a median [IQR] follow-up of 16 [5–50] months, the most important side effects were cutaneous manifestations (n = 8), mild leukopenia (n = 3), myopathy (n = 1), and infections (n = 5). ANK is associated with rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement, even in nonresponders to other biologic agents. However, joint manifestations are more refractory than the systemic manifestations. PMID:26426623

  8. Childhood adversities and adult-onset asthma: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Korkeila, Jyrki; Lietzen, Raija; Sillanmäki, Lauri H; Rautava, Päivi; Korkeila, Katariina; Kivimäki, Mika; Koskenvuo, Markku; Vahtera, Jussi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Childhood adversities may be important determinants of later illnesses and poor health behaviour. However, large-scale prospective studies on the associations between childhood adversities and the onset of asthma in adulthood are lacking. Design Prospective cohort study with 7-year follow-up. Setting Nationally representative study. Data were collected from the Health and Social Support (HeSSup) survey and national registers. Participants The participants represent the Finnish population from the following age groups: 20–24, 30–34, 40–44, and 50–54 years at baseline in 1998 (24 057 survey participants formed the final cohort of this study). The occurrence of childhood adversities was assessed at baseline with a six-item survey scale. The analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, behavioural health risks and common mental disorders. Primary and secondary outcomes The survey data were linked to data from national health registers on incident asthma during a 7-year follow-up to define new-onset asthma cases with verified diagnoses. Results A total of 12 126 (59%) participants reported that they encountered a childhood adversity. Of them 3677 (18% of all) endured three to six adversities. During a follow-up of 7 years, 593 (2.9%) participants were diagnosed with incident asthma. Those who reported three or more childhood adversities had a 1.6-fold (95% CI 1.31 to 2.01) greater risk of asthma compared to those without childhood adversities. This hazard attenuated but remained statistically significant after adjustment for conventional risk factors (HR 1.33; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.67). Conclusions Adults who report having encountered adversities in childhood may have an increased risk of developing asthma. PMID:23069774

  9. Lower limb muscle impairment in myotonic dystrophy type 1: the need for better guidelines.

    PubMed

    Petitclerc, Émilie; Hébert, Luc J; Desrosiers, Johanne; Gagnon, Cynthia

    2015-04-01

    In myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), leg muscle weakness is a major impairment. There are challenges to obtaining a clear portrait of muscle strength impairment. A systematic literature review was conducted on lower limb strength impairment in late-onset and adult phenotypes to document variables which affect strength measurement. Thirty-two articles were reviewed using the COSMIN guidelines. Only a third of the studies described a reproducible protocol. Only 2 muscle groups have documented reliability for quantitative muscle testing and only 1 total score for manual muscle testing. Variables affecting muscle strength impairment are not described in most studies. This review illustrates the variability in muscle strength assessment in relation to DM1 characteristics and the questionable validity of the results with regard to undocumented methodological properties. There is therefore a clear need to adopt a consensus on the use of a standardized muscle strength assessment protocol. PMID:25399769

  10. Obesity's Effects on the Onset of Functional Impairment among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Kristi Rahrig

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study has two purposes. First, it determines if there is a relationship between body weight and the onset of functional impairment across time among this sample of older adults. More specifically, it examines if obese older adults are more likely to experience the onset of functional impairment. Second, it explores how health…

  11. Adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy: A fresh perspective.

    PubMed

    Chowers, Itay; Tiosano, Liran; Audo, Isabelle; Grunin, Michelle; Boon, Camiel J F

    2015-07-01

    Adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy (AFVD) was first described by Gass four decades ago. AFVD is characterized by subretinal vitelliform macular lesions and is usually diagnosed after the age of 40. The lesions gradually increase and then decrease in size over the years, leaving an area of atrophic outer retina and retinal pigment epithelium. This process is accompanied by a loss of visual acuity. Vitelliform lesions are hyperautofluorescent and initially have a dome-shaped appearance on optical coherence tomography. The electro-oculogram and full-field electroretinogram are typically normal, indicating localized retinal pathology. Phenocopies are also associated with other ocular disorders, such as vitreomacular traction, age-related macular degeneration, pseudodrusen, and central serous chorioretinopathy. A minority of AFVD patients have a mutation in the PRPH2, BEST1, IMPG1, or IMPG2 genes. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the HTRA1 gene has also been associated with this phenotype. Accordingly, the phenotype can arise from alterations in the photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and/or interphotoreceptor matrix depending on the underlying gene defect. Excess photoreceptor outer segment production and/or impaired outer segment uptake due to impaired phagocytosis are likely underlying mechanisms. At present, no cure is available for AFVD. Thus, the current challenges in the field include identifying the underlying cause in the majority of AFVD cases and the development of effective therapeutic approaches. PMID:25681578

  12. [When do you implant a pacemaker in myotonic dystrophy?].

    PubMed

    Babuty, Dominique; Lallemand, Bénédicte; Laurent, Valérie; Clémenty, Nicolas; Pierre, Bertrand; Fauchier, Laurent; Raynaud, Martine; Pellieux, Sybille

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most frequent adult form of hereditary muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation on the DMPK gene. Myotonic dystrophy leads to multiple systemic complications related to weakness, respiratory failure, cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac conduction disturbances. Age of death is earlier in myotonic dystrophy patients than in general population with a high frequency of sudden death. Several mechanisms are involved in sudden death: atrio-ventricular block, severe ventricular arrhythmias or non-cardiac mechanism. The high degree of atrio-ventricular block is a well-recognized indication of pacemaker implantation but the prophylactic implantation of pacemaker should be considered to prevent sudden death in asymptomatic myotonic dystrophy patients. A careful clinical evaluation needs to be done for the identification of patients at high risk of sudden death. The resting ECG and SA ECG are non-invasive tools useful to select the patients who need an electrophysiologic study. In presence of prolonged HV interval more than or equal to 70 ms one can discuss the implantation of a prophylactic pacemaker. The choice of an implantable cardiac defibrillator is preferred in presence of spontaneous ventricular tachycardia or an alteration of the left ventricular ejection fraction. PMID:21549556

  13. Myotonic Dystrophy: Increased expression of the normal allele in CDM infants muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Radvanyi, H.H.; Gourdon, G.; Junien, C. |

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant multisystemic disorder characterized by a highly variable clinical phenotype. The mutation has been identified as an unstable trinucleotide CTG repeat in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the myotonin-protein kinase (MT-PK) gene. Congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM), which represents the most severe phenotype, is exclusively maternally inherited. Recent studies, analysis by Northern blots and RT-PCR provided apparently conflicting results on the mutated allele expression in samples from congenitally affected children. The level of expression of the mutant allele depends on the extent of the repeat in the adult form and is no longer expressed when over 800-1300 repeats, whether in adult forms or in CDM. Could this decrease account for the late onset forms? However, the differences between the two phenotypes cannot be explained by the same mechanism. Alternatively, these differences could be due to differences in expression of the normal allele. We analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR the expression of the MT-PK gene in muscle samples from four CDM infants and two aged-matched normal controls. In two of these, the mutant allele (3.3 and 8 kb) was undetectable on Northern blots. We observed an increased expression of the MT-PK gene (10- to 20-fold) in tissues of severely affected congenital patients which can be attributed to the normal allele. Since expression of the normal allele is either normal or slightly decreased in the adult form, the dramatic increase in the congenital form could reflect a disturbance in muscle differentiation. Expression studies of MT-PK at different stages of development and, especially after the 20th week, are therefore required.

  14. Muscleblind-like 3 deficit results in a spectrum of age-associated pathologies observed in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jongkyu; Dixon, Donald M; Dansithong, Warunee; Abdallah, Walid F; Roos, Kenneth P; Jordan, Maria C; Trac, Brandon; Lee, Han Shin; Comai, Lucio; Reddy, Sita

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1) exhibits distinctive disease specific phenotypes and the accelerated onset of a spectrum of age-associated pathologies. In DM1, dominant effects of expanded CUG repeats result in part from the inactivation of the muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins. To test the role of MBNL3, we deleted Mbnl3 exon 2 (Mbnl3(ΔE2)) in mice and examined the onset of age-associated diseases over 4 to 13 months of age. Accelerated onset of glucose intolerance with elevated insulin levels, cardiac systole deficits, left ventricle hypertrophy, a predictor of a later onset of heart failure and the development of subcapsular and cortical cataracts is observed in Mbnl3(ΔE2) mice. Retention of embryonic splice isoforms in adult organs, a prominent defect in DM1, is not observed in multiple RNAs including the Insulin Receptor (Insr), Cardiac Troponin T (Tnnt2), Lim Domain Binding 3 (Ldb3) RNAs in Mbnl3(ΔE2) mice. Although rare DM1-like splice errors underlying the observed phenotypes cannot be excluded, our data in conjunction with the reported absence of alternative splice errors in embryonic muscles of a similar Mbnl3(ΔE2) mouse by RNA-seq studies, suggest that mechanisms distinct from the adult retention of embryonic splice patterns may make important contributions to the onset of age-associated pathologies in DM1. PMID:27484195

  15. Muscleblind-like 3 deficit results in a spectrum of age-associated pathologies observed in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jongkyu; Dixon, Donald M.; Dansithong, Warunee; Abdallah, Walid F.; Roos, Kenneth P.; Jordan, Maria C.; Trac, Brandon; Lee, Han Shin; Comai, Lucio; Reddy, Sita

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1) exhibits distinctive disease specific phenotypes and the accelerated onset of a spectrum of age-associated pathologies. In DM1, dominant effects of expanded CUG repeats result in part from the inactivation of the muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins. To test the role of MBNL3, we deleted Mbnl3 exon 2 (Mbnl3ΔE2) in mice and examined the onset of age-associated diseases over 4 to 13 months of age. Accelerated onset of glucose intolerance with elevated insulin levels, cardiac systole deficits, left ventricle hypertrophy, a predictor of a later onset of heart failure and the development of subcapsular and cortical cataracts is observed in Mbnl3ΔE2 mice. Retention of embryonic splice isoforms in adult organs, a prominent defect in DM1, is not observed in multiple RNAs including the Insulin Receptor (Insr), Cardiac Troponin T (Tnnt2), Lim Domain Binding 3 (Ldb3) RNAs in Mbnl3ΔE2 mice. Although rare DM1-like splice errors underlying the observed phenotypes cannot be excluded, our data in conjunction with the reported absence of alternative splice errors in embryonic muscles of a similar Mbnl3ΔE2 mouse by RNA-seq studies, suggest that mechanisms distinct from the adult retention of embryonic splice patterns may make important contributions to the onset of age-associated pathologies in DM1. PMID:27484195

  16. Therapeutics Development in Myotonic Dystrophy Type I

    PubMed Central

    Foff, Erin Pennock; Mahadevan, Mani S.

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1), the most common adult muscular dystrophy, is a multi-system, autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by an expanded CTG repeat that leads to nuclear retention of a mutant RNA and subsequent RNA toxicity. Significant insights into the molecular mechanisms of RNA toxicity have led to the surprising possibility that treating DM1 is a viable prospect. In this review, we briefly present the clinical picture in DM1, and describe how the research in understanding the pathogenesis of RNA toxicity in DM1 has led to targeted approaches to therapeutic development at various steps in the pathogenesis of the disease. We discuss the promise and current limitations of each with an emphasis on RNA-based therapeutics and small molecules. We conclude with a discussion of the unmet need for clinical tools and outcome measures that are essential prerequisites to proceed in evaluating these potential therapies in clinical trials. PMID:21607985

  17. Genetics Home Reference: adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia

    MedlinePlus

    ... it causes a severe decline in thinking and reasoning abilities (dementia). Over time, motor skills are affected, ... Schmahmann JD. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids: clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathologic observations. Brain Pathol. 2009 Jan; ...

  18. Voice Onset Time for Turkish Stop Consonants in Adult Cochlear Implanted Patients.

    PubMed

    Dalgic, Abdullah; Kandogan, Tolga; Aksoy, Gokce

    2015-09-01

    The voice onset time is a temporal acoustic parameter defined as the time between the release of the oral constriction for plosive production and the onset of vocal fold vibrations. Hearing impairment is one of the factors that can effect the magnitude of voice onset time. Since voice onset time is a useful, noninvasive method for documenting the articulatory-phonatory aspects of vocal training during speech, we investigated voice onset time values for Turkish stop consonants in adult cochlear implanted patients in order to clarify the effect of CI and sequential hearing rehabilitation over voice onset time values. The CI patients were divided into two groups according to duration of CI usage. We looked for relations between results of the study and average voice onset time values in Turkish language for adults. Mean VOT values for for both males and females in the first and second group are shown in Tables 1, 2, 3, and 4. Most syllables both in males and females statistically significant differ from average VOT values, e.g. They did not reach to normal hearing adults level. These acoustic results indicated that VOT may be an effective measure for examining the effect of cochlear implantation over the articulatory accuracy. As far as we know, this is the first publication using voice onset time values for the efficiency of cochlear implantation in adult patients. [Table: see text] [Table: see text] [Table: see text] [Table: see text]. PMID:26405669

  19. Adult onset unilateral systematized porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bandoyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti

    2014-06-01

    Porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus (PEODDN) is an uncommon, benign dermatosis that is characterized by asymptomatic grouped keratotic papules and plaques with a linear pattern on the extremities with distinct porokeratotic histopathological features. The lesions usually appear at birth or in childhood, although rare cases of late-onset adult PEODDN have been described. Herein we report a case of adult onset PEODDN with unilateral and segmental involvement. PMID:24945650

  20. [Adult onset Still's disease with the initial symptom of pharyngalgia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Enhui; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jingfei

    2015-09-01

    Adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory disease characterized by spiking fevers, arthritis/ arthralgias, typical salmon-colored bumpy rash, pharyngalgia, myalgia and possible involvement of visceral organs. The diagnosis is exclusively based on clinical symptoms, according to the criteria, after the exclusion of well-known infectious, neoplastic, or other autoimmune/autoinflammatory disorders. This report includes one case of adult onset Still's disease with the initial symptom of pharyngalgia. PMID:26647549

  1. The effect of rocuronium and sugammadex on neuromuscular blockade in a child with congenital myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Amelia; Lobo, Clinton; Stoddart, Peter A

    2013-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1) is the commonest muscular dystrophy found in adults; however, it may present in the neonatal period with hypotonia, talipes, poor feeding, and respiratory failure. Inheritance is autosomal dominant with a defect in the DMPK gene found on the long arm of chromosome 19 with variable expansion of the cytosine-thymine-guanine (CTG) triplet repeat. A 14-month-old boy with congenital MD type 1 was scheduled for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) insertion, orchidopexy, and division of tongue-tie. Following induction of anesthesia, acceleromyography was used to monitor neuromuscular function. This revealed a very rapid onset of profound neuromuscular block which lasted significantly longer than would be expected in a child without MD1. Sugammadex reversed the block rapidly. The anesthetic management of children with MD1 has been well described but not the acceleromyographic monitored use of rocuronium and its subsequent reversal with the new cyclodextrin sugammadex. PMID:23763618

  2. Myotonic dystrophy type 1, daytime sleepiness and REM sleep dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves A; Laberge, Luc

    2012-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), or Steinert's disease, is the most common adult-onset form of muscular dystrophy. DM1 also constitutes the neuromuscular condition with the most significant sleep disorders including excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), central and obstructive sleep apneas, restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic leg movements in wake (PLMW) and periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS) as well as nocturnal and diurnal rapid eye movement (REM) sleep dysregulation. EDS is the most frequent non-muscular complaint in DM1, being present in about 70-80% of patients. Different phenotypes of sleep-related problems may mimic several sleep disorders, including idiopathic hypersomnia, narcolepsy without cataplexy, sleep apnea syndrome, and periodic leg movement disorder. Subjective and objective daytime sleepiness may be associated with the degree of muscular impairment. However, available evidence suggests that DM1-related EDS is primarily caused by a central dysfunction of sleep regulation rather than by sleep fragmentation, sleep-related respiratory events or periodic leg movements. EDS also tends to persist despite successful treatment of sleep-disordered breathing in DM1 patients. As EDS clearly impacts on physical and social functioning of DM1 patients, studies are needed to identify the best appropriate tools to identify hypersomnia, and clarify the indications for polysomnography (PSG) and multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) in DM1. In addition, further structured trials of assisted nocturnal ventilation and randomized trials of central nervous system (CNS) stimulant drugs in large samples of DM1 patients are required to optimally treat patients affected by this progressive, incurable condition. PMID:22465566

  3. Evidence for meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.M.; Barnetson, R.A.; Phillips, M.F.

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), an autosomal dominant disorder, is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy, affecting at least 1 in 8000 of the population. It is a multisystemic disorder, primarily characterized by myotonia, muscle wasting and cataract. The molecular basis of DM is an expanded CTG repeat located within the 3{prime} untranslated region of a putative serine-threonine protein kinase on chromosome 19q13.3. DM exhibits anticipation, that is, with successive generations there is increasing disease severity and earlier age of onset. This mechanism and the fact that the origin of the disease has been attributed to one or a small number of founder chromosomes suggests that, in time, DM should die out. Meiotic drive has been described as a way in which certain alleles are transmitted to succeeding generations in preference to others: preferential transmission of large CTG alleles may account for their continued existence in the gene pool. There is evidence that a CTG allele with > 19 repeats may gradually increase in repeat number over many generations until it is sufficiently large to give a DM phenotype. We report a study of 495 transmissions from individuals heterozygous for the CTG repeat and with repeat numbers within the normal range (5-30). Alleles were simply classified as large or small relative to the other allele in an individual. Of 242 male meioses, 126 transmissions from parent to child were of the larger allele to their offspring (57.7%, p=0.014). This shows that there is strong evidence for meiotic drive favoring the transmission of the larger DM allele in unaffected individuals. Contrary to a previous report of meiotic drive in the male, we have shown that females preferentially transmit the larger DM allele. Taken together, the data suggest the occurrence of meiotic drive in both males and females in this locus.

  4. Chronic Pain in Persons With Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Hoffman, Amy J.; Stoelb, Brenda L.; Abresch, Richard T.; Carter, Gregory T.; McDonald, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the nature and scope of pain in working-aged adults with myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Design Retrospective, cross-sectional survey. Setting Community-based survey. Participants Convenience sample of subjects with MMD and FSHD. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Overall intensity and duration of pain, pain inference, pain sites, pain treatments, and relief provided by pain treatments. Results More subjects with FSHD (82%) than with MMD (64%) reported pain. The most frequently reported pain sites for both diagnostic groups were lower back (66% MMD, 74% FSHD) and legs (60% MMD, 72% FSHD). Significant differences in pain intensity were found between the diagnostic groups in the hands, legs, knees, ankles, and feet, with patients with MMD reporting greater pain intensity at these sites than patients with FSHD. Age was related to the onset of pain (participants reporting pain were younger than those not reporting pain in the FSHD sample), but pain severity was not significantly associated with age in those reporting pain. Respondents with both diagnoses that reported mobility limitations and used assistive devices (eg, wheelchair, cane) reported more pain severity than those with mobility limitations who did not use assistive devices, who, in turn, reported more pain severity than respondents who reported no mobility limitations at all. The treatments that were reported to provide the greatest pain relief were not necessarily those that were the most frequently tried or still used. Conclusions The findings indicate that pain is a more common problem in persons with FSHD than in persons with MMD, although it is common in both populations. In addition, these pain problems are chronic, underscoring the need to identify and provide effective pain treatments for patients with these neuromuscular diseases. PMID:18226657

  5. Niemann-Pick type C: focus on the adolescent/adult onset form.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Marano, Massimo; Florio, Lucia; De Santis, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is an inherited sphingolipidosis characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and early mortality. The symptomatology and disease progression of NP-C are markedly affected by the age at onset of neurological manifestations, and categorization into early-infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adolescent/adult neurological onset forms can aid evaluation of disease course and responses to therapy. Here, we review current information on the detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of NP-C, with a focus on the adolescent/adult-onset form. A recent analysis indicated that the combined incidence of NP-C related to NPC1 gene mutations (NPC1) and NP-C related to NPC2 gene mutations (NPC2) is approximately 1 case in every 89 000 live births. In particular, late-onset phenotypes might well provide a greater contribution to the overall incidence than has previously been reported. Some neuropathological features in NP-C are held in common with other advanced age-onset diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Visceral symptoms such as splenomegaly are frequently asymptomatic in patients with adolescent/adult-onset NP-C, and are only occasionally detected during routine ultrasound assessments. In contrast, most patients with adolescent/adult-onset exhibit some degree of slowly progressive, non-disease-specific movement disorders (e.g. cerebellar ataxia), and/or more pathognomonic neurological signs such as vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. An increasing number of adolescent/adult-onset cases have been reported following initial recognition of cognitive impairment and/or psychiatric signs. The recent development and implementation of new clinical screening tools (e.g. the NP-C suspicion index) and biomarkers (e.g. plasma oxysterols) should help identify patients who warrant further investigation and possible treatment. PMID:26998855

  6. Sandhoff disease mimicking adult-onset bulbospinal neuronopathy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P K; Young, E; King, R H

    1989-09-01

    A 32 year old male is described with an onset of upper limb postural tremor in adolescence followed by muscle cramps. Progressive proximal amyotrophy and weakness in the limbs developed late in the third decade. Examination disclosed, in addition, bilateral facial weakness and mild dysarthria. Enzyme studies revealed hexosaminidase A and B deficiency, indicating a diagnosis of Sandhoff disease. Intra-axonal membranocytoplasmic bodies were present in a rectal biopsy. The presentation, which resembled that of X-linked bulbospinal neuronopathy, widens the clinical spectrum for disorders related to G(M2) gangliosidosis. PMID:2795083

  7. Increased autophagy and apoptosis contribute to muscle atrophy in a myotonic dystrophy type 1 Drosophila model

    PubMed Central

    Bargiela, Ariadna; Cerro-Herreros, Estefanía; Fernandez-Costa, Juan M.; Vilchez, Juan J.; Llamusi, Beatriz; Artero, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Muscle mass wasting is one of the most debilitating symptoms of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) disease, ultimately leading to immobility, respiratory defects, dysarthria, dysphagia and death in advanced stages of the disease. In order to study the molecular mechanisms leading to the degenerative loss of adult muscle tissue in DM1, we generated an inducible Drosophila model of expanded CTG trinucleotide repeat toxicity that resembles an adult-onset form of the disease. Heat-shock induced expression of 480 CUG repeats in adult flies resulted in a reduction in the area of the indirect flight muscles. In these model flies, reduction of muscle area was concomitant with increased apoptosis and autophagy. Inhibition of apoptosis or autophagy mediated by the overexpression of DIAP1, mTOR (also known as Tor) or muscleblind, or by RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of autophagy regulatory genes, achieved a rescue of the muscle-loss phenotype. In fact, mTOR overexpression rescued muscle size to a size comparable to that in control flies. These results were validated in skeletal muscle biopsies from DM1 patients in which we found downregulated autophagy and apoptosis repressor genes, and also in DM1 myoblasts where we found increased autophagy. These findings provide new insights into the signaling pathways involved in DM1 disease pathogenesis. PMID:26092529

  8. Adults with childhood-onset chronic conditions admitted to U.S. pediatric and adult intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jeffrey D; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Yoo, Erika J; Houtrow, Amy J; Boscardin, W John; Dudley, R Adams; Okumura, Megumi J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare demographics, intensive care units (ICU) admission characteristics, and ICU outcomes among adults with childhood-onset chronic conditions (COCC) admitted to U.S. pediatric and adult ICUs. Materials and Methods Retrospective cross-sectional analyses of 6,088 adults aged 19–40 years admitted in 2008 to 70 pediatric ICUs that participated in the Virtual Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Performance Systems and 50 adult ICUs that participated in Project IMPACT. Results COCC were present in 53% of young adults admitted to pediatric units, compared to 9% of those in adult units. The most common COCC in both groups were congenital cardiac abnormalities, cerebral palsy, and chromosomal abnormalities. Adults with COCC admitted to pediatric units were significantly more likely to be younger, have lower functional status, and be non-trauma patients than those in adult units. The median ICU length-of-stay was 2 days and the intensive care unit mortality rate was 5% for all COCC patients with no statistical difference between pediatric or adult units. Conclusions There are marked differences in characteristics between young adults with COCC admitted to PICUs and adult ICUs. Barriers to accommodating these young adults may be reasons why many such adults have not transitioned from pediatric to adult critical care. PMID:25466316

  9. Clinical analysis of adult-onset spinocerebellar ataxias in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-ataxic symptoms of spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) vary widely and often overlap with various types of SCAs. Duration and severity of the disease and genetic background may play a role in such phenotypic diversity. We conducted the study in order to study clinical characteristics of common SCAs in Thailand and the factors that may influence their phenotypes. Methods 131 (49.43%) out of 265 Thai ataxia families with cerebellar degeneration had positive tests for SCA1, SCA2, Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) or SCA6. The study evaluated 83 available families including SCA1 (21 patients), SCA2 (15), MJD (39) and SCA6 (8). Comparisons of frequency of each non-ataxic sign among different SCA subtypes were analysed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken to analyze parameters in association with disease severity and size of CAG repeat. Results Mean ages at onset were not different among patients with different SCAs (40.31 ± 11.33 years, mean ± SD). Surprisingly, SCA6 patients often had age at onset and phenotypes indistinguishable from SCA1, SCA2 and MJD. Frequencies of ophthalmoparesis, nystagmus, hyperreflexia and areflexia were significantly different among the common SCAs, whilst frequency of slow saccade was not. In contrast to Caucasian patients, parkinsonism, dystonia, dementia, and facial fasciculation were uncommon in Thai patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ophthalmoparesis (p < 0.001) and sensory impairment (p = 0.025) were associated with the severity of the disease. Conclusions We described clinical characteristics of the 4 most common SCAs in Thailand accounting for almost 90% of familial spinocerebellar ataxias. There were some different observations compared to Caucasian patients including earlier age at onset of SCA6 and the paucity of extrapyramidal features, cognitive impairment and facial fasciculation. Severity of the disease, size of the pathological CAG repeat allele

  10. A Potent Inhibitor of Protein Sequestration by Expanded Triplet (CUG) Repeats that Shows Phenotypic Improvements in a Drosophila Model of Myotonic Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Luu, Long M; Nguyen, Lien; Peng, Shaohong; Lee, JuYeon; Lee, Hyang Yeon; Wong, Chun-Ho; Hergenrother, Paul J; Chan, H Y Edwin; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2016-07-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most common form of adult-onset muscular dystrophy, originating in a CTG repeat expansion in the DMPK gene. The expanded CUG transcript sequesters MBNL1, a key regulator of alternative splicing, leading to the misregulation of numerous pre-mRNAs. We report an RNA-targeted agent as a possible lead compound for the treatment of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) that reveals both the promise and challenges for this type of small-molecule approach. The agent is a potent inhibitor of the MBNL1-rCUG complex with an inhibition constant (Ki ) of 25±8 nm, and is also relatively nontoxic to HeLa cells, able to dissolve nuclear foci, and correct the insulin receptor splicing defect in DM1 model cells. Moreover, treatment with this compound improves two separate disease phenotypes in a Drosophila model of DM1: adult external eye degeneration and larval crawling defect. However, the compound has a relatively low maximum tolerated dose in mice, and its cell uptake may be limited, providing insight into directions for future development. PMID:27245480

  11. Recurrent adult onset Henoch-Schonlein Purpura: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Neil; Guido, Bruce; Mago, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Henoch-Schonlein purpura is an immunoglobulin A (IgA)-immune complex mediated leukocytoclastic vasculitis that classically manifests with palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis, and hematuria or proteinuria. The condition is much more predominant in children (90% of cases) and commonly follows an upper respiratory infection. We present a case of recurrent Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) complicated by nephritis in an adult female initially categorized as IgA nephropathy (IgAN). We review the pathophysiologic basis of HSP nephritis as the variant of HSP accompanied by renal involvement and its pathogenetic commonality with IgA nephropathy. PMID:27617937

  12. Adult-Onset Still's Disease and Cardiac Tamponade: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity. PMID:26175648

  13. Adult-onset phenylketonuria with rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Tufekcioglu, Zeynep; Cakar, Arman; Bilgic, Basar; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Gurvit, Hakan; Emre, Murat

    2016-06-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder due to mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene, which converts phenylalanine (PHE) to tyrosine. Although it is principally a childhood disorder, in rare cases, the first signs of PKU may develop in late adulthood resembling common neurological diseases. Here we report a 59-year-old, previously normal functioning man who was admitted with blurred vision, cognitive problems, and gait difficulty that began 8 months before. He had brisk reflexes and left side dominant parkinsonism. His Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was 25/30, and neuropsychological evaluation revealed a dysexecutive syndrome with simultanagnosia and constructional apraxia. His Clinical Dementia Rating score (CDR) was 1. Cranial MRI revealed bilateral diffuse hyperintense lesions in parietal and occipital white matter in T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, and diffusion weighted images. Diagnostic workup for rapidly progressive dementias was all normal except PHE level which was found to be highly elevated (1075 μmol/L, normal 39-240 μmol/L) with normal tyrosine level (61.20 μmol/L, normal 35-100 μmol/L). Three months after PHE-restricted diet, his cognitive impairment and signs of parkinsonism significantly improved, with MRI scan unchanged. This case demonstrates that late-onset PKU is a rare, treatable cause of rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism with certain constellations such as consanguinity and white matter abnormalities (WMAs) in imaging. PMID:26962957

  14. The distinction between juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Haines, J.L.; Damji, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Because of the significant differences between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma, especially with regard to inheritance, prevalence, severity, and age of onset, we read with interest the recent publication by Morissette et al., describing a pedigree with a phenotype that overlaps the distinctive features of juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (usually abbreviated as POAG or COAG). These authors conclude that a gene mapped to human chromosome 1q21-q31 (GLC1A) can be responsible for both juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. The implications of such a result could be extremely important, in light of the high prevalence of the adult form of the disease. However, while the data presented in this report suggest that variable expressivity of the GLC1A gene may lead to a broader range of onset for this form of juvenile glaucoma, these data do not identify the GLC1A gene as an important cause of POAG. To prevent misleading interpretations of this and similar studies, we wish to clarify the distinction between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. 8 refs.

  15. Late adult onset of Langerhans cell histiocytosis mimicking glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Perren, F; Fankhauser, L; Thiévent, B; Pache, J-C; Delavelle, J; Rochat, T; Landis, T; Chizzolini, C

    2011-02-15

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) with multiple organ involvement is a rare disorder in adults. Extrapituitary involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) is uncommon. We report the unusual case of a 55-year-old woman presenting with a left-sided hemiataxia-hemiparesis, left hemisensory loss and short-lasting episodes of an alien left hand due to lesions of the internal capsule and the right thalamus, extending into the mesencephalon associated with extensive surrounding edema, without pituitary involvement. The neuroradiological image suggested glioblastoma multiforme. Brain biopsy revealed inflammatory tissue and "pseudotumoral" multiple sclerosis was suspected. Biopsy of concomitant lung and bone lesions disclosed Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The treatment with pulsed steroids in association with mycophenolate mofetil led to a sustained, clinical neurological remission. PMID:21131007

  16. Adult Onset of Xanthelasmoid Mastocytosis: Report of a Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Nafiseh Sadat; Nejad, Masumeh Hosseini; Feli, Shahab; Bakhshoodeh, Behnoosh; Layegh, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Xanthelasmoid or pseudoxanthomatous mastocytosis is an extremely rare variant of diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis. Herein, we describe an adult male with cutaneous mastocytosis showing multiple widespread yellowish ovoid papules like eruptive xanthoma. A 60-year-old male visited our outpatient clinic with a 1-year history of generalized yellowish, ovoid, and skin color papular eruption located on the trunk, groin, extremities, with the modest pruritus. Vital signs were stable, and Darier's sign was negative. No other subjective and objective signs were detected during the examination. No abnormality was detected in his diagnostic laboratory tests. Skin biopsy was taken, and histopathologic examination revealed proliferation of mast cells with ovoid and spindle nuclei with distinct cytoplasm borders around the capillaries, which was compatible with mastocytosis. Antihistamine was prescribed for pruritus control which was successful, but eruptions were persistent, and even 1-year phototherapy was not useful. PMID:27512209

  17. Segregation distortion in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Magee, A C; Hughes, A E

    1998-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant disease which, in the typical pedigree, shows a three generation anticipation cascade. This results in infertility and congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM) with the disappearance of DM in that pedigree. The concept of segregation distortion, where there is preferential transmission of the larger allele at the DM locus, has been put forward to explain partially the maintenance of DM in the population. In a survey of DM in Northern Ireland, 59 pedigrees were ascertained. Sibships where the status of all the members had been identified were examined to determine the transmission of the DM expansion from affected parents to their offspring. Where the transmitting parent was male, 58.3% of the offspring were affected, and in the case of a female transmitting parent, 68.7% were affected. Studies on meiotic drive in DM have shown increased transmission of the larger allele at the DM locus in non-DM heterozygotes for CTGn. This study provides further evidence that the DM expansion tends to be transmitted preferentially. PMID:9863607

  18. Adult versus adolescent onset of smoking: how are mood disorders and other risk factors involved?

    PubMed Central

    Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Landolt, Karin; Angst, Jules; Gamma, Alex; Merikangas, Kathleen R.; Gutzwiller, Felix; Rössler, Wulf

    2010-01-01

    Aims To examine the strength of association between smoking and mood disorders and the association between smoking and its traditional risk factors, comparing those who started smoking in adolescence with those who started smoking in early adulthood. Design and participants The analyses relied on prospective data from the Zurich Study. This longitudinal community study started in 1979 with a stratified sample of 591 participants aged 20/21 years, weighted towards those with mental disorders. Follow-up interviews were conducted at ages 23, 28, 30, 35 and 41. Measurements In this analysis the adult versus adolescent onset of smoking was regressed on the cumulative prevalence of mood disorders, personality characteristics measured by the Freiburg Personality Inventory, common risk factors such as parental smoking, conduct and school problems, troubles with the family and basic sociodemographic variables (sex, education). Findings In the Zurich Study cohort we found that 61.6% were former or current smokers, of whom 87% started smoking before the age of 20 and 13% after the age of 20. Adolescent onset of smoking was associated strongly with later major depression, dysthymia or bipolar disorders and, furthermore, with parental smoking, extroverted personality and discipline problems and rebelliousness in youth. However, only depression and dysthymia were associated with adult onset smoking and other risk factors associated with smoking were not so associated in this group. Conclusions Correlates of smoking onset in adolescence are mainly not applicable to the onset of smoking in young adulthood. Smoking onset beyond adolescence is an open research issue. PMID:19624327

  19. Adult-Onset Antisocial Behavior Trajectories: Associations with Adolescent Family Processes and Emerging Adulthood Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mata, Andrea D.; van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Guided by conceptual and empirical work on emerging adulthood, this study investigated the role of closeness to mother and father and behavioral autonomy during adolescence on the development of adult-onset antisocial behavior. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we identified four aggressive…

  20. Physical Therapists' Perceptions of Providing Services to Adults with Childhood-Onset Neuromotor Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton-Griffith, Kelsi N.; Cicirello, Nancy A.; Turner, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Adults with childhood-onset neuromotor disabilities face problems accessing health care services. There are often challenges finding primary care providers or specialized providers, such as physical therapists, who are knowledgeable about neuromotor disabilities. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of physical therapists…

  1. Childhood-Onset Disease Predicts Mortality in an Adult Cohort of Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, Aimee O.; Trupin, Laura; Yazdany, Jinoos; Panopalis, Peter; Julian, Laura; Katz, Patricia; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Yelin, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine childhood-onset disease as a predictor of mortality in a cohort of adult patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Data were derived from the University of California Lupus Outcomes Study, a longitudinal cohort of 957 adult subjects with SLE that includes 98 subjects with childhood-onset SLE. Baseline and follow-up data were obtained via telephone interviews conducted between 2002-2007. The number of deaths during 5 years of follow-up was determined and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for the cohort, and across age groups, were calculated. Kaplan-Meier life table analysis was used to compare mortality rates between childhood (defined as SLE diagnosis <18 years) and adult-onset SLE. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine predictors of mortality. Results During the median follow-up period of 48 months, 72 deaths (7.5% of subjects) occurred, including 9 (12.5%) among those with childhood-onset SLE. The overall SMR was 2.5 (CI 2.0-3.2). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, after adjusting for age, childhood-onset subjects were at increased risk for mortality throughout the follow-up period (p<0.0001). In a multivariate model adjusting for age, disease duration and other covariates, childhood-onset SLE was independently associated with an increased mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-7.3), as was low socioeconomic status measured by education (HR: 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.2) and end stage renal disease (HR: 2.1; 95% CI 1.1-4.0). Conclusion Childhood-onset SLE was a strong predictor of mortality in this cohort. Interventions are needed to prevent early mortality in this population. PMID:20235215

  2. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Kramer, P.L.

    1997-02-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-on-set primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. 57 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. The Incidence and Clinical Characteristics of Adult-Onset Convergence Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ghadban, Rafif; Martinez, Jennifer M.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Mohney, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and natural history of convergence insufficiency (CI) in a population-based cohort of adults. Design Retrospectively reviewed population-based cohort. Participants Adult (≥19 years of age) residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota. Methods The medical records of all adults diagnosed with CI over a 20-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Main outcome measures Clinical characteristics and outcomes for adult-onset convergence insufficiency. Results A total of 118 adults (annual incidence of 8.44 per 100 000 patients older than 19 years) were diagnosed with CI during the 20-year period, comprising 15.7% of all forms of adult-onset strabismus observed in this population. The median age at diagnosis was 68.5 years (range 21.7 to 97.1 years) and 68 (57.6%) were female. The mean initial exodeviation at near was 14.1 PD (range 1 to 30 PD) and 1.7 PD (range 0 to 10 PD) at distance. The Kaplan-Meier rate of exotropia increasing by 7 prism diopters or more at near over time was 4.2% at 5 years, 13.5% at 10 years, and 24.4% at 20 years. Approximately 88% were managed with prisms while less than 5% underwent surgical correction. Conclusions Adult-onset convergence insufficiency comprised approximately 1 in 6 adults who were newly diagnosed with strabismus in this 20-year cohort. There was a significant increase in incidence with increasing age. Nearly one-fourth had an increase of their near exodeviation of at least 7 PD by 20 years after their diagnosis and most patients were managed conservatively. PMID:25626756

  4. Rapid onset pressor and sympathetic responses to static handgrip in older hypertensive adults.

    PubMed

    Greaney, J L; Edwards, D G; Fadel, P J; Farquhar, W B

    2015-07-01

    Exaggerated pressor and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responses have been reported during static handgrip in hypertensive (HTN) adults. Recent work suggests that such responses may occur much more rapidly in HTN patients; however, this has not been extensively studied. Thus, we examined the blood pressure (BP) and MSNA responses at the immediate onset of muscle contraction and tested the hypothesis that older HTN adults would exhibit rapid onset pressor and sympathetic responses compared with normotensive (NTN) adults. Heart rate (HR), BP (Finometer) and MSNA (peroneal microneurography) were retrospectively analyzed in 15 HTN (62 ± 1 years; resting BP 153 ± 3/91 ± 5 mm Hg) and 23 age-matched NTN (60 ± 1 years; resting BP 112 ± 1/67 ± 2 mm Hg) subjects during the first 30 s of static handgrip at 30 and 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). HTN adults demonstrated exaggerated increases in mean BP during the first 10 s of both 30% (NTN: Δ1 ± 1 vs HTN: Δ7 ± 2 mm Hg; P < 0.05) and 40% (NTN: Δ2 ± 1 vs HTN: Δ8 ± 2 mm Hg; P < 0.05) intensity handgrip. Likewise, HTN adults exhibited atypical increases in MSNA within 10 s. Increases in HR were also greater in HTN adults at 10 s of 30% MVC handgrip, although not at 40% MVC. There were no group differences in 10 s pressor or sympathetic responses to a cold pressor test, suggesting no differences in generalized sympathetic responsiveness. Thus, static handgrip evokes rapid onset pressor and sympathetic responses in older HTN adults. These findings suggest that older HTN adults likely have greater cardiovascular risk even during short duration activities of daily living that contain an isometric component. PMID:25471615

  5. Epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus: institutional experience with 2001 patients.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Sun, Hai; Guthikonda, Bharat; Notarianni, Christina; Nanda, Anil

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Adult-onset hydrocephalus is not commonly discussed in the literature, especially regarding its demographic distribution. In contrast to pediatric hydrocephalus, which is related to a primary CSF pathway defect, its development in adults is often secondary to other pathologies. In this study, the authors investigated the epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus as it pertains to different etiologies and in reference to age, sex, and race distributions. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical notes of 2001 patients with adult-onset hydrocephalus who presented to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center within a 25-year span. Significant differences between the groups were analyzed by a chi-square test; p < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS The overall mean (± SEM) incidence of adult hydrocephalus in this population was 77 ± 30 per year, with a significant increase in incidence in the past decade (55 ± 3 [1990-2003] vs 102 ± 6 [2004-2015]; p < 0.0001). Hydrocephalus in a majority of the patients had a vascular etiology (45.5%) or was a result of a tumor (30.2%). The incidence of hydrocephalus in different age groups varied according to various pathologies. The incidence was significantly higher in males with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (p = 0.03) or head injury (p = 0.01) and higher in females with pseudotumor cerebri (p < 0.0001). In addition, the overall incidence of hydrocephalus was significantly higher in Caucasian patients (p = 0.0002) than in those of any other race. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge of the demographic variations in adult-onset hydrocephalus is helpful in achieving better risk stratification and better managing the disease in patients. For general applicability, these results should be validated in a large-scale meta-analysis based on a national population database. PMID:27581317

  6. Anesthetic management of a patient with myotonic dystrophy for laparoscopic cholecystectomy--a case report.

    PubMed

    El-Dawlatly, Abdelazeem; Aldohayan, Abdullah; Nawaz, Sayeed; Alshutry, Abdullah

    2008-06-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is rare disease that offers challenges to anesthesiologists. We report a case of adult patient with myotonic dystrophy who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A 48-year-old male patient, known case of MD, was presented for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Physical examination revealed, young man, calm, quite, cooperative, not in pain or distress with frontal baldness, temporal bone recession, elongated face, mild degree of ptosis and swan neck. Under complete aseptic conditions, thoracic epidural T6-7 with catheter insertion was performed while the patient was placed on left lateral side. Plain bupivacaine 0.5% 7cc was injected through the catheter. Level of analgesia tested with ice reached up to T4. Intravenous sedation was achieved with midazolam 2 mg and ketamine 50 mg. The patient was comfortably lying supine on warm heated mattress, except of bilateral shoulder pains which was relieved with midazolam and ketamine. In conclusion, regional anesthesia, spinal or epidural, is preferable in MD patients. Shoulder pains is the main intraoperative problem encountered in our patient. Therefore, studies are needed for treating shoulder pain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in a patient with MD who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under thoracic epidural analgesia. Myotonic dystrophy (M) is rare disease and represents challenges to anesthesiologists. We report a case of adult patient with myotonic dystrophy who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:18637613

  7. Intestinal non-rotation and pseudoobstruction in myotonic dystrophy: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sartoretti, C; Sartoretti, S; DeLorenzi, D; Buchmann, P

    1996-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant inherited disease of the skeletal and cardiac musculature that involves the pharyngeal and gastrointestinal smooth and striated muscles, resulting in velopharyngeal insufficiency, Swallowing difficulties, gastrointestinal motility disorders and anal incontinence. Gastrointestinal symptoms are found in a large proportion of patients suffering from this disease and may herald the onset of muscular disorders, in rare cases they are even the predominant feature of the disorder. We report on a 31-years-old patient with formerly undiagnosed myotonic dystrophy in combination with a non-rotation of the intestinal tract, an association of disorders that to our knowledge never has been reported before. Our patient was admitted as an emergency with signs of an acute abdomen with ileus, associated with acute aspiration pneumonia. Surgical intervention was avoided once the diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy had been confirmed and the patient was treated successfully by conservative therapy. A review of the literature indicates that conservative treatment of motility disorders of the bowel in patients with myotonic dystrophy is to be recommended. PMID:8919334

  8. Effects of Age, Gender, Bolus Volume, Bolus Viscosity, and Gustation on Swallowing Apnea Onset Relative to Lingual Bolus Propulsion Onset in Normal Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiss, Susan G.; Strauss, Monica; Treole, Kathleen; Stuart, Andrew; Boutilier, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the normal relation of swallowing apnea (SA) onset relative to lingual bolus propulsion along with factors that may alter this relation. Forty adults, composed of 10 men and 10 women in each of 2 age groups (i.e., 20-30 and 63-79 years) participated. SA onset was assessed during 5- and 20-ml bolus volumes…

  9. How does dementia onset in parents influence unmarried adult children's wealth.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kanika

    2016-03-01

    There is a growing concern that long-term care (LTC) needs of older adults lead to negative financial consequences for their family members. This paper examines whether the onset of dementia in parents influences wealth change among unmarried adult children regardless of their status as informal caregivers. Longitudinal data from seven waves (1998-2010) of the Health and Retirement Study (1540 person-wave observations) are used to analyze this question. Unconditional quantile regressions demonstrate that as a result of parental dementia diagnosis, unmarried adult children have lower wealth accumulation above the median of the wealth change distribution. These effects are more pronounced for unmarried adult children without siblings. Further, this response is observed to persist in the subsequent period as well. Both losses in labor income and nursing home expenditures may play a role in leading to wealth declines. PMID:26859082

  10. Adult-onset Still's disease as a mask of Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak-Buś, Katarzyna; Leszczyński, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder, which creates difficulties in making a proper diagnosis. Ambiguous symptoms and results of auxiliary tests, lack of unequivocal diagnostic tests and the need to exclude other causes of the disease are major problems in clinical practice. A case of a 22-year-old woman with dominated recurrent fever, significantly elevated inflammation markers and arthritis is presented. Based on clinical signs after exclusion of infection, hematological and other reasons, the patient was diagnosed with adult-onset Still's disease. Standard treatment, with high doses of glucocorticoids and a disease-modifying drug, was applied, without the anticipated effects. The diagnostic tests were conducted again due to the lack of clinical improvement, increase of inflammatory markers and unusual response to treatment. A new symptom of significance, i.e. mediastinal lymphadenopathy, was found. After the histopathological examination of lymph nodes, Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed and targeted therapy for hematological malignancy was applied.

  11. Experienced fatigue in facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy, and HMSN-I

    PubMed Central

    Kalkman, J; Schillings, M; van der Werf, S P; Padberg, G; Zwarts, M; van Engelen, B G M; Bleijenberg, G

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of severe fatigue and its relation to functional impairment in daily life in patients with relatively common types of neuromuscular disorders. Methods: 598 patients with a neuromuscular disease were studied (139 with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, 322 with adult onset myotonic dystrophy, and 137 with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I). Fatigue severity was assessed with Checklist Individual Strength (CIS-fatigue). Functional impairments in daily life were measured with the short form 36 item health questionnaire (SF-36). Results: The three different neuromuscular patient groups were of similar age and sex. Severe experienced fatigue was reported by 61–74% of the patients. Severely fatigued patients had more problems with physical functioning, social functioning, mental health, bodily pain, and general health perception. There were some differences between the three disorders in the effects of fatigue. Conclusions: Severe fatigue is reported by the majority of patients with relatively common types of neuromuscular disorders. Because experienced fatigue severity is associated with the severity of various functional impairments in daily life, it is a clinically and socially relevant problem in this group of patients. PMID:16170086

  12. Urticaria and dermographism in patients with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Ayabe, Liliane Akemi; Brandt, Hebert Roberto Clivati; Romiti, Ricardo; Maruta, Celina W

    2012-08-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) patients typically present with arthralgia, fever, lymphadenopathy and a transient salmon maculopapular rash. Only approximately 25 cases of AOSD with urticaria were described in the literature. In this article, the authors report three additional cases of AOSD with urticarial and dermographic lesions who had a good clinical response to glucocorticoid and antihistamines. A review of the literature concerning this issue is also herein written. PMID:21785958

  13. Intra-arterial Chemotherapy for Adult Onset Retinoblastoma in a 32-Year-Old Man.

    PubMed

    Magan, Tejal; Khoo, Chloe T L; Jabbour, Pascal M; Fuller, Dwain G; Shields, Carol L

    2016-01-01

    A 32-year-old man with active unilateral group D retinoblastoma that was recurrent following external beam radiotherapy was treated with intra-arterial chemotherapy, leading to tumor regression. Additional plaque radiotherapy and intravitreal chemotherapy were required for complete control. Final visual acuity was 20/40. In selected cases, adult-onset retinoblastoma can be managed with intra-arterial chemotherapy. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53:e43-e46.]. PMID:27486894

  14. Adult-onset Still's disease revealed by perimyocarditis and a concomitant reactivation of an EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Meckenstock, Roderich; Therby, Audrey; Gibault-Genty, Geraldine; Khau, David; Monnier, Sebastien; Greder-Belan, Alix

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 17-year-old patient presenting perimyocarditis as the initial manifestation of the adult-onset Still's disease. Corticotherapy was rapidly successful but induced major acute hepatitis in relation with Epstein-Barr virus reactivation. After 1 year, even if the global outcome is favourable, a slightly lowered ejection fraction still persists. Former case reports and differential diagnosis with reactive haemophagocytic syndrome would be discussed. PMID:23166163

  15. Dioxin (TCDD) Induces Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Adult Onset Disease and Sperm Epimutations

    PubMed Central

    Manikkam, Mohan; Tracey, Rebecca; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental compounds can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in subsequent generations following ancestral exposure during fetal gonadal sex determination. The current study examined the ability of dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo[p]dioxin, TCDD) to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and DNA methylation epimutations in sperm. Gestating F0 generation females were exposed to dioxin during fetal day 8 to 14 and adult-onset disease was evaluated in F1 and F3 generation rats. The incidences of total disease and multiple disease increased in F1 and F3 generations. Prostate disease, ovarian primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovary disease were increased in F1 generation dioxin lineage. Kidney disease in males, pubertal abnormalities in females, ovarian primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovary disease were increased in F3 generation dioxin lineage animals. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome identified 50 differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) in gene promoters. These DMR provide potential epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures. Observations demonstrate dioxin exposure of a gestating female promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and sperm epimutations. PMID:23049995

  16. Globus pallidus deep brain stimulation for adult-onset axial dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Mewes, Klaus; Jinnah, H.A.; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Gross, Robert E.; Triche, Shirley; Freeman, Alan; Factor, Stewart A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Generalized dystonia, both primary and secondary forms, and axial dystonias such as tardive dystonia, and idiopathic cervical dystonia are responsive to globus pallidus interna (GPi) DBS. There is a paucity of investigations probing the impact of DBS on adult-onset axial dystonia. We assessed the efficacy of GPi DBS in four patients with rare adult-onset axial dystonia. Methods Primary outcome measure was improvement in the motor component of the Burke-Fahn-Marsden (BFM) rating scale. Secondary outcome measures were quality of life as determined by the SF-36 questionnaire, time to achieve best possible benefit and DBS parameters that accounted for the best response. In patients with prominent concomitant cervical dystonia we also used the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS). Results GPi DBS improved BFM scores by 87.63 ± 11.46%. Improvement in total severity scale of TWSTRS was 71.5 ± 12.7%. Quality of life also remarkably improved as evidenced by 109.38 ± 82.97 and 7.05 ± 21.48% percent change in psychometrically-based physical component summary (PCS), and a mental component summary (MCS) score respectively. Conclusions GPi DBS is a very effective treatment for adult-onset axial dystonia. Considering its refractoriness to medical therapy and significant impact on quality of life DBS should be considered for this disorder. PMID:25260969

  17. Onset aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability associated with primary caregiver depression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Kuo, Meng-Ting; Wu, Jia-Lin; Chu, Cordia; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2014-03-01

    Caregivers of adults with an intellectual disability experience depressive symptoms, but the aging factors of the care recipients associated with the depressive symptoms are unknown. The objective of this study was to analyze the onset aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability that associated with the depression scores of their primary caregivers. A cross-sectional survey was administered to gather information from 455 caregivers of adults with an intellectual disability about their symptoms of depression which assessed by a 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). The 12 aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability include physical and mental health. The results indicate that 78% of adults with an intellectual disability demonstrate aging conditions. Physical conditions associated with aging include hearing decline (66.3%), vision decline (63.6%), incontinence (44%), articulation and bone degeneration (57.9%), teeth loss (80.4), physical strength decline (81.2%), sense of taste and smell decline (52.8%), and accompanied chronic illnesses (74.6%). Mental conditions associated with aging include memory loss (77%), language ability deterioration (74.4%), poor sleep quality (74.2%), and easy onset of depression and sadness (50.3%). Aging conditions of adults with an intellectual disability (p<0.001) was one factor that significantly affected the presence of depressive symptom among caregivers after controlling demographic characteristics. Particularly, poor sleep quality of adults with an intellectual disability (yes vs. no, OR=3.807, p=0.002) was statistically correlated to the occurrence of significant depressive symptoms among their caregivers. This study suggests that the authorities should reorient community services and future policies toward the needs of family caregivers to decrease the burdens associated with caregiving. PMID:24467811

  18. Cardiac involvement in myotonic muscular dystrophy (Steinert's disease): a prospective study of 25 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Perloff, J.K.; Stevenson, W.G.; Roberts, N.K.; Cabeen, W.; Weiss, J.

    1984-11-01

    The presence, degree and frequency of disorders of cardiac conduction and rhythm and of regional or global myocardial dystrophy or myotonia have not previously been studied prospectively and systematically in the same population of patients with myotonic dystrophy. Accordingly, 25 adults with classic Steinert's disease underwent electrocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, vectorcardiography, chest x-rays, echocardiography, electrophysiologic studies, and technetium-99m angiography. Clinically important cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy reside in specialized tissues rather than in myocardium. Involvement is relatively specific, primarily assigned to the His-Purkinje system. The cardiac muscle disorder takes the form of dystrophy rather than myotonia, and is not selective, appearing with approximately equal distribution in all 4 chambers. Myocardial dystrophy seldom results in clinically overt ventricular failure, but may be responsible for atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since myotonic dystrophy is genetically transmitted, a primary biochemical defect has been proposed with complete expression of the gene toward striated muscle tissue, whether skeletal or cardiac. Specialized cardiac tissue and myocardium have close, if not identical, embryologic origins, so it is not surprising that the genetic marker affects both. Cardiac involvement is therefore an integral part of myotonic dystrophy, targeting particularly the infranodal conduction system, to a lesser extent the sinus node, and still less specifically, the myocardium.

  19. Electrophysiological characterization of adult-onset Niemann-Pick type C disease.

    PubMed

    Iodice, Rosa; Dubbioso, Raffaele; Topa, Antonietta; Ruggiero, Lucia; Pisciotta, Chiara; Esposito, Marcello; Tozza, Stefano; Santoro, Lucio; Manganelli, Fiore

    2015-01-15

    In infantile and juvenile Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease electrophysiological studies have shown central (CNS) and peripheral (PNS) nervous system abnormalities. However, an extensive electrophysiological evaluation of CNS and PNS in adult form of NPC is still lacking. The aim of the study is to assess in adult-onset NPC disease the involvement of CNS and PNS by a multimodal electrophysiological approach. Three patients affected by adult form of NPC disease underwent electrophysiological evaluation including nerve conduction study (NCS), magnetic motor (MEPs), visual (VEPs), somatosensory (SSEPs) and brainstem auditory (BAEPs) evoked potentials. NCS, MEPs, VEPs and upper limb SSEPs were normal. Lower limb SSEPs were abnormal in all patients and abnormalities were consistent with a length-dependent process affecting the central somatosensory pathway. BAEPs were abnormal in all patients with both peripheral and central impairment of auditory pathway. Our electrophysiological findings suggest that auditory and lower limb somatosensory pathways are constantly affected in adult-onset form of NPC disease. The involvement of PNS, pyramidal, visual and upper limb somatosensory pathways might occur later during the course of disease. PMID:25537619

  20. Chinese new immigrant mothers' perception about adult-onset non-communicable diseases prevention during childhood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linda Dong Ling; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Wu, Joseph Tsz Kei; Fielding, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Many non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are largely preventable via behaviour change and healthy lifestyle, which may be best established during childhood. This study sought insights into Chinese new immigrant mothers' perceptions about adult-onset NCDs prevention during childhood. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were carried out with new immigrant mothers from mainland China who had at least one child aged 14 years or younger living in Hong Kong. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach. The present study identified three major themes: perceived causes of adult NCDs, beliefs about NCDs prevention and everyday health information practices. Unhealthy lifestyle, contaminated food and environment pollution were perceived as the primary causes of adult NCDs. Less than half of the participants recognized that parents had responsibility for helping children establish healthy behaviours from an early age to prevent diseases in later life. Most participants expressed helplessness about chronic diseases prevention due to lack of knowledge of prevention, being perceived as beyond individual control. Many participants experienced barriers to seeking health information, the most common sources of health information being interpersonal conversation and television. Participants' everyday information practice was passive and generally lacked awareness regarding early prevention of adult-onset NCDs. Updated understanding of this issue has notable implications for future health promotion interventions. PMID:24842077

  1. The History and Timing of Depression Onset as Predictors of Young-Adult Self-Esteem

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Donald A.; Ueno, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Depression often emerges early in the lifecourse and is consistently shown to be associated with poor self-esteem. The three main objectives of the current study are to (1) evaluate the association between a history major depression and self-esteem in young adulthood; (2) assess the relationship between timing of depression onset and young adult self-esteem; and (3) help rule out the alternative interpretation that the relationship between major depression and self-esteem is due to state dependence bias stemming from recent depressive symptoms and stressful life events. To address these objectives we use data from a two-wave panel study based on a community sample of young adults in Miami-Dade County, Florida (n = 1,197). Results indicated a history of major depression during sensitive periods of social development is associated with negative changes in self-esteem over a two-year period during the transition to young adulthood. Among those with a history of depression, earlier onset was more problematic than later onset for young adult self-esteem, although the difference disappeared once the level of self-esteem two years prior was controlled. The linkages between the history and timing of depression onset with self-esteem were observed net of recent depressive symptoms and stressful life events, and thus robust to an alternative interpretation of state dependence. The findings support the argument that major depression, especially if it develops earlier during child-adolescent development, has negative consequences for one’s self-esteem. PMID:21860585

  2. Distinguishing adult-onset asthma from COPD: a review and a new approach

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Michael J; Perret, Jennifer L; Dharmage, Shyamali C; McDonald, Vanessa M; McDonald, Christine F

    2014-01-01

    Adult-onset asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major public health burdens. This review presents a comprehensive synopsis of their epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentations; describes how they can be distinguished; and considers both established and proposed new approaches to their management. Both adult-onset asthma and COPD are complex diseases arising from gene–environment interactions. Early life exposures such as childhood infections, smoke, obesity, and allergy influence adult-onset asthma. While the established environmental risk factors for COPD are adult tobacco and biomass smoke, there is emerging evidence that some childhood exposures such as maternal smoking and infections may cause COPD. Asthma has been characterized predominantly by Type 2 helper T cell (Th2) cytokine-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation associated with airway hyperresponsiveness. In established COPD, the inflammatory cell infiltrate in small airways comprises predominantly neutrophils and cytotoxic T cells (CD8 positive lymphocytes). Parenchymal destruction (emphysema) in COPD is associated with loss of lung tissue elasticity, and small airways collapse during exhalation. The precise definition of chronic airflow limitation is affected by age; a fixed cut-off of forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity leads to overdiagnosis of COPD in the elderly. Traditional approaches to distinguishing between asthma and COPD have highlighted age of onset, variability of symptoms, reversibility of airflow limitation, and atopy. Each of these is associated with error due to overlap and convergence of clinical characteristics. The management of chronic stable asthma and COPD is similarly convergent. New approaches to the management of obstructive airway diseases in adults have been proposed based on inflammometry and also multidimensional assessment, which focuses on the four domains of the airways, comorbidity, self-management, and

  3. Congenital myotonic dystrophy: molecular diagnosis and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Hojo, K; Yamagata, H; Moji, H; Fujita, T; Miki, T; Fujimura, M; Kidoguchi, K

    1995-05-01

    Recently, an unstable DNA fragment specific to myotonic dystrophy (MyD) was discovered. In affected individuals, a DNA fragment is found that is larger than in normal siblings. Our objectives were to show whether the results of DNA analysis agree with the disease severity and prognosis in congenital myotonic dystrophy (CMyD) by DNA analysis. We investigated three pregnancies (two studied retrospectively) in three families. We genotyped the family members with the Southern blots and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. In one case a prenatal diagnosis was carried out using chorionic villus sampling. This report also presents the three cases of affected mothers and CMyD babies with their growth courses. We clarify four main problems in CMyD, namely, respiratory distress, delayed motor development, feeding difficulty, and delayed mental development. The allele size in the range of 10 to 13 kb tended to be present as the adult form of MyD, and 14 to 15 kb as the CMyD. The three CMyD cases whose alleles size in the range of 14 to 15 kb showed various forms of disease and prognosis. We reached the following conclusions: the disease severity and prognosis in babies with CMyD did not correlate with the result of DNA analysis. The DNA analysis is a useful test for prenatal diagnosis. However, it is impossible to predict the disease severity and prognosis in babies with CMyD. PMID:7612095

  4. Adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis with palmitoyl-protein thioesterase deficiency: first adult-onset patients of a childhood disease.

    PubMed

    van Diggelen, O P; Thobois, S; Tilikete, C; Zabot, M T; Keulemans, J L; van Bunderen, P A; Taschner, P E; Losekoot, M; Voznyi, Y V

    2001-08-01

    The fluorogenic enzyme assay for palmitoyl-protein thioesterase (PPT) has greatly facilitated the diagnosis of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Santavuori-Haltia disease) and the search for possible new variants with atypical clinical presentation. Here, we present the first cases of adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis with onset in the fourth decade of life due to a profound deficiency of PPT. The causative mutations in the CLN1 gene were the known, deleterious mutation R151X and the novel missense mutation G108R. Patients presented at onset (31 and 38 years), with psychiatric symptoms only. At present (ages 56 and 54 years), visual, verbal, and cognitive losses have progressed and both patients have cerebellar ataxia and cannot walk without support. PMID:11506414

  5. Pesticide Methoxychlor Promotes the Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Adult-Onset Disease through the Female Germline

    PubMed Central

    Manikkam, Mohan; Haque, M. Muksitul; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Nilsson, Eric E.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental compounds including fungicides, plastics, pesticides, dioxin and hydrocarbons can promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in future generation progeny following ancestral exposure during the critical period of fetal gonadal sex determination. This study examined the actions of the pesticide methoxychlor to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease and associated differential DNA methylation regions (i.e. epimutations) in sperm. Gestating F0 generation female rats were transiently exposed to methoxychlor during fetal gonadal development (gestation days 8 to 14) and then adult-onset disease was evaluated in adult F1 and F3 (great-grand offspring) generation progeny for control (vehicle exposed) and methoxychlor lineage offspring. There were increases in the incidence of kidney disease, ovary disease, and obesity in the methoxychlor lineage animals. In females and males the incidence of disease increased in both the F1 and the F3 generations and the incidence of multiple disease increased in the F3 generation. There was increased disease incidence in F4 generation reverse outcross (female) offspring indicating disease transmission was primarily transmitted through the female germline. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome of the methoxychlor lineage males identified differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) termed epimutations in a genome-wide gene promoters analysis. These epimutations were found to be methoxychlor exposure specific in comparison with other exposure specific sperm epimutation signatures. Observations indicate that the pesticide methoxychlor has the potential to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and the sperm epimutations appear to provide exposure specific epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures. PMID:25057798

  6. A case of paternally inherited congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, M; Yamada, H; Higuchi, I; Kaminishi, Y; Miki, T; Johnson, K; Osame, M

    1994-01-01

    We report two sisters with congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM) born to a normal mother and an affected father. The congenitally affected daughters had symptoms from birth. The age of onset of DM in the father was 39 years. Analysis of the CTG trinucleotide expansion in this family showed increase in the repeat length with increasing severity, with the smallest expansion in the grandfather and the largest expansion in the younger of the two CDM sisters. This family shows that exceptionally it is possible for CDM to be inherited paternally and refutes the hypothesis that CDM is exclusively of maternal origin. This contradicts several of the previous hypotheses concerning the mechanisms by which the CDM phenotype arises. Images PMID:8064819

  7. MPV17 Mutations Causing Adult-Onset Multisystemic Disorder With Multiple Mitochondrial DNA Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Garone, Caterina; Rubio, Juan Carlos; Calvo, Sarah E.; Naini, Ali; Tanji, Kurenai; DiMauro, Salvatore; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the cause of an adult-onset multisystemic disease with multiple deletions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Design Case report. Setting University hospitals. Patient A 65-year-old man with axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, ophthalmoparesis, diabetes mellitus, exercise intolerance, steatohepatopathy, depression, parkinsonism, and gastrointestinal dysmotility. Results Skeletal muscle biopsy revealed ragged-red and cytochrome-c oxidase–deficient fibers, and Southern blot analysis showed multiple mtDNA deletions. No deletions were detected in fibroblasts, and the results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the amount of mtDNA was normal in both muscle and fibroblasts. Exome sequencing using a mitochondrial library revealed compound heterozygous MPV17 mutations (p.LysMet88-89MetLeu and p.Leu143*), a novel cause of mtDNA multiple deletions. Conclusions In addition to causing juvenile-onset disorders with mtDNA depletion, MPV17 mutations can cause adult-onset multisystemic disease with multiple mtDNA deletions. PMID:22964873

  8. A Unique Case of Pica of Adult Onset with Interesting Psychosexual Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Suddhendu; Sanyal, D.; Bhattacharyya, R.

    2011-01-01

    Pica has been considered as the ingestion of inedible substances or atypical food combinations. Pica has been reported widely in pediatric age group and often found to be co existing with obsessive compulsive or major depressive disorder. Reports of pica in elderly age group are relatively uncommon and rarely does it have an adult onset. In this article we present a case of adult onset pica. A young lady with unusual sensation in her abdomen was found to consume iron nails over years and there was history of dyspareunia since her marriage three months back. On query it was known that the lady is having same sex relationship over years. There unique conglomeration of cultural, psychodynamic and physiological determinants which together is responsible for this unusual habit of this lady. Moreover the onset of the disease at a late age and different psychodynamic issues make the case all the more interesting. Whether the pica is an eating disorder or obsessive compulsive disorder is still controversial. Pica has been mentioned in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV TR. The present case report warrants the need to look into this entity more closely with regards to its occurrence and etiology. PMID:22021963

  9. Predicting abscesses in adults with community-onset monomicrobial Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia: microorganisms matters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Hsun; Lee, Ching-Chi; Hsieh, Chih-Chia; Hong, Ming-Yuan; Chi, Chih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae is a leading pathogen of community-onset bacteremia. This study aims to establish a predictive scoring algorithm to identify adults with community-onset Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia who are at risk for abscesses. Of the total 1262 adults, 152 (12.0%) with abscess occurrence were noted. The 6 risk factors significantly associated with abscess occurrence-liver cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, thrombocytopenia and high C-reactive protein (>100 mg/L) at bacteremic onset, delayed defervescence, and bacteremia-causing Klebsiella pneumoniae-were each assigned +1 point to form the scoring algorithm. In contrast, the elderly, fatal comorbidity (McCabe classification), and bacteremia-causing Escherichia coli were each assigned -1 point, owing to their negative associations with abscess occurrence. Using the proposed scoring algorithm, a cut-off value of +1 yielded a high sensitivity (85.5%) and an acceptable specificity (60.4%). Although the proposed predictive model needs further validation, this simple scoring algorithm may be useful for the early identification of abscesses by clinicians. PMID:26456388

  10. The Onset of Depression During the Great Recession: Foreclosure and Older Adult Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Cagney, Kathleen A.; Browning, Christopher R.; Iveniuk, James; English, Ned

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined neighborhood-level foreclosure rates and their association with onset of depressive symptoms in older adults. Methods. We linked data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (2005–2006 and 2010–2011 waves), a longitudinal, nationally representative survey, to data on zip code–level foreclosure rates, and predicted the onset of depressive symptoms using logit-linked regression. Results. Multiple stages of the foreclosure process predicted the onset of depressive symptoms, with adjustment for demographic characteristics and changes in household assets, neighborhood poverty, and visible neighborhood disorder. A large increase in the number of notices of default (odds ratio [OR] = 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14, 2.67) and properties returning to ownership by the bank (OR = 1.62; 95% CI = 1.06, 2.47) were associated with depressive symptoms. A large increase in properties going to auction was suggestive of such an association (OR = 1.45; 95% CI = 0.96, 2.19). Age, fewer years of education, and functional limitations also were predictive. Conclusions. Increases in neighborhood-level foreclosure represent an important risk factor for depression in older adults. These results accord with previous studies suggesting that the effects of economic crises are typically first experienced through deficits in emotional well-being. PMID:24446830

  11. Intermittent rhabdomyolysis with adult onset associated with a mutation in the ACADVL gene.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Ana Patrícia; Nogueira, Célia; Rocha, Hugo; Vilarinho, Laura; Evangelista, Teresinha

    2013-12-01

    Deficiency of very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) is an autosomal recessive disease. Most common phenotypes occur in the neonatal period or in childhood with cardiomyopathy, hepatomegaly, and hypoketogenic hypoglycemia. Juvenile/adult-onset is characterized by exercise intolerance and recurrent rhabdomyolysis triggered by prolonged exercise or fasting. This article reports a patient with the homozygous mutation c.1097G>A (p.R366H) in the ACADVL gene. In Portugal, VLCAD deficiency became part of the neonatal screening plan in 2004, and as of 2012, 8 early-onset cases have been diagnosed, giving an incidence rate of 1:97.238 per 737.902 newborns. This patient was diagnosed outside of the neonatal screening plan. Beta-oxidation defects pose a diagnostic challenge because of their transient clinical and laboratorial manifestations and the absence of morphological changes in muscle biopsy further complicate matters, especially in the late-onset forms of the disease. The adult phenotype of VLCAD deficiency is highlighted, emphasizing the need for a high suspicion index and the value of tandem mass spectrometry for the diagnosis. PMID:24263034

  12. Adult-Onset Presentations of Genetic Immunodeficiencies: Genes Can Throw Slow Curves

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Katharine S.; Lewis, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review The molecular and genetic mechanisms behind adult presentations of primary immunodeficiency diseases are examined, with particular emphasis on cases where this was heralded by severe, recurrent or opportunistic infection. Recent Findings A detailed analysis over the last two decades of the relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype for a number of genetic immunodeficiencies has revealed multiple mechanisms that can account for the delayed presentation of genetic disorders that typically present in childhood, including hypomorphic gene mutations and X-linked gene mutations with age-related skewing in random X-chromosome inactivation. Adult-onset presentations of chronic granulomatous disease, X-linked agammaglobulinemia, interleukin-12/T helper 1/interferon-gamma and interleukin-23/T helper 17/interleukin-17 pathway defects, and X-linked lymphoproliferative disorder are used to illustrate these mechanisms. Finally, certain genetic types of common variable immunodeficiency are used to illustrate that inherited null mutations can take decades to manifest immunologically. Summary Both genetic mechanisms and environmental factors can account for adult-onset infectious and non-infectious complications as manifestations of disorders that typically present in childhood. This emphasizes the potential complexity in the relationship between genotype and phenotype with natural human mutations. PMID:20581672

  13. Generation of a novel mouse model that recapitulates early and adult onset glycogenosis type IV.

    PubMed

    Akman, H Orhan; Sheiko, Tatiana; Tay, Stacey K H; Finegold, Milton J; Dimauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J

    2011-11-15

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic feature of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age of disease onset. Absence of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy affecting primarily muscle and liver. However, residual enzyme activity (5-20%) leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects muscle as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Here, we describe two mouse models of GSD IV that reflect this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to insert flippase recognition target recombination sites around exon 7 of the Gbe1 gene and a phosphoglycerate kinase-Neomycin cassette within intron 7, leading to a reduced synthesis of GBE. Mice bearing this mutation (Gbe1(neo/neo)) exhibit a phenotype similar to juvenile onset GSD IV, with wide spread accumulation of PG. Meanwhile, FLPe-mediated homozygous deletion of exon 7 completely eliminated GBE activity (Gbe1(-/-)), leading to a phenotype of lethal early onset GSD IV, with significant in utero accumulation of PG. Adult mice with residual GBE exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. Differently from muscle, PG in liver is a degradable source of glucose and readily depleted by fasting, emphasizing that there are structural and regulatory differences in glycogen metabolism among tissues. Both mouse models recapitulate typical histological and physiological features of two human variants of branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:21856731

  14. Bartonella henselae infection presenting with a picture of adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Durey, Areum; Kwon, Hea Yoon; Im, Jae-Hyoung; Lee, Sun Myoung; Baek, JiHyeon; Han, Seung Baik; Kang, Jae-Seung; Lee, Jin-Soo

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient with a clinical picture of suggestive for adult-onset Still's Disease (ASOD) due to Bartonella infection. A 42-year-old immunocompetent man was admitted with fever, rash, arthralgia and sore throat. As his clinical picture suggested ASOD except unusual skin manifestation, we treated him on steroid and ibuprofen. His fever and constitutional symptoms responded immediately within 24hrs of commencing therapy, yet rash and leukocytosis remained. Meanwhile, Bartonella infection was proved by culture of bone marrow. Minocyclin treatment started combined with hydroxychloroquine sulfate and the patient discharged with overall improvement. PMID:27000538

  15. Adult Onset Still's Disease: A Review on Diagnostic Workup and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Gopalarathinam, Rajesh; Orlowsky, Eric; Kesavalu, Ramesh; Yelaminchili, Sreeteja

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology and pathogenesis that presents in 5 to 10% of patients as fever of unknown origin (FUO) accompanied by systemic manifestations. We report an interesting case of a 33-year-old African-American male who presented with one-month duration of FUO along with skin rash, sore throat, and arthralgia. After extensive workup, potential differential diagnoses were ruled out and the patient was diagnosed with AOSD based on the Yamaguchi criteria. The case history, incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, differential diagnoses, diagnostic workup, treatment modalities, and prognosis of AOSD are discussed in this case report. PMID:27042373

  16. Cord Blood Transplantation Following Reduced-intensity Conditioning for Adult-onset Inherited Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Takuro; Kato, Koji; Sakamoto, Keiji; Hayashi, Masayasu; Takashima, Shuichiro; Mori, Yasuo; Takenaka, Katsuto; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Teshima, Takanori; Harada, Naoki; Nagafuji, Koji; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Akashi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Inherited hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a genetic anomaly disorder in which abnormally activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes cannot induce the apoptosis of target cells and antigen-presenting cells, leading to hemophagocytosis, pancytopenia, and a variety of symptoms such as a high fever. The present patient with adult-onset HLH developed refractory disease despite receiving immunosuppressive treatments. He underwent a reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen that comprised antithymocyte globulin (ATG) followed by cord blood transplantation (RIC-CBT). He achieved and maintained a complete donor type. The incorporation of ATG into RIC-CBT may prevent graft failure and control hemophagocytosis, however, further efforts are necessary to reduce infectious complications. PMID:26984088

  17. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Complicating Combined Tocilizumab and Cyclosporine Therapy for Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsurukawa, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Kawahara, Chieko; Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Inamoto, Miwako; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with refractory adult-onset Still's disease presented with ocular herpes zoster infection during TCZ treatment. After three days of acyclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), she developed a severe headache and high fever. Viral DNA isolation and cerebral spinal fluid abnormalities led to a herpes zoster meningitis diagnosis. Her meningitis was cured by high doses of intravenous acyclovir (10 mg/kg for 14 days). To our knowledge, this is the first report of meningeal herpes zoster infection in rheumatic diseases under TCZ treatment. PMID:27092286

  18. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Complicating Combined Tocilizumab and Cyclosporine Therapy for Adult-Onset Still's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsurukawa, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Kawahara, Chieko; Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Inamoto, Miwako; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with refractory adult-onset Still's disease presented with ocular herpes zoster infection during TCZ treatment. After three days of acyclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), she developed a severe headache and high fever. Viral DNA isolation and cerebral spinal fluid abnormalities led to a herpes zoster meningitis diagnosis. Her meningitis was cured by high doses of intravenous acyclovir (10 mg/kg for 14 days). To our knowledge, this is the first report of meningeal herpes zoster infection in rheumatic diseases under TCZ treatment. PMID:27092286

  19. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Khalighi, Koroush; Kodali, Archana; Thapamagar, Suman B.; Walker, Stanley R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an inherited progressive muscle disorder caused by defects in muscle proteins. As the incidence of this condition is low, not many are familiar with the multisystem involvement. At times, cardiac disease may even be the predominant manifestation in the form of arrhythmias, conduction defects, and cardiomyopathies. The progression of the disease can lead to sudden, unpredictable death. Thus, it is important to identify this subgroup and treat accordingly. Objective To identify patients with DM and assess their risk for sudden cardiac death. Methods Nine patients previously diagnosed with muscular dystrophy were evaluated by cardiologists for various reasons, from a general follow-up to cardiac arrest. All of them had electrocardiograms (EKG) and 2-D echocardiograms, and seven of them had further electrophysiological (EP) studies. Results Of the nine patients with DM, eight had EKG evidence of conduction abnormalities ranging from first-degree heart block to complete heart block. Of the seven who had EP studies, five had inducible ventricular tachycardia requiring immediate cardioversion and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implant. Two of them underwent permanent pacemaker placement due to complete heart block and infra-Hissian block. The remaining two patients opted for a conservative approach with yearly EKG monitoring. Conclusion Because one-third of the cardiac deaths in patients with DM are sudden, there is a strong need to identify these patients and intervene in those at high risk. Prophylactic pacemaker placement is recommended even in those with minimal conduction system abnormality. However, the common practice is to identify patients at high risk of conduction abnormalities by EP studies and then provide them with prophylactic invasive strategies. PMID:25656662

  20. Genetic testing of children for adult-onset conditions: opinions of the British adult population and implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Shkedi-Rafid, Shiri; Fenwick, Angela; Dheensa, Sandi; Lucassen, Anneke M

    2015-10-01

    This study set out to explore the attitudes of a representative sample of the British public towards genetic testing in children to predict disease in the future. We sought opinions about genetic testing for adult-onset conditions for which no prevention/treatment is available during childhood, and about genetic 'carrier' status to assess future reproductive risks. The study also examined participants' level of agreement with the reasons professional organisations give in favour of deferring such testing. Participants (n=2998) completed a specially designed questionnaire, distributed by email. Nearly half of the sample (47%) agreed that parents should be able to test their child for adult-onset conditions, even if there is no treatment or prevention at time of testing. This runs contrary to professional guidance about genetic testing in children. Testing for carrier status was supported by a larger proportion (60%). A child's future ability to decide for her/himself if and when to be tested was the least supported argument in favour of deferring testing. PMID:25370041

  1. Blepharospasm-oromandibular dystonia syndrome (Brueghel's syndrome). A variant of adult-onset torsion dystonia?

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, C D

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients with the idiopathic blepharospasm-oromandibular dystonia syndrome are described. All presented in adult life, usually in the sixth decade; women were more commonly affected than men. Thirteen had blepharospasm alone, nine had oromandibular dystonia alone, and 17 had both. Torticollis or dystonic writer's camp preceded the syndrome in two patients. Eight other patients developed toritocollis, dystonic posturing of the arms, or involvement of respiratory muscles. No cause or hereditary basis for the illness were discovered. The evidence to indicate that this syndrome is due to an abnormality of extrapyramidal function, and that it is another example of adult-onset focal dystonia akin to spasmodic torticollis and dystonic writer's cramp, is discussed. Images PMID:1011031

  2. Adult-onset painful axonal polyneuropathy caused by a dominant NAGLU mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tétreault, Martine; Gonzalez, Michael; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Allard, Pierre; Gehring, Kalle; Leblanc, Diane; Leclerc, Nadine; Schondorf, Ronald; Mathieu, Jean; Zuchner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset painful sensory neuropathies are usually acquired conditions associated with common diseases. Adult presentations of known hereditary forms are often accompanied by other organ involvement. We recruited a large French-Canadian family with a dominantly inherited late-onset painful sensory neuropathy. The main clinical feature is recurrent leg pain that progresses to constant painful paraesthesias in the feet and later the hands. As it evolves, some patients develop a mild sensory ataxia. We selected four affected individuals for whole exome sequencing. Analysis of rare variants shared by all cases led to a list of four candidate variants. Segregation analysis in all 45 recruited individuals has shown that only the p.Ile403Thr variant in the α-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) gene segregates with the disease. Recessive NAGLU mutations cause the severe childhood lysosomal disease mucopolysacharidosis IIIB. Family members carrying the mutation showed a significant decrease of the enzymatic function (average 45%). The late-onset and variable severity of the symptoms may have precluded the description of such symptoms in parents of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB cases. The identification of a dominant phenotype associated with a NAGLU mutation supports that some carriers of lysosomal enzyme mutations may develop later in life much milder phenotypes. PMID:25818867

  3. Multiple sclerosis and risk of young-adult-onset Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hajiebrahimi, Mohammadhossein; Burkill, Sarah; Hillert, Jan; Olsson, Tomas; Bahmanyar, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is an association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and young-adult-onset Hodgkin lymphoma (YAHL) as this will signal etiologic similarities relevant both to inherited characteristics and environmental exposures in childhood. Methods: Swedish general population registers identified a cohort of 29,617 with an MS diagnosis between 1968 and 2012, matched with a cohort of 296,164 without MS. Cox regression was used to assess the association of MS with subsequent YAHL (defined as onset between ages 15 and 39 years; n = 20), with adjustment, for age/period, sex, county of residence, and level of education. Results: The adjusted hazard ratio (and 95% confidence interval) for the association of MS with YAHL is 3.30 (1.01–10.73), resulting from 4 and 16 events in the MS and non-MS cohorts, respectively. All 4 of the YAHL diagnoses in MS occurred in women, and the association of MS with YAHL has a hazard ratio of 4.04 (1.17–13.94) among women. There was no notable association of MS with older-onset Hodgkin lymphoma. Conclusion: There may be common risks for YAHL and MS, consistent with an etiologic role in MS for early-life exposures, such as to infectious agents. PMID:27144218

  4. Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 in a family with adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Lynch, David R.; Lukas, Thomas; Ahmeti, Kreshnik; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Ryan, Eanna; Schadt, Kimberly A.; Newman, Jordan H.; Deng, Han-Xiang; Siddique, Nailah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic defect for adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) in a family with 5 patients. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify the shared genetic variants in 3 affected members in a PLS family with 5 affected individuals. Sanger sequencing was used for validation of the variants and for cosegregation analysis. Mitochondrial activity for both patients and unaffected siblings was measured using a SeaHorse metabolic analyzer. Results: Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent cosegregation analysis demonstrated that compound heterozygous missense variants L695P and I743T in SPG7 were the only mutations cosegregating with the disease in an autosomal recessive fashion in this family. The parents and siblings are genetically heterozygous and clinically unaffected. Functional studies suggested that the PLS-associated SPG7 mutants affect mitochondrial function when glucose is reduced. Conclusions: Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 are associated with adult-onset PLS, extending the spectrum of SPG7-linked neurologic diseases. Patients with the PLS phenotype should have genetic testing for paraplegin, especially when the condition is familial. PMID:27123479

  5. Prevalence of adult-onset multifactorial disease among offspring of atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, S; Suyama, A; Cologne, J B; Akahoshi, M; Yamada, M; Suzuki, G; Koyama, K; Takahashi, N; Kasagi, E; Grant, E J; Lagarde, E; Hsu, W L; Furukawa, K; Ohishi, W; Tatsukawa, Y; Neriishi, K; Takahashi, I; Ashizawa, K; Hida, A; Imaizumi, M; Nagano, J; Cullings, H M; Katayama, H; Ross, N P; Kodama, K; Shore, R E

    2008-10-01

    The first study to examine whether parental radiation exposure leads to increased heritable risk of common adult-onset multifactorial diseases (i.e., hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, ischemic heart disease, and stroke) was conducted among 11,951 participants in the clinical examination program out of a potential of 24,673 mail survey subjects who were offspring of survivors born from May 1946 through December 1984. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated no evidence of an association between the prevalence of multifactorial diseases in the offspring and parental radiation exposure, after adjusting for age, city, gender and various risk factors. The odds ratio (OR) for a paternal dose of 1 Gy was 0.91 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81-1.01, P = 0.08], and that for a maternal dose of 1 Gy was 0.98 (95% CI 0.86-1.10, P = 0.71). There was no apparent effect of parental age at exposure or of elapsed time between parental exposure and birth, but male offspring had a low odds ratio (OR = 0.76 at 1 Gy) for paternal exposure, but cautious interpretation is needed for this finding. The clinical assessment of nearly 12,000 offspring of A-bomb survivors who have reached a median age of about 50 years provided no evidence for an increased prevalence of adult-onset multifactorial diseases in relation to parental radiation exposure. PMID:19024652

  6. Frontostriatal dysexecutive syndrome: a core cognitive feature of myotonic dystrophy type 2.

    PubMed

    Peric, Stojan; Mandic-Stojmenovic, Gorana; Stefanova, Elka; Savic-Pavicevic, Dusanka; Pesovic, Jovan; Ilic, Vera; Dobricic, Valerija; Basta, Ivana; Lavrnic, Dragana; Rakocevic-Stojanovic, Vidosava

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess cognitive status in a large group of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) compared to type 1 (DM1) subjects matched for gender and age, using a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests. Thirty-four genetically confirmed adult DM2 patients were recruited and matched for gender and age with 34 adult-onset DM1 subjects. All patients underwent detailed classic pen and pencil neuropsychological investigation and also computerized automated battery-CANTAB. More than half of DM2 patients had abnormal results on executive tests [Intra/Extradimensional Set Shift (IED), Stockings of Cambridge (SOC)] and verbal episodic memory (Ray Auditory Verbal Learning Test). Regarding DM1, abnormal results in more than 50 % of subjects were achieved in even ten tests, including visuospatial, language, executive, cognitive screening and visual memory tests. Direct comparison between patient groups showed that lower percentage of DM2 patients had abnormal results on following tests: Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised, Raven Standard Progressive Matrices, Block Design, copy and recall of Rey-Osterieth Complex Figure, number of categories and perseverative responses on Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and Boston Naming Test (p < 0.01), as well as Trail Making Test-B and Spatial Span (p < 0.05). Our results showed significant dysexecutive syndrome and certain impairment of episodic verbal memory in DM2 patients that are reflective of frontal (especially frontostriatal) and temporal lobe dysfunction. On the other hand, dysexecutive and visuospatial/visuoconstructional deficits predominate in DM1 which correspond to the frontal, parietal (and occipital) lobe dysfunction. PMID:25346064

  7. Congenital and childhood myotonic dystrophy: Current aspects of disease and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Genevieve; Cardamone, Michael; Farrar, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is multisystem disease arising from mutant CTG expansion in the non-translating region of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase gene. While DM1 is the most common adult muscular dystrophy, with a worldwide prevalence of one in eight thousand, age of onset varies from before birth to adulthood. There is a broad spectrum of clinical severity, ranging from mild to severe, which correlates with number of DNA repeats. Importantly, the early clinical manifestations and management in congenital and childhood DM1 differ from classic adult DM1. In neonates and children, DM1 predominantly affects muscle strength, cognition, respiratory, central nervous and gastrointestinal systems. Sleep disorders are often under recognised yet a significant morbidity. No effective disease modifying treatment is currently available and neonates and children with DM1 may experience severe physical and intellectual disability, which may be life limiting in the most severe forms. Management is currently supportive, incorporating regular surveillance and treatment of manifestations. Novel therapies, which target the gene and the pathogenic mechanism of abnormal splicing are emerging. Genetic counselling is critical in this autosomal dominant genetic disease with variable penetrance and potential maternal anticipation, as is assisting with family planning and undertaking cascade testing to instigate health surveillance in affected family members. This review incorporates discussion of the clinical manifestations and management of congenital and childhood DM1, with a particular focus on hypersomnolence and sleep disorders. In addition, the molecular genetics, mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and development of novel treatment strategies in DM1 will be summarised. PMID:26566479

  8. Efficacy of Retigabine in Adjunctive Treatment of Partial Onset Seizures in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Splinter, Michele Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate efficacy and tolerability of retigabine (ezogabine, US adopted name) in the adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults. Retigabine is the first anticonvulsant in its class, decreasing neuronal excitability by opening voltage-gated potassium channels. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE were systematically searched using search terms retigabine and ezogabine for randomized controlled trials published from 1980 through August 17, 2013. Additionally, articles relating to pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, tolerability and interactions were examined for inclusion. Published abstracts and websites of the Food and Drug Administration and European Medication Agency were reviewed for additional relevant information. Results One phase IIb and two phase III trials were identified. Retigabine has been reported to have dose dependent efficacy in adjunctive treatment of resistant partial-onset seizures in adults in doses of 600, 900 and 1200 mg/day. Similar to other anticonvulsants, the most common adverse events were central nervous system related. Retigabine has several unique adverse events compared to other anticonvulsants: urinary retention and, with extended use, pigment changes to the skin and retina. Retigabine is metabolized by glucuronidation and acetylation. There are few drug interactions with retigabine. Conclusions Retigabine has been shown to have efficacy when used as adjunctive therapy in partial-onset seizures. It has a novel mechanism of action, activation of voltage-gated potassium channels. It has less drug interactions than many other anticonvulsants because it is not metabolized through the P-450 system. Its place in therapy has yet to be determined, especially with recent reports of pigment discoloration of skin and the retina with extended use. PMID:24250245

  9. Pain Characteristics Associated With the Onset of Disability in Older Adults: The MOBILIZE Boston Study

    PubMed Central

    Eggermont, Laura H.P.; Leveille, Suzanne G.; Shi, Ling; Kiely, Dan K.; Shmerling, Robert H.; Jones, Rich N.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Bean, Jonathan F.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives To determine the effects of chronic pain on the development of disability and decline in physical performance over time among older adults. Design Longitudinal cohort study with 18 months follow-up. Setting Urban/suburban communities Participants 634 community-dwelling older adults aged >64 years. Measurements Chronic pain assessment consisted of musculoskeletal pain locations, and pain severity and pain interference by subscales of the Brief Pain Inventory. Disability was self-reported as any difficulty in mobility and basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL, IADL). Mobility performance was measured using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Relationships between baseline pain and incident disability in 18 months were determined using risk ratios (RRs) from multivariable Poisson regression models. Results Almost 65% of participants reported chronic musculoskeletal pain at baseline. New onset of mobility difficulty at 18-months was strongly associated with baseline pain distribution: 7% (no sites), 18% (1 site), 24% (multisite) and 39% (widespread pain, p-value for trend <0.001). Similar graded effects were found for other disability measures. Elders with multisite or widespread pain had at least a three-fold increased risk for onset of mobility difficulty compared to their peers without pain after adjusting for disability risk factors (multisite pain: RR=2.95, 95%CI, 1.58–5.50; widespread pain: RR=3.57, 95%CI, 1.71–7.48). Widespread pain contributed to decline in mobility performance (1 point decline in SPPB, RR=1.47, 95%CI, 1.08–2.01). Similar associations were found for baseline pain interference predicting subsequent mobility decline and (I)ADL disability. Weaker and less consistent associations were observed with pain severity. Conclusion Older community-dwelling adults living with chronic pain in multiple musculoskeletal locations have a substantial increased risk for developing disability over time and for

  10. Adult onset sinonasal rhabdomyosarcoma - a rare case report with cytohistological features.

    PubMed

    Sood, N; Sehrawat, N

    2016-08-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a fast growing, malignant tumour arising from immature mesenchymal cells, committed to skeletal muscle differentiation. It is more often seen in the paediatric population and constitutes less than 1% of all malignancies and less than 3% of all soft tissue tumours. RMS of the paranasal sinuses constitutes 10-15% of adult head and neck RMS, ethmoidal and maxillary sinuses being the most common. We report a 56-year-oldman presenting with left nasal obstruction, epistaxis on and off and left cheek swelling. Nasal endoscopy revealed a reddish friable mass, bleeding on touch, in the left nasal cavity. CECT scan showed a heterogeneous growth in the left maxillary sinus eroding the medial orbital wall and lateral nasal wall. FNAC of the left cheek swelling yielded highly cellular smears showing predominantly singly scattered round to ovoid neoplastic cells with scanty cytoplasm and indistinct nucleoli. Few of the cells had eccentric nuclei with moderate amount of eosinophilic cytoplasm. Attempted pseudorossette formation was seen. An impression of round cell tumour was given. A diagnosis of an adult onset sinonasal rhabdomyosarcoma was made on histopathological examination of the nasal biopsy, supported by immunohistochemistry (IHC) showing strong myogenin positivity, focal positivity for PAX8 and negativity for CK, LCA, S-100 and CD99. Parameningeal RMS is rare in adults especially the elderly. However, it needs to be considered whenever a poorly-differentiated neoplasm is seen in this age and IHC is a useful aid. PMID:27568676

  11. Adult-Onset Hypothyroidism Enhances Fear Memory and Upregulates Mineralocorticoid and Glucocorticoid Receptors in the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Pedrazuela, Ana; Fernández-Lamo, Iván; Alieva, María; Pereda-Pérez, Inmaculada; Venero, César; Guadaño-Ferraz, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is the most common hormonal disease in adults, which is frequently accompanied by learning and memory impairments and emotional disorders. However, the deleterious effects of thyroid hormones deficiency on emotional memory are poorly understood and often underestimated. To evaluate the consequences of hypothyroidism on emotional learning and memory, we have performed a classical Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm in euthyroid and adult-thyroidectomized Wistar rats. In this experimental model, learning acquisition was not impaired, fear memory was enhanced, memory extinction was delayed and spontaneous recovery of fear memory was exacerbated in hypothyroid rats. The potentiation of emotional memory under hypothyroidism was associated with an increase of corticosterone release after fear conditioning and with higher expression of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors in the lateral and basolateral nuclei of the amygdala, nuclei that are critically involved in the circuitry of fear memory. Our results demonstrate for the first time that adult-onset hypothyroidism potentiates fear memory and also increases vulnerability to develop emotional memories. Furthermore, our findings suggest that enhanced corticosterone signaling in the amygdala is involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of fear memory potentiation. Therefore, we recommend evaluating whether inappropriate regulation of fear in patients with post-traumatic stress and other mental disorders is associated with abnormal levels of thyroid hormones, especially those patients refractory to treatment. PMID:22039511

  12. Case report: An adult-onset type II citrin deficiency patient in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    TANG, LUJIA; CHEN, LIANG; WANG, HAIRONG; DAI, LIHUA; PAN, SHUMING

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25A13) gene may result in neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency and/or adult-onset type II citrullinemia. These conditions are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The current case report describes a 43-year-old man who presented with sudden delirium and upper limb weakness. Upon admission, the patient was fully conscious and alert but later lost consciousness subsequent to a sudden convulsive seizure. Hyperammonemia was detected and analysis of the SLC25A13 gene identified an 851del4 mutation. Thus, the possibility of genetic disease should be considered as a potential cause of the symptoms of patients with altered states of consciousness, such as delirium and loss of consciousness, in cases where the cause of the disturbance is unknown. PMID:27347070

  13. Adult onset Still's disease accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiao-Tu; Wang, Mao-Jie; Huang, Run-Yue; Ding, Bang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by rash, leukocytosis, fever and arthralgia/arthritis. The most common pulmonary manifestations associated with AOSD are pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion. The present study describes a 40-year-old male with AOSD who developed fever, sore throat and shortness of breath. Difficulty breathing promptly developed, and the patient was diagnosed with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The patient did not respond to antibiotics, including imipenem, vancomycin, fluconazole, moxifloxacin, penicillin, doxycycline and meropenem, but was sensitive to glucocorticoid treatment, including methylprednisolone sodium succinate. ARDS accompanied by AOSD has been rarely reported in the literature. In conclusion, in a patient with ARDS who does not respond to antibiotic treatment, the involvement of AOSD should be considered. PMID:27588099

  14. Adult-Onset Fatal Neurohepatopathy in a Woman Caused by MPV17 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Bryce A; Mehta, Neil; Hameed, Bilal; Pekmezci, Melike; Packman, Seymour; Ralph, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes are classically considered diseases of early childhood, typically affecting the liver, peripheral, and central nervous systems with a rapidly progressive course. Evidence is emerging that initial symptom onset can extend into adulthood, though few such cases have been reported. We describe a 25-year-old woman who presented initially with secondary amenorrhea, followed by a megaloblastic anemia, lactic acidosis, leukoencephalopathy, progressive peripheral neuropathy, and liver cirrhosis. An apparently homozygous P98L mutation was identified in MPV17, a gene associated with a lethal infantile neurohepatopathy. Homozygosity for the same allele was recently reported in a man with a similar hepatic and neurologic phenotype. This is the first clinical report of an adult female with this disorder, and the first to describe amenorrhea and megaloblastic anemia as likely associated symptoms. PMID:24190800

  15. Hidden in plain sight: macrophage activation syndrome complicating Adult Onset Still's Disease.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Lourdes; Vila, Salvador; Mellado, Robert Hunter

    2010-01-01

    Hemophagocytic Lymphystiocytosis is a rare and fatal complication of rheumatic diseases, particularly Adult Onset Still's Disease (AOSD). It may be precipitated with immunosuppressive drugs and with viral and bacterial infections. A diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion associated to certain clinical manifestations (fever, rash, Splemomegaly, any cytology blood dyscrasia, hipertrigliceridemia, hiperfibrinogenemia, and others), as well as pathologic evidence of hemophagocitosis from bone marrow biopsy or tissue samples of affected organs. Therapy consists of high dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs. We present a 42 year old woman with AOSD in remission who developed HLH in spite of receiving therapy with high dose steroids and immunosuppressive drugs. She had 2 negative bone marrow aspirates. Evidence of Hemophagocytosis was detected in both bone marrow biopsies. Timely evaluation and recognition of the signs and symptoms of HLH is crucial for the prompt management and a decrease in the mortality associated with this disease. PMID:23875527

  16. A mouse model of adult-onset anaemia due to erythropoietin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shun; Souma, Tomokazu; Hirano, Ikuo; Pan, Xiaoqing; Minegishi, Naoko; Suzuki, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoietin regulates erythropoiesis in a hypoxia-inducible manner. Here we generate inherited super-anaemic mice (ISAM) as a mouse model of adult-onset anaemia caused by erythropoietin deficiency. ISAM express erythropoietin in the liver but lack erythropoietin production in the kidney. Around weaning age, when the major erythropoietin-producing organ switches from the liver to the kidney, ISAM develop anaemia due to erythropoietin deficiency, which is curable by administration of recombinant erythropoietin. In ISAM severe chronic anaemia enhances transgenic green fluorescent protein and Cre expression driven by the complete erythropoietin-gene regulatory regions, which facilitates efficient labelling of renal erythropoietin-producing cells. We show that the majority of cortical and outer medullary fibroblasts have the innate potential to produce erythropoietin, and also reveal a new set of erythropoietin target genes. ISAM are a useful tool for the evaluation of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and to trace the dynamics of erythropoietin-producing cells. PMID:23727690

  17. Predictive Medicine: Recombinant DNA Technology and Adult-Onset Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Genetic factors are of great importance in common adult-onset disorders such as atherosclerosis, cancer, and neuro-degenerative diseases. Advances in DNA technology now allow identification of persons at high-risk of developing some of these diseases. This advance is leading to predictive medicine. In some genetic disorders, such as those leading to atherosclerosis and cancer, identification of high-risk individuals allows intervention which alters the natural history of the disorder. In other diseases, for which there is no treatment, such as Huntington's disease, the application of this technology provides information that relieves uncertainty and may affect quality of life, but does not alter the course of the illness. General implementation of predictive testing programs awaits the results of pilot projects, which will demonstrate the needs, appropriate levels of support, and guidelines for delivery of such testing. PMID:21253100

  18. Bone Characteristics and Their Determinants in Adolescents and Young Adults with Early-Onset Severe Obesity.

    PubMed

    Viljakainen, H T; Valta, H; Lipsanen-Nyman, M; Saukkonen, T; Kajantie, E; Andersson, S; Mäkitie, O

    2015-10-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with compromised bone health. We studied bone characteristics and their determinants in obese young adults. The study included 68 subjects with early-onset severe obesity and 73 normal-weight controls. Data on physical activity (PA), diet and smoking were collected. Bone characteristics were measured using peripheral QCT. The obese and control subjects were similar in age (mean 19.6 ± 2.6 years) and height but BMIs differed (39.7 and 22.6 kg/m(2)). A clustering of unhealthy lifestyles was marked: Obese subjects reported less supervised PA in childhood, adolescence and currently (p < 0.03) and were more likely to smoke (p = 0.005), and had a lower healthy eating index (HEI) (p = 0.007) but similar alcohol consumption compared with controls. In obese women, all crude bone characteristics were higher than in controls; in men, the differences were smaller. Associations of lifestyle factors with bone characteristics were tested using partial correlations. Independently of BMI, supervised PA in adolescence and alcohol consumption were related positively to bone characteristics in both groups. HEI associated positively with bone characteristics only in controls, while smoking was a positive determinant of bone characteristics only in obese subjects. The multivariate model showed that the contribution of lifestyle factors to bone characteristics was minimal compared with BMI. Early-onset obesity is accompanied by poor dietary quality, sedentary lifestyle, and more frequent smoking, but the overall contribution of these lifestyle factors to bone strength is limited. Bone strength is more likely to be compromised in men and in unloaded bone sites in subjects with early-onset severe obesity. The impact of obesity-related endocrine changes on bone characteristics need to be evaluated in future studies. PMID:26139232

  19. Multimodal Image Analysis in Acquired Vitelliform Lesions and Adult-Onset Foveomacular Vitelliform Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rocha Bastos, Ricardo; Ferreira, Carla Sofia; Brandão, Elisete; Falcão-Reis, Fernando; Carneiro, Ângela M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize vitelliform lesions (VLs) in adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy (AOFVD) and acquired vitelliform (AVL) patients using multimodal image analysis. Methods. Retrospective study of twenty-eight eyes from nineteen patients diagnosed with AVL or AOFVD. They were evaluated by color fundus photographs, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fluorescein angiography (FA), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Results. Bilateral VLs were associated with AOFVD (p = 0.013). Regular and centered VLs were associated with AOFVD (p = 0.004 and p = 0.016), whereas irregular and noncentered lesions were more frequent in AVL patients. Visual acuity, greatest linear dimension (GLD), lesion height (LH), and pseudohypopyon were similar between groups. Whereas median LH and GLD in AVL group diminished significantly during follow-up (p = 0.009 and p = 0.001), AOFVD lesions tended to become larger and thicker. Conclusions. When consulting a patient presenting a VL with unknown age of onset, familial history, or previous retinal diseases, some aspects of multimodal imaging assessment may lead the ophthalmologist to a correct diagnosis. PMID:27190637

  20. Cathepsin F mutations cause Type B Kufs disease, an adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine R.; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; Canafoglia, Laura; Andermann, Eva; Damiano, John; Morbin, Michela; Bruni, Amalia C.; Giaccone, Giorgio; Cossette, Patrick; Saftig, Paul; Grötzinger, Joachim; Schwake, Michael; Andermann, Frederick; Staropoli, John F.; Sims, Katherine B.; Mole, Sara E.; Franceschetti, Silvana; Alexander, Noreen A.; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Chapman, Harold A.; Carpenter, Stirling; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Kufs disease, an adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is challenging to diagnose and genetically heterogeneous. Mutations in CLN6 were recently identified in recessive Kufs disease presenting as progressive myoclonus epilepsy (Type A), whereas the molecular basis of cases presenting with dementia and motor features (Type B) is unknown. We performed genome-wide linkage mapping of two families with recessive Type B Kufs disease and identified a single region on chromosome 11 to which both families showed linkage. Exome sequencing of five samples from the two families identified homozygous and compound heterozygous missense mutations in CTSF within this linkage region. We subsequently sequenced CTSF in 22 unrelated individuals with suspected recessive Kufs disease, and identified an additional patient with compound heterozygous mutations. CTSF encodes cathepsin F, a lysosomal cysteine protease, dysfunction of which is a highly plausible candidate mechanism for a storage disorder like ceroid lipofuscinosis. In silico modeling suggested the missense mutations would alter protein structure and function. Moreover, re-examination of a previously published mouse knockout of Ctsf shows that it recapitulates the light and electron-microscopic pathological features of Kufs disease. Although CTSF mutations account for a minority of cases of type B Kufs, CTSF screening should be considered in cases with early-onset dementia and may avoid the need for invasive biopsies. PMID:23297359

  1. Multimodal Image Analysis in Acquired Vitelliform Lesions and Adult-Onset Foveomacular Vitelliform Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rocha Bastos, Ricardo; Ferreira, Carla Sofia; Brandão, Elisete; Falcão-Reis, Fernando; Carneiro, Ângela M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize vitelliform lesions (VLs) in adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy (AOFVD) and acquired vitelliform (AVL) patients using multimodal image analysis. Methods. Retrospective study of twenty-eight eyes from nineteen patients diagnosed with AVL or AOFVD. They were evaluated by color fundus photographs, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fluorescein angiography (FA), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Results. Bilateral VLs were associated with AOFVD (p = 0.013). Regular and centered VLs were associated with AOFVD (p = 0.004 and p = 0.016), whereas irregular and noncentered lesions were more frequent in AVL patients. Visual acuity, greatest linear dimension (GLD), lesion height (LH), and pseudohypopyon were similar between groups. Whereas median LH and GLD in AVL group diminished significantly during follow-up (p = 0.009 and p = 0.001), AOFVD lesions tended to become larger and thicker. Conclusions. When consulting a patient presenting a VL with unknown age of onset, familial history, or previous retinal diseases, some aspects of multimodal imaging assessment may lead the ophthalmologist to a correct diagnosis. PMID:27190637

  2. [A case of adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2) triggered by an overseas travel].

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masayoshi; Shimada, Takuya; Hamaoka, Shima; Shibata, Masunari; Naito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old male presented with abnormal behavior and consciousness disturbance on the day after traveling abroad and was admitted to our hospital. Laboratory tests showed hyperammonemia and hypercitrullinemia. The electro-encephalogram showed frontal dominant bilateral slow δ burst. He had a peculiar taste for nuts. But he didn't take nuts during the overseas travel for 3 days. The family history revealed that his younger brother died of a status epilepticus of unknown cause at the age of 29. These findings were compatible with hepatic encephalopathy due to adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). Gene analysis provided a definite diagnosis of CTLN2. Diet and drug therapy have improved his condition. He is due to have liver transplantation which is the only established radical treatment for CTLN2 if his condition becomes worse. The present case shows that cessation of the habitual intake of nuts only for 3 days could lead to onset of CTLN2. PMID:25283831

  3. Differences in B7 and CD28 family gene expression in the peripheral blood between newly diagnosed young-onset and adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Pruul, K; Kisand, K; Alnek, K; Metsküla, K; Reimand, K; Heilman, K; Peet, A; Varik, K; Peetsalu, M; Einberg, Ü; Tillmann, V; Uibo, R

    2015-09-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, and there are pathogenetic differences between young- and adult-onset T1D patients. We hypothesized that the expressions of genes involved in costimulatory immune system pathways in peripheral blood are differently regulated in young- and adult-onset T1D. Study group I consisted of 80 children, adolescents, and young adults (age range 1.4-21.4 y; 31 controls and 49 T1D patients). Study group II consisted of 48 adults (age range 22.0-78.4 y; 30 controls and 18 T1D patients). The mRNA expression levels of CD86, CD28, CD25, CD226, CD40, BTLA, GITR, PDCD1, FoxP3, TGF-β, ICOS, sCTLA4, flCTLA4, and CD80 were measured in peripheral blood. Genetic polymorphisms (HLA haplotypes; rs231806, rs231775, and rs3087243 in CTLA4; rs763361 in CD226; and rs706778 in CD25) and T1D-associated autoantibodies were analyzed. In group I, there was significantly lower expression of CD226 in T1D patients than in the controls. In group II, there were significantly higher expression levels of CD86 and TGF-β in T1D patients than in the controls. In the T1D patients in group I, the upregulated CD80 expression correlated with the expression of both CTLA4 splice variants (sCTLA4 and flCTLA4). In contrast, in group II, upregulated CD86 correlated with TGF-β and CD25. In group I, the inhibitory CD80-CTLA4 pathway was activated, whereas, in group II, the activation CD86-CD28 pathway and TGF-β production were activated. These results emphasize the differences between young-onset and adult-onset T1D in the regulation of costimulatory pathways. These differences should be considered when developing novel treatments for T1D. PMID:25980680

  4. Size of the unstable CTG repeat sequence in relation to phenotype and parental transmission in myotonic dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, H.G.; Rundle, S.A.; MacMillan, J.C.; Myring, J.; Brook, J.D.; Crow, S.; Reardon, W.; Fenton, I.; Shaw, D.J.; Harper, P.S. )

    1993-06-01

    A clinical and molecular analysis of 439 individuals affected with myotonic dystrophy, from 101 kindreds, has shown that the size of the unstable CTG repeat detected in nearly all cases of myotonic dystrophy is related both to age at onset of the disorder and to the severity of the phenotype. The largest repeat sizes (1.5--6.0 kb) are seen in patients with congenital myotonic dystrophy, while the minimally affected patients have repeat sizes of < 0.5 kb. Comparison of parent-child pairs has shown that most offspring have an earlier age at onset and a larger repeat size than their parents, with only 4 of 182 showing a definite decrease in repeat size, accompanied by a later age at onset or less severe phenotype. Increase in repeat size from parent to child is similar for both paternal and maternal transmissions when the increase is expressed as a proportion of the parental repeat size. Analysis of congenitally affected cases shows not only that they have, on average, the largest repeat sizes but also that their mothers have larger mean repeat sizes, supporting previous suggestions that a maternal effect is involved in the pathogenesis of this form of the disorder. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Genes and Pathways Involved in Adult Onset Disorders Featuring Muscle Mitochondrial DNA Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Naghia; Ronchi, Dario; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Replication and maintenance of mtDNA entirely relies on a set of proteins encoded by the nuclear genome, which include members of the core replicative machinery, proteins involved in the homeostasis of mitochondrial dNTPs pools or deputed to the control of mitochondrial dynamics and morphology. Mutations in their coding genes have been observed in familial and sporadic forms of pediatric and adult-onset clinical phenotypes featuring mtDNA instability. The list of defects involved in these disorders has recently expanded, including mutations in the exo-/endo-nuclease flap-processing proteins MGME1 and DNA2, supporting the notion that an enzymatic DNA repair system actively takes place in mitochondria. The results obtained in the last few years acknowledge the contribution of next-generation sequencing methods in the identification of new disease loci in small groups of patients and even single probands. Although heterogeneous, these genes can be conveniently classified according to the pathway to which they belong. The definition of the molecular and biochemical features of these pathways might be helpful for fundamental knowledge of these disorders, to accelerate genetic diagnosis of patients and the development of rational therapies. In this review, we discuss the molecular findings disclosed in adult patients with muscle pathology hallmarked by mtDNA instability. PMID:26251896

  6. Effects of Aging and Adult-Onset Hearing Loss on Cortical Auditory Regions

    PubMed Central

    Cardin, Velia

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common feature in human aging. It has been argued that dysfunctions in central processing are important contributing factors to hearing loss during older age. Aging also has well documented consequences for neural structure and function, but it is not clear how these effects interact with those that arise as a consequence of hearing loss. This paper reviews the effects of aging and adult-onset hearing loss in the structure and function of cortical auditory regions. The evidence reviewed suggests that aging and hearing loss result in atrophy of cortical auditory regions and stronger engagement of networks involved in the detection of salient events, adaptive control and re-allocation of attention. These cortical mechanisms are engaged during listening in effortful conditions in normal hearing individuals. Therefore, as a consequence of aging and hearing loss, all listening becomes effortful and cognitive load is constantly high, reducing the amount of available cognitive resources. This constant effortful listening and reduced cognitive spare capacity could be what accelerates cognitive decline in older adults with hearing loss. PMID:27242405

  7. Evolution of disease phenotype in adult and pediatric onset Crohn’s disease in a population-based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lovasz, Barbara Dorottya; Lakatos, Laszlo; Horvath, Agnes; Szita, Istvan; Pandur, Tunde; Mandel, Michael; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Golovics, Petra Anna; Mester, Gabor; Balogh, Mihaly; Molnar, Csaba; Komaromi, Erzsebet; Kiss, Lajos Sandor; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the evolution of disease phenotype in adult and pediatric onset Crohn’s disease (CD) populations, diagnosed between 1977 and 2008. METHODS: Data of 506 incident CD patients were analyzed (age at diagnosis: 28.5 years, interquartile range: 22-38 years). Both in- and outpatient records were collected prospectively with a complete clinical follow-up and comprehensively reviewed in the population-based Veszprem province database, which included incident patients diagnosed between January 1, 1977 and December 31, 2008 in adult and pediatric onset CD populations. Disease phenotype according to the Montreal classification and long-term disease course was analysed according to the age at onset in time-dependent univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Among this population-based cohort, seventy-four (12.8%) pediatric-onset CD patients were identified (diagnosed ≤ 17 years of age). There was no significant difference in the distribution of disease behavior between pediatric (B1: 62%, B2: 15%, B3: 23%) and adult-onset CD patients (B1: 56%, B2: 21%, B3: 23%) at diagnosis, or during follow-up. Overall, the probability of developing complicated disease behaviour was 49.7% and 61.3% in the pediatric and 55.1% and 62.4% in the adult onset patients after 5- and 10-years of follow-up. Similarly, time to change in disease behaviour from non stricturing, non penetrating (B1) to complicated, stricturing or penetrating (B2/B3) disease was not significantly different between pediatric and adult onset CD in a Kaplan-Meier analysis. Calendar year of diagnosis (P = 0.04), ileal location (P < 0.001), perianal disease (P < 0.001), smoking (P = 0.038) and need for steroids (P < 0.001) were associated with presence of, or progression to, complicated disease behavior at diagnosis and during follow-up. A change in disease location was observed in 8.9% of patients and it was associated with smoking status (P = 0.01), but not with age at diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Long

  8. The Effects of Onset and Offset Warning and Post-Target Stimuli on the Saccade Latency of Children and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Susan M.; Ross, Leonard E.

    1983-01-01

    Two studies involving children (mean age of 10 years) and adults investigated the effects of visual stimulus onsets and offsets on the latency of saccades to peripheral targets. Results were interpreted as indicating that, while stimulus intake processes have a greater interference effect on children's eye movements, oculomotor processes are…

  9. Steatogenesis in adult-onset type II citrullinemia is associated with down-regulation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Michiharu; Kimura, Takefumi; Yazaki, Masahide; Tanaka, Naoki; Yang, Yang; Nakajima, Takero; Horiuchi, Akira; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Joshita, Satoru; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Umemura, Takeji; Tanaka, Eiji; Gonzalez, Frank J; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2015-03-01

    SLC25A13 (citrin or aspartate-glutamate carrier 2) is located in the mitochondrial membrane in the liver and its genetic deficiency causes adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). CTLN2 is one of the urea cycle disorders characterized by sudden-onset hyperammonemia due to reduced argininosuccinate synthase activity. This disorder is frequently accompanied with hepatosteatosis in the absence of obesity and ethanol consumption. However, the precise mechanism of steatogenesis remains unclear. The expression of genes associated with fatty acid (FA) and triglyceride (TG) metabolism was examined using liver samples obtained from 16 CTLN2 patients and compared with 7 healthy individuals. Although expression of hepatic genes associated with lipogenesis and TG hydrolysis was not changed, the mRNAs encoding enzymes/proteins involved in FA oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl-CoA transferase 1α, medium- and very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, and acyl-CoA oxidase 1), very-low-density lipoprotein secretion (microsomal TG transfer protein), and FA transport (CD36 and FA-binding protein 1), were markedly suppressed in CTLN2 patients. Serum concentrations of ketone bodies were also decreased in these patients, suggesting reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation activity. Consistent with these findings, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism, was significantly down-regulated. Hepatic PPARα expression was inversely correlated with severity of steatosis and circulating ammonia and citrulline levels. Additionally, phosphorylation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase was enhanced in CTLN2 livers, which was likely associated with lower hepatic PPARα. Collectively, down-regulation of PPARα is associated with steatogenesis in CTLN2 patients. These findings provide a novel link between urea cycle disorder, lipid metabolism, and PPARα. PMID:25533124

  10. Cerebral Cell Renewal in Adult Mice Controls the Onset of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Gouazé, Alexandra; Brenachot, Xavier; Rigault, Caroline; Krezymon, Alice; Rauch, Camille; Nédélec, Emmanuelle; Lemoine, Aleth; Gascuel, Jean; Bauer, Sylvian; Pénicaud, Luc; Benani, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    The hypothalamus plays a crucial role in the control of the energy balance and also retains neurogenic potential into adulthood. Recent studies have reported the severe alteration of the cell turn-over in the hypothalamus of obese animals and it has been proposed that a neurogenic deficiency in the hypothalamus could be involved in the development of obesity. To explore this possibility, we examined hypothalamic cell renewal during the homeostatic response to dietary fat in mice, i.e., at the onset of diet-induced obesity. We found that switching to high-fat diet (HFD) accelerated cell renewal in the hypothalamus through a local, rapid and transient increase in cell proliferation, peaking three days after introducing the HFD. Blocking HFD-induced cell proliferation by central delivery of an antimitotic drug prevented the food intake normalization observed after HFD introduction and accelerated the onset of obesity. This result showed that HFD-induced dividing brain cells supported an adaptive anorectic function. In addition, we found that the percentage of newly generated neurons adopting a POMC-phenotype in the arcuate nucleus was increased by HFD. This observation suggested that the maturation of neurons in feeding circuits was nutritionally regulated to adjust future energy intake. Taken together, these results showed that adult cerebral cell renewal was remarkably responsive to nutritional conditions. This constituted a physiological trait required to prevent severe weight gain under HFD. Hence this report highlighted the amazing plasticity of feeding circuits and brought new insights into our understanding of the nutritional regulation of the energy balance. PMID:23967273

  11. Anticipation resulting in elimination of the myotonic dystrophy gene: a follow up study of one extended family.

    PubMed Central

    de Die-Smulders, C E; Höweler, C J; Mirandolle, J F; Brunner, H G; Hovers, V; Brüggenwirth, H; Smeets, H J; Geraedts, J P

    1994-01-01

    We have re-examined an extended myotonic dystrophy (DM) family, previously described in 1955, in order to study the long term effects of anticipation in DM and in particular the implications for families affected by this disease. This follow up study provides data on 35 gene carriers and 46 asymptomatic at risk family members in five generations. Clinical anticipation, defined as the cascade of mild, adult, childhood, or congenital disease in subsequent generations, appeared to be a relentless process, occurring in all affected branches of the family. The cascade was found to proceed asynchronously in the different branches, mainly because of an unequal number of generations with mild disease. The transition from the mild to the adult type was associated with transmission through a male parent. Stable transmission of the asymptomatic/mild phenotype showed a female transmission bias. We further examined the extent and causes of gene loss in this pedigree. Gene loss in the patient group was complete, owing to infertility of the male patients with adult onset disease and the fact that mentally retarded patients did not procreate. Out of the 46 at risk subjects in the two youngest generations, only one was found to have a full mutation. This is the only subject who may transmit the gene to the sixth generation. No protomutation carriers were found in the fourth and fifth generations. Therefore it is highly probable that the DM gene will be eliminated from this pedigree within one generation. The high population frequency of DM can at present not be explained by the contribution of asymptomatic cases in the younger generations of known families, but is probably caused by the events in the ancestral generations. PMID:7815415

  12. Exclusion of one pedigree affected by adult onset primary open angle glaucoma from linkage to the juvenile glaucoma locus on chromosome 1q21-q31.

    PubMed Central

    Avramopoulos, D; Kitsos, G; Economou-Petersen, E; Grigoriadou, M; Vassilopoulos, D; Papageorgiou, C; Psilas, K; Petersen, M B

    1996-01-01

    A locus for autosomal dominant juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) was recently assigned to chromosome region 1q21-q31. In the present study, a large Greek family with autosomal dominant adult onset POAG was investigated using microsatellite markers. Exclusion of linkage of the adult onset POAG gene to the region D1S194-D1S191 was obtained in this pedigree. Therefore, the data provide evidence that juvenile and adult onset POAG are genetically distinct disease entities. PMID:9004141

  13. A nonsense mutation of human XRCC4 is associated with adult-onset progressive encephalocardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Leonardo; Nasca, Alessia; Zanolini, Alice; Cendron, Filippo; d'Adamo, Pio; Costa, Rodolfo; Lamperti, Costanza; Celotti, Lucia; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We studied two monozygotic twins, born to first cousins, affected by a multisystem disease. At birth, they both presented with bilateral cryptorchidism and malformations. Since early adulthood, they developed a slowly progressive neurological syndrome, with cerebellar and pyramidal signs, cognitive impairment, and depression. Dilating cardiomyopathy is also present in both. By whole-exome sequencing, we found a homozygous nucleotide change in XRCC4 (c.673C>T), predicted to introduce a premature stop codon (p.R225*). XRCC4 transcript levels were profoundly reduced, and the protein was undetectable in patients' skin fibroblasts. XRCC4 plays an important role in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), a system that is involved in repairing DNA damage from, for example, ionizing radiations. Gamma-irradiated mutant cells demonstrated reduction, but not abolition, of DSB repair. In contrast with embryonic lethality of the Xrcc4 KO mouse, nonsense mutations in human XRCC4 have recently been associated with primordial dwarfism and, in our cases, with adult-onset neurological impairment, suggesting an important role for DNA repair in the brain. Surprisingly, neither immunodeficiency nor predisposition to malignancy was reported in these patients. PMID:25872942

  14. Targeting Hsp90/Hsp70-based protein quality control for treatment of adult onset neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Pratt, William B; Gestwicki, Jason E; Osawa, Yoichi; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Currently available therapies for adult onset neurodegenerative diseases provide symptomatic relief but do not modify disease progression. Here we explore a new neuroprotective approach based on drugs targeting chaperone-directed protein quality control. Critical target proteins that unfold and aggregate in these diseases, such as the polyglutamine androgen receptor in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, huntingtin in Huntington's disease, α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease, and tau in Alzheimer's disease, are client proteins of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), and their turnover is regulated by the protein quality control function of the Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery. Hsp90 and Hsp70 have opposing effects on client protein stability in protein quality control; Hsp90 stabilizes the clients and inhibits their ubiquitination, whereas Hsp70 promotes ubiquitination dependent on CHIP (C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein) and proteasomal degradation. We discuss how drugs that modulate proteostasis by inhibiting Hsp90 function or promoting Hsp70 function enhance the degradation of the critical aggregating proteins and ameliorate toxic symptoms in cell and animal disease models. PMID:25292434

  15. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Saheki, Takeyori ); Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Tanikawa, Kyuichi ); O'Brien, W.E.; Beaudet, A.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, the authors show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. The authors also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Shaheen, N; Kumashiro, R; Tanikawa, K; O'Brien, W E; Beaudet, A L; Saheki, T

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, we show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. We also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. PMID:8105687

  17. Pathologic staging of white matter lesions in adult-onset leukoencephalopathy/leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids.

    PubMed

    Alturkustani, Murad; Keith, Julia; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Rademakers, Rosa; Ang, Lee-Cyn

    2015-03-01

    The pathologic features of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy/leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids (ALAS) are variable, and this has led to different hypotheses as to whether primarily demyelination or axonopathy may underlie this disorder. Typical ALAS pathology is rarely accompanied by focal multiple sclerosis (MS)-like plaques. In ALAS pathology accompanied by focal multiple sclerosis (MS)-like plaques cases, the pathologic features cannot be distinguished from those of progressive MS with diffusely abnormal white matter. To clarify these issues, we examined neuropathologic features in 159 representative samples from 5 ALAS cases (3 men and 2 women aged 39-61 years) and in 95 representative samples from 3 chronic MS cases (1 man and 2 women aged 50-73 years). The white matter abnormalities in ALAS cases were characterized by 3 evolving stages: 1) white matter with numerous spheroids in a background of well-myelinated fibers; 2) moderate loss of myelinated fibers with sparse to moderate number of spheroids; and 3) leukodystrophy-like pattern of confluent axonal and myelin loss. The application of this staging system suggests that myelin loss in ALAS is preceded by axonopathy. In progressive MS cases, the diffusely abnormal white matter pathology could be attributed to both primary demyelination and axonopathy. Some cases with predominant axonopathy are difficult to distinguish from cases with ALAS. PMID:25668567

  18. Health-related quality of life in sporadic adult-onset ataxia.

    PubMed

    Abele, Michael; Klockgether, Thomas

    2007-02-15

    Despite progressive disability in sporadic adult-onset ataxia (SAOA), little is known about patients' assessment of their ataxic disorder and its impact on health-related quality of life (Hr-QoL). This study investigated Hr-QoL by means of the following self-administered scales: Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Medical Outcome Study Short Form (SF-36). Twenty-two unselected ataxia patients were included. Sleep-related complaints were found in 9 (41%) of 22 and symptoms of depression in 6 (38%) of 16 patients. Compared to a large german control group, SAOA patients had lower scores in all SF-36 dimensions except for bodily pain. The greatest impairment was found in the domain physical functioning, followed by the domains social functioning and role limitations (emotional problems). There was a significant negative correlation of all nonmotor SF-36 dimensions with the BDI score. Walking aid dependency was significantly correlated with poorer health status perception in several motor and nonmotor domains. In addition, impaired sleep quality was correlated with an impaired general health perception and with bodily pain. The study demonstrates a great impact of SAOA on Hr-QoL. Adequate treatment of depression, motor disability, and impaired sleep quality is essential to improve Hr-QoL in ataxic patients. PMID:17149704

  19. Symptom Burden in Persons with Myotonic and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amanda E.; McMullen, Kara; Jensen, Mark P.; Carter, Gregory T.; Molton, Ivan R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examines the prevalence of pain, fatigue, imbalance, memory impairment and vision loss in persons with myotonic and facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, and their association with functioning. Design A survey (n=170) included measures of severity (0–10 scales) and course of these symptoms, as well as measures of social integration, home competency, mental health and productive activity. Descriptive and regression analyses examined the associations between symptoms and functioning. Results Fatigue (91%), imbalance (82%) and pain (77%) were most commonly reported. The most severe symptom was fatigue (mean severity 5.14 ± 2.81), followed by imbalance (4.95 ± 3.25). Symptoms were most likely to stay the same or worsen since onset. Controlling for potential medical and demographic confounds, symptoms were associated with 17% of the mental health variance, 10% of home competency, 10% of social integration, 16% of productive activity for DM1 and 12% of productive activity for FSHD. Conclusions Pain, fatigue and imbalance are common in persons with muscular dystrophy. Interventions may be useful to mitigate their impact on functioning. Further research should examine these relationships to guide clinical practices. PMID:24247759

  20. Hereditary leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids: a spectrum of phenotypes from CNS vasculitis to parkinsonism in an adult onset leukodystrophy series

    PubMed Central

    Jaunmuktane, Zane; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Phadke, Rahul; Brandner, Sebastian; Milonas, Ionnis; Dean, Andrew; Bajaj, Nin; McNicholas, Nuala; Costello, Daniel; Cronin, Simon; McGuigan, Chris; Rossor, Martin; Fox, Nick; Murphy, Elaine; Chataway, Jeremy; Houlden, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Background Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids (HDLS) is a hereditary, adult onset leukodystrophy which is characterised by the presence of axonal loss, axonal spheroids and variably present pigmented macrophages on pathological examination. It most frequently presents in adulthood with dementia and personality change. HDLS has recently been found to be caused by mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) gene. Methods In this study, we sequenced the CSF1R gene in a cohort of 48 patients from the UK, Greece and Ireland with adult onset leukodystrophy of unknown cause. Results Five pathogenic mutations were found, including three novel mutations. The presentations ranged from suspected central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis to extrapyramidal to cognitive phenotypes. The case histories and imaging are presented here, in addition to neuropathological findings from two cases with novel mutations. Conclusion We estimate that CSF1R mutations account for 10% of idiopathic adult onset leukodystrophies and that genetic testing for CSF1R mutations is essential in adult patients presenting with undefined CNS vasculitis or a leukodystrophy with prominent neuropsychiatric signs or dementia. PMID:25935893

  1. An increased incidence of Hodgkin's lymphoma in patients with adult-onset sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sarcomas are rare, often fatal malignancies of connective tissues that can occur in genetic predisposition syndromes or result from carcinogen exposure. Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is not known to contribute to any recognised familial cancer syndrome comprising sarcomas, but is known to be associated with a variety of second cancers, including sarcomas. This study describes the prevalence of HL in families affected by sarcoma. Methods The International Sarcoma Kindred Study (ISKS) is a prospective cohort of 561 families ascertained via a proband with adult-onset sarcoma. Cancer-specific standardised incidence ratios (SIR) for multiple primary malignancies in probands were estimated. Clinical characteristics of individuals reporting both sarcoma and HL were described. Standardised incidence ratios for the occurrence of cancer in ISKS families were also estimated. Results Multiple primary cancers were reported in 16% of probands, significantly higher than in the general population. The risk of HL in probands was increased 15.8-fold (95%CI 7.9-31.6) and increased risks were also seen for breast cancer (SIR 2.9, 95%CI 1.9-4.4) and thyroid cancer (SIR 8.4, 95%CI 4.2-16.8). In 8 probands with both HL and sarcoma, the diagnosis of HL preceded that of sarcoma in 7 cases, and occurred synchronously in one case. Only 3 cases of sarcoma occurred in or close to prior radiotherapy fields. The overall incidence of HL in the ISKS cohort was not significantly increased by comparison with age- and gender-specific population estimates (SIR 1.63, 95%CI 1.05-2.43), suggesting that the association between HL and sarcomas did not extend to other family members. The age of onset of non-sarcoma, non-HL cancers in families affected by both HL and sarcoma was younger than the general population (56.2 y vs 65.6 y, P < 0.0001). Conclusions The basis for the association between HL and sarcomas may include the carcinogenic effects of therapy combined with excellent survival rates for HL

  2. Depression and the Onset of Dementia in Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Diana Byrd; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Comparison of 61 adults with Down's syndrome and 43 adults with mental retardation resulting from other causes found that 8 Down's syndrome adults had both depression and declines in functioning, whereas no adults in the other group showed functional declines. Greater severity of depression was related to poor functioning in adults with Down's…

  3. Traumatic brain injury and age at onset of cognitive impairment in older adults.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Risacher, Shannon L; McAllister, Thomas W; Saykin, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    There is a deficiency of knowledge regarding how traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with age at onset (AAO) of cognitive impairment in older adults. Participants with a TBI history were identified from the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI 1/GO/2) medical history database. Using an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) model, the AAO was compared between those with and without TBI, and potential confounding factors were controlled. The AAO was also compared between those with mild TBI (mTBI) and moderate or severe TBI (sTBI). Lastly, the effects of mTBI were analyzed on the AAO of participants with clinical diagnoses of either mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer's disease (AD). The AAO for a TBI group was 68.2 ± 1.1 years [95 % confidence interval (CI) 66.2-70.3, n = 62], which was significantly earlier than the AAO for the non-TBI group of 70.9 ± 0.2 years (95 % CI 70.5-71.4, n = 1197) (p = 0.013). Participants with mTBI history showed an AAO of 68.5 ± 1.1 years (n = 56), which was significantly earlier than the AAO for the non-TBI group (p = 0.032). Participants with both MCI and mTBI showed an AAO of 66.5 ± 1.3 years (95 % CI 63.9-69.1, n = 45), compared to 70.6 ± 0.3 years for the non-TBI MCI group (95 % CI 70.1-71.1, n = 935) (p = 0.016). As a conclusion, a history of TBI may accelerate the AAO of cognitive impairment by two or more years. These results were consistent with reports of TBI as a significant risk factor for cognitive decline in older adults, and TBI is associated with an earlier AAO found in patients with MCI or AD. PMID:27007484

  4. Stroke prevention by direct revascularization for patients with adult-onset moyamoya disease presenting with ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tackeun; Oh, Chang Wan; Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyojun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Cho, Won-Sang; Bang, Jae Seung

    2016-06-01

    . CONCLUSIONS Direct or combined revascularization for patients with adult-onset moyamoya disease presenting with ischemia can prevent further stroke. PMID:26636391

  5. Prevalence of reticular pseudodrusen in newly presenting adult onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wilde, C; Lakshmanan, A; Patel, M; Morales, M U; Dhar-Munshi, S; Amoaku, W M K

    2016-06-01

    PurposeTo report the association and prevalence of reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) in eyes with newly presenting adult onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy (AFVD). To compare the strength of association with other pathologies resulting from dysfunction of the choroid-Bruch's membrane-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) complex, including eyes with geographic atrophy (GA) and angioid streaks.MethodsRetrospective single-centre review of all consecutive newly presenting AFVD. Multimodal imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus photographs, red-free/blue light images, and fundus fluorescein angiograms were graded for the presence of RPD. For comparison, all consecutive newly presenting cases of GA and eyes with angioid streaks were studied.ResultsFifteen (15) patients were identified with AFVD (mean age of 77.3 years; 73.3% female). Mean age of patients with AFVD and RPD was 80.5 years (SD 3.7), whereas that of patients with AFVD without RPD was 75.1 years (SD 7.0). This age difference did not reach statistical significance, P=0.1. Six (40%) had identifiable RPD; being a bilateral finding in 100% of patients. No males with AFVD and RPD were identified. A total of 92 eyes presented with GA. Twenty-three (23) of these (25.0%) had RPD. Twelve (12) patients presented with identifiable angioid streaks, with 4 (36.4%) having RPD.ConclusionRPD are a frequent finding in eyes with newly presenting AFVD; not being restricted to AMD, but a finding common among diseases where pathophysiological mechanisms involve damage to Bruch's membrane and the RPE, whether genetic or degenerative. Our study supports the concept that they occur with high but variable frequencies in eyes with various pathologies. PMID:27034200

  6. [Adult-onset Hartnup disease presenting with neuropsychiatric symptoms but without skin lesions].

    PubMed

    Mori, E; Yamadori, A; Tsutsumi, A; Kyotani, Y

    1989-06-01

    Hartnup disease is an inborn abnormality of renal and intestinal transport involving the neutral amino acids. Intermittent pellagra-like rash, attacks of cerebellar ataxia and psychiatric disturbance are characteristic symptoms of this disease. We described here a patient with adult-onset Hartnup disease who presented unique neuropsychiatric symptoms but no dermatologic symptoms, and reported features of amino acids transport in this patient and his family. The patient, a man aged 37 years, was referred to us because of lasting daytime bruxism. He is the second child of healthy parents who are first cousin; his elder brother who has been mentally retarded became bed-ridden and died at 32 years of age. His younger brother is completely healthy. Although the patient's development in infancy has been slightly retarded, he completed compulsory 9-year education. At 29 years of age, he experienced episodes of diplopia, ataxic gait and insomnia, and at 33 years of age, of transient stupor. There had been no history of photosensitivity or dermatitis. On neurological examination, there were trunkal ataxia, increased muscular tone and decreased mental activity besides bruxism. These symptoms remained unchanged despite of several medications including trihexyphenidyl, diazepam, halloperidol, tiapride and sulpiride. Two months later, the patient became stuporous; bruxism and hypertonicity became exaggerated. Myerson's sign, sucking reflex and grasp reflex in both hand appeared. There was no dermal lesion. A cranial computed tomography revealed a small calcification in the right frontal subcortical region and a single photon emission tomography indicated possible bifrontal hypoperfusion. Electroencephalograms demonstrated non-specific slowing. Somatosensory evoked potentials and nerve conduction velocities were normal. There were constant indicanuria and amino-aciduria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2582682

  7. Astrocyte Leptin Receptor (ObR) and Leptin Transport in Adult-Onset Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weihong; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Sakharkar, Amul; Cain, Courtney; Yu, Chuanhui; Kastin, Abba J.

    2008-01-01

    The agouti viable yellow (Avy) spontaneous mutation generates an unusual mouse phenotype of agouti-colored coat and adult-onset obesity with metabolic syndrome. Persistent production of agouti signaling protein in Avy mice antagonizes melanocortin receptors in the hypothalamus. To determine how this disruption of neuroendocrine circuits affects leptin transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we measured leptin influx in Avy and B6 control mice after the development of obesity, hyperleptinemia, and increased adiposity. After iv bolus injection, 125I-leptin crossed the BBB significantly faster in young (2 month old) B6 mice than in young Avy mice or in older (8 month old) mice of either strain. This difference was not observed by in situ brain perfusion studies, indicating the cause being circulating factors, such as elevated leptin levels or soluble receptors. Thus, Avy mice showed peripheral leptin resistance. ObRa, the main transporting receptor for leptin at the BBB, showed no change in mRNA expression in the cerebral microvessels between the age-matched (2 month old) Avy and B6 mice. Higher ObRb mRNA was seen in the Avy microvasculature with unknown significance. Immunofluorescent staining unexpectedly revealed that many of the ObR(+) cells were astrocytes and that the Avy mice showed significantly more ObR(+) astrocytes in the hypothalamus than the B6 mice. Although leptin permeation from the circulation was slower in the Avy mice, the increased ObR expression in astrocytes and increased ObRb mRNA in microvessels suggest the possibility of heightened central nervous system sensitivity to circulating leptin. PMID:18292187

  8. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and its role in the pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy 1.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, Perla; Llagostera, Esther

    2008-11-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is an autosomal, dominant inherited, neuromuscular disorder. The DM1 mutation consists in the expansion of an unstable CTG-repeat in the 3'-untranslated region of a gene encoding DMPK (myotonic dystrophy protein kinase). Clinical expression of DM1 is variable, presenting a progressive muscular dystrophy that affects distal muscles more than proximal and is associated with the inability to relax muscles appropriately (myotonia), cataracts, cardiac arrhythmia, testicular atrophy and insulin resistance. DMPK is a Ser/Thr protein kinase homologous to the p21-activated kinases MRCK and ROCK/rho-kinase/ROK. The most abundant isoform of DMPK is an 80 kDa protein mainly expressed in smooth, skeletal and cardiac muscles. Decreased DMPK protein levels may contribute to the pathology of DM1, as revealed by gene target studies. Here we review current understanding of the structural, functional and pathophysiological characteristics of DMPK. PMID:18583094

  9. Heterogeneous depression responses to chronic pain onset among middle-aged adults: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhuoying; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Bonanno, George A

    2014-06-30

    Studies on depression response to chronic pain are limited by lack of clarification of different forms of response patterns and cross-sectional measures. The current study examined heterogeneous long-term patterns of depression response to chronic pain onset prospectively using the mixture modeling technique. Depression symptoms prior to and following pain onset over a course of six years were charted in a nationally representative middle-aged sample. Four distinct depression symptom trajectories emerged. The resilience (72.0%) trajectory describes a pattern of no/minimal depression symptoms prior to and following pain onset. The post-pain depression trajectory (11.4%) describes a pattern of low depression at baseline and increasing symptoms following pain onset. The chronic depression (6.8%) trajectory is characterized by persistently high depression symptoms irrespective of pain onset. The prior depression improved (9.8%) trajectory describes a pattern of high depression at baseline and gradually declining symptoms following pain onset. Self-rated health at both baseline and following pain onset predicted the resilience trajectory. Baseline self-rated health distinguished the post-pain depression and chronic depression trajectories. Individuals in the prior depression improved trajectory were older and had more chronic illnesses at baseline but fewer illnesses following pain onset, compared to those in the resilience or post-pain depression trajectory. PMID:24679514

  10. Therapeutic Approaches for Dominant Muscle Diseases: Highlight on Myotonic Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Klein, A F; Dastidar, S; Furling, D; Chuah, M K

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy (DM), one of the most common neuromuscular disorders in adults, comprises two genetically distinct forms triggered by unstable expanded repeats in non-coding regions. The most common DM1 is caused by expanded CTG repeats in the 3'UTR of the DMPK gene, whereas DM2 is due to large expanded CCTG repeats in the first intron of the CNBP gene. Both mutations induce a pathogenic RNA gain-of-function mechanism. Mutant RNAs containing CUG or CCUG expanded repeats, which are retained in the nuclei as aggregates alter activities of alternative splicing regulators such as MBNL proteins and CELF1. As a consequence, alternative splicing misregulations of several pre-mRNAs are associated with DM clinical symptoms. Currently, there is no available cure for this dominant neuromuscular disease. Nevertheless, promising therapeutic strategies have been developed in the last decade. Preclinical progress in DM research prompted the first DM1 clinical trial based on antisense oligonucleotides promoting a RNase-H-mediated degradation of the expanded CUG transcripts. The ongoing Phase 1/2a clinical trial will hopefully give further insights into the quest to find a bona fide cure for DM1. In this review, we will provide an overview of the different strategies that were developed to neutralize the RNA toxicity in DM1. Different approaches including antisense oligonucleotide technologies, gene therapies or small molecules have been tested and validated in cellular and animal models. Remaining challenges and additional avenues to explore will be discussed. PMID:26122101

  11. Continuous Multi-Parameter Heart Rate Variability Analysis Heralds Onset of Sepsis in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saif; Ramsay, Tim; Huebsch, Lothar; Flanagan, Sarah; McDiarmid, Sheryl; Batkin, Izmail; McIntyre, Lauralyn; Sundaresan, Sudhir R.; Maziak, Donna E.; Shamji, Farid M.; Hebert, Paul; Fergusson, Dean; Tinmouth, Alan; Seely, Andrew J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of sepsis enables timely resuscitation and antibiotics and prevents subsequent morbidity and mortality. Clinical approaches relying on point-in-time analysis of vital signs or lab values are often insensitive, non-specific and late diagnostic markers of sepsis. Exploring otherwise hidden information within intervals-in-time, heart rate variability (HRV) has been documented to be both altered in the presence of sepsis, and correlated with its severity. We hypothesized that by continuously tracking individual patient HRV over time in patients as they develop sepsis, we would demonstrate reduced HRV in association with the onset of sepsis. Methodology/Principal Findings We monitored heart rate continuously in adult bone marrow transplant (BMT) patients (n = 21) beginning a day before their BMT and continuing until recovery or withdrawal (12±4 days). We characterized HRV continuously over time with a panel of time, frequency, complexity, and scale-invariant domain techniques. We defined baseline HRV as mean variability for the first 24 h of monitoring and studied individual and population average percentage change (from baseline) over time in diverse HRV metrics, in comparison with the time of clinical diagnosis and treatment of sepsis (defined as systemic inflammatory response syndrome along with clinically suspected infection requiring treatment). Of the 21 patients enrolled, 4 patients withdrew, leaving 17 patients who completed the study. Fourteen patients developed sepsis requiring antibiotic therapy, whereas 3 did not. On average, for 12 out of 14 infected patients, a significant (25%) reduction prior to the clinical diagnosis and treatment of sepsis was observed in standard deviation, root mean square successive difference, sample and multiscale entropy, fast Fourier transform, detrended fluctuation analysis, and wavelet variability metrics. For infected patients (n = 14), wavelet HRV demonstrated a 25% drop from baseline 35 h

  12. The relationship between childhood conduct disorder and adult antisocial behavior is partially mediated by early-onset alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Najat; Duggan, Conor; Howard, Rick; Lumsden, John

    2012-10-01

    Early-onset alcohol abuse (EOAA) was previously found to both mediate and moderate the effect of childhood conduct disorder (CD) on adult antisocial behavior (ASB) in an American community sample of young adults (Howard, R., Finn, P. R., Gallagher, J., & Jose, P. (2011). Adolescent-onset alcohol abuse exacerbates the influence of childhood conduct disorder on late adolescent and early adult antisocial behavior. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology. Advance online publication. doi:10.1080/14789949.2011.641996). This study tested whether this result would generalize to a British forensic sample comprising 100 male forensic patients with confirmed personality disorder. Results confirmed that those in whom EOAA co-occurred with CD showed the highest level of personality pathology, particularly Cluster B traits and antisocial/borderline comorbidity. Those with co-occurring CD with EOAA, compared with those showing only CD, showed more violence in their criminal history and greater recreational drug use. Regression analysis showed that both EOAA and CD predicted adult ASB when covariates were controlled. Further analysis showed that EOAA significantly mediated but did not moderate the effect of CD on ASB. The failure to demonstrate an exacerbating effect of EOAA on the relationship between CD and ASB likely reflects the high prevalence of CD in this forensic sample. Some implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:22888992

  13. Adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients display decreased IGRP-specific Tr1 cells in blood.

    PubMed

    Chujo, Daisuke; Nguyen, Thien-Son; Foucat, Emile; Blankenship, Derek; Banchereau, Jacques; Nepom, Gerald T; Chaussabel, Damien; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    The breakdown of immune tolerance against islet antigens causes type 1 diabetes (T1D). The antigens associated with adult-onset T1D (AT1D) remain largely undefined. It is possible that AT1D patients display a unique type of CD4(+) T cells specific for a certain islet antigen. Here we analyzed the cytokine production profiles of CD4(+) helper T (Th) cells that are specific for three islet antigens; GAD65, preproinsulin, and IGRP in patients with AT1D, juvenile-onset T1D (JT1D), and age-, gender- and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched control adults. While IGRP-specific Th cells in AT1D patients were dominantly Th1 cells, IGRP-specific Th cells in control adults and JT1D patients were dominantly Th2 and T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells. Notably, the frequency of IGRP-specific Tr1 cells was significantly lower in AT1D patients than in control adults and JT1D patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that IGRP-specific Th cells play a unique pathogenic role in AT1D. PMID:26341315

  14. Splicing misregulation of SCN5A contributes to cardiac-conduction delay and heart arrhythmia in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Freyermuth, Fernande; Rau, Frédérique; Kokunai, Yosuke; Linke, Thomas; Sellier, Chantal; Nakamori, Masayuki; Kino, Yoshihiro; Arandel, Ludovic; Jollet, Arnaud; Thibault, Christelle; Philipps, Muriel; Vicaire, Serge; Jost, Bernard; Udd, Bjarne; Day, John W; Duboc, Denis; Wahbi, Karim; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Mochizuki, Hideki; Deryckere, François; Kimura, Takashi; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Ishiura, Shoichi; Lacroix, Vincent; Campan-Fournier, Amandine; Navratil, Vincent; Chautard, Emilie; Auboeuf, Didier; Horie, Minoru; Imoto, Keiji; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Swanson, Maurice S; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; Inada, Shin; Itoh, Hideki; Nakazawa, Kazuo; Ashihara, Takashi; Wang, Eric; Zimmer, Thomas; Furling, Denis; Takahashi, Masanori P; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is caused by the expression of mutant RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats that sequester muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins, leading to alternative splicing changes. Cardiac alterations, characterized by conduction delays and arrhythmia, are the second most common cause of death in DM. Using RNA sequencing, here we identify novel splicing alterations in DM heart samples, including a switch from adult exon 6B towards fetal exon 6A in the cardiac sodium channel, SCN5A. We find that MBNL1 regulates alternative splicing of SCN5A mRNA and that the splicing variant of SCN5A produced in DM presents a reduced excitability compared with the control adult isoform. Importantly, reproducing splicing alteration of Scn5a in mice is sufficient to promote heart arrhythmia and cardiac-conduction delay, two predominant features of myotonic dystrophy. In conclusion, misregulation of the alternative splicing of SCN5A may contribute to a subset of the cardiac dysfunctions observed in myotonic dystrophy. PMID:27063795

  15. Splicing misregulation of SCN5A contributes to cardiac-conduction delay and heart arrhythmia in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Freyermuth, Fernande; Rau, Frédérique; Kokunai, Yosuke; Linke, Thomas; Sellier, Chantal; Nakamori, Masayuki; Kino, Yoshihiro; Arandel, Ludovic; Jollet, Arnaud; Thibault, Christelle; Philipps, Muriel; Vicaire, Serge; Jost, Bernard; Udd, Bjarne; Day, John W.; Duboc, Denis; Wahbi, Karim; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Mochizuki, Hideki; Deryckere, François; Kimura, Takashi; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Ishiura, Shoichi; Lacroix, Vincent; Campan-Fournier, Amandine; Navratil, Vincent; Chautard, Emilie; Auboeuf, Didier; Horie, Minoru; Imoto, Keiji; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Swanson, Maurice S.; de Munain, Adolfo Lopez; Inada, Shin; Itoh, Hideki; Nakazawa, Kazuo; Ashihara, Takashi; Wang, Eric; Zimmer, Thomas; Furling, Denis; Takahashi, Masanori P.; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is caused by the expression of mutant RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats that sequester muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins, leading to alternative splicing changes. Cardiac alterations, characterized by conduction delays and arrhythmia, are the second most common cause of death in DM. Using RNA sequencing, here we identify novel splicing alterations in DM heart samples, including a switch from adult exon 6B towards fetal exon 6A in the cardiac sodium channel, SCN5A. We find that MBNL1 regulates alternative splicing of SCN5A mRNA and that the splicing variant of SCN5A produced in DM presents a reduced excitability compared with the control adult isoform. Importantly, reproducing splicing alteration of Scn5a in mice is sufficient to promote heart arrhythmia and cardiac-conduction delay, two predominant features of myotonic dystrophy. In conclusion, misregulation of the alternative splicing of SCN5A may contribute to a subset of the cardiac dysfunctions observed in myotonic dystrophy. PMID:27063795

  16. Gastrointestinal manifestations in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Biagi, Sonia; Stasi, Cristina; Costa, Francesco; Mumolo, Maria Gloria; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Marchi, Santino

    2006-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is characterized by myotonic phenomena and progressive muscular weakness. Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is frequent and may occur at any level. The clinical manifestations have previously been attributed to motility disorders caused by smooth muscle damage, but histologic evidence of alterations has been scarce and conflicting. A neural factor has also been hypothesized. In the upper digestive tract, dysphagia, heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia are the most common complaints, while in the lower tract, abdominal pain, bloating and changes in bowel habits are often reported. Digestive symptoms may be the first sign of dystrophic disease and may precede the musculo-skeletal features. The impairment of gastrointestinal function may be sometimes so gradual that the patients adapt to it with little awareness of symptoms. In such cases routine endoscopic and ultrasonographic evaluations are not sufficient and targeted techniques (electrogastrography, manometry, electromyography, functional ultrasonography, scintigraphy, etc.) are needed. There is a low correlation between the degree of skeletal muscle involvement and the presence and severity of gastrointestinal disturbances whereas a positive correlation with the duration of the skeletal muscle disease has been reported. The drugs recommended for treating the gastrointestinal complaints such as prokinetic, anti-dyspeptic drugs and laxatives, are mainly aimed at correcting the motility disorders. Gastrointestinal involvement in MD remains a complex and intriguing condition since many important problems are still unsolved. Further studies concentrating on genetic aspects, early diagnostic techniques and the development of new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve our management of the gastrointestinal manifestations of MD. PMID:16609987

  17. Obesity-related abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, K Hoa; Ande, Sudharsana R; Mishra, Suresh

    2016-01-29

    The incidence of adult-onset T1D in low-risk non-HLA type has increased several folds, whereas the contemporaneous incidence in high-risk HLA-type remains stable. Various factors behind this selective increase in T1D in young adults remain unclear. Obesity and its associated abnormalities appear to be an important determinant; however, the underlying mechanism involved is not understood. Recently, we have developed two novel transgenic obese mice models, Mito-Ob and m-Mito-Ob, by expressing a pleiotropic protein prohibitin (PHB) and a phospho mutant form of PHB (Y114F-PHB or m-PHB) from the aP2 gene promoter, respectively. Both mice models develop obesity in a sex-neutral manner, independent of diet; but obesity associated chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance in a male sex-specific manner. Interestingly, on a high fat diet (HFD) only male m-Mito-Ob mice displayed marked mononuclear cell infiltration in pancreas and developed insulitis that mimic adult-onset T1D. Male Mito-Ob mice that share the metabolic phenotype of male m-Mito-Ob mice, and female m-Mito-Ob that harbor m-PHB similar to male m-Mito-Ob mice, did not develop insulitis. Thus, insulitis development in male m-Mito-Ob in response to HFD requires both, obesity-related abnormalities and m-PHB. Collectively, this data provides a proof-of-concept that obesity-associated abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D and reveals PHB as a potential susceptibility gene for T1D. PMID:26766792

  18. Adult psychopathic personality with childhood-onset hyperactivity and conduct disorder: a central problem constellation in forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Soderstrom, Henrik; Sjodin, Anna-Kari; Carlstedt, Anita; Forsman, Anders

    2004-01-01

    To describe lifetime mental disorders among perpetrators of severe inter-personal crimes and to identify the problem domains most closely associated with aggression and a history of repeated violent criminality, we used structured interviews, clinical assessments, analyses of intellectual functioning, medical and social files, and collateral interviews in 100 consecutive subjects of pretrial forensic psychiatric investigations. Childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorders [attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), learning disability, tics and autism spectrum disorders] affected 55% of the subjects and formed complex comorbidity patterns with adult personality disorders [including psychopathic traits according to the Psychopathy Checklist (PCL-R)], mood disorders and substance abuse. The closest psychiatric covariates to high Lifetime History of Aggression (LHA) scores and violent recidivism were the PCL-R scores and childhood conduct disorder (CD). Behavioral and affective PCL-R factors were closely associated with childhood AD/HD, CD, and autistic traits. The results support the notion that childhood-onset social and behavioral problems form the most relevant psychiatric symptom cluster in relation to pervasive adult violent behavior, while late-onset mental disorders are more often associated with single acts of violent or sexual aggression. PMID:14675746

  19. Clinical and genetic analysis of the first known Asian family with myotonic dystrophy type 2.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takahiro; Nakamura, Harumasa; Oya, Yasushi; Kimura, Takashi; Imahuku, Ichiro; Ohno, Kinji; Nishino, Ichizo; Abe, Koji; Matsuura, Tohru

    2014-03-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is more common than DM1 in Europe and is considered a rare cause of myotonic dystrophies in Asia. Its clinical course is also milder with more phenotypic variability than DM1. We herein describe the first known Asian family (three affected siblings) with DM2 based on clinical and genetic analyses. Notably, two of the affected siblings were previously diagnosed with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Myotonia (the inability of the muscle to relax) was absent or only faintly present in these individuals. The third sibling had grip myotonia and is the first known Asian DM2 patient. The three DM2 siblings share several systemic characteristics, including late-onset, proximal-dominant muscle weakness, diabetes, cataracts and asthma. Repeat-primed PCR across the DM2 repeat revealed a characteristic ladder pattern of a CCTG expansion in all siblings. Southern blotting analysis identified the presence of 3400 repeats. Further DM2 studies in Asian populations are needed to define the clinical presentation of Asian DM2 and as yet unidentified phenotypic differences from Caucasian patients. PMID:24430576

  20. Aetiology of Bacteraemia as a Risk Factor for Septic Shock at the Onset of Febrile Neutropaenia in Adult Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Regis Goulart; Goldani, Luciano Zubaran

    2014-01-01

    Septic shock (SS) at the onset of febrile neutropaenia (FN) is an emergency situation that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The impact of the specific aetiology of bloodstream infections (BSIs) in the development of SS at the time of FN is not well established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the aetiology of BSIs and SS at the time of FN in hospitalised adult cancer patients. This prospective cohort study was performed at a single tertiary hospital from October 2009 to August 2011. All adult cancer patients admitted consecutively to the haematology ward with FN were evaluated. A stepwise logistic regression was conducted to verify the association between the microbiological characteristics of BSIs and SS at the onset of FN. In total, 307 cases of FN in adult cancer patients were evaluated. There were 115 cases with documented BSI. A multivariate analysis showed that polymicrobial bacteraemia (P = 0.01) was associated with SS. The specific blood isolates independently associated with SS were viridans streptococci (P = 0.02) and Escherichia coli (P = 0.01). Neutropaenic cancer patients with polymicrobial bacteraemia or BSI by viridans streptococci or Escherichia coli are at increased risk for SS at the time of FN. PMID:24804223

  1. Effect of adult onset hypothyroidism on behavioral parameters and acetylcholinesterase isoforms activity in specific brain regions of male mice.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulou, Catherine G; Constantinou, Caterina; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Giompres, Panagiotis; Margarity, Marigoula

    2016-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal development and function of mammalian central nervous system (CNS); TH dysregulation has been implicated in several cognitive and behavioral deficits related to dysfunctions of neurotransmitter systems. In the present study, we investigated the effects of adult onset hypothyroidism on the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and on related behavioral parameters. For this purpose we used adult male Balb/cJ mice that were divided randomly into euthyroid and hypothyroid animal groups. Animals were rendered hypothyroid through administration of 1% w/v KClO4 in their drinking water for 8weeks. At the end of the treatment, learning/memory procedures were examined through step-through passive avoidance task while fear/anxiety was assessed using elevated plus-maze (EPM) and open-field (OF) tests. AChE activity was determined colorimetrically in two different fractions, salt-soluble fraction (SS) (containing mainly the G1 isoform) and detergent-soluble fraction (DS) (containing mainly the G4 isoform) in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, midbrain, hippocampus and striatum. Our results indicate that adult onset hypothyroidism caused significant memory impairment and increased fear/anxiety. Moreover, the activity of both isoforms of AChE was reduced in all brain regions examined in a brain region- and isoform-specific manner. PMID:27317840

  2. Delineation of Early and Later Adult Onset Depression by Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongjun; Nie, Binbin; Li, Na; Luo, Chunrong; Li, Haijun; Liu, Fang; Bai, Yan; Shan, Baoci; Xu, Lin; Xu, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to a lack of evidence, there is no consistent age of onset to define early onset (EO) versus later onset (LO) major depressive disorder (MDD). Fractional anisotropy (FA), derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), has been widely used to study neuropsychiatric disorders by providing information about the brain circuitry, abnormalities of which might facilitate the delineation of EO versus LO MDD. Method In this study, 61 pairs of untreated, non-elderly, first-episode MDD patients and healthy controls (HCs) aged 18–45 years old received DTI scans. The voxel-based analysis method (VBM), classification analysis, using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), and regression analyses were used to determine abnormal FA clusters and their correlations with age of onset and clinical symptoms. Results Classification analysis suggested in the best model that there were two subgroups of MDD patients, delineated by an age of onset of 30 years old, by which MDD patients could be divided into EO (18–29 years old) and LO (30–45 years old) groups. LO MDD was characterized by decreased FA, especially in the white matter (WM) of the fronto-occipital fasciculus and posterior limb of internal capsule, with a negative correlation with the severity of depressive symptoms; in marked contrast, EO MDD showed increased FA, especially in the WM of the corpus callosum, corticospinal midbrain and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, while FA of the WM near the midbrain had a positive correlation with the severity of depressive symptoms. Conclusion Specific abnormalities of the brain circuitry in EO vs. LO MDD were delineated by an age of onset of 30 years old, as demonstrated by distinct abnormal FA clusters with opposite correlations with clinical symptoms. This DTI study supported the evidence of an exact age for the delineation of MDD, which could have broad multidisciplinary importance. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00703742 PMID:25393297

  3. Validation of DSM-5 age-of-onset criterion of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults: Comparison of life quality, functional impairment, and family function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ju; Lo, Kuan-Wu; Yang, Li-Kuang; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2015-12-01

    The newly published Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) elevates the threshold of the ADHD age-of-onset criterion from 7 to 12 years. This study evaluated the quality of life and functional impairment of adults with ADHD who had symptoms onset by or after 7 years and examined the mediation effect of family function and anxiety/depression symptoms between ADHD diagnosis and quality of life and functional impairment. We assessed 189 adults with ADHD and 153 non-ADHD controls by psychiatric interview and self-administered reports on the Adult ADHD Quality of Life Scale, Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale, Family APGAR, and Adult Self Report Inventory-4. The ADHD group was divided into early-onset ADHD (onset <7 years, n=147) and late-onset ADHD (onset between 7 and 12 years, n=42). The mediation analysis was conducted to verify the mediating factors from ADHD to functional impairment and quality of life. The late-onset ADHD had more severe functional impairment at work and poorer family support than early-onset ADHD while they had comparable impairment at other domains. Less perceived family support and current anxiety/depressive symptoms partially mediated the link between ADHD diagnosis and quality of life/functional impairment both in early- and late-onset ADHD. Our data support decreased quality of life and increased functional impairment in adult ADHD, regardless of age of onset, and these adverse outcomes may be mediated by family support and anxiety/depression at adulthood. Our findings also imply that the new DSM-5 ADHD criteria do not over-include individuals without impairment. PMID:26318976

  4. Adult-onset focal expression of mutated human tau in the hippocampus impairs spatial working memory of rats

    PubMed Central

    Mustroph, M.L.; King, M.A.; Klein, R.L.; Ramirez, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Tauopathy in the hippocampus is one of the earliest cardinal features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a condition characterized by progressive memory impairments. In fact, density of tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the hippocampus strongly correlates with severity of cognitive impairments in AD. In the present study, we employed a somatic cell gene transfer technique to create a rodent model of tauopathy by injecting a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector with a mutated human tau gene (P301L) into the hippocampus of adult rats. The P301L mutation is causal for frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17 (FTDP-17), but it has been used for studying memory effects characteristic of AD in transgenic mice. To ascertain if P301L-induced mnemonic deficits are persistent, animals were tested for 6 months. It was hypothesized that adult-onset, spatially restricted tau expression in the hippocampus would produce progressive spatial working memory deficits on a learned alternation task. Rats injected with the tau vector exhibited persistent impairments on the hippocampal-dependent task beginning at about 6 weeks post-transduction compared to rats injected with a green fluorescent protein vector. Histological analysis of brains for expression of human tau revealed hyperphosphorylated human tau and NFTs in the hippocampus in experimental animals only. Thus, adult-onset, vector-induced tauopathy spatially restricted to the hippocampus progressively impaired spatial working memory in rats. We conclude that the model faithfully reproduces histological and behavioral findings characteristic of dementing tauopathies. The rapid onset of sustained memory impairment establishes a preclinical model particularly suited to the development of potential tauopathy therapeutics. PMID:22561128

  5. Which dieters are at risk for the onset of binge-eating? A prospective study of adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Andrea B.; Wall, Melanie; Loth, Katie A.; Le Grange, Daniel; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Dieting is a well-established risk factor for binge-eating, yet the majority of dieters do not develop binge-eating problems. The purpose of the current study was to examine psychosocial factors involved in the relation between dieting and binge-eating over a 10-year follow-up period. Methods A population-based sample (n=1,827) completed surveys assessing eating habits, psychological functioning, and weight status at 5-year intervals spanning early/middle adolescence (Time 1), late adolescence/early young adulthood (Time 2) and early/middle young adulthood (Time 3). Dieting, along with depression symptoms, self-esteem, and teasing experiences at Time 1 and Time 2 were used to predict new onset binge-eating at Time 2 and Time 3, respectively. Interactions between dieting status and varying degrees of these psychosocial factors in relation to binge-eating onset were also tested. Results Dieters were 2–3 times more likely than non-dieters to develop binge-eating problems over 5-year follow-ups. At most time-points, depression symptoms and self-esteem predicted binge-eating onset beyond the effects of dieting alone. Detrimental levels of these factors among dieters (relative to non-dieters) increased the likelihood of binge-eating onset only during the latter follow-up period. Conclusions Depression and self-esteem appear to be particularly salient factors involved in the relation between dieting and binge-eating onset among adolescents and young adults. Early identification of these factors should be a priority in order to prevent the development of binge-eating problems among already at-risk individuals. PMID:22727082

  6. Piriform sinus carcinoma with a paraneoplastic syndrome misdiagnosed as adult onset Still’s disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Li, Wen; Du, Jintao

    2015-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PS) occur less commonly in association with otolaryngologic neoplasms than other carcinomas such as those of lung or breast. Piriform sinus carcinoma with PS is extremely rare. We here report a case of piriform sinus carcinoma accompanied by PS that was initially misdiagnosed as adult onset Still’s disease and describe our diagnosis and treatment. One lesson we have drawn from the experience of this misdiagnosis is that PS symptoms may manifest before the primary tumor is evident and complicate the diagnostic process. PMID:26770614

  7. Memory Loss and Frontal Cognitive Dysfunction in a Patient with Adult-onset Neuronal Intranuclear Inclusion Disease.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kunihiko; Sone, Jun; Fujioka, Yusuke; Masuda, Michihito; Ohdake, Reiko; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Sobue, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease (NIID) is an uncommon progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Adult-onset NIID can result in prominent dementia. We herein describe the case of a 74-year-old man who presented with dementia, cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, and autonomic dysfunction. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed hyperintensity of the corticomedullary junction. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images showed frontal-dominant white matter hyperintensity. NIID was diagnosed from the presence of intranuclear inclusions in a skin biopsy sample. Neuropsychological testing revealed memory loss and frontal cognitive dysfunction, especially in relation to language and executive functions. We were therefore able to confirm the association of NIID with cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27523009

  8. Protective Connections and Educational Attainment among Young Adults with Childhood-Onset Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslow, Gary; Haydon, Abigail A.; McRee, Annie-Laurie; Halpern, Carolyn T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Youth with childhood-onset chronic illness (COCI) are at risk of poor educational attainment. Specific protective factors that promote college graduation in this population have not been studied previously. In this study, we examine the role protective factors during adolescence play in promoting college graduation among young adults…

  9. The History and Timing of Depression Onset as Predictors of Young Adult Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayman, Mathew D.; Lloyd, Donald A.; Ueno, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Depression often emerges early in the lifecourse and is consistently shown to be associated with poor self-esteem. The 3 main objectives of the current study are to (1) evaluate the association between a history major depression and self-esteem in young adulthood, (2) assess the relationship between timing of depression onset and young adult…

  10. Timing of onset of evening activity of adult chinese rose beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult Chinese rose beetles, Adoretus sinicus (Burmeister) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Adoretini), present in China, Taiwan, Indonesia, Cambodia, Laos, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, the Marianas Islands, the Caroline Islands, and the Hawaiian Islands, are nighttime defoliators that feed on a wide vari...

  11. An adult onset case of alpha-methyl-acyl-CoA racemase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emily Helen; Gavrilov, Dimitar K; Oglesbee, Devin; Freeman, William D; Vavra, Michael W; Matern, Dietrich; Tortorelli, Silvia

    2010-12-01

    α-Methyl-acyl-CoA-racemase (AMACR) deficiency (OMIM 604489) is a rare peroxisomal disorder with a variable age of onset from infancy to late adulthood. We describe a 45-year-old male with a history of seizures who presented with relapsing encephalopathy. Laboratory studies revealed an elevated serum pristanic acid concentration, an elevated pristanic/phytanic acid ratio, as well as the previously described homozygous mutation in the AMACR gene, c.154T>C, consistent with AMACR deficiency. This homozygous mutation is associated with a variable phenotype ranging from neonatal cholestasis to late-onset sensorimotor neuropathy. Dietary pristanic acid restriction was attempted to improve clinical status and the patient has remained in remission for more than 16 months. PMID:20821052

  12. Reactive macrophage activation syndrome possibly triggered by canakinumab in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Banse, Christopher; Vittecoq, Olivier; Benhamou, Ygal; Gauthier-Prieur, Maud; Lequerré, Thierry; Lévesque, Hervé

    2013-12-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and serious complication of adult-onset Still's disease. We describe a case in a 49-year-old woman with Still's disease refractory to glucocorticoids, methotrexate, and infliximab. Anakinra provided satisfactory disease control for 1 year, after which escape phenomenon occurred. After four tocilizumab injections, cutaneous melanoma developed. The persistent systemic manifestations prompted treatment with two canakinumab injections. Ten days later, she had a spiking fever, dyspnea, low back pain, abdominal pain, odynophagia, and hepatomegaly. Laboratory tests showed liver cytolysis (180 IU/L; N: 10-35), acute renal failure (creatinine, 407 μmol/L; N:50-100), thrombocytopenia (60 G/L; N: 150-400), leukocytosis (12,200/mm(3); N: 4000-10,000), hypertriglyceridemia (5070 mmol/L; N: 0.4-1.6), lactate dehydrogenase elevation (4824 IU/L; N: 135-250), and hyperferritinemia (97 761 μg/L; N:15-150). Examination of a bone marrow biopsy showed phagocytosis. Tests were negative for viruses and other infectious agents. Glucocorticoid therapy (1.5 mg/Kg/d) and intravenous polyvalent immunoglobulins (0.5 g/Kg/d) were given. Her condition improved despite the many factors of adverse prognostic significance (thrombocytopenia, absence of lymphadenopathy, and glucocorticoid therapy at diagnosis). This is the first reported case of MAS after canakinumab therapy in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease. PMID:23751410

  13. Uteroplacental insufficiency alters nephrogenesis and downregulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression in a model of IUGR with adult-onset hypertension.

    PubMed

    Baserga, Mariana; Hale, Merica A; Wang, Zheng Ming; Yu, Xing; Callaway, Christopher W; McKnight, Robert A; Lane, Robert H

    2007-05-01

    Clinical and animal studies indicate that intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) following uteroplacental insufficiency (UPI) reduces nephron number and predisposes toward renal insufficiency early in life and increased risk of adult-onset hypertension. In this study, we hypothesized that the inducible enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a pivotal protein in nephrogenesis, constitutes a mechanism through which UPI and subsequent glucocorticoid overexposure can decrease nephron number. We further hypothesized that UPI downregulates the key enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11beta-HSD2), which converts corticosterone to inert 11-dehydrocorticosterone, thereby protecting both the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) from the actions of corticosterone. Following bilateral uterine ligation on the pregnant rat, UPI significantly decreased renal COX-2, 11beta-HSD2, and GR mRNA and protein levels, but upregulated expression of MR at birth. At day 21 of life, 11beta-HSD2, GR, and also MR mRNA and protein levels were downregulated. UPI did not affect blood pressures (BP) at day 21 of life but significantly increased systolic BP in both genders at day 140. We conclude that in our animal model, UPI decreases fetal COX-2 expression during a period of active nephrogenesis in the IUGR rat, which is also characterized by decreased nephron number and adult-onset hypertension. PMID:17272666

  14. Clinical features and long-term outcomes of systemic lupus erythematosus: comparative data of childhood, adult and late-onset disease in a national register.

    PubMed

    Sousa, S; Gonçalves, M J; Inês, L S; Eugénio, G; Jesus, D; Fernandes, S; Terroso, G; Romão, V C; Cerqueira, M; Raposo, A; Couto, M; Nero, P; Sequeira, G; Nóvoa, T; Melo Gomes, J A; da Silva, J Canas; Costa, L; Macieira, C; Silva, C; Silva, J A P; Canhão, H; Santos, M J

    2016-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) affects predominantly women at reproductive age but may present at any age. Age at disease onset has a modulating effect on presentation and course of disease, but controversies persist regarding its impact on long-term outcome. Our aims were to characterize clinical features, co-morbidities and cumulative damage in childhood-onset, adult-onset and late-onset SLE. Patients with childhood-onset SLE fulfilling ACR 1997 criteria were identified in a nationwide register-Reuma.pt/SLE (N = 89) and compared with adult-onset and late-onset counterparts matched 1:1:1 for disease duration. 267 SLE patients with mean disease duration of 11.9 ± 9.3 years were analyzed. Skin (62 %), kidney (58 %), neurological (11 %) and hematologic involvement (76 %) were significantly more common in childhood-onset SLE and disease activity was higher in this subset than in adult- and late-onset disease (SLEDAI-2K 3.4 ± 3.8 vs. 2.2 ± 2.7 vs. 1.6 ± 2.8, respectively; p = 0.004). Also, more childhood-onset patients received cyclophosphamide (10 %) and mycophenolate mofetil (34 %). A greater proportion of women (96 %), prevalence of arthritis (89 %) and anti-SSA antibodies (34 %) were noted in the adult-onset group. There was a significant delay in the diagnosis of SLE in older ages. Co-morbidities such as hypertension, diabetes and thyroid disease were significantly more frequent in late-onset SLE, as well as the presence of irreversible damage evaluated by the SLICC/ACR damage index (20 vs. 26 vs. 40 %; p < 0.001). Greater organ involvement as well as the frequent need for immunosuppressants supports the concept of childhood-onset being a more severe disease. In contrast, disease onset is more indolent but co-morbidity burden and irreversible damage are greater in late-onset SLE, which may have implications for patients' management. PMID:26979603

  15. An autopsied case of sporadic adult-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with FUS-positive basophilic inclusions.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Fujii, Naoki; Kondo, Akira; Iwaki, Akiko; Hokonohara, Toshihiro; Honda, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kensuke; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Iwaki, Toru

    2011-02-01

    Basophilic inclusions (BIs), which are characterized by their staining properties of being weakly argyrophilic, reactive with Nissl staining, and immunohistochemically negative for tau and transactive response (TAR) DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), have been identified in patients with juvenile-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and adult-onset atypical ALS with ophthalmoplegia, autonomic dysfunction, cerebellar ataxia, or a frontal lobe syndrome. Mutations in the fused in sarcoma gene (FUS) have been reported in cases of familial and sporadic ALS, and FUS immunoreactivity has been demonstrated in basophilic inclusion body disease (BIBD), neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease (NIFID), and atypical frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive and tau-negative inclusions (aFTLD-U). In the present study, we immunohistochemically and ultrastructurally studied an autopsy case of sporadic adult-onset ALS with numerous BIs. The patient presented with the classical clinical course of ALS since 75 years of age and died at age 79. Postmortem examination revealed that both Betz cells in the motor cortex and motor neurons in the spinal cord were affected. The substantia nigra was spared. Notably, BIs were frequently observed in the motor neurons of the anterior horns, the inferior olivary nuclei, and the basal nuclei of Meynert. BIs were immunopositive for p62, LC3, and FUS, but immunonegative for tau, TDP-43, and neurofilament. Ultrastructurally, BIs consisted of filamentous or granular structures associated with degenerated organelles with no limiting membrane. There were no Bunina bodies, skein-like inclusions, or Lewy-like inclusions. All exons and exon/intron boundaries of the FUS gene were sequenced but no mutations were identified. PMID:20573033

  16. Homozygous myotonic dystrophy: clinical and molecular studies of three unrelated cases.

    PubMed Central

    Martorell, L; Illa, I; Rosell, J; Benitez, J; Sedano, M J; Baiget, M

    1996-01-01

    We report the clinical and molecular study of three unrelated homozygous myotonic dystrophy patients. In the first family, the homozygous patient shows the classical form of the disease with two DM alleles of very different expansion sizes (1000 and 60 repeats). In the second family, the homozygous patient is mildly affected and carries a minimally expanded allele (64 repeats) and a "normal" allele (38 repeats) that increases in size when transmitted. Such an intergenerational expansion of an allele in this range of repeats has not been reported to date. The third homozygous case has late onset bilateral cataracts as the only symptom. She has two minimally expanded alleles (51 and 120 repeats) that showed different intergenerational enlargement during transmission to the next generation. Images PMID:8880582

  17. Are early onset aging conditions correlated to daily activity functions in youth and adults with Down syndrome?

    PubMed

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Chen, Wen-Xiu; Lin, Fu-Gong; Wu, Jia-Ling; Chu, Cordia

    2014-11-13

    This study aims to answer the research question of "Are early onset aging conditions correlated to daily activity functions in youth and adults with Down syndrome (DS)?" A cross-sectional survey was employed to recruit 216 individuals with DS over 15 years of age in the analyses. A structured questionnaire included demographic data, brief self-reported aging conditions, Dementia Screening Questionnaire for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (DSQIID) and activity of daily living (ADL) scales were completed by the primary caregivers who were well-suited for providing information on the functioning conditions of the DS individuals. Results showed that the most five frequent aging conditions (sometimes, usually and always) included frailty (20.2%), vision problem (15.8%), loss of language ability (15.3%), sleep problem (14.9%) and memory impairment (14.5%). Other onset aging conditions included more chronic diseases (13.9%), hearing loss (13%), chewing ability and tooth loss (12.5%), incontinence (11.1%), depressive syndrome (7.7%), falls and gait disorder (7.2%), loss of taste and smell (7.2%). The data also showed scores of DSQIID, onset aging conditions and ADL has significant relationships each other in Pearson's correlation tests. Finally, multiple linear regression analyses indicated onset aging conditions (β=-0.735, p<0.001) can significantly predicted the variation in ADL scores after adjusting other factors (R(2)=0.381). This study suggests that the authority should initiate early intervention programs aim to improve healthy aging and ADL functions for people with DS. PMID:25462513

  18. Empirical third-generation cephalosporin therapy for adults with community-onset Enterobacteriaceae bacteraemia: Impact of revised CLSI breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chih-Chia; Lee, Chung-Hsun; Li, Ming-Chi; Hong, Ming-Yuan; Chi, Chih-Hsien; Lee, Ching-Chi

    2016-04-01

    Third-generation cephalosporins (3GCs) [ceftriaxone (CRO) and cefotaxime (CTX)] have remarkable potency against Enterobacteriaceae and are commonly prescribed for the treatment of community-onset bacteraemia. However, clinical evidence supporting the updated interpretive criteria of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) is limited. Adults with community-onset monomicrobial Enterobacteriaceae bacteraemia treated empirically with CRO or CTX were recruited. Clinical information was collected from medical records and CTX MICs were determined using the broth microdilution method. Eligible patients (n=409) were categorised into de-escalation (260; 63.6%), no switch (115; 28.1%) and escalation (34; 8.3%) groups according to the type of definitive antibiotics. Multivariate regression revealed five independent predictors of 28-day mortality: fatal co-morbidities based on McCabe classification [odds ratio (OR)=19.96; P<0.001]; high Pitt bacteraemia score (≥4) at bacteraemia onset (OR=13.91; P<0.001); bacteraemia because of pneumonia (OR=5.45; P=0.007); de-escalation after empirical therapy (OR=0.28; P=0.03); and isolates with a CTX MIC≤1mg/L (OR=0.17; P=0.02). Of note, isolates with a CTX MIC≤8mg/L (indicated as susceptible by previous CLSI breakpoints) were not associated with mortality. Furthermore, clinical failure and 28-day mortality rates had a tendency to increase with increasing CTX MIC (γ=1.00; P=0.01). Conclusively, focusing on patients with community-onset Enterobacteriaceae bacteraemia receiving empirical 3GC therapy, the present study provides clinically critical evidence to validate the proposed reduction in the susceptibility breakpoint of CTX to MIC≤1mg/L. PMID:27005458

  19. Childhood onset systemic lupus erythematosus: how is it different from adult SLE?

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Amita; Srivastava, Puja

    2015-02-01

    About 20% of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) starts in childhood and children have less gender bias in favor of females as compared to adults. Systemic manifestations, nephritis, neuro-psychiatric disease and cytopenias are more common in children at presentation than adults. Since most children develop lupus in their early adolescence, dealing with the diagnosis of an unpredictable lifelong disease during this phase of life is challenging. Physicians must recognise specific medical and social needs of this age group, for optimal long-term outcome. Steroids and immunosuppressive drugs are the cornerstone for treatment in children as with adults with lupus. The outcome has improved considerably with these drugs and 10-year survival is nearly 90%. Due to longer life spans more damage accrues in children as compared to adults. Most of the drugs are associated with significant toxicity and the goal of having a drug which reduces disease activity and damage without hampering normal growth, development and fertility is still an elusive one. The current review focuses on clinical and immunological aspects of childhood SLE and how it differs from adulthood SLE. PMID:24965742

  20. Effects of early-onset voluntary exercise on adult physical activity and associated phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Wendy; Meek, Thomas H; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Vu, Kim T; Garland, Theodore

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of early-life exercise on adult physical activity (wheel running, home-cage activity), body mass, food consumption, and circulating leptin levels in males from four replicate lines of mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running (High Runner or HR) and their four non-selected control (C) lines. Half of the mice were given wheel access shortly after weaning for three consecutive weeks. Wheel access was then removed for 52 days, followed by two weeks of adult wheel access for all mice. A blood sample taken prior to adult wheel testing was analyzed for circulating leptin concentration. Early-life wheel access significantly increased adult voluntary exercise on wheels during the first week of the second period of wheel access, for both HR and C mice, and HR ran more than C mice. During this same time period, activity in the home cages was not affected by early-age wheel access, and did not differ statistically between HR and C mice. Throughout the study, all mice with early wheel access had lower body masses than their sedentary counterparts, and HR mice had lower body masses than C mice. With wheel access, HR mice also ate significantly more than C mice. Early-life wheel access increased plasma leptin levels (adjusted statistically for fat-pad mass as a covariate) in C mice, but decreased them in HR mice. At sacrifice, early-life exercise had no statistically significant effects on visceral fat pad, heart (ventricle), liver or spleen masses (all adjusted statistically for variation in body mass). Results support the hypothesis that early-age exercise in mice can have at least transitory positive effects on adult levels of voluntary exercise, in addition to reducing body mass, and may be relevant for the public policy debates concerning the importance of physical education for children. PMID:26079567

  1. Gender as a Modifying Factor Influencing Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Phenotype Severity and Mortality: A Nationwide Multiple Databases Cross-Sectional Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hamroun, Dalil; Varet, Hugo; Fabbro, Marianne; Rougier, Felix; Amarof, Khadija; Arne Bes, Marie-Christine; Bedat-Millet, Anne-Laure; Behin, Anthony; Bellance, Remi; Bouhour, Françoise; Boutte, Celia; Boyer, François; Campana-Salort, Emmanuelle; Chapon, Françoise; Cintas, Pascal; Desnuelle, Claude; Deschamps, Romain; Drouin-Garraud, Valerie; Ferrer, Xavier; Gervais-Bernard, Helene; Ghorab, Karima; Laforet, Pascal; Magot, Armelle; Magy, Laurent; Menard, Dominique; Minot, Marie-Christine; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Pellieux, Sybille; Pereon, Yann; Preudhomme, Marguerite; Pouget, Jean; Sacconi, Sabrina; Sole, Guilhem; Stojkovich, Tanya; Tiffreau, Vincent; Urtizberea, Andoni; Vial, Christophe; Zagnoli, Fabien; Caranhac, Gilbert; Bourlier, Claude; Riviere, Gerard; Geille, Alain; Gherardi, Romain K.; Eymard, Bruno; Puymirat, Jack; Katsahian, Sandrine; Bassez, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Background Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is one of the most heterogeneous hereditary disease in terms of age of onset, clinical manifestations, and severity, challenging both medical management and clinical trials. The CTG expansion size is the main factor determining the age of onset although no factor can finely predict phenotype and prognosis. Differences between males and females have not been specifically reported. Our aim is to study gender impact on DM1 phenotype and severity. Methods We first performed cross-sectional analysis of main multiorgan clinical parameters in 1409 adult DM1 patients (>18y) from the DM-Scope nationwide registry and observed different patterns in males and females. Then, we assessed gender impact on social and economic domains using the AFM-Téléthon DM1 survey (n = 970), and morbidity and mortality using the French National Health Service Database (n = 3301). Results Men more frequently had (1) severe muscular disability with marked myotonia, muscle weakness, cardiac, and respiratory involvement; (2) developmental abnormalities with facial dysmorphism and cognitive impairment inferred from low educational levels and work in specialized environments; and (3) lonely life. Alternatively, women more frequently had cataracts, dysphagia, digestive tract dysfunction, incontinence, thyroid disorder and obesity. Most differences were out of proportion to those observed in the general population. Compared to women, males were more affected in their social and economic life. In addition, they were more frequently hospitalized for cardiac problems, and had a higher mortality rate. Conclusion Gender is a previously unrecognized factor influencing DM1 clinical profile and severity of the disease, with worse socio-economic consequences of the disease and higher morbidity and mortality in males. Gender should be considered in the design of both stratified medical management and clinical trials. PMID:26849574

  2. Psychiatric and Cognitive Phenotype of Childhood Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douniol, Marie; Jacquette, Aurelia; Cohen, David; Bodeau, Nicolas; Rachidi, Linda; Angeard, Nathalie; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Vallee, Louis; Eymard, Bruno; Plaza, Monique; Heron, Delphine; Guile, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the psychiatric and cognitive phenotype in young individuals with the childhood form of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Method: Twenty-eight individuals (15 females, 13 males) with childhood DM1 (mean age 17y, SD 4.6, range 7-24y) were assessed using standardized instruments and cognitive testing of general intelligence,…

  3. Adult-onset cystic hygroma: A case report of rare entity.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Sumit; Shah, Vandana; Anchlia, Sonal; Vyas, Siddharth

    2016-01-01

    Cystic hygroma is a benign congenital malformation of the lymphatic system that occurs in infant or children younger than 2 years of age. Although cystic hygroma is well recognized in pediatric practice, it seldom presents de novo in adulthood. These are commonly present in head and neck but can be present anywhere. Cystic hygroma is very rare in adults, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adult neck swellings. Patients presenting with a painless, soft, fluctuant, and enlarging neck mass should have a careful history and physical examination along with radiological imaging to assist with diagnosis. Surgical intervention is the treatment of choice for this rare condition. Here, we are reporting a case of cystic hygroma in a 32-year-old male patient in the neck region. The objectives of this case report are to discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, histopathological findings and management of this malformation. PMID:27134456

  4. Adult-onset cystic hygroma: A case report of rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Sumit; Shah, Vandana; Anchlia, Sonal; Vyas, Siddharth

    2016-01-01

    Cystic hygroma is a benign congenital malformation of the lymphatic system that occurs in infant or children younger than 2 years of age. Although cystic hygroma is well recognized in pediatric practice, it seldom presents de novo in adulthood. These are commonly present in head and neck but can be present anywhere. Cystic hygroma is very rare in adults, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adult neck swellings. Patients presenting with a painless, soft, fluctuant, and enlarging neck mass should have a careful history and physical examination along with radiological imaging to assist with diagnosis. Surgical intervention is the treatment of choice for this rare condition. Here, we are reporting a case of cystic hygroma in a 32-year-old male patient in the neck region. The objectives of this case report are to discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, histopathological findings and management of this malformation. PMID:27134456

  5. ATP1A3 Mutation in Adult Rapid-Onset Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Sweadner, Kathleen J.; Toro, Camilo; Whitlow, Christopher T.; Snively, Beverly M.; Cook, Jared F.; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Markello, Thomas C.; Brashear, Allison

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year old male presented with ataxia and dysarthria that had appeared over a period of months. Exome sequencing identified a de novo missense variant in ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na,K-ATPase. Several lines of evidence suggest that the variant is causative. ATP1A3 mutations can cause rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP) with a similar age and speed of onset, as well as severe diseases of infancy. The patient’s ATP1A3 p.Gly316Ser mutation was validated in the laboratory by the impaired ability of the expressed protein to support the growth of cultured cells. In a crystal structure of Na,K-ATPase, the mutated amino acid was directly apposed to a different amino acid mutated in RDP. Clinical evaluation showed that the patient had many characteristics of RDP, however he had minimal fixed dystonia, a defining symptom of RDP. Successive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed progressive cerebellar atrophy, explaining the ataxia. The absence of dystonia in the presence of other RDP symptoms corroborates other evidence that the cerebellum contributes importantly to dystonia pathophysiology. We discuss the possibility that a second de novo variant, in ubiquilin 4 (UBQLN4), a ubiquitin pathway component, contributed to the cerebellar neurodegenerative phenotype and differentiated the disease from other manifestations of ATP1A3 mutations. We also show that a homozygous variant in GPRIN1 (G protein-regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1) deletes a motif with multiple copies and is unlikely to be causative. PMID:26990090

  6. Invisible Victims: Delayed Onset Depression among Adults with Same-Sex Parents

    PubMed Central

    Sullins, D. Paul

    2016-01-01

    The relationship of elevated depression risk recently discovered among adult persons raised by same-sex parents with possible precipitating conditions in childhood has not previously been acknowledged. This study tests whether such inattention is supportable. Logistic regression based risk ratios were estimated from longitudinal measures of mental health outcomes observed in three waves (at ages 15, 22, and 28) of the US National Survey of Adolescent to Adult Health (n = 15,701). At age 28, the adults raised by same-sex parents were at over twice the risk of depression (CES-D: risk ratio 2.6, 95% CI 1.4–4.6) as persons raised by man-woman parents. These findings should be interpreted with caution. Elevated risk was associated with imbalanced parental closeness and parental child abuse in family of origin; depression, suicidality, and anxiety at age 15; and stigma and obesity. More research and policy attention to potentially problematic conditions for children with same-sex parents appears warranted. PMID:27313882

  7. Invisible Victims: Delayed Onset Depression among Adults with Same-Sex Parents.

    PubMed

    Sullins, D Paul

    2016-01-01

    The relationship of elevated depression risk recently discovered among adult persons raised by same-sex parents with possible precipitating conditions in childhood has not previously been acknowledged. This study tests whether such inattention is supportable. Logistic regression based risk ratios were estimated from longitudinal measures of mental health outcomes observed in three waves (at ages 15, 22, and 28) of the US National Survey of Adolescent to Adult Health (n = 15,701). At age 28, the adults raised by same-sex parents were at over twice the risk of depression (CES-D: risk ratio 2.6, 95% CI 1.4-4.6) as persons raised by man-woman parents. These findings should be interpreted with caution. Elevated risk was associated with imbalanced parental closeness and parental child abuse in family of origin; depression, suicidality, and anxiety at age 15; and stigma and obesity. More research and policy attention to potentially problematic conditions for children with same-sex parents appears warranted. PMID:27313882

  8. Possible macrophage activation syndrome following initiation of adalimumab in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Souabni, Leila; Dridi, Leila; Ben Abdelghani, Kawther; Kassab, Selma; Chekili, Selma; Laater, Ahmed; Zakraoui, Leith

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) has been rarely reported in the course of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) and in the majority of cases, it was triggered by an infection. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first case of MAS occurring after adalimumab treatment initiation and not triggered by an infection. A 26-yearold woman with classical features of AOSD developed persistent fever, severe bicytopenia associated with extreme hyperferritinemia, hyponatremia and abnormal liver function tow months after the initiation of adalimumab treatment. The diagnosis of MAS was made without histological proof. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy and her condition improved. During the disease course, extensive studies could not identify any viral infection or other known underlying etiology for the reactive MAS. The adalimumab was incriminated in this complication. Currently, the patient is in remission on tocilizumab and low-dose prednisolone. PMID:25018831

  9. Differential onset of infantile deprivation produces distinctive long-term effects in adult ex-laboratory chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Kalcher, Elfriede; Franz, Cornelia; Crailsheim, Karl; Preuschoft, Signe

    2008-12-01

    Maternal or social deprivation during early infancy inevitably produces social deficiencies in juvenile chimpanzees. Hypothesizing such deficiencies to persist into adulthood (a), and, as in humans, a sensitive period in early infancy for attachment formation (b), we predicted and found behavioral differences in resocialized adult ex-laboratory chimpanzees after about 20 years of solitary confinement depending on their age at onset of deprivation: early deprived (ED; mean: 1.2 years) chimpanzees engaged significantly less in social interactions, spent less time associated, and showed more nonsocial idiosyncrasies than did late deprived (LD; mean: 3.6 years) chimpanzees. In addition to these individual attributes relational qualities, specifically the combination of ED and LD chimpanzees within social groups, have an impact on social recovery. LDs can best exploit their social potential in the company of other LDs and EDs tend to stagnate in their recovery when socialized with other EDs. PMID:18688804

  10. Wiki-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adult Onset Sarcoma: A New Paradigm in Sarcoma Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, S. J.; Thomas, D.; Desai, J.; Vuletich, C.; von Dincklage, J.; Olver, I.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 Australia introduced Wiki-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adult Onset Sarcoma. These guidelines utilized a customized MediaWiki software application for guideline development and are the first evidence-based guidelines for clinical management of sarcoma. This paper presents our experience with developing and implementing web-based interactive guidelines and reviews some of the challenges and lessons from adopting an evidence-based (rather than consensus-based) approach to clinical sarcoma guidelines. Digital guidelines can be easily updated with new evidence, continuously reviewed and widely disseminated. They provide an accessible method of enabling clinicians and consumers to access evidence-based clinical practice recommendations and, as evidenced by over 2000 views in the first four months after release, with 49% of those visits being from countries outside of Australia. The lessons learned have relevance to other rare cancers in addition to the international sarcoma community. PMID:25784832

  11. HPV Type 6 and 18 Coinfection in a Case of Adult-Onset Laryngeal Papillomatosis: Immunization with Gardasil.

    PubMed

    Fancello, Virginia; Melis, Andrea; Piana, Andrea Fausto; Castiglia, Paolo; Cossu, Andrea; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Bozzo, Corrado; King, Emma Victoria; Meloni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal papillomatosis (LP) is a rare human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease that often requires multiple surgical interventions and residual impairment of voice is almost inevitable. We report the case of a patient with adult onset recurrent LP, showing moderate dysplasia and coinfection with HPV types 6 and 18. The tetravalent HPV vaccine Gardasil was prescribed off label, with the aim of triggering an immunogenic response and consequently reducing the probability of further recurrences. The patient was followed for 9 months with no sign of relapse of his LP. The postexposure use of the anti-HPV vaccine could represent a promising therapeutic agent in established LP. Unfortunately, the potential efficacy of this new therapeutic option in this situation has been suggested only by isolated case reports. Further controlled studies, with a longer follow-up and a larger sample size, are needed to assess efficacy of Gardasil in LP. PMID:26783482

  12. HPV Type 6 and 18 Coinfection in a Case of Adult-Onset Laryngeal Papillomatosis: Immunization with Gardasil

    PubMed Central

    Fancello, Virginia; Melis, Andrea; Piana, Andrea Fausto; Castiglia, Paolo; Cossu, Andrea; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Bozzo, Corrado; King, Emma Victoria; Meloni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal papillomatosis (LP) is a rare human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease that often requires multiple surgical interventions and residual impairment of voice is almost inevitable. We report the case of a patient with adult onset recurrent LP, showing moderate dysplasia and coinfection with HPV types 6 and 18. The tetravalent HPV vaccine Gardasil was prescribed off label, with the aim of triggering an immunogenic response and consequently reducing the probability of further recurrences. The patient was followed for 9 months with no sign of relapse of his LP. The postexposure use of the anti-HPV vaccine could represent a promising therapeutic agent in established LP. Unfortunately, the potential efficacy of this new therapeutic option in this situation has been suggested only by isolated case reports. Further controlled studies, with a longer follow-up and a larger sample size, are needed to assess efficacy of Gardasil in LP. PMID:26783482

  13. Adult Onset of BRAFV600E-Mutated Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Cutaneous Involvement Successfully Diagnosed by Immunohistochemical Staining

    PubMed Central

    Tono, Hisayuki; Fujimura, Taku; Kakizaki, Aya; Furudate, Sadanori; Ishibashi, Masaya; Aiba, Setsuya

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is characterized by the clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells; it is categorized as a single-system disease with single or multifocal lesions, and as a multi-system disease with or without the risk of organ involvement. Although the skin is not categorized as a risk organ, the precise diagnosis of skin lesions is necessary to determine the protocol for the treatment of LCH. In this report, we describe a 28-year-old Japanese man with adult onset of BRAFV600E-mutated LCH with cutaneous involvement successfully diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining. Our report suggests that immunohistochemical staining for the BRAFV600E gene could be a diagnostic tool to determine the clinical type of LCH. PMID:26500535

  14. Evaluation of Permanent Growth Hormone Deficiency (GHD) in Young Adults with Childhood Onset GHD: A multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Berberoğlu, Merih; Darendeliler, Feyza; Poyrazoğlu, Şükran; Darcan, Şükran; İşgüven, Pınar; Bideci, Aysun; Öcal, Gönül; Bundak, Rüveyde; Yüksel, Bilgin; Arslanoğlu, İlknur

    2008-01-01

    Background: Reconfirming the diagnosis of childhood onset growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in young adults is necessary to demonstrate the need for continuation of GH therapy. Objective: This nationally−based study was planned to establish GH status during adulthood in childhood−onset GH deficient patients and to evaluate factors that would predict persistency of the GHD. Methods: In this multicenter study, 70 GH deficient patients who had reached final height were evaluated after completion of GH treatment. Fifty−two patients (74%) had isolated GHD and 18 patients (26%) had multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD). Patients who had reached final height and the pubertal Tanner stage 5 were reevaluated for GH status. After at least 6 weeks of cessation of GH treatment, patients were retested with insulin induced hypoglycemia. Results: GHD was found to be transient in 64.3% of all patients. Of the isolated GH deficient patients 82.7% had transient GHD, whereas 88.9% of the MPHD patients showed persistent GHD. Comparison of isolated GH deficient and multiple hormone deficient patients indicated higher peak GH, IGF−I and IGFBP−3 levels in isolated GH deficient patients. No parameter was significantly different in the transiently and persistently GH deficient patients with respect to gender. Although specificity of IGF−I value of less than −2 SD showing persistency of GHD was lower than the specificity of IGFBP−3 value of less than −2 SD (65.7% vs 84%), negative predictive values were similar for the two parameters (85.2% and 84%, respectively). Conclusion: Most of the cases of childhood onset GHD are idiopathic and the GHD is transient. In patients with MPHD, GHD is generally permanent. Low IGF−I and IGFBP−3 levels are supporting findings to show persistency of the GHD. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21318062

  15. Congenital and prolonged adult-onset deafness cause distinct degradations in neural ITD coding with bilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Kenneth E; Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2013-06-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (CI) users perform poorly on tasks involving interaural time differences (ITD), which are critical for sound localization and speech reception in noise by normal-hearing listeners. ITD perception with bilateral CI is influenced by age at onset of deafness and duration of deafness. We previously showed that ITD coding in the auditory midbrain is degraded in congenitally deaf white cats (DWC) compared to acutely deafened cats (ADC) with normal auditory development (Hancock et al., J. Neurosci, 30:14068). To determine the relative importance of early onset of deafness and prolonged duration of deafness for abnormal ITD coding in DWC, we recorded from single units in the inferior colliculus of cats deafened as adults 6 months prior to experimentation (long-term deafened cats, LTDC) and compared neural ITD coding between the three deafness models. The incidence of ITD-sensitive neurons was similar in both groups with normal auditory development (LTDC and ADC), but significantly diminished in DWC. In contrast, both groups that experienced prolonged deafness (LTDC and DWC) had broad distributions of best ITDs around the midline, unlike the more focused distributions biased toward contralateral-leading ITDs present in both ADC and normal-hearing animals. The lack of contralateral bias in LTDC and DWC results in reduced sensitivity to changes in ITD within the natural range. The finding that early onset of deafness more severely degrades neural ITD coding than prolonged duration of deafness argues for the importance of fitting deaf children with sound processors that provide reliable ITD cues at an early age. PMID:23462803

  16. Mutations in DNAJC5, Encoding Cysteine-String Protein Alpha, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Adult-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Nosková, Lenka; Stránecký, Viktor; Hartmannová, Hana; Přistoupilová, Anna; Barešová, Veronika; Ivánek, Robert; Hůlková, Helena; Jahnová, Helena; van der Zee, Julie; Staropoli, John F.; Sims, Katherine B.; Tyynelä, Jaana; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Nijssen, Peter C.G.; Mole, Sara E.; Elleder, Milan; Kmoch, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL) is characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent storage material in neural tissues and neurodegeneration and has an age of onset in the third decade of life or later. The genetic and molecular basis of the disease has remained unknown for many years. We carried out linkage mapping, gene-expression analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate-gene sequencing in affected individuals from 20 families and/or individuals with simplex cases; we identified in five individuals one of two disease-causing mutations, c.346_348delCTC and c.344T>G, in DNAJC5 encoding cysteine-string protein alpha (CSPα). These mutations—causing a deletion, p.Leu116del, and an amino acid exchange, p.Leu115Arg, respectively—are located within the cysteine-string domain of the protein and affect both palmitoylation-dependent sorting and the amount of CSPα in neuronal cells. The resulting depletion of functional CSPα might cause in parallel the presynaptic dysfunction and the progressive neurodegeneration observed in affected individuals and lysosomal accumulation of misfolded and proteolysis-resistant proteins in the form of characteristic ceroid deposits in neurons. Our work represents an important step in the genetic dissection of a genetically heterogeneous group of ANCLs. It also confirms a neuroprotective role for CSPα in humans and demonstrates the need for detailed investigation of CSPα in the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses and other neurodegenerative diseases presenting with neuronal protein aggregation. PMID:21820099

  17. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 is implicated in disease activity in adult and juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Meshaal, Safa; El Refai, Rasha; El Saie, Ahmed; El Hawary, Rabab

    2016-06-01

    The Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway is one of a handful of pleiotropic cascades used to transduce a multitude of signals for development and homeostasis in humans. It is the principal signaling mechanism for a wide array of cytokines and growth factors. Dysregulated cytokine action on immune cells plays an important role in the initiation and progress of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we tried to assess the role of STAT5 in systemic lupus erythematosus and correlate its phosphorylation level with the disease activity. The activation of the STAT5 was assessed by measuring the level of expression of phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5) using flow cytometry on the peripheral blood T and B cells in 58 SLE patients (40 adult and 18 juvenile onset) and on 23 healthy age- and sex-matched controls for both groups. Serum prolactin level was also assessed in the patients and control by ELISA. The study revealed that the level of pSTAT5 was higher in adult SLE patients than in healthy control (p = 0.001) and in juvenile-onset SLE patients versus age-matched control (p = 0.031). A positive correlation existed between the pSTAT5 levels and Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) score and also with multiple clinical manifestations indicating a potential role of STAT5 signaling in pathogenesis SLE. The pSTAT5 signaling is implicated in the disease activity of SLE and may be a useful target of therapy by correcting the dysregulation of cytokines involved in the disease pathogenesis. PMID:27041383

  18. Sarcopenic obesity and risk of new onset depressive symptoms in older adults: English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, M; Batty, G D; Kivimaki, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: We examined the role of sarcopenic obesity as a risk factor for new-onset depressive symptoms over 6-year follow-up in a large sample of older adults. Methods: The sample comprised 3862 community dwelling participants (1779 men, 2083 women; mean age 64.6±8.3 years) without depressive symptoms at baseline, recruited from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. At baseline and 4-year follow-up, handgrip strength (kg) of the dominant hand was assessed using a hand-held dynamometer, as a measure of sarcopenia. The outcome was new onset depressive symptoms at 6-year follow-up, defined as a score of ⩾4 on the 8-item Centre of Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Sarcopenic obesity was defined as obese individuals (body mass index ⩾30 kg m−2) in the lowest tertile of sex-specific grip strength (<35.3 kg men; <19.6 kg women). Results: Using a multivariable logistic regression model, the risk of depressive symptoms was greatest in obese adults in the lowest tertile of handgrip strength (odds ratio (OR), 1.79, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10, 2.89) compared with non-obese individuals with high handgrip strength. Participants who were obese at baseline and had a decrease of more than 1 s.d. in grip strength over 4-year follow-up were at greatest risk of depressive symptoms (OR=1.97, 95% CI, 1.22, 3.17) compared with non-obese with stable grip strength. Conclusions: A reduction in grip strength was associated with higher risk of depressive symptoms in obese participants only, suggesting that sarcopenic obesity is a risk factor for depressive symptoms. PMID:26122029

  19. The clinical implications of adult-onset henoch-schonelin purpura

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Henoch-Schonlein Purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis mediated by IgA-immune complex deposition. It is characterized by the clinical tetrad of non-thrombocytopenic palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis and renal involvement. Pathologically, it can be considered a form of immune complex-mediated leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) involving the skin and other organs. Though it primarily affects children (over 90% of cases), the occurrence in adults has been rarely reported. Management often involves the use of immunomodulatory or immune-suppressive regimens. PMID:21619657

  20. Adult-onset Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Type f Caused by Acute Lower Leg Cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Usui, Yuko; Kakuta, Risako; Araki, Makoto; Sato, Taigo; Gu, Yoshiaki; Yano, Hisakazu; Taniuchi, Norihide

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, routine Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccination began in 2013. Thus, similar to other countries, a strain shift is expected in the near future. We experienced a case of H. influenzae type f (Hif) bacteremia in a 66-year-old man. The primary focus of the infection was the soft tissue of the left lower leg, which is an extremely rare origin in adults. Subsequently, we conducted multilocus sequence typing and identified the strain as sequence type 124, which is the most common invasive strain of Hif worldwide. This case may mark the beginning of an Hif strain shift in Japan. PMID:27374690

  1. Clinical and immunological aspects and outcome of a Brazilian cohort of 414 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): comparison between childhood-onset, adult-onset, and late-onset SLE.

    PubMed

    das Chagas Medeiros, M M; Bezerra, M Campos; Braga, F N Holanda Ferreira; da Justa Feijão, M R Melo; Gois, A C Rodrigues; Rebouças, V C do Rosário; de Carvalho, T M Amorim Zaranza; Carvalho, L N Solon; Ribeiro, Át Mendes

    2016-04-01

    The clinical expression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is influenced by genetic and environmental factors and therefore varies between ethnicities. Information on the epidemiology of SLE in Brazil is scarce and practically limited to studies conducted in socioeconomically developed regions (South and Southeast). The objective of this study was to describe the clinical and immunological aspects and outcome of a cohort of patients with SLE treated at a university hospital in northeastern Brazil and compare patterns related to age at onset: childhood (cSLE), adult (aSLE), and late (lSLE). A random sample of 414 records (women: 93.5%) were reviewed. The mean age at SLE onset and the mean disease duration were 28.9 ± 10.9 years and 10.2 ± 6.6 years, respectively. Most patients had aSLE (n = 338; 81.6%), followed by cSLE (n = 60; 14.5%) and lSLE (n = 16; 3.9%). The female/male ratio was 6.5:1 in cSLE and 16.8:1 in aSLE; in lSLE, all patients were female (p = 0.05). During follow-up, the cSLE group presented higher rates of nephritis (70% vs. 52.9% vs. 12.5%; p = 0.0001) and leuko/lymphopenia (61.7% vs. 43.8% vs. 56.2%; p = 0.02). No significant differences were found for anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Treatment with immunosuppressants was significantly more common, and higher doses of prednisone were used, in cSLE. The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases were more frequent in lSLE (p = 0.03). No significant differences were found between the three groups with regard to mean damage accrual (SDI), remission, and mortality. Although cSLE presented higher rates of nephritis and leuko/lymphopenia, more frequent use of immunosuppressants and higher prednisone doses than aSLE and lSLE, the three groups did not differ significantly with regard to damage accrual, remission, and mortality. PMID:26405022

  2. Effect of maternal transmissions on clinical manifestations of myotonic dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Eguchi, I.; Koike, R.; Onodera, O.

    1994-09-01

    The mutation of myotonic dystrophy (DM) has been identified as unstable expansions of trinucleotide CTG repeat, located on chromosome 19q13-3. Although previous investigations have emphasized the strong association of the sizes of the CTG repeat with ages of onset as well as the clinical manifestations, effects of the paternal or maternal transmissions other than CTG repeats on the clinical manifestations in DM have not been evaluated in detail. To investigate how parental transmission affect the DM phenotype, we analyzed 15 cases of paternal transmission and 25 cases of maternal transmission. We have classified DM patients into 4 clinical grades. As in accordance with previous reports, there is a good correlation on sizes of the CTG repeat with their clinical features. The sizes of the CTG repeat in congenital DM patients (4.13{plus_minus}0.221 kbp) (Mean {plus_minus}SEM), who inherited mutant genes from their mothers, were not significantly larger than those of non-congenital DM patients (3.65 {plus_minus}0.36 kbp). As it has been well established that congenital DM patients are born to affected mothers, we investigated to see if there are any parental bias on the clinical manifestations in non-congenital DM. We classified each case into 4 classes depending on the size ranges of the CTG repeat (0 to 1.5 kbp, 1.5 to 3.0 kbp, 3.0 to 4.5 kbp, 4.5 kbp<). In each group of the size ranges of the CTG repeat, the distribution of cases among grades I to III were compared between paternally and maternally transmitted cases. There were statistically significant differences in the distributions of cases among grades I to III for the size ranges of 3 to 4.5 kbp expansions (p<0.01) and over 4.5 kbp expansions (p<0.05) on {chi}{sup 2} test, respectively. The results revealed that maternally transmitted cases tend to show severe phenotypes compared to paternally transmitted ones even if they have similar sizes of CTG repeat.

  3. Childhood dyspraxia predicts adult-onset nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Jason; Mittal, Vijay; Kline, Emily; Mortensen, Erik L; Michelsen, Niels; Ekstrøm, Morten; Millman, Zachary B; Mednick, Sarnoff A; Sørensen, Holger J

    2015-11-01

    Several neurological variables have been investigated as premorbid biomarkers of vulnerability for schizophrenia and other related disorders. The current study examined whether childhood dyspraxia predicted later adult nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders. From a standardized neurological examination performed with children (aged 10-13) at genetic high risk of schizophrenia and controls, several measures of dyspraxia were used to create a scale composed of face/head dyspraxia, oral articulation, ideomotor dyspraxia (clumsiness), and dressing dyspraxia (n = 244). Multinomial logistic regression showed higher scores on the dyspraxia scale predict nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders relative to other psychiatric disorders and no mental illness outcomes, even after controlling for genetic risk, χ2 (4, 244) = 18.61, p < .001. Findings that symptoms of dyspraxia in childhood (reflecting abnormalities spanning functionally distinct brain networks) specifically predict adult nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders are consistent with a theory of abnormal connectivity, and they highlight a marked early-stage vulnerability in the pathophysiology of nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders. PMID:26439077

  4. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary “myopathic” changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions. PMID:26999347

  5. Epigenetics as the mediator of fetal programming of adult onset disease: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Saffery, Richard; Novakovic, Boris

    2014-11-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease hypothesis describes how early life environmental factors influence development in a way that impacts later health and disease risk. The hypothesis is supported by a large number of animal studies and a smaller number of observational studies in humans. Epigenetic variation induced in early life has emerged as a prime candidate to be the mediator of such effects, but little direct evidence of this relation exists in humans, primarily due to the inherent problems associated with unraveling the relative contributions of genetic and environmental variables to phenotypic diversity. There are several prerequisites for establishing a causal link that include demonstrating interindividual epigenetic variability in early life in response to specific environmental exposures. Further, compelling evidence linking epigenetic change to disease, prior to onset is required. Finally, the functional relevance of specific epigenetic change must be demonstrated. Evidence is emerging in all of these areas but, ultimately, only large longitudinal life-course studies, commencing prior to birth, can provide direct evidence in support of a role of epigenetic processes as a driver of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease in humans. PMID:24835110

  6. Adult-onset Kawasaki disease (mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome) and concurrent Coxsackievirus A4 infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yuki; Kenzaka, Tsuneaki; Noda, Ayako; Yamamoto, Yu; Matsumura, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Kawasaki disease (KD) most commonly develops in infants, although its specific cause is still unclear. We report here a rare case of adult-onset KD which revealed to be concurrently infected by Coxsackievirus A4. Case presentation The patient was a 37-year-old Japanese man who presented with fever, exanthema, changes in the peripheral extremities, bilateral non-exudative conjunctival injection, and changes in the oropharynx, signs that meet the diagnostic criteria for KD defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this case, the patient had a significantly high antibody titer for Coxsackievirus A4, which led us to presume that the occurrence of KD was concurrent Coxsackievirus A4 infection. Conclusion We reported a very rare case of KD which suggests that the disease can be concurrent Coxsackievirus A4 infection. Although KD is an acute childhood disease, with fever as one of the principal features, KD should also be considered in the differential diagnosis when adult patients present with a fever of unknown cause associated with a rash. PMID:26491373

  7. Evaluation of information-processing speed and neuropsychological functioning in patients with myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Stuss, D T; Kates, M H; Poirier, C A; Hylton, D; Humphreys, P; Keene, D; Laflèche, G

    1987-04-01

    Patients with myotonic dystrophy (MD) were compared to a control group, matched to the patients in important demographic variables including IQ, on the Sternberg Memory Scanning procedure, to investigate the hypothesis of a selective change in speed of information processing in MD patients. The neuropsychological functioning of these MD patients was also compared to normative data to provide a descriptive picture of their abilities; these results were correlated to the factors of age of onset and duration of the disease. Finally, the MD patients were also compared to the defined control group on the neuropsychological measures. There was little evidence of selective slowness of information processing or particular deficit independent of overall IQ. Neuropsychologically, the MD patients as a group performed at the low average level. There was, however, a wide range of abilities, suggesting that MD patients are not a unitary group in terms of neuropsychological functioning. Age of onset of the disease was important, at least for certain results. Further research of the neuropsychological functioning of MD patients must account for the wide range of results, with more precise measures of actual onset of the disease and muscular weakness, in a longitudinal evaluation. PMID:3558745

  8. Is it possible to identify infrahissian cardiac conduction abnormalities in myotonic dystrophy by non-invasive methods?

    PubMed Central

    Babuty, D; Fauchier, L; Tena-Carbi, D; Poret, P; Leche, J; Raynaud, M; Fauchier, J; Cosnay, P

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To identify intracardiac conduction abnormalities in patients with myotonic dystrophy from their clinical, ECG, and genetic features.
METHODS—39 consecutive patients (mean (SD) age 42.9 (12.1) years; 16 female, 23 male) underwent clinical examination, genetic studies, resting and 24 hour ambulatory ECG, signal averaged ECG, and electrophysiological studies.
RESULTS—23 patients suffered from cardiac symptoms, 23 had one or more cardiac conduction abnormality on resting ECG, one had sinus deficiency, and 21 (53.8%) had prolonged HV intervals. No correlation was found between the severity of the neurological symptoms, onset of disease, cardiac conduction abnormalities on ECG, and the intracardiac conduction abnormalities on electrophysiological study. The size of the DNA mutation was longer in the abnormal HV interval group than in the normal HV interval group (3.5 (1.8) v 2.2 (1.0) kb, p < 0.02). Signal averaged ECG parameters (total QRS duration (QRSD) and duration of low amplitude signals ⩽ 40 µV (LAS 40)) were greater in patients with an abnormal HV interval than in those with a normal HV interval (123.4 (24.6) v 102.8 (12.3) ms and 47.5 (12.8) v 35.3 (8.8) ms, respectively; p < 0.005). Only the association of QRSD ⩾ 100 ms with LAS 40 ⩾ 36 ms identified patients with an abnormal HV interval with good sensitivity (80%) and specificity (83.3%).
CONCLUSIONS—Infrahissian conduction abnormalities are common in myotonic dystrophy and can be identified using signal averaged electrocardiography.


Keywords: myotonic dystrophy; atrioventricular block; genetic factors; signal averaged ECG PMID:10525524

  9. A common gene for juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucomas confined on chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Morissette, J.; Plante, M.; Raymond, V.

    1995-06-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), which causes progressive loss of the visual fields, was subdivided into two groups according to age at onset: (1) chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) diagnosed after 40 years and (2) juvenile open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) diagnosed between 3 years of age and early adulthood. A JOAG gene (GLC1A) was recently mapped to chromosome 1q. We studied 142 members of a huge multigenerational French Canadian family affected with autosomal dominant POAG. Either JOAG or COAG was diagnosed with ocular hypertension (OHT), which may lead to POAG. To localize a common disease gene that might be responsible for both glaucoma subsets, we performed linkage analysis considering JOAG and COAG under the same phenotypic category. JOAG/COAG was tightly linked to seven microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q23-q25; a maximum lod score of 6.62 was obtained with AF-M278ye5. To refine the disease locus, we exploited a recombination mapping strategy based on a unique founder effect. The same characteristic haplotype, composed of 14 markers spanning 12 cM between loci D1S196 and D1S212, was recognized in all persons affected by JOAG, COAG, or OHT, but it did not occur in unaffected spouses and in normal family members >35 years of age, except for three obligatory carriers. Key combination events confined the disease region within a 9-cM interval between loci D1S445 and D1S416/D1S480. These observations demonstrate that the GLC1A gene is responsible for both adult-onset and juvenile glaucomas and suggest that the JOAG and COAG categories within this family may be part of a clinical continuum artificially divided at age 40 years. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Parenchymal lung involvement in adult-onset Still disease: A STROBE-compliant case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Cottin, Vincent; Jamilloux, Yvan; Hot, Arnaud; Gaillard-Coadon, Agathe; Durieu, Isabelle; Broussolle, Christiane; Iwaz, Jean; Sève, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Parenchymal lung involvement (PLI) in adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) has seldom, if ever, been studied. We examine here retrospective cohort AOSD cases and present a review of the literature (1971-2014) on AOSD-related PLI cases.Patients with PLI were identified in 57 AOSD cases. For inclusion, the patients had to fulfill Yamaguchi or Fautrel classification criteria, show respiratory symptoms, and have imaging evidence of pulmonary involvement, and data allowing exclusion of infectious, cardiogenic, toxic, or iatrogenic cause of PLI should be available. This AOSD + PLI group was compared with a control group (non-PLI-complicated AOSD cases from the same cohort).AOSD + PLI was found in 3 out of the 57 patients with AOSD (5.3%) and the literature mentioned 27 patients. Among these 30 AOSD + PLI cases, 12 presented an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the remaining 18 another PLI. In the latter, a nonspecific interstitial pneumonia computed tomography pattern prevailed in the lower lobes, pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive lung function, the alveolar differential cell count was neutrophilic in half of the cases, and the histological findings were consistent with bronchiolitis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Corticosteroids were fully efficient in all but 3 patients. Ten out of 12 ARDS cases occurred during the first year of the disease course. All ARDS-complicated AOSD cases received corticosteroids with favorable outcomes in 10 (2 deceased). Most PLIs occurred during the systemic onset of AOSD.PLI may occur in 5% of AOSDs, of which ARDS is the most severe. Very often, corticosteroids are efficient in controlling this complication. PMID:27472698

  11. Dominant-Negative Effects of Adult-Onset Huntingtin Mutations Alter the Division of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Carla; Aubert, Sophie; Bourgois-Rocha, Fany; Barnat, Monia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Déglon, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the huntingtin protein (HTT) gene underlie both adult-onset and juvenile forms of Huntington’s disease (HD). HTT modulates mitotic spindle orientation and cell fate in mouse cortical progenitors from the ventricular zone. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESC) characterized as carrying mutations associated with adult-onset disease during pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, we investigated the influence of human HTT and of an adult-onset HD mutation on mitotic spindle orientation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from hESCs. The RNAi-mediated silencing of both HTT alleles in neural stem cells derived from hESCs disrupted spindle orientation and led to the mislocalization of dynein, the p150Glued subunit of dynactin and the large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. We also investigated the effect of the adult-onset HD mutation on the role of HTT during spindle orientation in NSCs derived from HD-hESCs. By combining SNP-targeting allele-specific silencing and gain-of-function approaches, we showed that a 46-glutamine expansion in human HTT was sufficient for a dominant-negative effect on spindle orientation and changes in the distribution within the spindle pole and the cell cortex of dynein, p150Glued and NuMA in neural cells. Thus, neural derivatives of disease-specific human pluripotent stem cells constitute a relevant biological resource for exploring the impact of adult-onset HD mutations of the HTT gene on the division of neural progenitors, with potential applications in HD drug discovery targeting HTT-dynein-p150Glued complex interactions. PMID:26863614

  12. Does modafinil enhance activity of patients with myotonic dystrophy?

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, G.J.; van Dijk, J.G.

    2007-01-01

    We performed a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study in 13 patients with myotonic dystrophy to address the question whether modafinil, known to improve hypersomnolence in myotonic dystrophy, may improve levels of activity as well. We used the Epworth Sleepiness Scale as a measure of hypersomnolence and a structured interview of the patient and the partner or housemate as a measure of activity. We additionally used a restricted form of the RAND-36 to relate a possible improvement of activity to perceived general health. We confirmed earlier positive findings of modafinil regarding reduced somnolence (p = 0.015), but no significant effects were seen regarding activity levels (p = 0.2 for patients’ self-reports and 0.5 for partners’ reports). PMID:17285226

  13. Cytokine polymorphisms and plasma levels are associated with sleep onset insomnia in adults living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gay, Caryl L; Zak, Rochelle S; Lerdal, Anners; Pullinger, Clive R; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Lee, Kathryn A

    2015-07-01

    Sleep disturbance has been associated with inflammation and cytokine activity, and we previously described genetic associations between cytokine polymorphisms and sleep maintenance and duration among adults with HIV/AIDS. Although sleep onset insomnia (SOI) is also a commonly reported sleep problem, associations between cytokine biomarkers and SOI have not been adequately studied. The purpose of this study was to describe SOI in relation to cytokine plasma concentrations and gene polymorphisms in a convenience sample of 307 adults (212 men, 72 women, and 23 transgender) living with HIV/AIDS. Based on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index item that asks the time it usually took to fall asleep in the past month, participants were categorized as either >30min to fall asleep (n=70, 23%) or 30min or less to fall asleep (n=237). Plasma cytokines were analyzed, and genotyping was conducted for 15 candidate genes involved in cytokine signaling: interferon-gamma (IFNG), IFNG receptor 1 (IFNGR1), interleukins (IL1R2, IL2, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL13, IL17A), nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NFKB1 and NFKB2), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA). Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated as potential covariates. After adjusting for genomic estimates of ancestry, self-reported race/ethnicity and viral load, SOI was associated with higher IL-13 plasma levels and with six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): IL1B rs1143642 and rs1143623, IL6 rs4719714, IL13 rs1295686, NFKB1 rs4648110, and TNFA rs2857602. In addition, the IL1B rs1143642 polymorphism was associated with plasma levels of IL-1β in adjusted analyses. This study strengthens the evidence for an association between inflammation and sleep disturbance, particularly self-report of habitual SOI. In this chronic illness population, the cytokine polymorphisms associated with SOI provide direction for future personalized medicine intervention research. PMID:25535857

  14. Long-term outcomes of adults with pediatric-onset spinal cord injuries as a function of neurological impairment

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Lawrence C.; Chlan, Kathleen M.; Zebracki, Kathy; Anderson, Caroline J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify outcomes of participation, life satisfaction, and medical complications as a function of impairment in adults with pediatric-onset spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods Study participants were adults who sustained SCI at age 18 years or younger and were interviewed at age 24 years or older (M = 26.9, SD = 3.5). The telephone interview included a questionnaire and several standardized measures: FIM® instrument (FIM®), Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique (CHART), SF-12® Health Survey, and Satisfaction with Life Scale. Using the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury and the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS), subjects were grouped into four impairment categories: C1–C4 ABC, C5–C8 ABC, T1–L4 ABC, and AIS D. Results Of the 410 participants, 62% were male, 54% had tetraplegia, 70% had AIS A lesions, and average age at injury was 14 years (SD = 4.3). Of the 407 subjects who had complete neurological information, 59 had C1–C4 ABC, 140 had C5–C8 ABC, 168 had T1–L4 ABC, and 40 had AIS D lesions. The outcomes were delineated for education, employment, independent living and driving, marriage, participation, medical complications, health-related quality of life, and global life satisfaction, in addition to the ASIA motor score and FIM® motor scores, for each of the four impairment groups. Conclusions This information should help focus interventions that facilitate positive outcomes in relationship to the severity of impairment. In addition, these data can provide a level of expectation about long-term outcomes for newly injured children and their parents. PMID:21528628

  15. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model

    SciTech Connect

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Copperman, Jeremy; Taber, Alex; Reister, Emily E.; Sharma, Kush; Todd, Peter K.; Guenza, Marina G.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2014-10-10

    In this study, CUG repeat expansions in the 3' UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein–RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (Ψ) and 2'-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with Ψ or 2'-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamics and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for Ψ-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. Ψ modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases.

  16. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Copperman, Jeremy; Taber, Alex; Reister, Emily E.; Sharma, Kush; Todd, Peter K.; Guenza, Marina G.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2014-10-10

    In this study, CUG repeat expansions in the 3' UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein–RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (Ψ) and 2'-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with Ψ or 2'-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamicsmore » and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for Ψ-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. Ψ modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases.« less

  17. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A; Copperman, Jeremy; Taber, Alex; Reister, Emily E; Sharma, Kush; Todd, Peter K; Guenza, Marina G; Berglund, J Andrew

    2014-11-10

    CUG repeat expansions in the 3' UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein-RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (Ψ) and 2'-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with Ψ or 2'-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamics and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for Ψ-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. Ψ modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases. PMID:25303993

  18. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Copperman, Jeremy; Taber, Alex; Reister, Emily E.; Sharma, Kush; Todd, Peter K.; Guenza, Marina G.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    CUG repeat expansions in the 3′ UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein–RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (Ψ) and 2′-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with Ψ or 2′-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamics and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for Ψ-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. Ψ modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases. PMID:25303993

  19. Response to immunotherapy in a patient with adult onset Leigh syndrome and T9176C mtDNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Chuquilin, Miguel; Govindarajan, Raghav; Peck, Dawn; Font-Montgomery, Esperanza

    2016-09-01

    Leigh syndrome is a mitochondrial disease caused by mutations in different genes, including ATP6A for which no known therapy is available. We report a case of adult-onset Leigh syndrome with response to immunotherapy. A twenty year-old woman with baseline learning difficulties was admitted with progressive behavioral changes, diplopia, headaches, bladder incontinence, and incoordination. Brain MRI and PET scan showed T2 hyperintensity and increased uptake in bilateral basal ganglia, respectively. Autoimmune encephalitis was suspected and she received plasmapheresis with clinical improvement. She was readmitted 4 weeks later with dysphagia and aspiration pneumonia. Plasmapheresis was repeated with resolution of her symptoms. Given the multisystem involvement and suggestive MRI changes, genetic testing was done, revealing a homoplasmic T9176C ATPase 6 gene mtDNA mutation. Monthly IVIG provided clinical improvement with worsening when infusions were delayed. Leigh syndrome secondary to mtDNA T9176C mutations could have an autoimmune mechanism that responds to immunotherapy. PMID:27408822

  20. Pathways of acetylcholine synthesis, transport and release as targets for treatment of adult-onset cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Amenta, F; Tayebati, S K

    2008-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a neurotransmitter widely diffused in central, peripheral, autonomic and enteric nervous system. This paper has reviewed the main mechanisms of ACh synthesis, storage, and release. Presynaptic choline transport supports ACh production and release, and cholinergic terminals express a unique transporter critical for neurotransmitter release. Neurons cannot synthesize choline, which is ultimately derived from the diet and is delivered through the blood stream. ACh released from cholinergic synapses is hydrolyzed by acetylcholinesterase into choline and acetyl coenzyme A and almost 50% of choline derived from ACh hydrolysis is recovered by a high-affinity choline transporter. Parallel with the development of cholinergic hypothesis of geriatric memory dysfunction, cholinergic precursor loading strategy was tried for treating cognitive impairment occurring in Alzheimer's disease. Controlled clinical studies denied clinical usefulness of choline and lecithin (phosphatidylcholine), whereas for other phospholipids involved in choline biosynthetic pathways such as cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) or alpha-glyceryl-phosphorylcholine (choline alphoscerate) a modest improvement of cognitive dysfunction in adult-onset dementia disorders is documented. These inconsistencies have probably a metabolic explanation. Free choline administration increases brain choline availability but it does not increase ACh synthesis/or release. Cholinergic precursors to serve for ACh biosynthesis should be incorporate and stored into phospholipids in brain. It is probable that appropriate ACh precursors and other correlated molecules (natural or synthesized) could represent a tool for developing therapeutic strategies by revisiting and updating treatments/supplementations coming out from this therapeutic stalemate. PMID:18289004

  1. Adult-onset multiple acyl CoA dehydrogenation deficiency associated with an abnormal isoenzyme pattern of serum lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Fuminobu; Baba, Kousuke; Toyooka, Keiko; Liang, Wen-Chen; Nishino, Ichizo; Yamadera, Misaki; Sumi, Hisae; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Nishikawa, Yoshiro

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of a 37 year-old male with multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD). The patient had suffered from exercise intolerance in his hip and thigh muscles for one year. Then, restriction of carbohydrates for a diet made his symptoms rapidly deteriorate. Blood test revealed compound heterozygosity for two novel missense mutations in the electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase gene (ETFDH), and an abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern: LDH-1 (60.0%) and LDH-2 (26.0%) predominated with abnormally elevated LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (2.3), compared with muscle-derived LDH-5 (4.0%). Oral riboflavin treatment significantly improved his exercise intolerance and the LDH profile: LDH-1 (34.4%), LDH-2 (34.9%), LDH-5 (6.9%) and LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (1.0). The abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern may be one feature of adult-onset MADD selectively affecting type I muscle fibers with relatively high LDH-1 content. PMID:21907580

  2. Adult-onset Still's disease: an Italian multicentre retrospective observational study of manifestations and treatments in 245 patients.

    PubMed

    Sfriso, Paolo; Priori, Roberta; Valesini, Guido; Rossi, Silvia; Montecucco, Carlo Maurizio; D'Ascanio, Anna; Carli, Linda; Bombardieri, Stefano; LaSelva, Gaetana; Iannone, Florenzo; Lapadula, Giovanni; Alivernini, Stefano; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Colaci, Michele; Ferri, Clodoveo; Iacono, Daniela; Valentini, Gabriele; Costa, Luisa; Scarpa, Raffaele; LoMonaco, Andrea; Bagnari, Valentina; Govoni, Marcello; Piazza, Ilaria; Adami, Silvano; Ciccia, Francesco; Triolo, Giovanni; Alessandri, Elisa; Cutolo, Maurizio; Cantarini, Luca; Galeazzi, Mauro; Ruscitti, Piero; Giacomelli, Roberto; Caso, Francesco; Galozzi, Paola; Punzi, Leonardo

    2016-07-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory condition of unknown aetiology characterized by typical episodes of spiking fever, evanescent rash, arthralgia, leukocytosis and hyperferritinemia. Given the lack of data in Italian series, we promote a multicentric data collection to characterize the clinical phenotype of Italian patients with AOSD. Data from 245 subjects diagnosed with AOSD were collected by 15 centres between March and May 2013. The diagnosis was made following Yamaguchi's criteria. Data regarding clinical manifestations, laboratory features, disease course and treatments were reported and compared with those presented in other published series of different ethnicity. The most frequent features were the following: arthritis (93 %), pyrexia (92.6 %), leukocytosis (89 %), negative ANA (90.4 %) and neutrophilia (82 %). As compared to other North American, North European, Middle Eastern and Far Eastern cohorts, Italian data show differences in clinical and laboratory findings. Regarding the treatments, in 21.9 % of cases, corticosteroids and traditional DMARDs have not been able to control the disease while biologics have been shown to be effective in 48 to 58 patients. This retrospective work summarizes the largest Italian multicentre series of AOSD patients and presents clinical and laboratory features that appear to be influenced by the ethnicity of the affected subjects. PMID:27207567

  3. Therapeutic impact of systemic AAV-mediated RNA interference in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bisset, Darren R; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa A; Zavaljevski, Maja; Wei, Jessica; Carter, Gregory T; Weiss, Michael D; Chamberlain, Joel R

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising therapeutic approach for dominant genetic disorders that involve gain-of-function mechanisms. One candidate disease for RNAi therapy application is myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), which results from toxicity of a mutant mRNA. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene. The expression of DMPK mRNA containing an expanded CUG repeat (CUG(exp)) leads to defects in RNA biogenesis and turnover. We designed miRNA-based RNAi hairpins to target the CUG(exp) mRNA in the human α-skeletal muscle actin long-repeat (HSA(LR)) mouse model of DM1. RNAi expression cassettes were delivered to HSA(LR) mice using recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors injected intravenously as a route to systemic gene therapy. Vector delivery significantly reduced disease pathology in muscles of the HSA(LR) mice, including a reduction in the CUG(exp) mRNA, a reduction in myotonic discharges, a shift toward adult pre-mRNA splicing patterns, reduced myofiber hypertrophy and a decrease in myonuclear foci containing the CUG(exp) mRNA. Significant reversal of hallmarks of DM1 in the rAAV RNAi-treated HSA(LR) mice indicate that defects characteristic of DM1 can be mitigated with a systemic RNAi approach targeting the nuclei of terminally differentiated myofibers. Efficient rAAV-mediated delivery of RNAi has the potential to provide a long-term therapy for DM1 and other dominant muscular dystrophies. PMID:26082468

  4. Adult-Onset Deficiency in Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Alters Oligodendrocyte Turnover in the Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Kun; Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Lichtenwalner, Robin J.; Sonntag, William E.; Riddle, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) provide trophic support during development and also appear to influence cell structure, function and replacement in the adult brain. Recent studies demonstrated effects of the GH/IGF-I axis on adult neurogenesis, but it is unclear whether the GH/IGF-I axis influences glial turnover in the normal adult brain. In the current study we used a selective model of adult-onset GH and IGF-I deficiency to evaluate the role of GH and IGF-I in regulating glial proliferation and survival in the adult corpus callosum. GH/IGF-I-deficient dwarf rats of the Lewis strain were made GH/IGF-I replete via twice daily injections of GH starting at postnatal day 28 (P28), approximately the age at which GH pulse amplitude increases in developing rodents. GH/IGF-I deficiency was initiated in adulthood by removing animals from GH treatment. Quantitative analyses revealed that adult-onset GH/IGF-I deficiency decreased cell proliferation in the white matter and decreased the survival of newborn oligodendrocytes. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that aging-related changes in the GH/IGF-I axis produce deficits in ongoing turnover of oligodendrocytes, which may contribute to aging-related cognitive changes and deficits in remyelination after injury. PMID:19115393

  5. Interleukin 1 inhibition with anakinra in adult-onset Still disease: a meta-analysis of its efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Dongsheng; Yang, Zhihai; Han, Shuyin; Liang, Xingguang; Ma, Kuifen; Zhang, Xingguo

    2014-01-01

    Background Anakinra is the first interleukin-1 inhibitor to be used in clinical practice, and recent evidence showed that interleukin-1 plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of adult-onset Still disease (AoSD). However, data concerning efficacy with anakinra use in different clinical trials has not been evaluated, and the overall remission of AoSD with anakinra treatment has not been well defined. Methods We conducted a search on Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for relevant trials. Statistical analyses were conducted to calculate the overall remission rates, odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI), by using either random effects or fixed effect models according to the heterogeneity. Results Of the 273 articles that were identified, 265 were excluded. Eight studies were eligible for inclusion. The overall remission rate and complete remission rate of anakinra in AoSD patients were 81.66% (95% CI: 69.51%–89.69%) and 66.75% (95% CI: 59.94%–75.3%), respectively. Compared with the controls, the use of anakinra was associated with a significant remission in AoSD, with an OR of 0.16 (95% CI: 0.06–0.44, P=0.0005). There were also significant reductions of the dosage of corticosteroid (mean difference =21.19) (95% CI: 13.2–29.18, P<0.0001) from anakinra onset to the latest follow up time. Clinical and laboratory parameters were all improved, and anakinra was well tolerated in patients with AoSD. No evidence of publication bias was observed. Conclusion Our study has shown that anakinra is effective in remitting the manifestations of AoSD, with reduction of the dose of corticosteroid in patients with AoSD. Further, anakinra therapy was not associated with increased risk of adverse events, and it was well tolerated in patients with AoSD. Further research is still recommended to investigate these findings. PMID:25473268

  6. Rearranged Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Adult-Onset Papillary Thyroid Cancer Amongst Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    rearrangements, being observed in 6 of 10 PTC cases with ALK rearrangements versus 2 of 15 cases with no ALK rearrangements. The six radiation-exposed cases of PTC harboring both ALK rearrangements and solid/trabecular-like architecture were associated with higher radiation doses and younger ages at the time of the A-bombing and at diagnosis compared to the other 19 PTC with no detectable gene alterations. Conclusion Our findings suggest that ALK rearrangements are involved in the development of radiation-induced adult-onset PTC. PMID:23050789

  7. Experiences of Racism and the Incidence of Adult-Onset Asthma in the Black Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeffrey; O’Connor, George T.; Brown, Timothy A.; Cozier, Yvette C.; Palmer, Julie R.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic stress resulting from experiences of racism may increase the incidence of adult-onset asthma through effects on the immune system and the airways. We conducted prospective analyses of the relation of experiences of racism with asthma incidence in the Black Women’s Health Study, a prospective cohort of black women in the United States followed since 1995 with mailed biennial questionnaires. Methods: Among 38,142 participants followed from 1997 to 2011, 1,068 reported incident asthma. An everyday racism score was created based on five questions asked in 1997 and 2009 about the frequency in daily life of experiences of racism (eg, poor service in stores), and a lifetime racism score was based on questions about racism on the job, in housing, and by police. We used Cox regression models to derive multivariable incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% CIs for categories of each racism score in relation to incident asthma. Results: The IRRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.19-1.78) for the highest compared with the lowest quartile of the 1997 everyday racism score (P for trend <.0001) and 1.44 (95% CI, 1.18-1.75) for the highest compared with the lowest category of 1997 lifetime racism. Among women who reported the same levels of racism in 1997 and 2009, the IRRs for the highest categories of everyday and lifetime racism were 2.12 (95% CI, 1.55-2.91) and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.20-2.30), respectively. Conclusions: Given the high prevalence of experiences of racism and asthma in black women in the United States, a positive association between racism and asthma is of public health importance. PMID:23887828

  8. Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) in the era of biologic therapies: dichotomous view for cytokine and clinical expressions.

    PubMed

    Maria, Alexandre Thibault Jacques; Le Quellec, Alain; Jorgensen, Christian; Touitou, Isabelle; Rivière, Sophie; Guilpain, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare inflammatory disorder characterized by hectic spiking fever, evanescent rash and joint involvement. Prognosis is highly variable upon disease course and specific involvements, ranging from benign and limited outcome to chronic destructive polyarthritis and/or life-threatening events in case of visceral complications or reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (RHL). AOSD remains a debatable entity at the frontiers of autoimmune diseases and autoinflammatory disorders. The pivotal role of macrophage cell activation leading to a typical Th1 cytokine storm is now well established in AOSD, and confirmed by the benefits using treatments targeting TNF-α, IL-1β or IL-6 in refractory patients. However, it remains difficult to determine predictive factors of outcome and to draw guidelines for patient management. Herein, reviewing literature and relying on our experience in a series of 8 refractory AOSD patients, we question nosology and postulate that different cytokine patterns could underlie contrasting clinical expressions, as well as responses to targeted therapies. We therefore propose to dichotomize AOSD according to its clinical presentation. On the one hand, 'systemic AOSD' patients, exhibiting the highest inflammation process driven by excessive IL-18, IL-1β and IL-6 production, would be at risk of life-threatening complications (such as multivisceral involvements and RHL), and would preferentially respond to IL-1β and IL-6 antagonists. On the other hand, 'rheumatic AOSD' patients, exhibiting pre-eminence of joint involvement driven by IL-8 and IFN-γ production, would be at risk of articular destructions, and would preferentially respond to TNF-α blockers. PMID:25183244

  9. Comparison of Glomerular Transcriptome Profiles of Adult-Onset Steroid Sensitive Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis and Minimal Change Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hong; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Weijia; Wei, Chengguo; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Wen; Li, Xiao; Wang, Weiming; Lv, Danfeng; He, John Cijiang; Chen, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To search for biomarkers to differentiate primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and minimal change disease (MCD). Methods We isolated glomeruli from kidney biopsies of 6 patients with adult-onset steroid sensitiveFSGS and 5 patients with MCD, and compared the profiles of glomerular transcriptomes between the two groups of patients using microarray analysis. Results Analysis of differential expressed genes (DEGs) revealed that up-regulated DEGs in FSGS patients compared with MCD patients were primarily involved in spermatogenesis, gamete generation, regulation of muscle contraction, response to unfolded protein, cell proliferation and skeletal system development. The down-regulated DEGs were primarily related to metabolic process, intracellular transport, oxidation/reduction andestablishment of intracellular localization. We validated the expression of the top 6 up-regulated and top 6 down-regulated DEGs using real-time PCR. Membrane metallo-endopeptidase (MME) is a down-regulated gene that was previously identified as a key gene for kidney development. Immunostaining confirmed that the protein expression of MME decreased significantly in FSGS kidneys compared with MCD kidneys. Conclusions This report was the first study to examine transcriptomes in Chinese patients with various glomerular diseases. Expressions of MME both in RNA and protein level decreased significantly in glomeruli of FSGS kidneys compared with MCD kidneys. Our data suggested that MME might play a role in the normal physiological function of podocytes and a decrease in MME expression might be related to podocyte injury. We also identified genes and pathways specific for FSGS versus MCD, and our data could help identify potential new biomarkers for the differential diagnosis between these two diseases. PMID:26536600

  10. Adult-onset Diamond-Blackfan anemia with a novel mutation in the exon 5 of RPL11: too late and too rare

    PubMed Central

    Flores Ballester, Elena; Gil-Fernández, Juan José; Vázquez Blanco, Miguel; Mesa, José M; de Dios García, Juan; Tamayo, Ana T; Burgaleta, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital erythroid aplasia usually diagnosed in the early infancy and associated with mutations or large deletions in 11 ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Adult patients with severe, transfusion dependence, aregenerative anemia might have a genetic-in-origin disease with an atypical presentation. Late onset nonclassical DBA should be ruled out and mutations of RP genes studied. PMID:26185635

  11. Adult-onset Diamond-Blackfan anemia with a novel mutation in the exon 5 of RPL11: too late and too rare.

    PubMed

    Flores Ballester, Elena; Gil-Fernández, Juan José; Vázquez Blanco, Miguel; Mesa, José M; de Dios García, Juan; Tamayo, Ana T; Burgaleta, Carmen

    2015-06-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital erythroid aplasia usually diagnosed in the early infancy and associated with mutations or large deletions in 11 ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Adult patients with severe, transfusion dependence, aregenerative anemia might have a genetic-in-origin disease with an atypical presentation. Late onset nonclassical DBA should be ruled out and mutations of RP genes studied. PMID:26185635

  12. Negative expansion of the myotonic dystrophy unstable sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Abeliovich, D; Lerer, I; Pashut-Lavon, I; Shmueli, E; Raas-Rothschild, A; Frydman, M

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed the unstable fragment of the myotonic dystrophy (DM) gene in a pregnancy at 50% risk for DM. The affected father in this family had a 3.0-kb expansion of the DM unstable region. The fetus inherited the mutated gene, but with an expansion of 0.5 kb. This case represented a counseling problem in light of the absence of data concerning "negative expansion." Analysis of the DM gene in 17 families with 72 affected individuals revealed four more cases of negative expansions, all of them in paternal transmissions. The possible significance of this finding is discussed. Images Figure 2 PMID:8503449

  13. Annual Research Review: Current limitations and future directions in MRI studies of child- and adult-onset developmental psychopathologies

    PubMed Central

    Horga, Guillermo; Kaur, Tejal; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    The widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the study of child- and adult-onset developmental psychopathologies has generated many investigations that have measured brain structure and function in vivo throughout development, often generating great excitement over our ability to visualize the living, developing brain using the attractive, even seductive images that these studies produce. Often lost in this excitement is the recognition that brain imaging generally, and MRI in particular, is simply a technology, one that does not fundamentally differ from any other technology, be it a blood test, a genotyping assay, a biochemical assay, or behavioral test. No technology alone can generate valid scientific findings. Rather, it is only technology coupled with a strong experimental design that can generate valid and reproducible findings that lead to new insights into the mechanisms of disease and therapeutic response. In this review we discuss selected studies to illustrate the most common and important limitations of MRI study designs as most commonly implemented thus far, as well as the misunderstanding that the interpretations of findings from those studies can create for our theories of developmental psychopathologies. Those limitations are in large part responsible thus far for the generally poor reproducibility of findings across studies, poor generalizability to the larger population, failure to identify developmental trajectories, inability to distinguish causes from effects of illness, and poor ability to infer causal mechanisms in most MRI studies of developmental psychopathologies. For each of these limitations in study design and the difficulties they entail for the interpretation of findings, we discuss various approaches that numerous laboratories are now taking to address those difficulties, which have in common the yoking of brain imaging technologies to studies with inherently stronger designs that permit more valid and more powerful

  14. Adult-onset hypothyroidism and the cerebral metabolism of (1,2-13C2) acetate as detected by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chapa, F; Künnecke, B; Calvo, R; Escobar del Rey, F; Morreale de Escobar, G; Cerdán, S

    1995-01-01

    The effects of adult-onset hypothyroidism on the metabolic compartmentation of the cerebral tricarboxylic acid cycle and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt have been investigated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Rats thyroidectomized as adults and age-matched controls were infused in the right jugular vein with unlabeled or (1,2-13C2) acetate solutions for 60 min. At the end of the infusion, the brains were frozen in situ and perchloric acid extracts were prepared and analyzed by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and reverse-phase HPLC. Thyroidectomized animals showed a decrease in the incorporation of 13C from (1,2-13C2) acetate in cerebral metabolites and an increase in the concentrations of unlabeled glutamate and GABA. Computer-assisted interpretation of the 13C multiplets observed for the carbons of glutamate, glutamine, and GABA indicated that adult-onset hypothyroidism produced 1) a decrease in the contribution of infused (1,2-13C2) acetate to the glial tricarboxylic acid cycle; 2) an increase in the contribution of unlabeled acetyl-CoA to the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle; and 3) impairments in the exchange of glutamate, glutamine, and GABA between the neuronal and glial compartments. Despite the fact that the adult brain has often been considered metabolically unresponsive to thyroid hormone status, present results show metabolic alterations in the neuronal and glial compartments that are reversible with substitution therapy. PMID:7828544

  15. Six Serum miRNAs Fail to Validate as Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Costa, Juan M; Llamusi, Beatriz; Bargiela, Ariadna; Zulaica, Miren; Alvarez-Abril, M Carmen; Perez-Alonso, Manuel; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; Lopez-Castel, Arturo; Artero, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by expansion of a CTG microsatellite in the 3' untranslated region of the DMPK gene. Despite characteristic muscular, cardiac, and neuropsychological symptoms, CTG trinucleotide repeats are unstable both in the somatic and germinal lines, making the age of onset, clinical presentation, and disease severity very variable. A molecular biomarker to stratify patients and to follow disease progression is, thus, an unmet medical need. Looking for a novel biomarker, and given that specific miRNAs have been found to be misregulated in DM1 heart and muscle tissues, we profiled the expression of 175 known serum miRNAs in DM1 samples. The differences detected between patients and controls were less than 2.6 fold for all of them and a selection of six candidate miRNAs, miR-103, miR-107, miR-21, miR-29a, miR-30c, and miR-652 all failed to show consistent differences in serum expression in subsequent validation experiments. PMID:26919350

  16. Role of myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) in glucose homeostasis and muscle insulin action.

    PubMed

    Llagostera, Esther; Catalucci, Daniele; Marti, Luc; Liesa, Marc; Camps, Marta; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Kondo, Richard; Reddy, Sita; Dillmann, Wolfgang H; Palacin, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Gomis, Ramon; Kaliman, Perla

    2007-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3'-unstranslated region of the DMPK gene, which encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase. One of the common clinical features of DM1 patients is insulin resistance, which has been associated with a pathogenic effect of the repeat expansions. Here we show that DMPK itself is a positive modulator of insulin action. DMPK-deficient (dmpk-/-) mice exhibit impaired insulin signaling in muscle tissues but not in adipocytes and liver, tissues in which DMPK is not expressed. Dmpk-/- mice display metabolic derangements such as abnormal glucose tolerance, reduced glucose uptake and impaired insulin-dependent GLUT4 trafficking in muscle. Using DMPK mutants, we show that DMPK is required for a correct intracellular trafficking of insulin and IGF-1 receptors, providing a mechanism to explain the molecular and metabolic phenotype of dmpk-/- mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that reduced DMPK expression may directly influence the onset of insulin-resistance in DM1 patients and point to dmpk as a new candidate gene for susceptibility to type 2-diabetes. PMID:17987120

  17. Role of Myotonic Dystrophy Protein Kinase (DMPK) in Glucose Homeostasis and Muscle Insulin Action

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Luc; Liesa, Marc; Camps, Marta; Ciaraldi, Theodore P.; Kondo, Richard; Reddy, Sita; Dillmann, Wolfgang H.; Palacin, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Gomis, Ramon; Kaliman, Perla

    2007-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3′-unstranslated region of the DMPK gene, which encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase. One of the common clinical features of DM1 patients is insulin resistance, which has been associated with a pathogenic effect of the repeat expansions. Here we show that DMPK itself is a positive modulator of insulin action. DMPK-deficient (dmpk−/−) mice exhibit impaired insulin signaling in muscle tissues but not in adipocytes and liver, tissues in which DMPK is not expressed. Dmpk−/− mice display metabolic derangements such as abnormal glucose tolerance, reduced glucose uptake and impaired insulin-dependent GLUT4 trafficking in muscle. Using DMPK mutants, we show that DMPK is required for a correct intracellular trafficking of insulin and IGF-1 receptors, providing a mechanism to explain the molecular and metabolic phenotype of dmpk−/− mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that reduced DMPK expression may directly influence the onset of insulin-resistance in DM1 patients and point to dmpk as a new candidate gene for susceptibility to type 2-diabetes. PMID:17987120

  18. Six Serum miRNAs Fail to Validate as Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Costa, Juan M.; Llamusi, Beatriz; Bargiela, Ariadna; Zulaica, Miren; Alvarez-Abril, M. Carmen; Perez-Alonso, Manuel; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by expansion of a CTG microsatellite in the 3’ untranslated region of the DMPK gene. Despite characteristic muscular, cardiac, and neuropsychological symptoms, CTG trinucleotide repeats are unstable both in the somatic and germinal lines, making the age of onset, clinical presentation, and disease severity very variable. A molecular biomarker to stratify patients and to follow disease progression is, thus, an unmet medical need. Looking for a novel biomarker, and given that specific miRNAs have been found to be misregulated in DM1 heart and muscle tissues, we profiled the expression of 175 known serum miRNAs in DM1 samples. The differences detected between patients and controls were less than 2.6 fold for all of them and a selection of six candidate miRNAs, miR-103, miR-107, miR-21, miR-29a, miR-30c, and miR-652 all failed to show consistent differences in serum expression in subsequent validation experiments. PMID:26919350

  19. Segmental myofiber necrosis in myotonic dystrophy - An immunoperoxidase study of immunoglobulins in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, M. M.; Banerjee, D.; Hudson, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Because serum immunoglobulin G levels are low in patients with myotonic dystrophy, it was hypothesized that it might be catabolized within abnormal muscle fibers. Accordingly, immunohistochemical stains for immunoglobulins were performed on muscle sections derived at biopsy or autopsy from patients with myotonic dystrophy, other forms of muscular dystrophy, nondystrophic muscle disease, or normal muscle. Positive staining for immunoglobulins was found only in necrotic segments of myofibers (in 7 of 19 dystrophic and 6 of 27 nondystrophic subjects), and it is believed that the staining was due to nonspecific diffusion. However, staining reactions distinguished between incipient necrosis and artifactual contraction bands and allowed us to study segmental myofiber necrosis, comparing its frequency in the various muscle diseases. Segmental myofiber necrosis was present in 4 of 16 cases of myotonic dystrophy. The relevance of this finding to the clinical and morphologic features of myotonic dystrophy is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6351629

  20. Disturbed sleep as risk factor for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder--Data from a 10-year prospective-longitudinal study among adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Philipp S; Höfler, Michael; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lieb, Roselind; Bauer, Michael; Pfennig, Andrea; Beesdo-Baum, Katja

    2015-09-01

    There is ample data suggesting that individuals with bipolar disorder more frequently suffer from disturbed sleep even when euthymic. Since sleep is a process that is crucial for affective homeostasis, disturbed sleep in healthy individuals may be a risk factor for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. Utilizing data from a large cohort of adolescents and young adults, this study tests the hypothesis that disturbed sleep constitutes a risk factor for the later onset of bipolar disorder. A representative community sample of N = 3021 adolescents and young adults (baseline age 14-24) was assessed using the standardized Composite International Diagnostic Interview and followed-up prospectively up to 3 times over up to 10 years. Disturbed sleep at baseline was quantified utilizing the corresponding items from the self-report inventory SCL-90-R. The compound value (insomnia-score) as an ordinal parameter for the severity of sleep disturbances was used to assess associations with the incidence of bipolar disorder among participants free of major mental disorder at baseline (N = 1943) using odds ratios (OR) from logistic regressions. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, parental mood disorder and lifetime alcohol or cannabis dependence. Poor sleep quality significantly increased the risk for the subsequent development of bipolar disorder (OR = 1.75; p = 0.001). Regarding individual sleep items, trouble falling asleep and early morning awakening were predictive for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. Disturbed sleep in persons otherwise free of major mental disorders appears to confer an increased risk for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. PMID:26228404

  1. Adversities in childhood and adult psychopathology in the South Africa Stress and Health Study: associations with first-onset DSM-IV disorders.

    PubMed

    Slopen, Natalie; Williams, David R; Seedat, Soraya; Moomal, Hashim; Herman, Allen; Stein, Dan J

    2010-11-01

    Extensive epidemiologic research from the United States demonstrates that childhood adversities (CAs) are predictive of several psychiatric outcomes, including depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and externalizing disorders. To date, this has not been explored in a national sample of adults in South Africa. The present study examined the joint predictive effects of 11 retrospectively reported CAs on the first onset of DSM-IV disorders in the South Africa Stress and Health Study (SASH), a nationally representative sample of adults. We utilized substantively plausible regression models of joint CA effects that account for the comorbidity between individual CAs; outcomes included DSM-IV anxiety disorders, mood disorders, substance use disorders, and externalizing disorders measured with the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview. The results indicated that experiences of CA varied by race, and many CAs were correlated with one another. The best-fitting model for first onset of any disorder included separate indicators for each type of CA, in addition to indicator variables for the number of other CAs reported. Results disaggregated by class of disorder showed that the majority of CAs with significant odds ratios only predicted anxiety disorder. Results disaggregated by life course stage of first onset showed that significant effects of CAs can be observed at each stage of the life course. This study contributes to a growing body of research on the social determinants of mental health in South Africa. Our findings illustrate the importance of utilizing a model that accounts for the clustering and accumulation of CAs, and suggest that a variety of CAs predict onset of mental disorders, particularly anxiety disorders, at several stages of the life course. PMID:20870332

  2. When uncommon and common coalesce: adult onset Still's disease associated with breast augmentation as part of autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Dagan, A; Kogan, M; Shoenfeld, Y; Segal, G

    2016-06-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon, multisystemic, auto-inflammatory disorder, while breast augmentation is a very common cosmetic procedure. We describe a case in which these two coalesce, AOSD, manifested with pleuritis and pericarditis, developed after breast mammoplasty. The pathogenetic, missing link, behind the development of AOSD following mammoplasty, is thought to be the autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). We reviewed other cases of AOSD associated with breast mammoplasty published to date and the literature regarding AOSD and ASIA syndrome. The review is followed by a short debate of whether silicone implants should be explanted in similar, future cases. PMID:25604318

  3. Abnormal splicing switch of DMD's penultimate exon compromises muscle fibre maintenance in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rau, Frédérique; Lainé, Jeanne; Ramanoudjame, Laetitita; Ferry, Arnaud; Arandel, Ludovic; Delalande, Olivier; Jollet, Arnaud; Dingli, Florent; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Kabashi, Edor; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Koo, Taeyoung; Loew, Damarys; Swanson, Maurice S; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Dickson, George; Allamand, Valérie; Marie, Joëlle; Furling, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a dominant neuromuscular disease caused by nuclear-retained RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats. These toxic RNAs alter the activities of RNA splicing factors resulting in alternative splicing misregulation and muscular dysfunction. Here we show that the abnormal splicing of DMD exon 78 found in dystrophic muscles of DM1 patients is due to the functional loss of MBNL1 and leads to the re-expression of an embryonic dystrophin in place of the adult isoform. Forced expression of embryonic dystrophin in zebrafish using an exon-skipping approach severely impairs the mobility and muscle architecture. Moreover, reproducing Dmd exon 78 missplicing switch in mice induces muscle fibre remodelling and ultrastructural abnormalities including ringed fibres, sarcoplasmic masses or Z-band disorganization, which are characteristic features of dystrophic DM1 skeletal muscles. Thus, we propose that splicing misregulation of DMD exon 78 compromises muscle fibre maintenance and contributes to the progressive dystrophic process in DM1. PMID:26018658

  4. Atrial flutter in myotonic dystrophy type 1: Patient characteristics and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Wahbi, Karim; Sebag, Frederic A; Lellouche, Nicolas; Lazarus, Arnaud; Bécane, Henri-Marc; Bassez, Guillaume; Stojkovic, Tanya; Fayssoil, Abdallah; Laforêt, Pascal; Béhin, Anthony; Meune, Christophe; Eymard, Bruno; Duboc, Denis

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence and the incidence of atrial flutter in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and the most appropriate strategies for its management are unknown. We retrospectively included in the DM1 Heart Registry 929 adult patients with DM1 admitted to our Institutions between January 2000 and September 2013. We selected patients presenting with atrial flutter and analysed data relative to the occurrence of arterial thromboembolism, severe bradyarrhythmias and atrial flutter recurrences. Atrial flutter was present in 79 of the 929 patients included in our Registry, representing a 8.5% prevalence. Patients with atrial flutter were older, had a higher muscular disability rating scale score and had higher prevalence of other cardiac manifestations of DM1. Sixty patients presented with a first episode of atrial flutter, representing a 4.6% incidence. Severe bradyarrhythmias requiring permanent pacing were present in 4 patients (6.7%). Over a 53 ± 28 months mean follow-up duration, 2 patients (3.3%) had ischaemic stroke and 12 (20%) had atrial flutter recurrences. Patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation were more frequently free of atrial flutter recurrence than other patients (95 vs. 61%; HR = 0.17; P = 0.04). Atrial flutter is a common manifestation of DM1, potentially complicated by arterial thromboembolism or severe bradyarrhythmias. Radiofrequency catheter ablation is associated with a lower risk for recurrences. PMID:26948709

  5. Abnormal splicing switch of DMD's penultimate exon compromises muscle fibre maintenance in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Frédérique; Lainé, Jeanne; Ramanoudjame, Laetitita; Ferry, Arnaud; Arandel, Ludovic; Delalande, Olivier; Jollet, Arnaud; Dingli, Florent; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Kabashi, Edor; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Koo, Taeyoung; Loew, Damarys; Swanson, Maurice S.; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Dickson, George; Allamand, Valérie; Marie, Joëlle; Furling, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a dominant neuromuscular disease caused by nuclear-retained RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats. These toxic RNAs alter the activities of RNA splicing factors resulting in alternative splicing misregulation and muscular dysfunction. Here we show that the abnormal splicing of DMD exon 78 found in dystrophic muscles of DM1 patients is due to the functional loss of MBNL1 and leads to the re-expression of an embryonic dystrophin in place of the adult isoform. Forced expression of embryonic dystrophin in zebrafish using an exon-skipping approach severely impairs the mobility and muscle architecture. Moreover, reproducing Dmd exon 78 missplicing switch in mice induces muscle fibre remodelling and ultrastructural abnormalities including ringed fibres, sarcoplasmic masses or Z-band disorganization, which are characteristic features of dystrophic DM1 skeletal muscles. Thus, we propose that splicing misregulation of DMD exon 78 compromises muscle fibre maintenance and contributes to the progressive dystrophic process in DM1. PMID:26018658

  6. RNA toxicity in myotonic muscular dystrophy induces NKX2-5 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, Ramesh S; Frenzel-McCardell, Carla D; Yu, Qing; Srinivasan, Varadamurthy; Tucker, Amy L; Puymirat, Jack; Thornton, Charles A; Prall, Owen W; Harvey, Richard P; Mahadevan, Mani S

    2010-01-01

    Myotonic muscular dystrophy (DM1) is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder in adults and is considered the first example of a disease caused by RNA toxicity. Using a reversible transgenic mouse model of RNA toxicity in DM1, we provide evidence that DM1 is associated with induced NKX2-5 expression. Transgene expression resulted in cardiac conduction defects, increased expression of the cardiac-specific transcription factor NKX2-5 and profound disturbances in connexin 40 and connexin 43. Notably, overexpression of the DMPK 3′ UTR mRNA in mouse skeletal muscle also induced transcriptional activation of Nkx2-5 and its targets. In human muscles, these changes were specific to DM1 and were not present in other muscular dystrophies. The effects on NKX2-5 and its downstream targets were reversed by silencing toxic RNA expression. Furthermore, using Nkx2-5+/− mice, we show that NKX2-5 is the first genetic modifier of DM1-associated RNA toxicity in the heart. PMID:18084293

  7. Brain Connectomics' Modification to Clarify Motor and Nonmotor Features of Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Laura; Mancini, Matteo; Silvestri, Gabriella; Petrucci, Antonio; Masciullo, Marcella; Spanò, Barbara; Torso, Mario; Mastropasqua, Chiara; Giacanelli, Manlio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Cercignani, Mara; Meola, Giovanni; Bozzali, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The adult form of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) presents with paradoxical inconsistencies between severity of brain damage, relative preservation of cognition, and failure in everyday life. This study, based on the assessment of brain connectivity and mechanisms of plasticity, aimed at reconciling these conflicting issues. Resting-state functional MRI and graph theoretical methods of analysis were used to assess brain topological features in a large cohort of patients with DM1. Patients, compared to controls, revealed reduced connectivity in a large frontoparietal network that correlated with their isolated impairment in visuospatial reasoning. Despite a global preservation of the topological properties, peculiar patterns of frontal disconnection and increased parietal-cerebellar connectivity were also identified in patients' brains. The balance between loss of connectivity and compensatory mechanisms in different brain networks might explain the paradoxical mismatch between structural brain damage and minimal cognitive deficits observed in these patients. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of brain abnormalities that fit well with both motor and nonmotor clinical features experienced by patients in their everyday life. The current findings suggest that measures of functional connectivity may offer the possibility of characterizing individual patients with the potential to become a clinical tool. PMID:27313901

  8. Brain Connectomics' Modification to Clarify Motor and Nonmotor Features of Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    PubMed

    Serra, Laura; Mancini, Matteo; Silvestri, Gabriella; Petrucci, Antonio; Masciullo, Marcella; Spanò, Barbara; Torso, Mario; Mastropasqua, Chiara; Giacanelli, Manlio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Cercignani, Mara; Meola, Giovanni; Bozzali, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The adult form of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) presents with paradoxical inconsistencies between severity of brain damage, relative preservation of cognition, and failure in everyday life. This study, based on the assessment of brain connectivity and mechanisms of plasticity, aimed at reconciling these conflicting issues. Resting-state functional MRI and graph theoretical methods of analysis were used to assess brain topological features in a large cohort of patients with DM1. Patients, compared to controls, revealed reduced connectivity in a large frontoparietal network that correlated with their isolated impairment in visuospatial reasoning. Despite a global preservation of the topological properties, peculiar patterns of frontal disconnection and increased parietal-cerebellar connectivity were also identified in patients' brains. The balance between loss of connectivity and compensatory mechanisms in different brain networks might explain the paradoxical mismatch between structural brain damage and minimal cognitive deficits observed in these patients. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of brain abnormalities that fit well with both motor and nonmotor clinical features experienced by patients in their everyday life. The current findings suggest that measures of functional connectivity may offer the possibility of characterizing individual patients with the potential to become a clinical tool. PMID:27313901

  9. Early Onset of Drug and Polysubstance Use as Predictors of Injection Drug Use Among Adult Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Trenz, Rebecca C.; Scherer, Michael; Harrell, Paul; Zur, Julia; Sinha, Ashish; Latimer, William

    2012-01-01

    Early onset of alcohol, marijuana, and cigarette use is an indicator of later substance use problems in adulthood such as alcohol or other drug dependence. This paper seeks to address the association between early onset alcohol, marijuana, cigarette, and polysubstance use with injection drug use among recent illicit drug users. The current study used baseline data from the Baltimore site of the NEURO-HIV Epidemiologic Study, an investigation of neuropsychological and social-behavioral risk factors of HIV, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C among both injection and non-injection drug users in Baltimore Maryland. The present study used a subset (N = 651) of the larger parent study that identified as White or Black, and reported any drug use in the past 6 months. In the full sample slightly more than half (52.5%) of study participants were IDUs. IDUs differed from non-IDUs on age of initiation for cigarettes, marijuana, and alcohol, with IDUs initiating the use of all three substances significantly earlier than non-IDUs. IDUs also had significantly greater proportions of early onset of alcohol (χ2 = 19.71, p < .01), cigarette (χ2 = 11.05, p < .01), marijuana (χ2 = 10.83, p < .01), and polysubstance use (χ2 = 23.48, p < .01) than non-IDUs. After adjusting for age, gender, and race/ethnicity, only participants identified as early onset alcohol users (AOR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.00-2.18) and early onset polysubstance users (AOR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.10-2.38) were more likely to have IDU status than those who reported initiating substance use later. IDU status was then stratified by race/ethnicity. After controlling for age and gender, only early polysubstance use was a significant predictor of IDU status for Whites (AOR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.07-3.93). Consistent with literature on early substance initiation and later illicit substance use, early onset alcohol and polysubstance use is an important risk factor for IDU in adulthood. PMID:22172686

  10. Genomic organization and transcriptional units at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, D.J.; Rundle, S.A.; Harley, H.G.; Crow, S.R.; Harper, P.S. ); McCurrach, M.; Sohn, R.; Thirion, J.P.; Buckler, A.J.; Housman, D.E.; Brook, J.D. ); Hamshere, M.G. )

    1993-12-01

    The genomic structure and apparently complete coding sequence of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene have been determined. The gene contains 15 exons distributed over about 13 kb of genomic DNA. It codes for a protein of 624 amino acids with an N-terminal domain highly homologous to cAMP-dependent serine-threonine protein kinases, an intermediate domain with a high [alpha]-helical content and weak similarity to various filamentous proteins, and a hydrophobic C-terminal segment. Located in close proximity is a second gene, coding for a transcript of about 3 kb, that is homologous to the gene DMR-N9 in the corresponding mouse locus, but has no homologies to other known genes or proteins. Strong expression of the latter gene in brain suggests that it may have a role in the development of mental symptoms in severe cases of the disease. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Neuropsychiatric aspects of adult-onset Tay-Sachs disease: two case reports with several new findings.

    PubMed

    Hurowitz, G I; Silver, J M; Brin, M F; Williams, D T; Johnson, W G

    1993-01-01

    Deficiency of hexosaminidase A causes the GM2 gangliosidosis known as Tay-Sachs disease. It is now known that this condition has several late-onset variants that cause numerous neuropsychiatric disturbances. Early recognition is important because treatment with phenothiazines and heterocyclic antidepressants may worsen the course. The authors report two cases with several new findings, including prominent psychiatric symptoms without psychosis early in the course of the illness. PMID:8428133

  12. Natural history of adult-onset eIF2B-related disorders: a multi-centric survey of 16 cases.

    PubMed

    Labauge, Pierre; Horzinski, Laetitia; Ayrignac, Xavier; Blanc, Pierre; Vukusic, Sandra; Rodriguez, Diana; Mauguiere, Francois; Peter, Laure; Goizet, Cyril; Bouhour, Francoise; Denier, Christian; Confavreux, Christian; Obadia, Michael; Blanc, Frederic; de Sèze, Jérome; Fogli, Anne; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2009-08-01

    Mutations in one of the five eukaryotic initiation factor 2B genes (EIF2B1-5) were first described in childhood ataxia with cerebral hypomyelination--vanishing white matter syndrome. The syndrome is characterized by (i) cerebellar and pyramidal signs in children aged 2-5 years; (ii) extensive cavitating leucoencephalopathy; and (iii) episodes of rapid deterioration following stress. Since then a broad clinical spectrum from congenital to adult-onset forms has been reported, leading to the concept of eIF2B-related disorders. Our aim was to describe clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging characteristics, genetic findings and natural history of patients with adult-onset eIF2B-related disorders (after age 16). The inclusion criteria were based on the presence of eIF2B mutations and a disease onset after the age of 16 years. One patient with an asymptomatic diagnosis (age 16 years) was also included. Clinical and magnetic resonance findings were retrospectively recorded in all patients. All patients were examined to assess clinical evolution, using functional, pyramidal, cerebellar and cognitive scales. This multi-centric study included 16 patients from 14 families. A sex ratio imbalance was noted (male/female = 3/13). The mean age of onset was 31.1 years (range 16-62). Initial symptoms were neurologic (n = 11), psychiatric (n = 2) and ovarian failure (n = 2). Onset of the symptoms was linked to a precipitating factor in 13% of cases that included minor head trauma and delivery. During follow-up (mean: 11.2 years, range 2-22 years) 12.5% of the patients died. Of the 14 survivors, 62% showed a decline in their cognitive functions, and 79% were severely handicapped or bedridden. One case remained asymptomatic. Stress worsened clinical symptoms in 38% of the patients. Magnetic resonance imaging findings consist of constant cerebral atrophy, extensive cystic leucoencephalopathy (81%), corpus callosum (69%) and cerebellar (38%) T2-weighted hyperintensities. All

  13. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, M G; Nelson, I; Sweeney, M G; Cooper, J M; Watkins, P J; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Harding, A E

    1995-01-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7726155

  14. Longitudinal changes in cerebellar and subcortical volumes in adult-onset Niemann-Pick disease type C patients treated with miglustat.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Elizabeth A; Walterfang, Mark; Abel, Larry; Desmond, Patricia; Fahey, Michael; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2015-09-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a rare neurovisceral disorder resulting in impaired intracellular lipid trafficking. The only disease-modifying treatment available to date is miglustat, an iminosugar inhibiting the accumulation of lipid by-products in neurons. This study explored how changes in cerebellar grey and white matter volumes, and in subcortical volumes, related to patient treatment status and disability and ataxia ratings. Nine adult-onset NPC patients and 17 matched controls underwent T1-weighted MRI. One patient was not receiving miglustat, and pre-treatment data were available for a further patient. Semi-automated cerebellar and subcortical segmentation was undertaken, and the rates of change in putamen, hippocampal, thalamic and caudal volumes, and grey and white matter cerebellar volumes, were compared to rates of change in Iturriaga disability score, Brief Ataxia Rating Scale (BARS), and horizontal saccadic gain. Untreated NPC patients appeared to lose cerebellar grey and white matter, bilateral thalamic volume, and right caudate volume faster than treated patients. Cerebellar grey matter volume loss and volume loss in the left thalamus were significantly correlated with Iturriaga disability scale changes. Change in both cerebellar grey and white matter was correlated with decrease in horizontal saccadic gain, but not with change in BARS. This is the first study to examine longitudinal treatment effects of miglustat on cerebellar and subcortical volumes in patients with adult-onset NPC, and is evidence that miglustat may have a protective effect on cerebellar and subcortical structure and function. PMID:26092521

  15. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: Different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, M.G.; Nelson, I.; Sweeney, M.G.; Cooper, J.M.; Watkins, P.J.; Morgan-Hughes, J.A.; Harding, A.E.

    1995-05-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Coping efforts and resilience among adult children who grew up with a parent with young-onset dementia: a qualitative follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen, Aud; Engedal, Knut; Thorsen, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Background It is estimated that one in four persons with young-onset dementia (YOD) (<65 years old) has children younger than 18 years old at the onset of the dementia. These children experience a childhood different from what is expected. Adult children of parents with YOD are seldom addressed in research, and the impact of the dementia on the children's development over time has rarely been studied. Aim The goal of this study was to explore how adult children experienced the influence of their parents’ dementia on their own development during adolescence; what coping efforts, strategies, and resources they employed; and how they evaluated the most recent changes in their life situation. Method A follow-up, grounded theory approach in two phases was used. Qualitative interviews with 14 informants (18–30 years of age) were conducted in 2014 and one year later, in 2015. Findings Nearly all the informants expressed that their emotional well-being and their life situation were better at the second interview compared to the time of dementia onset in their parents. To overcome the difficulties of being a child of a parent with YOD, they used different instrumental, cognitive, and emotional coping strategies, subsumed analytically under the concept detachment. This category covers three subcategories of coping strategies: moving apart, greater personal distance, and calmer emotional reactions. Another category, resilience, designates combinations of the coping strategies. Vital for the development of coping resources and resilience was the need the informants had for social support—for people they saw who listened to them and responded to their needs. Conclusion Most of the informants reported that they experienced a better life situation and less emotional stress over time as their parent's dementia progressed. They developed better coping capacities and greater resilience. Vital for the development of coping resources and resilience was the need the informants

  17. Two-year seizure reduction in adults with medically intractable partial onset epilepsy treated with responsive neurostimulation: Final results of the RNS System Pivotal trial

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Christianne N; King-Stephens, David; Massey, Andrew D; Nair, Dileep R; Jobst, Barbara C; Barkley, Gregory L; Salanova, Vicenta; Cole, Andrew J; Smith, Michael C; Gwinn, Ryder P; Skidmore, Christopher; Van Ness, Paul C; Bergey, Gregory K; Park, Yong D; Miller, Ian; Geller, Eric; Rutecki, Paul A; Zimmerman, Richard; Spencer, David C; Goldman, Alica; Edwards, Jonathan C; Leiphart, James W; Wharen, Robert E; Fessler, James; Fountain, Nathan B; Worrell, Gregory A; Gross, Robert E; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Duckrow, Robert B; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Bazil, Carl; O'Donovan, Cormac A; Sun, Felice T; Courtney, Tracy A; Seale, Cairn G; Morrell, Martha J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of responsive stimulation at the seizure focus as an adjunctive therapy to reduce the frequency of seizures in adults with medically intractable partial onset seizures arising from one or two seizure foci. Methods Randomized multicenter double-blinded controlled trial of responsive focal cortical stimulation (RNS System). Subjects with medically intractable partial onset seizures from one or two foci were implanted, and 1 month postimplant were randomized 1:1 to active or sham stimulation. After the fifth postimplant month, all subjects received responsive stimulation in an open label period (OLP) to complete 2 years of postimplant follow-up. Results All 191 subjects were randomized. The percent change in seizures at the end of the blinded period was −37.9% in the active and −17.3% in the sham stimulation group (p = 0.012, Generalized Estimating Equations). The median percent reduction in seizures in the OLP was 44% at 1 year and 53% at 2 years, which represents a progressive and significant improvement with time (p < 0.0001). The serious adverse event rate was not different between subjects receiving active and sham stimulation. Adverse events were consistent with the known risks of an implanted medical device, seizures, and of other epilepsy treatments. There were no adverse effects on neuropsychological function or mood. Significance Responsive stimulation to the seizure focus reduced the frequency of partial-onset seizures acutely, showed improving seizure reduction over time, was well tolerated, and was acceptably safe. The RNS System provides an additional treatment option for patients with medically intractable partial-onset seizures. PMID:24621228

  18. Primary caregivers' awareness and perception of early-onset dementia conditions in adolescents and young and middle-aged adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Chen, Wen-Xiu; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Lin, Lan-Ping; Lin, Fu-Gong; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Jia-Ling; Chu, Cordia; Chou, Yu-Ching

    2014-09-01

    The present study aims to investigate the onset of dementia conditions using the Dementia Screening Questionnaire for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (DSQIID) scale and to identify the possible factors associated with DSQIID scores in people with Down syndrome (DS). The study population was recruited from the voluntary registry members of the Republic of China Foundation for Persons with Down syndrome; primary caregivers provided DSQIID information on 196 adolescents and adults with DS (aged 15-48 years) who were entered into the database and analyzed using SPSS 20.0 software. The results described the distribution of early-onset dementia conditions in 53 adolescents and adults with DS, and 2.6% of the subjects with DS had possible dementia (DSQIID score ≧ 20). Univariate analyses found that older age (p=0.001) and comorbid conditions (p=0.003) were significantly associated with DSQIID scores. Older subjects were more likely to have higher DSQIID scores than were younger age groups after ANOVA and Scheffe's tests. Lastly, a multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age (p<0.01), severe disability level (p<0.05) and comorbid condition (p<0.01) significantly explained 13% of the variation in DSQIID scores after adjusting for the factors of gender, education level and multiple disabilities in adolescents and adults with DS. The study highlights that future research should focus on the occurrence of dementia in people with DS and on identifying its influencing factors based on sound measurements, to initiate appropriate healthy aging policies for this group of people. PMID:24858786

  19. Acute Progression of Adult-Onset Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome due to CFH Mutation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sikorska, Dorota; Hoppe, Krzysztof; Schwermer, Krzysztof; Oko, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS), unlike typical HUS, is not due to bacteria but rather to an idiopathic or genetic cause that promotes dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. It leads to hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal impairment. Although aHUS secondary to a genetic mutation is relatively rare, when occurring due to a mutation in Factor H (CFH), it usually presents with younger onset and has a more severe course, which in the majority ends with end-stage renal failure. Paradoxically to most available data, our case features acute aHUS due to a CFH mutation with late onset (38-year-old) and rapid progression to end-stage renal disease. Due to current data indicating a high risk of graft failure in such patients, the diagnosis of aHUS secondary to a genetic cause has disqualified our patient from a living (family) donor renal transplantation and left her with no other option but to begin permanent renal replacement therapy. PMID:24558625

  20. Characteristics of intergenerational contractions of the CTG repeat in myotonic dystropy

    SciTech Connect

    Ashizawa, T.; Anvret, M.; Grandell, U.; Baiget, M.; Cobo, A.M.; Barcelo, J.M.; Korneluk, R.G.; Dallapiccola, B.; Novelli, G.; Fenwick, R.G. Jr.

    1994-03-01

    In myotonic dystropy (DM), the size of a CTG repeat in the DM kinase gene generally increases in successive generations with clinical evidence of anticipation. However, there have also been cases with an intergenerational contraction of the repeat. The authors have examined 1,489 DM parent-offspring pairs, of which 95 (6.4%) showed such contractions in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). In 56 of th 95 pairs, clinical data allowed an analysis of their anticipation status. It is surprising that anticipation occurred in 27 (48%) of these 56 pairs, while none clearly showed a later onset of DM in the asymptomatic offspring. The contraction occurred in 76 (10%) of 753 paternal transmission and in 19 (3%) of 736 maternal transmissions. Anticipation was observed more frequently in maternal (85%) than in paternal (37%) transmissions (P<.001). The parental repeat size correlated with the size of intergenerational contraction (r[sup 2] = .50, P [much lt].001), and the slope of linear regression was steeper in paternal ([minus].62) than in maternal ([minus].30) transmissions (P [much lt].001). Sixteen DM parents had multiple DM offspring with the CTG repeat contractions. This frequency was higher than the frequency expected from the probability of the repeat contractions (6.4%) and the size of DM sib population (1.54 DM offspring per DM parent, in 968 DM parents). The authors conclude that (1) intergenerational contraction of the CTG repeat in leukocyte DNA frequently accompanies apparent anticipation, especially when DM is maternally transmitted, and (2) the paternal origin of the repeat and the presence of the repeat contraction in a sibling increase the probability of the CTG repeat contraction. 43 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  1. Characteristics of Intergenerational Contractions of the CTG Repeat in Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ashizawa, T.; Anvret, M.; Baiget, M.; Barceló, J. M.; Brunner, H.; Cobo, A. M.; Dallapiccola, B.; Fenwick, R. G.; Grandell, U.; Harley, H.; Junien, C.; Koch, M. C.; Korneluk, R. G.; Lavedan, C.; Miki, T.; Mulley, J. C.; de Munain, A. López; Novelli, G.; Roses, A. D.; Seltzer, W. K.; Shaw, D. J.; Smeets, H.; Sutherland, G. R.; Yamagata, H.; Harper, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    In myotonic dystrophy (DM), the size of a CTG repeat in the DM kinase gene generally increases in successive generations with clinical evidence of anticipation. However, there have also been cases with an intergenerational contraction of the repeat. We examined 1,489 DM parent-offspring pairs, of which 95 (6.4%) showed such contractions in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). In 56 of the 95 pairs, clinical data allowed an analysis of their anticipation status. It is surprising that anticipation occurred in 27 (48%) of these 56 pairs, while none clearly showed a later onset of DM in the symptomatic offspring. The contraction occurred in 76 (10%) of 753 paternal transmissions and in 19 (3%) of 736 maternal transmissions. Anticipation was observed more frequently in maternal (85%) than in paternal (37%) transmissions (P < .001). The parental repeat size correlated with the size of intergenerational contraction (r2 = .50, P « .001), and the slope of linear regression was steeper in paternal (–.62) than in maternal (–.30) transmissions (P « .001). Sixteen DM parents had multiple DM offspring with the CTG repeat contractions. This frequency was higher than the frequency expected from the probability of the repeat contractions (6.4%) and the size of DM sib population (1.54 DM offspring per DM parent, in 968 DM parents). We conclude that (1) intergenerational contraction of the CTG repeat in leukocyte DNA frequently accompanies apparent anticipation, especially when DM is maternally transmitted, and (2) the paternal origin of the repeat and the presence of the repeat contraction in a sibling increase the probability of the CTG repeat contraction. PMID:8116611

  2. Health-related quality of life in adults with epilepsy: the effect of age, age at onset and duration of epilepsy in a multicentre Italian study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The potential effect of age-related factors on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with epilepsy has rarely been analyzed in the literature. Methods We examined this association in a selected population of 815 adults with epilepsy recruited in the context of a multicentre study for the evaluation of Epi-QoL, one of the first Italian epilepsy-specific measures of HRQOL for adults with epilepsy. The Epi-QoL is a 46-item self-administered questionnaire focusing on six domains, which was successfully tested for reproducibility and validity. Ordinary least-squares regression models were used to assess the relationships between age-related factors (patient's age, age at seizure onset, and duration of epilepsy) and overall Epi-QoL score, controlling for the effect of potential confounders. We fitted simple regression models including each age-related factor alone to assess the independent role of each factor on the overall Epi-QoL score. We also fitted multiple regression models including pairs of age-related factors solely, as well as one or two age-related factors together with the same set of confounders. Results Simple regression models showed that age and duration of epilepsy were significant negative predictors of the overall Epi-QoL score: the higher was each age-related factor, the lower was the overall Epi-QoL score; age at onset alone was a nonsignificant predictor of the overall Epi-QoL score. Multiple regression models including two age-related factors solely showed that duration of epilepsy was still a significant negative predictor of the overall Epi-QoL score in both pairwise models, whereas age was a significant negative predictor only in the model including age at onset. Age at onset emerged as a significant positive predictor of the overall Epi-QoL score only in the model including age: the higher was age at onset, the higher was the overall Epi-QoL score. Adjusted regression models including either one or two age

  3. Localization of a locus (GLC1B) for adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma to the 2cen-q13 region

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilova, D.; Trifan, O.C.; Sarfarazi, M.

    1996-08-15

    Primary open angle glaucoma (GLC1) is a common ocular disorder with a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve and visual field defects that is often associated with an elevated intraocular pressure. The severe but rare juvenile-onset type has previously been mapped to 1q21-q31, and its genetic heterogeneity has been established. Herein, we present a new locus (GLC1B) for one form of GLC1 on chromosome 2cen-q13 with a clinical presentation of low to moderate intraocular pressure, onset in late 40s, and a good response to medical treatment. Two-point and haplotype analyses of affected and unaffected meioses in six families provided maximum linkage information with D2S417, GATA112EO3, D2S113, D2S373, and D2S274 (lod scores ranging from 3.11 to 6.48) within a region of 8.5 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S2264. Analysis of affected meioses alone revealed no recombination with an additional two markers (D2S2264 and D2S135) in a region of 11.2 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S176. Analysis of unaffected meioses identified only one healthy 86-year-old male who has inherited the entire affected haplotype and, hence, is a gene carrier for this condition. Eight additional families with similar and/or different clinical presentation did not show any linkage to this region and, therefore, provided evidence for genetic heterogeneity of adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma. 63 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Association of early-onset dementia with activities of daily living (ADL) in middle-aged adults with intellectual disabilities: the caregiver's perspective.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Hsia, Yi-Chen; Wu, Chia-Ling; Chu, Cordia; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2014-03-01

    Few studies have investigated in detail which factors influence activities of daily living (ADL) in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) comorbid with/without dementia conditions. The objective of the present study was to describe the relation between early onset dementia conditions and progressive loss of ADL capabilities and to examine the influence of dementia conditions and other possible factors toward ADL scores in adults with ID. This study was part of the "Healthy Aging Initiatives for Persons with an Intellectual Disability in Taiwan: A Social Ecological Approach" project. We analyzed data from 459 adults aged 45 years or older with an ID regarding their early onset symptoms of dementia and their ADL profile based on the perspective of the primary caregivers. Results show that a significant negative correlation was found between dementia score and ADL score in a Pearson's correlation test (r=-0.28, p<0.001). The multiple linear regression model reported that factors of male gender (β=4.187, p<0.05), marital status (β=4.79, p<0.05), education level (primary: β=5.544, p<0.05; junior high or more: β=8.147, p<0.01), Down's syndrome (β=-9.290, p<0.05), severe or profound disability level (β=-6.725, p<0.05; β=-15.773, p<0.001), comorbid condition (β=-4.853, p<0.05) and dementia conditions (β=-9.245, p<0.001) were variables that were able to significantly predict the ADL score (R(2)=0.241) after controlling for age. Disability level and comorbidity can explain 10% of the ADL score variation, whereas dementia conditions can only explain 3% of the ADL score variation in the study. The present study highlights that future studies should scrutinize in detail the reasons for the low explanatory power of dementia for ADL, particularly in examining the appropriateness of the measurement scales for dementia and ADL in aging adults with ID. PMID:24467810

  5. An autopsied case of adult-onset bulbospinalform Alexander disease with a novel S393R mutation in the GFAP gene.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Saito, Yufuko; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Mimuro, Maya; Aiba, Ikuko; Saito, Kozo; Mizuta, Ikuko; Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Nakagawa, Masanori; Yoshida, Mari

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese man with no apparent family history noticed diplopia. He gradually showed gait disturbance and dysuria. Abducens disorder of eye movement with nystagmus, tongue atrophy with fasciculation, spastic tetraparesis, and sensory disturbance were also observed. MRI showed severe atrophy of the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord ("tadpole appearance"). Tracheotomy and gastrostomy were performed 7 years after onset due to the development of bulbar palsy. Death occurred following respiratory failure after 11 years total disease duration. The brain weighed 1,380 g. The cerebrum, cerebellum, midbrain, and upper pons were preserved from atrophy, but the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord showed severe atrophy. A few Rosenthal fibers were observed in the cerebral white matter, basal ganglia, and cerebellum, whereas numerous Rosenthal fibers were observed in the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord. Myelin loss with relatively preserved axons was extensively observed from the middle of the pons to the spinal cord. The clinicopathological diagnosis was adult-onset bulbospinal-form Alexander disease. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene analysis revealed a novel mutation of S393R. Expression patterns of S393R mutant GFAP using adrenal carcinoma-derived cells (SW13 cells) showed a decreased number of filamentous structures and abnormal aggregates. PMID:25828773

  6. Incidence of Adult-onset Asthma After Hypothetical Interventions on Body Mass Index and Physical Activity: An Application of the Parametric G-Formula

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Varraso, Raphaëlle; Danaei, Goodarz; Camargo,, Carlos A.; Hernán, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    High body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight (kg)/height (m)2) is associated with increased asthma risk, but uncertainty persists about the role of physical activity. We estimated the independent and joint associations of hypothetical interventions on BMI and physical activity with the risk of adult-onset asthma in 76,470 asthma-free women from the Nurses’ Health Study who were followed between 1988 and 1998. Information about asthma, BMI, physical activity, and other factors was updated every 2 years. We used the parametric g-formula to estimate the 10-year asthma risk in the following 4 scenarios: no intervention, 5% BMI reduction in a 2-year period for those who were overweight or obese, at least 2.5 hours/week of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and both of the previous 2 interventions. At baseline, women had a mean age of 55 (standard deviation, 7) years and a mean BMI of 25.4 (standard deviation, 4.8). Median time spent in physical activity was 0.7 hours/week. During follow-up, 1,146 women developed asthma. The 10-year asthma risk under no intervention was 1.5%. Compared with no intervention, the population risk ratios were 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 0.99) under the BMI intervention, 0.96 (95% CI: 0.81, 1.10) under the physical activity intervention, and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.78, 1.06) under the joint intervention. Interventions on BMI and physical activity may have a modest impact on the risk of adult-onset asthma in this population of US women. PMID:24107616

  7. Association between rs9930506 polymorphism of the fat mass & obesity-associated (FTO) gene & onset of obesity in Polish adults

    PubMed Central

    Wrzosek, Małgorzata; Zakrzewska, Anna; Ruczko, Lech; Jabłonowska-Lietz, Beata; Nowicka, Grażyna

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is known to be associated with obesity. However, no data are available on the relation between FTO rs9930506 polymorphism and obesity in Polish population. The aim of this study was to evaluate an association between rs9930506 variants of the FTO gene and obesity in Polish adults. Methods: The study group consisted of 442 adults, aged 33.9 ±12.7 yr, with mean BMI 27.2 ± 5.4 kg/m2. The following variables were determined for each subject: fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides. Real-time PCR was used to detect the A/G alleles of the rs9939506 polymorphism in the FTO gene. An association between the rs9930506 polymorphism and obesity was determined using codominant, dominant, and recessive models. The odds ratio (OR) was calculated to determine the risk of obesity associated with this polymorphism. Results: It was observed that the presence of FTO rs9939506 G allele was associated with increased risk for obesity and this association was found significant in both recessive (OR = 1.72, P = 0.014) and co-dominant (OR = 1.36, P = 0.031) models of inheritance. The FTO rs9939506 GG homozygotes had a significantly higher BMI than those with other genotypes. Interpretation & conclusions: This study shows that FTO rs9939506 GG genotype is related to higher BMI and is associated with obesity in Polish adults. PMID:27241640

  8. Pediatric, elderly, and emerging adult-onset peaks in Burkitt lymphoma incidence diagnosed in four continents, excluding Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mbulaiteye, Sam M.; Anderson, William F.; Ferlay, Jacques; Bhatia, Kishor; Chang, Cindy; Rosenberg, Philip S.; Devesa, Susan S.; Parkin, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) in the general population and immunosuppressed persons with AIDS in United States was characterized by three age-specific incidence peaks near 10, 40 and 70 years. We hypothesized that BL from different geographical areas may exhibit pediatric, adult, and elderly age incidence peaks. We investigated this hypothesis using data on 3403 cases obtained from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (1978–2002). Data from Africa were sparse or incomplete, and thus were excluded. Age-standardized rates (ASR) and age-specific incidence rates were calculated, supplemented with calculations performed using age-period-cohort models. The ASR rose 5.3% (95% confidence interval (CI), 5.0–5.6) per year in males and 4.6% (95% CI, 4.5–4.8) in females. The ASR increased gradually in children and steeply in adults and most rapidly in the elderly both in males and females. Overall, BL male/female ASR ratio was 2.5, but it declined from 3.1 (95% CI, 3.0–3.3) for pediatric BL to 2.3 (95% CI 2.2–2.4) for adult BL and 1.5 (95% CI, 1.4–1.6) for elderly BL. Age-specific incidence peaks occurred near 10 years and 70 years in all regions and periods. A peak near 40 years of age emerged in the mid-1990s, particularly in men. Findings using APC models confirmed those based on standard analyses. Our findings, based on international BL cases, support our hypothesis that BL is multimodal and that BL peaks at different ages may be clues to differences in the etiology and/or biology of BL at those ages. PMID:22488262

  9. Adult-onset hyperthyroidism impairs spatial learning: possible involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Bitiktaş, Soner; Kandemir, Başak; Tan, Burak; Kavraal, Şehrazat; Liman, Narin; Dursun, Nurcan; Dönmez-Altuntaş, Hamiyet; Aksan-Kurnaz, Işil; Suer, Cem

    2016-08-01

    Given evidence that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation is part of the nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones, we investigated the possible consequences of hyperthyroidism for the cognitive functioning of adult rats. Young adult rats were treated with L-thyroxine or saline. Twenty rats in each group were exposed to Morris water maze testing, measuring their performance in a hidden-platform spatial task. In a separate set of rats not exposed to Morris water maze testing (untrained rats), the expression and phosphorylated levels of p38-MAPK and of its two downstream effectors, Elk-1 and cAMP response element-binding protein, were evaluated using quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Rats with hyperthyroidism showed delayed acquisition of learning compared with their wild-type counterparts, as shown by increased escape latencies and distance moved on the last two trials of daily training in the water maze. The hyperthyroid rats, however, showed no difference during probe trials. Western blot analyses of the hippocampus showed that hyperthyroidism increased phosphorylated p38-MAPK levels in untrained rats. Although our study is correlative in nature and does not exclude the contribution of other molecular targets, our findings suggest that the observed impairments in acquisition during actual learning in rats with hyperthyroidism may result from the increased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK. PMID:27258653

  10. Two Cases of Endometrial Cancer in Twin Sisters with Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We describe two cases of endometrial cancer (EC) occurring in nulligravid twin sisters with myotonic dystrophy. Both tested negative for Lynch syndrome and both were treated with laparoscopic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingooophorectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Although EC tends to run in families, the diagnosis in itself is not considered sufficient cause for screening or prophylactic measures in close relatives. However, the presence of additional risk factors, such as nulligravidity and myotonic dystrophy in the underlying cases, may call for extra vigilance in first-degree family members. PMID:27595026

  11. Cardiac conduction abnormalities and Stokes-Adams attacks in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, C.; Gagnon, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is a well known cause of cardiomyopathy. While various cardiac conduction abnormalities have been described in patients with myotonic dystrophy, so far only sporadic cases of Stokes-Adams attacks have been reported. Of 27 patients with this disease various conduction disturbances were detected in 17 (63%), 5 of whom presented with Stokes-Adams attacks and were found to have intracardiac conduction defects. The prognosis in four of the five patients was greatly improved with permanent pacemaker implantation. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:657033

  12. In vitro mapping of Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Storbeck, C.J.; Sabourin, L.; Baird, S.

    1994-09-01

    The Myotonic Dystrophy Kinase (DMK) gene has been cloned and shared homology to serine/threonine protein kinases. Overexpression of this gene in stably transfected mouse myoblasts has been shown to inhibit fusion into myotubes while myoblasts stably transfected with an antisense construct show increased fusion potential. These experiments, along with data showing that the DM gene is highly expressed in muscle have highlighted the possibility of DMK being involved in myogenesis. The promoter region of the DM gene lacks a consensus TATA box and CAAT box, but harbours numerous transcription binding sites. Clones containing extended 5{prime} upstream sequences (UPS) of DMK only weakly drive the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) when transfected into C2C12 mouse myoblasts. However, four E-boxes are present in the first intron of the DM gene and transient assays show increased expression of the CAT gene when the first intron is present downstream of these 5{prime} UPS in an orientation dependent manner. Comparison between mouse and human sequence reveals that the regions in the first intron where the E-boxes are located are highly conserved. The mapping of the promoter and the importance of the first intron in the control of DMK expression will be presented.

  13. [Social Cognitive Impairment in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1].

    PubMed

    Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka

    2016-02-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1) is a heritable, multisystem disease that affects not only the muscles but also the brain. DM 1 is often accompanied by developmental behavioral disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders. The autistic traits in DM 1 may be related to social cognitive dysfunction. The social cognitive function of patients with DM 1 was examined with respect to facial emotion recognition and theory of mind, which is the specific cognitive ability to understand the mental states of other people. With respect to facial emotion recognition, the sensitivities to disgust and anger were lower among patients with DM 1 than among healthy subjects, and this difference could not be attributed to visual impairment. To examine the theory of mind ability, the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" test and the faux pas recognition test were used. Patients with DM 1 were found to be impaired in both tests, but the results were not attributed to visual ability and lexical comprehension. The possible causes of social cognitive dysfunction in DM 1 are the l cerebral atrophy and white matter abnormalities in the temporal, frontal, and insular cortex. Dysfunctions in these areas may affect the emotional and theory of mind abilities in DM 1, which result in the behavioral and communication disorders. PMID:26873233

  14. Orofacial dysfunction in children and adolescents with myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sjögreen, Lotta; Engvall, Monica; Ekström, Anne-Berit; Lohmander, Anette; Kiliaridis, Stavros; Tulinius, Már

    2007-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by an expansion of a CTG repeat sequence on chromosome 19q13. The aim of the present study was to describe the characteristics and prevalence of oral motor dysfunction in a cohort of children and adolescents with DM and to correlate different aspects of oral motor function with the type of DM and sex. Fifty-six individuals with DM (30 males, 26 females; median age 13y 2mo; range 2y 6mo-21y 5mo) were compared with healthy controls. They were divided into four subgroups: severe congenital DM (n=18); mild congenital DM (n=18); childhood DM (n=18); and classical DM (n=2). A speech-language pathologist assessed different variables of oral motor function, intelligibility, and lip force. The families used a questionnaire to report on eating difficulties and drooling. All individuals with DM had impaired facial expression. Intelligibility was moderately or severely reduced in 30 patients (60%), excluding six patients without speech. Most had a moderate or severe impairment of lip motility (76.0%), tongue motility (52.2%), and lip force (69.2%), causing deviant production of bilabial and dental consonants. The families reported problems with eating (51.9%) and drooling (37.0%). Oral motor dysfunction was most prominent in congenital DM, and males were more affected than females. PMID:17209971

  15. Depression in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1: clinical and neuronal correlates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was designed to investigate the prevalence and correlates of depression in Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Methods Thirty-one patients with DM1 and 47 subjects in a clinical contrast group, consisting of other neuromuscular disorders, including Spinal muscular atrophy, Limb girdle muscle atrophy and Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, completed Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We aimed to establish whether different factors associated with DM1 correlated with ratings in the BDI. Results Signs of a clinical depression were prevalent in 32% of the patients with DM1, which was comparable with ratings in the clinical contrast group. The depressive condition was mild to moderate in both groups. In DM1, a longer duration of clinical symptoms was associated with lower scores on the BDI and higher educational levels were correlated with higher scores on depression. We also found a negative association with brain white matter lesions. Conclusions Findings indicate significantly more DM1 patients than normative collectives showing signs of a clinical depression. The depressive condition is however mild to moderate and data indicate that the need for intervention is at hand preferentially early during the disease process. PMID:20482818

  16. Compound loss of muscleblind-like function in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuang-Yung; Li, Moyi; Manchanda, Mini; Batra, Ranjan; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Mohan, Apoorva; Warren, Sonisha A; Chamberlain, Christopher M; Finn, Dustin; Hong, Hannah; Ashraf, Hassan; Kasahara, Hideko; Ranum, Laura P W; Swanson, Maurice S

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a multi-systemic disease that impacts cardiac and skeletal muscle as well as the central nervous system (CNS). DM is unusual because it is an RNA-mediated disorder due to the expression of toxic microsatellite expansion RNAs that alter the activities of RNA processing factors, including the muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins. While these mutant RNAs inhibit MBNL1 splicing activity in heart and skeletal muscles, Mbnl1 knockout mice fail to recapitulate the full-range of DM symptoms in these tissues. Here, we generate mouse Mbnl compound knockouts to test the hypothesis that Mbnl2 functionally compensates for Mbnl1 loss. Although Mbnl1−/−; Mbnl2−/− double knockouts (DKOs) are embryonic lethal, Mbnl1−/−; Mbnl2+/− mice are viable but develop cardinal features of DM muscle disease including reduced lifespan, heart conduction block, severe myotonia and progressive skeletal muscle weakness. Mbnl2 protein levels are elevated in Mbnl1−/− knockouts where Mbnl2 targets Mbnl1-regulated exons. These findings support the hypothesis that compound loss of MBNL function is a critical event in DM pathogenesis and provide novel mouse models to investigate additional pathways disrupted in this RNA-mediated disease. PMID:24293317

  17. Targeting nuclear RNA for in vivo correction of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Thurman M; Leger, Andrew J; Pandey, Sanjay K; MacLeod, A Robert; Nakamori, Masayuki; Cheng, Seng H; Wentworth, Bruce M; Bennett, C Frank; Thornton, Charles A

    2012-08-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) hold promise for gene-specific knockdown in diseases that involve RNA or protein gain-of-function effects. In the hereditary degenerative disease myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), transcripts from the mutant allele contain an expanded CUG repeat and are retained in the nucleus. The mutant RNA exerts a toxic gain-of-function effect, making it an appropriate target for therapeutic ASOs. However, despite improvements in ASO chemistry and design, systemic use of ASOs is limited because uptake in many tissues, including skeletal and cardiac muscle, is not sufficient to silence target messenger RNAs. Here we show that nuclear-retained transcripts containing expanded CUG (CUG(exp)) repeats are unusually sensitive to antisense silencing. In a transgenic mouse model of DM1, systemic administration of ASOs caused a rapid knockdown of CUG(exp) RNA in skeletal muscle, correcting the physiological, histopathologic and transcriptomic features of the disease. The effect was sustained for up to 1 year after treatment was discontinued. Systemically administered ASOs were also effective for muscle knockdown of Malat1, a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that is retained in the nucleus. These results provide a general strategy to correct RNA gain-of-function effects and to modulate the expression of expanded repeats, lncRNAs and other transcripts with prolonged nuclear residence. PMID:22859208

  18. [Myotonic dystrophy: magnetic resonance tomography and clinico-genetic correlations].

    PubMed

    Damian, M S; Koch, M C; Bachmann, G; Schilling, G; Fach, B; Stöppler, S; Trittmacher, S; Dorndorf, W

    1995-06-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder involving muscle, brain, heart, eyes and endocrine organs, among others. The molecular basis is an unstable trinucleotide repeat at the 3'-untranslated end of the myotonin protein kinase gene on chromosome 19 q 13.3, and the number of repeats correlates with the severity of muscle weakness. We performed a clinical, psychometric and MRI study on 43 patients with DM and correlated findings with the molecular analysis. Nineteen patients had mild distal muscle weakness, 17 moderate und 7 severe weakness. Thirteen had marked cognitive deficits with reduced speed of cognition, low IQ, and apathy. MRI showed pathological muscle signal in 35 cases with a characteristic mosaic involving distal muscle groups, often sparing the posterior tibial muscle. Cerebral MRI showed significant subcortical white matter lesions in 20 cases and brain atrophy in 15 cases. Clinical and MRI findings of CNS and muscle both correlated with CTG repeat length, but did not parallel each other. DM is a significant disease of the brain as well as muscle, and several aspects of the disease correlate with molecular findings, with a threshold effect for repeats exceeding 1000 trinucleotides. The individual predominance of specific organ involvement probably depends on variable somatic mosaicism of the molecular defect. PMID:7637829

  19. Myotonic dystrophy type 1: frequency of ophthalmologic findings.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Karin Suzete; Iwabe-Marchese, Cristina; França, Marcondes Cavalcante; Nucci, Anamarli; Carvalho, Keila Monteiro de

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the frequency of ophthalmologic abnormalities in a cohort of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients and to correlate them with motor function. We reviewed the pathophysiology of cataract and low intraocular pressure (IOP). Method Patients were included after clinical and laboratory diagnosis and after signed informed consent. They were evaluated by Motor Function Measure scale, Portuguese version (MFM-P) and ophthalmic protocol. Results We evaluated 42 patients aged 17 to 64 years (mean 40.7 ± 12.5), 22 of which were men. IOP (n = 41) was reduced in all but one. We found cataract or positivity for surgery in 38 (90.48%) and ptosis in 23 (54.76%). These signs but not IOP were significantly correlated with severity of motor dysfunction. Abnormalities in ocular motility and stereopsis were observed. Conclusion Cataract and ptosis are frequent in DM1 and associated to motor dysfunction. Reduced IOP is also common, but appears not to be related with motor impairment. PMID:27050845

  20. Somatic heterogeneity of the CTG repeat in myotonic dystrophy is age and size dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, L J; Ashizawa, T; Monckton, D G; Caskey, C T; Richards, C S

    1995-01-01

    The most common form of adult muscular dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy (DM), is caused by the abnormal expansion of the CTG repeat, located in the 3' UTR of the DM gene. The expanded-CTG allele often presents as a diffused band on Southern blot analysis, suggesting somatic mosaicism. In order to study the somatic instability of the CTG repeat, we have investigated the dynamics of the size heterogeneity of the CTG expansion. Size heterogeneity is shown as a smear on Southern blot and is measured by the midpeak-width ratio of the expanded allele to the normal sized allele. The ratio is also corrected for compression in the higher-molecular-weight region. It is found that the size heterogeneity of the expanded-CTG repeats, of 173 DM patients, correlates well with the age of the patient (r = .81, P << .001). The older patients show larger size variation. This correlation is independent of the sex of either the patient or the transmitting parent. The size heterogeneity of the expansion, based on age groups, is also dependent on the size of the expanded trinucleotide repeat. However, obvious size heterogeneity is not observed in congenital cases, regardless of the size of expansion. Comparison of individual patient samples collected at two different times has confirmed that the degree of size heterogeneity increases with age and has revealed a subtle but definite upward shift in the size of the expanded-CTG allele. The progression of the CTG repeat toward larger expansion with age is further confirmed by small-pool PCR assay that resolved the heterogeneous fragments into discrete bands.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7825566

  1. Identification of intracellular signaling pathways that induce myotonic dystrophy protein kinase expression during myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Marta; Canicio, Judith; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; Kaliman, Perla

    2002-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common inherited adult neuromuscular disorder. DM is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3'-untranslated region of a protein kinase gene (DMPK). Decreased DMPK protein levels may contribute to the pathology of DM, as revealed by gene target studies. However, the postnatal regulation of DMPK expression and its pathophysiological role remain undefined. We studied the regulation of DMPK protein and mRNA expression during myogenesis in rat L6E9 myoblasts, mouse C2C12 myoblasts, and 10T1/2 fibroblasts stably expressing the myogenic transcription factor MyoD (10T1/2-MyoD). We detected DMPK as an 80-kDa protein mainly localized to the cytosolic fraction of skeletal muscle cells. DMPK expression and protein kinase activity were enhanced in IGF-II-differentiated cells. In L6E9 and C2C12 cells, DMPK expression was regulated through the same signaling pathways (i.e. phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, nuclear factor-kappaB, nitric oxide synthase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) that had been described as being crucial for the myogenesis induced by either low serum or IGF-II. However, in 10T1/2-MyoD cells, p38 MAPK inhibition blocked cell fusion and caveolin-3 expression without affecting DMPK up-regulation. These results suggest that although DMPK is induced during myogenesis, its expression cannot be totally associated with the development of a fully differentiated phenotype. PMID:12130568

  2. Patient-reported impact of symptoms in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (PRISM-1)

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Rita; Johnson, Nicholas; Quinn, Christine; Martens, William; McDermott, Michael P.; Rothrock, Nan; Thornton, Charles; Vickrey, Barbara; Victorson, David; Moxley, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the most critical symptoms in a national myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) population and to identify the modifying factors that have the greatest effect on the severity of these symptoms. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 278 adult patients with DM1 from the national registry of patients with DM1 between April and August 2010. We assessed the prevalence and relative significance of 221 critical DM1 symptoms and 14 disease themes. These symptoms and themes were chosen for evaluation based on prior interviews with patients with DM1. Responses were categorized by age, CTG repeat length, gender, and duration of symptoms. Results: Participants with DM1 provided symptom rating survey responses to address the relative frequency and importance of each DM1 symptom. The symptomatic themes with the highest prevalence in DM1 were problems with hands or arms (93.5%), fatigue (90.8%), myotonia (90.3%), and impaired sleep or daytime sleepiness (87.9%). Participants identified fatigue and limitations in mobility as the symptomatic themes that have the greatest effect on their lives. We found an association between age and the average prevalence of all themes (p < 0.01) and between CTG repeat length and the average effect of all symptomatic themes on participant lives (p < 0.01). Conclusions: There are a wide range of symptoms that significantly affect the lives of patients with DM1. These symptoms, some previously underrecognized, have varying levels of importance in the DM1 population and are nonlinearly dependent on patient age and CTG repeat length. PMID:22786587

  3. Adult children of parents with young-onset dementia narrate the experiences of their youth through metaphors

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen, Aud; Engedal, Knut; Thorsen, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Background Limited research exists on the development and needs of children of parents with young-onset dementia (YOD) (<65 years old). There is scarce knowledge of how these children experience the situation of growing up with a parent with dementia. This study investigates the stories of children of persons with YOD and interprets their metaphorical expressions of their experiences as a source of understanding their situation and needs during the development and course of their parent’s dementia. Methods Qualitative interviews with 14 informants (aged 18–30 years; nine daughters, five sons) were conducted in 2014 and subsequently analyzed by the informants’ use of metaphors. Steger’s three-step method for analyzing metaphors was applied. Results The analysis identified four themes in the metaphors: the informants’ relations to the disease, to the self, to the parent, and to others. From these themes, four core metaphors were abstracted: “my parent is sliding away”; “emotional chaos”; “becoming a parent to my parent”; and “a battle”. Conclusion The study revealed that growing up with a parent with dementia has a great impact on the children’s situation and their experiences of their personal development. Children of a parent with YOD are a group with unmet needs for support. A formalized system where the children can get into contact with service providers to receive tailored information and individual follow-up needs to be established. The service providers must listen to the children’s stories, perceive how metaphors convey their experiences, and recognize their need for support for their own development. PMID:26060403

  4. [A case in which the subject was affected by Listeia meningoencephalitis during administration of infliximab for steroid-dependent adult onset Still's disease].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Motohisa; Takahashi, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Chie; Ohara, Mikiko; Suzuki, Chisako; Naishiro, Yasuyoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Nonaka, Michio; Imai, Kohzoh

    2006-06-01

    The subject was a 22-year-old woman who developed high fever and arthralgias and eruptions in the extremities around June 2005. She sought medical advice at a nearby dermatology clinic, where hepatic dysfunction was noted on blood testing. The patient was thus hospitalized the next day. Although CRP levels were significantly high, no sign of infection was observed and bone marrow cell differentiation was normal. Adult onset Still's disease was diagnosed based on the observation of persistent high fever >39 degrees C, eruptions, increased leukocytes, pharyngeal pain, splenomegaly, hepatic dysfunction, negative autoantibody results from blood testing, and high serum ferritin levels. Administration of prednisolone 30 mg/day was initiated, but proved ineffective. Steroid pulse therapy was conducted, and the subject was transferred to our medical facility for continued treatment. Attempts were made to control the disease using combined steroid and cyclosporine administration; but exacerbation of high serum ferritin levels and hepatic dysfunctions were observed, so a second course of steroid pulse therapy was conducted. Symptoms improved temporarily, but steroid levels were difficult to reduce. Cyclosporine was therefore replaced by methotrexate, and administration of infliximab was initiated. In the course of treatment, administration of a sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim combination was initiated, but was discontinued due to suspicion of drug-induced hepatic injury. A second administration of infliximab was conducted in late August, and rapid improvements in clinical symptoms and abnormal test values was observed. However, high fever and headache developed suddenly in early September. Based on the results of spinal fluid testing, blood and spinal fluid cultures and MRI of the head, Listeria meningoencephalitis was diagnosed. Diplopia and impaired consciousness occurred during the disease course, and formation of a brain abscess was observed on imaging. However, symptoms

  5. Observational clinical study of 22 adult-onset Pompe disease patients undergoing enzyme replacement therapy over 5years.

    PubMed

    Stepien, Karolina M; Hendriksz, Christian J; Roberts, Mark; Sharma, Reena

    2016-04-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disease resulting from deficiency of the acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). The late-onset Pompe Disease (LOPD) patients develop muscular and respiratory complications later in life. We describe a retrospective observational cohort study including 22 patients with LOPD. The cohort was assessed at baseline before Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT) with alglucosidase alpha (20mg/kg biweekly) was commenced and subsequently relevant information was collected at 2, 4 and 5years later. The median age of the patients at study entry was 44years (16-64years), with median disease duration of 11.5years (4-31years). At baseline, 10 patients (45%) could walk without support, 12 (55%) could walk with unilateral or bilateral support including 3/12 were wheelchair bound. Mean predicted FVC % was 55.7 (95% CI 45-66) of predicted normal at baseline and showed no significant change after 5years (54.6 (95% CI 43-66)), (all p=0.9815). Mean FVC % supine was 41.8 (95% CI 33.8-49) of predicted normal at baseline and remained significantly unchanged at 5years (48.4 (95% CI 37-59.6)), (all p=0.8680). The overnight non-invasive ventilator dependence increased by 18.2% as compared with baseline and requirement of mobility aids increased during this period by 5.2% as compared with the baseline. Mean walking distance at 6min walk test was 411.5 (95% CI 338-485) at baseline, 266.5 (95% CI 187-346) m at 2years, 238.6 (95% CI 162-315) m at 4years and 286.8 (95% CI 203-370) m at 5years (p=0.1981; ANOVA was completed only for 14 patients). A gradual decline in FVC% predicted was noted only in four cases and a decline in FVC% supine in two other. Only one patient showed a decline in both pulmonary function tests. In all remaining cases (17/22) respiratory function remains stable. In conclusion overall pulmonary function tests and mobility remained stable for 5years in majority of patients on ERT. However, in some patients they continued to decline in spite of ERT

  6. ADHD as risk factor for early onset and heightened adult problem severity of illicit substance use: An Accelerated Gateway Model

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Eugene M.; Hearn, Lauren E.; Rose, Jonathan; Latimer, William W.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aims of the present study were to assess ADHD history as a risk factor for earlier initiation and current use of licit and illicit substances among a sample of drug using adults. It was hypothesized that ADHD history would accelerate the Gateway Theory of drug use. Participants included 941 drug-using African American and Caucasian individuals in Baltimore, Maryland. The sample consisted of 124 (13.2%) participants who reported a history of ADHD and 817 (86.8%) who reported no history of ADHD. The accelerated gateway hypothesis was supported, as a history of self-reported ADHD was significantly associated with younger ages of initiation for alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana, and cocaine use. Participants with a history of ADHD were also more likely to engage in recent HIV-risk behavior, such as injection drug use and needle sharing. This study provides compelling data in support of an accelerated gateway model for substance use related to ADHD history and increased problem severity in adulthood. Targeted substance use prevention and intervention may be beneficial for those with ADHD. PMID:25123341

  7. Two cases of myotonic dystrophy manifesting various ophthalmic findings with genetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min Ji; Yim, Hye Bin; Hwang, Hyung Bin

    2016-07-01

    We report two cases of myotonic dystrophy in one family; both diagnosed from genetic analysis following ophthalmic indications, but before the manifestation of systemic symptoms. A 39-year-old female visited our clinic for routine examination. Mild ptosis, sluggish pupillary response, and bilateral snowflake cataracts were found. Fundus examination revealed an increased cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) in both eyes and a defect in the retinal nerve fiber layer in the right eye. Intraocular pressure was low, but within the normal range in both eyes. Because cataracts are characteristic of myotonic dystrophy, we suggested that her 14-year-old daughter, who did not have any systemic complaints, undergo ophthalmic examination. She also had mild ptosis and snowflake cataracts. Both patients underwent genetic evaluation and were diagnosed with myotonic dystrophy caused by unstable expansion of cytosine-thymine-guanine trinucleotide repeats in the dystrophia myotonica-protein kinase gene. Ophthalmologists can diagnose myotonic dystrophy based on clinical and genetic findings, before the manifestation of systemic abnormalities. PMID:27609169

  8. Myotonic dystrophy CTG expansion affects synaptic vesicle proteins, neurotransmission and mouse behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Guiraud-Dogan, Céline; Sicot, Géraldine; Huguet, Aline; Luilier, Sabrina; Steidl, Esther; Saenger, Stefanie; Marciniak, Elodie; Obriot, Hélène; Chevarin, Caroline; Nicole, Annie; Revillod, Lucile; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Takashi; Matsuura, Tohru; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Swanson, Maurice S.; Trovero, Fabrice; Buisson, Bruno; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Hamon, Michel; Humez, Sandrine; Bassez, Guillaume; Metzger, Friedrich; Buée, Luc; Munnich, Arnold; Sergeant, Nicolas; Gourdon, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is a complex multisystemic inherited disorder, which displays multiple debilitating neurological manifestations. Despite recent progress in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy type 1 in skeletal muscle and heart, the pathways affected in the central nervous system are largely unknown. To address this question, we studied the only transgenic mouse line expressing CTG trinucleotide repeats in the central nervous system. These mice recreate molecular features of RNA toxicity, such as RNA foci accumulation and missplicing. They exhibit relevant behavioural and cognitive phenotypes, deficits in short-term synaptic plasticity, as well as changes in neurochemical levels. In the search for disease intermediates affected by disease mutation, a global proteomics approach revealed RAB3A upregulation and synapsin I hyperphosphorylation in the central nervous system of transgenic mice, transfected cells and post-mortem brains of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. These protein defects were associated with electrophysiological and behavioural deficits in mice and altered spontaneous neurosecretion in cell culture. Taking advantage of a relevant transgenic mouse of a complex human disease, we found a novel connection between physiological phenotypes and synaptic protein dysregulation, indicative of synaptic dysfunction in myotonic dystrophy type 1 brain pathology. PMID:23404338

  9. Myotonic dystrophy as a cause of colonic pseudoobstruction: not just another constipated child

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Andrea M; Johnston, Jennifer H; Gleason, Wallace A; Rhoads, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Muscular dystrophy has been traditionally associated with common gastrointestinal symptoms such as reflux, constipation, and dysphasia. In myotonic dystrophy, there are rare reports of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPOS). We herein present a case of CIPOS requiring colectomy and with good results. PMID:26185641

  10. Isotonic contractile impairment due to genetic CLC-1 chloride channel deficiency in myotonic mouse diaphragm muscle.

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, Erik; Pollarine, Jennifer; Moyer, Michelle

    2007-07-01

    The hallmark of genetic CLC-1 chloride channel deficiency in myotonic humans, goats and mice is delayed muscle relaxation resulting from persistent electrical discharges. In addition to the ion channel defect, muscles from myotonic humans and mice also have major changes in fibre type and myosin isoform composition, but the extent to which this affects isometric contractions remains controversial. Many muscles, including the diaphragm, shorten considerably during normal activities, but shortening contractions have never been assessed in myotonic muscle. The present study tested the hypothesis that CLC-1 deficiency leads to an impairment of muscle isotonic contractile performance. This was tested in vitro on diaphragm muscle from SWR/J-Clcn1(adr-mto)/J myotonic mice. The CLC-1-deficient muscle demonstrated delayed relaxation, as expected. During the contractile phase, there were significant reductions in power and work across a number of stimulation frequencies and loads in CLC-1-deficient compared with normal muscle, the magnitude of which in many instances exceeded 50%. Reductions in shortening and velocity of shortening occurred, and were more pronounced when calculated as a function of absolute than relative load. However, the maximal unloaded shortening velocity calculated from Hill's equation was not altered significantly. The impaired isotonic contractile performance of CLC-1-deficient muscle persisted during fatigue-inducing stimulation. These data indicate that genetic CLC-1 chloride channel deficiency in mice not only produces myotonia but also substantially worsens the isotonic contractile performance of diaphragm muscle. PMID:17483199

  11. Regular inhaled corticosteroids in adult-onset asthma and the risk for future cancer: a population-based cohort study with proper person-time analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Victor C; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Huang, Hsu-Kai; Chao, Tsung-Ming; Hong, Ya-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) can exert anti-inflammatory effects for chronic airway diseases, and several observational studies suggest that they play a role as cancer chemopreventive agents, particularly against lung cancer. We aimed to examine whether regular ICS use was associated with a reduced risk for future malignancy in patients with newly diagnosed adult-onset asthma. Methods We used a population-based cohort study between 2001 and 2008 with appropriate person-time analysis. Participants were followed up until the first incident of cancer, death, or to the end of 2008. The Cox model was used to derive an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for cancer development. Kaplan–Meier cancer-free survival curves of two groups were compared. Results The exposed group of 2,117 regular ICS users and the nonexposed group of 17,732 non-ICS users were assembled. After 7,365 (mean, 3.5 years; standard deviation 2.1) and 73,789 (mean, 4.1 years; standard deviation 2.4) person-years of follow-up for the ICS users and the comparator group of non-ICS users, respectively, the aHR for overall cancer was nonsignificantly elevated at 1.33 with 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00–1.76, P=0.0501. The Kaplan–Meier curves for overall cancer-free proportions of both groups were not significant (log-rank, P=0.065). Synergistic interaction of concurrent presence of regular ICS use was conducted using “ICS-negative and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-negative” as the reference. The aHR for the group of “ICS-positive, COPD-negative” did not reach statistically significant levels with aHR at 1.38 (95% CI, 0.53–3.56). There was a statistically significant synergistic interaction of concurrent presence of regular ICS use and COPD with aHR at 3.78 (95% CI, 2.10–6.81). Conclusion The protective effect of regular ICS use in the studied East Asian patients with adult-onset asthma was not detectable, contrary to reports of previous

  12. Retigabine for the adjunctive treatment of adults with partial-onset seizures in epilepsy with and without secondary generalization : a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Craig, Dawn; Rice, Stephen; Paton, Fiona; Fox, David; Woolacott, Nerys

    2013-02-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of retigabine (GlaxoSmithKline) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of this drug for the treatment of adults with partial-onset seizures in epilepsy, with and without secondary generalization, as part of the Institute's single technology appraisal (STA) process. The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG undertakes a critical review of the clinical and cost-effectiveness evidence of the technology based upon the manufacturer's submission to NICE. The ERG also independently searches for relevant evidence and evaluates modifications to the manufacturer's decision-analytic model. This paper provides a description of the company submission, the ERG review and NICE's subsequent decisions. The clinical effectiveness data were derived from three placebo-controlled randomized controlled trials (RCTs). A meta-analysis pooling across all doses of retigabine found beneficial effects of retigabine in terms of responder rate (odds ratio [OR] 2.79; 95 % CI 2.08, 3.76) and rate of seizure freedom (OR 2.54; 95 % CI 0.92, 6.98) [both double-blind phase analyses]. When compared in a network meta-analysis with the selected comparator antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) [eslicarbazepine acetate, lacosamide, pregabalin, tiagabine and zonisamide], retigabine offered broadly similar efficacy in terms of responder rate and freedom from seizure. The de novo decision-analytic model presented within the submission evaluated the cost effectiveness of retigabine compared with these AEDs and no treatment (i.e. maintenance therapy). After numerous additional analyses, the ERG considered the use of retigabine to be not cost effective for NICE at thresholds below £43,000 if no treatment was considered a relevant comparator. The NICE Appraisal Committee decided that an appropriate comparator was an active treatment. The

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in myotonic dystrophy type 1 muscle.

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, Koji; Nakamori, Masayuki; Furuya, Hirokazu; Arahata, Hajime; Kanemoto, Soshi; Kimura, Takashi; Imaizumi, Kazunori; Takahashi, Masanori P; Sakoda, Saburo; Fujii, Naoki; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2007-11-01

    In myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), alternative splicing of ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1) and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) genes has been reported. These proteins are essential for maintaining intracellular Ca2+ in skeletal muscle. To clarify involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in DM1 muscles, we examined the activation of ER stress-related proteins by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and RT-PCR. In four of five DM1 muscle biopsies, except for a muscle biopsy from a patient with the shortest CTG expansion and no myotonia, increased expression of GRP78 and calnexin, and phosphorylation of PERK and eIF-2 alpha were revealed in fibers with sarcoplasmic masses and in highly atrophic fibers with pyknotic nuclear clumps. Caspase-3 and -7 were also expressed in these fibers. Increased expression of GRP78 in these DM1 muscles was confirmed by western blot analysis. GRP78 mRNA and spliced isoform of XBP1 mRNA were also increased in DM1 muscle biopsies. Furthermore, we demonstrated increased expression of GRP78 in highly atrophic fibers with pyknotic nuclear clumps in all three muscle biopsies from neurogenic muscular atrophies. However, five muscle biopsies from central core disease presumably with disturbed intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and a muscle biopsy from paramyotonia congenita with myotonia showed no activation of these proteins. Taken together, ER stress is involved in muscle wasting in DM1. However, it seems to be evoked not only by disrupted intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:17661063

  14. Muscle wasting in myotonic dystrophies: a model of premature aging

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Aierdi, Alba Judith; Goicoechea, Maria; Aiastui, Ana; Fernández-Torrón, Roberto; Garcia-Puga, Mikel; Matheu, Ander; López de Munain, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 or Steinert’s disease) and type 2 (DM2) are multisystem disorders of genetic origin. Progressive muscular weakness, atrophy and myotonia are the most prominent neuromuscular features of these diseases, while other clinical manifestations such as cardiomyopathy, insulin resistance and cataracts are also common. From a clinical perspective, most DM symptoms are interpreted as a result of an accelerated aging (cataracts, muscular weakness and atrophy, cognitive decline, metabolic dysfunction, etc.), including an increased risk of developing tumors. From this point of view, DM1 could be described as a progeroid syndrome since a notable age-dependent dysfunction of all systems occurs. The underlying molecular disorder in DM1 consists of the existence of a pathological (CTG) triplet expansion in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the Dystrophia Myotonica Protein Kinase (DMPK) gene, whereas (CCTG)n repeats in the first intron of the Cellular Nucleic acid Binding Protein/Zinc Finger Protein 9 (CNBP/ZNF9) gene cause DM2. The expansions are transcribed into (CUG)n and (CCUG)n-containing RNA, respectively, which form secondary structures and sequester RNA-binding proteins, such as the splicing factor muscleblind-like protein (MBNL), forming nuclear aggregates known as foci. Other splicing factors, such as CUGBP, are also disrupted, leading to a spliceopathy of a large number of downstream genes linked to the clinical features of these diseases. Skeletal muscle regeneration relies on muscle progenitor cells, known as satellite cells, which are activated after muscle damage, and which proliferate and differentiate to muscle cells, thus regenerating the damaged tissue. Satellite cell dysfunction seems to be a common feature of both age-dependent muscle degeneration (sarcopenia) and muscle wasting in DM and other muscle degenerative diseases. This review aims to describe the cellular, molecular and macrostructural processes involved in the

  15. Abnormal Splicing of NEDD4 in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Screen, Mark; Jonson, Per Harald; Raheem, Olayinka; Palmio, Johanna; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sirito, Mario; Krahe, Ralf; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is a multisystemic disorder caused by a (CCTG)n repeat expansion in intron 1 of CNBP. Transcription of the repeats causes a toxic RNA gain of function involving their accumulation in ribonuclear foci. This leads to sequestration of splicing factors and alters pre-mRNA splicing in a range of downstream effector genes, which is thought to contribute to the diverse DM2 clinical features. Hyperlipidemia is frequent in DM2 patients, but the treatment is problematic because of an increased risk of statin-induced adverse reactions. Hypothesizing that shared pathways lead to the increased risk, we compared the skeletal muscle expression profiles of DM2 patients and controls with patients with hyperlipidemia on statin therapy. Neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated-4 (NEDD4), an ubiquitin ligase, was one of the dysregulated genes identified in DM2 patients and patients with statin-treated hyperlipidemia. In DM2 muscle, NEDD4 mRNA was abnormally spliced, leading to aberrant NEDD4 proteins. NEDD4 was down-regulated in persons taking statins, and simvastatin treatment of C2C12 cells suppressed NEDD4 transcription. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), an established NEDD4 target, was increased and accumulated in highly atrophic DM2 muscle fibers. PTEN ubiquitination was reduced in DM2 myofibers, suggesting that the NEDD4-PTEN pathway is dysregulated in DM2 skeletal muscle. Thus, this pathway may contribute to the increased risk of statin-adverse reactions in patients with DM2. PMID:24907641

  16. Symptoms of Eating Disorders and Depression in Emerging Adults with Early-Onset, Long-Duration Type 1 Diabetes and Their Association with Metabolic Control

    PubMed Central

    Bächle, Christina; Lange, Karin; Stahl-Pehe, Anna; Castillo, Katty; Scheuing, Nicole; Holl, Reinhard W.; Giani, Guido; Rosenbauer, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Background This study analyzed the prevalence of and association between symptoms of eating disorders and depression in female and male emerging adults with early-onset, long-duration type 1 diabetes and investigated how these symptoms are associated with metabolic control. Methods In a nationwide population-based survey, 211 type 1 diabetes patients aged 18-21 years completed standardized questionnaires, including the SCOFF questionnaire for eating disorder symptoms and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for symptoms of depression and severity of depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 score). Multiple linear and logistic regression models were used to analyze the association between eating disorder and depressive symptoms and their associations with HbA1c. Results A total of 30.2% of the women and 9.5% of the men were screening positive for eating disorders. The mean PHQ-9 score (standard deviation) was 5.3 (4.4) among women and 3.9 (3.6) among men. Screening positive for an eating disorder was associated with more severe depressive symptoms among women (βwomen 3.8, p<0.001). However, neither eating disorder symptoms nor severity of depressive symptoms were associated with HbA1c among women, while HbA1c increased with the severity of depressive symptoms among men (βmen 0.14, p=0.006). Conclusions Because of the high prevalence of eating disorder and depressive symptoms, their interrelationship, and their associations with metabolic control, particularly among men, regular mental health screening is recommended for young adults with type 1 diabetes. PMID:26121155

  17. Ventricular fibrillation induced by coagulating mode bipolar electrocautery during pacemaker implantation in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 patient.

    PubMed

    Russo, Vincenzo; Rago, Anna; DI Meo, Federica; Cioppa, Nadia Della; Papa, Andrea Antonio; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Nigro, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of ventricular fibrillation, induced by bipolar electrocautery during elective dual chamber pacemaker implantation, is reported in a patient affected by Myotonic Distrophy type 1 with normal left ventricular ejection fraction. PMID:25873784

  18. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; Ferrero, E.; Di Gregorio, E.; Imperiale, D.; Vaula, G.; Stamoulis, G.; Santoni, F.; Atzori, C.; Gasparini, L.; Ferrera, D.; Canale, C.; Guipponi, M.; Pennacchio, L. A.; Antonarakis, S. E.; Brussino, A.; Brusco, A.

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.

  19. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; Ferrero, E.; Di Gregorio, E.; Imperiale, D.; Vaula, G.; Stamoulis, G.; Santoni, F.; Atzori, C.; et al

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in amore » postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.« less

  20. ALS-linked TDP-43 mutations produce aberrant RNA splicing and adult-onset motor neuron disease without aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Eveline S; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Huelga, Stephanie C; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Ditsworth, Dara; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Parone, Philippe A; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Clutario, Kevin M; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Marsala, Martin; Shaw, Christopher E; Yeo, Gene W; Cleveland, Don W

    2013-02-19

    Transactivating response region DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is the major protein component of ubiquitinated inclusions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions. Two ALS-causing mutants (TDP-43(Q331K) and TDP-43(M337V)), but not wild-type human TDP-43, are shown here to provoke age-dependent, mutant-dependent, progressive motor axon degeneration and motor neuron death when expressed in mice at levels and in a cell type-selective pattern similar to endogenous TDP-43. Mutant TDP-43-dependent degeneration of lower motor neurons occurs without: (i) loss of TDP-43 from the corresponding nuclei, (ii) accumulation of TDP-43 aggregates, and (iii) accumulation of insoluble TDP-43. Computational analysis using splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrates alterations of endogenous TDP-43-dependent alternative splicing events conferred by both human wild-type and mutant TDP-43(Q331K), but with high levels of mutant TDP-43 preferentially enhancing exon exclusion of some target pre-mRNAs affecting genes involved in neurological transmission and function. Comparison with splicing alterations following TDP-43 depletion demonstrates that TDP-43(Q331K) enhances normal TDP-43 splicing function for some RNA targets but loss-of-function for others. Thus, adult-onset motor neuron disease does not require aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43, with ALS-linked mutants producing loss and gain of splicing function of selected RNA targets at an early disease stage. PMID:23382207

  1. Mitochondrial peptidase IMMP2L mutation causes early onset of age-associated disorders and impairs adult stem cell self-renewal.

    PubMed

    George, Sunil K; Jiao, Yan; Bishop, Colin E; Lu, Baisong

    2011-08-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) are proposed to play a central role in aging and age-associated disorders, although direct in vivo evidence is lacking. We recently generated a mouse mutant with mutated inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) gene, which impairs the signal peptide sequence processing of mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase 2. The mitochondria from mutant mice generate elevated levels of superoxide ion and cause impaired fertility in both sexes. Here, we design experiments to examine the effects of excessive mitochondrial ROS generation on health span. We show that Immp2l mutation increases oxidative stress in multiple organs such as the brain and the kidney, although expression of superoxide dismutases in these tissues of the mutants is also increased. The mutants show multiple aging-associated phenotypes, including wasting, sarcopenia, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, and ataxia, with female mutants showing earlier onset and more severe age-associated disorders than male mutants. The loss of body weight and fat was unrelated to food intake. Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSC) from mutant mice showed impaired proliferation capability, formed significantly less and smaller colonies in colony formation assays, although they retained adipogenic differentiation capability in vitro. This functional impairment was accompanied by increased levels of oxidative stress. Our data showed that mitochondrial ROS is the driving force of accelerated aging and suggested that ROS damage to adult stem cells could be one of the mechanisms for age-associated disorders. PMID:21332923

  2. Age-dependent chloride channel expression in skeletal muscle fibres of normal and HSALR myotonic mice

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Yu, Carl; Quiñonez, Marbella; Vergara, Julio L

    2013-01-01

    We combine electrophysiological and optical techniques to investigate the role that the expression of chloride channels (ClC-1) plays on the age-dependent electrical properties of mammalian muscle fibres. To this end, we comparatively evaluate the magnitude and voltage dependence of chloride currents (ICl), as well as the resting resistance, in fibres isolated from control and human skeletal actin (HSA)LR mice (a model of myotonic dystrophy) of various ages. In control mice, the maximal peak chloride current ([peak-ICl]max) increases from −583 ± 126 to −956 ± 260 μA cm−2 (mean ± SD) between 3 and 6 weeks old. Instead, in 3-week-old HSALR mice, ICl are significantly smaller (−153 ± 33 μA cm−2) than in control mice, but after a long period of ∼14 weeks they reach statistically comparable values. Thus, the severe ClC-1 channelopathy in young HSALR animals is slowly reversed with aging. Frequency histograms of the maximal chloride conductance (gCl,max) in fibres of young HSALR animals are narrow and centred in low values; alternatively, those from older animals show broad distributions, centred at larger gCl,max values, compatible with mosaic expressions of ClC-1 channels. In fibres of both animal strains, optical data confirm the age-dependent increase in gCl, and additionally suggest that ClC-1 channels are evenly distributed between the sarcolemma and transverse tubular system membranes. Although gCl is significantly depressed in fibres of young HSALR mice, the resting membrane resistance (Rm) at −90 mV is only slightly larger than in control mice due to upregulation of a Rb-sensitive resting conductance (gK,IR). In adult animals, differences in Rm are negligible between fibres of both strains, and the contributions of gCl and gK,IR are less altered in HSALR animals. We surmise that while hyperexcitability in young HSALR mice can be readily explained on the basis of reduced gCl, myotonia in adult HSALR animals may be explained on the basis of a

  3. Expanded CTG repeat demarcates a boundary for abnormal CpG methylation in myotonic dystrophy patient tissues

    PubMed Central

    López Castel, Arturo; Nakamori, Masayuki; Tomé, Stephanie; Chitayat, David; Gourdon, Geneviève; Thornton, Charles A.; Pearson, Christopher E.

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) affects multiple organs, shows age-dependent progression and is caused by CTG expansions at the DM1 locus. We determined the DM1 CpG methylation profile and CTG length in tissues from DM1 foetuses, DM1 adults, non-affected individuals and transgenic DM1 mice. Analysis included CTCF binding sites upstream and downstream of the CTG tract, as methylation-sensitive CTCF binding affects chromatinization and transcription of the DM1 locus. In humans, in a given foetus, expansions were largest in heart and smallest in liver, differing by 40–400 repeats; in adults, the largest expansions were in heart and cerebral cortex and smallest in cerebellum, differing by up to 5770 repeats in the same individual. Abnormal methylation was specific to the mutant allele. In DM1 adults, heart, liver and cortex showed high-to-moderate methylation levels, whereas cerebellum, kidney and skeletal muscle were devoid of methylation. Methylation decreased between foetuses and adults. Contrary to previous findings, methylation was not restricted to individuals with congenital DM1. The expanded repeat demarcates an abrupt boundary of methylation. Upstream sequences, including the CTCF site, were methylated, whereas the repeat itself and downstream sequences were not. In DM1 mice, expansion-, tissue- and age-specific methylation patterns were similar but not identical to those in DM1 individuals; notably in mice, methylation was present up- and downstream of the repeat, but greater upstream. Thus, in humans, the CpG-free expanded CTG repeat appears to maintain a highly polarized pattern of CpG methylation at the DM1 locus, which varies markedly with age and tissues. PMID:21044947

  4. SETX mutations are a frequent genetic cause of juvenile and adult onset cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/background Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia defines a group of genetically distinct recessive ataxias including ataxia-telangectasia (A-T, ATM gene), ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1, APTX gene) and type 2 (AOA2, SETX gene). Although, a few unique clinical features differentiate each of these forms, the patients also share common clinical signs, such as the presence of cerebellar atrophy, sensorimotor axonal neuropathy, and elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) serum level. Materials and methods We selected 22 Italian patients from 21 families, presenting progressive cerebellar ataxia, axonal neuropathy, and elevated serum AFP. We screened the coding regions of ATM, APTX and SETX genes for point mutations by direct sequencing or DHPLC, and searched genomic rearrangements in SETX by MLPA analysis. In selected cases, quantification of ATM and senataxin proteins was performed by Western blot. Clinical, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging data were collected. Results Thirteen patients (12 families) carried SETX mutations (AOA2, 57%), two were mutated in ATM (A-T), and three in APTX (AOA1). In three remaining patients, we could not find pathogenic mutations, and in one case we found, in homozygosis, the SETX p.K992R polymorphism (population frequency 1-2%). In AOA2 cases, we identified 14 novel and three reported SETX mutations. Signs at onset were gait ataxia and facial dyskinesia, and the age ranged between 11 and 18 years. None had obvious oculomotor apraxia at the latest examination (age 14–45 years). The patient carrying the p.K992R SETX polymorphism had a phenotype similar to that of the diagnosed AOA2 patients, while the other three undiagnosed subjects had a very late onset and a few distinguishing clinical features. Discussion and conclusions We describe a large series of 13 AOA2 Italian patients. The phenotype was consistent with previous descriptions of AOA2, except for a higher frequency of strabism, and for the absence of oculomotor

  5. New-onset refractory status epilepticus in an adult with an atypical presentation of cat-scratch disease: successful treatment with high-dose corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Laswell, Emily M; Chambers, Kasandra D; Whitsel, Danielle R; Poudel, Kiran

    2015-06-01

    New-onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) is defined as a sudden onset of refractory status epilepticus in patients who do not have a history of epilepsy. It is a neurologic emergency, and determining the underlying etiology is an important factor for effectively managing and predicting the prognosis of NORSE. We describe the case of a 28-year-old woman who was hospitalized with NORSE secondary to an unknown etiology. She did not respond to traditional anticonvulsant therapy, including benzodiazepines, fosphenytoin, propofol, and levetiracetam. The patient was placed on continuous electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring and was treated further with multiple antiepileptics, which were titrated aggressively based on EEG readings and therapeutic drug levels; despite this treatment, EEG monitoring revealed continued seizures. Thus, high-dose corticosteroids were started for seizure control. Her workup included computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the head, a lumbar puncture, toxicology screening, and extensive testing for multiple infectious and inflammatory etiologies. The patient's history revealed recent exposure to a new cat. Serologic results were positive for Bartonella henselae, and she was diagnosed with cat-scratch disease (CSD). She did not have the typical presentation of symptoms of lymphadenopathy, however, which is common in CSD. Doxycycline 100 mg and rifampin 300 mg twice daily were added to the patient's anticonvulsant and corticosteroid therapy. She was hospitalized for a total of 26 days and discharged with only minor neurologic impairment (short-term memory deficits and minor cognitive problems). The patient was discharged receiving antiepileptics, antibiotics, and a corticosteroid taper. To our knowledge, this is the first clinically known case of NORSE secondary to CSD without typical CSD symptoms in the adult population. The patient failed to respond to traditional anticonvulsant therapy alone. With the addition of high

  6. Young-Onset Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kuruppu, Dulanji K; Matthews, Brandy R

    2014-01-01

    Young-onset dementia (YOD) is an neurological syndrome that affects behavior and cognition of patients younger than 65 years of age. Although frequently misdiagnosed, a systematic approach, reliant upon attainment of detailed medical history, collateral history from an informant, neuropsychological testing, laboratory studies, and neuroimaging, may facilitate earlier and more accurate diagnosis with subsequent intervention. The differential diagnosis of YOD is extensive and includes early-onset forms of adult neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, Lewy body dementias, Huntington's disease, and prion disease. Late-onset forms of childhood neurodegenerative conditions may also present as YOD and include mitochondrial disorders, lysosomal storage disorders, and leukodystrophies. Potentially reversible etiologies including inflammatory disorders, infectious diseases, toxic/metabolic abnormalities, transient epileptic amnesia, obstructive sleep apnea, and normal pressure hydrocephalus also represent important differential diagnostic considerations in YOD. This review will present etiologies, diagnostic strategies, and options for management of YOD with comprehensive summary tables for clinical reference. PMID:24234358

  7. The Change of Grip Strength in a Patient with Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy Over a 4-year Period

    PubMed Central

    Kozuka, Naoki; Uchida, Eiji; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Tatsumi, Haruyuki; Takeda, Hidekatsu; Tachi, Nobutada

    2008-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MyD) is a neuromuscular disease that is autosomal dominant and the most common form of muscular dystrophy affecting adults. The clinical features of MyD include a multisystemic disorder characterized by myotonia, progressive muscle weakness and wasting, cataracts, premature balding and mental retardation. The most severe type of MyD is classified as congenital MyD (CMyD). The muscle weakness in CMyD is very severe, but muscle development can be observed in the period of growth. However, no clinical case of this type has been reported yet. Therefore, we report on a girl with CMyD who had an increase in muscle strength over a four-year period. The girl with CMyD participated in this study from the age of 9 to the age of 12. The measurement of muscle strength was recorded as the maximum score of grip strength with the use of dynamometers. Grip strength was assessed once a year by the same two physical therapists. Grip strength of CMyD for each year was markedly weak when compared with the normal controls, but muscle strength changed within some specific growth areas. The muscle weakness in CMyD was remarkable, but the result showed that specific muscle strength of CMyD in childhood was actually increased. PMID:25792886

  8. Functional and Structural Analyses of CYP1B1 Variants Linked to Congenital and Adult-Onset Glaucoma to Investigate the Molecular Basis of These Diseases.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Antara; Chakraborty, Subhadip; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Ray, Kunal

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness, appears in various forms. Mutations in CYP1B1 result in primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) by an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance while it acts as a modifier locus for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). We investigated the molecular basis of the variable phenotypes resulting from the defects in CYP1B1 by using subclones of 23 CYP1B1 mutants reported in glaucoma patients, in a cell based system by measuring the dual activity of the enzyme to metabolize both retinol and 17β-estradiol. Most variants linked to POAG showed low steroid metabolism while null or very high retinol metabolism was observed in variants identified in PCG. We examined the translational turnover rates of mutant proteins after the addition of cycloheximide and observed that the levels of enzyme activity mostly corroborated the translational turnover rate. We performed extensive normal mode analysis and molecular-dynamics-simulations-based structural analyses and observed significant variation of fluctuation in certain segmental parts of the mutant proteins, especially at the B-C and F-G loops, which were previously shown to affect the dynamic behavior and ligand entry/exit properties of the cytochrome P450 family of proteins. Our molecular study corroborates the structural analysis, and suggests that the pathologic state of the carrier of CYP1B1 mutations is determined by the allelic state of the gene. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to dissect biological activities of CYP1B1 for correlation with congenital and adult onset glaucomas. PMID:27243976

  9. Echocardiographic assessment of subclinical left ventricular eccentric hypertrophy in adult-onset GHD patients by geometric remodeling: an observational case-control study

    PubMed Central

    de Gregorio, Cesare; Curtò, Lorenzo; Recupero, Antonino; Grimaldi, Patrizia; Almoto, Barbara; Venturino, Marilena; Cento, Domenico; Narbone, Maria Carola; Trimarchi, Francesco; Coglitore, Sebastiano; Cannavò, Salvatore

    2006-01-01

    Background Most patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) show high body mass index. Overweight subjects, but GHD patients, were demonstrated to have high left ventricular mass index (LVMi) and abnormal LV geometric remodeling. We sought to study these characteristics in a group of GHD patients, in an attempt to establish the BMI-independent role of GHD. Methods Fifty-four patients, 28 F and 26 M, aged 45.9 ± 13.1, with adult-onset GHD (pituitary adenomas 48.2%, empty sella 27.8%, pituitary inflammation 5.5%, cranio-pharyngioma 3.7%, not identified pathogenesis 14.8%) were enrolled. To minimize any possible interferences of BMI on the aim of this study, the control group included 20 age- and weight-matched healthy subjects. The LV geometry was identified by the relationship between LVMi (cut-off 125 g/m2) and relative wall thickness (cut-off 0.45) at echocardiography. Results There was no significant between-group difference in resting cardiac morphology and function, nor when considering age-related discrepancy. The majority of patients had normal-low LVM/LVMi, but about one fourth of them showed higher values. These findings correlated to relatively high circulating IGF-1 and systolic blood pressure at rest. The main LV geometric pattern was eccentric hypertrophy in 22% of GHD population (26% of with severe GHD) and in 15% of controls (p = NS). Conclusion Though the lack of significant differences in resting LV morphology and function, about 25% of GHD patients showed high LVMi (consisting of eccentric hypertrophy), not dissimilarly to overweight controls. This finding, which prognostic role is well known in obese and hypertensive patients, is worthy to be investigated in GHD patients through wider controlled trials. PMID:16507109

  10. Identification of two novel mutations in the SLC25A13 gene and detection of seven mutations in 102 patients with adult-onset type II citrullinemia.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Yamaguchi, N; Kobayashi, K; Nishi, I; Horinouchi, H; Jalil, M A; Li, M X; Ushikai, M; Iijima, M; Kondo, I; Saheki, T

    2000-12-01

    Adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2) is characterized by a liver-specific deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) protein. We have recently identified the gene responsible for CTLN2, viz., SLC25A13, which encodes a calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier protein, designated citrin, and found five mutations of the SLC25A13 gene in CTLN2 patients. In the present study, we have identified two novel mutations, 1800ins1 and R605X, in SLC25A13 mRNA and the SLC25A13 gene. Diagnostic analysis for the seven mutations in 103 CTLN2 patients diagnosed by biochemical and enzymatic studies has revealed that 102 patients had one or two of the seven mutations and 93 patients were homozygotes or compound heterozygotes. These results indicate that CTLN2 is caused by an abnormality in the SLC25A13 gene, and that our criteria for CTLN2 before DNA diagnosis are correct. Five of 22 patients from consanguineous unions have been shown to be compound heterozygotes, suggesting a high frequency of the mutated genes. The frequency of homozygotes is calculated to be more than 1 in 20,000 from carrier detection (6 in 400 individuals tested) in the Japanese population. We have detected no cross-reactive immune materials in the liver of CTLN2 patients with any of the seven mutations by Western blot analysis with anti-human citrin antibody. From these findings, we hypothesize that CTLN2 is caused by a complete deletion of citrin, although the mechanism of ASS deficiency is still unknown. PMID:11153906

  11. TLR4 Endogenous Ligand S100A8/A9 Levels in Adult-Onset Still’s Disease and Their Association with Disease Activity and Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Han, Jae Ho; Kim, Woo-Jung; Noh, Hyun Jin; An, Jeong-Mi; Yim, Hyunee; Jung, Ju-Yang; Kim, You-Sun; Suh, Chang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    S100A8/A9 has been suggested as a marker of disease activity in patients with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). We evaluated the clinical significance of S100A8/A9 as a biomarker and its pathogenic role in AOSD. Blood samples were collected prospectively from 20 AOSD patients and 20 healthy controls (HCs). Furthermore, skin and lymph node biopsy specimens of AOSD patients were investigated for S100A8/A9 expression levels via immunohistochemistry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of active AOSD patients and HCs were investigated for S100A8/A9 cell signals. S100A8/A9, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in active AOSD patients were higher than those of HCs. S100A8/A9 levels correlated positively with IL-1β, TNF-α and C-reactive protein. The inflammatory cells expressing S100A8/A9 were graded from one to three in skin and lymph node biopsies of AOSD patients. The grading for S100A8/A9 was more intense in the skin lesions with karyorrhexis, mucin deposition, and neutrophil infiltration. Like lipopolysaccharide (LPS), S100A8/A9 induced phosphorylation of p38 and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) in PBMCs, suggesting that S100A8/A9 activates Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathways. These findings suggest that S100A8/A9 may be involved in the inflammatory response with induction of proinflammatory cytokines and may serve as a clinicopathological marker for disease activity in AOSD. PMID:27537874

  12. Adult-Onset Deletion of β-Catenin in (10kb)Dmp1-Expressing Cells Prevents Intermittent PTH-Induced Bone Gain.

    PubMed

    Kedlaya, Rajendra; Kang, Kyung Shin; Hong, Jung Min; Bettagere, Vidya; Lim, Kyung-Eun; Horan, Daniel; Divieti-Pajevic, Paola; Robling, Alexander G

    2016-08-01

    β-Catenin (βcat) is a major downstream signaling node in canonical Wingless-related integration site (Wnt) signaling pathway, and its activity is crucial for canonical Wnt signal transduction. Wnt signaling has recently been implicated in the osteo-anabolic response to PTH, a potent calcium-regulating factor. We investigated whether βcat is essential for the anabolic action of intermittent PTH by generating male mice with adult-onset deletion of βcat in a subpopulation of bone cells (osteocytes and late-stage osteoblasts), treating them with an anabolic regimen of PTH, and measuring the skeletal responses. Male (10kb)Dmp1-CreERt2 transgenic mice that also harbored floxed loss-of-function βcat alleles (βcat(f/f)) were induced for Cre activity using tamoxifen, then injected daily with human PTH 1-34 (30 μg/kg) or vehicle for 5 weeks. Mice in which βcat was deleted showed either total lack of bone mineral density (BMD) gain, or BMD loss, and did not respond to PTH treatment. However, bone mass measurements in the trabecular compartment of the femur and spine revealed PTH-induced bone gain whether βcat was deleted or not. PTH-stimulated increases in periosteal and cancellous bone formation rates were not impaired by βcat deletion, but resorption markers and cortical porosity were significantly increased in induced mice, particularly induced mice treated with PTH. These results suggest that βcat is required for net-positive BMD effects of PTH therapy but that the anabolic effects per se of PTH treatment might not require osteocytic/osteoblastic βcat. PMID:27253995

  13. Elevated high-mobility group B1 levels in active adult-onset Still's disease associated with systemic score and skin rash.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Yang; Suh, Chang-Hee; Sohn, Seonghyang; Nam, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyoun-Ah

    2016-08-01

    High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein, and such prototypical damage-associated molecular patterns mediate the immune response in the noninfectious inflammatory response. Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder involved in the dysregulation of innate immunity. We investigated the serum HMGB1 level in patients with AOSD and evaluated its clinical significance. Blood samples were collected from 40 patients with active AOSD and 40 healthy controls (HC). Of the patients with AOSD, follow-up samples were collected from 16 patients after a resolution of AOSD disease activity. Serum HMGB1 levels in patients with AOSD were higher than those of the HC (10.0 ± 5.85 vs. 5.15 ± 1.79 ng/mL, p < 0.001). Serum HMGB1 levels were found to be correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) and the systemic score. The AOSD patient who had a sore throat showed a higher serum HMGB1 level than those patients who did not, and the patient with a skin rash had higher levels than the patients without. In addition, the serum HMGB1 levels were decreased after the resolution of disease activity in the AOSD patients who were followed up. The serum HMGB1 levels were elevated in AOSD patients compared to the HC and were correlated with both CRP and the systemic score. The HMGB1 levels were associated with skin rash and a sore throat in AOSD patients. After the resolution of disease activity, serum HMGB1 levels were found to have decreased. PMID:27225247

  14. Functional and Structural Analyses of CYP1B1 Variants Linked to Congenital and Adult-Onset Glaucoma to Investigate the Molecular Basis of These Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Saikat; Ray, Kunal

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness, appears in various forms. Mutations in CYP1B1 result in primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) by an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance while it acts as a modifier locus for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). We investigated the molecular basis of the variable phenotypes resulting from the defects in CYP1B1 by using subclones of 23 CYP1B1 mutants reported in glaucoma patients, in a cell based system by measuring the dual activity of the enzyme to metabolize both retinol and 17β-estradiol. Most variants linked to POAG showed low steroid metabolism while null or very high retinol metabolism was observed in variants identified in PCG. We examined the translational turnover rates of mutant proteins after the addition of cycloheximide and observed that the levels of enzyme activity mostly corroborated the translational turnover rate. We performed extensive normal mode analysis and molecular-dynamics-simulations-based structural analyses and observed significant variation of fluctuation in certain segmental parts of the mutant proteins, especially at the B-C and F-G loops, which were previously shown to affect the dynamic behavior and ligand entry/exit properties of the cytochrome P450 family of proteins. Our molecular study corroborates the structural analysis, and suggests that the pathologic state of the carrier of CYP1B1 mutations is determined by the allelic state of the gene. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to dissect biological activities of CYP1B1 for correlation with congenital and adult onset glaucomas. PMID:27243976

  15. Neurobiology of Childhood-Onset Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Parthasarathy

    2008-01-01

    In the last decade there has been an exponential increase in studies on neurobiological measures in childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS). There seems to be a consensus that structural changes in COS are more marked than in adolescence-onset (AdOS) or adult-onset schizophrenia (AOS). Atrophy of total brain volume is progressive throughout the course…

  16. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  17. Modeling Myotonic Dystrophy 1 in C2C12 Myoblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rui; Dong, Wei; Shen, Xiaopeng; Peng, Xiaoping; Aceves, Angie G; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is a common form of muscular dystrophy. Although several animal models have been established for DM1, myoblast cell models are still important because they offer an efficient cellular alternative for studying cellular and molecular events. Though C2C12 myoblast cells have been widely used to study myogenesis, resistance to gene transfection, or viral transduction, hinders research in C2C12 cells. Here, we describe an optimized protocol that includes daily maintenance, transfection and transduction procedures to introduce genes into C2C12 myoblasts and the induction of myocyte differentiation. Collectively, these procedures enable best transfection/transduction efficiencies, as well as consistent differentiation outcomes. The protocol described in establishing DM1 myoblast cell models would benefit the study of myotonic dystrophy, as well as other muscular diseases. PMID:27501221

  18. Bilateral Adduction Palsy in a Patient with Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Jeon; Oh, Jung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by CTG repeat expansion in the DMPK gene in chromosome 19q13.3. External ophthalmoplegia is a rare manifestation in DM1. We report a DM1 patient confirmed by the presence of 650 CTG triplet expansions in the DMPK gene and had limitation of adduction gaze bilaterally. Brain MRI showed bilateral medial rectus muscles atrophy. Our patient provides additional evidence of ocular motor muscle involvement in DM1. PMID:27358583

  19. Expansion of the myotonic dystrophy gene in Italian and Spanish patients.

    PubMed Central

    Melchionda, S; Cobo, A; Gennarelli, M; Martorell, L; Fattorini, C; Baiget, M; Lopez de Munain, A; Johnson, K; Shelbourne, P; Novelli, G

    1992-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy results from expansion of a (CTG)n repeat at the 3' untranslated region of the myotonin-protein kinase gene. We show here the genomic analysis of 322 symptomatic patients with the cDNA-25 probe detecting disease specific EcoRI restriction fragments. The expansion was found in the majority of Italian and Spanish patients (92%). The implications of these results for the detection of symptomatic patients in southern Europe are discussed. PMID:1453428

  20. A low absolute number of expanded transcripts is involved in myotonic dystrophy type 1 manifestation in muscle.

    PubMed

    Gudde, Anke E E G; González-Barriga, Anchel; van den Broek, Walther J A A; Wieringa, Bé; Wansink, Derick G

    2016-04-15

    Muscular manifestation of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), a common inheritable degenerative multisystem disorder, is mainly caused by expression of RNA from a (CTG·CAG)n-expanded DM1 locus. Here, we report on comparative profiling of expression of normal and expanded endogenous or transgenic transcripts in skeletal muscle cells and biopsies from DM1 mouse models and patients in order to help us in understanding the role of this RNA-mediated toxicity. In tissue ofHSA(LR)mice, the most intensely used 'muscle-only' model in the DM1 field, RNA from the α-actin (CTG)250 transgene was at least 1000-fold more abundant than that from theDmpkgene, or theDMPKgene in humans. Conversely, theDMPKtransgene in another line, DM500/DMSXL mice, was expressed ∼10-fold lower than the endogenous gene. Temporal regulation of expanded RNA expression differed between models. Onset of expression occurred remarkably late inHSA(LR)myoblasts duringin vitromyogenesis whereasDmpkorDMPK(trans)genes were expressed throughout proliferation and differentiation phases. Importantly, quantification of absolute transcript numbers revealed that normal and expandedDmpk/DMPKtranscripts in mouse models and DM1 patients are low-abundance RNA species. Northern blotting, reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, RNA-sequencing and fluorescentin situhybridization analyses showed that they occur at an absolute number between one and a few dozen molecules per cell. Our findings refine the current RNA dominance theory for DM1 pathophysiology, as anomalous factor binding to expanded transcripts and formation of soluble or insoluble ribonucleoprotein aggregates must be nucleated by only few expandedDMPKtranscripts and therefore be a small numbers game. PMID:26908607

  1. A low absolute number of expanded transcripts is involved in myotonic dystrophy type 1 manifestation in muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gudde, Anke E. E. G.; González-Barriga, Anchel; van den Broek, Walther J. A. A.; Wieringa, Bé; Wansink, Derick G.

    2016-01-01

    Muscular manifestation of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), a common inheritable degenerative multisystem disorder, is mainly caused by expression of RNA from a (CTG·CAG)n-expanded DM1 locus. Here, we report on comparative profiling of expression of normal and expanded endogenous or transgenic transcripts in skeletal muscle cells and biopsies from DM1 mouse models and patients in order to help us in understanding the role of this RNA-mediated toxicity. In tissue of HSALR mice, the most intensely used ‘muscle-only’ model in the DM1 field, RNA from the α-actin (CTG)250 transgene was at least 1000-fold more abundant than that from the Dmpk gene, or the DMPK gene in humans. Conversely, the DMPK transgene in another line, DM500/DMSXL mice, was expressed ∼10-fold lower than the endogenous gene. Temporal regulation of expanded RNA expression differed between models. Onset of expression occurred remarkably late in HSALR myoblasts during in vitro myogenesis whereas Dmpk or DMPK (trans)genes were expressed throughout proliferation and differentiation phases. Importantly, quantification of absolute transcript numbers revealed that normal and expanded Dmpk/DMPK transcripts in mouse models and DM1 patients are low-abundance RNA species. Northern blotting, reverse transcriptase–quantitative polymerase chain reaction, RNA-sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses showed that they occur at an absolute number between one and a few dozen molecules per cell. Our findings refine the current RNA dominance theory for DM1 pathophysiology, as anomalous factor binding to expanded transcripts and formation of soluble or insoluble ribonucleoprotein aggregates must be nucleated by only few expanded DMPK transcripts and therefore be a small numbers game. PMID:26908607

  2. Phenotypic characterization of a Csf1r haploinsufficient mouse model of adult-onset leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP).

    PubMed

    Chitu, Violeta; Gokhan, Solen; Gulinello, Maria; Branch, Craig A; Patil, Madhuvati; Basu, Ranu; Stoddart, Corrina; Mehler, Mark F; Stanley, E Richard

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) that abrogate the expression of the affected allele or lead to the expression of mutant receptor chains devoid of kinase activity have been identified in both familial and sporadic cases of ALSP. To determine the validity of the Csf1r heterozygous mouse as a model of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) we performed behavioral, radiologic, histopathologic, ultrastructural and cytokine expression studies of young and old Csf1r+/- and control Csf1r+/+ mice. Six to 8-month old Csf1r+/- mice exhibit cognitive deficits, and by 9-11 months develop sensorimotor deficits and in male mice, depression and anxiety-like behavior. MRIs of one year-old Csf1r+/- mice reveal lateral ventricle enlargement and thinning of the corpus callosum. Ultrastructural analysis of the corpus callosum uncovers dysmyelinated axons as well as neurodegeneration, evidenced by the presence of axonal spheroids. Histopathological examination of 11-week-old mice reveals increased axonal and myelin staining in the cortex, increase of neuronal cell density in layer V and increase of microglial cell densities throughout the brain, suggesting that early developmental changes contribute to disease. By 10-months of age, the neuronal cell density normalizes, oligodendrocyte precursor cells increase in layers II-III and V and microglial densities remain elevated without an increase in astrocytes. Also, the age-dependent increase in CSF-1R+ neurons in cortical layer V is reduced. Moreover, the expression of Csf2, Csf3, Il27 and Il6 family cytokines is increased, consistent with microglia-mediated inflammation. These results demonstrate that the inactivation of one Csf1r allele is sufficient to cause an ALSP-like disease in mice. The Csf1r+/- mouse is a model of ALSP that will allow the critical events for disease development to be determined and permit rapid evaluation of therapeutic approaches. Furthermore

  3. Phenotypic characterization of a Csf1r haploinsufficient mouse model of adult-onset leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP)

    PubMed Central

    Chitu, Violeta; Gokhan, Solen; Gulinello, Maria; Branch, Craig A.; Patil, Madhuvati; Basu, Ranu; Stoddart, Corrina; Mehler, Mark F.; Stanley, E. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) that abrogate the expression of the affected allele or lead to the expression of mutant receptor chains devoid of kinase activity have been identified in both familial and sporadic cases of ALSP. To determine the validity of the Csf1r heterozygous mouse as a model of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) we performed behavioral, radiologic, histopathologic, ultrastructural and cytokine expression studies of young and old Csf1r+/− and control Csf1r+/+ mice. Six to 8-month old Csf1r+/− mice exhibit cognitive deficits, and by 9-11 months develop sensorimotor deficits and in male mice, depression and anxiety-like behavior. MRIs of one year-old Csf1r+/− mice reveal lateral ventricle enlargement and thinning of the corpus callosum. Ultrastructural analysis of the corpus callosum uncovers dysmyelinated axons as well as neurodegeneration, evidenced by the presence of axonal spheroids. Histopathological examination of 11-week-old mice reveals increased axonal and myelin staining in the cortex, increase of neuronal cell density in layer V and increase of microglial cell densities throughout the brain, suggesting that early developmental changes contribute to disease. By 10-months of age, the neuronal cell density normalizes, oligodendrocyte precursor cells increase in layers II-III and V and microglial densities remain elevated without an increase in astrocytes. Also, the age-dependent increase in CSF-1R+ neurons in cortical layer V is reduced. Moreover, the expression of Csf2, Csf3, Il27 and Il6 family cytokines is increased, consistent with microglia-mediated inflammation. These results demonstrate that the inactivation of one Csf1r allele is sufficient to cause an ALSP-like disease in mice. The Csf1r+/− mouse is a model of ALSP that will allow the critical events for disease development to be determined and permit rapid evaluation of therapeutic approaches

  4. Adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as multiple system atrophy: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Kotaro; Koga, Shunsuke; Aoki, Naoya; Lin, Wenlang; Suzuki, Kinuko; Ross, Owen A; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-02-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common peroxisomal disorder and is caused by ABCD1 mutations. A cerebello-brainstem dominant form that mainly involves the cerebellum and brainstem is summarized in a review of the literature, with autopsy-confirmed cases exceedingly rare. We report a 69-year-old White man who was diagnosed with this rare disorder and describe neuropathologic, ultrastructural and genetic analyses. He did not have adrenal insufficiency or a family history of X-ALD or Addison's disease. His initial symptom was temporary loss of eyesight at age 34 years. His major symptoms were chronic and progressive gait disorder, weakness in his lower extremities and spasticity, as well as autonomic failure and cerebellar ataxia suggesting possible multiple system atrophy (MSA). He also had seizures, hearing loss and sensory disturbances. His brain MRI showed no obvious atrophy or significant white matter pathology in cerebrum, brainstem or cerebellum. He died at age 69 years with a diagnosis of MSA. Microscopic analysis showed mild, patchy myelin rarefaction with perivascular clusters of PAS-positive, CD68-positive macrophages in the white matter most prominent in the cerebellum and occipital lobe, but also affecting the optic tract and internal capsule. Electron microscopy of cerebellar white matter showed cleft-like trilamellar cytoplasmic inclusions in macrophages typical of X-ALD, which prompted genetic analysis that revealed a novel ABCD1 mutation, p.R163G. Given the relatively mild pathological findings and long disease duration, it is likely that the observed pathology was the result of a slow and indolent disease process. We described a patient who had sporadic cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD with long clinical course, mild pathological findings, and an ABCD1 p.R163G substitution. We also review a total of 34 cases of adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD. Although rare, X-ALD should be considered in the

  5. A Sex-Linked Gene Controlling the Onset of Sexual Maturity in Female and Male Platyfish (XIPHOPHORUS MACULATUS), Fecundity in Females and Adult Size in Males

    PubMed Central

    Kallman, Klaus D.; Borkoski, Valerie

    1978-01-01

    A sex-linked gene, P, controls the onset of sexual maturity in the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus. The activity of this gene is correlated with the age and size at which the gonadotropic zone of the adenohypophysis differentiates and becomes physiologically active. Immature fish of all genotypes grow at the same rate; however, as adults, males with "early" genotypes are significantly smaller than males of "late" genotypes, since growth rate declines strongly under the influence of androgenic hormone. Five alleles, P1... P5, have been identified from natural populations that under controlled conditions cause gonad maturation between eight and 73 weeks. P1P1 males become mature at eight weeks and 21 mm, P2P2 and P3P3 males between eleven and 13.5 weeks and 25 to 29 mm, and P4P4 males at 25 weeks and 37 mm. Since P5 is X-linked, no males homozygous for P5 could be produced. The difference between P2 and P3 is largely based upon their interaction with P5. P3P5 males mature at 17.5 weeks and 33.5 mm and P2P5 males at 28 weeks and 38 mm. The rate of transformation of the unmodified anal fin into a gonopodium, which is under androgenic control, is directly related to the age at initiation of sexual maturity, ranging from 3.2 weeks in P1P1 males to seven weeks in P2P 5 males. These differences may reflect different levels of circulating gonadotropic and androgenic hormones.—In two genotypes of females, initiation of vitellogenesis was closely correlated with size and this critical size was independent of age (e.g., 21 mm for P1P1 ). In a third genotype (P1P5) the minimum size for vitellogenesis decreased with increasing age, so that females would mature as early as eleven weeks, provided they had attained at least 29 mm, but at 25 weeks even females as small as 23 mm possessed ripe gonads. For P5P5 females, which become mature between 34 and 73 weeks of age, there is no correlation between size and initiation of vitellogenesis. In all four genotypes of females examined

  6. A LONGER INTERVAL WITHOUT GROWTH HORMONE REPLACEMENT AND FEMALE GENDER ARE ASSOCIATED WITH LOWER BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN ADULTS WITH CHILDHOOD ONSET GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY - A KIMS DATABASE ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Tritos, Nicholas A; Hamrahian, Amir H; King, Donna; Greenspan, Susan L; Cook, David M; Jönsson, Peter J; Wajnrajch, Michael P; Koltowska – Häggstrom, Maria; Biller, Beverly MK

    2016-01-01

    Objective Childhood onset growth hormone deficiency (COGHD) is associated with low bone mineral density (BMD). Adults with persistent COGHD may be at risk for insufficient bone accrual or bone loss during adulthood. The purpose of this study was to identify BMD predictors and characterize the effects of GH replacement on BMD in COGHD adults with persistent GHD. Design Retrospective analysis of the KIMS database. Methods Variables predicting standardized BMD (sBMD) were identified. The effect of GH replacement (3 years) on BMD was examined. Results 314 COGHD adults (148 women, 166 men; 62 non-naïve, 178 semi-naïve, and 74 true naïve, depending on length and timing of previous GH replacement), who had BMD measured in lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) at study entry. In semi-naïve subjects, a longer gap in GH replacement between childhood and adulthood was predictive of lower sBMD in the FN (r= −0.18, P=0.038). Thyrotropin deficiency predicted lower sBMD in the LS (r= −0.16,P=0.052). In true naïve patients, a longer gap between onset of pituitary disease and study entry (r= −0.35,P=0.012) and female gender (r= −0.27,P=0.043) independently predicted lower sBMD in the FN. There were no differences in BMD increases between non-naïve, semi-naïve and true naïve subjects on GH replacement. Conclusions In semi-naïve subjects a longer interval off GH replacement was associated with lower sBMD in the FN. Among true naïve patients, a longer gap between the onset of pituitary disease and GH replacement, and female gender predicted lower sBMD in the FN. PMID:22711759

  7. [Dilated cardiomyopathy and visceral anomalies in myotonic dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Pentimone, F; Del Corso, L; Vannini, A; Mori, L; Moruzzo, D

    1990-05-01

    In dystrophia myotonica clinical evidence of cardiac involvement usually appears several years after the onset of neuromuscular symptoms. In more than 90% of cases there is damage to the specialized cardiac tissues and in about 7% of cases there are alterations to the myocardium. We report a case characterized by early and spread deterioration of the pump function developing into refractory congestive heart failure. The contemporary involvement of the smooth muscle of gallbladder and colon confirms the hypothesis that dystrophia myotonica is a pan-muscle disease. PMID:2234457

  8. Exposure to Adult Substance Use as a Risk Factor in Adolescent Substance Use Onset: Part 1. Technical Report #97-13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Allison J.; Collins, Linda M.; Graham, John W.

    The influence of parents and other important adults on adolescent substance use is becoming recognized as a salient topic of research. A study designed to assess the impact of adult substance use on adolescents' progression through increasingly more advanced stages of substance use is reported here. Latent Transition Analysis was used to estimate…

  9. Mexiletine is an effective antimyotonia treatment in myotonic dystrophy type 1(LOE Classification)

    PubMed Central

    Logigian, E.L.; Martens, W.B.; Moxley, R.T.; McDermott, M.P.; Dilek, N.; Wiegner, A.W.; Pearson, A.T.; Barbieri, C.A.; Annis, C.L.; Thornton, C.A.; Moxley, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine if mexiletine is safe and effective in reducing myotonia in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Background: Myotonia is an early, prominent symptom in DM1 and contributes to decreased dexterity, gait instability, difficulty with speech/swallowing, and muscle pain. A few preliminary trials have suggested that the antiarrhythmic drug mexiletine is useful, symptomatic treatment for nondystrophic myotonic disorders and DM1. Methods: We performed 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trials, each involving 20 ambulatory DM1 participants with grip or percussion myotonia on examination. The initial trial compared 150 mg of mexiletine 3 times daily to placebo, and the second trial compared 200 mg of mexiletine 3 times daily to placebo. Treatment periods were 7 weeks in duration separated by a 4- to 8-week washout period. The primary measure of myotonia was time for isometric grip force to relax from 90% to 5% of peak force after a 3-second maximum grip contraction. EKG measurements and adverse events were monitored in both trials. Results: There was a significant reduction in grip relaxation time with both 150 and 200 mg dosages of mexiletine. Treatment with mexiletine at either dosage was not associated with any serious adverse events, or with prolongation of the PR or QTc intervals or of QRS duration. Mild adverse events were observed with both placebo and mexiletine treatment. Conclusions: Mexiletine at dosages of 150 and 200 mg 3 times daily is effective, safe, and well-tolerated over 7 weeks as an antimyotonia treatment in DM1. Classification of Evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that mexiletine at dosages of 150 and 200 mg 3 times daily over 7 weeks is well-tolerated and effective in reducing handgrip relaxation time in DM1. GLOSSARY DM1 = myotonic dystrophy type 1; MVIC = maximal voluntary isometric contraction; PF = peak force; RT = relaxation time; TID = 3 times daily. PMID:20439846

  10. Successful use of BiPAP in infants with congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chau, Shuk-Kuen; Lee, So-Lun

    2013-04-01

    Reported herein are two cases of severe phenotype of congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM) with presentation of respiratory insufficiency at birth. The infants were successfully managed with bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) via nasal mask. The use of BiPAP in infants with CDM has not been reported before. The rationale for using BiPAP is discussed. BiPAP may be more effective than continuous positive airway pressure in managing respiratory insufficiency, especially in infants with the more severe phenotype of CDM. PMID:23679166

  11. Preferential Nucleosome Assembly at DNA Triplet Repeats from the Myotonic Dystrophy Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Amirhaeri, Sorour; Kang, Seongman; Wells, Robert D.; Griffith, Jack D.

    1994-07-01

    The expansion of CTG repeats in DNA occurs in or near genes involved in several human diseases, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington's disease. Nucleosomes, the basic structural element of chromosomes, consist of 146 base pairs of DNA coiled about an octamer of histone proteins and mediate general transcriptional repression. Electron microscopy was used to examine in vitro the nucleosome assembly of DNA containing repeating CTG triplets. The efficiency of nucleosome formation increased with expanded triplet blocks, suggesting that such blocks may repress transcription through the creation of stable nucleosomes.

  12. A journey in bioinspired supramolecular chemistry: from molecular tweezers to small molecules that target myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review summarizes part of the author’s research in the area of supramolecular chemistry, beginning with his early life influences and early career efforts in molecular recognition, especially molecular tweezers. Although designed to complex DNA, these hosts proved more applicable to the field of host–guest chemistry. This early experience and interest in intercalation ultimately led to the current efforts to develop small molecule therapeutic agents for myotonic dystrophy using a rational design approach that heavily relies on principles of supramolecular chemistry. How this work was influenced by that of others in the field and the evolution of each area of research is highlighted with selected examples. PMID:26877815

  13. Altered β-adrenergic response in mice lacking myotonic dystrophy protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Llagostera, Esther; Álvarez López, María Jesús; Scimia, Cecilia; Catalucci, Daniele; Párrizas, Marcelina; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Kaliman, Perla

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase product of the gene mutated in myotonic dystrophy 1 (DMPK) is reported to play a role in cardiac pathophysiology. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms modulated by DMPK, we characterize the impact of DMPK ablation in the context of cardiac β-adrenergic function. Our data demonstrate that DMPK knockout mice present altered β-agonist-induced responses and suggest that this is due, at least in part, to a reduced density of β(1)-adrenergic receptors in cardiac plasma membranes. PMID:22190319

  14. Altered β-adrenergic response in mice lacking myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK)

    PubMed Central

    Llagostera, Esther; López, María Jesús Álvarez; Scimia, Cecilia; Catalucci, Daniele; Párrizas, Marcelina; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Kaliman, Perla

    2011-01-01

    The protein kinase product of the gene mutated in myotonic dystrophy 1 (DMPK) is reported to play a role in cardiac pathophysiology. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms modulated by DMPK, we characterize the impact of DMPK ablation in the context of cardiac β-adrenergic function. Our data demonstrate that DMPK knock-out mice present altered β-agonist-induced responses and suggest that this is due, at least in part, to a reduced density of β1-adrenergic receptors in cardiac plasma membranes. PMID:22190319

  15. Anxiety and Depression during Transition from Hospital to Community in Older Adults: Concepts of a Study to Explain Late Age Onset Depression

    PubMed Central

    Lalor, Aislinn F.; Brown, Ted; Robins, Lauren; Lee, Den-Ching Angel; O’Connor, Daniel; Russell, Grant; Stolwyk, Rene; McDermott, Fiona; Johnson, Christina; Haines, Terry P.

    2015-01-01

    The transition between extended hospitalization and discharge home to community-living contexts for older adults is a critical time period. This transition can have an impact on the health outcomes of older adults such as increasing the risk for health outcomes like falls, functional decline and depression and anxiety. The aim of this work is to identify and understand why older adults experience symptoms of depression and anxiety post-discharge and what factors are associated with this. This is a mixed methods study of adults aged 65 years and over who experienced a period of hospitalization longer than two weeks and return to community-living post-discharge. Participants will complete a questionnaire at baseline and additional monthly follow-up questionnaires for six months. Anxiety and depression and their resulting behaviors are major public health concerns and are significant determinants of health and wellbeing among the ageing population. There is a critical need for research into the impact of an extended period of hospitalization on the health status of older adults post-discharge from hospital. This research will provide evidence that will inform interventions and services provided for older adults after they have been discharged home from hospital care. PMID:27417775

  16. Molecular basis of adult-onset and chronic G sub M2 gangliosidoses in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish origin: Substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the. alpha. -subunit of. beta. -hexosaminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Paw, B.H.; Kaback, M.M.; Neufeld, E.F. )

    1989-04-01

    Chronic and adult-onset G{sub M2} gangliosidoses are neurological disorders caused by marked deficiency of the A isoenzyme of {beta}-hexosaminidase; they occur in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, though less frequently than classic (infantile) Tay-Sachs disease. Earlier biosynthetic studies had identified a defective {alpha}-subunit that failed to associate with the {beta}-subunit. The authors have now found a guanosine to adenosine transition at the 3{prime} end of exon 7, which causes substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the {alpha}-subunit. An RNase protection assay was used to localize the mutation to a segment of mRNA from fibroblasts of a patient with the adult-onset disorder. That segment of mRNA (after reverse transcription) and a corresponding segment of genomic DNA were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced by the dideoxy method. The sequence analysis, together with an assay based on the loss of a ScrFI restriction site, showed that the patient was a compound heterozygote who had inherited the 269 (Gly {yields} Ser) mutation from his father and an allelic null mutation from his mother. The 269 (Gly {yields} Ser) mutation, in compound heterozygosity with a presumed null allele, was also found in fetal fibroblasts with an association-defective phenotype and in cells from five patients with chronic G{sub M2} gangliosidosis.

  17. Comparison of mechanomyography and acceleromyography for the assessment of rocuronium induced neuromuscular block in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Vanlinthout, L E H; Booij, L H D J; van Egmond, J; Robertson, E N

    2010-06-01

    We measured acceleromyography and mechanomyography simultaneously with monitoring of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in four patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. Furthermore, we compared neuromuscular block measures from these patients with those from normal controls from previous studies. In myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients, the dose-response curve obtained with acceleromyography was steeper and right-shifted compared with that obtained using mechanomyography. However, the effective doses to produce 95% neuromuscular block determined with both acceleromyography and mechanomyography were similar to each other and to values found in normal patients. In the three myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients with mild to moderate disease, times to recovery from block were similar to those observed in normal controls. In both patients and normal controls, neuromuscular block recovered faster with acceleromyography. However, in one patient with severe muscle wasting, recovery of neuromuscular block was prolonged. We conclude that mechanomyography and acceleromyography cannot be used interchangeably to monitor neuromuscular block in myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients. PMID:20565393

  18. Cognition and Adaptive Skills in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1: A Study of 55 Individuals with Congenital and Childhood Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrom, Anne-Berit; Hakenas-Plate, Louise; Tulinius, Mar; Wentz, Elisabet

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To investigate cognitive abilities and adaptive skills in children and adolescents with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and correlate the findings to the cytosine-thymine-guanine (CTG) repeat expansion size. Method: Cognitive level was assessed in 55 children and adolescents with DM1 (31 males, 24 females; mean age 12y 1mo, SD 5y 1mo; range…

  19. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePlus

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  20. Predictors of Early Alcohol Drinking Onset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, David; Prause, JoAnn

    2007-01-01

    Early alcohol drinking onset (ADO) has been implicated as a cause of adult alcohol disorder inviting interventions that target the causes of ADO. This study explores the precursors of early ADO using variables measured before drinking onset, reaching back to the mothers of the respondents. The sample consists of children of the women respondents…

  1. Brain pathology in myotonic dystrophy: when tauopathy meets spliceopathy and RNAopathy

    PubMed Central

    Caillet-Boudin, Marie-Laure; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-Jose; Tran, Hélène; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Buee, Luc; Sergeant, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) of type 1 and 2 (DM1 and DM2) are inherited autosomal dominant diseases caused by dynamic and unstable expanded microsatellite sequences (CTG and CCTG, respectively) in the non-coding regions of the genes DMPK and ZNF9, respectively. These mutations result in the intranuclear accumulation of mutated transcripts and the mis-splicing of numerous transcripts. This so-called RNA gain of toxic function is the main feature of an emerging group of pathologies known as RNAopathies. Interestingly, in addition to these RNA inclusions, called foci, the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) in patient brains also distinguishes DM as a tauopathy. Tauopathies are a group of nearly 30 neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by intraneuronal protein aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein Tau (MAPT) in patient brains. Furthermore, a number of neurodegenerative diseases involve the dysregulation of splicing regulating factors and have been characterized as spliceopathies. Thus, myotonic dystrophies are pathologies resulting from the interplay among RNAopathy, spliceopathy, and tauopathy. This review will describe how these processes contribute to neurodegeneration. We will first focus on the tauopathy associated with DM1, including clinical symptoms, brain histology, and molecular mechanisms. We will also discuss the features of DM1 that are shared by other tauopathies and, consequently, might participate in the development of a tauopathy. Moreover, we will discuss the determinants common to both RNAopathies and spliceopathies that could interfere with tau-related neurodegeneration. PMID:24409116

  2. Ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring in myotonic dystrophy (Steinert's Disease). A study of 22 patients.

    PubMed

    Fragola, P V; Ruscitti, G C; Autore, C; Antonini, G; Capria, A; Fiorito, S; Vichi, R; Pennisi, E; Cannata, D

    1987-01-01

    Ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring (AEM) was performed in 22 patients (range 13-62 years; mean age 38.2 +/- 12.7) with grades I, II and III of myotonic dystrophy in order to evaluate the occurrence of potentially dangerous cardiac arrhythmias and conduction disturbances. All patients had previously undergone echocardiographic examination to determine whether structure and function abnormalities were present. In 6 patients with normal resting electrocardiogram, AEM revealed: first degree A-V block (4 cases), class IVa Lown ventricular arrhythmias (3 cases) and episodes of atrial fibrillation (4 cases). In 2 of 3 cases with abnormal scalar electrocardiogram new abnormalities (first degree A-V block and further prolongation of P-R interval) were demonstrated by AEM. Only 1 patient had mild signs of left ventricular dysfunction at echo. Disorders of cardiac conduction and rhythm are characteristic of myotonic dystrophy and can predispose to severe cardiac events. In this respect AEM is shown to be an early and sensitive tool in identifying patients at risk. PMID:3652080

  3. Analysis of meiotic segregation, using single-sperm typing: meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus.

    PubMed Central

    Leeflang, E. P.; McPeek, M. S.; Arnheim, N.

    1996-01-01

    Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus has recently been suggested as being responsible for maintaining the frequency, in the human population, of DM chromosomes capable of expansion to the disease state. In order to test this hypothesis, we have studied samples of single sperm from three individuals heterozygous at the DM locus, each with one allele larger and one allele smaller than 19 CTG repeats. To guard against the possible problem of differential PCR amplification rates based on the lengths of the alleles, the sperm were also typed at another closely linked marker whose allele size was unrelated to the allele size at the DM locus. Using statistical models specifically designed to study single-sperm segregation data, we find no evidence of meiotic segregation distortion. The upper limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the estimate of the common segregation probability for the three donors is at or below .515 for all models considered, and no statistically significant difference from .5 is detected in any of the models. This suggests that any greater amount of segregation distortion at the myotonic dystrophy locus must result from events following sperm ejaculation. The mathematical models developed make it possible to study segregation distortion with high resolution by using sperm-typing data from any locus. PMID:8808606

  4. Analysis of meiotic segregation, using single-sperm typing: Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Leeflang, E.P.; Arnheim, N.; McPeek, M.S.

    1996-10-01

    Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus has recently been suggested as being responsible for maintaining the frequency, in the human population, of DM chromosomes capable of expansion to the disease state. In order to test this hypothesis, we have studied samples of single sperm from three individuals heterozygous at the DM locus, each with one allele larger and one allele smaller than 19 CTG repeats. To guard against the possible problem of differential PCR amplification rates based on the lengths of the alleles, the sperm were also typed at another closely linked marker whose allele size was unrelated to the allele size at the DM locus. Using statistical models specifically designed to study single-sperm segregation data, we find no evidence of meiotic segregation distortion. The upper limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the estimate of the common segregation probability for the three donors is at or below .515 for all models considered, and no statistically significant difference from .5 is detected in any of the models. This suggests that any greater amount of segregation distortion at the myotonic dystrophy locus must result from events following sperm ejaculation. The mathematical models developed make it possible to study segregation distortion with high resolution by using sperm-typing data from any locus. 26 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  5. INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AND NEW-ONSET DEPRESSION: A LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF WOMEN’S CHILDHOOD AND ADULT HISTORIES OF ABUSE

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet-Morin, Isabelle; Fisher, Helen L.; York-Smith, Marianna; Fincham-Campbell, Stephanie; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that women victims of intimate partner violence are at increased risk for poor mental health. This research disentangled the effect of partner violence on new-onset depression and psychosis spectrum symptoms from effects of child maltreatment and other confounding factors, including substance abuse and antisocial personality. Methods Participants were 1,052 mothers involved in the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally representative cohort of families followed prospectively. To test the directionality of associations between partner violence and depression, only women without a history of depression at the beginning of the study were considered (n = 978). Partner violence and mental health were assessed during face-to-face interviews with women across three time points. Results Four of 10 women reported being the victim of violence from their partner in a 10-year period. They represent 33% of our cohort and they account for 51% of new-onset depression. These women had a twofold increase in their risk of suffering from new-onset depression once the effect of childhood maltreatment, socioeconomic deprivation, antisocial personality, and young motherhood were controlled. Women who were abused both in childhood and adulthood were four to seven times more likely to suffer from depression than never-abused women. We observed similar associations with psychosis spectrum symptoms. Conclusions Women victims of partner violence account for more than their share of depression. Findings strengthen existing evidence that partner violence independently contributes to women’s poor mental health. Psychological difficulties among a considerable number of women could be reduced by stopping partner violence. PMID:25691224

  6. PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO LOW DOSE PFOA INDUCES LOW DEVELOPMENTAL BODY WEIGHT FOLLOWED BY ADULT ONSET OBESITY THAT IS BLUNTED IN OVARIECTOMIZED ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Barker hypothesis, or fetal origins of adult disease, proposes that individuals born to mothers who were pregnant during lean times develop a "thrifty" phenotype with a smaller body size and lowered metabolic rates, leading to a propensity for obesity and development of disor...

  7. An atypical presentation of adult-onset Still’s disease complicated by pulmonary hypertension and macrophage activation syndrome treated with immunosuppression: a case-based review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Daniel K.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Haythe, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a known complication of rheumatologic diseases, but it is only rarely associated with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). We describe the case of a 30-year-old woman who presented in a pulmonary hypertension crisis and was found to have underlying AOSD with PAH and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with a course complicated by macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). She dramatically improved with steroids, cyclosporine A, and anakinra, with total resolution of the MAS and significant improvement of her pulmonary arterial pressures. While there are only select case reports of AOSD associated with PAH, this is the first reported case of (1) AOSD complicated by both PAH and MAS and (2) AOSD complicated by biopsy-proven NSIP. Clinically, this case highlights the efficacy of immunosuppressive agents in the treatment of PAH and MAS from underlying AOSD and supports their use in this setting. PMID:27162622

  8. The Myotonic Plot Thickens: Electrical Myotonia in Antimuscle-Specific Kinase Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Magnussen, Marcus; Karakis, Ioannis; Harrison, Taylor B.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical myotonia is known to occur in a number of inherited and acquired disorders including myotonic dystrophies, channelopathies, and metabolic, toxic, and inflammatory myopathies. Yet, electrical myotonia in myasthenia gravis associated with antibodies against muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) has not been previously reported. We describe two such patients, both of whom had a typical presentation of proximal muscle weakness with respiratory failure in the context of a significant electrodecrement in repetitive nerve stimulation. In both cases, concentric needle examination revealed electrical myotonia combined with myopathic motor unit morphology and early recruitment. These findings suggest that MuSK myasthenia should be included within the differential diagnosis of disorders with electrical myotonia. PMID:26770848

  9. The effect of myotonic dystrophy transcript levels and location on muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastroyiannopoulos, Nikolaos P.; Chrysanthou, Elina; Kyriakides, Tassos C.; Uney, James B.; Mahadevan, Mani S.; Phylactou, Leonidas A.

    2008-12-12

    In myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1), nuclear retention of mutant DMPK transcripts compromises muscle cell differentiation. Although several reports have identified molecular defects in myogenesis, it remains still unclear how exactly the retention of the mutant transcripts induces this defect. We have recently created a novel cellular model in which the mutant DMPK 3' UTR transcripts were released to the cytoplasm of myoblasts by using the WPRE genetic element. As a result, muscle cell differentiation was repaired. In this paper, this cellular model was further exploited to investigate the effect of the levels and location of the mutant transcripts on muscle differentiation. Results show that the levels of these transcripts were proportional to the inhibition of both the initial fusion of myoblasts and the maturity of myotubes. Moreover, the cytoplasmic export of the mutant RNAs to the cytoplasm caused less inhibition only in the initial fusion of myoblasts.

  10. Myotonic dystrophy: genetic, clinical, and molecular analysis of patients from 41 Brazilian families.

    PubMed Central

    Passos-Bueno, M R; Cerqueira, A; Vainzof, M; Marie, S K; Zatz, M

    1995-01-01

    Results of genealogical, DNA, and clinical findings in 41 families with 235 patients affected with myotonic dystrophy (DM) led to the following observations. (1) The relative proportion of affected patients among blacks is apparently lower than among whites or orientals. (2) A significant excess of males was observed. (3) The frequency of DM patients who did not reproduce was similar for males and females; however, female patients had on average 25% fewer children than male patients. (4) There was a significant intergenerational increase in the mean length of the CTG repeat which was also correlated with the severity of the phenotype. (5) No significant difference was observed in the mean size of the CTG repeat in offspring of male as compared to female transmitters. (6) With the exception of the congenital cases of maternal origin, the largest expansions were paternally inherited, but did not lead to congenital DM. Images PMID:7897620

  11. Feasibility of monitoring muscle health in microgravity environments using Myoton technology.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Stefan; Peipsi, Aleko; Stokes, Maria; Knicker, Axel; Abeln, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise is important for people living under extreme environmental conditions to stay healthy. Particularly in space, exercise can partially counteract the loss of muscle mass and muscle strength caused by microgravity. Monitoring the adaptation of the musculoskeletal system to assess muscle quality and devise individual training programmes is highly desirable but is restricted by practical, technical and time constraints on board the International Space Station. This study aimed to test the feasibility of using myometric measurements to monitor the mechanical properties of skeletal muscles and tendons in weightlessness during parabolic flights. The mechanical properties (frequency, decrement, stiffness relaxation time and creep) of the m. gastrocnemius, m. erector spinae and Achilles tendon were assessed using the hand-held MyotonPRO device in 11 healthy participants (aged 47 ± 9 years) in normal gravity as well as in microgravity during two parabolic flight campaigns. Results showed significant (p < .05-.001) changes in all mechanical properties of both muscles and the Achilles tendon, indicating a more relaxed tissue state in microgravity. Recordings from a phantom rubber material with the device in a test rig confirmed that the device itself was not affected by gravity, as changes between gravity conditions that were too small (<1 %) to explain the changes observed in the tissues. It is concluded that myometric measurements are a feasible, easy-to-use and non-invasive approach to monitor muscle health in extreme conditions that prohibit many other methods. Real-time assessment of the quality of a muscle being exposed to the negative effect of microgravity and also the positive effects of muscular training could be achieved using Myoton technology. PMID:25331739

  12. Onset Age of Obesity and Variables of Personality and Biography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Carol

    Three hypotheses derived from Hilde Bruch's formulations regarding onset differences among the obese were tested. In Bruch's theory, adult-onset, or reactive, obesity is a result of psychological trauma; the individual uses eating as a defense against anxiety and depression. Child-onset, or developmental, obesity results from a mixture of…

  13. Computer method for the analysis of evoked motor unit potentials. 2. Duchenne, limb-girdle, facioscapulohumeral and myotonic muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, J P; Hansen, S

    1975-01-01

    Single motor unit potentials recorded from surface electrodes over the extensor digitorum brevis muscle and evoked by stimulation of the anterior tibial nerve at the ankle were obtained by a computer subtraction method. Their latencies, durations, amplitudes, and areas were measured in control subjects and patients with Duchenne, limb-girdle, facioscapulohumeral, and myotonic muscular dystrophy. Lateral popliteal motor nerve conduction velocities were also recorded. In the muscular dystrophies there was a significant increase in both the latencies and durations of motor unit potentials, the latter in notable contrast with the findings of conventional needle electromyography. Fastest motor conduction velocities were significantly reduced in the limb-girdle, facioscapulohumeral, and myotonic muscular dystrophy patients, while the shortest distal motor latencies were significantly prolonged in these patients and those with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The results support the presence of a definitive neurogenic influence in the muscular dystrophies. PMID:1151411

  14. High-fat diet induced adiposity and insulin resistance in mice lacking the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Llagostera, Esther; Carmona, Mari Carmen; Vicente, Meritxell; Escorihuela, Rosa María; Kaliman, Perla

    2009-06-18

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (MD1) is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3'-unstranslated region of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) gene. MD1 patients frequently present insulin resistance and increased visceral adiposity. We examined whether DMPK deficiency is a genetic risk factor for high-fat diet-induced adiposity and insulin resistance using the DMPK knockout mouse model. We found that high-fat fed DMPK knockout mice had significantly increased body weights, hypertrophic adipocytes and whole-body insulin resistance compared with wild-type mice. This nutrient-genome interaction should be considered by physicians given the cardiometabolic risks and sedentary lifestyle associated with MD1 patients. PMID:19482024

  15. Effects of priming exercise on the speed of adjustment of muscle oxidative metabolism at the onset of moderate-intensity step transitions in older adults.

    PubMed

    De Roia, Gabriela; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Adami, Alessandra; Papadopoulou, Christina; Capelli, Carlo

    2012-05-15

    Aging is associated with a functional decline of the oxidative metabolism due to progressive limitations of both O(2) delivery and utilization. Priming exercise (PE) increases the speed of adjustment of oxidative metabolism during successive moderate-intensity transitions. We tested the hypothesis that such improvement is due to a better matching of O(2) delivery to utilization within the working muscles. In 21 healthy older adults (65.7 ± 5 yr), we measured contemporaneously noninvasive indexes of the overall speed of adjustment of the oxidative metabolism (i.e., pulmonary Vo(2) kinetics), of the bulk O(2) delivery (i.e., cardiac output), and of the rate of muscle deoxygenation (i.e., deoxygenated hemoglobin, HHb) during moderate-intensity step transitions, either with (ModB) or without (ModA) prior PE. The local matching of O(2) delivery to utilization was evaluated by the ΔHHb/ΔVo(2) ratio index. The overall speed of adjustment of the Vo(2) kinetics was significantly increased in ModB compared with ModA (P < 0.05). On the contrary, the kinetics of cardiac output was unaffected by PE. At the muscle level, ModB was associated with a significant reduction of the "overshoot" in the ΔHHb/ΔVo(2) ratio compared with ModA (P < 0.05), suggesting an improved O(2) delivery. Our data are compatible with the hypothesis that, in older adults, PE, prior to moderate-intensity exercise, beneficially affects the speed of adjustment of oxidative metabolism due to an acute improvement of the local matching of O(2) delivery to utilization. PMID:22422668

  16. No Effect of the 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 on β-Cell Residual Function and Insulin Requirement in Adults With New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Markus; Kaupper, Thomas; Adler, Kerstin; Foersch, Johannes; Bonifacio, Ezio; Ziegler, Anette-G.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether daily intake of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] is safe and improves β-cell function in patients with recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Safety was assessed in an open study of 25 patients aged 18–39 years with recent-onset type 1 diabetes who received 0.25 μg 1,25(OH)2D3 daily for 9 months. An additional 40 patients were randomly assigned to 0.25 μg 1,25(OH)2D3 or placebo daily for 9 months and followed for a total of 18 months for safety, β-cell function, insulin requirement, and glycemic control. RESULTS Safety assessment showed values in the normal range in nearly all patients, regardless of whether they received 1,25(OH)2D3 or placebo. No differences in AUC C-peptide, peak C-peptide, and fasting C-peptide after a mixed-meal tolerance test between the treatment and placebo groups were observed at 9 and 18 months after study entry, with ∼40% loss for each parameter over the 18-month period. A1C and daily insulin requirement were similar between treatment and placebo groups throughout the study follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 at a daily dose of 0.25 μg was safe but did not reduce loss of β-cell function. PMID:20357369

  17. Gastrobronchial fistula following minimally invasive esophagectomy for esophageal cancer in a patient with myotonic dystrophy: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Hugin, Silje; Johnson, Egil; Johannessen, Hans-Olaf; Hofstad, Bjørn; Olafsen, Kjell; Mellem, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Myotonic dystrophies are inherited multisystemic diseases characterized by musculopathy, cardiac arrythmias and cognitive disorders. These patients are at increased risk for fatal post-surgical complications from pulmonary hypoventilation. We present a case with myotonic dystrophy and esophageal cancer who had a minimally invasive esophagectomy complicated with gastrobronchial fistulisation. Presentation of case A 44-year-old male with myotonic dystrophy type 1 and esophageal cancer had a minimally invasive esophagectomy performed instead of open surgery in order to reduce the risk for pulmonary complications. At day 15 respiratory failure occurred from a gastrobronchial fistula between the right intermediary bronchus (defect 7–8 mm) and the esophagogastric anastomosis (defect 10 mm). In order to minimize large leakage of air into the gastric conduit the anastomosis was stented and ventilation maintained at low airway pressures. His general condition improved and allowed extubation at day 29 and stent removal at day 35. Bronchoscopy confirmed that the fistula was healed. The patient was discharged from hospital at day 37 without further complications. Discussion The fistula was probably caused by bronchial necrosis from thermal injury during close dissection using the Ligasure instrument. Fistula treatment by non-surgical intervention was considered safer than surgery which could be followed by potentially life-threatening respiratory complications. Indications for stenting of gastrobronchial fistulas will be discussed. Conclusions Minimally invasive esophagectomy was performed instead of open surgery in a myotonic dystrophy patient as these patients are particularly vulnerable to respiratory complications. Gastrobronchial fistula, a major complication, was safely treated by stenting and low airway pressure ventilation. PMID:26520033

  18. Natural history of adult-onset Ménétrier's disease: Report of a case with 9-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    XIONG, LI-SHOU; GONG, YING-YING

    2016-01-01

    Ménétrier's disease (MD) is a rare disease characterized by markedly hypertrophied gastric mucosal folds typically associated with hypoalbuminemia and anemia. However, the natural history of MD in adults remains unclear and is rarely reported in the literature. The current study presents a case of MD with a 9-year follow-up. A 56-year-old man was diagnosed with MD in 2005. The patient was followed up and underwent surveillance endoscopy once or twice each year. In the present case, the anemia and hypoproteinemia were eliminated following red blood cell transfusion and intravenous iron therapies. The symptoms were relieved after 4 years. Treatment with octreotide had little effect on the gastric mucosa, while antimicrobial combination therapy provided no benefit in the present H. pylori-negative case of MD. In addition, despite abnormalities of the gastric mucosa in the patient persisting after 9 years of follow-up with no evidence of malignancy, malignant transformation in MD should not be overlooked, and regular monitoring of the gastric mucosa via endoscopy is necessary. PMID:27284333

  19. Kidney-specific inactivation of the Pkd1 gene induces rapid cyst formation in developing kidneys and a slow onset of disease in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Lantinga-van Leeuwen, Irma S; Leonhard, Wouter N; van der Wal, Annemieke; Breuning, Martijn H; de Heer, Emile; Peters, Dorien J M

    2007-12-15

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, caused by mutations in the PKD1 gene, is characterized by progressive deterioration of kidney function due to the formation of thousands of cysts leading to kidney failure in mid-life or later. How cysts develop and grow is currently unknown, although extensive research revealed a plethora of cellular changes in cyst lining cells. We have constructed a tamoxifen-inducible, kidney epithelium-specific Pkd1-deletion mouse model. Upon administration of tamoxifen to these mice, a genomic fragment containing exons 2-11 of the Pkd1-gene is specifically deleted in the kidneys and cysts are formed. Interestingly, the timing of Pkd1-deletion has strong effects on the phenotype. At 1 month upon gene disruption, adult mice develop only a very mild cystic phenotype showing some small cysts and dilated tubules. Young mice, however, show massive cyst formation. In these mice, at the moment of gene disruption, cell proliferation takes place to elongate the nephron. Our data indicate that Pkd1 gene deficiency does not initiate sufficient autonomous cell proliferation leading to cyst formation and that additional stimuli are required. Furthermore, we show that one germ-line mutation of Pkd1 is already associated with increased proliferation. PMID:17932118

  20. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 Are Associated with Adult-Onset Immunodeficiency with Acquired Anti-Interferon-Gamma Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pithukpakorn, Manop; Roothumnong, Ekkapong; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Luangwedchakarn, Voravich; Umrod, Pinklow; Thongnoppakhun, Wanna; Foongladda, Suporn; Suputtamongkol, Yupin

    2015-01-01

    Recently a newly identified clinical syndrome of disseminated non-tuberculous mycobacterial diseases (with or without other opportunistic infections in adult patients who were previously healthy, has been recognized in association with an acquired autoantibody to interferon-gamma. This syndrome is emerging as an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially among people of Asian descent. Trigger for the production of this autoantibody remains unknown, but genetic factors are strongly suspected to be involved. We compared HLA genotyping between 32 patients with this clinical syndrome, and 38 controls. We found that this clinical syndrome was associated with very limited allele polymorphism, with HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 alleles, especially HLA-DRB1*15:01, DRB1*16:02, DQB1*05:01 and DQB1*05:02. Odds ratio of DRB1*15:01, DRB1*16:02, DQB1*05:01 and DQB1*05:02 were 7.03 (95% CI, 2.18–22.69, P<0.0001, 9.06 (95% CI, 2.79–29.46, P<0.0001), 6.68 (95% CI, 2.29–19.52, P = 0.0004), and 6.64 (95% CI, 2.30–19.20, P = 0.0004), respectively. Further investigation is warranted to provide better understanding on pathogenesis of this association. PMID:26011559

  1. FE65 and FE65L1 amyloid precursor protein-binding protein compound null mice display adult-onset cataract and muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jaehong; Moncaster, Juliet A; Wang, Lirong; Hafeez, Imran; Herz, Joachim; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Goldstein, Lee E; Guénette, Suzanne Y

    2015-06-01

    FE65 and FE65L1 are cytoplasmic adaptor proteins that bind a variety of proteins, including the amyloid precursor protein, and that mediate the assembly of multimolecular complexes. We previously reported that FE65/FE65L1 double knockout (DKO) mice display disorganized laminin in meningeal fibroblasts and a cobblestone lissencephaly-like phenotype in the developing cortex. Here, we examined whether loss of FE65 and FE65L1 causes ocular and muscular deficits, 2 phenotypes that frequently accompany cobblestone lissencephaly. Eyes of FE65/FE65L1 DKO mice develop normally, but lens degeneration becomes apparent in young adult mice. Abnormal lens epithelial cell migration, widespread small vacuole formation, and increased laminin expression underneath lens capsules suggest impaired interaction between epithelial cells and capsular extracellular matrix in DKO lenses. Cortical cataracts develop in FE65L1 knockout (KO) mice aged 16 months or more but are absent in wild-type or FE65 KO mice. FE65 family KO mice show attenuated grip strength, and the nuclei of DKO muscle cells frequently locate in the middle of muscle fibers. These findings reveal that FE65 and FE65L1 are essential for the maintenance of lens transparency, and their loss produce phenotypes in brain, eye, and muscle that are comparable to the clinical features of congenital muscular dystrophies in humans. PMID:25757569

  2. Childhood Onset Schizophrenia: Clinical Features, Course and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sood, Mamta; Kattimani, Shivanand

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia in children is diagnosed by using adult criteria. Based on the age of onset, patients with childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) are subdivided into those with very early onset (before age 12-14 years) and those with early onset (between 14-17 years). The prevalence of COS is reported to be 1 in 10,000 before the age of 12 years;…

  3. The p.Ala510Val mutation in the SPG7 (paraplegin) gene is the most common mutation causing adult onset neurogenetic disease in patients of British ancestry.

    PubMed

    Roxburgh, Richard H; Marquis-Nicholson, Renate; Ashton, Fern; George, Alice M; Lea, Rod A; Eccles, David; Mossman, Stuart; Bird, Thomas; van Gassen, Koen L; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Love, Donald R

    2013-05-01

    The c.1529C >T change in the SPG7 gene, encoding the mutant p.Ala510Val paraplegin protein, was first described as a polymorphism in 1998. This was based on its frequency of 3 % and 4 % in two separate surveys of controls in the United Kingdom (UK) population. Subsequently, it has been found to co-segregate with disease in a number of different populations. Yeast expression studies support its having a deleterious effect. In this paper a consanguineous sibship is described in which four members who are homozygous for the p.Ala510Val variant present with a spectrum of disease. This spectrum encompasses moderately severe hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) with more minor ataxia in two siblings, moderately severe ataxia without spasticity in the third, and a very mild gait ataxia in the fourth. Two of the siblings also manifest vestibular failure. The remaining eight unaffected siblings are either heterozygous for the p.Ala510Val variant, or do not carry it at all. Homozygosity mapping using a high-density SNP array across the whole genome found just 11 genes (on two regions of chromosome 3) outside the SPG7 region on chromosome 16, which were homozygously shared by the affected siblings, but not shared by the unaffected siblings; none of them are likely to be causative. The weight of evidence is strongly in favour of the p.Ala510Val variant being a disease-causing mutation. We present additional data from the Auckland City Hospital neurogenetics clinic to show that the p.Ala510Val mutation is prevalent amongst HSP patients of UK extraction belying any suggestion that European p.Ala510Val haplotypes harbour a disease-causing mutation which the UK p.Ala510Val haplotypes do not. Taken together with previous findings of a carrier frequency of 3-4 % in the UK population (giving a homozygosity rate of 20-40/100,000), the data imply that the p.Ala510Val is the most common mutation causing neurogenetic disease in adults of UK ancestry, albeit the penetrance may be low or

  4. Early-Onset Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Early-Onset Alzheimer’s What is early-onset Alzheimer’s disease? Early-onset Alzheimer’s disease is when Alzheimer’s affects a person younger than 65 years of age. People ...

  5. Diagnosing young onset dementia can be challenging.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Samrah; Baker, Ian; Butler, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Although the risk of developing dementia increases with age, onset can be as early as the third or fourth decade of life. Genetic influences play a more important role in younger than in older people with dementia, so young onset dementia may cluster in families. Diagnosing young onset dementia is challenging. The range of possible presenting features is broad, encompassing behavioural, cognitive, psychiatric and neurological domains, and symptoms are often subtle initially. Frequently the complaints are misattributed to stress or depression, and the patient is falsely reassured that they are too young to have dementia. The most common causes of young onset dementia are early onset forms of adult neurodegenerative conditions and alcohol. Vascular dementia is the second most common cause of young onset dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Conventional vascular risk factors may be absent and diagnosis relies on imaging evidence of cerebrovascular disease. Obtaining a detailed history remains the most important part of the workup and usually requires corroboration by a third party. Undertaking a basic neurological examination is also important. Those with suspected young onset dementia should be referred to a neurology-led cognitive disorders clinic where available as the differenti diagnosis is considerably broader tha in older adults and requires specialist investigation. PMID:27382914

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans dnj-14, the orthologue of the DNAJC5 gene mutated in adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, provides a new platform for neuroprotective drug screening and identifies a SIR-2.1-independent action of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Sudhanva S; Johnson, James R; McCue, Hannah V; Chen, Xi; Edmonds, Matthew J; Ayala, Mimieveshiofuo; Graham, Margaret E; Jenn, Robert C; Barclay, Jeff W; Burgoyne, Robert D; Morgan, Alan

    2014-11-15

    Adult onset neuronal lipofuscinosis (ANCL) is a human neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunction and premature death. Recently, the mutations that cause ANCL were mapped to the DNAJC5 gene, which encodes cysteine string protein alpha. We show here that mutating dnj-14, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of DNAJC5, results in shortened lifespan and a small impairment of locomotion and neurotransmission. Mutant dnj-14 worms also exhibited age-dependent neurodegeneration of sensory neurons, which was preceded by severe progressive chemosensory defects. A focussed chemical screen revealed that resveratrol could ameliorate dnj-14 mutant phenotypes, an effect mimicked by the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, rolipram. In contrast to other worm neurodegeneration models, activation of the Sirtuin, SIR-2.1, was not required, as sir-2.1; dnj-14 double mutants showed full lifespan rescue by resveratrol. The Sirtuin-independent neuroprotective action of resveratrol revealed here suggests potential therapeutic applications for ANCL and possibly other human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24947438

  7. Mutations in the VMD2 gene are associated with juvenile-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease) and adult vitelliform macular dystrophy but not age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Krämer, F; White, K; Pauleikhoff, D; Gehrig, A; Passmore, L; Rivera, A; Rudolph, G; Kellner, U; Andrassi, M; Lorenz, B; Rohrschneider, K; Blankenagel, A; Jurklies, B; Schilling, H; Schütt, F; Holz, F G; Weber, B H

    2000-04-01

    Recently, the VMD2 gene has been identified as the causative gene in juvenile-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease), a central retinopathy primarily characterised by an impaired function of the retinal pigment epithelium. In this study we have further characterised the spectrum of VMD2 mutations in a series of 41 unrelated Best disease patients. Furthermore we expanded our analysis to include 32 unrelated patients with adult vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD) and 200 patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Both AVMD and AMD share some phenotypic features with Best disease such as abnormal subretinal accumulation of lipofuscin material, progressive geographic atrophy and choroidal neovascularisation, and may be the consequence of a common pathogenic mechanism. In total, we have identified 23 distinct disease-associated mutations in Best disease and four different mutations in AVMD. Two of the mutations found in the AVMD patients were also seen in Best disease suggesting a considerable overlap in the aetiology of these two disorders. There were no mutations found in the AMD group. In addition, four frequent intragenic polymorphisms did not reveal allelic association of the VMD2 locus with AMD. These data exclude a direct role of VMD2 in the predisposition to AMD. PMID:10854112

  8. The myotonic dystrophy kinase 3{prime}-untranslated region and its effect on gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, C.W.Y.; Sabourin, L.A.; Narang, M.A.

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disease involving the expansion of an unstable CTG repeat in the 3{prime}-untranslated (3{prime}-UTR) region of the DM kinase (DMK) gene. Increased levels of mRNA in congenital compared to normal tissue have been shown, suggesting elevated DMK levels may be responsible for the disease phenotype. To study the effect of the DMK 3{prime}UTR on gene expression, a reporter gene system was constructed using the constitutive CMV promoter with the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) open reading frame and the DMK 3{prime}UTR containing from 5 repeats up to 90 repeats. Transient transfection into a rhabdomyosarcoma cell line shows a three-fold increase in CAT activity from constructs containing a wildtype 3{prime}UTR (5 and 20 repeats) compared to a control construct containing only a poly(A) signal. Reporter constructs with repeats in the protomutation (50 repeats) and mutation (90 repeats) range show a greater than 10-fold increase over control CAT activity. These results suggest the presence of elements in the DMK 3{prime}UTR capable of conferring increased gene expression. We are currently investigating cell-specific activity of the constructs and conducting deletion mapping to identify regulatory elements in the 3{prime}-UTR.

  9. Cell Membrane Integrity in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1: Implications for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    González-Barriga, Anchel; Kranzen, Julia; Croes, Huib J. E.; Bijl, Suzanne; van den Broek, Walther J. A. A.; van Kessel, Ingeborg D. G.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.; van Deutekom, Judith C. T.; Wieringa, Bé; Mulders, Susan A. M.; Wansink, Derick G.

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystemic disease caused by toxic RNA from a DMPK gene carrying an expanded (CTG•CAG)n repeat. Promising strategies for treatment of DM1 patients are currently being tested. These include antisense oligonucleotides and drugs for elimination of expanded RNA or prevention of aberrant binding to RNP proteins. A significant hurdle for preclinical development along these lines is efficient systemic delivery of compounds across endothelial and target cell membranes. It has been reported that DM1 patients show elevated levels of markers of muscle damage or loss of sarcolemmal integrity in their serum and that splicing of dystrophin, an essential protein for muscle membrane structure, is abnormal. Therefore, we studied cell membrane integrity in DM1 mouse models commonly used for preclinical testing. We found that membranes in skeletal muscle, heart and brain were impermeable to Evans Blue Dye. Creatine kinase levels in serum were similar to those in wild type mice and expression of dystrophin protein was unaffected. Also in patient muscle biopsies cell surface expression of dystrophin was normal and calcium-positive fibers, indicating elevated intracellular calcium levels, were only rarely seen. Combined, our findings indicate that cells in DM1 tissues do not display compromised membrane integrity. Hence, the cell membrane is a barrier that must be overcome in future work towards effective drug delivery in DM1 therapy. PMID:25799359

  10. Actinomycin D Specifically Reduces Expanded CUG Repeat RNA in Myotonic Dystrophy Models

    PubMed Central

    Siboni, Ruth B.; Nakamori, Masayuki; Wagner, Stacey D.; Struck, Adam J.; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Harriott, Shanee A.; Cass, Daniel M.; Tanner, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an inherited disease characterized by the inability to relax contracted muscles. Affected individuals carry large CTG expansions that are toxic when transcribed. One possible treatment approach is to reduce or eliminate transcription of CTG repeats. Actinomycin D (ActD) is a potent transcription inhibitor and FDA-approved chemotherapeutic that binds GC-rich DNA with high affinity. Here, we report that ActD decreased CUG transcript levels in a dose-dependent manner in DM1 cell and mouse models at significantly lower concentrations (nanomolar) compared to its use as a general transcription inhibitor or chemotherapeutic. ActD also significantly reversed DM1-associated splicing defects in a DM1 mouse model, and did so within the currently approved human treatment range. RNA-seq analyses showed that low concentrations of ActD did not globally inhibit transcription in a DM1 mouse model. These results indicate that transcription inhibition of CTG expansions is a promising treatment approach for DM1. PMID:26686629

  11. Staufen1 impairs stress granule formation in skeletal muscle cells from myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ravel-Chapuis, Aymeric; Klein Gunnewiek, Amanda; Bélanger, Guy; Crawford Parks, Tara E.; Côté, Jocelyn; Jasmin, Bernard J.

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is caused by an expansion of CUG repeats (CUGexp) in the DMPK mRNA 3′UTR. CUGexp-containing mRNAs become toxic to cells by misregulating RNA-binding proteins. Here we investigated the consequence of this RNA toxicity on the cellular stress response. We report that cell stress efficiently triggers formation of stress granules (SGs) in proliferating, quiescent, and differentiated muscle cells, as shown by the appearance of distinct cytoplasmic TIA-1– and DDX3-containing foci. We show that Staufen1 is also dynamically recruited into these granules. Moreover, we discovered that DM1 myoblasts fail to properly form SGs in response to arsenite. This blockage was not observed in DM1 fibroblasts, demonstrating a cell type–specific defect. DM1 myoblasts display increased expression and sequestration of toxic CUGexp mRNAs compared with fibroblasts. Of importance, down-regulation of Staufen1 in DM1 myoblasts rescues SG formation. Together our data show that Staufen1 participates in the inhibition of SG formation in DM1 myoblasts. These results reveal that DM1 muscle cells fail to properly respond to stress, thereby likely contributing to the complex pathogenesis of DM1. PMID:27030674

  12. How genetics affects the brain to produce higher-level dysfunctions in myotonic dystrophy type 1

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Laura; Petrucci, Antonio; Spanò, Barbara; Torso, Mario; Olivito, Giusy; Lispi, Ludovico; Costanzi-Porrini, Sandro; Giulietti, Giovanni; Koch, Giacomo; Giacanelli, Manlio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Cercignani, Mara; Bozzali, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystemic disorder dominated by muscular impairment and brain dysfunctions. Although brain damage has previously been demonstrated in DM1, its associations with the genetics and clinical/neuropsychological features of the disease are controversial. This study assessed the differential role of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) damage in determining higher-level dysfunctions in DM1. Ten patients with genetically confirmed DM1 and 16 healthy matched controls entered the study. The patients underwent a neuropsychological assessment and quantification of CTG triplet expansion. All the subjects underwent MR scanning at 3T, with studies including T1-weighted volumes and diffusion-weighted images. Voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistics were used for unbiased quantification of regional GM atrophy and WM integrity. The DM1 patients showed widespread involvement of both tissues. The extent of the damage correlated with CTG triplet expansion and cognition. This study supports the idea that genetic abnormalities in DM1 mainly target the WM, but GM involvement is also crucial in determining the clinical characteristics of DM1. PMID:26214024

  13. Segregation distortion of the CTG repeats at the myotonic dystrophy locus.

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, R.; Stivers, D. N.; Deka, R.; Yu, L. M.; Shriver, M. D.; Ferrell, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disease, is caused by a CTG-repeat expansion, with affected individuals having > or = 50 repeats of this trinucleotide, at the DMPK locus of human chromosome 19q13.3. Severely affected individuals die early in life; the milder form of this disease reduces reproductive ability. Alleles in the normal range of CTG repeats are not as unstable as the (CTG)(> or = 50) alleles. In the DM families, anticipation and parental bias of allelic expansions have been noted. However, data on mechanism of maintenance of DM in populations are conflicting. We present a maximum-likelihood model for examining segregation distortion of CTG-repeat alleles in normal families. Analyzing 726 meiotic events in 95 nuclear families from the CEPH panel pedigrees, we find evidence of preferential transmission of larger alleles (of size < or = 29 repeats) from females (the probability of transmission of larger alleles is .565 +/- 0.03, different from .5 at P approximately equal .028). There is no evidence of segregation distortion during male meiosis. We propose a hypothesis that preferential transmission of larger CTG-repeat alleles during female meiosis can compensate for mutational contraction of repeats within the normal allelic size range, and reduced viability and fertility of affected individuals. Thus, the pool of premutant alleles at the DM locus can be maintained in populations, which can subsequently mutate to the full mutation status to give rise to DM. PMID:8659513

  14. Founder effect and prevalence of myotonic dystrophy in South Africans: molecular studies.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, A.; Krause, A.; Ramsay, M.; Jenkins, T.

    1996-01-01

    A high prevalence of myotonic dystrophy (DM) has been described in South African Caucasoid Afrikaans-speaking families in the northern Transvaal. Evidence is presented for a strong founder effect, with a single haplotype occurring on 68% of all Caucasoid DM chromosomes; among the Afrikaans speakers, the proportion was 83%. In addition to this major haplotype, five minor DM haplotypes in the Caucasoids and two minor haplotypes in DM individuals of mixed ancestry were found. All DM chromosomes, however, had a common haplotype core, namely, Alu (ins), HinfI-2 (intron 9), and TaqI-2 (D19S463). We have detected significant linkage disequilibrium between the DM mutation and particular alleles of the extragenic markers D19S112 and D19S207. Significant differences were found in allele and haplotype distributions in the Caucasoid DM and non-DM chromosomes and Negroid non-DM chromosomes. These findings together with the strong association of allele 3 at the D19S63 locus on 93% (14/15) of the South African DM chromosomes suggest that the majority of present-day DM mutations in South African Caucasoids may have originated from a common initial founder who introduced one of the European ancestral mutations. PMID:8755933

  15. Contribution of molecular analyses to the estimation of the risk of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, A M; Poza, J J; Martorell, L; López de Munain, A; Emparanza, J I; Baiget, M

    1995-01-01

    A molecular analysis of the maternal and child CTG repeat size and intergenerational amplification was performed in order to estimate the risk of having a child with congenital myotonic dystrophy (CMD). In a study of 124 affected mother-child pairs (42 mother-CMD and 82 mother-non-CMD) the mean maternal CTG allele in CMD cases was three times higher (700 repeats) than in non-CMD cases (236 repeats). When the maternal allele was in the 50-300 repeats range, 90% of children were non-CMD. In contrast, when the maternal allele was greater than 300 repeats, 59% inherited the congenital form. Furthermore, the risk of having a CMD child is also related to the intergenerational amplification, which was significantly greater in the mother-CMD pairs than in the mother-non-CMD pairs. Although the risk of giving birth to a CMD child always exists for affected mothers, our data show that such a risk is considerably higher if the maternal allele is greater than 300 repeats. Images PMID:7760317

  16. Influence of the sex of the transmitting grandparent in congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    López de Munain, A; Cobo, A M; Poza, J J; Navarrete, D; Martorell, L; Palau, F; Emparanza, J I; Baiget, M

    1995-01-01

    To analyse the influence of the sex of the transmitting grandparents on the occurrence of the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy (CDM), we have studied complete three generation pedigrees of 49 CDM cases, analysing: (1) the sex distribution in the grandparents' generation, and (2) the intergenerational amplification of the CTG repeat, measured in its absolute and relative values, between grandparents and the mothers of CDM patients and between the latter and their CDM children. The mean relative intergenerational increase in the 32 grandparent-mother pairs was significantly greater than in the 56 mother-CDM pairs (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.001). The mean expansion of the grandfathers (103 CTG repeats) was also significantly different from that seen in the grandmothers' group (154 CTG repeats) (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.01). This excess of non-manifesting males between the CDM grandparents' generation with a smaller CTG length than the grandmothers could suggest that the premutation has to be transmitted by a male to reach the degree of instability responsible for subsequent intergenerational CTG expansions without size constraints characteristic of the CDM range. PMID:8544186

  17. Direct molecular analysis of myotonic dystrophy in the German population: important considerations in genetic counselling.

    PubMed Central

    Meiner, A; Wolf, C; Carey, N; Okitsu, A; Johnson, K; Shelbourne, P; Kunath, B; Sauermann, W; Thiele, H; Kupferling, P

    1995-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is associated with the expansion and instability of a trinucleotide (CTG) repeat at the DM locus on chromosome 19. Direct genomic analysis in the German population was carried out on 18 DM families, six families with equivocal diagnosis, 69 subjects with equivocal clinical diagnosis, and 100 controls using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a refined Southern protocol. In the majority of the cases molecular analysis confirmed the clinical diagnosis. These included seven cases of congenital DM (CDM) with widely differing gene expansions and instabilities. In most DM families the expanded fragment became larger in successive generations, but we also identified four families with contractions and two families that showed stability of the enlarged fragment during transmission. In four clinically defined DM patients we were unable to detect enlarged CTG repeats. Sequencing of each exon of the DM gene in two of these patients failed to show any mutations. Our cases have important implications for genetic counselling of DM families, highlighting both the diagnostic value of direct genomic analysis and its limitations. PMID:7473660

  18. Detection of linkage disequilibrium between the myotonic dystrophy locus and a new polymorphic DNA marker.

    PubMed Central

    Harley, H G; Brook, J D; Floyd, J; Rundle, S A; Crow, S; Walsh, K V; Thibault, M C; Harper, P S; Shaw, D J

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the linkage of two new polymorphic DNA markers (D19S62 and D19S63) and a previously unreported polymorphism with an existing DNA marker (ERCC1) to the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus. In addition, we have used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to obtain a fine-structure map of this region. The detection of linkage disequilibrium between DM and one of these markers (D19S63) is the first demonstration of this phenomenon in a heterogeneous DM population. The results suggest that at least 58% of DM patients in the British population, as well as those in a French-Canadian subpopulation, are descended from the same ancestral DM mutation. We discuss the implications of this finding in terms of strategies for cloning the DM gene, for a possible role in modification of risk for prenatal and presymptomatic testing, and we speculate on the origin and number of existing mutations which may result in a DM phenotype. PMID:2063878

  19. Overweight Is an Independent Risk Factor for Reduced Lung Volumes in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Seijger, Charlotte G. W.; Drost, Gea; Posma, Joram M.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.; Heijdra, Yvonne F.

    2016-01-01

    Background In this large observational study population of 105 myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients, we investigate whether bodyweight is a contributor of total lung capacity (TLC) independent of the impaired inspiratory muscle strength. Methods Body composition was assessed using the combination of body mass index (BMI) and fat-free mass index. Pulmonary function tests and respiratory muscle strength measurements were performed on the same day. Patients were stratified into normal (BMI < 25 kg/m2) and overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) groups. Multiple linear regression was used to find significant contributors for TLC. Results Overweight was present in 59% of patients, and body composition was abnormal in almost all patients. In overweight patients, TLC was significantly (p = 2.40×10−3) decreased, compared with normal-weight patients, while inspiratory muscle strength was similar in both groups. The decrease in TLC in overweight patients was mainly due to a decrease in expiratory reserve volume (ERV) further illustrated by a highly significant (p = 1.33×10−10) correlation between BMI and ERV. Multiple linear regression showed that TLC can be predicted using only BMI and the forced inspiratory volume in 1 second, as these were the only significant contributors. Conclusions This study shows that, in DM1 patients, overweight further reduces lung volumes, as does impaired inspiratory muscle strength. Additionally, body composition is abnormal in almost all DM1 patients. PMID:27015655

  20. Rational design of bioactive, modularly assembled aminoglycosides targeting the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Parkesh, Raman; Nakamori, Masayuki; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2012-12-21

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused when an expanded r(CUG) repeat (r(CUG)(exp)) binds the RNA splicing regulator muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1) as well as other proteins. Previously, we reported that modularly assembled small molecules displaying a 6'-N-5-hexynoate kanamycin A RNA-binding module (K) on a peptoid backbone potently inhibit the binding of MBNL1 to r(CUG)(exp). However, these parent compounds are not appreciably active in cell-based models of DM1. The lack of potency was traced to suboptimal cellular permeability and localization. To improve these properties, second-generation compounds that are conjugated to a d-Arg(9) molecular transporter were synthesized. These modified compounds enter cells in higher concentrations than the parent compounds and are efficacious in cell-based DM1 model systems at low micromolar concentrations. In particular, they improve three defects that are the hallmarks of DM1: a translational defect due to nuclear retention of transcripts containing r(CUG)(exp); pre-mRNA splicing defects due to inactivation of MBNL1; and the formation of nuclear foci. The best compound in cell-based studies was tested in a mouse model of DM1. Modest improvement of pre-mRNA splicing defects was observed. These studies suggest that a modular assembly approach can afford bioactive compounds that target RNA. PMID:23130637

  1. Structure of the myotonic dystrophy type 2 RNA and designed small molecules that reduce toxicity.

    PubMed

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Lohman, Jeremy R; Guan, Lirui; Tran, Tuan; Sarkar, Partha; Schatz, George C; Disney, Matthew D

    2014-02-21

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is an incurable neuromuscular disorder caused by a r(CCUG) expansion (r(CCUG)(exp)) that folds into an extended hairpin with periodically repeating 2×2 nucleotide internal loops (5'CCUG/3'GUCC). We designed multivalent compounds that improve DM2-associated defects using information about RNA-small molecule interactions. We also report the first crystal structure of r(CCUG) repeats refined to 2.35 Å. Structural analysis of the three 5'CCUG/3'GUCC repeat internal loops (L) reveals that the CU pairs in L1 are each stabilized by one hydrogen bond and a water-mediated hydrogen bond, while CU pairs in L2 and L3 are stabilized by two hydrogen bonds. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal that the CU pairs are dynamic and stabilized by Na(+) and water molecules. MD simulations of the binding of the small molecule to r(CCUG) repeats reveal that the lowest free energy binding mode occurs via the major groove, in which one C residue is unstacked and the cross-strand nucleotides are displaced. Moreover, we modeled the binding of our dimeric compound to two 5'CCUG/3'GUCC motifs, which shows that the scaffold on which the RNA-binding modules are displayed provides an optimal distance to span two adjacent loops. PMID:24341895

  2. Rational Design of Bioactive, Modularly Assembled Aminoglycosides Targeting the RNA that Causes Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Parkesh, Raman; Nakamori, Masayuki; Thornton, Charles A.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused when an expanded r(CUG) repeat (r(CUG)exp) binds the RNA splicing regulator muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1) as well as other proteins. Previously, we reported that modularly assembled small molecules displaying a 6′-N-5-hexynoate kanamycin A RNA-binding module (K) on a peptoid backbone potently inhibit the binding of MBNL1 to r(CUG)exp. However, these parent compounds are not appreciably active in cell-based models of DM1. The lack of potency was traced to suboptimal cellular permeability and localization. To improve these properties, second-generation compounds that are conjugated to a D-Arg9 molecular transporter were synthesized. These modified compounds enter cells in higher concentrations than the parent compounds and are efficacious in cell-based DM1 model systems at low micromolar concentrations. In particular, they improve three defects that are the hallmarks of DM1: a translational defect due to nuclear retention of transcripts containing r(CUG)exp; pre-mRNA splicing defects due to inactivation of MBNL1; and the formation of nuclear foci. The best compound in cell-based studies was tested in a mouse model of DM1. Modest improvement of pre-mRNA splicing defects was observed. These studies suggest that a modular assembly approach can afford bioactive compounds that target RNA. PMID:23130637

  3. Structure of the Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2 RNA and Designed Small Molecules That Reduce Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Park, HaJeung; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Guan, Lirui; Tran, Tuan; Sarkar, Partha; Schatz, George C.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is an untreatable neuromuscular disorder caused by a r(CCUG) expansion (r(CCUG)exp) that folds into an extended hairpin with periodically repeating 2×2 nucleotide internal loops (5’CCUG/3’GUCC). We designed multivalent compounds that improve DM2-associated defects using information about RNA-small molecule interactions. We also report the first crystal structure of r(CCUG)exp refined to 2.35 Å. Structural analysis of the three 5’CCUG/3’GUCC repeat internal loops (L) reveals that the CU pairs in L1 are each stabilized by one hydrogen bond and a water-mediated hydrogen bond while CU pairs in L2 and L3 are stabilized by two hydrogen bonds. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal that the CU pairs are dynamic and stabilized by Na+ and water molecules. MD simulations of the binding of the small molecule to r(CCUG) repeats reveal that the lowest free energy binding mode occurs via the major groove, in which one C residue is unstacked and the cross-strand nucleotides are displaced. Moreover, we modeled the binding of our dimeric compound to two 5’CCUG/3’GUCC motifs, which shows that the scaffold on which the RNA-binding modules are displayed provides an optimal distance to span two adjacent loops. PMID:24341895

  4. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase phosphorylates phospholamban and regulates calcium uptake in cardiomyocyte sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, Perla; Catalucci, Daniele; Lam, Jason T; Kondo, Richard; Gutiérrez, José Carlos Paz; Reddy, Sita; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; Chien, Kenneth R; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2005-03-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3'-untranslated region of a protein kinase gene (DMPK). Cardiovascular disease is one of the most prevalent causes of death in DM patients. Electrophysiological studies in cardiac muscles from DM patients and from DMPK(-/-) mice suggested that DMPK is critical to the modulation of cardiac contractility and to the maintenance of proper cardiac conduction activity. However, there are no data regarding the molecular signaling pathways involved in DM heart failure. Here we show that DMPK expression in cardiac myocytes is highly enriched in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) where it colocalizes with the ryanodine receptor and phospholamban (PLN), a muscle-specific SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a) inhibitor. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that DMPK and PLN can physically associate. Furthermore, purified wild-type DMPK, but not a kinase-deficient mutant (K110A DMPK), phosphorylates PLN in vitro. Subsequent studies using the DMPK(-/-) mice demonstrated that PLN is hypo-phosphorylated in SR vesicles from DMPK(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that Ca(2+) uptake in SR is impaired in ventricular homogenates from DMPK(-/-) mice. Together, our data suggest the existence of a novel regulatory DMPK pathway for cardiac contractility and provide a molecular mechanism for DM heart pathology. PMID:15598648

  5. No relevant excess prevalence of myotonic dystrophy type 2 in patients with suspected fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, J; Verrips, A; Tieleman, A A; Scheffer, H; Cats, H A; den Broeder, A A; van Engelen, B G M

    2016-06-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is a rare, autosomal dominant, multisystem disorder with proximal weakness, myotonia, pain and cataract as important symptoms. Given the assumed underreporting of DM2 in the Netherlands combined with the predominant role of pain in DM2 as well as in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), we hypothesized there will be an excess prevalence of DM2 in patients with (suspected) FMS. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of DM2 in patients with suspected FMS. A prevalence of 2% was considered a relevant excess frequency. Between November 2011 and April 2014, 398 patients with suspected FMS who had been assessed by a rheumatologist participated in this cross-sectional study. 95% of the study population was female, with a mean age of 42 years. The final ICD-9 diagnoses were collected, in 96% the diagnosis was FMS. 92% met the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for FMS. A questionnaire including neuromuscular symptoms was completed. Creatine kinase was determined, and genetic testing for DM2 was conducted in all patients. DM2 was established in only one patient (0.25%, 95% CI 0.04-1.4%), thus disapproving our hypothesis of a relevant prevalence of 2%. Our results suggest that patients with suspected FMS should not routinely be tested for DM2. PMID:27132119

  6. Segregation distortion of the CTG repeats at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Stivers, D.N.; Deka, R.; Yu, Ling M.; Shriver, M.D.; Ferrell, R.E.

    1996-07-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disease, is caused by a CTG-repeat expansion, with affected individuals having {ge}50 repeats of this trinucleotide, at the DMPK locus of human chromosome 19q13.3. Severely affected individuals die early in life; the milder form of this disease reduces reproductive ability. Alleles in the normal range of CTG repeats are not as unstable as the (CTG){sub {ge}50} alleles. In the DM families, anticipation and parental bias of allelic expansions have been noted. However, data on mechanism of maintenance of DM in populations are conflicting. We present a maximum-likelihood model for examining segregation distortion of CTG-repeat alleles in normal families. Analyzing 726 meiotic events in 95 nuclear families from the CEPH panel pedigrees, we find evidence of preferential transmission of larger alleles (of size {le}29 repeats) from females (the probability of transmission of larger alleles is .565 {plus_minus} 0.03, different from .5 at P {approx} .028). There is no evidence of segregation distortion during male meiosis. We propose a hypothesis that preferential transmission of larger CTG-repeat alleles during female meiosis can compensate for mutational contraction of repeats within the normal allelic size range, and reduced viability and fertility of affected individuals. Thus, the pool of premutant alleles at the DM locus can be maintained in populations, which can subsequently mutate to the full mutation status to give rise to DM. 31 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  7. Renal dysfunction can be a common complication in patients with myotonic dystrophy 1.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Toshio; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nakamori, Masayuki; Sugiura, Toshihiro; Nakamori, Aya; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Sakoda, Saburo

    2016-09-15

    Although renal failure can be a life-threatening complication even in neuromuscular disorders (NMDs), renal dysfunction is easily overlooked because muscle atrophy decreases the serum creatinine level. Renal function was retrospectively assessed using cystatin C (CysC) in various NMDs to clarify the differences among diseases. As is in the general population, age was correlated to CysC, and female patients showed lower CysC levels. Although elevated CysC was frequent in myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1: MIM 160900) and motor neuron disorders, an inter-disease comparison by sex adjusted for age showed that only DM1 had a higher CysC compared to other diseases. Multivariate linear regression with the stepwise method also suggested that the number of CTG repeats had an impact on CysC levels. In two autopsy DM1 cases, nephrosclerotic changes were observed even though they were in their forties. These facts suggested a disease-specific pathomechanism for renal dysfunction in DM1. Although further study is required, renal function should be carefully monitored in patients with DM1. PMID:27538647

  8. Short antisense-locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) correct alternative splicing abnormalities in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wojtkowiak-Szlachcic, Agnieszka; Taylor, Katarzyna; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Sznajder, Lukasz J.; Mykowska, Agnieszka; Sroka, Joanna; Thornton, Charles A.; Sobczak, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant multisystemic disorder caused by expansion of CTG triplet repeats in 3′-untranslated region of DMPK gene. The pathomechanism of DM1 is driven by accumulation of toxic transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats (CUGexp) in nuclear foci which sequester several factors regulating RNA metabolism, such as Muscleblind-like proteins (MBNLs). In this work, we utilized very short chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides composed exclusively of locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) complementary to CUG repeats, as potential therapeutic agents against DM1. Our in vitro data demonstrated that very short, 8- or 10-unit all-LNAs effectively bound the CUG repeat RNA and prevented the formation of CUGexp/MBNL complexes. In proliferating DM1 cells as well as in skeletal muscles of DM1 mouse model the all-LNAs induced the reduction of the number and size of CUGexp foci and corrected MBNL-sensitive alternative splicing defects with high efficacy and specificity. The all-LNAs had low impact on the cellular level of CUGexp-containing transcripts and did not affect the expression of other transcripts with short CUG repeats. Our data strongly indicate that short all-LNAs complementary to CUG repeats are a promising therapeutic tool against DM1. PMID:25753670

  9. Reconstructing the Rasch-Built Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Activity and Participation Scale

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Mieke C. E.; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G. J.; Faber, Catharina G.; Merkies, Ingemar S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A previously published Rasch-built activity and participation scale specifically designed for patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) was criticized for having been constructed in a relatively small cohort of patients and containing items too broadly phrased for DM1 patients, thus hampering its clinical use. Methods We report the results of the reconstructed Rasch-built DM1 activity and participation scale for clinical use (DM1-ActivC) through Rasch analyses using an expanded questionnaire containing 146 more simply phrased activity and participation inquiries completed by 340 patients with DM1. Results Through stepwise investigation including data quality control, model fit, response category ordering, local dependency and item bias, we succeeded in reconstructing the DM1-ActivC consisting of 25 items that showed good Rasch model fit, including construct convergent validity, items’ weights and persons’ locations reliability, and unidimensionality. Conclusion The DM1-ActivC scale has been reconstructed and fulfills all modern clinimetric requirements. Its use is recommended in future longitudinal trials in patients with DM1 to determine its responsiveness. PMID:26484877

  10. DMPK-associated myotonic dystrophy and CTG repeats in Alabama African Americans.

    PubMed

    Acton, R T; Rivers, C A; Watson, B; Oh, S J

    2007-11-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a result of a CTG expansion in the 3'-untranslated region of the DMPK gene. DM1 is rare among African blacks who have fewer large CTG repeats in the normal range than other racial/ethnic groups. Neither the prevalence of DM1 nor the relationship of CTG expansion to clinical status in African Americans (AAs) is well documented. We describe two AA brothers with DM1, each of whom had CTG repeats of 5/639; their father was reported to have DM1 and had CTG repeats of 5/60. Other family members had CTG repeats of 5-14. An unrelated AA patient from a second kinship also had DM1; an analysis revealed CTG repeats of 27/191. In 161 Alabama AA control subjects, we observed 18 CTG alleles from 5 to 28 repeats; the most common allele had five CTG repeats. The frequency of CTG repeats >or=15 were greater (p < 0.0003) in Pygmy, Amhara Ethiopian, Ashkenazi Jewish, North African Jewish, Israeli Muslim Arab, European white, and Japanese populations than in the Alabama AA population. These data suggest that the risk for DM1 in AAs is intermediate between that of African blacks and whites of European descent. PMID:17877752

  11. Impact of Biopsychosocial Factors on Chronic Pain in Persons With Myotonic and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Miró, Jordi; Raichle, Katherine A.; Carter, Gregory T.; O’Brien, Sarah A.; Abresch, Richard T.; McDonald, Craig M.; Jensen, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the role of biopsychosocial factors in patients with type 1 myotonic and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (MMD1/FSHD) with chronic pain. Associations between psychosocial factors were found to be important in other samples of persons with pain and both psychological functioning and pain interference in a sample of patients suffering from MMD/FSHD. Prospective, multiple group, survey study of 182 patients with confirmed MMD1 and FSHD. Participants completed surveys assessing pain interference and psychological functioning, as well as psychosocial, demographic, and injury-related variables. Analyses indicated that greater catastrophizing was associated with increased pain interference and poorer psychological functioning, pain attitudes were significantly related to both pain interference and psychological functioning, and coping responses were significantly related only to pain interference. In addition, greater perceived social support was associated with better psychological functioning. The results support the use of studying pain in persons with MMD/FSHD from a biopsychosocial perspective, and the importance of identifying psychosocial factors that may play a role in the adjustment to and response to pain secondary to MMD/FSHD. PMID:19414560

  12. Identification and characterization of modified antisense oligonucleotides targeting DMPK in mice and nonhuman primates for the treatment of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sanjay K; Wheeler, Thurman M; Justice, Samantha L; Kim, Aneeza; Younis, Husam S; Gattis, Danielle; Jauvin, Dominic; Puymirat, Jack; Swayze, Eric E; Freier, Susan M; Bennett, C Frank; Thornton, Charles A; MacLeod, A Robert

    2015-11-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults. DM1 is caused by an expanded CTG repeat in the 3'-untranslated region of DMPK, the gene encoding dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK). Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) containing 2',4'-constrained ethyl-modified (cEt) residues exhibit a significantly increased RNA binding affinity and in vivo potency relative to those modified with other 2'-chemistries, which we speculated could translate to enhanced activity in extrahepatic tissues, such as muscle. Here, we describe the design and characterization of a cEt gapmer DMPK ASO (ISIS 486178), with potent activity in vitro and in vivo against mouse, monkey, and human DMPK. Systemic delivery of unformulated ISIS 486718 to wild-type mice decreased DMPK mRNA levels by up to 90% in liver and skeletal muscle. Similarly, treatment of either human DMPK transgenic mice or cynomolgus monkeys with ISIS 486178 led to up to 70% inhibition of DMPK in multiple skeletal muscles and ∼50% in cardiac muscle in both species. Importantly, inhibition of DMPK was well tolerated and was not associated with any skeletal muscle or cardiac toxicity. Also interesting was the demonstration that the inhibition of DMPK mRNA levels in muscle was maintained for up to 16 and 13 weeks post-treatment in mice and monkeys, respectively. These results demonstrate that cEt-modified ASOs show potent activity in skeletal muscle, and that this attractive therapeutic approach warrants further clinical investigation to inhibit the gain-of-function toxic RNA underlying the pathogenesis of DM1. PMID:26330536

  13. A polymorphism in the MSH3 mismatch repair gene is associated with the levels of somatic instability of the expanded CTG repeat in the blood DNA of myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients.

    PubMed

    Morales, Fernando; Vásquez, Melissa; Santamaría, Carolina; Cuenca, Patricia; Corrales, Eyleen; Monckton, Darren G

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mosaicism of the expanded CTG repeat in myotonic dystrophy type 1 is age-dependent, tissue-specific and expansion-biased, contributing toward the tissue-specificity and progressive nature of the symptoms. Previously, using regression modelling of repeat instability we showed that variation in the rate of somatic expansion in blood DNA contributes toward variation in age of onset, directly implicating somatic expansion in the disease pathway. Here, we confirm these results using a larger more genetically homogenous Costa Rican DM1 cohort (p<0.001). Interestingly, we also provide evidence that supports subtle sex-dependent differences in repeat length-dependent age at onset and somatic mutational dynamics. Previously, we demonstrated that variation in the rate of somatic expansion was a heritable quantitative trait. Given the important role that DNA mismatch repair genes play in mediating expansions in mouse models, we tested for modifier gene effects with 13 DNA mismatch gene polymorphisms (one each in MSH2, PMS2, MSH6 and MLH1; and nine in MSH3). After correcting for allele length and age effects, we identified three polymorphisms in MSH3 that were associated with variation in somatic instability: Rs26279 (p=0.003); Rs1677658 (p=0.009); and Rs10168 (p=0.031). However, only the association with Rs26279 remained significant after multiple testing correction. Although we revealed a statistically significant association between Rs26279 and somatic instability, we did not detect an association with the age at onset. Individuals with the A/A genotype for Rs26279 tended to show a greater propensity to expand the CTG repeat than other genotypes. Interestingly, this SNP results in an amino acid change in the critical ATPase domain of MSH3 and is potentially functionally dimorphic. These data suggest that MSH3 is a key player in generating somatic variation in DM1 patients and further highlight MSH3 as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26994442

  14. Unusual sequelae of adult-onset dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Naffaa, Mohammad Ebrahim; Bishara, Rema; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman diagnosed with dermatomyositis 5 years ago based on progressive proximal muscle weakness, elevated creatine kinase, typical findings on electromyography and muscle biopsy. Despite the treatment, in contrast to improvement in her muscle symptoms, the heliotrope rash of her eyelids persisted. After several years, the patient developed multiple limited skin retraction lesions with hyperpigmentation on both lower limbs. Palpation of these lesions revealed dry, cold and very firm skin on both thighs and calves, particularly in the distal areas. X-ray and ultrasound imaging of the calves showed multiple subcutaneous calcifications in the distal muscles. PMID:25085949

  15. Different types of fatigue in patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy and HMSN-I. Experienced fatigue and physiological fatigue.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, Joke S; Zwarts, Machiel J; Schillings, Maartje L; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2008-09-01

    Although fatigue is a common symptom in neuromuscular disorders, little is known about different types of fatigue. Sixty-five FSHD, 79 adult-onset MD and 73 HMSN type I patients were studied. Experienced fatigue was assessed with the CIS-fatigue subscale. Physiological fatigue was measured during a 2-min sustained maximal voluntary contraction of the biceps brachii muscle using the twitch interpolation technique to assess central activation failure (CAF) and peripheral fatigue. Experienced fatigue, CAF and peripheral fatigue appeared to be predominantly separate types of fatigue. PMID:18690504

  16. Young-Onset Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... idiopathic, or typical, PD. Understanding the roles of environment and genes will ultimately allow us to identify the multiple causes of PD. Is Medication Treatment Different for Young-Onset PD? Medical management of young-onset Parkinson's disease requires an understanding ...

  17. Child and Adolescent (Early Onset) Schizophrenia: A Review in Light of DSM-III-R.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werry, John S.

    1992-01-01

    This review of studies of early onset schizophrenia examines the nosological similarity between adult and early onset schizophrenia, differential diagnosis, treatment, and the extent to which children and adolescents diagnosed as having schizophrenia using adult criteria have the characteristic adult correlates. The paper discusses gender…

  18. The evolution of infrahissian conduction time in myotonic dystrophy patients: clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Lallemand, Bénédicte; Clementy, Nicolas; Bernard-Brunet, Anne; Pierre, Bertrand; Corcia, Philippe; Fauchier, Laurent; Raynaud, Martine; Pellieux, Sybille

    2011-01-01

    Background Myotonic dystrophy (MD1) is a hereditary autosomal dominant disease with variable penetrance. Cardiac conduction disturbances are frequent and may be responsible for sudden death, but its progression was heretofore unknown. Aims The aim of the study was to analyse the natural history of infrahissian conduction time in patients with a normal first electrophysiological test, and to identify the predictive value of the clinical and ECG factors accompanying an alteration of infrahissian conduction. Methods Among 127 consecutive screened MD patients, 25 were enrolled and underwent a second electrophysiological testing. The second electrophysiological test was carried out on patients showing new symptoms, new atrioventricular conduction disturbances on ECG, or significant modifications of signal-averaged (SA)-ECG, and on asymptomatic patients with a follow-up of at least 60 months since the first electrophysiological test. Results Among the 25 patients, four had new clinical symptoms, four others developed new atrioventricular conduction abnormalities on ECG and six had significant modifications of the SA-ECG. The mean His-ventricle (HV) interval increased significantly between the two electrophysiological studies (initial HV interval 52.1 ms±1.6 ms, final HV interval 61.4 ms±2.2 ms, p<0.005), with a mean increase of 1.2 ms/year. The five patients with HV interval of 70 ms or greater were implanted with a prophylactic dual-chamber pacemaker. Modifications of resting ECG and SA-ECG were strongly associated with HV interval prolongation. Conclusion In patients with a normal initial electrophysiological study, modifications on the resting ECG and/or SA-ECG, on annual check-up, were associated with an alteration of infrahissian conduction. PMID:22038543

  19. Pentamidine rescues contractility and rhythmicity in a Drosophila model of myotonic dystrophy heart dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mouli; Selma-Soriano, Estela; Magny, Emile; Couso, Juan Pablo; Pérez-Alonso, Manuel; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; Artero, Ruben; Llamusi, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Up to 80% of individuals with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) will develop cardiac abnormalities at some point during the progression of their disease, the most common of which is heart blockage of varying degrees. Such blockage is characterized by conduction defects and supraventricular and ventricular tachycardia, and carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. Despite its importance, very few animal model studies have focused on the heart dysfunction in DM1. Here, we describe the characterization of the heart phenotype in a Drosophila model expressing pure expanded CUG repeats under the control of the cardiomyocyte-specific driver GMH5-Gal4. Morphologically, expression of 250 CUG repeats caused abnormalities in the parallel alignment of the spiral myofibrils in dissected fly hearts, as revealed by phalloidin staining. Moreover, combined immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization of Muscleblind and CUG repeats, respectively, confirmed detectable ribonuclear foci and Muscleblind sequestration, characteristic features of DM1, exclusively in flies expressing the expanded CTG repeats. Similarly to what has been reported in humans with DM1, heart-specific expression of toxic RNA resulted in reduced survival, increased arrhythmia, altered diastolic and systolic function, reduced heart tube diameters and reduced contractility in the model flies. As a proof of concept that the fly heart model can be used for in vivo testing of promising therapeutic compounds, we fed flies with pentamidine, a compound previously described to improve DM1 phenotypes. Pentamidine not only released Muscleblind from the CUG RNA repeats and reduced ribonuclear formation in the Drosophila heart, but also rescued heart arrhythmicity and contractility, and improved fly survival in animals expressing 250 CUG repeats. PMID:26515653

  20. Muscleblind, BSF and TBPH are mislocalized in the muscle sarcomere of a Drosophila myotonic dystrophy model.

    PubMed

    Llamusi, Beatriz; Bargiela, Ariadna; Fernandez-Costa, Juan M; Garcia-Lopez, Amparo; Klima, Raffaella; Feiguin, Fabian; Artero, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a genetic disease caused by the pathological expansion of a CTG trinucleotide repeat in the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene. In the DMPK transcripts, the CUG expansions sequester RNA-binding proteins into nuclear foci, including transcription factors and alternative splicing regulators such as MBNL1. MBNL1 sequestration has been associated with key features of DM1. However, the basis behind a number of molecular and histological alterations in DM1 remain unclear. To help identify new pathogenic components of the disease, we carried out a genetic screen using a Drosophila model of DM1 that expresses 480 interrupted CTG repeats, i(CTG)480, and a collection of 1215 transgenic RNA interference (RNAi) fly lines. Of the 34 modifiers identified, two RNA-binding proteins, TBPH (homolog of human TAR DNA-binding protein 43 or TDP-43) and BSF (Bicoid stability factor; homolog of human LRPPRC), were of particular interest. These factors modified i(CTG)480 phenotypes in the fly eye and wing, and TBPH silencing also suppressed CTG-induced defects in the flight muscles. In Drosophila flight muscle, TBPH, BSF and the fly ortholog of MBNL1, Muscleblind (Mbl), were detected in sarcomeric bands. Expression of i(CTG)480 resulted in changes in the sarcomeric patterns of these proteins, which could be restored by coexpression with human MBNL1. Epistasis studies showed that Mbl silencing was sufficient to induce a subcellular redistribution of TBPH and BSF proteins in the muscle, which mimicked the effect of i(CTG)480 expression. These results provide the first description of TBPH and BSF as targets of Mbl-mediated CTG toxicity, and they suggest an important role of these proteins in DM1 muscle pathology. PMID:23118342

  1. Identification of Plant-derived Alkaloids with Therapeutic Potential for Myotonic Dystrophy Type I.

    PubMed

    Herrendorff, Ruben; Faleschini, Maria Teresa; Stiefvater, Adeline; Erne, Beat; Wiktorowicz, Tatiana; Kern, Frances; Hamburger, Matthias; Potterat, Olivier; Kinter, Jochen; Sinnreich, Michael

    2016-08-12

    Myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1) is a disabling neuromuscular disease with no causal treatment available. This disease is caused by expanded CTG trinucleotide repeats in the 3' UTR of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase gene. On the RNA level, expanded (CUG)n repeats form hairpin structures that sequester splicing factors such as muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1). Lack of available MBNL1 leads to misregulated alternative splicing of many target pre-mRNAs, leading to the multisystemic symptoms in DM1. Many studies aiming to identify small molecules that target the (CUG)n-MBNL1 complex focused on synthetic molecules. In an effort to identify new small molecules that liberate sequestered MBNL1 from (CUG)n RNA, we focused specifically on small molecules of natural origin. Natural products remain an important source for drugs and play a significant role in providing novel leads and pharmacophores for medicinal chemistry. In a new DM1 mechanism-based biochemical assay, we screened a collection of isolated natural compounds and a library of over 2100 extracts from plants and fungal strains. HPLC-based activity profiling in combination with spectroscopic methods were used to identify the active principles in the extracts. The bioactivity of the identified compounds was investigated in a human cell model and in a mouse model of DM1. We identified several alkaloids, including the β-carboline harmine and the isoquinoline berberine, that ameliorated certain aspects of the DM1 pathology in these models. Alkaloids as a compound class may have potential for drug discovery in other RNA-mediated diseases. PMID:27298317

  2. Rational and Modular Design of Potent Ligands Targeting the RNA that Causes Myotonic Dystrophy 2

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Melissa M.; Pushechnikov, Alexei; Disney, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    Most ligands targeting RNA are identified through screening a therapeutic target for binding members of a ligand library. A potential alternative way to construct RNA binders is through rational design using information about the RNA motifs ligands prefer to bind. Herein, we describe such an approach to design modularly assembled ligands targeting the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), a currently untreatable disease. A previous study identified that 6′-N-5-hexynoate kanamycin A (1) prefers to bind 2×2 nucleotide, pyrimidine-rich RNA internal loops. Multiple copies of such loops were found in the RNA hairpin that causes DM2. The 1 ligand was then modularly displayed on a peptoid scaffold with varied number and spacing to target several internal loops simultaneously. Modularly assembled ligands were tested for binding to a series of RNAs and for inhibiting the formation of the toxic DM2 RNA-muscleblind protein (MBNL-1) interaction. The most potent ligand displays three 1 modules, each separated by four spacing submonomers, and inhibits the formation of the RNA-protein complex with an IC50 of 25 nM. This ligand is higher affinity and more specific for binding DM2 RNA than MBNL-1. It binds the DM2 RNA at least 20-times more tightly than related RNAs and 15-fold more tightly than MBNL-1. A related control peptoid displaying 6′-N-5-hexynoate neamine (2) is >100-fold less potent at inhibiting the RNA-protein interaction and binds to DM2 RNA >125-fold more weakly. Uptake studies into a mouse myoblast cell line also show that the most potent ligand is cell permeable. PMID:19348464

  3. Rationally designed small molecules targeting the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 are potently bioactive.

    PubMed

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Hoskins, Jason; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2012-05-18

    RNA is an important drug target, but it is difficult to design or discover small molecules that modulate RNA function. In the present study, we report that rationally designed, modularly assembled small molecules that bind the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) are potently bioactive in cell culture models. DM1 is caused when an expansion of r(CUG) repeats, or r(CUG)(exp), is present in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) mRNA. r(CUG)(exp) folds into a hairpin with regularly repeating 5'CUG/3'GUC motifs and sequesters muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1). A variety of defects are associated with DM1, including (i) formation of nuclear foci, (ii) decreased translation of DMPK mRNA due to its nuclear retention, and (iii) pre-mRNA splicing defects due to inactivation of MBNL1, which controls the alternative splicing of various pre-mRNAs. Previously, modularly assembled ligands targeting r(CUG)(exp) were designed using information in an RNA motif-ligand database. These studies showed that a bis-benzimidazole (H) binds the 5'CUG/3'GUC motif in r(CUG)(exp.) Therefore, we designed multivalent ligands to bind simultaneously multiple copies of this motif in r(CUG)(exp). Herein, we report that the designed compounds improve DM1-associated defects including improvement of translational and pre-mRNA splicing defects and the disruption of nuclear foci. These studies may establish a foundation to exploit other RNA targets in genomic sequence. PMID:22332923

  4. Rationally Designed Small Molecules Targeting the RNA That Causes Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Are Potently Bioactive

    PubMed Central

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Hoskins, Jason; Rzuczek, Suzanne G.; Thornton, Charles A.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    RNA is an important drug target, but it is difficult to design or discover small molecules that modulate RNA function. In the present study, we report that rationally designed, modularly assembled small molecules that bind the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) are potently bioactive in cell culture models. DM1 is caused when an expansion of r(CUG) repeats, or r(CUG)exp, is present in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) mRNA. r(CUG)exp folds into a hairpin with regularly repeating 5′CUG/3′GUC motifs and sequester muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1). A variety of defects are associated with DM1 including: (i) formation of nuclear foci, (ii) decreased translation of DMPK mRNA due to its nuclear retention, and (iii) pre-mRNA splicing defects due to inactivation of MBNL1, which controls the alternative splicing of various pre-mRNAs. Previously, modularly assembled ligands targeting r(CUG)exp were designed using information in an RNA motif-ligand database. These studies showed that a bis-benzimidazole (H) binds the 5′CUG/3′GUC motif in r(CUG)exp. Therefore, we designed multivalent ligands to bind multiple copies of this motif simultaneously in r(CUG)exp. Herein, we report that the designed compounds improve DM1-associated defects including improvement of translational and pre-mRNA splicing defects and the disruption of nuclear foci. These studies may establish a foundation to exploit other RNA targets in genomic sequence. PMID:22332923

  5. Abnormal splicing of NEDD4 in myotonic dystrophy type 2: possible link to statin adverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Screen, Mark; Jonson, Per Harald; Raheem, Olayinka; Palmio, Johanna; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sirito, Mario; Krahe, Ralf; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne

    2014-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is a multisystemic disorder caused by a (CCTG)n repeat expansion in intron 1 of CNBP. Transcription of the repeats causes a toxic RNA gain of function involving their accumulation in ribonuclear foci. This leads to sequestration of splicing factors and alters pre-mRNA splicing in a range of downstream effector genes, which is thought to contribute to the diverse DM2 clinical features. Hyperlipidemia is frequent in DM2 patients, but the treatment is problematic because of an increased risk of statin-induced adverse reactions. Hypothesizing that shared pathways lead to the increased risk, we compared the skeletal muscle expression profiles of DM2 patients and controls with patients with hyperlipidemia on statin therapy. Neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated-4 (NEDD4), an ubiquitin ligase, was one of the dysregulated genes identified in DM2 patients and patients with statin-treated hyperlipidemia. In DM2 muscle, NEDD4 mRNA was abnormally spliced, leading to aberrant NEDD4 proteins. NEDD4 was down-regulated in persons taking statins, and simvastatin treatment of C2C12 cells suppressed NEDD4 transcription. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), an established NEDD4 target, was increased and accumulated in highly atrophic DM2 muscle fibers. PTEN ubiquitination was reduced in DM2 myofibers, suggesting that the NEDD4-PTEN pathway is dysregulated in DM2 skeletal muscle. Thus, this pathway may contribute to the increased risk of statin-adverse reactions in patients with DM2. PMID:24907641

  6. Living with myotonic dystrophy; what can be learned from couples? a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1) is one of the most prevalent neuromuscular diseases, yet very little is known about how MD1 affects the lives of couples and how they themselves manage individually and together. To better match health care to their problems, concerns and needs, it is important to understand their perspective of living with this hereditary, systemic disease. Methods A qualitative study was carried out with a purposive sample of five middle-aged couples, including three men and two women with MD1 and their partners. Fifteen in-depth interviews with persons with MD1, with their partners and with both of them as a couple took place in the homes of the couples in two cities and three villages in the Netherlands in 2009. Results People with MD1 associate this progressive, neuromuscular condition with decreasing abilities, describing physical, cognitive and psychosocial barriers to everyday activities and social participation. Partners highlighted the increasing care giving burden, giving directions and using reminders to compensate for the lack of initiative and avoidant behaviour due to MD1. Couples portrayed the dilemmas and frustrations of renegotiating roles and responsibilities; stressing the importance of achieving a balance between individual and shared activities. All participants experienced a lack of understanding from relatives, friends, and society, including health care, leading to withdrawal and isolation. Health care was perceived as fragmentary, with specialists focusing on specific aspects of the disease rather than seeking to understand the implications of the systemic disorder on daily life. Conclusions Learning from these couples has resulted in recommendations that challenge the tendency to treat MD1 as a condition with primarily physical impairments. It is vital to listen to couples, to elicit the impact of MD1, as a multisystem disorder that influences every aspect of their life together. Couple management, supporting the

  7. Primary Hyperparathyroidism and Hyperthyroidism in a Patient with Myotonic Dystrophy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cherif, Yosra; Zantour, Baha; Alaya, Wafa; Berriche, Olfa; Younes, Samia; Sfar, Mohamed Habib

    2015-01-01

    Various endocrine manifestations are commonly described in myotonic dystrophy (MD), including primary hypogonadism, diabetes mellitus, and thyroid and parathyroid dysfunction. We describe a 46-year-old woman with a family history of MD with her son. She was diagnosed with cardiac arrhythmia and required the implantation of a pacemaker. She was noted to have a bilateral cataract. She complained of muscle weakness, diffuse myalgia, and palpitation. The electromyography (EMG) showed myotonic discharges. Laboratory tests showed high serum calcium 2.83 mmol/L, serum phosphate 1.2 mmol/L, parathormone 362.5 pg/mL, thyroid stimulating hormone TSH 0.02 mIU/L (normal range: 0.34–5.6 mIU/L), FT4 21.17 ng/mL, and negative anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies. Cervical ultrasound revealed a multinodular goiter. The 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy localized a lower right parathyroid adenoma. The clinical data, the family history of MD, EMG data, and endocrine disturbances were strongly suggestive of MD associated with hyperthyroidism and primary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:26175917

  8. Induction and reversal of myotonic dystrophy type 1 pre-mRNA splicing defects by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Tran, Tuan; Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Chen, Catherine Z; Hoskins, Jason; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan J; Patnaik, Samarjit; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Chris P; Schatz, George C; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    The ability to control pre-mRNA splicing with small molecules could facilitate the development of therapeutics or cell-based circuits that control gene function. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is caused by the dysregulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing due to sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1) by expanded, non-coding r(CUG) repeats (r(CUG)(exp)). Here we report two small molecules that induce or ameliorate alternative splicing dysregulation. A thiophene-containing small molecule (1) inhibits the interaction of MBNL1 with its natural pre-mRNA substrates. Compound (2), a substituted naphthyridine, binds r(CUG)(exp) and displaces MBNL1. Structural models show that 1 binds MBNL1 in the Zn-finger domain and that 2 interacts with UU loops in r(CUG)(exp). This study provides a structural framework for small molecules that target MBNL1 by mimicking r(CUG)(exp) and shows that targeting MBNL1 causes dysregulation of alternative splicing, suggesting that MBNL1 is thus not a suitable therapeutic target for the treatment of myotonic dystrophy type 1. PMID:23806903

  9. Epidemiology of early-onset schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Häfner, H; Nowotny, B

    1995-01-01

    A total of 232 (84%) first episodes of schizophrenia from our epidemiologically defined ABC sample (Age, Beginning and Course) were retrospectively assessed with regard to the onset and early course of the disorder. In a follow-up study a representative subgroup (n = 133) was prospectively examined in five cross sections over 3 years from first admission on. Population-based incidence rates for 5-year age groups comprising a range of < 10 - < 60 years were calculated on the basis of two definitions of onset: first sign of disorder and first psychotic symptom. In 40% of adult patients who had been admitted with a first schizophrenic episode after age 20 years the prodromal phase, in 11% the psychotic prephase, began before that age. This demonstrates that schizophrenia often begins in an age period in which the social and cognitive development and brain maturation are still unfinished. Early-onset schizophrenias (< or = 20 years) were compared with a medium-onset group (21 - < 35 years) and a late-onset group (35 - < 60 years) with regard to age and type of onset, early symptom-related course, social development and social course. The number of schizophrenia-specific positive and negative syndromes in early-onset schizophrenia is comparable to that of higher age groups. However, neurotic syndromes, emotional disorders and conduct disorders are most frequent in younger patients, especially in young men. Paranoid syndromes seem to prevail in late-onset schizophrenia, whereas less differentiated positive syndromes, such as delusional mood, are more frequent in the youngest age group. An earlier onset of schizophrenia has more severe social consequences than onset in adults, because it interrupts the cognitive and social development at an earlier stage. The worse social course of schizophrenia in men compared with women cannot be related to a more severe symptomatology, but to the earlier age at onset and the impairment or stagnation of social ascent at an earlier stage

  10. Instability of CAG repeats in Huntington's disease: relation to parental transmission and age of onset.

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, Y; Biancalana, V; Mandel, J L

    1994-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) has recently been found to be caused by expansion of a trinucleotide (CAG) repeat within the putative coding region of a gene with an unknown function. We report here an analysis of HD mutation and the characteristics of its transmission in 36 HD families. CAG repeats on HD chromosomes were unstable when transmitted from parent to offspring. Instability appeared more frequent and stronger upon transmission from a male than from a female, with a clear tendency towards increased size. We have also found a significant inverse correlation (p = 0.0001) between the age of onset and the CAG repeat length. The observed scatter would, however, not allow an accurate individual prediction of age of onset. Three juvenile onset cases analysed had an HD mutation of paternal origin. In at least two of these cases a large expansion of the HD allele upon paternal transmission may explain the major anticipation observed. Our results suggest that several features of the expansion mutation in HD are similar to those previously observed for mutations of similar size in spinobulbar muscular atrophy and in myotonic dystrophy, and to those observed more recently in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and in dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy, four diseases also caused by expansion of CAG repeats. PMID:8064815

  11. Young onset dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, E; Warren, J; Rossor, M

    2004-01-01

    Young onset dementia is a challenging clinical problem with potentially devastating medical and social consequences. The differential diagnosis is wide, and includes a number of rare sporadic and hereditary diseases. However, accurate diagnosis is often possible, and all patients should be thoroughly investigated to identify treatable processes. This review presents an approach to the diagnosis, investigation, and management of patients with young onset dementia, with particular reference to common and treatable causes. PMID:15016933

  12. Spondyloarthritis with onset after age 45.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Ignazio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Padula, Angela; Leccese, Pietro; Palazzi, Carlo

    2013-12-01

    The ASAS (Assessment in SpondyloArtrhritis international Society) classification criteria for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis permit to classify patients with age at disease onset less than 45 years. Nevertheless, these two forms of spondyloarthritis may begin after the age of 45. With the longer duration of the life expectancy, patients with this late-onset form of spondyloarthritis may be more frequently recognized in the near future. A small percentage (ranging from 3.5 to 6 %) of patients with axial SpA, as defined by the modified New York criteria, have onset of their disease after 45 years of age. Relatively more frequent is the late onset form of peripheral spondyloarthritis with the characteristics of undifferentiated spondyloarthritis. Its clinical spectrum is as broad as it is in children and very young adults. Psoriatic arthritis frequently begins over the age of 45 and occasionally after the age of 60. Some old studies had suggested than elderly-onset psoriatic arthritis is more severe than younger-onset disease, but a recent study found no such difference, and further studies are needed. PMID:24170254

  13. Computational Investigation of RNA CUG Repeats Responsible for Myotonic Dystrophy 1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy 1 (DM1) is a genetic disease caused by expansion of CTG repeats in DNA. Once transcribed, these repeats form RNA hairpins with repeating 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loop motifs, r(CUG)n, which attract muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) protein leading to the disease. In DM1 CUG can be repeated thousands of times, so these structures are intractable to characterization using structural biology. However, inhibition of MBNL1-r(CUG)n binding requires a detailed analysis of the 1×1 UU internal loops. In this contribution we employ regular and umbrella sampling molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to describe the structural and thermodynamic properties of 1×1 UU internal loops. Calculations were run on a reported crystal structure and a designed system, which mimics an infinitely long RNA molecule with continuous CUG repeats. Two-dimensional (2D) potential of mean force (PMF) surfaces were created by umbrella sampling, and the discrete path sampling (DPS) method was utilized to investigate the energy landscape of 1×1 UU RNA internal loops, revealing that 1×1 UU base pairs are dynamic and strongly prefer the anti–anti conformation. Two 2D PMF surfaces were calculated for the 1×1 UU base pairs, revealing several local minima and three syn–anti ↔ anti–anti transformation pathways. Although at room temperature the syn–anti ↔ anti–anti transformation is not observed on the MD time scale, one of these pathways dominates the dynamics of the 1×1 UU base pairs in temperature jump MD simulations. This mechanism has now been treated successfully using the DPS approach. Our results suggest that local minima predicted by umbrella sampling calculations could be stabilized by small molecules, which is of great interest for future drug design. Furthermore, distorted GC/CG conformations may be important in understanding how MBNL1 binds to RNA CUG repeats. Hence we provide new insight into the dynamic roles of RNA loops and their contributions to presently

  14. Onset of magnetospheric substorms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B.; Bogott, F.

    1972-01-01

    An examination of the onset of magnetospheric substorms is made by using ATS 5 energetic particles, conjugate balloon X rays and electric fields, all-sky camera photographs, and auroral-zone magnetograms. It is shown that plasma injection to ATS distances, conjugate 1- to 10-keV auroral particle precipitation, energetic electron precipitation, and enhancements of westward magnetospheric electric-field component all occur with the star of slowly developing negative magnetic bays. No trapped or precipitating energetic-particle features are seen at ATS 5 when later sharp negative magnetic-bay onsets occur at Churchill or Great Whale River.

  15. Cortical and Subcortical Grey and White Matter Atrophy in Myotonic Dystrophies Type 1 and 2 Is Associated with Cognitive Impairment, Depression and Daytime Sleepiness

    PubMed Central

    Prehn, Christian; Krogias, Christos; Schneider, Ruth; Klein, Jan; Gold, Ralf; Lukas, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Central nervous system involvement is one important clinical aspect of myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 2 (DM1 and DM2). We assessed CNS involvement DM1 and DM2 by 3T MRI and correlated clinical and neuocognitive symptoms with brain volumetry and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Methods 12 patients with juvenile or classical DM1 and 16 adult DM2 patients underwent 3T MRI, a thorough neurological and neuropsychological examination and scoring of depression and daytime sleepiness. Volumes of brain, ventricles, cerebellum, brainstem, cervical cord, lesion load and VBM results of the patient groups were compared to 33 matched healthy subjects. Results Clinical symptoms were depression (more pronounced in DM2), excessive daytime sleepiness (more pronounced in DM1), reduced attention and flexibility of thinking, and deficits of short-term memory and visuo-spatial abilities in both patient groups. Both groups showed ventricular enlargement and supratentorial GM and WM atrophy, with prevalence for more GM atrophy and involvement of the motor system in DM1 and more WM reduction and affection of limbic structures in DM2. White matter was reduced in DM1 in the splenium of the corpus callosum and in left-hemispheric WM adjacent to the pre- and post-central gyrus. In DM2, the bilateral cingulate gyrus and subgyral medio-frontal and primary somato-sensory WM was affected. Significant structural-functional correlations of morphological MRI findings (global volumetry and VBM) with clinical findings were found for reduced flexibility of thinking and atrophy of the left secondary visual cortex in DM1 and of distinct subcortical brain structures in DM2. In DM2, depression was associated with brainstem atrophy, Daytime sleepiness correlated with volume decrease in the middle cerebellar peduncles, pons/midbrain and the right medio-frontal cortex. Conclusion GM and WM atrophy was significant in DM1 and DM2. Specific functional-structural associations related morphological changes

  16. Comparison of CTG repeat length expansion and clinical progression of myotonic dystrophy over a five year period.

    PubMed Central

    Martorell, L; Martinez, J M; Carey, N; Johnson, K; Baiget, M

    1995-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is associated with an underlying CTG trinucleotide repeat expansion at a locus on chromosome 19q13.3. We have determined the repeat length in 23 DM patients with varying clinical severity of symptoms and various sizes of repeat amplification. We confirm that as in previous studies there is no strong correlation between repeat length and clinical symptoms but find that the repeat length in peripheral blood cells of patients increases over a time span of five years indicating continuing mitotic instability of the repeat throughout life. Repeat length progression does not appear to be indicative of clinical progression but age probably is. The degree of expansion correlates with the initial repeat size and 50% of the patients with continuing expansions showed clinical progression of their disease symptoms over the five year study period. Images PMID:7473648

  17. Tibialis Anterior Muscle Needle Biopsy and Sensitive Biomolecular Methods: A Useful Tool in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Iachettini, S.; Valaperta, R.; Marchesi, A.; Perfetti, A.; Cuomo, G.; Fossati, B.; Vaienti, L.; Costa, E.; Meola, G.

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by a CTG repeat expansion in 3’UTR of DMPK gene. This mutation causes accumulation of toxic RNA in nuclear foci leading to splicing misregulation of specific genes. In view of future clinical trials with antisense oligonucleotides in DM1 patients, it is important to set up sensitive and minimally-invasive tools to monitor the efficacy of treatments on skeletal muscle. A tibialis anterior (TA) muscle sample of about 60 mg was obtained from 5 DM1 patients and 5 healthy subjects through a needle biopsy. A fragment of about 40 mg was used for histological examination and a fragment of about 20 mg was used for biomolecular analysis. The TA fragments obtained with the minimally-invasive needle biopsy technique is enough to perform all the histopathological and biomolecular evaluations useful to monitor a clinical trial on DM1 patients. PMID:26708183

  18. [Brain imaging in early onset anorexia].

    PubMed

    Bargiacchi, A

    2014-05-01

    Structural and functional brain alterations in the structures involved in taste processing, emotions regulation and the reward system have been described in anorexia nervosa. The neurodevelopmental origin of this disorder has been recently discussed. In this article, brain-imaging data in early onset anorexia nervosa will be recalled and the relationship between clinical symptoms, normal brain maturation and brain imaging data in adolescents and adults will be discussed. PMID:24726667

  19. Huntington Disease: A Case Study of Early Onset Presenting as Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duesterhus, Pia; Schimmelmann, Benno Graf; Wittkugel, Oliver; Schulte-Markwort, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Huntington disease is a dominantly inherited, neurodegenerative disease characterized by choreiform movement disturbances and dementia, usually with adult onset. The rare juvenile-onset Huntington disease differs from the adult phenotype. A case presenting twice, at age 10 with all the signs of a major depression and age 14 with mutism and…

  20. Young onset dementia.

    PubMed

    Draper, B; Withall, A

    2016-07-01

    Young onset dementia (YOD), where symptoms of dementia have an onset before the age of 65, has become more prominent due to the population increase from the Baby Boomer generation. This clinical perspective examines key issues in the assessment, diagnosis and management of YOD. Challenges in the assessment and diagnosis of YOD are partly due to the diverse range of types of YOD, where degenerative dementias are less common and secondary dementias more common than in late onset dementia. Early symptoms are broad and include depression, behavioural change, neurological disorders, systemic disorders and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Perceived diagnostic delay may result in frustration and distress in people with YOD and their families. Chronic depression and MCI are associated with longer time to diagnosis, and in these situations, clinicians need to establish appropriate review processes and communicate clearly. A diagnosis of YOD may have marked consequences for a younger person, including early retirement, financial impacts and the psychological challenge of coming to grips with cognitive decline. Partners, children and other supporters often have unmet needs, feel burdened by care and are at high risk of physical and emotional consequences. Concerns about the heritability of dementia may add to family distress. Recent community service developments in Australia for YOD are outlined and the challenges of residential care described. PMID:27405890

  1. Alterations of attention and emotional processing following childhood-onset damage to the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Navarro, Juan P.; Driscoll, David; Anderson, Steven W.; Tranel, Daniel; Bechara, Antoine; Buchanan, Tony W.

    2015-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC), especially the medial sector, plays a crucial role in emotional processing. Damage to this region results in impaired processing of emotional information, perhaps due to an inability to initiate and maintain attention toward emotional materials, a process that is normally automatic. Childhood onset damage to the PFC impairs emotional processing more than adult-onset PFC damage. The aim of this work was to study the involvement of the PFC in attention to emotional stimuli, and to explore how age at lesion onset affects this involvement. To address these issues, we studied both the emotional and attentional modulation of the startle reflex. Our sample was composed of 4 patients with childhood-onset PFC damage, 6 patients with adult-onset PFC damage, and 10 healthy comparison participants. Subjects viewed 54 affective pictures; acoustic startle probes were presented at 300 ms after picture onset in 18 pictures (as an index of attentional modulation) and at 3,800 ms after picture onset in 18 pictures (as an index of emotional modulation). Childhood-onset PFC patients did not show attentional or emotional modulation of the response, in contrast to adult-onset PFC damage and comparison participants. Early-onset damage to the PFC results, therefore, in more severe dysfunction in the processing of affective stimuli than adult-onset PFC damage, perhaps reflecting limited plasticity in the neural systems that support these processes. PMID:24377423

  2. Late onset globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, R P; Petronas, N; Barton, N W

    1991-01-01

    A 29 year old male with onset of globoid cell leukodystrophy at age 14 is described. This is the first case of enzymatically confirmed globoid cell leukodystrophy with onset of symptoms after the age of ten. This patient is unique because of the late onset and slow progression and extends the clinical spectrum of globoid cell leukodystrophy. Images PMID:1800646

  3. Onset Manifestations of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy (Kennedy's Disease).

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Soraru, Gianni

    2016-03-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is regarded as a disorder with adult onset between third and fifth decade of life. However, there is increasing evidence that SBMA may start already before adulthood. The present study investigated the following: (1) Which clinical manifestations have been described so far in the literature as initial manifestations? (2) Which was the age at onset of these manifestations? and (3) Is age at onset dependent on the CAG-repeat length if non-motor manifestations are additionally considered? Data for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE using appropriate search terms. Onset manifestations in SBMA can be classified as frequent, rare, motor, non-motor, or questionable. Frequent are muscle weakness, cramps, fasciculations/twitching, tremor, dysarthria, dysphagia, or gynecomastia. Rare are myalgia, easy fatigability, exercise intolerance, polyneuropathy, hyper-CKemia, under-masculinized genitalia, scrotal hypospadias, microphallus, laryngospasm, or oligospermia. Questionable manifestations include sensory disturbances, cognitive impairment, increased pituitary volume, diabetes, reduced tongue pressure, elevated creatine-kinase, or low androgens/high estrogens. Age at onset is highly variable ranging from 4-76 years. Non-motor manifestations develop usually before motor manifestations. Age at onset depends on what is considered as an onset manifestation. Considering non-motor onset manifestations, age at onset is independent of the CAG-repeat size. In conclusion, age at onset of SBMA depends on what is regarded as onset manifestation. If non-motor manifestations are additionally considered, age at onset is independent of the CAG-repeat length. Since life expectancy is hardly reduced in SBMA, re-investigation of patients from published studies with regard to their initial disease profiles is recommended. PMID:26482145

  4. Far field R-wave sensing in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1: right atrial appendage versus Bachmann's bundle region lead placement.

    PubMed

    Russo, Vincenzo; Nigro, Gerardo; Antonio Papa, Andrea; Rago, Anna; Di Meo, Federica; Cristiano, Anna; Molino, Antonio; Calabrò, Raffaele; Giovanna Russo, Maria; Politano, Luisa

    2014-10-01

    Aim of the present study was to investigate far field R-wave sensing (FFRS) timing and characteristics in 34 Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients undergoing dual chamber pacemaker implantation, comparing Bachmann's bundle (BB) stimulation (16 patients) site with the conventional right atrial appendage (RAA) pacing site (18 patients). All measurements were done during sinus rhythm and in supine position, with unipolar (UP) and bipolar (BP) sensing configuration. The presence, amplitude threshold (FFRS trsh) and FFRS timing were determined. There were no differences between both atrial sites in the Pmin and Pmean values of sensed P-wave amplitudes, as well as between UP and BP sensing configurations. The FFRS trsh was lower at the BB region in comparison to the RAA site. The mean BP FFRS trsh was significantly lower than UP configuration in both atrial locations. There were no significant differences in atrial pacing threshold, sensing threshold and atrial lead impedances at the implant time and at FFRS measurements. Bachmann's bundle area is an optimal atrial lead position for signal sensing as well as conventional RAA, but it offers the advantage of reducing the oversensing of R-wave on the atrial lead, thus improving functioning of standard dual chamber pacemakers in DM1 patients. PMID:25709379

  5. Natural history of cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy (Steinert's disease): a 13-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Mammarella, A; Paradiso, M; Antonini, G; Paoletti, V; De Matteis, A; Basili, S; Donnarumma, L; Labbadia, G; Di Franco, M; Musca, A

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is associated with a wide spectrum of cardiac abnormalities, but only a few longitudinal studies have investigated the natural course of heart disease in MD. To assess whether neuromuscular involvement significantly predicts cardiac disorders in MD, 83 patients with various grades of disease severity were enrolled in a 13-year follow-up study (mean, 60.6 +/- 37.8 months) that included periodic physical and instrumental cardiac examinations (standard and Holter electrocardiography, echocardiography). During follow-up, muscular disease worsened clinically in 9 patients (11%) whose baseline severity grade changed accordingly; only 3 of them demonstrated parallel worsening of cardiac disturbance, however, compared with a large number of patients who showed additional cardiac abnormalities. These included further worsening of pre-existing pathologic features (19/83) and the appearance de novo of serious arrhythmias and/or conduction defects (23/83). Pacemaker implantation was necessary in 11 of 83 patients (13.2%) who had symptomatic bradyarrhythmias, bifascicular block, and P-R prolongation with a His-to-ventricle interval exceeding 55 ms, as documented by electrophysiologic study. Eight (9.6%) patients died: 2 from noncardiac and 1 from unknown causes, 1 from heart failure, and 4 from sudden death closely related to documented ventricular tachycardia. The incidence and seriousness of arrhythmic and conduction disturbances correlated with the severity of the muscular involvement. Nevertheless, cardiac and muscular disease did not show a linear progression. Cardiac involvement generally worsened more rapidly than did skeletal muscle disease. PMID:11186144

  6. Induction and Reversal of Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Pre-mRNA Splicing Defects by Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Tran, Tuan; Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Chen, Catherine Z.; Hoskins, Jason; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan J.; Patnaik, Samarjit; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Chris P.; Schatz, George C.; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Thornton, Charles A.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to control pre-mRNA splicing with small molecules could facilitate the development of therapeutics or cell-based circuits that control gene function. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by the dysregulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing due to sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1) by expanded, non-coding r(CUG) repeats (r(CUG)exp). Here we report two small molecules that induce or ameliorate alternative splicing dysregulation. The thiophene-containing small molecule (1) inhibits the interaction of MBNL1 with its natural pre-mRNA substrates. Compound (2), a substituted naphthyridine, binds r(CUG)exp and displaces MBNL1. Structural models show that 1 binds MBNL1 in the Zn-finger domain and that 2 interacts with UU loops in r(CUG)exp. This study provides a structural framework for small molecules that target MBNL1 by mimicking r(CUG)exp and shows that targeting MBNL1 causes dysregulation of alternative splicing, suggesting that MBNL1 is thus not a suitable therapeutic target for the treatment of DM1. PMID:23806903

  7. Abnormal sodium current properties contribute to cardiac electrical and contractile dysfunction in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Algalarrondo, Vincent; Wahbi, Karim; Sebag, Frédéric; Gourdon, Geneviève; Beldjord, Chérif; Azibi, Kamel; Balse, Elise; Coulombe, Alain; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Eymard, Bruno; Duboc, Denis; Hatem, Stéphane N

    2015-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common neuromuscular disorder and is associated with cardiac conduction defects. However, the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in DM1 are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that abnormalities in the cardiac sodium current (INa) are involved, and used a transgenic mouse model reproducing the expression of triplet expansion observed in DM1 (DMSXL mouse). The injection of the class-I antiarrhythmic agent flecainide induced prominent conduction abnormalities and significantly lowered the radial tissular velocities and strain rate in DMSXL mice compared to WT. These abnormalities were more pronounced in 8-month-old mice than in 3-month-old mice. Ventricular action potentials recorded by standard glass microelectrode technique exhibited a lower maximum upstroke velocity [dV/dt](max) in DMSXL. This decreased [dV/dt](max) was associated with a 1.7 fold faster inactivation of INa in DMSXL myocytes measured by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Finally in the DMSXL mouse, no mutation in the Scn5a gene was detected and neither cardiac fibrosis nor abnormalities of expression of the sodium channel protein were observed. Therefore, alterations in the sodium current markedly contributed to electrical conduction block in DM1. This result should guide pharmaceutical and clinical research toward better therapy for the cardiac arrhythmias associated with DM1. PMID:25613807

  8. Reliable and versatile immortal muscle cell models from healthy and myotonic dystrophy type 1 primary human myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Pantic, Boris; Borgia, Doriana; Giunco, Silvia; Malena, Adriana; Kiyono, Tohru; Salvatori, Sergio; De Rossi, Anita; Giardina, Emiliano; Sangiuolo, Federica; Pegoraro, Elena; Vergani, Lodovica; Botta, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    Primary human skeletal muscle cells (hSkMCs) are invaluable tools for deciphering the basic molecular mechanisms of muscle-related biological processes and pathological alterations. Nevertheless, their use is quite restricted due to poor availability, short life span and variable purity of the cells during in vitro culture. Here, we evaluate a recently published method of hSkMCs immortalization, relying on ectopic expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and telomerase (TERT) in myoblasts from healthy donors (n=3) and myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients (n=2). The efficacy to maintain the myogenic and non-transformed phenotype, as well as the main pathogenetic hallmarks of DM1, has been assessed. Combined expression of the three genes i) maintained the CD56(NCAM)-positive myoblast population and differentiation potential; ii) preserved the non-transformed phenotype and iii) maintained the CTG repeat length, amount of nuclear foci and aberrant alternative splicing in immortal muscle cells. Moreover, immortal hSkMCs displayed attractive additional features such as structural maturation of sarcomeres, persistence of Pax7-positive cells during differentiation and complete disappearance of nuclear foci following (CAG)7 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) treatment. Overall, the CCND1, CDK4 and TERT immortalization yields versatile, reliable and extremely useful human muscle cell models to investigate the basic molecular features of human muscle cell biology, to elucidate the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms and to test new therapeutic approaches for DM1 in vitro. PMID:26905645

  9. Coupling between pre-onset flows and substorm onset waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E.; Mende, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    A critical, long-standing problem in substorm research is identification of the sequence of events leading to substorm expansion phase onset. Recent THEMIS all-sky imager (ASI) array observations have shown a repeatable pre-onset sequence, which is initiated by a poleward boundary intensification (PBI) and is followed by auroral streamers moving equatorward (earthward flow in the plasma sheet) and then by substorm onset. On the other hand, substorm onset is also preceded by azimuthally propagating waves, indicating a possible importance of wave instability for triggering substorm onset. However, it has been difficult to identify the link between fast flows and waves. We have found an isolated substorm event that was well-instrumented with the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR), THEMIS white-light ASI, and multi-spectral ASI, where the auroral onset occurred within the PFISR and ASI fields-of-view. This substorm onset was preceded by a PBI, and ionospheric flows propagated equatorward from the polar cap, crossed the PBI and reached the growth phase arc. This sequence provides evidence that flows from open magnetic field lines propagate across the open-closed boundary and reach the near-Earth plasma sheet prior to the onset. Quasi-stable oscillations in auroral luminosity and ionospheric density are found along the growth phase arc. These pre-onset auroral waves amplified abruptly at the onset time, soon after the equatorward flows reached the onset region. This sequence suggests a coupling process where pre-existing stable waves in the near-Earth plasma sheet interact with flows from further downtail and then evolve to onset instability.

  10. Age of onset and the subclassification of conduct/dissocial disorder

    PubMed Central

    Silberg, Judy; Moore, Ashlee A.; Rutter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Conduct Disorder (CD) is a markedly heterogeneous psychiatric condition. Moffitt (1993) proposed that subclassification of CD should be according to age of onset. Our goals were to compare childhood-onset and adolescent-onset CD in terms of differences in phenotypic risk factors, genetic analyses, and factors associated with the persistence of antisocial behavior into young adulthood. Methods The data are from the Virginia Twin Study of Adolescent Behavioral Development (VTSABD) and Young Adult Follow-Up (YAFU). Childhood-onset CD was defined as CD beginning at or before age 11. Adolescent-onset CD was defined as having CD onset between ages 14 and 17. These subgroups were compared on ADHD, young adult antisocial behavior (ASB), family dysfunction, and parental depression. Genetic analyses compare childhood-onset and adolescent-onset CD, as well as their cooccurrence with ADHD and ASB. Finally, predictors of persistence were examined. Results Childhood-onset CD was significantly associated with ADHD, ASB, family dysfunction, and parental depression. Adolescent-onset CD was marginally associated with parental depression (p = .05) but not with any of the other risk factors. Univariate genetic models showed that both childhood-onset and adolescent-onset CD involve a large genetic liability accounting for 62% and 65% of the variance, respectively. A common genetic factor (as well as an ADHD-specific factor) accounted for the cooccurence of childhood-onset CD and ADHD. The cooccurrence of childhood-onset CD and ASB are reflected by a common genetic factor with genetic specific effects on ASB. There was no etiological link between adolescent-onset CD and either ADHD or ASB. Both ADHD and family dysfunction were significantly associated with the persistence of antisocial behavior into young adulthood. Conclusions Phenotypic findings differentiated between childhood-onset and adolescent-onset CD. ADHD and family dysfunction predicted persistence of antisocial

  11. Prediction of Juvenile-Onset Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Zadnik, Karla; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Cotter, Susan A.; Jones-Jordan, Lisa A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Manny, Ruth E.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Mutti, Donald O.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Myopia (nearsightedness) has its onset in childhood and affects about one-third of adults in the United States. Along with its high prevalence, myopia is expensive to correct and is associated with ocular diseases that include glaucoma and retinal detachment. OBJECTIVE To determine the best set of predictors for myopia onset in school-aged children. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study was an observational cohort study of ocular development and myopia onset conducted at 5 clinical sites from September 1, 1989, through May 22, 2010. Data were collected from 4512 ethnically diverse, nonmyopic school-aged children from grades 1 through 8 (baseline grades 1 through 6) (ages 6 through 13 years [baseline, 6 through 11 years]). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We evaluated 13 candidate risk factors for their ability to predict the onset of myopia. Myopia onset was defined as −0.75 diopters or more of myopia in each principal meridian in the right eye as measured by cycloplegic autorefraction at any visit after baseline until grade 8 (age 13 years). We evaluated risk factors using odds ratios from discrete time survival analysis, the area under the curve, and cross validation. RESULTS A total of 414 children became myopic from grades 2 through 8 (ages 7 through 13 years). Of the 13 factors evaluated, 10 were associated with the risk for myopia onset (P < .05). Of these 10 factors, 8 retained their association in multivariate models: spherical equivalent refractive error at baseline, parental myopia, axial length, corneal power, crystalline lens power, ratio of accommodative convergence to accommodation (AC/A ratio), horizontal/vertical astigmatism magnitude, and visual activity. A less hyperopic/more myopic baseline refractive error was consistently associated with risk of myopia onset in multivariate models (odds ratios from 0.02 to 0.13, P < .001), while near work, time

  12. Age at Transition from Pediatric to Adult Care Has No Relationship with Mortality for Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes in Japan: Diabetes Epidemiology Research International (DERI) Mortality Study

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Yoshiko; Nishimura, Rimei; Morimoto, Aya; Sano, Hironari; Utsunomiya, Kazunori; Tajima, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    Objective To follow up Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes for a maximum of 40 years to examine when they transitioned from pediatric care to adult care and to explore whether the attending physician, i.e., pediatrician or internist, was associated with prognosis. Methods Participants consisted of 1,299 patients who had been diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes at less than 15 years old between 1965 and 1979 identified through two nationwide surveys. Patients were classified as having received either pediatric care or adult care at the age of 15 and 30, and were compared for differences in mortality associated with the attending physician. Results The attending physicians were confirmed for a total of 1,093 patients at the age of 15. Of these patients, 43.8% and 40.3% received pediatric care and adult care, respectively. Of the 569 patients receiving pediatric care, 74.2%, 56.6%, 53.4%, and 51.3% continued with pediatric care at 20, 30, 40, and 50 years old, respectively. The attending physicians (pediatrician or internist) at the age of 15 and 30 had no significant impact on their survival (P = 0. 892, 0.411, respectively). Conclusions More than half of the patients who had received pediatric care at the age of 15 continued to receive pediatric care even after the age of 30, suggesting that their transition was far from smooth, while the attending physician at the age of both 15 and 30 was not a prognostic factor for mortality. Thus, the timing for transition to adult care in these patients has no relationship with mortality in Japan. PMID:26937952

  13. Bioethical issues of preventing hereditary diseases with late onset in the Sakha Republic (Yakutia)

    PubMed Central

    Kononova, Sardana K.; Sidorova, Oksana G.; Fedorova, Sardana A.; Platonov, Fedor A.; Izhevskaya, Vera L.; Khusnutdinova, Elza K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prenatal diagnosis of congenital and hereditary diseases is a priority for the development of medical technologies in Russia. However, there are not many published research results on bioethical issues of prenatal DNA testing. Objective The main goal of the article is to describe some of the bioethical aspects of prenatal DNA diagnosis of hereditary diseases with late onset in genetic counselling practice in the Sakha Republic (Yakutia) – a far north-eastern region of Russia. Methods The methods used in the research are genetic counselling, invasive chorionic villus biopsy procedures, molecular diagnosis, social and demographic characteristics of patients. Results In 10 years, 48 (76%) pregnant women from families tainted with hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and 15 pregnant women from families with myotonic dystrophy have applied for medical and genetic counselling in order to undergo prenatal DNA testing. The average number of applications is 7–8 per year. There are differences in prenatal genetic counselling approaches. Conclusion It is necessary to develop differentiated ethical approaches depending on the mode of inheritance, age of manifestation, and clinical polymorphism of hereditary disease. PMID:25147769

  14. NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of r(CCGCUGCGG)2 Reveal a Dynamic UU Internal Loop Found in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1†

    PubMed Central

    Parkesh, Raman; Fountain, Matthew; Disney, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    The NMR structure of an RNA with a copy of the 5′CUG/3′GUC motif found in the triplet repeating disorder myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is disclosed. The lowest energy conformation of the UU pair is a single hydrogen bonded structure; however, the UU protons undergo exchange indicating structural dynamics. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the single hydrogen bonded structure is the most populated one but the UU pair interconverts between 0, 1, and 2 hydrogen bonded pairs. These studies have implications for the recognition of the DM1 RNA by small molecules and proteins. PMID:21204525

  15. Dissecting Allele Architecture of Early Onset IBD Using High-Density Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Prahalad, Sampath; Walters, Thomas; Guthery, Stephen L.; Dubinsky, Marla; Baldassano, Robert; Crandall, Wallace V.; Rosh, Joel; Markowitz, James; Stephens, Michael; Kellermayer, Richard; Pfefferkorn, Marian; Heyman, Melvin B.; LeLeiko, Neal; Mack, David; Moulton, Dedrick; Kappelman, Michael D.; Kumar, Archana; Prince, Jarod; Bose, Promita; Mondal, Kajari; Ramachandran, Dhanya; Bohnsack, John F.; Griffiths, Anne M.; Haberman, Yael; Essers, Jonah; Thompson, Susan D.; Aronow, Bruce; Keljo, David J.; Hyams, Jeffrey S.; Denson, Lee A.; Kugathasan, Subra

    2015-01-01

    Background The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are common, complex disorders in which genetic and environmental factors are believed to interact leading to chronic inflammatory responses against the gut microbiota. Earlier genetic studies performed in mostly adult population of European descent identified 163 loci affecting IBD risk, but most have relatively modest effect sizes, and altogether explain only ~20% of the genetic susceptibility. Pediatric onset represents about 25% of overall incident cases in IBD, characterized by distinct disease physiology, course and risks. The goal of this study is to compare the allelic architecture of early onset IBD with adult onset in population of European descent. Methods We performed a fine mapping association study of early onset IBD using high-density Immunochip genotyping on 1008 pediatric-onset IBD cases (801 Crohn’s disease; 121 ulcerative colitis and 86 IBD undetermined) and 1633 healthy controls. Of the 158 SNP genotypes obtained (out of the 163 identified in adult onset), this study replicated 4% (5 SNPs out of 136) of the SNPs identified in the Crohn’s disease (CD) cases and 0.8% (1 SNP out of 128) in the ulcerative colitis (UC) cases. Replicated SNPs implicated the well known NOD2 and IL23R. The point estimate for the odds ratio (ORs) for NOD2 was above and outside the confidence intervals reported in adult onset. A polygenic liability score weakly predicted the age of onset for a larger collection of CD cases (p< 0.03, R2= 0.007), but not for the smaller number of UC cases. Conclusions The allelic architecture of common susceptibility variants for early onset IBD is similar to that of adult onset. This immunochip genotyping study failed to identify additional common variants that may explain the distinct phenotype that characterize early onset IBD. A comprehensive dissection of genetic loci is necessary to further characterize the genetic architecture of early onset IBD. PMID:26098103

  16. Onset of Voicing in Stuttered and Fluent Utterances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Gloria J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Electroglottographic (EGG) and acoustic waveforms of the first few glottal pulses of voicing were monitored and voice onset time (VOT) measured during an adaptation task performed by adult stutterers and controls. Fluent utterances of stutterers resembled those of controls. After dysfluencies, however, the EGG signal increased gradually, lending…

  17. Children's Acquisition of English Onset and Coda /l/: Articulatory Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Susan; Demuth, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to better understand how and when onset /l/ ("leap") and coda /l/ ("peel") are acquired by children by examining both the articulations involved and adults' perceptions of the produced segments. Method: Twenty-five typically developing Australian English-speaking children aged 3;0…

  18. Taxonomy for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Onset before Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Clovis A; Avcin, Tadej; Brunner, Hermine I

    2012-01-01

    Objective To propose a common nomenclature to refer to individuals who fulfill the American College of Rheumatology Classification Criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during childhood or adolescence. Methods The medical literature was reviewed for studies conducted in the target population between 1960 and December of 2011 to obtain information about the terms used to refer to such children and adolescents. We reviewed the threshold ages used and disease features considered to discriminate these individuals from patients with onset of SLE during adulthood. Furthermore, the nomenclature used in other chronic diseases with onset during both childhood and adulthood was assessed. Results There was an astonishing variability in the age cut-offs used to define SLE-onset prior to adulthood, ranging from 14 to 21 years but most studies used 18 years of age. The principal synonyms in the medical literature were SLE without reference to the age at onset of disease, childhood-onset SLE, juvenile SLE, and pediatric (or paediatric) SLE. Conclusions Based on the definition of childhood, in analogy with other complex chronic disease commencing prior to adulthood, and given the current absence of definite genetic variations that discriminate adults from children, the term childhood-onset SLE is proposed when referring to individuals with onset of SLE prior to age 18 years. PMID:22730317

  19. Delayed sleep onset in depressed young people

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The circadian abnormality of delayed sleep phase has been suggested to characterise a subgroup of depressed young adults with different risk factors and course of illness. We aim to assess the prevalence and factors, particularly substance use, associated with such delay in a large help-seeking cohort of young people with mental health problems. Methods From a consecutively recruited sample of 802 help-seeking young people, 305 (38%) had at least moderate depressive symptoms (QIDS-C16 >10), sleep data and did not have a chronic severe mental illness. Demographic and clinical characteristics were evaluated through self report and clinical interview. Delayed sleep phase was defined as a sleep onset between the hours of 02:00 a.m. – 06:00 a.m. and the characteristics of this group were compared to normal phase sleepers. Results Delayed sleep onset was reported amongst 18% (n = 56/305) of the depressed group compared to 11% of the non-depressed young people. Amongst the depressed group, delayed sleep onset was associated with tobacco, alcohol and cannabis misuse and short sleep duration (x̅: 5.8 hrs vs. x̅: 7.8 hrs). There were no differences in demographic factors, personality traits or symptoms. Tobacco smoking was very common: In logistic regression analyses only tobacco use (OR 2.28, 95% CI: 1.04 - 5.01) was associated with delayed sleep onset. There was no interaction with age. Conclusions Delayed sleep onset was twice as common in depressed young people as the general population and young people with other mental health problems, and is a potential marker for a subgroup of mood disorders. Those with delayed sleep onset were not more severely depressed but had short sleep duration, a risk for chronic psychological ill health, and higher levels of tobacco use. Nicotine use was common in this group, has biological evidence as a sleep disrupter, and requires specifically addressing in this population. PMID:24506941

  20. Structure and dynamics of the DNA hairpins formed by tandemly repeated CTG triplets associated with myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, S V; Garcoa, A E; Gupta, G

    1996-01-01

    Anomalous expansion of the DNA triplet (CTG)n causes myotonic dystrophy. Structural studies have been carried out on (CTG)n repeats in an attempt to better understand the molecular mechanism of repeat expansion. NMR and gel electrophoretic studies demonstrate the presence of hairpin structures for (CTG)5 and (CTG)6 in solution. The monomeric hairpin structure remains invariant over a wide range of salt concentrations (10-200 mM NaCl), DNA concentrations (micromolar to millimolar in DNA strand) and pH (6.0-7.5). The (CTG)n hairpin contains three bases in the loop when n is odd and four bases when n is even. For both odd and even n the stacking and pairing in the stem remain the same, i.e, two hydrogen bond T.T pairs stack with the neighboring G.C pairs. All the nucleotides in (CTG)5 and (CTG)6 adopt C2'-endo, anti conformations. Full-relaxation matrix analysis has been performed to derive the NOE distance constraints from NOESY experiments at seven different mixing times (25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 200 and 500 ms). NOESY-derived distance constraints were subsequently used in restrained molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a family of structures consistent with the NMR data. The theoretical order parameters are computed for H5-H6(cytosines) and H2'-H2" dipolar correlations for both (CTG)5 and (CTG)6 by employing the Lipari-Szabo formalism. Experimental data show that the cytosine in the loop of the (CTG)5 hairpin is slightly more flexible than those in the stem. The cytosine in the loop of the (CTG)6 hairpin is extremely flexible, implying that the dynamics of the four base loop is intrinsically different from that of the three base loop. PMID:8604323

  1. Functional and histopathological identification of the respiratory failure in a DMSXL transgenic mouse model of myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Panaite, Petrica-Adrian; Kuntzer, Thierry; Gourdon, Geneviève; Lobrinus, Johannes Alexander; Barakat-Walter, Ibtissam

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute and chronic respiratory failure is one of the major and potentially life-threatening features in individuals with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Despite several clinical demonstrations showing respiratory problems in DM1 patients, the mechanisms are still not completely understood. This study was designed to investigate whether the DMSXL transgenic mouse model for DM1 exhibits respiratory disorders and, if so, to identify the pathological changes underlying these respiratory problems. Using pressure plethysmography, we assessed the breathing function in control mice and DMSXL mice generated after large expansions of the CTG repeat in successive generations of DM1 transgenic mice. Statistical analysis of breathing function measurements revealed a significant decrease in the most relevant respiratory parameters in DMSXL mice, indicating impaired respiratory function. Histological and morphometric analysis showed pathological changes in diaphragmatic muscle of DMSXL mice, characterized by an increase in the percentage of type I muscle fibers, the presence of central nuclei, partial denervation of end-plates (EPs) and a significant reduction in their size, shape complexity and density of acetylcholine receptors, all of which reflect a possible breakdown in communication between the diaphragmatic muscles fibers and the nerve terminals. Diaphragm muscle abnormalities were accompanied by an accumulation of mutant DMPK RNA foci in muscle fiber nuclei. Moreover, in DMSXL mice, the unmyelinated phrenic afferents are significantly lower. Also in these mice, significant neuronopathy was not detected in either cervical phrenic motor neurons or brainstem respiratory neurons. Because EPs are involved in the transmission of action potentials and the unmyelinated phrenic afferents exert a modulating influence on the respiratory drive, the pathological alterations affecting these structures might underlie the respiratory impairment detected in DMSXL mice

  2. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 RNA Crystal Structures Reveal Heterogeneous 1 × 1 Nucleotide UU Internal Loop Conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit; Park, HaJeung; Fang, Pengfei; Parkesh, Raman; Guo, Min; Nettles, Kendall W.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2012-03-27

    RNA internal loops often display a variety of conformations in solution. Herein, we visualize conformational heterogeneity in the context of the 5'CUG/3'GUC repeat motif present in the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Specifically, two crystal structures of a model DM1 triplet repeating construct, 5'r[{und UU}GGGC(C{und U}G){sub 3}GUCC]{sub 2}, refined to 2.20 and 1.52 {angstrom} resolution are disclosed. Here, differences in the orientation of the 5' dangling UU end between the two structures induce changes in the backbone groove width, which reveals that noncanonical 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops can display an ensemble of pairing conformations. In the 2.20 {angstrom} structure, CUGa, the 5' UU forms a one hydrogen-bonded pair with a 5' UU of a neighboring helix in the unit cell to form a pseudoinfinite helix. The central 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loop has no hydrogen bonds, while the terminal 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops each form a one-hydrogen bond pair. In the 1.52 {angstrom} structure, CUGb, the 5' UU dangling end is tucked into the major groove of the duplex. While the canonically paired bases show no change in base pairing, in CUGb the terminal 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops now form two hydrogen-bonded pairs. Thus, the shift in the major groove induced by the 5' UU dangling end alters noncanonical base patterns. Collectively, these structures indicate that 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops in DM1 may sample multiple conformations in vivo. This observation has implications for the recognition of this RNA, and other repeating transcripts, by protein and small molecule ligands.

  3. Studying a Drug-like, RNA-Focused Small Molecule Library Identifies Compounds That Inhibit RNA Toxicity in Myotonic Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Southern, Mark R; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-12-18

    There are many RNA targets in the transcriptome to which small molecule chemical probes and lead therapeutics are desired. However, identifying compounds that bind and modulate RNA function in cellulo is difficult. Although rational design approaches have been developed, they are still in their infancies and leave many RNAs "undruggable". In an effort to develop a small molecule library that is biased for binding RNA, we computationally identified "drug-like" compounds from screening collections that have favorable properties for binding RNA and for suitability as lead drugs. As proof-of-concept, this collection was screened for binding to and modulating the cellular dysfunction of the expanded repeating RNA (r(CUG)(exp)) that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1. Hit compounds bind the target in cellulo, as determined by the target identification approach Competitive Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull-down (C-ChemCLIP), and selectively improve several disease-associated defects. The best compounds identified from our 320-member library are more potent in cellulo than compounds identified by high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns against this RNA. Furthermore, the compound collection has a higher hit rate (9% compared to 0.01-3%), and the bioactive compounds identified are not charged; thus, RNA can be "drugged" with compounds that have favorable pharmacological properties. Finally, this RNA-focused small molecule library may serve as a useful starting point to identify lead "drug-like" chemical probes that affect the biological (dys)function of other RNA targets by direct target engagement. PMID:26414664

  4. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 RNA crystal structures reveal heterogeneous 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loop conformations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Park, HaJeung; Fang, Pengfei; Parkesh, Raman; Guo, Min; Nettles, Kendall W; Disney, Matthew D

    2011-11-15

    RNA internal loops often display a variety of conformations in solution. Herein, we visualize conformational heterogeneity in the context of the 5'CUG/3'GUC repeat motif present in the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Specifically, two crystal structures of a model DM1 triplet repeating construct, 5'r[UUGGGC(CUG)(3)GUCC](2), refined to 2.20 and 1.52 Å resolution are disclosed. Here, differences in the orientation of the 5' dangling UU end between the two structures induce changes in the backbone groove width, which reveals that noncanonical 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loops can display an ensemble of pairing conformations. In the 2.20 Å structure, CUGa, the 5' UU forms a one hydrogen-bonded pair with a 5' UU of a neighboring helix in the unit cell to form a pseudoinfinite helix. The central 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loop has no hydrogen bonds, while the terminal 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loops each form a one-hydrogen bond pair. In the 1.52 Å structure, CUGb, the 5' UU dangling end is tucked into the major groove of the duplex. While the canonically paired bases show no change in base pairing, in CUGb the terminal 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loops now form two hydrogen-bonded pairs. Thus, the shift in the major groove induced by the 5' UU dangling end alters noncanonical base patterns. Collectively, these structures indicate that 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loops in DM1 may sample multiple conformations in vivo. This observation has implications for the recognition of this RNA, and other repeating transcripts, by protein and small molecule ligands. PMID:21988728

  5. The Role of Flexibility in the Rational Design of Modularly Assembled Ligands Targeting the RNAs that Cause the Myotonic Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Melissa M.; Pushechnikov, Alexei; Childs-Disney, Jessica L.

    2010-01-01

    Modularly assembled ligands were designed to target the RNAs that cause two currently untreatable neuromuscular disorders, myotonic dystrophy types 1 (DM1) and 2 (DM2). DM1 is caused by an expanded repeating sequence of CUG, and DM2 is caused by expanded CCUG repeats. Both are present in non-coding regions and fold into hairpins with either repeating 1×1 nucleotide UU (DM1) or 2×2 nucleotide 5′CU/3′UC (DM2) internal loops separated by two GC pairs. The repeats are toxic because they sequester the RNA splicing regulator Muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1). Rational design of ligands targeting these RNAs was enabled by a database of RNA motif-ligand partners compiled using Two-Dimensional Combinatorial Screening (2DCS). One 2DCS study found that the 6″-azido-kanamycin A module binds internal loops similar to those found in DM1 and DM2. In order to further enhance affinity, the ligand was assembled on a peptoid backbone to precisely control the valency and the distance between ligand modules. Designed compounds are more potent and specific binders to the toxic RNAs than MBNL1 and inhibit the formation of the RNA-protein complexes with nanomolar IC50’s. This study shows that three important factors govern potent inhibition: (1) the surface area sequestered by the assembled ligands; (2) the spacing between ligand modules since a longer distance is required to target DM2 RNAs than DM1 RNAs; and, (3) flexibility in the modular assembly scaffold used to display the RNA-binding module. These results have impacts on the general design of assembled ligands targeting RNAs present in genomic sequence. PMID:20058255

  6. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 RNA Crystal Structures Reveal Heterogeneous 1×1 Nucleotide UU Internal Loop Conformations⊥

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Park, HaJeung; Fang, Pengfei; Parkesh, Raman; Guo, Min; Nettles, Kendall W.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    RNA internal loops often display a variety of conformations in solution. Herein, we visualize conformational heterogeneity in the context of the 5′CUG/3′GUC repeat motif present in the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Specifically, two crystal structures are disclosed of a model DM1 triplet repeating construct, 5′r(UUGGGC(CUG)3GUCC)2, refined to 2.20 Å and 1.52 Å resolution. Here, differences in orientation of the 5′ dangling UU end between the two structures induce changes in the backbone groove width, which reveals that non-canonical 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loops can display an ensemble of pairing conformations. In the 2.20 Å structure, CUGa, the 5′UU forms one hydrogen-bonded pairs with a 5′UU of a neighboring helix in the unit cell to form a pseudo-infinite helix. The central 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loop has no hydrogen bonds, while the terminal 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loops each form a one hydrogen-bonded pair. In the 1.52 Å structure, CUGb, the 5′ UU dangling end is tucked into the major groove of the duplex. While the canonical paired bases show no change in base pairing, in CUGb the terminal 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loops form now two hydrogen-bonded pairs. Thus, the shift in major groove induced by the 5′UU dangling end alters non-canonical base patterns. Collectively, these structures indicate that 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loops in DM1 may sample multiple conformations in vivo. This observation has implications for the recognition of this RNA, and other repeating transcripts, by protein and small molecule ligands. PMID:21988728

  7. Muscular myopathies other than myotonic dystrophy also associated with (CTG)n expansion at the DMPK locus

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vasavi; Ahuja, Y. R.; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Assess triplet repeat expansion (CTG)n at the ‘dystrophia-myotonica protein kinase’ (DMPK) locus in muscular myopathies to elucidate its role in myopathic symptoms and enable genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis in families. Methods and Results: Individuals with symptoms of myopathy, hypotonia and controls selected randomly from the population were evaluated for triplet repeat expansion of (CTG)n repeats in the 3’untranslated region (UTR) of DMPK gene, the causative mutation in myotonic dystrophy (DM). DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of 40 individuals; they presented symptoms of muscle myopathy (n = 11), muscle hypotonia (n = 4), members of their families (n = 5) and control individuals from random population (n = 20). Molecular analysis of genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for the DMPK gene encompassing the triplet repeat expansion, showed that all controls (n = 20) gave a 2.1 kb band indicating normal triplet repeat number. Three out of 11 cases (two clinically diagnosed DM and one muscular dystrophy) had an expansion of the (CTG)n repeat in the range of 1000-2100 repeats corresponding to the repeat number in cases of severe DM. Other two of these 11 cases, showed a mild expansion of ~ 66 repeats. Three samples, which included two cases of hypotonia and the father of a subject with muscular dystrophy, also gave a similar repeat expansion (~66 repeats). Conclusion: Results suggest a role of (CTG)n expansion at the DMPK locus in unexplained hypotonias and muscular myopathies other than DM. This calls for screening of the triplet repeat expansion at the DMPK locus in cases of idiopathic myopathies and hypotonia. PMID:23560000

  8. Relationship between muscle impairments, postural stability, and gait parameters assessed with lower-trunk accelerometry in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Bachasson, Damien; Moraux, Amélie; Ollivier, Gwenn; Decostre, Valérie; Ledoux, Isabelle; Gidaro, Teresa; Servais, Laurent; Behin, Anthony; Stojkovic, Tanya; Hébert, Luc J; Puymirat, Jack; Eymard, Bruno; Bassez, Guillaume; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated gait using lower-trunk accelerometry and investigated relationships between gait abnormalities, postural instability, handgrip myotonia, and weakness in lower-limb and axial muscle groups commonly affected in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Twenty-two patients (11 men, 11 women; age = 42 years (range: 26-51)) with DM1 and twenty healthy controls (9 men, 11 women; age = 44 years (range: 24-50)) participated in this study. Gait analysis using lower-trunk accelerometry was performed at self-selected walking pace. Postural stability was measured via center of pressure displacement analysis using a force platform during eyes-closed normal stance. Handgrip myotonia was quantified using force-relaxation curve modeling. Patients displayed lower walking speed, stride frequency, stride length, gait regularity, and gait symmetry. Strength of ankle plantar flexors, ankle dorsal flexors and neck flexors correlated with interstride regularity in the vertical direction (ρ = 0.57, ρ = 0.59, and ρ = 0.44, respectively; all P < 0.05). Knee extension strength correlated with gait symmetry in the anteroposterior direction (ρ = 0.45, P < 0.05). Center of pressure velocity was greater in patients and correlated with neck flexion and ankle plantar flexion weakness (ρ = -0.51 and ρ = -0.62, respectively; both P < 0.05), and with interstride regularity in the vertical direction (ρ = -0.58, P < 0.05). No correlation was found between handgrip myotonia and any other variable studied. Lower-trunk accelerometry allows the characterization of gait pattern abnormalities in patients with DM1. Further studies are required to determine the relevance of systematic gait analysis using lower-trunk accelerometry for patient follow-up and intervention planning. PMID:27234310

  9. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) prevents ROS-induced cell death by assembling a hexokinase II-Src complex on the mitochondrial surface

    PubMed Central

    Pantic, B; Trevisan, E; Citta, A; Rigobello, M P; Marin, O; Bernardi, P; Salvatori, S; Rasola, A

    2013-01-01

    The biological functions of myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK), a serine/threonine kinase whose gene mutations cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), remain poorly understood. Several DMPK isoforms exist, and the long ones (DMPK-A/B/C/D) are associated with the mitochondria, where they exert unknown activities. We have studied the isoform A of DMPK, which we have found to be prevalently associated to the outer mitochondrial membrane. The kinase activity of mitochondrial DMPK protects cells from oxidative stress and from the ensuing opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), which would otherwise irreversibly commit cells to death. We observe that DMPK (i) increases the mitochondrial localization of hexokinase II (HK II), (ii) forms a multimeric complex with HK II and with the active form of the tyrosine kinase Src, binding its SH3 domain and (iii) it is tyrosine-phosphorylated by Src. Both interaction among these proteins and tyrosine phosphorylation of DMPK are increased under oxidative stress, and Src inhibition selectively enhances death in DMPK-expressing cells after HK II detachment from the mitochondria. Down-modulation of DMPK abolishes the appearance of muscle markers in in vitro myogenesis, which is rescued by oxidant scavenging. Our data indicate that, together with HK II and Src, mitochondrial DMPK is part of a multimolecular complex endowed with antioxidant and pro-survival properties that could be relevant during the function and differentiation of muscle fibers. PMID:24136222

  10. Global and Temporal Cortical Folding in Patients with Early-Onset Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penttila, Jani; Paillere-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mangin, Jean-Francois; Burke, Lisa; Corrigall, Richard; Frangou, Sophia; Cachia, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances in the temporal lobes and alterations in cortical folding in adult on-set schizophrenia are studied using magnetic resonance T1 images of 51 patients. The study showed that patients with early on-set schizophrenia had lower global sulcal indices in both hemispheres and the left collateral sulcus has a lower sulcal index irrespective…

  11. Digging Deeper Using Neuroimaging Tools Reveals Important Clues to Early-Onset Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumra, Sanjiv

    2008-01-01

    The article describes the use of structural neuroimaging to understand the psychopathology of childhood-onset schizophrenia. Results showed an increase in lateral volumes, reduced total and regional volumes of gray matter in the cortex and increased basal ganglia volumes as in adult-onset schizophrenia in comparison with healthy subjects.

  12. The onset of driving phobias.

    PubMed

    Munjack, D J

    1984-12-01

    Thirty driving phobics who called the Psychiatry Outpatient Phobia Clinic (25 females and five males) were given a 20-min semi-standardized telephone interview during which they were asked about the circumstances of the onset of their driving fears. Twelve (40%) reported that their fears were precipitated by a panic attack on the freeway; six (20%) by a collision; and three (10%) by other frightening experiences in automobiles. Four (13.3%) related the onset to family stress or upheaval. Other modes of onset also occurred. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of existing theories of fear acquisition and treatment approaches. PMID:6526942

  13. Associations between mental disorders and subsequent onset of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Dan J.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Alonso, Jordi; Bruffaerts, Ronny; de Jonge, Peter; Liu, Zharoui; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; O’Neill, Siobhan; Viana, Maria Carmen; Al-Hamzawi, Ali Obaid; Angermeyer, Mattias C.; Benjet, Corina; de Graaf, Ron; Ferry, Finola; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Levinson, Daphna; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Florescu, Silvia; Hu, Chiyi; Kawakami, Norito; Haro, Josep Maria; Piazza, Marina; Wojtyniak, Bogdan J; Xavier, Miguel; Lim, Carmen C.W.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Scott, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous work has suggested significant associations between various psychological symptoms (e.g. depression, anxiety, anger, alcohol abuse) and hypertension. However, the presence and extent of associations between common mental disorders and subsequent adult onset of hypertension remains unclear. Further, there is little data available on how such associations vary by gender or over life course. Methods Data from the World Mental Health Surveys (comprising 19 countries, and 52,095 adults) were used. Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of common mental disorders and subsequent onset of hypertension, with and without psychiatric comorbidity adjustment. Variations in the strength of associations by gender and by life course stage of onset of both the mental disorder and hypertension were investigated. Results After psychiatric comorbidity adjustment, depression, panic disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, alcohol abuse, and drug abuse were significantly associated with subsequent diagnosis of hypertension (with ORs ranging from 1.1 to 1.6). Number of lifetime mental disorders was associated with subsequent hypertension in a dose-response fashion. For social phobia and alcohol abuse, associations with hypertension were stronger for males than females. For panic disorder, the association with hypertension was particularly apparent in earlier onset hypertension. Conclusions Depression, anxiety, impulsive eating disorders, and substance use disorders disorders were significantly associated with the subsequent diagnosis of hypertension. These data underscore the importance of early detection of mental disorders, and of physical health monitoring in people with these conditions.. PMID:24342112

  14. Children's Acquisition of English Onset and Coda /l/: Articulatory Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Demuth, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to better understand how and when onset /l/ (leap) and coda /l/ (peel) are acquired by children by examining both the articulations involved and adults' perceptions of the produced segments. Method Twenty-five typically developing Australian English–speaking children aged 3;0 (years;months) to 7;11 participated in an elicited imitation task, during which audio, video, and lingual ultrasound images were collected. Transcribers perceptually rated audio, whereas video and ultrasound images were visually examined for the presence of adult-like articulations. Results Data from this study establish that for Australian English–learning children, coda /l/s are acquired later than onset /l/s, and older children produce greater proportions of adultlike /l/s in both onset and coda positions, roughly following established norms for American English–speaking children. However, although perceptibility of coda /l/s was correlated with their articulations, onset /l/s were nearly uniformly perceived as adultlike despite substantial variation in the articulations used to produce them. Conclusions The disparity in the production and perception of children's singleton onset /l/s is linked to both physiological and phonological development. Suggestions are made for future research to tease these factors apart. PMID:25321384

  15. Strangeness and onset of deconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Becattini, F.

    2012-05-15

    I will review the current status of global strangeness production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions with particular emphasis on recent results from core-corona model. I will discuss its relevance for the detection of the onset of deconfinement.

  16. Delayed-onset chloroquine retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenfeld, M; Nesher, R; Merin, S

    1986-01-01

    Delayed-onset chloroquine retinopathy was diagnosed in a patient seven years after cessation of treatment by a total dose of 730 g of chloroquine for rheumatoid arthritis. Visual functions continued to deteriorate after the diagnosis. Periodic examinations by ophthalmoscopy and by functional tests such as EOG and visual fields should be continued in patients at risk of delayed-onset chloroquine retinopathy after discontinuance of the drug. PMID:3964626

  17. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Childhood-Onset Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fujinami, Kaoru; Zernant, Jana; Chana, Ravinder K.; Wright, Genevieve A.; Tsunoda, Kazushige; Ozawa, Yoko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Robson, Anthony G.; Holder, Graham E.; Allikmets, Rando; Michaelides, Michel; Moore, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of patients with childhood-onset Stargardt disease (STGD). Design Retrospective case series. Participants Forty-two patients who were diagnosed with STGD in childhood at a single institution between January 2001 and January 2012. Methods A detailed history and a comprehensive ophthalmic examination were undertaken, including color fundus photography, autofluorescence imaging, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and pattern and full-field electroretinograms. The entire coding region and splice sites of ABCA4 were screened using a next-generation, sequencing-based strategy. The molecular genetic findings of childhood-onset STGD patients were compared with those of adult-onset patients. Main Outcome Measures Clinical, imaging, electrophysiologic, and molecular genetic findings. Results The median ages of onset and the median age at baseline examination were 8.5 (range, 3–16) and 12.0 years (range, 7-16), respectively. The median baseline logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution visual acuity was 0.74. At baseline, 26 of 39 patients (67%) with available photographs had macular atrophy with macular/peripheral flecks; 11 (28%) had macular atrophy without flecks; 1 (2.5%) had numerous flecks without macular atrophy; and 1 (2.5%) had a normal fundus appearance. Flecks were not identified at baseline in 12 patients (31%). SD-OCT detected foveal outer retinal disruption in all 21 patients with available images. Electrophysiologic assessment demonstrated retinal dysfunction confined to the macula in 9 patients (36%), macular and generalized cone dysfunction in 1 subject (4%), and macular and generalized cone and rod dysfunction in 15 individuals (60%). At least 1 disease-causing ABCA4 variant was identified in 38 patients (90%), including 13 novel variants; ≥2 variants were identified in 34 patients (81%). Patients with childhood-onset STGD more frequently harbored 2 deleterious variants

  18. LATE-AGE ONSET SCLERODERMA

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Rebecca L.; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Gelber, Allan C.; Hummers, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although patients who develop scleroderma (SSc) later in life (≥ 65 years) may express the entire clinical spectrum of disease, we hypothesize that patients with late-age onset incur a different risk for specific organ manifestations of disease compared to those with younger-age onset SSc. METHODS In total, 2300 SSc patients were evaluated between 1990–2009 and reviewed from a university-based Scleroderma Center cohort. Demographic profile, SSc subtype, autoantibody status, Medsger severity scores, pulmonary function tests, echocardiography, and right heart catheterization parameters were compared between late-age versus younger-age onset patients. RESULTS Overall, 2084 (91%) patients developed SSc prior to age 65; whereas 216 (9%) were ≥65 years. Late-age onset patients had a significantly higher proportion of anti-centromere antibodies (42% vs 27%; p=0.001) compared to younger-age onset. Risk of pulmonary hypertension (OR 1.77; 95%CI 1.00, 3.12), muscle weakness (OR 1.85; 95%CI 1.30, 2.64), renal impairment (OR 2.83; 95%CI 1.98, 4.04) and cardiac disease (OR 2.69; 95%CI 1.92, 3.78) was greater among those with late-age onset SSc; although risk of digital ischemia (OR 0.64; 95%CI 0.47, 0.86) was reduced. The cumulative incidence of pulmonary hypertension at 5 years was greater among those with late-age (9%) compared to younger-age (2.5%) onset SSc (log-rank, p<0.001). CONCLUSION These findings suggest that older SSc patients are at greater risk for pulmonary hypertension, renal impairment, cardiac disease, and muscle weakness. Awareness of the distinct risk for specific organ manifestations in SSc, in particular pulmonary hypertension, should guide the care of older SSc patients whose disease begins after age 65 years. PMID:21685299

  19. The importance of decision onset.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Tobias; Grinband, Jack; Ferrera, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    The neural mechanisms of decision making are thought to require the integration of evidence over time until a response threshold is reached. Much work suggests that response threshold can be adjusted via top-down control as a function of speed or accuracy requirements. In contrast, the time of integration onset has received less attention and is believed to be determined mostly by afferent or preprocessing delays. However, a number of influential studies over the past decade challenge this assumption and begin to paint a multifaceted view of the phenomenology of decision onset. This review highlights the challenges involved in initiating the integration of evidence at the optimal time and the potential benefits of adjusting integration onset to task demands. The review outlines behavioral and electrophysiolgical studies suggesting that the onset of the integration process may depend on properties of the stimulus, the task, attention, and response strategy. Most importantly, the aggregate findings in the literature suggest that integration onset may be amenable to top-down regulation, and may be adjusted much like response threshold to exert cognitive control and strategically optimize the decision process to fit immediate behavioral requirements. PMID:26609111

  20. Late Onset Clozapine Induced Agranulocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, Rajmohan; Kakkan, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Agranulocytosis is defined as an absolute neutrophil count less than 100/mm3 in association with infectious disease. The risk of agranulocytosis is 0.38% of all clozapine treated cases and there is a relatively lesser incidence in Indian population. The risk of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis and neutropenia is highest in the first 6 months and higher in the initial 18 months after the onset of treatment. There have been very few reports of neutropenia and agranulocytosis after this period. There have so far been no reports of late onset clozapine induced agranulocytosis has been reported from India. A case of late onset clozapine induced agranulocytosis with possible mechanism of the same is reported. PMID:25336778

  1. Cutaneous warming promotes sleep onset.

    PubMed

    Raymann, Roy J E M; Swaab, Dick F; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2005-06-01

    Sleep occurs in close relation to changes in body temperature. Both the monophasic sleep period in humans and the polyphasic sleep periods in rodents tend to be initiated when core body temperature is declining. This decline is mainly due to an increase in skin blood flow and consequently skin warming and heat loss. We have proposed that these intrinsically occurring changes in core and skin temperatures could modulate neuronal activity in sleep-regulating brain areas (Van Someren EJW, Chronobiol Int 17: 313-54, 2000). We here provide results compatible with this hypothesis. We obtained 144 sleep-onset latencies while directly manipulating core and skin temperatures within the comfortable range in eight healthy subjects under controlled conditions. The induction of a proximal skin temperature difference of only 0.78 +/- 0.03 degrees C (mean +/- SE) around a mean of 35.13 +/- 0.11 degrees C changed sleep-onset latency by 26%, i.e., by 3.09 minutes [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.91 to 4.28] around a mean of 11.85 min (CI, 9.74 to 14.41), with faster sleep onsets when the proximal skin was warmed. The reduction in sleep-onset latency occurred despite a small but significant decrease in subjective comfort during proximal skin warming. The induction of changes in core temperature (delta = 0.20 +/- 0.02 degrees C) and distal skin temperature (delta = 0.74 +/- 0.05 degrees C) were ineffective. Previous studies have demonstrated correlations between skin temperature and sleep-onset latency. Also, sleep disruption by ambient temperatures that activate thermoregulatory defense mechanisms has been shown. The present study is the first to experimentally demonstrate a causal contribution to sleep-onset latency of skin temperature manipulations within the normal nocturnal fluctuation range. Circadian and sleep-appetitive behavior-induced variations in skin temperature might act as an input signal to sleep-regulating systems. PMID:15677527

  2. Cardiovascular risk in pediatric-onset rheumatological diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are becoming major health concerns for adults with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The enhanced atherogenesis in this patient population is promoted by the exposure to traditional risk factors as well as nontraditional cardiovascular insults, such as corticosteroid therapy, chronic inflammation and autoantibodies. Despite definite differences between many adult-onset and pediatric-onset rheumatologic diseases, it is extremely likely that atherosclerosis will become the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this pediatric patient population. Because cardiovascular events are rare at this young age, surrogate measures of atherosclerosis must be used. The three major noninvasive vascular measures of early atherosclerosis - namely, flow-mediated dilatation, carotid intima-media thickness and pulse wave velocity - can be performed easily on children. Few studies have explored the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and even fewer have used the surrogate vascular measures to document signs of early atherosclerosis in children with pediatric-onset rheumatic diseases. The objective of this review is to provide an overview on cardiovascular risk and early atherosclerosis in pediatric-onset systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and juvenile dermatomyositis patients, and to review cardiovascular preventive strategies that should be considered in this population. PMID:23731870

  3. Late onset arginase deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and midbrain hyperintensity

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Raja, Rajat; Balagopal, Anuroop

    2016-01-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are very rare metabolic disorders that present with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. Of the UCDs, Arginase deficiency (ARD) is the rarest and presents in childhood with a progressive spastic diplegia or seizures. Acute presentation in adulthood is extremely unusual.[1] We present the first case of adult onset ARD presenting with encephalopathy and diffusion weighted MRI findings that resembled a moustache in the midbrain.

  4. Late onset arginase deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and midbrain hyperintensity.

    PubMed

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Raja, Rajat; Balagopal, Anuroop

    2016-01-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are very rare metabolic disorders that present with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. Of the UCDs, Arginase deficiency (ARD) is the rarest and presents in childhood with a progressive spastic diplegia or seizures. Acute presentation in adulthood is extremely unusual.[1] We present the first case of adult onset ARD presenting with encephalopathy and diffusion weighted MRI findings that resembled a moustache in the midbrain. PMID:27570396

  5. Eslicarbazepine acetate for partial-onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Luef, Gerhard

    2011-12-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), a new voltage-gated sodium channel blocker that is chemically related to carbamazepine and partially metabolized to oxcarbazepine, has attracted attention as results of previous Phase II and III studies demonstrated and confirmed efficacy and tolerability of ESL 800 and 1200 mg once daily as add-on therapy for adult patients with drug-resistant partial-onset seizures. In children, efficacy data point towards a dose-dependent decrease in seizure frequency and tolerability analyses showed a low incidence of mild drug-related adverse effects at 5 and 15 mg/kg/day. The most frequently reported adverse effects were dizziness, somnolence, headache, diplopia, nausea and vomiting. The convenience of once-daily dosing and a short/simple titration regimen in combination with a comparative efficacy and tolerability profile might promote ESL as a valid alternative to the current adjunctive antiepileptic drug therapy armamentarium for drug-resistant partial seizures in adults. Since clinical trials in children and adolescents on ESL efficacy and safety are ongoing and data already published are far from conclusive, the therapeutic value of ESL in this special population has to be established in the near future. PMID:22091592

  6. Early onset esophageal adenocarcinoma: a distinct molecular entity?

    PubMed Central

    van Nistelrooij, Anna M.J.; van Marion, Ronald; Biermann, Katharina; Spaander, Manon C.W.; van Lanschot, J. Jan B.; Wijnhoven, Bas P.L.; Dinjens, Winand N.M.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is typically diagnosed in elderly with a median age of 68 years. The incidence of EAC has been rising over the last decades, also among young adults. The aim of the study was to investigate whether early onset EAC is a distinct molecular entity. To identify early onset EACs, the nationwide network and registry of histo- and cytopathology in the Netherlands (PALGA) was searched. Twenty-eight tumors of patients aged ≤40 years were selected and matched with 27 tumors of patients aged ≥68 years. DNA was isolated from surgically resected specimen and sequenced on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine with the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Panel. No differences in mutational load between early onset and conventional EACs were observed (P=0.196). The most frequently mutated genes were TP53 (73%) and P16 (16%). Additional mutations in early onset EACs occurred exclusively in: APC, CDH1, CTNNB1, FGFR2, and STK11. In the conventional EACs additional mutations were exclusively identified in: ABL1, FBXW7, GNA11, GNAS, KRAS, MET, SMAD4, and VHL. Additional mutations besides TP53 and P16 seem to occur in different genes related to cell fate pathways for early onset EACs, while the additional mutations in conventional EACs are related to survival pathways. PMID:26973859

  7. Delayed onset of the 2002 Indian monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatau, M. K.; Flatau, P. J.; Schmidt, J.; Kiladis, G. N.

    2003-07-01

    We show that there is a set of dynamical predictors, which facilitate forecasting of a delayed monsoon onset. The main dynamical contributor is the early May propagation of the ``bogus onset Intraseasonal Oscillation'' which triggers a set of events precluding the climatological monsoon onset. We analyze in detail the 2002 monsoon onset and show that it followed a pattern described in our previous study. We notice that the 2003 monsoon onset followed very similar pattern and was delayed.

  8. Gender Dysphoria in Adults.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Kenneth J; Lawrence, Anne A; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C

    2016-03-28

    Gender dysphoria (GD), a term that denotes persistent discomfort with one's biologic sex or assigned gender, replaced the diagnosis of gender identity disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 2013. Subtypes of GD in adults, defined by sexual orientation and age of onset, have been described; these display different developmental trajectories and prognoses. Prevalence studies conclude that fewer than 1 in 10,000 adult natal males and 1 in 30,000 adult natal females experience GD, but such estimates vary widely. GD in adults is associated with an elevated prevalence of comorbid psychopathology, especially mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and suicidality. Causal mechanisms in GD are incompletely understood, but genetic, neurodevelopmental, and psychosocial factors probably all contribute. Treatment of GD in adults, although largely standardized, is likely to evolve in response to the increasing diversity of persons seeking treatment, demands for greater client autonomy, and improved understanding of the benefits and limitations of current treatment modalities. PMID:26788901

  9. Adult-Onset Asthma to Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asthma has been associated with atherosclerotic disease in several studies with some evidence that this association may be limited to women. However, most previous studies have failed to account for the heterogeneity of asthma subtypes. We previously reported increased carotid intima medial thickne...

  10. Adult onset folliculocentric langerhans cell histiocytosis confined to the scalp.

    PubMed

    Hancox, John G; James, Asha Pardasani; Madden, Christopher; Wallace, Christopher A; McMichael, Amy J

    2004-04-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a pleomorphic disease entity characterized by local or disseminated atypical Langerhans cells found most commonly in bone, lungs, mucocutaneous structures, and endocrine organs. Cutaneous disease occurs in approximately one quarter of all cases. Cutaneous findings include soft-tissue swelling, eczematous changes, a seborrheic dermatitis-like appearance, and ulceration. We report a rare case of LCH confined to the scalp with folliculocentric infiltrates. This 32-year-old male patient presented with follicularly based erythema, scale, and pustules unresponsive to topicals and oral antibiotics. The patient's lesions mimicked lichen planopilaris and folliculitis decalvans during the disease process. On hematoxylin and eosin stain, scalp biopsy showed a perivascular interstitial patchy lichenoid mononuclear cell infiltrate that focally abutted follicular infundibula. Prominent mononuclear cells having reniform nuclei were present, and immunoperoxidase stains for CD1a confirmed Langerhans cell differentiation. Serological and imaging workup failed to display systemic involvement. PMID:15024194

  11. Adult-Onset Asthma Might Raise Heart Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Risks But shared risk factors, such as air pollution, might explain the connection, researchers say To use ... is often caused by different factors -- such as air pollution -- and often results in a more rapid decline ...

  12. Acute onset of postoperative syringohydromyelia.

    PubMed

    Rao, K Santosh Mohan; Balasubramaniam, Chidambaram; Subramaniam, K

    2015-01-01

    Syringohydromyelia is a frequent finding in cases of tethered cord syndrome. The classical teaching is that the development and progression of a syrinx is a chronic process. We present a case report of an acute onset syringomyelia in an infant, who underwent an excision of a lumbosacral transitional lipoma and detethering of the cord. Immediately after recovery, the infant was found to have flaccid paraplegia. An emergency magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large acute onset syringomyelia for which he underwent an emergency midline myelotomy and release of fluid from the syrinx. Though the eventual recovery was good, this made us re-visit our understanding of the concept of syringohydromyelia. The case details and a plausible hypothesis for the rapid development of the syrinx are presented. PMID:26557165

  13. Acute onset of postoperative syringohydromyelia

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. Santosh Mohan; Balasubramaniam, Chidambaram; Subramaniam, K.

    2015-01-01

    Syringohydromyelia is a frequent finding in cases of tethered cord syndrome. The classical teaching is that the development and progression of a syrinx is a chronic process. We present a case report of an acute onset syringomyelia in an infant, who underwent an excision of a lumbosacral transitional lipoma and detethering of the cord. Immediately after recovery, the infant was found to have flaccid paraplegia. An emergency magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large acute onset syringomyelia for which he underwent an emergency midline myelotomy and release of fluid from the syrinx. Though the eventual recovery was good, this made us re-visit our understanding of the concept of syringohydromyelia. The case details and a plausible hypothesis for the rapid development of the syrinx are presented. PMID:26557165

  14. Abrupt-Onset Severe Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yo-El S.; Schwedt, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    Thunderclap headache, a severe headache which is maximal in intensity at onset, is associated with numerous underlying disorders, including subarachnoid hemorrhage, unruptured intracranial aneurysm, cervical artery dissection, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy. After exclusion of all possible causes, thunderclap headache may be considered a primary headache. This review summarizes the diagnostic considerations and clinical approach to thunderclap headache, with particular emphasis on the reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes. PMID:20352589

  15. Dipolarization Fronts from Reconnection Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Swisdak, M. M.; Merkin, V. G.; Buzulukova, N.; Moore, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Dipolarization fronts observed in the magnetotail are often viewed as signatures of bursty magnetic reconnection. However, until recently spontaneous reconnection was considered to be fully prohibited in the magnetotail geometry because of the linear stability of the ion tearing mode. Recent theoretical studies showed that spontaneous reconnection could be possible in the magnetotail geometries with the accumulation of magnetic flux at the tailward end of the thin current sheet, a distinctive feature of the magnetotail prior to substorm onset. That result was confirmed by open-boundary full-particle simulations of 2D current sheet equilibria, where two magnetotails were separated by an equilibrium X-line and weak external electric field was imposed to nudge the system toward the instability threshold. To investigate the roles of the equilibrium X-line, driving electric field and other parameters in the reconnection onset process we performed a set of 2D PIC runs with different initial settings. The investigated parameter space includes the critical current sheet thickness, flux tube volume per unit magnetic flux and the north-south component of the magnetic field. Such an investigation is critically important for the implementation of kinetic reconnection onset criteria into global MHD codes. The results are compared with Geotail visualization of the magnetotail during substorms, as well as Cluster and THEMIS observations of dipolarization fronts.

  16. Learning about Myotonic Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for Teachers ... Education Kit Online Genetics Education Resources Smithsonian NHGRI Genome Exhibition Talking Glossary: English Talking Glossary: Español Issues ...

  17. The Vocational Well-Being of Workers with Childhood Onset of Disability: Life Satisfaction and Perceived Workplace Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mark E.; Konrad, Alison M.; Yang, Yang; Ng, Eddy S. W.; Doherty, Alison J.

    2011-01-01

    Workers with disabilities are understudied, and workers with childhood onset of disability have been excluded from many of the studies on disability and work t