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Sample records for adult patients hospitalized

  1. ACG Clinical Guideline: Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    McClave, Stephen A; DiBaise, John K; Mullin, Gerard E; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-03-01

    The value of nutrition therapy for the adult hospitalized patient is derived from the outcome benefits achieved by the delivery of early enteral feeding. Nutritional assessment should identify those patients at high nutritional risk, determined by both disease severity and nutritional status. For such patients if they are unable to maintain volitional intake, enteral access should be attained and enteral nutrition (EN) initiated within 24-48 h of admission. Orogastric or nasogastric feeding is most appropriate when starting EN, switching to post-pyloric or deep jejunal feeding only in those patients who are intolerant of gastric feeds or at high risk for aspiration. Percutaneous access should be used for those patients anticipated to require EN for >4 weeks. Patients receiving EN should be monitored for risk of aspiration, tolerance, and adequacy of feeding (determined by percent of goal calories and protein delivered). Intentional permissive underfeeding (and even trophic feeding) is appropriate temporarily for certain subsets of hospitalized patients. Although a standard polymeric formula should be used routinely in most patients, an immune-modulating formula (with arginine and fish oil) should be reserved for patients who have had major surgery in a surgical ICU setting. Adequacy of nutrition therapy is enhanced by establishing nurse-driven enteral feeding protocols, increasing delivery by volume-based or top-down feeding strategies, minimizing interruptions, and eliminating the practice of gastric residual volumes. Parenteral nutrition should be used in patients at high nutritional risk when EN is not feasible or after the first week of hospitalization if EN is not sufficient. Because of their knowledge base and skill set, the gastroenterologist endoscopist is an asset to the Nutrition Support Team and should participate in providing optimal nutrition therapy to the hospitalized adult patient.

  2. Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-05-01

    Patient falls within hospitals have been identified as serious but largely preventable incidents, particularly among older adult patients. Previous literature has explored intrinsic factors associated with patient falls, but literature identifying possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls is lacking. This study seeks to identify patient motions and activities along with associated environmental design factors in a patient bathroom and clinician zone setting that may lead to falls. A motion capture experiment was conducted in a laboratory setting on 27 subjects over the age of seventy using scripted tasks and mockups of the bathroom and clinician zone of a patient room. Data were post-processed using Cortex and Visual3D software. A potential fall was characterized by a set of criteria based on the jerk of the upper body׳s center of mass (COM). Results suggest that only motion-related factors, particularly turning, pushing, pulling, and grabbing, contribute most significantly to potential falls in the patient bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute significantly in the clinician zone. Future work includes identifying and changing precise environmental design factors associated with these motions for an updated patient room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup. PMID:26920507

  3. Hospital utilization patterns and costs for adult sickle cell patients in Illinois.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, K; Karrison, T; Koshy, M; Patel, A; Friedmann, P; Cassel, C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine population size, demographic characteristics, hospital utilization patterns, the specialties of physicians providing care, and costs for hospitalized adult sickle cell patients in Illinois. METHODS: A statewide, administrative dataset for the two-year period from january 1992 through December 1993 was analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: There were 8403 admissions among 1189 individual sickle cell patients for the two-year period. Eighty-five percent of patients resided in the Chicago metropolitan area. The median age of the 1189 patients was 29; two-thirds had Medicaid or Medicare coverage. Emergency departments were the primary source of admissions (85.7%). The most common admitting diagnosis was painful crisis (97.4%), and average length of stay was four days. The median number of admissions per patient was three; most patients (85%) used only one or two hospitals. A small group used more than four hospitals and accounted for 23% of statewide admissions. Primary care physicians cared for most patients, and total hospitalization charges were more than $59 million. CONCLUSIONS: In Illinois the adult sickle cell population is concentrated in major urban centers, primarily the Chicago metropolitan area. These patients accounted for approximately 8400 admissions and more than $59 million in hospital charges during the two-year study period. A small group of patients used multiple hospitals and accounted for more than 23% of total hospitalization charges. This study shows the necessity of and provides a useful framework for developing targeted programs for adult sickle cell patients as well as for training physicians to efficiently provide comprehensive health care services for this population. PMID:9018288

  4. A systematic review of hospitalization resulting from medicine-related problems in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamid, Abdullah; Ghaleb, Maisoon; Aljadhey, Hisham; Aslanpour, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    Aims Medicine-related problems (MRPs) represent a major issue leading to hospitalization, especially in adult and elderly patients. The aims of this review are to investigate the prevalence, causes and major risk factors for MRPs leading to hospitalization in adult patients and to identify the main medicine classes involved. Methods Studies were identified through electronic searches of Medline, Embase, Scopus and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts between January 2000 and May 2013. A systematic review was conducted of both retrospective and prospective studies. Studies included were those involving hospitalization resulting from MRPs in adults (≥18 years old), whereas studies excluded were those investigating drug misuse and abuse and studies investigating MRPs in hospitalized patients. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 20. Results Forty-five studies were identified, including 21 that investigated hospitalization resulting from adverse drug reactions, six studies that investigated hospitalization due to adverse drug events and 18 studies that investigated hospitalization due to MRPs. The median prevalence rates of hospitalization resulting from adverse drug reactions, adverse drug events and MRPs were 7% (interquartile range, 2.4–14.9%), 4.6% (interquartile range, 2.85–16.6%) and 12.1% (interquartile range, 6.43–22.2%), respectively. The major causes contributing to MRPs were adverse drug reactions and noncompliance. In addition, the major risk factors associated with MRPs were old age, polypharmacy and comorbidities. Moreover, the main classes of medicines implicated were medicines used to treat cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Conclusions Hospitalization due to MRPs had a high prevalence, in the range of 4.6–12.1%. Most MRPs encountered were prevalent among adult patients taking medicines for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. PMID:24283967

  5. Interventions That Affect Gastrointestinal Motility in Hospitalized Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Asrani, Varsha M.; Yoon, Harry D.; Megill, Robin D.; Windsor, John A.; Petrov, Maxim S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility is a common complication in acute, critically ill, postoperative, and chronic patients that may lead to impaired nutrient delivery, poor clinical, and patient-reported outcomes. Several pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions to treat GI dysmotility were investigated in dozens of clinical studies. However, they often yielded conflicting results, at least in part, because various (nonstandardized) definitions of GI dysmotility were used and methodological quality of studies was poor. While a universally accepted definition of GI dysmotility is yet to be developed, a systematic analysis of data derived from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials may provide robust data on absolute and relative effectiveness of various interventions as the study outcome (GI motility) was assessed in the least biased manner. To systematically review data from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials to determine and compare the effectiveness of interventions that affect GI motility. Three electronic databases (MEDLINE, SCOPUS, and EMBASE) were searched. A random effects model was used for meta-analysis. The summary estimates were reported as mean difference (MD) with the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI). A total of 38 double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials involving 2371 patients were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review. These studies investigated a total of 20 different interventions, of which 6 interventions were meta-analyzed. Of them, the use of dopamine receptor antagonists (MD, −8.99; 95% CI, −17.72 to −0.27; P = 0.04) and macrolides (MD, −26.04; 95% CI, −51.25 to −0.82; P = 0.04) significantly improved GI motility compared with the placebo group. The use of botulism toxin significantly impaired GI motility compared with the placebo group (MD, 5.31; 95% CI, −0.04 to 10.67; P = 0.05). Other interventions (dietary factors, probiotics, hormones) did

  6. Acinetobacter Infections among Adult Patients in Qatar: A 2-Year Hospital-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Al Samawi, Musaed Saad; Khan, Fahmi Yousef; Eldeeb, Yasser; Almaslamani, Muna; Alkhal, Abdullatif; Alsoub, Hussam; Ghadban, Wissam; Howady, Faraj; Hashim, Samar

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study was conducted at Hamad General Hospital, Qatar, to describe the demographic data, clinical features underlying diseases, antimicrobial susceptibility, and outcome of A. baumannii infection. It involved all adult patients 15 years of age or older who were managed at Hamad General Hospital for A. baumannii infection from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013. We identified a total of 239 patients with A. baumannii infection, of which 182 (76.2%) were males. The mean age was 49.10 ± 19.57 years. The majority of the episodes (25.1%) occurred in elderly patients (≥65 years) and the most commonly identified site of A. baumannii infection was the respiratory tract, 117 (48.9%). Most episodes of infection, 231 (96.7%), were hospital-acquired and high rate of nosocomial infections occurred in the medical intensive care unit, 66 (28.6%). All patients had underlying medical conditions. Maximum resistance was seen to cefotaxime, 147 (58.3%), and minimum resistance was seen to colistin, 2 (1.4%). Of the 239 isolates, 102 (42.7%) were susceptible and 137 (57.3%) were multidrug-resistant. The in-hospital mortality in our study was 31%. Male gender, multidrug resistance, and septic shock were found to be independent mortality predictors. PMID:27433169

  7. Common reasons for hospitalization among adult patients with diabetes in a private medical college in Kathmandu.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, P; Pathak, U N; Subedi, N

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is one of the important non communicable disease affecting the adult populations around the world. Incidence of diabetes increasing in South Asia. Nepal is also experiencing increasing in diabetes disease burden. Diabetes mellitus is one of the important causes of hospital admission in the western world. In this study we evaluated the causes of hospital admission amongst diabetic population. Most common cause is of diagnosis is some forms of infections commonest (20%) being urinary tract infections. Ten out of total 69 patients had septicemia. Six patients out of 69 had sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis only one patient presented with metabolic complications of diabetes i.e. diabetic ketoacidosis. Coronary artery disease with heart failure was present in 14 patients. Five patients had diabetic nephropathy and 3 had retinopathy. This shows that infections is the major cause of hospital admission for diabetics followed by heart failure. Tuberculosis is important diagnosis in person with diabetes. This study shows more female patients get admitted and amongst admitted patents glycemic control is poor. This signify that women had more complications than male counter parts. PMID:24579542

  8. Demographic, clinical and laboratory findings among adult and pediatric patients hospitalized with dengue in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Velasco, John Mark S; Alera, Ma Theresa P; Ypil-Cardenas, Charity Ann; Dimaano, Efren M; Jarman, Richard G; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Yoon, In-Kyu; Cummings, Derek A; Mammen, Mammen P

    2014-03-01

    We evaluated the differences in demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings between adult and pediatric patients hospitalized with dengue fever. Ninety patients with dengue infection admitted at San Lazaro Hospital (SLH), Manila from September 2005 to January 2006 were included in the study. The cases were laboratory-confirmed to have dengue infection. The majority of dengue cases (92%) had secondary dengue infection (median age = 18, age range: 2-37) while the remainder (8%) had a primary dengue infection (median age = 12, age range: 7-22). Nearly all the patients (99%) had dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Sixty-five of the cases (72%) had serotype data: 2 (3%) were dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1) (median age = 17), 12 (18%) had DENV-2 (median age = 17.5), 38 (59%) had DENV-3 (median age = 16) and 13 (20%) had DENV-4 (median age = 18). The initial signs, symptoms and laboratory results except hematocrit (p = 0.02) and hemoglobin (p = 0.02) did not differ significantly between adults and children. During the study period, half the cases were adults (218 years; n = 45) and half were children (<18 years; n = 45). The ages of cases ranged from 2 to 37 years (median = 17 years) and the peak incidence was 15-19 years. Dengue is often considered as a pediatric disease. Additional studies are needed to determine if an age shift is occurring and where.

  9. Association between frailty and delirium in older adult patients discharged from hospital

    PubMed Central

    Verloo, Henk; Goulet, Céline; Morin, Diane; von Gunten, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Background Delirium and frailty – both potentially reversible geriatric syndromes – are seldom studied together, although they often occur jointly in older patients discharged from hospitals. This study aimed to explore the relationship between delirium and frailty in older adults discharged from hospitals. Methods Of the 221 patients aged >65 years, who were invited to participate, only 114 gave their consent to participate in this study. Delirium was assessed using the confusion assessment method, in which patients were classified dichotomously as delirious or nondelirious according to its algorithm. Frailty was assessed using the Edmonton Frailty Scale, which classifies patients dichotomously as frail or nonfrail. In addition to the sociodemographic characteristics, covariates such as scores from the Mini-Mental State Examination, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale, and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics and details regarding polymedication were collected. A multidimensional linear regression model was used for analysis. Results Almost 20% of participants had delirium (n=22), and 76.3% were classified as frail (n=87); 31.5% of the variance in the delirium score was explained by frailty (R2=0.315). Age; polymedication; scores of the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM), instrumental activities of daily living, and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics; and frailty increased the predictability of the variance of delirium by 32% to 64% (R2=0.64). Conclusion Frailty is strongly related to delirium in older patients after discharge from the hospital. PMID:26848261

  10. Antipsychotic Medication Prescribing Practices Among Adult Patients Discharged From State Psychiatric Inpatient Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    HOLLEN, VERA; SCHACHT, LUCILLE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to explore antipsychotic medication prescribing practices in a sample of 86,034 patients discharged from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals and to find the prevalence of patients discharged with no antipsychotic medications, on antipsychotic monotherapy, and on antipsychotic polypharmacy. For patients discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the study explored the adjusted rates of antipsychotic polypharmacy, the reasons patients were discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the proportion of antipsychotic polypharmacy by mental health disorder, and the characteristics associated with being discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed all discharges for adult patients (18 to 64 y of age) from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals between January 1 and December 31, 2011. The relationship among variables was explored using χ2, t test, and analysis of variance. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Results: The prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was 12%. Of the discharged patients receiving at least 1 antipsychotic medication (adjusted rate), 18% were on antipsychotic polypharmacy. The strongest predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy being prescribed were having a diagnosis of schizophrenia and a length of stay of 90 days or more. Patients were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy primarily to reduce their symptoms. Conclusions: Antipsychotic polypharmacy continues at a high enough rate to affect nearly 10,000 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia each year in state psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Further analysis of the clinical presentation of these patients may highlight particular aspects of the illness and its previous treatment that are contributing to practices outside the best-practice guideline. An increased understanding of trend data, patient characteristics, and national benchmarks provides an opportunity for

  11. Prevalence of human norovirus and Clostridium difficile coinfections in adult hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Stokely, Janelle N; Niendorf, Sandra; Taube, Stefan; Hoehne, Marina; Young, Vincent B; Rogers, Mary AM; Wobus, Christiane E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human norovirus (HuNoV) and Clostridium difficile are common causes of infectious gastroenteritis in adults in the US. However, limited information is available regarding HuNoV and C. difficile coinfections. Our study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of HuNoV and C. difficile coinfections among adult patients in a hospital setting and disease symptomatology. Study design and setting For a cross-sectional analysis, 384 fecal samples were tested for the presence of C. difficile toxins from patients (n=290), whom the provider suspected of C. difficile infections. Subsequent testing was then performed for HuNoV genogroups I and II. Multinomial logistic regression was performed to determine symptoms more frequently associated with coinfections. Results The final cohort consisted of the following outcome groups: C. difficile (n=196), C. difficile + HuNoV coinfection (n=40), HuNoV only (n=12), and neither (n=136). Coinfected patients were more likely to develop nausea, gas, and abdominal pain and were more likely to seek treatment in the winter season compared with individuals not infected or infected with either pathogen alone. Conclusion Our study revealed that patients with coinfection are more likely to experience certain gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular abdominal pain, suggesting an increased severity of disease symptomatology in coinfected patients. PMID:27418856

  12. A simple dietary assessment tool to monitor food intake of hospitalized adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Budiningsari, Dwi; Shahar, Suzana; Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Susetyowati, Susetyowati

    2016-01-01

    protein; 0.735 for non-animal source protein). Intraclass correlation coefficient ranged between 0.91 and 0.96 among respondents. There were no differences in energy, protein, carbohydrate, and fat intake estimated among health care staff (P=0.967; P=0.951; P=0.888; P=0.847, respectively). Conclusion In conclusion, PDAT provides a valid estimation of macronutrient consumption among hospitalized adult patients. PMID:27555779

  13. Prediction of Clinical Deterioration in Hospitalized Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Using a Neural Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Scott B.; Wong, Deborah J. L.; Correa, Aditi; Li, Ning; Deng, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical deterioration (ICU transfer and cardiac arrest) occurs during approximately 5–10% of hospital admissions. Existing prediction models have a high false positive rate, leading to multiple false alarms and alarm fatigue. We used routine vital signs and laboratory values obtained from the electronic medical record (EMR) along with a machine learning algorithm called a neural network to develop a prediction model that would increase the predictive accuracy and decrease false alarm rates. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting The hematologic malignancy unit in an academic medical center in the United States. Patient Population Adult patients admitted to the hematologic malignancy unit from 2009 to 2010. Intervention None. Measurements and Main Results Vital signs and laboratory values were obtained from the electronic medical record system and then used as predictors (features). A neural network was used to build a model to predict clinical deterioration events (ICU transfer and cardiac arrest). The performance of the neural network model was compared to the VitalPac Early Warning Score (ViEWS). Five hundred sixty five consecutive total admissions were available with 43 admissions resulting in clinical deterioration. Using simulation, the neural network outperformed the ViEWS model with a positive predictive value of 82% compared to 24%, respectively. Conclusion We developed and tested a neural network-based prediction model for clinical deterioration in patients hospitalized in the hematologic malignancy unit. Our neural network model outperformed an existing model, substantially increasing the positive predictive value, allowing the clinician to be confident in the alarm raised. This system can be readily implemented in a real-time fashion in existing EMR systems. PMID:27532679

  14. Hospital Triage System for Adult Patients Using an Influenza-Like Illness Scoring System during the 2009 Pandemic—Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Diaz, Esteban; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Gomez-Abundis, Gerardo F.; Briseño-Ramirez, Jaime; Perez-Gomez, Hector Raul; Lopez-Gatell, Hugo; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M.; Ramírez, Ernesto; López, Irma; Iguala, Miguel; Chapela, Ietza Bojórquez; Zavala, Ethel Palacios; Hernández, Mauricio; Stuart, Tammy L.; Villarino, Margarita Elsa; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Waterman, Steve; Uyeki, Timothy; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Background Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged during 2009. To help clinicians triage adults with acute respiratory illness, a scoring system for influenza-like illness (ILI) was implemented at Hospital Civil de Guadalajara, Mexico. Methods A medical history, laboratory and radiology results were collected on emergency room (ER) patients with acute respiratory illness to calculate an ILI-score. Patients were evaluated for admission by their ILI-score and clinicians' assessment of risk for developing complications. Nasal and throat swabs were collected from intermediate and high-risk patients for influenza testing by RT-PCR. The disposition and ILI-score of those oseltamivir-treated versus untreated, clinical characteristics of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) patients versus test-negative patients were compared by Pearson's Χ2, Fisher's Exact, and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Results Of 1840 ER patients, 230 were initially hospitalized (mean ILI-score = 15), and the rest were discharged, including 286 ambulatory patients given oseltamivir (median ILI-score = 11), and 1324 untreated (median ILI-score = 5). Fourteen (1%) untreated patients returned, and 3 were hospitalized on oseltamivir (median ILI-score  = 19). Of 371 patients tested by RT-PCR, 104 (28%) had pandemic influenza and 42 (11%) had seasonal influenza A detected. Twenty (91%) of 22 imaged hospitalized pandemic influenza patients had bilateral infiltrates compared to 23 (38%) of 61 imaged hospital test-negative patients (p<0.001). One patient with confirmed pandemic influenza presented 6 days after symptom onset, required mechanical ventilation, and died. Conclusions The triaging system that used an ILI-score complimented clinicians' judgment of who needed oseltamivir and inpatient care and helped hospital staff manage a surge in demand for services. PMID:20498718

  15. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of adult patients hospitalized for erysipelas and cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Perelló-Alzamora, M-R; Santos-Duran, J-C; Sánchez-Barba, M; Cañueto, J; Marcos, M; Unamuno, P

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the clinical and epidemiological aspects of all cases of erysipelas and infectious cellulitis admitted to a tertiary hospital during a period of five years. All patients admitted with the main diagnosis of erysipelas or cellulitis to the Department of Dermatology of the author's institution from January 2005 to May 2010 were included. Seventy patients were identified and their medical records were retrospectively reviewed so as to record the epidemiological and clinical data. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to analyze variables that predicted longer length of stay. The frequency of cellulitis in the lower limbs was higher in men and patients older than 65 years. Moderate/severe cellulitis in patients with basal comorbidity followed by a poor response to oral antibiotic therapy for 48 h were the most common reasons for admission. At arrival, four patients had abscessed areas. Fourteen patients developed local complications and 18 cases developed general in-hospital complications. Most patients improved or were healed with intravenous amoxicillin-clavulanate 1 g-200 mg/8 h. Intravenous amoxicillin-clavulanate 1 g-200 mg/8 h may be a good choice for empiric treatment in our setting. The development of in-hospital complications and the need for changing empiric antibiotic therapy were significant and independent variables associated with longer length of stay.

  16. Screening for Frailty in Hospitalized Older Adults: Reliability and Feasibility of the Maastricht Frailty Screening Tool for Hospitalized Patients (MFST-HP).

    PubMed

    Warnier, Ron M J; van Rossum, Erik; van Leendert, Jannic A A; Pijls, Noor A T; Mulder, Wubbo J; Schols, Jos M G A; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M

    2016-09-01

    As nurses in hospitals are confronted with increasing numbers of older patients, their geriatric nursing skills and knowledge must be integrated into daily clinical practice. Early risk identification via screening tools may help improve geriatric care. To reduce the assessment burden of nurses, the Maastricht Frailty Screening Tool for Hospitalized Patients (MFST-HP) was developed. The aim of the current study was to explore aspects of reliability, validity, and feasibility of the MFST-HP. Intrarater reliability was assessed by measuring patients two times within 24 hours. Interrater reliability was assessed by having patients screened by two different nurses. Construct validity was studied by the associations between the MFST-HP scores and age and comorbidities. Intraclass correlation coefficients for both intra- and interrater reliability were good (>0.93). Older patients and those with more comorbidity showed higher scores on the MFST-HP compared to younger patients and those with less comorbidity. The MFST-HP shows promise as a reliable, valid, and feasible screening tool for frailty among hospitalized older adults. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(5):243-251.]. PMID:27637112

  17. COGNUTUVE AND NEUROLOGICAL COMPLICATIONS OF BACTERIAL MENINGITIS IN ADULT PATIENTS: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY.

    PubMed

    El-Gindy, Eman M; Ali-Eldin, Fatima A; Bayoumy, Iman; Abdel-Moneim, Lamiaa; Ibrahim, Wesam A

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis is associated with disabling sequelae in a significant proportion of patients. It is associated with high mortality, risk of neuropsychological sequelae and risk of cognitive impairment the purpose of this study is to assess cognitive and neurological complications in adult patients with bacterial meningitis. A total of 45 patients with bacterial meningitis and 16 patients with tuberculous meningitis were enrolled. They were subjected to full medical history taking and clinical examination, full neurological examination on admission and discharge. Mini mental state examination (MMSE) and Wechsler memory scale (WMS) were used to assess cognitive function. The results showed that the ischemic brain insult (87.88%) followed by cranial nerves affection (32.42%) were the commonest neurological complication detected on discharge. Cognitive impairment was detected in 53.66% of patients using MMSE.WMS showed that orientation, information and logical memory were the most common affected. Cognitive and neurological complications were not statistically related to age or etiology (P>0.05). Longer duration until diagnosis (Beta = -.18, p < 0.001), presence of intracranial complications (Beta = -.12, p < 0.005), need for mechanical ventilation (Beta = -.79, p < 0.001) and drug abuse (Beta = -0.11, p < 0.05) were significant predictors of worse outcome assessed by Glasgow outcome score. PMID:26939225

  18. Status of human dignity of adult patients admitted to hospitals of Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Moosavi, Soolmaz

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining dignity and respect is among patients’ most fundamental rights. The importance of patient dignity, the status quo, patients’ needs, and a shortage of survey studies in this area were the underlying incentives for conducting this study. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which data were collected through Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI). The questionnaire was completed by 280 inpatients in 2012 to determine their perspectives on their personal state of human dignity. In this study, the mean score of patients’ dignity was 1.89 out of 5 (SD = 0.81). Results indicated a significant relationship between type of hospital and the distress caused by disease symptoms, peace of mind, and social support (P < 0.05). There were also relationship between type of ward and dependency (P < 0.05), type of disease and dependency (P < 0.05), gender and social support (P < 0.05), household size and peace of mind (P < 0.05). The person’s satisfaction with household income showed significant relationship with symptom distress, dependency and existential distress (P < 0.05). Results showed a significant inverse correlation between age and patient dignity (P = 0.005, r = - 0.166). However, the relationship between employment status, health insurance, education level and the above factors were insignificant. Studies indicate that there is a relationship between patients’ dignity and mental distress, and therefore policy makers and health services officials should establish and implement plans to maintain and enhance patients’ dignity in hospitals. Educating the health team, particularly the nurses can be very effective in maintaining patients’ dignity and respect. PMID:26587200

  19. Recognition of dementia in hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Katie; Mezey, Mathy

    2008-01-01

    Many hospital patients with dementia have no documented dementia diagnosis. In some cases, this is because they have never been diagnosed. Recognition of Dementia in Hospitalized Older Adults proposes several approaches that hospital nurses can use to increase recognition of dementia. This article describes the Try This approaches, how to implement them, and how to incorporate them into a hospital's current admission procedures. For a free online video demonstrating the use of these approaches, go to http://links.lww.com/A216. PMID:18156858

  20. A comparative study of adult patient doses in film screen and computed radiography in some Sudanese hospitals.

    PubMed

    Elshiekh, E; Suliman, I I; Habbani, F

    2015-07-01

    A study was performed to compare adult patient doses in film screen (FS) and computed radiography (CR) diagnostic X-ray examinations in some hospitals in Sudan over a period of 1 y; during this period of time, the CR systems were introduced to replace FS systems. Radiation doses were estimated for 354 patients in five hospitals (two FS units and three CR units). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was estimated from incident air kerma using patient exposure parameters and tube output. Dose calculations were performed using CALDOSE X 3.5 Monte Carlo-based software. In FS, third quartile of ESAK values for skull PA, skull LAT, chest PA, pelvis AP, lumbar spine AP and lumbar spine LAT were 1.5, 1.3, 0.3, 1.9, 2.8 and 5.9 mGy, respectively, while in CR, third quartile of ESAK values for the same examinations were 2.7, 1.7, 0.18, 1.7, 3.2 and 10.8 mGy, respectively. Comparable ESAK values were presented in FS and CR units. The results are important for future dose optimisation and setting national diagnostic reference levels. PMID:25889604

  1. A Study on the Epidemiology and Aetiology of Acute Gastroenteritis in Adult Patients Presenting at the Infectious Diseases Hospital in Tirana, Albania

    PubMed Central

    Stroni, Gentian P.; Dhimolea, Majlinda M.; Pipero, Pëllumb S.; Kraja, Dhimiter V.; Sallavaci, Suela Y.; Bino, Silva F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute gastroenteritis remains a common cause of hospital emergency room visits in Albania. However, the aetiology of severe gastroenteritis leading to hospitalization in adults frequently remains unclear. Aims: Our objective was to study the epidemiology and causes of community-acquired, acute gastroenteritis in adult patients presenting to hospital. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Methods: A prospective study was conducted from January 2010 to January 2012, among patients ≥15 years old with community-acquired gastroenteritis presenting to the emergency room of the University Hospital “Mother Theresa” in Tirana, Albania. Stool samples and rectal swabs were collected from the patients for microbiological testing. Results: The median age of the study patients was 33 (15–88) years and 577 (58%) were females. The median age of males was 35 (15–87) years. The vast majority of cases occurred in urban area (849, 85%), p<0.01. Patients were admitted throughout the year with peak admissions for patients infected by bacterial pathogens in summer and those affected by viral pathogens in autumn. A total of 917 (91.7%) patients underwent a laboratory examination. The overall isolation rate was 51%. Bacterial pathogens were found in 29%, viral pathogens in 19% and protozoal pathogens in 2.5% of patients. No aetiological agent or other cause of acute diarrhoea was found in 449 (49%) patients. Twenty-nine (3.2%) patients were hospitalized. Conclusion: Despite extensive laboratory investigations, enteropathogens were detected in only 51% of adult patients who presented to the hospital ER with acute gastroenteritis. Viral infections ranked as the second most common cause of gastroenteritis in adults. PMID:25625016

  2. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in adult hospitalized patients: the disease spectrum and diagnostic predictors - an experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    PubMed

    Chrispal, Anugrah; Boorugu, Harikishan; Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Chandy, Sara; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Thomas, Elsa Mary; Abraham, Asha Mary; Abraham, O C; Thomas, Kurien

    2010-10-01

    Local prevalences of individual diseases influence the prioritization of the differential diagnoses of a clinical syndrome of acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AFI). This study was conducted in order to delineate the aetiology of AFI that present to a tertiary hospital in southern India and to describe disease-specific clinical profiles. An 1-year prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age >16 years) who presented with an undifferentiated febrile illness of duration 5-21 days, requiring hospitalization. Blood cultures, malarial parasites and febrile serology (acute and convalescent), in addition to clinical evaluations and basic investigations were performed. Comparisons were made between each disease and the other AFIs. A total of 398 AFI patients were diagnosed with: scrub typhus (47.5%); malaria (17.1%); enteric fever (8.0%); dengue (7.0%); leptospirosis (3.0%); spotted fever rickettsiosis (1.8%); Hantavirus (0.3%); alternate diagnosis (7.3%); and unclear diagnoses (8.0%). Leucocytosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, aseptic meningitis, mild serum transaminase elevation and hypoalbuminaemia were independently associated with scrub typhus. Normal leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, renal failure, splenomegaly and hyperbilirubinaemia with mildly elevated serum transaminases were associated with malaria. Rash, overt bleeding manifestations, normal to low leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia and significantly elevated hepatic transaminases were associated with dengue. Enteric fever was associated with loose stools, normal to low leukocyte counts and normal platelet counts. It is imperative to maintain a sound epidemiological database of AFIs so that evidence-based diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines can be developed.

  3. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in adult hospitalized patients: the disease spectrum and diagnostic predictors - an experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    PubMed

    Chrispal, Anugrah; Boorugu, Harikishan; Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Chandy, Sara; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Thomas, Elsa Mary; Abraham, Asha Mary; Abraham, O C; Thomas, Kurien

    2010-10-01

    Local prevalences of individual diseases influence the prioritization of the differential diagnoses of a clinical syndrome of acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AFI). This study was conducted in order to delineate the aetiology of AFI that present to a tertiary hospital in southern India and to describe disease-specific clinical profiles. An 1-year prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age >16 years) who presented with an undifferentiated febrile illness of duration 5-21 days, requiring hospitalization. Blood cultures, malarial parasites and febrile serology (acute and convalescent), in addition to clinical evaluations and basic investigations were performed. Comparisons were made between each disease and the other AFIs. A total of 398 AFI patients were diagnosed with: scrub typhus (47.5%); malaria (17.1%); enteric fever (8.0%); dengue (7.0%); leptospirosis (3.0%); spotted fever rickettsiosis (1.8%); Hantavirus (0.3%); alternate diagnosis (7.3%); and unclear diagnoses (8.0%). Leucocytosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, aseptic meningitis, mild serum transaminase elevation and hypoalbuminaemia were independently associated with scrub typhus. Normal leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, renal failure, splenomegaly and hyperbilirubinaemia with mildly elevated serum transaminases were associated with malaria. Rash, overt bleeding manifestations, normal to low leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia and significantly elevated hepatic transaminases were associated with dengue. Enteric fever was associated with loose stools, normal to low leukocyte counts and normal platelet counts. It is imperative to maintain a sound epidemiological database of AFIs so that evidence-based diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines can be developed. PMID:20870680

  4. Cause-specific mortality in adult epilepsy patients from Tyrol, Austria: hospital-based study.

    PubMed

    Granbichler, Claudia A; Oberaigner, Willi; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Bauer, Gerhard; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Seppi, Klaus; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a devastating condition with a considerable increase in mortality compared to the general population. Few studies have focused on cause-specific mortality which we analyse in detail in over 4,000 well-characterized epilepsy patients. The cohort comprised of epilepsy patients ≥ 18, treated between 1970 and 2009 at the epilepsy clinic of Innsbruck Medical University, Austria, and living in the province of Tyrol, Austria. Epilepsy diagnosis was based on ILAE guidelines (1989); patients with brain tumor were excluded. Deceased patients and causes of death (ICD-codes) were obtained via record linkage to the national death registry. We computed age-, sex-, and period-adjusted standardized mortality rates (SMR) for 36 diagnoses subgroups in four major groups. Additional analyses were performed for an incidence cohort. Overall cohort: 4,295 patients, 60,649.1 person-years, 822 deaths, overall SMR 1.7 (95 % CI 1.6-1.9), highest elevated cause-specific SMR: congenital anomalies [7.1 (95 % CI 2.3-16.6)], suicide [4.2 (95 % CI 2.0-8.1)], alcohol dependence syndrome [3.9 (95 % CI 1.8-7.4)], malignant neoplasm of esophagus [3.1 (95 % CI 1.2-6.4)], pneumonia [2.7 (95 % CI 1.6-4.2)]. Incidence cohort: 1,299 patients, 14,215.4 person-years, 267 deaths, overall SMR 1.8 (95 % CI 1.6-2.1), highest elevated cause-specific SMR congenital anomalies [10.8 (95 % CI 1.3-39.3)], suicide [6.8 (95 % CI 1.4-19.8)], alcohol dependence syndrome (6.4 [95 % CI 1.8-16.5)], pneumonia [3.9 (95 % CI 1.8-7.4)], cerebrovascular disease at 3.5 (95 % CI 2.6-4.6). Mortality due to mental health problems, such as suicide or alcohol dependence syndrome, malignant neoplasms, and cerebrovascular diseases was highly increased in our study. In addition to aim for seizure freedom, we suggest improving general health promotion, including cessation of smoking, lowering of alcohol intake, and reduction of weight as well as early identification of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with epilepsy.

  5. COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF EARLY NUTRITIONAL THERAPY IN MALNOURISHED ADULT PATIENTS IN A HIGH COMPLEXITY HOSPITAL.

    PubMed

    Giraldo Giraldo, Nubia Amparo; Vásquez Velásquez, Johanna; Roldán Cano, Paula Andrea; Ospina Astudillo, Carolina; Sosa Cardona, Yuliet Paulina

    2015-12-01

    Introducción: la malnutrición hospitalaria es un problema frecuente en el mundo que aumenta las complicaciones, los días de estancia, la mortalidad y los costes sanitarios. Objetivos: el objetivo de este estudio fue establecer la coste-efectividad de la terapia nutricional precoz en pacientes malnutridos en un hospital de alta complejidad. Materiales y métodos: este estudio analítico con valoración económica, incluyó 227 adultos hospitalizados y malnutridos según Valoración Global Subjetiva. La cohorte prospectiva recibió Terapia Nutricional Precoz (TNP), mientras que la cohorte retrospectiva recibió Terapia Nutricional Tardía (TNT). Las medidas del coste- efectividad incluyeron costes por: días de estancia, complicaciones y condición de egreso. Resultados: las cohortes fueron similares en cuanto a características clínicas y demográficas, excepto en la mediana de edad; para la TNP fue 61 años (rango intercuartil [RIQ]: 48-71) y para la TNT fue 55 años (RIQ: 44-67) (p=0,024). La TNP se encontró costo-efectiva en la reducción de los días de estancia hospitalaria (11 días, RIQ: 7-17) en comparación con la TNT (18 días, RIQ: 10-28) (p.

  6. Predicting Early Mortality in Adult Trauma Patients Admitted to Three Public University Hospitals in Urban India: A Prospective Multicentre Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Gerdin, Martin; Roy, Nobhojit; Khajanchi, Monty; Kumar, Vineet; Dharap, Satish; Felländer-Tsai, Li; Petzold, Max; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Saha, Makhan Lal; von Schreeb, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Background In India alone, more than one million people die yearly due to trauma. Identification of patients at risk of early mortality is crucial to guide clinical management and explain prognosis. Prediction models can support clinical judgement, but existing models have methodological limitations. The aim of this study was to derive a vital sign based prediction model for early mortality among adult trauma patients admitted to three public university hospitals in urban India. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of adult trauma patients admitted to three urban university hospitals in India between October 2013 and January 2014. The outcome measure was mortality within 24 hours. We used logistic regression with restricted cubic splines to derive our model. We assessed model performance in terms of discrimination, calibration, and optimism. Results A total of 1629 patients were included. Median age was 35, 80% were males. Mortality between admission and 24 hours was 6%. Our final model included systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and Glasgow coma scale. Our model displayed good discrimination, with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROCC) of 0.85. Predicted mortality corresponded well with observed mortality, indicating good calibration. Conclusion This study showed that routinely recorded systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and Glasgow coma scale predicted early hospital mortality in trauma patients admitted to three public university hospitals in urban India. Our model needs to be externally validated before it can be applied in the clinical setting. PMID:25180494

  7. Comatose and noncomatose adult diabetic ketoacidosis patients at the University Teaching Hospital, Zambia: Clinical profiles, risk factors, and mortality outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kakusa, Mwanja; Kamanga, Brown; Ngalamika, Owen; Nyirenda, Soka

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the commonly encountered diabetes mellitus emergencies. Aim: This study aimed at describing the clinical profiles and hospitalization outcomes of DKA patients at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH) in Lusaka, Zambia and to investigate the role of coma on mortality outcome. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional analytical study of hospitalized DKA patients at UTH. The data collected included clinical presentation, precipitating factors, laboratory profiles, complications, and hospitalization outcomes. Primary outcome measured was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results: The median age was 40 years. Treatment noncompliance was the single highest identified risk factor for development of DKA, followed by new detection of diabetes, then infections. Comatose patients were significantly younger, had lower baseline blood pressure readings, and higher baseline respiratory rates compared to noncomatose patients. In addition, comatose patients had higher baseline admission random blood glucose readings. Their baseline sodium and chloride levels were also higher. The prevalences of hypokalemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia were also higher among comatose patients compared to noncomatose patients. Development of aspiration during admission with DKA, pneumonia at baseline, development of renal failure, and altered mental status were associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure was independently predictive of mortality. Conclusion: The mortality rate from DKA hospitalizations is high at UTH. Treatment noncompliance is the single highest identifiable precipitant of DKA. Aspiration, development of renal failure, altered sensorium, and pneumonia at baseline are associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure during admission is predictive of mortality. PMID:27042416

  8. Characteristics and determinants of adult patients with acute poisoning attending the accident and emergency department of a teaching hospital in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Khudair, I F; Jassim, Z; Hanssens, Y; Alsaad, W A

    2013-09-01

    Data about etiologic and demographic characteristics of acute poisoning in adults in Qatar are lacking. This prospective observational study was undertaken to analyze characteristics and possible determinants of acute poisoning in adults in Qatar. During 2010, 18,073 patients attended the emergency department of Hamad General Hospital, a teaching hospital in Qatar. Out of them, 599 (3.3%) patients were diagnosed as "poisoning case" with either chemical or pharmaceutical substances. The prevalence rate of poisoning incidence was 35.3/100,000 population. Seven patients died, corresponding with a case-fatality rate of 0.39/1000. The majority were male (65%) and the mean age was 34 years. The poisons involved were mainly chemicals (61.6%) and pharmaceuticals (38.4%). Female, mainly single, suffered more intentional poisoning compared to male. Of the patients aged 60 years and above (7.2%), the majority (95.3%) suffered unintentional poisoning with pharmaceuticals; 56% with warfarin, 12% with digoxin and 7% with insulin. Multivariate analysis shows that female gender, single status, younger than 35 years of age, being poisoned by pharmaceutical products, and the need for hospitalization are significant determinants for acute intentional poisoning after adjusting all other possible covariates. The findings of this study can be used to establish awareness and prophylactic campaigns in Qatar.

  9. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... but can also be caused by fungi. Hospital construction. Hospital staff do everything they can to prevent ... patients staying at hospitals where there is ongoing construction or renovation. 5 This is thought to be ...

  10. Characteristics and dying trajectories of adult hospital patients from acute care wards who die following review by the rapid response team.

    PubMed

    Coombs, M A; Nelson, K; Psirides, A J; Suter, N; Pedersen, A

    2016-03-01

    A third of patients reviewed by rapid response teams (RRT) require end-of-life care. However, little is known about the characteristics and management of these patients following RRT review. This paper presents results of a retrospective, descriptive audit that explored the dying trajectory of adult ward inpatients who died outside of intensive care following RRT review. The study setting was a 430-bed tertiary New Zealand hospital during 2013. RRT, inpatient databases and hospital notes were used to identify 100 consecutive adult inpatients who died subsequent to RRT review. Outcome measures included time from RRT review to death, place of death, pre-existing co-morbidities and frequency of medical review. Results demonstrated that patients were old (median 77 years, IQR 63-85years), emergency admissions (n=100) and admitted under a medical specialty (n=71). All but one of the cohort had pre-existing co-morbidities (mean 3.2, SD 1.7), almost a third (n=31) had cancer and 51% had 1-4 previous inpatient admissions within the previous 12 months. The mean length of stay prior to RRT review was 4.9 days (SD 5.5) during which patients were frequently reviewed by senior medical staff (mean 6.8 times, SD 6.9, range 0-44). Twenty per cent of patients died after their first RRT review with a further 40% receiving treatment limitation/palliation. Fifty-two per cent of patients had a pre-existing DNAR. Eighty per cent of patients died in hospital. Whilst the RRT fulfils an unmet need in decision-making at end of life, there is a need to understand what RRT, instead of ward-based or palliative care teams, offers dying patients. PMID:27029659

  11. Trends, victims, and injuries in injurious patient assaults on adult, geriatric, and child/adolescent psychiatric units in US hospitals, 2007-2013.

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S

    2015-04-01

    While rates of other nurse-sensitive adverse outcomes have declined in recent years, little is known about trends in rates of assault by psychiatric inpatients. The primary purpose of this study was to examine recent trends in injurious assault rates against patients and staff on adult, geriatric, and child/adolescent psychiatric units, using data from a nationwide sample of hospitals. A secondary aim was to assess the frequency with which patients and various types of hospital staff were reported as the most severely injured victim. National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators® data from 2007 to 2013 were extracted. The sample comprised 345 hospitals (324 general, 5 pediatric, 16 psychiatric), 438 adult, 75 geriatric, and 105 child/adolescent units, each with assault rate data from at least three of the seven study years. All but four states in the United States were represented. Spearman's rank coefficients were used to test for time trends. In 16.3 million patient days, nearly three-quarters of the 14,877 injurious assaults by patients involved injury only to hospital staff, whereas one-fifth resulted in injury only to patients. A registered nurse was named most frequently as the most severely injured victim (32.1% of assaults), and nursing staff of all types accounted for 64.9% of the most severely injured. Assault rates did not change significantly over time. Unlike several other nursing-sensitive adverse outcomes that have been the focus of policymakers, assault rates have not declined in recent years and remain a problem in need of more focused attention.

  12. Variation in the Type, Rate, and Selection of Patients for Out-of-hospital Airway Procedures Among Injured Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Newgard, Craig D.; Koprowicz, Kent; Wang, Henry; Monnig, Aaron; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Sears, Gena K.; Davis, Daniel P.; Bulger, Eileen; Stephens, Shannon W.; Daya, Mohamud R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objective was to compare the type, rate, and selection of injured patients for out-of-hospital airway procedures among emergency medical services (EMS) agencies in 10 sites across North America. Methods The authors analyzed a consecutive patient, prospective cohort registry of injured adults and children with an out-of-hospital advanced airway attempt, collected from December 1, 2005, through February 28, 2007, by 181 EMS agencies in 10 sites across the United States and Canada. Advanced airway procedures were defined as orotracheal intubation, nasotracheal intubation, supraglottic airway, or cricothyrotomy. Airway procedure rates were calculated based on age-specific population values for the 10 sites and the number of injured patients with field physiologic abnormality (systolic blood pressure of ≤90 mm Hg, respiratory rate of <10 or >29 breaths / min, Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score of ≤12). Descriptive measures were used to compare patients between sites. Results A total 1,738 patients had at least one advanced airway attempt and were included in the analysis. There was wide variation between sites in the types of airway procedures performed, including orotracheal intubation (63% to 99%), supraglottic airways (0 to 27%), nasotracheal intubation (0 to 21%), and cricothyrotomy (0 to 2%). Use of rapid sequence intubation (RSI) varied from 0% to 65%. The population-adjusted rates of field airway intervention (by site) ranged from 1.2 to 22.8 per 100,000 adults and 0.2 to 4.0 per 100,000 children. Among trauma patients with physiologic abnormality, some sites performed airway procedures in almost 50% of patients, while other sites used these procedures in fewer than 10%. There was also large variation in demographic characteristics, physiologic measures, mechanism of injury, mode of transport, field cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and unadjusted mortality among airway patients. Conclusions Among 10 sites across North America, there was wide

  13. Prevalence of Peripheral Arterial Disease among Adult Patients Attending Outpatient Clinic at a General Hospital in South Angola.

    PubMed

    Paquissi, Feliciano Chanana; Cuvinje, Arminda Bimbi Paquissi; Cuvinje, Almeida Bailundo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis, whose prevalence is increasing worldwide, and is associated with all-cause mortality. However, no study has assessed this disease in Huambo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PAD in patients attending an outpatient clinic at a general hospital in Huambo, South Angola. Methods. A cross-sectional study, including 115 patients aged 40 years and older attending an outpatient service. The evaluation included a basic questionnaire for lifestyle and medical history and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement using hand-held Doppler. PAD was defined as an ABI ≤0.9 in either lower limb. Results. Of 115 patients, 62.60% were women with a median age of 52.5 (range of 40 to 91) years. The prevalence of PAD was 42.6% (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 95%: 33.91-52.17%). Among patients with PAD, 95.92% had mild disease and 4.08% moderate to severe disease. The main risk factor for PAD was age (≥60 years) (χ (2) = 3.917, P ≤ 0.05). The prevalence was slightly higher in men and hypertensive subjects, but without statistical significance with ORs of 1.5 (95% CI: 0.69-3.21) and 1.42 (95% CI: 0.64-3.17), respectively. Hypertension was also high in the group (66.95%). Conclusion. The prevalence of PAD was 42.6%, higher in those aged 60 years and older. More studies, with representative samples, are necessary to clarify PAD prevalence and associated risk factors. PMID:27293966

  14. Prevalence of Peripheral Arterial Disease among Adult Patients Attending Outpatient Clinic at a General Hospital in South Angola

    PubMed Central

    Paquissi, Feliciano Chanana; Cuvinje, Arminda Bimbi Paquissi; Cuvinje, Almeida Bailundo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis, whose prevalence is increasing worldwide, and is associated with all-cause mortality. However, no study has assessed this disease in Huambo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PAD in patients attending an outpatient clinic at a general hospital in Huambo, South Angola. Methods. A cross-sectional study, including 115 patients aged 40 years and older attending an outpatient service. The evaluation included a basic questionnaire for lifestyle and medical history and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement using hand-held Doppler. PAD was defined as an ABI ≤0.9 in either lower limb. Results. Of 115 patients, 62.60% were women with a median age of 52.5 (range of 40 to 91) years. The prevalence of PAD was 42.6% (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 95%: 33.91–52.17%). Among patients with PAD, 95.92% had mild disease and 4.08% moderate to severe disease. The main risk factor for PAD was age (≥60 years) (χ2 = 3.917, P ≤ 0.05). The prevalence was slightly higher in men and hypertensive subjects, but without statistical significance with ORs of 1.5 (95% CI: 0.69–3.21) and 1.42 (95% CI: 0.64–3.17), respectively. Hypertension was also high in the group (66.95%). Conclusion. The prevalence of PAD was 42.6%, higher in those aged 60 years and older. More studies, with representative samples, are necessary to clarify PAD prevalence and associated risk factors. PMID:27293966

  15. Exacerbation of daily cough and allergic symptoms in adult patients with chronic cough by Asian dust: A hospital-based study in Kanazawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Tomomi; Kambayashi, Yasuhiro; Ohkura, Noriyuki; Fujimura, Masaki; Nakanishi, Sayaka; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu; Saijoh, Kiyofumi; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Michigami, Yoshimasa; Hitomi, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-01

    The health effects associated with Asian dust have attracted attention due to the rapid increase in the number of Asian dust events in East Asia in recent years. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between Asian dust and daily cough, as well as allergic symptoms, in adult patients who suffer from chronic cough. We enrolled 86 adult patients from Kanazawa University Hospital, Japan, who were diagnosed with asthma, cough variant asthma, atopic cough or a combination of these conditions. From January to June 2011, subjects recorded their symptoms in a diary every day. Asian dust and non-Asian dust periods were defined according to the dust extinction coefficient, measured using the light detection and ranging (LIDAR). The daily levels of total suspended particulates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and coexisting factors related to allergies, such as the Japanese cedar pollen count, were measured. McNemar's test showed that there were significantly more cough-positive patients during Asian dust periods than during the non-Asian dust period (p = 0.022). In addition, during Asian dust periods when the daily levels of Japanese cedar pollen, Japanese cypress pollen and PAHs were elevated, there were significantly more patients who experienced itchy eyes than during the non-Asian dust period (p < 0.05). On the other hand, there were no significant differences in the allergic symptoms, including sneezing or a runny nose and nasal congestion. This is the first report to show that Asian dust triggers cough and allergic symptoms in adult patients with chronic cough.

  16. Assessment of the magnitude and associated factors of immunological failure among adult and adolescent HIV-infected patients in St. Luke and Tulubolo Hospital, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bayou, Bekelech; Sisay, Abay; Kumie, Abera

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has become a standard of care for the treatment of HIV infection. However, cost and resistance to ART are major obstacles for access to treatment especially in resource-limited settings. In this study, we aimed to assess the magnitude and associated factors of Immunological failure among adult and adolescent HIV infected Patients (with age ‘15yrs) on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) in St. Luke and Tulu Bolo Hospitals, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Methods A retrospective follow-up study was conducted among HIV-infected patients initiated 1st line ART at St. Luke and Tulu Bolo Hospitals, South West Shoa Zone, Oromia, Ethiopia. Results A total of 828 patient charts were reviewed. 477(57.6%) were female and the median age was 32 years. The median baseline CD4 count was 148cells/mm3. The most common prescribed ART was TDF based (36.7%). Out of 828 patients chart reviewed 6.8% (56) were developed immunological failure. Out of them only 20 (2.4%) were detected and put on second line regimen. The incidence of immunological failure was 1.8 cases per 100 person years of follow-up. Patients who had not disclosed their HIV status to any one had high risk of immunological failure compared with patients those who had disclosed their HIV status (AHR, 0.429; 95% CI 0.206 - 0.893; P-value=0.024). Conclusion Non disclosures of HIV status and with ambulatory of baseline functional status were found to be predictors of immunological failure. Most of the immunological failure cases were not detected early and not switched to second line ARV regimen. So patients with the above risk factors should be considered for a timely switch to second line HAART. PMID:26587140

  17. Directive and supportive behaviors used by families of hospitalized older adults to affect the process of hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Jacelon, Cynthia S

    2006-08-01

    As part of a grounded-theory study exploring the social processes of hospitalized older adults, family members were asked about their roles in relation to their hospitalized relative. Participants included five hospitalized older adults (aged > or = 75 years), a family member, and a nurse for each older adult. Data saturation determined the number of participants. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method to develop the substantive theory of managing personal integrity during hospitalization. Personal integrity is a concept encompassing the properties of health, dignity, and autonomy. Siblings, spouses, children, and grandchildren used a combination of supportive and directive behaviors to affect personal integrity and the hospitalization for their older relatives. In prior research, the entire family was viewed as the patient. This research is unique in that the family is viewed as a modifier of hospitalization affecting the older adult's hospital experience and not as the focus of care. PMID:16837693

  18. Hospital Libraries in Patient's Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iroka, Luke A.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the positive effects of patient education, including the physician patient relationship, improvements in health status, and cost effectiveness. The status of hospital libraries in Nigeria is described, and suggestions for the implementation of patient education programs are made. (5 references) (CLB)

  19. Epidemiology and risk factors for nosocomial Non-Candida albicans candidemia in adult patients at a tertiary care hospital in North China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiurong; Yan, Donghui; Sun, Wei; Zeng, Zhaoyin; Su, Ruirui; Su, Jianrong

    2015-09-01

    Nosocomial candidemia extends the length of hospital stay, increases the costs of medical care, and is associated with a high mortality rate. Epidemiological data that assist in the choice of initial therapy may help to improve the prognosis. The present study was undertaken to investigate the epidemiology of nosocomial candidemia and identify risk factors for nosocomial candidemia caused by C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species (NAC). A retrospective chart review was undertaken to analyze cases of nosocomial candidemia treated at the Beijing Friendship Hospital between January 2008 and December 2012. All cases of candidemia were identified using the previously published criteria. Among 106 patients analyzed, 53.8% had nosocomial candidemia caused by NAC. Candida albicans was the most common causative agent, accounting for 46.2% of all cases, followed by C. glabrata (25.5%), C. tropicalis (15.1%), C. parapsilosis (10.4%) and C. Krusei (0.9%). Comparison of nosocomial C. albicans and NAC candidemia by multivariate logistic regression showed that factors independently associated with nosocomial NAC candidemia included exposure to azole agents (odds ratio [OR]: 3.359; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.136-10.154; P = .031) and artificial surgical implants (OR: 37.519; 95% CI: 2.5-562.998; P = .009). A significant risk factor for nosocomial C. albicans candidemia was cancer surgery (OR: 0.075; 95% CI: 0.013-0.437; P = .004). Clinical and epidemiological differences in the risk factors between nosocomial candidemia caused by C. albicans and NAC should be considered when selecting an initial antifungal regimen for the treatment of adult patients. This should be undertaken before the availability of species identification and/or antifungal susceptibility results.

  20. Protein-based profiling of the immune response to uropathogenic Escherichia coli in adult patients immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis.

    PubMed

    Sundac, Lana; Dando, Samantha J; Sullivan, Matthew J; Derrington, Petra; Gerrard, John; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are common infections in humans. Despite the substantial healthcare cost represented by these infections, the human immune response associated with the infection immediately following the onset of symptoms in patients remains largely undefined. We performed a prospective study aimed at defining the milieu of urinary cytokines in adult inpatients in the 24-48 h period immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis due to UPEC. Urine samples, analyzed using 27-target multiplex protein assays, were used to generate immune profiles for patients and compared to age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The levels of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly elevated in urine as a result of infection, an observation consistent with prior findings in murine models and clinical literature. We also identified significant responses for several novel factors not previously associated with the human response to UTI, including Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-17A, eotaxin, Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and several growth factors. These data establish crucial parallels between the human immune response to UPEC and murine model UTI studies, and emphasize the complex but poorly defined nature of the human immune response to UPEC, particularly in the immediate period following the onset of symptoms for acute cystitis. PMID:27354295

  1. Protein-based profiling of the immune response to uropathogenic Escherichia coli in adult patients immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis.

    PubMed

    Sundac, Lana; Dando, Samantha J; Sullivan, Matthew J; Derrington, Petra; Gerrard, John; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are common infections in humans. Despite the substantial healthcare cost represented by these infections, the human immune response associated with the infection immediately following the onset of symptoms in patients remains largely undefined. We performed a prospective study aimed at defining the milieu of urinary cytokines in adult inpatients in the 24-48 h period immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis due to UPEC. Urine samples, analyzed using 27-target multiplex protein assays, were used to generate immune profiles for patients and compared to age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The levels of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly elevated in urine as a result of infection, an observation consistent with prior findings in murine models and clinical literature. We also identified significant responses for several novel factors not previously associated with the human response to UTI, including Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-17A, eotaxin, Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and several growth factors. These data establish crucial parallels between the human immune response to UPEC and murine model UTI studies, and emphasize the complex but poorly defined nature of the human immune response to UPEC, particularly in the immediate period following the onset of symptoms for acute cystitis.

  2. Autopsy of Adult Patients Deceased in an Academic Hospital: Considerations of Doctors and Next-of-Kin in the Consent Process

    PubMed Central

    Weustink, Annick C.; Hunink, M. G. Myriam; Oosterhuis, J. Wolter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hospital autopsies, vanishing worldwide, need to be requested by clinicians and consented to by next-of-kin. The aim of this prospective observational study was to examine how often and why clinicians do not request an autopsy, and for what reasons next-of-kin allow, or refuse it. Methods Clinicians at the Erasmus University Medical Centre were asked to complete a questionnaire when an adult patient had died. Questionnaires on 1000 consecutive naturally deceased adults were collected. If possible, missing data in the questionnaires were retrieved from the electronic patient record. Results Data from 958 (96%) questionnaires was available for analysis. In 167/958 (17·4%) cases clinicians did not request an autopsy, and in 641/791 (81·0%) cases next-of-kin did not give consent. The most important reason for both clinicians (51·5%) and next-of-kin (51·0%) to not request or consent to an autopsy was an assumed known cause of death. Their second reason was that the deceased had gone through a long illness (9·6% and 29·5%). The third reason for next-of-kin was mutilation of the deceased’s body by the autopsy procedure (16·1%). Autopsy rates were highest among patients aged 30–39 years, Europeans, suddenly and/or unexpectedly deceased patients, and tissue and/or organ donors. The intensive care and emergency units achieved the highest autopsy rates, and surgical wards the lowest. Conclusion The main reason for not requesting or allowing an autopsy is the assumption that the cause of death is known. This is a dangerous premise, because it is a self-fulfilling prophecy. Clinicians should be aware, and communicate with the next of kin, that autopsies not infrequently disclose unexpected findings, which might have changed patient management. Mutilation of the deceased’s body seems a minor consideration of next-of-kin, though how it really affects autopsy rates, should be studied by offering minimally or non-invasive autopsy methods. PMID:27736974

  3. Hospital study of adult community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, J T; Finch, R G; Ward, M J; Macrae, A D

    1982-07-31

    The cause of primary pneumonia was diagnosed in 124 of 127 consecutive adult patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired illness. Pneumococcal infection was found in 96 (76%) patients and legionnaries' disease was the second commonest infection identified (15%). Other bacterial infections were uncommon. 11 patients had atypical pneumonia, including 7 with psittacosis. There were several mixed infections and most of the 11 patients with viral infections also had bacterial pneumonia. 19 patients died (15%) and mortality was associated with increasing age, the presence of coexisting disease, and the cause of the pneumonia. Recognition of the most likely causes of severe pneumonia allows logical initial antibiotic treatment for such patients admitted to hospital. PMID:6124681

  4. Prevalence of Impaired Memory in Hospitalized Adults and Associations with In-Hospital Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Calev, Hila; Spampinato, Lisa M; Press, Valerie G; Meltzer, David O; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective inpatient teaching requires intact patient memory, but studies suggest hospitalized adults may have memory deficits. Sleep loss among inpatients could contribute to memory impairment. Objective To assess memory in older hospitalized adults, and to test the association between sleep quantity, sleep quality and memory, in order to identify a possible contributor to memory deficits in these patients. Design Prospective cohort study Setting General medicine and hematology/oncology inpatient wards Patients 59 hospitalized adults at least 50 years of age with no diagnosed sleep disorder. Measurements Immediate memory and memory after a 24-hour delay were assessed using a word recall and word recognition task from the University of Southern California Repeatable Episodic Memory Test (USC-REMT). A vignette-based memory task was piloted as an alternative test more closely resembling discharge instructions. Sleep duration and efficiency overnight in the hospital were measured using actigraphy. Results Mean immediate recall was 3.8 words out of 15 (SD=2.1). Forty-nine percent of subjects had poor memory, defined as immediate recall score of 3 or lower. Median immediate recognition was 11 words out of 15 (IQR=9, 13). Median delayed recall score was 1 word and median delayed recognition was 10 words (IQR= 8–12). In-hospital sleep duration and efficiency were not significantly associated with memory. The medical vignette score was correlated with immediate recall (r=0.49, p<0.01) Conclusions About half of inpatients studied had poor memory while in the hospital, signaling that hospitalization might not be an ideal teachable moment. In-hospital sleep was not associated with memory scores. PMID:25872763

  5. Ceftazidime-avibactam (CTZ-AVI) as a treatment for hospitalized adult patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bradley J; Golan, Yoav

    2016-01-01

    Avibactam, a novel β-lactamase inhibitor, has recently been co-formulated with ceftazidime and approved for use in patients with complicated intra-abdominal and urinary tract infections, where no better treatment alternative exists. The basis for its FDA approval has been the extensive clinical experience with ceftazidime and the demonstration in vitro and in animal models that the addition of avibactam reverses resistance to ceftazidime in extended-spectrum β-lactamase and some carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Early clinical data are promising, with efficacy demonstrated in patients with complicated intra-abdominal and urinary tract infections. This review will summarize the in vitro, animal and clinical data available on this agent to date. PMID:27042762

  6. Utility of Electronic Medical Records to Assess the Relationship Between Parenteral Nutrition and Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infections in Adult Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Paul; Larson, Elaine L.; Furuya, E. Yoko; Liu, Jianfang; Seres, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Parenteral nutrition is associated with increased central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). Electronic databases are important for identifying independent risk factors for prevention strategies. Our aims were to evaluate the utility of using electronic data sources to identify risk factors for CLABSIs, including parenteral nutrition (PN), and to assess the association between CLABSI and PN administration. Methods Data were obtained for all discharges of adult patients in whom a central line was inserted between September 1, 2007, and December 31, 2008, in a large, academically affiliated hospital in New York City. CLABSI was defined electronically using a modified definition from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A manual chart review was also undertaken to assess validity/reliability of the electronic database and gather additional information. Risk factors for CLABSI were examined using logistic regression. Results Among 4840 patients, there were 220 CLABSIs, an incidence of 5.4 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days. Risk factors included PN (odds ratio [OR], 4.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.50–7.48), intensive care unit stay (OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.58–3.23), renal disease (OR, 2.79; 95% CI, 2.00–3.88), and immunodeficiency (OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.70–3.00). Diabetes mellitus was associated with reduced CLABSI rates (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.45–0.88). Conclusions The utility of electronic medical records for determining risk factors is limited by such things as free-text data entry. Using a hybrid between fully electronic and manual chart review, reliable data were obtained. PN is associated with a high risk for CLABSI in a population highly selected for indications for PN. PMID:24898208

  7. Early Hospital Mortality among Adult Trauma Patients Significantly Declined between 1998-2011: Three Single-Centre Cohorts from Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Gerdin, Martin; Roy, Nobhojit; Dharap, Satish; Kumar, Vineet; Khajanchi, Monty; Tomson, Göran; Tsai, Li Felländer; Petzold, Max; von Schreeb, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Background Traumatic injury causes more than five million deaths each year of which about 90% occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Hospital trauma mortality has been significantly reduced in high-income countries, but to what extent similar results have been achieved in LMIC has not been studied in detail. Here, we assessed if early hospital mortality in patients with trauma has changed over time in an urban lower middle-income setting. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of patients admitted due to trauma in 1998, 2002, and 2011 to a large public hospital in Mumbai, India. Our outcome measure was early hospital mortality, defined as death between admission and 24-hours. We used multivariate logistic regression to assess the association between time and early hospital mortality, adjusting for patient case-mix. Injury severity was quantified using International Classification of Diseases-derived Injury Severity Score (ICISS). Major trauma was defined as ICISS<0.90. Results We analysed data on 4189 patients out of which 86.5% were males. A majority of patients were between 15 and 55 years old and 36.5% had major trauma. Overall early hospital mortality was 8.9% in 1998, 6.0% in 2002, and 8.1% in 2011. Among major trauma patients, early hospital mortality was 13.4%, in 1998, 11.3% in 2002, and 10.9% in 2011. Compared to trauma patients admitted in 1998, those admitted in 2011 had lower odds for early hospital mortality (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.41–0.76) including those with major trauma (OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.41–0.78). Conclusions We observed a significant reduction in early hospital mortality among patients with major trauma between 1998 and 2011. Improved survival was evident only after we adjusted for patient case-mix. This finding highlights the importance of risk-adjustment when studying longitudinal mortality trends. PMID:24594775

  8. Exploration of nightmares in hospital treatment of borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Lansky, M R; Bley, C R

    1990-01-01

    A clinical investigation of nightmares enhanced the psychotherapy of many hospitalized borderline patients. Early familial trauma, prominent in the latent content of the nightmares, predisposed these patients to adult dysfunction or to a maladaptive response to subsequent trauma. The hospital ward's emphasis on intergenerational family therapy and the well-integrated holding environment helped offset distress in patients resulting from the upsurgence of conflictual material latent in their nightmares, whether or not they were posttraumatic. The authors present illustrative cases.

  9. Hospital treatment of HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Ola, Samuel Olawale

    2006-12-01

    Treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria has progressed from the stage of inactivity, unconcern, abandonment and neglect to the present stage of holistic care involving treatment of the infection with Highly Active Anti Retroviral Agents, complications of the disease and side effects of antiretroviral therapy as well as that of human behavioural responses towards the disease with hope and promising outcome. The goal of the treatment is to prolong the patient's life while maintaining the best possible quality of health and life. It is now a continuum of care between the hospital and the different sectors of the community. Hospital treatment of patients with HIV-AIDS is complex and yet a simple task if there is healthy interaction of the patients and health care providers in a milieu of well equipped hospital setting with available treatment facilities for proper management of diseases. Similarly, for the care to achieve its goal, it requires a joint participation of the community and the commitment of the government not only on curtailment of the reservoir of HIV infection by antiretroviral therapy but total eradication of diseases, poverty and ignorance in all its entirety. PMID:18050774

  10. Noise in the adult emergency department of Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Douglas; Busch-Vishniac, Ilene J; West, James E

    2007-04-01

    While hospitals are generally noisy environments, nowhere is the pandemonium greater than in an emergency department, where there is constant flow of patients, doctors, nurses, and moving equipment. In this noise study we collected 24 h measurements throughout the adult emergency department of Johns Hopkins Hospital, the top ranked hospital in the U.S. for 16 years running. The equivalent sound pressure level (Leq) throughout the emergency department is about 5 dB(A) higher than that measured previously at a variety of in-patient units of the same hospital. Within the emergency department the triage area at the entrance to the department has the highest Leq, ranging from 65 to 73 dB(A). Sound levels in the emergency department are sufficiently high [on average between 61 and 69 dB(A)] to raise concerns regarding the communication of speech without errors--an important issue everywhere in a hospital and a critical issue in emergency departments because doctors and nurses frequently need to work at an urgent pace and to rely on oral communication.

  11. Posttraumatic stress symptoms in older adults hospitalized for fall injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Nimali; Sparks, Martha A.; Kato, Kaori; Wyka, Katarzyna; Wilbur, Kaitlyn; Chiaramonte, Gabrielle; Barie, Philip S.; Lachs, Mark S.; O'Dell, Michael; Evans, Arthur; Bruce, Martha L.; Difede, JoAnn

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although unintentional falls may pose a threat of death or injury, few studies have investigated their psychological impact on older adults. This study sought to gather data on early posttraumatic stress symptoms in older adults in the hospital setting after a fall. Method Participants in this study were 100 adults age 65 years or older admitted to a large urban hospital in New York City because of a fall. Men and women were represented approximately equally in the sample; most were interviewed within days of the fall event. The study's bedside interview included the Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Scale, which inquires about the presence and severity of 17 trauma-related symptoms. Results Twenty-seven participants reported substantial posttraumatic stress symptoms (moderate or higher severity). Exploratory bivariate analyses suggested an association between posttraumatic stress symptom severity and female gender, lower level of education, unemployment, number of medical conditions, and back/chest injury. Conclusions A significant percentage of older patients hospitalized after a fall suffer substantial posttraumatic stress. Future investigations are needed to assess the association between the psychiatric impact of a fall and short-term inpatient outcomes as well as longer-term functional outcomes. PMID:25213226

  12. Short-term and one-year outcome of infective endocarditis in adult patients treated in a Finnish teaching hospital during 1980–2004

    PubMed Central

    Heiro, Maija; Helenius, Hans; Hurme, Saija; Savunen, Timo; Engblom, Erik; Nikoskelainen, Jukka; Kotilainen, Pirkko

    2007-01-01

    Background Previous studies on factors predicting the prognosis of infective endocarditis have given somewhat conflicting results. Our aim was to define the factors predicting the outcome of patients treated in a Finnish teaching hospital. Methods A total of 326 episodes of infective endocarditis in 303 patients treated during 1980–2004 were evaluated for short-term and 1-year outcome and complications. Results Infection of 2 native valves and the occurrence of neurological complications, peripheral emboli, or heart failure significantly predicted both in-hospital and 1-year mortality, while age ≥65 years or the presence of a major criterion or vegetation on echocardiography predicted death within 1 year. A significant trend was observed between the level of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) on admission and both the short-term and 1-year outcome. In the patients who had CRP values ≥100 mg/l on admission, the hazard ratio for in-hospital death was 2.9-fold and the hazard ratio for 1-year death was 3.9-fold as compared to those with lower CRP values. Male sex and age < 64 years significantly predicted a need for both in-hospital and 1-year surgery, as did the development of heart failure or the presence of a major criterion or vegetation on echocardiography. Peripheral emboli were associated with a need for in-hospital surgery, while Streptococcus pneumoniae as the causative agent or infection of 2 native valves predicted a need for surgery within 1 year from admission. Conclusion Some of the factors (e.g. heart failure, neurological complications, peripheral emboli) predicting a poor prognosis and/or need for surgery were the same observed in previous studies. A new finding was that high CRP values (≥100 mg/l) on admission significantly predicted both short-term and 1-year mortality. PMID:17640339

  13. Score to identify the severity of adult patients with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection at hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Capelastegui, A; Quintana, J M; Bilbao, A; España, P P; Garin, O; Alonso, J; Astray, J; Cantón, R; Castilla, J; Castro, A; Delgado-Rodríguez, M; Godoy, P; Gónzález-Candelas, F; Martín, V; Mayoral, J M; Pumarola, T; Tamames, S; Soldevila, N; Baricot, M; Domínguez, A

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this paper was to develop a prognostic index for severe complications among hospitalized patients with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection. We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of 618 inpatients with 2009 H1N1 virus infection admitted to 36 Spanish hospitals between July 2009 and February 2010. Risk factors evaluated included host-related factors and clinical data at admission. We developed a composite index of severe in-hospital complications (SIHC), which included: mortality, mechanical ventilation, septic shock, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and requirement for resuscitation maneuvers. Six factors were independently associated with SIHC: age >45 years, male sex, number of comorbidities, pneumonia, dyspnea, and confusion. From the β parameter obtained in the multivariate model, a weight was assigned to each factor to compute the individual influenza risk score. The score shows an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.77. The SIHC rate was 1.9 % in the low-risk group, 10.3 % in the intermediate-risk group, and 29.6 % in the high-risk group. The odds ratio for complications was 21.8 for the high-risk group compared with the low-risk group. This easy-to-score influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection risk index accurately stratifies patients hospitalized for H1N1 virus infection into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups for SIHC.

  14. [Satisfaction of hospitalized patients in a hospital in Apurimac, Peru].

    PubMed

    Sihuin-Tapia, Elsa Yudy; Gómez-Quispe, Oscar Elisban; Ibáñez-Quispe, Vladimiro

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the satisfaction of hospitalized patients in the Sub-regional Hospital of Andahuaylas, 175 patients were surveyed using the Servqual multidimensional model. The estimate of variables associated with the satisfaction of the hospitalized patients was performed by using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. We found 25.0% satisfaction. Lower levels of satisfaction were associated with having a secondary level education (aOR: 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.64) and with having been hospitalized in the surgery department (aOR 0.14, CI: 95%: 0.04 to 0.53). It was concluded that there was a low level of satisfaction with the quality of care received by hospitalized patients and this was associated with the level of education and type of hospital department. PMID:26338391

  15. [Satisfaction of hospitalized patients in a hospital in Apurimac, Peru].

    PubMed

    Sihuin-Tapia, Elsa Yudy; Gómez-Quispe, Oscar Elisban; Ibáñez-Quispe, Vladimiro

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the satisfaction of hospitalized patients in the Sub-regional Hospital of Andahuaylas, 175 patients were surveyed using the Servqual multidimensional model. The estimate of variables associated with the satisfaction of the hospitalized patients was performed by using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. We found 25.0% satisfaction. Lower levels of satisfaction were associated with having a secondary level education (aOR: 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.64) and with having been hospitalized in the surgery department (aOR 0.14, CI: 95%: 0.04 to 0.53). It was concluded that there was a low level of satisfaction with the quality of care received by hospitalized patients and this was associated with the level of education and type of hospital department.

  16. Outcomes and Costs of Poisoned Patients Admitted to an Adult Emergency Department of a Spanish Tertiary Hospital: Evaluation through a Toxicovigilance Program

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Manuel; Martínez, Ana; Carcas, Antonio J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Toxicovigilance is the active process of identifying and evaluating the toxic risks existing in a community, and evaluating the measures taken to reduce or eliminate them. Objective Through a validated toxicovigilance program (SAT-HULP) we examined the characteristics of acute poisoning cases (APC) attended in the Emergency Department (ED) of La Paz Hospital (Madrid, Spain) and assessed their economic impact on the health system. Material and Methods The active poisoning surveillance system performs a daily search for cases in the hospital´s computerized case records. Found cases are entered into a database for recording of type of poisoning episode, reasons for exposure, causative agent, signs and symptoms and treatment. We carried out a cross-sectional epidemiological study with analytical projection, based on an impact study on cost per survivor. The data for the costs attributable to cases of APC observed at HULP (outpatients and inpatients) was obtained from the based on the information provided by the diagnosis-related groups (DRG) through the corresponding hospital discharge reports (available through SAT-HULP). Results During the first 30 month of SAT-HULP operation we found a total of 3,195 APC, a cumulative incidence rate of 1.75% of patients attended in the ED. The mean (SD) patient age was 40.9 (17.8) years and 51.2% were men. Drug abuse accounted for 47.5% of the cases. Suicide attempt was the second most frequent category (38.1%) and other causes accounted for 14.5% of APC. The total cost of hospital care for our hospital rose to €1,825,263.24 (approximately €730,105.30/year) resulting in a permanent occupation of 4 beds/year. Conclusions SAT-HULP constitutes a validated toxicovigilance tool, which continuously integrates available data in real-time and helps health services manage APC data flexibly, including the consumption of resources from the health system. PMID:27100460

  17. Depression among hospitalized and non-hospitalized gonadal cancer patients in tertiary care public hospitals in Karachi.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Tahira; Zadeh, Zainab Fotowwat

    2015-03-01

    The study aimed at determining the differences in the levels of depression between hospitalized and non-hospitalized Gonadal cancer patients in tertiary care public hospitals in Karachi. The present study was conducted at the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre and Civil Hospital, Karachi, from July to October 2009. One hundred adult patients diagnosed with Gonadal cancer volunteered for the study. Cases with any other co-morbidity were excluded. Urdu version of Siddiqui Shah Depression Scale (SSDS) was administered. Purposive and snowball sampling methods were used for data collection. The ages of participants in the sample ranged from 20 to 27 years with the mean age of 23.85 years. The participants belonged to the lower and middle classes. Out of the 30 hospitalized gonadal cancer patients 40% were moderately depressed and 60% were severely depressed, whereas out of 70 non-hospitalized gonadal cancer patients 74.3% were mildly depressed, 24.3% were moderately depressed and only 1.4% were severely depressed, which clearly indicated that the depression level of hospitalized gonadal cancer patients was high as compared to non-hospitalized gonadal cancer patients.

  18. Morbidity and Hospitalizations of Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenenbaum, Ariel; Chavkin, Maor; Wexler, Isaiah D.; Korem, Maya; Merrick, Joav

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade a significant increase in the life expectancy of people with Down syndrome (DS) has been observed, which has caused a higher incidence of morbidity as they age. However, there is a lack of literature regarding morbidity and hospitalization of adults with DS. Analysis of 297 hospitalizations of 120 adults with DS aged 18-73…

  19. Hyperkalaemia in patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Moore, M L; Bailey, R R

    1989-10-25

    A survey of all laboratory blood specimens with a plasma potassium concentration greater than or equal to 5.5 mmol/L was conducted over a three month period. Of 331 specimens with hyperkalaemia, 71 were excluded because the specimens was haemolysed, old or contaminated. The laboratory served a population of 348,561 and during this time measured the plasma potassium on 25,016 occasions. Sixty-six outpatients and 20 neonates were not evaluated. The survey was undertaken on 86 of 102 inpatients (46 males), 48 of whom were over 66 years of age. Fifty-seven patients were admitted under a medical service and 29 under a surgical service. Fifty-nine had a single episode of hyperkalaemia. Thirty-two underwent a surgical procedure. The commonest contributing factor was impaired renal function which was present in 71 (83%) patients. Although a definitive causative role for drugs could be identified in only five patients, in 52 (60%) patients drugs were a contributing factor (potassium supplements 24, ACE inhibitors 16, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs 12). Thirty-five of the 86 (41%) patients died during their hospital admission. Nineteen of the 35 deaths occurred within three days of the hyperkalaemia being recorded. A normal plasma potassium was eventually documented in 50 of the 86 patients. Of the remaining 36 patients, 25 (69%) subsequently died. In general the treatment of patients with hyperkalaemia focused on identifying and treating the underlying cause. Hyperkalaemia must always be considered seriously and regard given to the overall clinical status of the patient, with particular attention to drug therapy, renal and cardiac function, acid base status and the possibility of sepsis.

  20. Effects of an Enhanced Discharge Planning Intervention for Hospitalized Older Adults: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altfeld, Susan J.; Shier, Gayle E.; Rooney, Madeleine; Johnson, Tricia J.; Golden, Robyn L.; Karavolos, Kelly; Avery, Elizabeth; Nandi, Vijay; Perry, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To identify needs encountered by older adult patients after hospital discharge and assess the impact of a telephone transitional care intervention on stress, health care utilization, readmissions, and mortality. Design and Methods: Older adult inpatients who met criteria for risk of post-discharge complications were…

  1. A Computerized Hospital Patient Information Management System

    PubMed Central

    Wig, Eldon D.

    1982-01-01

    The information processing needs of a hospital are many, with varying degrees of complexity. The prime concern in providing an integrated hospital information management system lies in the ability to process the data relating to the single entity for which every hospital functions - the patient. This paper examines the PRIMIS computer system developed to accommodate hospital needs with respect to a central patient registry, inpatients (i.e., Admission/Transfer/Discharge), and out-patients. Finally, the potential for expansion to permit the incorporation of more hospital functions within PRIMIS is examined.

  2. High Frequency of Clinically Significant Bacteremia in Adults Hospitalized With Falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Nyein, Phyo Pyae; Aung, Ne Myo; Kyi, Tint Tint; Htet, Zaw Win; Anstey, Nicholas M; Kyi, Mar Mar; Hanson, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Background.  African children with severe falciparum malaria commonly have concomitant Gram-negative bacteremia, but co-infection has been thought to be relatively rare in adult malaria. Methods.  Adults with a diagnosis of falciparum malaria hospitalized at 4 tertiary referral hospitals in Myanmar had blood cultures collected at admission. The frequency of concomitant bacteremia and the clinical characteristics of the patients, with and without bacteremia, were explored. Results.  Of 67 adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria, 9 (13% [95% confidence interval, 5.3%-21.6%]) were also bacteremic on admission, 7 (78%) with Gram-negative enteric organisms (Escherichia coli [n = 3], typhoidal Salmonella species [n = 3], nontyphoidal Salmonella [n = 1]). Bacteremic adults had more severe disease (median Respiratory Coma Acidosis Malaria [RCAM] score 3; interquartile range [IQR], 1-4) than those without bacteremia (median RCAM score 1; IQR, 1-2) and had a higher frequency of acute kidney injury (50% vs 16%, P = .03). Although 35 (52%) were at high risk of death (RCAM score ≥2), all 67 patients in the study survived, 51 (76%) of whom received empirical antibiotics on admission. Conclusions.  Bacteremia was relatively frequent in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in Myanmar. Like children in high transmission settings, bacteremic adults in this low transmission setting were sicker than nonbacteremic adults, and were often difficult to identify at presentation. Empirical antibiotics may also be appropriate in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in low transmission settings, until bacterial infection is excluded.

  3. Hospital Closure and Insights into Patient Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Garg, N.; Husk, G.; Nguyen, T.; Onyile, A.; Echezona, S.; Kuperman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hospital closures are becoming increasingly common in the United States. Patients who received care at the closing hospitals must travel to different, often farther hospitals for care, and nearby remaining hospitals may have difficulty coping with a sudden influx of patients. Objectives Our objectives are to analyze the dispersion patterns of patients from a closing hospital and to correlate that with distance from the closing hospital for three specific visit types: emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory. Methods In this study, we used data from a health information exchange to track patients from Saint Vincent’s Medical Center, a hospital in New York City that closed in 2010, to determine where they received emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory care following the closure. Results We found that patients went to the next nearest hospital for their emergency and inpatient care, but ambulatory encounters did not correlate with distance. Discussion It is likely that patients followed their ambulatory providers as they transitioned to another hospital system. Additional work should be done to determine predictors of impact on nearby hospitals when another hospital in the community closes in order to better prepare for patient dispersion. PMID:25848422

  4. Treating drug-dependent patients in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Skene, Loane; Keays, David; Gardner, Bruce

    2002-08-01

    Are hospital staff legally permitted to test drug-dependent patients for drugs or infectious disease without the patient's consent in order to treat the patient or to protect themselves or other patients? What should staff do with "suspicious" items in the patient's possession (drugs, credit cards in different names, firearms)? Can drug-dependent patients lawfully use illicit drugs in hospital? Who should supply and administer them? PMID:12242876

  5. Patient Engagement in Hospital Fall Prevention.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Injurious falls are the most prevalent in-hospital adverse event, and hospitalized patients are at a greater risk of falling than the general population. Patient engagement in hospital fall prevention could be a possible approach to reducing falls and fall-related injuries. To engage patients, bedside nursing staff must first understand the concept of patient centeredness and then incorporate patient centeredness in clinical practice. Clinicians should move from being experts to being enablers. To conceptualize the knowledge gaps identified, a conceptual model was developed to guide future research and quality improvement efforts in hospital settings. This model could be used as a guide to advance nursing leadership in hospital fall prevention via promoting patient engagement (e.g., developing patient-centered fall prevention interventions with patients' input).

  6. Implementing Patient Safety Initiatives in Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira; Tupper, Judith; Coburn, Andrew; Wakefield, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Implementation of patient safety initiatives can be costly in time and energy. Because of small volumes and limited resources, rural hospitals often are not included in nationally driven patient safety initiatives. This article describes the Tennessee Rural Hospital Patient Safety Demonstration project, whose goal was to strengthen capacity for…

  7. Factors related to the mobility of hospitalized older adults: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Zisberg, Anna; Syn-Hershko, Anat

    2016-01-01

    A low ambulation rate is common even among acutely ill hospitalized older adults. This prospective observational study conducted among 769 older adults (≥70) hospitalized in acute-care units tested the relationship of satisfaction with hospital environment, sleep-medication consumption, and in-hospital caloric intake to mobility levels during hospitalization on 3 consecutive hospitalization days. Approximately 20% of the patients did not walk, 30% walked only in their room, and 50% mobilized outside their room. A multinomial-logistic regression, controlling for potential intervening factors, showed that sleep-medication avoidance (AOR = 1.99; p < 0.01) and higher caloric intake (AOR = 9.69; p < 0.001) differentiated patients walking outside the room from non-walking patients. Satisfaction with the physical environment was lower in the non-mobile group than in the other two. Results suggest that hospital environment, sleep-medication consumption, and caloric intake during hospitalization need to be addressed in attempts to improve in-hospital mobility in older adults. PMID:26597674

  8. How was your hospital stay? Patients' reports about their care in Canadian hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, C; Gauld, M; Chambers, L; O'Brien, B; Haynes, R B; Labelle, R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To survey adult medical and surgical patients about their concerns and satisfaction with their care in Canadian hospitals. DESIGN: Cross-sectional telephone survey undertaken from June 1991 to May 1992 with a standardized questionnaire. SETTING: Stratified random sample of public acute care hospitals in six provinces; 57 (79%) of the 72 hospitals approached agreed to participate. PATIENTS: Each participating hospital provided the study team with the names of 150 adult medical and surgical patients discharged home in consecutive order. A total of 4599 patients agreed to be interviewed (69% of eligible patients and 89% of patients contacted). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Satisfaction with (a) provider-patient communication (including information given), (b) provider's respect for patient's preferences, (c) attentiveness to patient's physical care needs, (d) education of patient regarding medication and tests, (e) quality of relationship between patient and physician in charge, (f) education of and communication with patient's family regarding care, (g) pain management and (h) hospital discharge planning. RESULTS: Most (61%) of the patients surveyed reported problems with 5 or fewer of the 39 specific care processes asked about in the study. Forty-one percent of the patients reported that they had not been told about the daily hospital routines. About 20% of the patients receiving medications reported that they had not been told about important side effects in a way they could understand; 20% of the patients who underwent tests reported similar problems with communication of the test results. Thirty-six percent of those having tests had not been told how much pain to expect. In discharge planning, the patients complained that they had not been told what danger signals to watch for at home (reported by 39%), when they could resume normal activities (by 32%) and what activities they could or could not do at home (by 29%). Over 90% of the patients reported that they

  9. A Bill of Rights for Hospitalized Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Mezey, Mathy D; Mitty, Ethel

    2011-03-01

    Acute-care hospitals have few structures, programs, or staff prepared to address the special needs of older adults. To address this issue, the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing [including the Nurses Improving Care for Hospitalized Elders (NICHE) program] and the Coalition of Geriatric Nursing Organizations proposed language for a Bill of Rights for Hospitalized Older Adults. The Bill of Rights moves from general value statements to the specific knowledge, skills, and actions necessary to provide quality of care to older adults. The authors describe the development and testing of the Bill of Rights and suggest steps for its adoption and dissemination.

  10. The use of vancomycin in the treatment of adult patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection: a survey in a tertiary hospital in China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Hu, Jiali; Kang, Lei; Deng, Zhengjun; Wu, Jiaofen; Pan, Jiaqian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vancomycin is frequently used in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Objectives: To determine MRSA infection status and the use of vancomycin in its treatment at a teaching hospital in China. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 140 cases of MRSA infection that were treated from January 2013 to October 2014. We analyzed the etiology of MRSA infection and the use of vancomycin in these cases. Results: MRSA infection mainly occurred in elderly patients concomitant with a variety of diseases, which incidence was more in men than women. More cases of MRSA infection were encountered in the ICU than in other departments. The positive culture results for MRSA were obtained in the sputum (38.57%), pharyngeal swab (19.29%), blood (5.71%), and wound secretion (11.43%) samples. The MRSA patients were sensitive to vancomycin, with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) being 1 μg/mL in 53.80% of the cases and 2 μg/mL in 44.10% of the cases, respectively. Among the 35 (25%) cases treated with vancomycin, 23 were cured, while 3 died and 7 (20%) were considered as an unreasonable application. Conclusions: MRSA infection mainly appeared in patients admitted to the ICU. The MIC of vancomycin had a tendency to increase gradually. PMID:26770588

  11. Portuguese nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Tavares, João Paulo; da Silva, Alcione Leite; Sá-Couto, Pedro; Boltz, Marie; Capezuti, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Portugal is impacted by the rapid growth of the aging population, which has significant implications for its health care system. However, nurses have received little education focusing on the unique and complex care needs of older adults. This gap in the nurses' education has an enormous impact in their knowledge and attitudes and affects the quality of nursing care provided to older adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1068 Portuguese nurses in five hospitals (northern and central region) with the following purposes: (i) explore the knowledge and attitudes of nurses about four common geriatric syndromes (pressure ulcer, incontinence, restraint use and sleep disturbance) in Portuguese hospitals; and (ii) evaluate the influence of demographic, professional and nurses' perception about hospital educational support, geriatric knowledge, and burden of caring for older adults upon geriatric nursing knowledge and attitudes. The mean knowledge and attitudes scores were 0.41 ± 0.15 and 0.40 ± 0.21, respectively (the maximum score was 1). Knowledge of nurses in Portuguese hospitals about the four geriatric syndromes (pressure ulcers, sleep disturbance, urinary incontinence and restraint use) was found inadequate. The nurses' attitudes towards caring for hospitalized older adults were generally negative. Nurses who work in academic hospitals demonstrated significantly more knowledge than nurses in hospital centers. The attitudes of nurses were significantly associated with the hospital and unit type, region, hospital educational support, staff knowledge, and perceived burden of caring for older adults. The study findings support the need for improving nurses' knowledge and attitudes towards hospitalized older adults and implementing evidence-based guidelines in their practice.

  12. Adult Day Care and Medical and Hospital Claims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.; Blandford, Audrey A.

    1987-01-01

    Examined effect of adult day care (ADC) on utilization of health care practitioner and inpatient hospital services. Data from three separate ADC studies revealed that, when operative for some time, ADC may result in dramatic decreases in hospital inpatient stays. Findings warrant further research. (Author/NB)

  13. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  14. Hospitalizations of Adults with Intellectual Disability in Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ailey, Sarah H.; Johnson, Tricia; Fogg, Louis; Friese, Tanya R.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) represent a small but important group of hospitalized patients who often have complex health care needs. Individuals with ID experience high rates of hospitalization for ambulatory-sensitive conditions and high rates of hospitalizations in general, even when in formal community care systems; however,…

  15. [Prevalence of skin tears among hospitalized patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Amaral, Ana Flávia dos Santos; Pulido, Kelly Cristina Strazzieri; Santos, Vera Lucia Conceição de Gouveia

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to analyze the prevalence of skin tears (ST) among hospitalized oncology patients and associated demographic and clinical variables. This is an epidemiological cross-sectional study type, performed at Octavio Frias de Oliveira State of São Paulo Cancer Institute. All adult patients hospitalized from April 10th to 18th 2010 were evaluated by interview and physical examination. Chi-square test was used to compare demographic and clinical variables between patients with and without ST. Five patients among 157 had nine skin tears, resulting in a prevalence of 3.3%. Among demographic variables, only number of children showed statistically significant difference (p=0.027) between groups. Clinically, patients with ST had lower Karnofsky scores (p=0.031), lower scores at Braden Scale (p=0.026) and less collaborative behaviors (p=0.042) when compared to patients with no lesions. This study contributes to a better knowledge of ST in oncology patients.

  16. Serious mental illness and acute hospital readmission in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R; Morgan, Daniel J; Comer, Angela C; Harris, Anthony D; Furuno, Jon P

    2012-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. The authors hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary care facility from 2005 to 2009. SMI was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizoaffective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26 878 eligible admissions, the prevalence of SMI was 6% and the incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population.

  17. Serious mental illness and acute hospital readmission in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R; Morgan, Daniel J; Comer, Angela C; Harris, Anthony D; Furuno, Jon P

    2012-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. The authors hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary care facility from 2005 to 2009. SMI was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizoaffective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26 878 eligible admissions, the prevalence of SMI was 6% and the incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population. PMID:22539798

  18. Length of stay and hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital by family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chuck K.; Chambers, Catharine; Fang, Dianne; Mazowita, Garey; Hwang, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare length of stay and total hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital under the care of family physicians who were their usual health care providers in the community (group A) and patients admitted to the same inpatient service under the care of family physicians who were not their usual health care providers (group B). Design Retrospective observational study. Setting A large urban hospital in Vancouver, BC. Participants All adult admissions to the family practice inpatient service between April 1, 2006, and June 30, 2008. Main outcome measures Ratio of length of stay to expected length of stay and total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit. Multivariate linear regression was performed to determine the effect of admitting group (group A vs group B) on the natural logarithm transformations of the outcomes. Results The median acute length of stay was 8.0 days (interquartile range [IQR] 4.0 to 13.0 days) for group A admissions and 8.0 days (IQR 4.0 to 15.0 days) for group B admissions. The median (IQR) total hospital costs were $6498 ($4035 to $11 313) for group A admissions and $6798 ($4040 to $12 713) for group B admissions. After adjustment for patient characteristics, patients admitted to hospital under the care of their own family physicians did not significantly differ in terms of acute length of stay to expected length of stay ratio (percent change 0.6%, P = .942) or total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit (percent change −2.0%, P = .722) compared with patients admitted under the care of other family physicians. Conclusion These findings suggest that having networks of family physicians involved in hospital care for patients is not less efficient than having family physicians provide care for their own patients. PMID:22518905

  19. Hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Aline Pinto; Montilla, Dalia Elena Romero; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the temporal evolution of the hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions according to their structure, magnitude and causes. METHODS Cross-sectional study based on data from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System and from the Primary Care Information System, referring to people aged 60 to 74 years living in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Souhteastern Brazil. The proportion and rate of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions were calculated, both the global rate and, according to diagnoses, the most prevalent ones. The coverage of the Family Health Strategy and the number of medical consultations attended by older adults in primary care were estimated. To analyze the indicators’ impact on hospitalizations, a linear correlation test was used. RESULTS We found an intense reduction in hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions for all causes and age groups. Heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases concentrated 50.0% of the hospitalizations. Adults older than 69 years had a higher risk of hospitalization due to one of these causes. We observed a higher risk of hospitalization among men. A negative correlation was found between the hospitalizations and the indicators of access to primary care. CONCLUSIONS Primary healthcare in the state of Rio de Janeiro has been significantly impacting the hospital morbidity of the older population. Studies of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions can aid the identification of the main causes that are sensitive to the intervention of the health services, in order to indicate which actions are more effective to reduce hospitalizations and to increase the population’s quality of life. PMID:25372173

  20. Teaching the adult ostomy patient.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, H S

    2001-01-01

    Ostomy education is based on principles of adult learning, including assessment of the learners' readiness, ability, and need to learn. Such teaching incorporates specific strategies designed to promote cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning and strategies to overcome potential cultural barriers. In addition, modifications may be included to meet the needs of aged or disabled patients who have cognitive deficits or low literacy skills. Finally, ostomy education must include an evaluation of its effectiveness. This article reviews general guidelines for planning, implementing, and evaluating patient education for adult patients with ostomies.

  1. Latex allergies - for hospital patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... hospital; Contact dermatitis - latex allergy; Allergy - latex; Allergic reaction - latex ... You can have a reaction to latex if your skin, mucous membranes (eyes, mouth, or other moist areas), or bloodstream (during surgery) come into contact ...

  2. Factors influencing warfarin response in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aziz, Mahmoud I.; Ali, Mostafa A. Sayed; Hassan, Ayman K.M.; Elfaham, Tahani H.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of simultaneous factors that potentially keep patients far from achieving target INR range at discharge in hospitalized patients. Prospective cross-sectional observational study conducted at the Cardiology Department and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Assiut University Hospitals. One-hundred and twenty patients were enrolled in the study from July 2013 to January 2014. Outcome measures were discharge INRs, bleeding and thromboembolic episodes. Bivariate analysis and multinomial logistic regression were conducted to determine independent risk factors that can keep patients outside target INR range. Patients who were newly initiated warfarin on hospital admission were given low initiation dose (2.8 mg ± 0.9). They were more likely to have INR values below 1.5 during hospital stay, 13 (27.7%) patients compared with 9 (12.3%) previously treated patients, respectively (p = .034). We found that the best predictors of achieving below target INR range relative to within target INR range were; shorter hospital stay periods (OR, 0.82 for every day increase [95% CI, 0.72–0.94]), being a male patient (OR, 2.86 [95% CI, 1.05–7.69]), concurrent infection (OR, 0.21 [95% CI, 0.07–0.59]) and new initiation of warfarin therapy on hospital admission (OR, 3.73 [95% CI, 1.28–10.9]). Gender, new initiation of warfarin therapy on hospital admission, shorter hospital stay periods and concurrent infection can have a significant effect on discharge INRs. Initiation of warfarin without giving loading doses increases the risk of having INRs below 1.5 during hospital stay and increases the likelihood of a patient to be discharged with INR below target range. Following warfarin dosing nomograms and careful monitoring of the effect of various factors on warfarin response should be greatly considered. PMID:26702259

  3. Evaluating the relationship between inattention and impulsivity-related falls in hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Barbara E; Ferrari, Marisa; Campbell, Cathy; Maddens, Michael; Whall, Ann L

    2010-01-01

    Impulsivity in older adults is poorly understood and there is limited literature on the relationship between impulsivity and falls. This retrospective study evaluated the relationship between of inattention and impulsivity related falls (IRF) in hospitalized older adults. The sample (N = 192) included patients 65 years and older with a documented in-patient fall in 2007. "Impaired judgment" was identified as the critical attribute of IRF. The Confusion Assessment Method item for inattention was extracted as the variable for inattention. Twenty-eight percent (28%) of falls were classified as IRF. A significant relationship was found between inattention on the shift prior to a fall and the fall being an IRF (Chi-square = 45.5, df = 1, p = .00, Phi = .54, p = .00). Early identification of older adults with impaired attention has potential to reduce IRF when nursing uses this assessment to implement additional safety interventions for hospitalized older adults. PMID:20159349

  4. Glycemic control and diabetes management in hospitalized patients in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of tight blood glucose control among outpatients with diabetes mellitus is well established, however, the management of diabetes in the hospital setting is generally considered secondary in importance. This study sought to assess glycemic control and diabetes management in adult patients admitted to hospitals in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional and nationwide survey was conducted from July 2010 to January 2012. Eligible cases were 18 years of age or older, had a diagnosis of diabetes and a hospitalization length of stay ≥72 hours. Socio-demographic information, hospitalization details, and data on diabetes diagnosis, management and treatment were collected for all patients by chart review. Information on all blood glucose (BG) readings for a maximum of 20 consecutive days of hospitalization was recorded for each patient. Results Overall, 2,399 patients were surveyed in 24 hospitals located in 13 cities from all five Brazilian regions. The prevalence of patients presenting hyperglycemic (BG >180 mg/dL) or hypoglycemic (BG <70 mg/dL) events was 89.4% and 30.9% in patients in general wards, and 88.2% and 27.7% in those in Intensive Care Units (ICUs), respectively. In addition, a BG measure >180 mg/dL was recorded in two-thirds of the patient-days. A high proportion of patients were treated with sliding-scale insulin regimen alone in the general wards (52.0%) and in the ICUs (69.2%), and only 35.7% and 3.9% received appropriate insulin therapy in general wards (basal + bolus insulin) and in ICUs (continuous IV insulin), respectively. Conclusions Inpatient glycemic control and diabetes management needs improvement. Opportunities to improve care in Brazilian hospitals include expanded use of intravenous insulin and subcutaneous basal-bolus insulin protocols, avoiding use of sliding-scale insulin alone, increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring, and institution wide quality improvement efforts targeting both physician and nursing

  5. Good's Syndrome Patients Hospitalized for Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuefeng; Shi, Juhong; Wang, Mengzhao; Xu, Kaifeng; Xiao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Good's syndrome (GS) is a rare combination of thymoma and hypogammaglobulinemia, resulting in immunodeficiency. Patients with GS are highly susceptible to bacterial infection, particularly encapsulated bacterial infection in upper and lower respiratory tracts. Good's syndrome patients with moderate-to- severe infection are often hospitalized. Clinical features of GS patients remain to be characterized. Patients with the discharge diagnosis of GS and simultaneous infection from Peking Union Medical College Hospital between January 2001 and July 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Among 14 hospitalized GS patients, 12 of them were admitted for severe infections. Mean patient age was 56.7 + 10.1 years. Average concentrations of serum IgG, IgA, and IgM were 2.3 + 1.9 g/L, 0.28 + 0.28 g/L, and 0.06 + 0.07 g/L, respectively. Respiratory and intestinal tracts were the most common sites for infection, which occurred in 7 and 4 patients, respectively. Pathogens identified in 10 patients included cytomegalovirus in 5 patients, Pneumocystis jirovecii, Clostridium difficile in 2 patients, Klebsiella pneumonia in 2 patients, and Streptococcus pneumonia and Hemophilus influenza in 1 patient. Ten patients were treated with antibiotics and immunoglobulin replacement. Only 1 patient who was on immunosuppressant therapy died from P. jirovecii pneumonia. Infection was the most frequent cause for hospitalization of GS patients. Both respiratory and intestinal tracts were the most common sites of infection. Cytomegalovirus and P. jirovecii represented 2 common opportunistic pathogens isolated from hospitalized GS patients with infections. PMID:26632723

  6. Patient (customer) expectations in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Sedat; Acuner, Taner; Yilmaz, Gökhan

    2007-06-01

    The expectations of patient are one of the determining factors of healthcare service. The purpose of this study is to measure the Patients' Expectations, based on Patient's Rights. This study was done with Likert-Survey in Trabzon population. The analyses showed that the level of the expectations of the patient was high on the factor of receiving information and at an acceptable level on the other factors. Statistical meaningfulness was determined between age, sex, education, health insurance, and the income of the family and the expectations of the patients (p<0.05). According to this study, the current legal regulations have higher standards than the expectations of the patients. The reason that the satisfaction of the patients high level is interpreted due to the fact that the level of the expectation is low. It is suggested that the educational and public awareness studies on the patients' rights must be done in order to increase the expectations of the patients. PMID:17028043

  7. High Frequency of Clinically Significant Bacteremia in Adults Hospitalized With Falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Nyein, Phyo Pyae; Aung, Ne Myo; Kyi, Tint Tint; Htet, Zaw Win; Anstey, Nicholas M; Kyi, Mar Mar; Hanson, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Background.  African children with severe falciparum malaria commonly have concomitant Gram-negative bacteremia, but co-infection has been thought to be relatively rare in adult malaria. Methods.  Adults with a diagnosis of falciparum malaria hospitalized at 4 tertiary referral hospitals in Myanmar had blood cultures collected at admission. The frequency of concomitant bacteremia and the clinical characteristics of the patients, with and without bacteremia, were explored. Results.  Of 67 adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria, 9 (13% [95% confidence interval, 5.3%-21.6%]) were also bacteremic on admission, 7 (78%) with Gram-negative enteric organisms (Escherichia coli [n = 3], typhoidal Salmonella species [n = 3], nontyphoidal Salmonella [n = 1]). Bacteremic adults had more severe disease (median Respiratory Coma Acidosis Malaria [RCAM] score 3; interquartile range [IQR], 1-4) than those without bacteremia (median RCAM score 1; IQR, 1-2) and had a higher frequency of acute kidney injury (50% vs 16%, P = .03). Although 35 (52%) were at high risk of death (RCAM score ≥2), all 67 patients in the study survived, 51 (76%) of whom received empirical antibiotics on admission. Conclusions.  Bacteremia was relatively frequent in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in Myanmar. Like children in high transmission settings, bacteremic adults in this low transmission setting were sicker than nonbacteremic adults, and were often difficult to identify at presentation. Empirical antibiotics may also be appropriate in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in low transmission settings, until bacterial infection is excluded. PMID:26989752

  8. High Frequency of Clinically Significant Bacteremia in Adults Hospitalized With Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Nyein, Phyo Pyae; Aung, Ne Myo; Kyi, Tint Tint; Htet, Zaw Win; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Kyi, Mar Mar; Hanson, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Background. African children with severe falciparum malaria commonly have concomitant Gram-negative bacteremia, but co-infection has been thought to be relatively rare in adult malaria. Methods. Adults with a diagnosis of falciparum malaria hospitalized at 4 tertiary referral hospitals in Myanmar had blood cultures collected at admission. The frequency of concomitant bacteremia and the clinical characteristics of the patients, with and without bacteremia, were explored. Results. Of 67 adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria, 9 (13% [95% confidence interval, 5.3%–21.6%]) were also bacteremic on admission, 7 (78%) with Gram-negative enteric organisms (Escherichia coli [n = 3], typhoidal Salmonella species [n = 3], nontyphoidal Salmonella [n = 1]). Bacteremic adults had more severe disease (median Respiratory Coma Acidosis Malaria [RCAM] score 3; interquartile range [IQR], 1–4) than those without bacteremia (median RCAM score 1; IQR, 1–2) and had a higher frequency of acute kidney injury (50% vs 16%, P = .03). Although 35 (52%) were at high risk of death (RCAM score ≥2), all 67 patients in the study survived, 51 (76%) of whom received empirical antibiotics on admission. Conclusions. Bacteremia was relatively frequent in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in Myanmar. Like children in high transmission settings, bacteremic adults in this low transmission setting were sicker than nonbacteremic adults, and were often difficult to identify at presentation. Empirical antibiotics may also be appropriate in adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria in low transmission settings, until bacterial infection is excluded. PMID:26989752

  9. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Requiring Hospitalization among U.S. Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S.; Self, W.H.; Wunderink, R.G.; Fakhran, S.; Balk, R.; Bramley, A.M.; Reed, C.; Grijalva, C.G.; Anderson, E.J.; Courtney, D.M.; Chappell, J.D.; Qi, C.; Hart, E.M.; Carroll, F.; Trabue, C.; Donnelly, H.K.; Williams, D.J.; Zhu, Y.; Arnold, S.R.; Ampofo, K.; Waterer, G.W.; Levine, M.; Lindstrom, S.; Winchell, J.M.; Katz, J.M.; Erdman, D.; Schneider, E.; Hicks, L.A.; McCullers, J.A.; Pavia, A.T.; Edwards, K.M.; Finelli, L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Community-acquired pneumonia is a leading infectious cause of hospitalization and death among U.S. adults. Incidence estimates of pneumonia confirmed radio-graphically and with the use of current laboratory diagnostic tests are needed. METHODS We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among adults 18 years of age or older in five hospitals in Chicago and Nashville. Patients with recent hospitalization or severe immunosuppression were excluded. Blood, urine, and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for culture, serologic testing, antigen detection, and molecular diagnostic testing. Study radiologists independently reviewed chest radiographs. We calculated population-based incidence rates of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization according to age and pathogen. RESULTS From January 2010 through June 2012, we enrolled 2488 of 3634 eligible adults (68%). Among 2320 adults with radiographic evidence of pneumonia (93%), the median age of the patients was 57 years (interquartile range, 46 to 71); 498 patients (21%) required intensive care, and 52 (2%) died. Among 2259 patients who had radio-graphic evidence of pneumonia and specimens available for both bacterial and viral testing, a pathogen was detected in 853 (38%): one or more viruses in 530 (23%), bacteria in 247 (11%), bacterial and viral pathogens in 59 (3%), and a fungal or mycobacterial pathogen in 17 (1%). The most common pathogens were human rhinovirus (in 9% of patients), influenza virus (in 6%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (in 5%). The annual incidence of pneumonia was 24.8 cases (95% confidence interval, 23.5 to 26.1) per 10,000 adults, with the highest rates among adults 65 to 79 years of age (63.0 cases per 10,000 adults) and those 80 years of age or older (164.3 cases per 10,000 adults). For each pathogen, the incidence increased with age. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia

  10. A Hospital-based Patient Legal Clinic.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Liz; Shahkhan, Hana; Loff, Bebe

    2016-03-01

    The HeLP Patient Legal Clinic has provided free legal advice to public hospital patients with health-related problems since March 2014. This article reports on the findings of a study of the first six months of HeLP's operation. The study adopted qualitative methods informed by grounded theory and sought to understand patient and social worker experiences of HeLP. Interviews were conducted with 13 patients and 10 next of kin. Focus group discussions were carried out with 19 social workers who referred patients to HeLP. Locating the legal service in the hospital's social work department enabled and expedited access to legal advice; a team-based approach to patient problems emerged that enhanced patient outcomes; and provision of legal advice relieved the anxiety experienced by patients, allowing them to focus better on their health concern.

  11. A Hospital-based Patient Legal Clinic.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Liz; Shahkhan, Hana; Loff, Bebe

    2016-03-01

    The HeLP Patient Legal Clinic has provided free legal advice to public hospital patients with health-related problems since March 2014. This article reports on the findings of a study of the first six months of HeLP's operation. The study adopted qualitative methods informed by grounded theory and sought to understand patient and social worker experiences of HeLP. Interviews were conducted with 13 patients and 10 next of kin. Focus group discussions were carried out with 19 social workers who referred patients to HeLP. Locating the legal service in the hospital's social work department enabled and expedited access to legal advice; a team-based approach to patient problems emerged that enhanced patient outcomes; and provision of legal advice relieved the anxiety experienced by patients, allowing them to focus better on their health concern. PMID:27323643

  12. Methods to evaluate the nutrition risk in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Erkan, Tülay

    2014-01-01

    The rate of malnutrition is substantially high both in the population and in chronic patients hospitalized because of different reasons. The rate of patients with no marked malnutrition at the time of hospitalization who develop malnutrition during hospitalization is also substantially high. Therefore, there are currently different screening methods with different targets to prevent malnutrition and its overlook. These methods should be simple and reliable and should not be time-consuming in order to be used in daily practice. Seven nutrition risk screening methods used in children have been established until the present time. However, no consensus has been made on any method as in adults. It should be accepted that interrogation of nutrition is a part of normal examination to increase awareness on this issue and to draw attention to this issue. PMID:26078678

  13. Risk Factors for Increased Hospital Resource Utilization and In-Hospital Mortality in Adults With Single Ventricle Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ronnie Thomas; Doshi, Pratik; Onukwube, Jennifer; Fram, Ricki Y; Robbins, James M

    2016-08-01

    Most patients with single ventricle congenital heart disease are now expected to survive to adulthood. Co-morbid medical conditions (CMCs) are common. We sought to identify risk factors for increased hospital resource utilization and in-hospital mortality in adults with single ventricle. We analyzed data from the 2001 to 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample database in patients aged ≥18 years admitted to nonteaching general hospitals (NTGHs), TGHs, and pediatric hospitals (PHs) with either hypoplastic left heart syndrome, tricuspid atresia or common ventricle. National estimates of hospitalizations were calculated. Elixhauser CMCs were identified. Length of stay (LOS), total hospital costs, and effect of CMCs were determined. Age was greater in NTGH (41.5 ± 1.3 years) than in TGH (32.8 ± 0.5) and PH (25.0 ± 0.6; p <0.0001). Adjusted LOS was shorter in NTGH (5.6 days) than in PH (9.7 days; p <0.0001). Adjusted costs were higher in PH ($56,671) than in TGH ($31,934) and NTGH ($18,255; p <0.0001). CMCs are associated with increased LOS (p <0.0001) and costs (p <0.0001). Risk factors for in-hospital mortality included increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 5.250, CI 2.825 to 9.758 for 45- to 64-year old vs 18- to 30-year old), male gender (OR 2.72, CI 1.804 to 4.103]), and the presence of CMC (OR 4.55, CI 2.193 to 9.436) for 2 vs none). No differences in mortality were found among NTGH, TGH, and PH. Cardiovascular procedures were more common in PH hospitalizations and were associated with higher costs and LOS. CMCs increase costs and mortality. In-hospital mortality is increased with age, male gender, and the presence of hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

  14. Music as an adjuvant therapy in control of pain and symptoms in hospitalized adults: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cole, Linda C; LoBiondo-Wood, Geri

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of music as an adjuvant therapy for pain control in hospitalized adults. The search terms music, music therapy, pain, adults, inpatient, and hospitalized were used to search the Cochrane Library, Cinahl, Medline, Natural Standard, and Scopus databases from January 2005 to March 2011. (A systematic review conducted by the Cochrane Collaboration has extensively covered the time frame from 1966 to 2004.) Seventeen randomized controlled trials met criteria for review and inclusion. Seven of the research studies were conducted with surgical patients, three with medical patients, one with medical-surgical patients, four with intensive care patients, and two with pregnant patients. The combined findings of these studies provide support for the use of music as an adjuvant approach to pain control in hospitalized adults. The use of music is safe, inexpensive, and an independent nursing function that can be easily incorporated into the routine care of patients. PMID:23107431

  15. Characteristics and Needs of Psychiatric Patients With Prolonged Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Afilalo, Marc; Soucy, Nathalie; Xue, Xiaoqing; Colacone, Antoinette; Jourdenais, Emmanuelle; Boivin, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the characteristics and needs prior to, on admission, during the first month in hospital, at the thirtieth day of hospitalization and posthospital discharge of psychiatric patients occupying acute beds. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in 2 tertiary care hospitals. Adult patients hospitalized on a psychiatric unit for 30 days were identified. Data was collected from their medical charts and interviews with their health care team. The categorization of acute and nonacute status at day 30 was based on the health care professional’s evaluation. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed. Results: A total of 262 patients were identified (mean age 45 years), 66% lived at home and 11% were homeless. More than one-half were cognitively impaired and a few had special medical needs. Ninety-seven per cent had been admitted from the emergency department. At day 30, 81% of patients required acute care, while 19% (95% CI 15% to 24%) occupied an acute care bed, despite the resolution of their acute condition. The main reason preventing discharge of nonacute patients was the difficulty or inability to find appropriate resources that met patients’ needs. As for patients who required acute care, the most common psychiatric issues were delusions or hallucinations (34%), inability to take medications independently (23.6%), and inadequate control of aggression or impulsivity (16.5%). Conclusions: Prevention of the discharge of nonacute patients is largely due to the difficulty in finding appropriate resources that meet patients’ needs. Improved access to community and subacute care resources could potentially facilitate the hospital discharge of psychiatric nonacute patients. PMID:26174218

  16. What Can Hospitalized Patients Tell Us About Adverse Events? Learning from Patient-Reported Incidents

    PubMed Central

    Weingart, Saul N; Pagovich, Odelya; Sands, Daniel Z; Li, Joseph M; Aronson, Mark D; Davis, Roger B; Bates, David W; Phillips, Russell S

    2005-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about how well hospitalized patients can identify errors or injuries in their care. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to elicit incident reports from hospital inpatients in order to identify and characterize adverse events and near-miss errors. Subjects We conducted a prospective cohort study of 228 adult inpatients on a medicine unit of a Boston teaching hospital. Methods Investigators reviewed medical records and interviewed patients during the hospitalization and by telephone 10 days after discharge about “problems,”“mistakes,” and “injuries” that occurred. Physician investigators classified patients' reports. We calculated event rates and used multivariable Poisson regression models to examine the factors associated with patient-reported events. Results Of 264 eligible patients, 228 (86%) agreed to participate and completed 528 interviews. Seventeen patients (8%) experienced 20 adverse events; 1 was serious. Eight patients (4%) experienced 13 near misses; 5 were serious or life threatening. Eleven (55%) of 20 adverse events and 4 (31%) of 13 near misses were documented in the medical record, but none were found in the hospital incident reporting system. Patients with 3 or more drug allergies were more likely to report errors compared with patients without drug allergies (incidence rate ratio 4.7, 95% CI 1.7, 13.4). Conclusion Inpatients can identify adverse events affecting their care. Many patient-identified events are not captured by the hospital incident reporting system or recorded in the medical record. Engaging hospitalized patients as partners in identifying medical errors and injuries is a potentially promising approach for enhancing patient safety. PMID:16117751

  17. Associations between Depressive Symptoms and 30-day Hospital Readmission among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Berges, Ivonne M.; Amr, Sania; Abraham, Danielle S.; Cannon, Dawn L.; Ostir, Glenn V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital readmissions are common and costly. Our goal was to determine the association between depressive symptoms and readmission within 30 days following hospital discharge in older adults. Methods We analyzed data from a study of 789 persons aged 65 years or older admitted to a 20-bed acute care for elders (ACE) hospital unit from May 2009 to July 2011. Depressive symptoms were recorded within 24-hours of admission to the hospital unit, using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies -Depression (CES-D) Scale. The primary outcome was readmission to hospital within 30 days of discharge. Results The mean age was 77 years; 66% were female, 72% were White, and 59% were unmarried. On average, older patients reported 2.6 comorbid conditions. Sixteen percent were classified with high depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 16). The readmission rate within 30 days was 15%. Older patients with high depressive symptoms had more than 1.6 times the odds (OR 1.66; 95% CI: 1.01-2.74) of being readmitted within 30-days, as compared to those with low depressive symptoms (CES-D < 16), after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, sex, marital status and comorbid conditions. Conclusion High depressive symptoms increased the risk of hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge after adjusting for relevant covariates. In-hospital screening for depressive symptoms may identify older persons at risk for recurrent hospital admissions. PMID:27134802

  18. Enteral Nutrition for Adults in the Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Kozeniecki, Michelle; Fritzshall, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    In patients unable to tolerate oral intake, multiple options of nutrient delivery are available to the clinician. Administration of enteral nutrition (EN) has long been considered the standard of care for nutrition support among patients unable to meet energy and protein requirements orally. Healthcare practitioners must make careful decisions related to ordering, administering, and monitoring EN therapy. In the hospital setting, the registered dietitian is a key resource in enteral formula selection and method of administration, monitoring for and troubleshooting EN-related complications, and transitioning to oral feeding. The hospital setting also presents many unique challenges in providing optimal nutrition to the enterally fed patient.

  19. Differences among hospitals in Medicare patient mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Chassin, M R; Park, R E; Lohr, K N; Keesey, J; Brook, R H

    1989-01-01

    Using hospital discharge abstract data for fiscal year 1984 for all acute care hospitals treating Medicare patients (age greater than or equal to 65), we measured four mortality rates: inpatient deaths, deaths within 30 days after discharge, and deaths within two fixed periods following admission (30 days, and the 95th percentile length of stay for each condition). The metric of interest was the probability that a hospital would have as many deaths as it did (taking age, race, and sex into account). Differences among hospitals in inpatient death rates were large and significant (p less than .05) for 22 of 48 specific conditions studied and for all conditions together; among these 22 "high-variation" conditions, medical conditions accounted for far more deaths than did surgical conditions. We compared pairs of conditions in terms of hospital rankings by probability of observed numbers of inpatient deaths; we found relatively low correlations (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.3 or lower) for most comparisons except between a few surgical conditions. When we compared different pairs of the four death measures on their rankings of hospitals by probabilities of the observed numbers of deaths, the correlations were moderate to high (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.54 to 0.99). Hospitals with low probabilities of the number of observed deaths were not distributed randomly geographically; a small number of states had significantly more than their share of these hospitals (p less than .01). Information from hospital discharge abstract data is insufficient to determine the extent to which differences in severity of illness or quality of care account for this marked variability, so data on hospital death rates cannot now be used to draw inferences about quality of care. The magnitude of variability in death rates and the geographic clustering of facilities with low probabilities, however, both argue for further study of hospital death rates. These data may prove

  20. Hospital dental practice in special patients

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Espín-Gálvez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Dental patients with special needs are people with different systemic diseases, multiple disorders or severe physical and/or mental disabilities. A Medline search was made, yielding a total of 29 articles that served as the basis for this study, which offers a brief description of the dental intervention protocols in medically compromised patients. Dental treatment in patients with special needs, whether presenting medical problems or disabilities, is sometimes complex. For this reason the hospital should be regarded as the ideal setting for the care of these individuals. Before starting any dental intervention, a correct patient evaluation is needed, based on a correct anamnesis, medical records and interconsultation reports, and with due assessment of the medical risks involved. The hospital setting offers the advantage of access to electronic medical records and to data referred to any complementary tests that may have been made, and we moreover have the possibility of performing treatments under general anesthesia. In this context, ambulatory major surgery is the best approach when considering general anesthesia in patients of this kind. Key words:Hospital dentistry, special patients, medically compromised patients. PMID:24121921

  1. Bad tidings and the hospitalized patient.

    PubMed

    Lerer, B; Avni, J; Wiesel, D

    1976-01-01

    The physician in hospital practice may be faced with a situation in which a patient under his care suffers a bereavement or some other unexpected tragedy but is unaware of the fact. Three such cases encountered in the context of our psychiatric sonsultation service are presented. Factors influencing the decision as to whether, when and how the patient should be informed are considered. The complex psychodynamic situation which arises and involves the patient, his family and the medical staff is described. Stress is laid on the role played by archaic fears of being the bearer of evil tidings. The situation is seen as being ideally handled by the direct treating physician in conjunction with the family, the extent of psychiatric intervention being dictated by the needs of each of the parties concerned. Ideally the patient should be told as soon as his physical and mental condition are seen as conducive and preferably before he leave hospital.

  2. A Use Case to Support Precision Medicine for Frequently Hospitalized Older Adults with Polypharmacy.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Manuel; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Polypharmacy in older adults results in multiple negative clinical consequences including increased risk of hospital readmissions. Precision medicine may provide tools to optimize complex medication regimens however its potential in older adults with polypharmacy is unknown. We carried out pharmacogenetic testing in an older adult with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy who was concerned about frequent readmissions despite receiving guideline-concordant care and being adherent to medication regimen. The testing identified patients' CYP2D6 rapid metabolizer status. This may have resulted in decreased exposure to Carvedilol which was primary drug for CHF management in this patient. Additional nine drug-drug interactions were identified during personalized drug regimen review. We concluded that, though precision medicine has enormous potential in older adults with polypharmacy, the complexity of pharmacogenetic information requires innovative informatics solutions to support optimal workflows, decision support, and medication optimization and management in order to fully utilize its potential in routine clinical care. PMID:27570642

  3. A Use Case to Support Precision Medicine for Frequently Hospitalized Older Adults with Polypharmacy.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Manuel; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Polypharmacy in older adults results in multiple negative clinical consequences including increased risk of hospital readmissions. Precision medicine may provide tools to optimize complex medication regimens however its potential in older adults with polypharmacy is unknown. We carried out pharmacogenetic testing in an older adult with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy who was concerned about frequent readmissions despite receiving guideline-concordant care and being adherent to medication regimen. The testing identified patients' CYP2D6 rapid metabolizer status. This may have resulted in decreased exposure to Carvedilol which was primary drug for CHF management in this patient. Additional nine drug-drug interactions were identified during personalized drug regimen review. We concluded that, though precision medicine has enormous potential in older adults with polypharmacy, the complexity of pharmacogenetic information requires innovative informatics solutions to support optimal workflows, decision support, and medication optimization and management in order to fully utilize its potential in routine clinical care.

  4. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: analysis of 533 adult patients who underwent transplantation at King's College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wang, Wenjia; Abeywardane, Ayesha; Adikarama, Malinthi; McLornan, Donal; Raj, Kavita; de Lavallade, Hugues; Devereux, Stephen; Mufti, Ghulam J; Pagliuca, Antonio; Potter, Victoria T; Mijovic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); it is often refractory to treatment and carries a high mortality. To improve understanding of the incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcome of post-transplantation AIHA, we analyzed 533 patients who received allogeneic HSCT, and we identified 19 cases of AIHA after HSCT (overall incidence, 3.6%). The median time to onset, from HSCT to AIHA, was 202 days. AIHA was associated with HSCT from unrelated donors (hazard ratio [HR], 5.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22 to 22.9; P = .026). In the majority (14 of 19; 74%) of AIHA patients, multiple agents for treatment were required, with only 9 of 19 (47%) patients achieving complete resolution of AIHA. Patients with post-transplantation AIHA had a higher overall mortality (HR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.33 to 4.63; P = .004), with 36% (4 of 11 cases) of deaths attributable to AIHA. PMID:25262883

  5. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: analysis of 533 adult patients who underwent transplantation at King's College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wang, Wenjia; Abeywardane, Ayesha; Adikarama, Malinthi; McLornan, Donal; Raj, Kavita; de Lavallade, Hugues; Devereux, Stephen; Mufti, Ghulam J; Pagliuca, Antonio; Potter, Victoria T; Mijovic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); it is often refractory to treatment and carries a high mortality. To improve understanding of the incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcome of post-transplantation AIHA, we analyzed 533 patients who received allogeneic HSCT, and we identified 19 cases of AIHA after HSCT (overall incidence, 3.6%). The median time to onset, from HSCT to AIHA, was 202 days. AIHA was associated with HSCT from unrelated donors (hazard ratio [HR], 5.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22 to 22.9; P = .026). In the majority (14 of 19; 74%) of AIHA patients, multiple agents for treatment were required, with only 9 of 19 (47%) patients achieving complete resolution of AIHA. Patients with post-transplantation AIHA had a higher overall mortality (HR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.33 to 4.63; P = .004), with 36% (4 of 11 cases) of deaths attributable to AIHA.

  6. [Respect of patient's dignity in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Duguet, A-M

    2010-12-01

    Every code of ethics of health professionals in France considers the respect of dignity as a fundamental duty. The French 2002 Law on patient rights says that the person has the right to respect of dignity and of private life. After a presentation of the articles of ethics codes regarding dignity, this paper presents recommendations to deliver medical care in situations where dignity might be endangered such as for patients hospitalized in psychiatric services without consent, or for medical examination of prisoners or medical care to vulnerable patients unable to express their will, especially in palliative care or at the end of life. Respect of dignity after death is illustrated by the reflection conducted by the Espace Ethique de l'AP-HP (Paris area hospitals) and in the Chart of the mortuary yard. A survey of the patients' letters of complaint received by the emergency service of the Toulouse University Hospital showed that, in five years, there were 188 letters and 18 pointed out infringements to the dignity of the person. The health professional team is now aware of this obligation, and in the accreditation of the hospitals, the respect of dignity is one of the indicators of the quality of medical care. PMID:21766725

  7. Are housestaff identifying malnourished hospitalized medicine patients?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael A; Duerksen, Donald R; Rahman, Adam

    2014-10-01

    Clinical nutrition and nutritional assessment are often a neglected component of medical school curriculums despite the high prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients. This study found that medical housestaff performed nutritional assessments in only 4% of admitted patients despite a high rate of malnutrition (57%). Survey results show housestaff lack knowledge in the area of malnutrition. Medical schools and training programs must place greater emphasis of providing qualified physician nutrition specialists to implement effective nutrition instruction. PMID:25061765

  8. Use of Acute Care Hospitals by Long-Stay Patients: Who, How Much, and Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Coster, Carolyn; Bruce, Sharon; Kozyrskyj, Anita

    2005-01-01

    The effects of long-term hospitalizations can be severe, especially among older adults. In Manitoba, between fiscal years 1991/1992 and 1999/2000, 40 per cent of acute care hospital days were used by the 5 per cent of patients who had long stays, defined as stays of more than 30 days. These proportions were remarkably stable, despite major changes…

  9. Adult allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: initial experience in the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Teh, A; Bosco, J J; Leong, K W; Saw, M H; Menaka, N; Devashanti, P

    1997-03-01

    Prior to 1993, bone marrow transplantation for adult patients was not available in Malaysia. Adult allogeneic bone marrow transplantation commenced in Malaysia when the first transplant was conducted at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur on 2 November 1993. Up till July 1995, 10 adult bone marrow transplants had been conducted at the University Hospital. Five patients had acute myeloid leukaemia in first remission, 4 had chronic myeloid leukaemia and 1 had acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first partial remission. The age range of patients at the time of transplant is 16-40 years (mean 25.5 years). All patients engrafted successfully and the survival for the first 100 days post-transplant is 90%. One patient demonstrated haematological relapse post-transplant but achieved remission with donor buffy-coat infusion. The mean drug cost incurred was RM28,269 for the first 100 days. Locally available adult allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is safe, affordable and has comparable results with reputable overseas transplant centres.

  10. Trends of hospitalizations, fatality rate and costs for acute myocardial infarction among Spanish diabetic adults, 2001-2006

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is one of the more frequent reasons diabetic patients are admitted to hospital, and there are reports that the long-term prognosis after an AMI is much worse in these patients than in non-diabetic patients. This study aims to compare hospital admissions and costs in Spanish diabetic and non-diabetic subjects due to AMI during the period 2001-2006. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 6 years of national hospitalization data associated with diabetes using the Minimum Basic Data Set. National hospitalization rates were calculated for AMI among diabetic and non-diabetic adults. Fatality rates, mean hospital stay and direct medical costs related to hospitalization were analyzed. Costs were calculated using Diagnosis-Related Groups for AMI in diabetics and non-diabetics patients. Results During the study period, a total of 307,099 patients with AMI were admitted to Spanish hospitals. Diabetic patients made up 29.6% of the total. The estimated incidence due to AMI in diabetics increased from 54.7 cases per 100,000 in 2001 to 64.1 in 2006. Diabetic patients had significantly higher mortality than nondiabetic patients after adjusting for age, gender, and year (OR 1.11 [95% CI, 1.08-1.14]). The cost among diabetic patients increased by 21.3% from 2001 to 2006. Conclusions Diabetic patients have higher rates of hospital admission and fatality rates during the hospitalization after an AMI than nondiabetic patients. Diabetic adults who have suffered an AMI have a greater than expected increase in direct hospital costs over the period 2001-2006. PMID:20205960

  11. Interventions That Affect Gastrointestinal Motility in Hospitalized Adult Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Randomized Trials.

    PubMed

    Asrani, Varsha M; Yoon, Harry D; Megill, Robin D; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility is a common complication in acute, critically ill, postoperative, and chronic patients that may lead to impaired nutrient delivery, poor clinical, and patient-reported outcomes. Several pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions to treat GI dysmotility were investigated in dozens of clinical studies. However, they often yielded conflicting results, at least in part, because various (nonstandardized) definitions of GI dysmotility were used and methodological quality of studies was poor. While a universally accepted definition of GI dysmotility is yet to be developed, a systematic analysis of data derived from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials may provide robust data on absolute and relative effectiveness of various interventions as the study outcome (GI motility) was assessed in the least biased manner.To systematically review data from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials to determine and compare the effectiveness of interventions that affect GI motility.Three electronic databases (MEDLINE, SCOPUS, and EMBASE) were searched. A random effects model was used for meta-analysis. The summary estimates were reported as mean difference (MD) with the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI).A total of 38 double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials involving 2371 patients were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review. These studies investigated a total of 20 different interventions, of which 6 interventions were meta-analyzed. Of them, the use of dopamine receptor antagonists (MD, -8.99; 95% CI, -17.72 to -0.27; P = 0.04) and macrolides (MD, -26.04; 95% CI, -51.25 to -0.82; P = 0.04) significantly improved GI motility compared with the placebo group. The use of botulism toxin significantly impaired GI motility compared with the placebo group (MD, 5.31; 95% CI, -0.04 to 10.67; P = 0.05). Other interventions (dietary factors, probiotics, hormones) did not affect GI motility

  12. AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE STROKE HOSPITAL PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Kes, Vanja Bašić; Jurašić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Lisak, Marijana; Jelec, Vjekoslav; Matovina, Lucija Zadro

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the most important cause of adult disability worldwide and in Croatia. In the past, stroke was almost exclusively considered to be a disease of the elderly; however, today the age limit has considerably lowered towards younger age. The aim of this study was to determine age and gender impact on stroke patients in a Croatian urban area during one-year survey. The study included all acute stroke patients admitted to our Department in 2004. A compiled stroke questionnaire was fulfilled during hospitalization by medical personnel on the following items: stroke risk factors including lifestyle habits (smoking and alcohol), pre-stroke physical ability evaluation, stroke evolution data, laboratory and computed tomography findings, outcome data and post-stroke disability assessment. Appropriate statistical analysis of numerical and categorical data was performed at the level of p < 0.05. Analysis was performed on 396 patients, 24 of them from the younger adult stroke group. Older stroke patients had worse disability at hospital discharge and women had worse disabilities at both stroke onset and hospital discharge, probably due to older age at stroke onset. Younger patients recovered better, while older patients had to seek secondary medical facilities more often, as expected. The most important in-hospital laboratory findings in young stroke patients were elevated lipid levels, while older patients had elevated serum glucose and C-reactive protein. Stroke onset in younger patients most often presented with sudden onset headache; additionally, onset seizure was observed more frequently than expected. Stroke risk factor analysis showed that women were more prone to hypertension, chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation, whereas men had carotid disease more frequently, were more often smokers and had higher alcohol intake. Additionally, age analysis showed that heart conditions and smoking were more prevalent among older

  13. Managing patients for zoonotic disease in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Clifford; Corning, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Zoonoses involve infections and infestations transmissible from animals to humans. Zoonoses are a major global threat. Exposure to zoonotic pathogens exists in various settings including encroachment on nature; foreign travel; pet keeping; bushmeat consumption; attendance at zoological parks, petting zoos, school ‘animal contact experiences’, wildlife markets, circuses, and domesticated and exotic animal farms. Under-ascertainment is believed to be common and the frequency of some zoonotic disease appears to be increasing. Zoonoses include direct, indirect and aerosolized transmission. Improved awareness of zoonoses in the hospital environment may be important to the growing need for prevention and control. We reviewed relevant literature for the years 2000 to present and identified a significant need for the promotion of awareness and management of zoonoses in the hospital environment. This article provides a new decision-tree, as well as staff and patient guidance on the prevention and control of zoonoses associated with hospitals. PMID:24040497

  14. Obesity not associated with severity among hospitalized adults with seasonal influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Braun, Elise S; Crawford, Forrest W; Desai, Mayur M; Meek, James; Kirley, Pam Daily; Miller, Lisa; Anderson, Evan J; Oni, Oluwakemi; Ryan, Patricia; Lynfield, Ruth; Bargsten, Marisa; Bennett, Nancy M; Lung, Krista L; Thomas, Ann; Mermel, Elizabeth; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Schaffner, William; Price, Andrea; Chaves, Sandra S

    2015-10-01

    We examined seasonal influenza severity [artificial ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and radiographic-confirmed pneumonia] by weight category among adults hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza. Using multivariate logistic regression models, we found no association between obesity or severe obesity and artificial ventilation or ICU admission; however, overweight and obese patients had decreased risk of pneumonia. Underweight was associated with pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio 1.31; 95 % confidence interval 1.04, 1.64).

  15. [Nursing iatrogenic events in hospitalized elderly patients].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Jussara Carvalho; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional quantitative study was to identify iatrogenic nursing events involving elderly patients hospitalized in two nursing wards of a university hospital (Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil). Data was collected among 100 patient records (50 men, 50 women) using an instrument created by the authors. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics in addition to Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results were significant at p < 0.05. Latrogenic events in the 26 files included: loss of intravenous site (14), pressure ulcers (8) and falls (2), among others. Reports were not detailed and failed to indicate interventions to prevent new occurrences. The findings suggest the importance of creating ways to encourage nursing professionals to accurately report iatrogenic events, as well as creating wards specifically for the elderly population.

  16. Patient falls in hospitals: an increasing problem.

    PubMed

    Weil, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Despite six decades of worldwide efforts that include publishing virtually hundreds of related epidemiological-type studies, there has been an increase (estimated to be 46% per 1000 patient days from 1954-6 to 2006-10) in the number of patient falls in hospitals and other health care facilities. These still occur most frequently near the bedside or in the bathroom, among mentally confused or physically impaired patients, and often involve those with greater comorbidity. The reasons that hospitals during the past half century have demonstrated a significant increase in patient falls per discharge or per patient days are numerous, are not completely surprising, and are certainly interrelated: improved accident reporting systems; on the average older, more impaired, more acutely ill, and more heavily sedated patients; and, less time spent by nursing personnel at the bedside. Most safety committees are not as effective as they should be, since they have difficulty in implementing a long-term, aggressive, facility-wide prevention program. Within that context, it may be worthwhile to discuss the advantages of nursing leadership rather than a representative of the facility's management staff to chair these safety committees. PMID:26304626

  17. A Use Case to Support Precision Medicine for Frequently Hospitalized Older Adults with Polypharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Manuel; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Polypharmacy in older adults results in multiple negative clinical consequences including increased risk of hospital readmissions. Precision medicine may provide tools to optimize complex medication regimens however its potential in older adults with polypharmacy is unknown. We carried out pharmacogenetic testing in an older adult with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy who was concerned about frequent readmissions despite receiving guideline-concordant care and being adherent to medication regimen. The testing identified patients’ CYP2D6 rapid metabolizer status. This may have resulted in decreased exposure to Carvedilol which was primary drug for CHF management in this patient. Additional nine drug-drug interactions were identified during personalized drug regimen review. We concluded that, though precision medicine has enormous potential in older adults with polypharmacy, the complexity of pharmacogenetic information requires innovative informatics solutions to support optimal workflows, decision support, and medication optimization and management in order to fully utilize its potential in routine clinical care. PMID:27570642

  18. In-Hospital Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccination Is Associated With Detection of Pneumococcal Vaccine Serotypes in Adults Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Grijalva, Carlos G; Wunderink, Richard G; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J; Balk, Robert; Fakhran, Sherene; Courtney, D Mark; Anderson, Evan J; Qi, Chao; Trabue, Christopher; Pavia, Andrew T; Moore, Matthew R; Jain, Seema; Edwards, Kathryn M; Self, Wesley H

    2015-12-01

    During an etiology study of adults hospitalized for pneumonia, in which urine specimens were examined for serotype-specific pneumococcal antigen detection, we observed that some patients received 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine before urine collection. Some urine samples became positive for specific vaccine pneumococcal serotypes shortly after vaccination, suggesting false-positive test results. PMID:26512357

  19. The excess burden of stroke in hospitalized adults with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Strouse, John J; Jordan, Lori C; Lanzkron, Sophie; Casella, James F

    2009-09-01

    This report compares the relative rates and risk factors associated with stroke in adults versus children with sickle cell disease (SCD) in the United States over the last decade. We identified incident strokes in patients with SCD using ICD-9 codes for acute stroke and SCD and the California Patient Discharge Databases. We estimated SCD prevalence by using the incidence of SCD at birth with adjustment for early mortality from SCD. We identified 255 acute strokes (70 primary hemorrhagic and 185 ischemic) among 69,586 hospitalizations for SCD-related complications from 1998 to 2007. The rate of stroke in children [<18 years old (310/100,000 person-years)] was similar to young adults [18-34 years old (360/100,000 person-years)], but much higher in middle-aged [35-64 years old (1,160/100,000 person-years)] and elderly adults [> or =65 years old (4,700/100,000 person-years)]. Stroke was associated with hypertension in children and hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, atrial fibrillation, and renal disease in adults. Most acute strokes (75%) and in-hospital deaths from stroke (91%) occurred in adults. Our results suggest that the rate of stroke in SCD peaks in older adults and is three-fold higher than rates previously reported in African-Americans of similar age (35-64 years) without SCD. Stroke in SCD is associated with several known adult risk factors for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Studies for the primary and secondary prevention of stroke in adults with SCD are urgently needed.

  20. Risk Factors for Increased Hospital Resource Utilization and In-Hospital Mortality in Adults With Single Ventricle Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ronnie Thomas; Doshi, Pratik; Onukwube, Jennifer; Fram, Ricki Y; Robbins, James M

    2016-08-01

    Most patients with single ventricle congenital heart disease are now expected to survive to adulthood. Co-morbid medical conditions (CMCs) are common. We sought to identify risk factors for increased hospital resource utilization and in-hospital mortality in adults with single ventricle. We analyzed data from the 2001 to 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample database in patients aged ≥18 years admitted to nonteaching general hospitals (NTGHs), TGHs, and pediatric hospitals (PHs) with either hypoplastic left heart syndrome, tricuspid atresia or common ventricle. National estimates of hospitalizations were calculated. Elixhauser CMCs were identified. Length of stay (LOS), total hospital costs, and effect of CMCs were determined. Age was greater in NTGH (41.5 ± 1.3 years) than in TGH (32.8 ± 0.5) and PH (25.0 ± 0.6; p <0.0001). Adjusted LOS was shorter in NTGH (5.6 days) than in PH (9.7 days; p <0.0001). Adjusted costs were higher in PH ($56,671) than in TGH ($31,934) and NTGH ($18,255; p <0.0001). CMCs are associated with increased LOS (p <0.0001) and costs (p <0.0001). Risk factors for in-hospital mortality included increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 5.250, CI 2.825 to 9.758 for 45- to 64-year old vs 18- to 30-year old), male gender (OR 2.72, CI 1.804 to 4.103]), and the presence of CMC (OR 4.55, CI 2.193 to 9.436) for 2 vs none). No differences in mortality were found among NTGH, TGH, and PH. Cardiovascular procedures were more common in PH hospitalizations and were associated with higher costs and LOS. CMCs increase costs and mortality. In-hospital mortality is increased with age, male gender, and the presence of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. PMID:27291967

  1. The association between managed care enrollments and potentially preventable hospitalization among adult Medicaid recipients in Florida

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The intent of adopting managed care plans is to improve access to health care services while containing costs. To date, there have been a number of studies that examine the relationship between managed care and access to health care. However, the results from previous studies have been inconsistent. Specifically, previous studies did not demonstrate a clear benefit of Medicaid managed care. In this study we have examine whether Medicaid managed care is associated with the probabilities of preventable hospitalizations. This study also analyzes the spillover effect of Medicaid managed care into Medicaid patients in traditional FFS plans and the interaction effects of other patient- and county-level variables on preventable hospitalizations. Methods The study included 254,321 Medicaid patients who were admitted to short-term general hospital in the 67 counties in Florida. Using 2008 hospital inpatient discharge data for working-age adult Medicaid enrollees (18-64 years) in Florida, we conduct multivariate logistic regression analyses to identify possible factors associated with preventable hospitalizations. The first model includes patient- and county-level variables. Then, we add interaction terms between Medicaid HMO and other variables such as race, rurality, market-level factors, and resource for primary care. Results The results show that Medicaid HMO patients are more likely to be hospitalized for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) (OR = 1.30; CI = 1.21, 1.40). We also find that market structure (i.e., competition) is significantly associated with preventable hospitalizations. However, our study does not support that there are spillover effects of Medicaid managed care on preventable hospitalizations for other Medicaid recipients. We find that interactions between Medicaid managed care and race, rurality and market structure are significant. Conclusions The results of our study show that the Medicaid managed care program in Florida

  2. Patient Safety Outcomes in Small Urban and Small Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vartak, Smruti; Ward, Marcia M.; Vaughn, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess patient safety outcomes in small urban and small rural hospitals and to examine the relationship of hospital and patient factors to patient safety outcomes. Methods: The Nationwide Inpatient Sample and American Hospital Association annual survey data were used for analyses. To increase comparability, the study sample was…

  3. Bedding, not boarding. Psychiatric patients boarded in hospital EDs create crisis for patient care and hospital finances.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth

    2013-11-18

    As the supply of psychiatric beds dwindles, hospitals are devising innovative ways handle psych patients who come through the emergency department. Some collaborate with other hospitals, use separate pysch EDs or refer patients to residential treatment centers.

  4. Central venous catheter infection in adults in acute hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Jones, Clare A

    As well as the human cost, central venous catheter (CVC)-related bloodstream infections significantly inflate hospital costs, mainly through increased length of stay in hospital, particularly in intensive care. This literature review appraises recent research on measures used to minimize CVC-related infection and compares it with current best practice. Randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews published on the subject between 2000 and 2005 were reviewed, concentrating on non-tunnelled, short-term CVCs in the acute hospital setting. The new evidence mainly backs up current best practice. However, skin disinfection could be improved by using alcoholic chlorhexidine followed by aqueous povidone-iodine before CVC insertion. Also, alcoholic chlorhexidine is the preferred solution for cleaning the hubs/connectors before accessing the CVC. Good hand hygiene and quality control and education programmes are vital to improve patient care. More research is needed to clarify the effectiveness of certain interventions and technologies, such as antimicrobial CVCs.

  5. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  6. Interactions between dietary supplements in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ilana; Attias, Samuel; Ben Arye, Eran; Goldstein, Lee; Schiff, Elad

    2016-10-01

    Inpatient consumption of dietary and herbal supplements (DHS) has recently received research attention, particularly due to potential DHS-drug interactions. Nevertheless, DHS-DHS interactions have seldom been evaluated among hospitalized patients. We evaluated potential DHS-DHS interactions among inpatients. The study was a cross-sectional prospective study, conducted at Bnai Zion Medical Center (Haifa, Israel) in 2009-2014. A multi-disciplinary team of researchers constructed a questionnaire aimed at detecting DHS use among inpatients. The Natural Medicine Database was used to examine identified DHS for potential DHS-DHS interactions. Then, medical files were reviewed to identify side effects potentially caused by such interactions and rate of documentation of DHS use. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to characterize potential risk factors for DHS-DHS interactions among hospitalized DHS users. Of 927 patients who agreed to answer the questionnaire, 458 (49.4 %) reported the use of 89 different DHS. Potential DHS-DHS interactions were identified in 12.9 % of DHS users. Three interactions were associated with the actual occurrence of adverse events. Patients at risk of DHS-DHS interactions included females (p = 0.026) and patients with greater numbers of concomitant medications (p < 0.0001) and of consumed DHS (p < 0.0001). In 88.9 % of DHS users, DHS use was not reported in medical files and only 18 % of the DHS involved in interactions were documented. Potential DHS-DHS interactions are common in inpatients, and may lead to hospitalization or worsen existing medical conditions. The causal relationship between potential interactions and actual adverse events requires further study.

  7. Interactions between dietary supplements in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ilana; Attias, Samuel; Ben Arye, Eran; Goldstein, Lee; Schiff, Elad

    2016-10-01

    Inpatient consumption of dietary and herbal supplements (DHS) has recently received research attention, particularly due to potential DHS-drug interactions. Nevertheless, DHS-DHS interactions have seldom been evaluated among hospitalized patients. We evaluated potential DHS-DHS interactions among inpatients. The study was a cross-sectional prospective study, conducted at Bnai Zion Medical Center (Haifa, Israel) in 2009-2014. A multi-disciplinary team of researchers constructed a questionnaire aimed at detecting DHS use among inpatients. The Natural Medicine Database was used to examine identified DHS for potential DHS-DHS interactions. Then, medical files were reviewed to identify side effects potentially caused by such interactions and rate of documentation of DHS use. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to characterize potential risk factors for DHS-DHS interactions among hospitalized DHS users. Of 927 patients who agreed to answer the questionnaire, 458 (49.4 %) reported the use of 89 different DHS. Potential DHS-DHS interactions were identified in 12.9 % of DHS users. Three interactions were associated with the actual occurrence of adverse events. Patients at risk of DHS-DHS interactions included females (p = 0.026) and patients with greater numbers of concomitant medications (p < 0.0001) and of consumed DHS (p < 0.0001). In 88.9 % of DHS users, DHS use was not reported in medical files and only 18 % of the DHS involved in interactions were documented. Potential DHS-DHS interactions are common in inpatients, and may lead to hospitalization or worsen existing medical conditions. The causal relationship between potential interactions and actual adverse events requires further study. PMID:26837208

  8. Hospital Resource Utilization for Common Noncardiac Diagnoses in Adult Survivors of Single Cardiac Ventricle.

    PubMed

    Seckeler, Michael D; Moe, Tabitha G; Thomas, Ian D; Meziab, Omar; Andrews, Jennifer; Heller, Elissa; Klewer, Scott E

    2015-12-01

    Single ventricle congenital heart disease (SV CHD) has transformed from a nearly universally fatal condition to a chronic illness. As the number of adults living with SV CHD continues to increase, there needs to be an understanding of health care resource utilization (HCRU), particularly for noncardiac conditions, for this patient population. We performed a retrospective database review of the University HealthSystem Consortium Clinical Database/Resource Manager for adult patients with SV CHD hospitalized for noncardiac conditions from January 2011 to November 2014. Patients with SV CHD were identified using International Classification of Disease (ICD)-9 codes associated with SV CHD (hypoplastic left heart, tricuspid atresia, and SV) and stratified into 2 groups by age (18 to 29 years and 30 to 40 years). Direct cost, length of stay (LOS), intensive care unit (ICU) admission rate and mortality data were compared with age-matched patients without CHD. There were 2,083,651 non-CHD and 590 SV CHD admissions in Group 1 and 2,131,046 non-CHD and 297 SV CHD admissions in Group 2. There was no difference in LOS in Group 1, but there were higher costs for several diagnoses. LOS and costs were higher for several diagnoses in Group 2. ICU admission rate and in-hospital mortality were higher for several diagnoses for patients with SV CHD in both groups. In conclusion, adults with SV CHD admitted for noncardiac diagnoses have higher HCRU (longer LOS and higher ICU admission rates) compared with similarly aged patients without CHD. These findings stress the importance of good primary care in this population with complex, chronic cardiac disease to prevent hospitalizations and higher HCRU. PMID:26455384

  9. Role of Physical Therapists in Reducing Hospital Readmissions: Optimizing Outcomes for Older Adults During Care Transitions From Hospital to Community.

    PubMed

    Falvey, Jason R; Burke, Robert E; Malone, Daniel; Ridgeway, Kyle J; McManus, Beth M; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2016-08-01

    Hospital readmissions in older adult populations are an emerging quality indicator for acute care hospitals. Recent evidence has linked functional decline during and after hospitalization with an elevated risk of hospital readmission. However, models of care that have been developed to reduce hospital readmission rates do not adequately address functional deficits. Physical therapists, as experts in optimizing physical function, have a strong opportunity to contribute meaningfully to care transition models and demonstrate the value of physical therapy interventions in reducing readmissions. Thus, the purposes of this perspective article are: (1) to describe the need for physical therapist input during care transitions for older adults and (2) to outline strategies for expanding physical therapy participation in care transitions for older adults, with an overall goal of reducing avoidable 30-day hospital readmissions. PMID:26939601

  10. Role of Physical Therapists in Reducing Hospital Readmissions: Optimizing Outcomes for Older Adults During Care Transitions From Hospital to Community.

    PubMed

    Falvey, Jason R; Burke, Robert E; Malone, Daniel; Ridgeway, Kyle J; McManus, Beth M; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2016-08-01

    Hospital readmissions in older adult populations are an emerging quality indicator for acute care hospitals. Recent evidence has linked functional decline during and after hospitalization with an elevated risk of hospital readmission. However, models of care that have been developed to reduce hospital readmission rates do not adequately address functional deficits. Physical therapists, as experts in optimizing physical function, have a strong opportunity to contribute meaningfully to care transition models and demonstrate the value of physical therapy interventions in reducing readmissions. Thus, the purposes of this perspective article are: (1) to describe the need for physical therapist input during care transitions for older adults and (2) to outline strategies for expanding physical therapy participation in care transitions for older adults, with an overall goal of reducing avoidable 30-day hospital readmissions.

  11. Refeeding syndrome in hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Rebecca L; Stettler, Nicolas; Mascarenhas, Maria R

    2003-08-01

    Refeeding syndrome has been well documented over the years, primarily through case reports and literature reviews. Awareness of refeeding syndrome is crucial in preventing the occurrence of, and the metabolic and physiologic complications associated with, aggressive nutrition support in malnourished populations. Once compromised patients have been identified to be at risk of refeeding syndrome, nutrition rehabilitation should be cautiously initiated. We have found a lack of clinical validation for instituting nutrition support in high-risk pediatric patients who may develop refeeding syndrome. The purposes of our investigation were to determine the incidence of refeeding syndrome in pediatric hospitalized patients beginning on parenteral nutrition and to determine how consistently the Department of Clinical Nutrition standards of care for screening and prevention were followed at our institution.

  12. Informal caregivers' participation when older adults in Norway are discharged from the hospital.

    PubMed

    Bragstad, Line Kildal; Kirkevold, Marit; Hofoss, Dag; Foss, Christina

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the participation of informal caregivers in the discharge process when patients aged 80 and over who were admitted from home to different hospitals in Norway were discharged to long-term community care. Data for this cross-sectional survey were collected through telephone interviews with a consecutive sample of 262 caregivers recruited between October 2007 and May 2009. The Discharge of Elderly Questionnaire was developed by the research team and was designed to elicit data concerning informal caregivers' self-reported perceptions on participation in the discharge process. A descriptive and comparative analysis of Thompson's levels of participation reported by the older generation (spouses and siblings) and the younger generation (adult children and children-in-law, nieces and grandchildren) was undertaken using bivariate cross-tabulations and chi-square tests for association and trend. Analyses showed that the younger generation of caregivers received and provided information to hospital staff to a greater degree than the older generation. Overall, 52% of the informal caregivers reported co-operating with the staff to a high or to some degree. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyse factors predicting the likelihood of informal caregivers reporting co-operation with hospital staff. The odds of younger generation caregivers reporting co-operation were more than twice as high (OR = 2.121, P = 0.045) as the odds of the older generation. Caregivers of patients with a hearing impairment had higher odds of reporting co-operation (OR = 1.722, P = 0.049) than caregivers of patients with no such impairment. The length of hospital stay, the caregiver's and patient's gender and education level were not significantly associated with caregiver's co-operation. The informal caregivers' experiences with information practices and user participation in hospitals highlight important challenges that must be taken seriously to ensure co

  13. Patient Safety Events and Harms During Medical and Surgical Hospitalizations for Persons With Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Daumit, Gail L.; McGinty, Emma E.; Pronovost, Peter; Dixon, Lisa B.; Guallar, Eliseo; Ford, Daniel E.; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.; Boonyasai, Romsai T.; Thompson, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study explored the risk of patient safety events and associated nonfatal physical harms and mortality in a cohort of persons with serious mental illness. This group experiences high rates of medical comorbidity and premature mortality and may be at high risk of adverse patient safety events. Methods Medical record review was conducted for medical-surgical hospitalizations occurring during 1994–2004 in a community-based cohort of Maryland adults with serious mental illness. Individuals were eligible if they died within 30 days of a medical-surgical hospitalization and if they also had at least one prior medical-surgical hospitalization within five years of death. All admissions took place at Maryland general hospitals. A case-crossover analysis examined the relationships among patient safety events, physical harms, and elevated likelihood of death within 30 days of hospitalization. Results A total of 790 hospitalizations among 253 adults were reviewed. The mean number of patient safety events per hospitalization was 5.8, and the rate of physical harms was 142 per 100 hospitalizations. The odds of physical harm were elevated in hospitalizations in which 22 of the 34 patient safety events occurred (p<.05), including medical events (odds ratio [OR]=1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.3–1.7) and procedure-related events (OR=1.6, CI=1.2–2.0). Adjusted odds of death within 30 days of hospitalization were elevated for individuals with any patient safety event, compared with those with no event (OR=3.7, CI=1.4–10.3). Conclusions Patient safety events were positively associated with physical harm and 30-day mortality in nonpsychiatric hospitalizations for persons with serious mental illness. PMID:27181736

  14. Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    BERTI-COUTO, Soraya de Azambuja; COUTO-SOUZA, Paulo Henrique; JACOBS, Reinhilde; NACKAERTS, Olivia; RUBIRA-BULLEN, Izabel Regina Fischer; WESTPHALEN, Fernando Henrique; MOYSÉS, Samuel Jorge; IGNÁCIO, Sérgio Aparecido; da COSTA, Maitê Barroso; TOLAZZI, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical criteria for the diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients. Material and Methods A clinical study was carried out on 145 subjects (48 males; 97 females; aged 20 to 90 years). Each subject was clinically examined, in the morning and in the afternoon, along 1 day. A focused anamnesis allowed identifying symptoms of hyposalivation, like xerostomia complaints (considered as a reference symptom), chewing difficulty, dysphagia and increased frequency of liquid intake. Afterwards, dryness of the mucosa of the cheecks and floor of the mouth, as well as salivary secretion during parotid gland stimulation were assessed during oral examination. Results Results obtained with Chi-square tests showed that 71 patients (48.9%) presented xerostomia complaints, with a significant correlation with all hyposalivation symptoms (p<0.05). Furthermore, xerostomia was also significantly correlated with all data obtained during oral examination in both periods of evaluation (p<0.05). Conclusion Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients is feasible and can provide an immediate and appropriate therapy avoiding further problems and improving their quality of life. PMID:22666830

  15. Patients' perceptions of care are associated with quality of hospital care: a survey of 4605 hospitals.

    PubMed

    Stein, Spencer M; Day, Michael; Karia, Raj; Hutzler, Lorraine; Bosco, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Favorable patient experience and low complication rates have been proposed as essential components of patient-centered medical care. Patients' perception of care is a key performance metric and is used to determine payments to hospitals. It is unclear if there is a correlation between technical quality of care and patient satisfaction. The study authors correlated patient perceptions of care measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores with accepted quality of care indicators. The Hospital Compare database (4605 hospitals) was used to examine complication rates and patient-reported experience for hospitals across the nation in 2011. The majority of the correlations demonstrated an inverse relationship between patient experience and complication rates. This negative correlation suggests that reducing these complications can lead to a better hospital experience. Overall, these results suggest that patient experience is generally correlated with the quality of care provided.

  16. [Management of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Gracia-Ramos, Abraham Edgar; Cruz-Domínguez, María Pilar; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo Osiris; Morales-González, José Antonio; Vera-Lastra, Olga Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a global health problem and Mexico rank sixth in prevalence of this entity. In our country, is the leading cause of death and is a major cause of hospital care being responsible for about 1 in 5 discharges. In the hospital setting, it has been observed that hyperglycemia, both diabetic and non-diabetic patients, is associated with an increased risk of complications, disability and death, and that adequate control in the blood glucose level produces a reduction in these complications. With these bases, several associations have recommended the treatment of hospital hyperglycemia through insulin administration, with the therapeutic goal of maintaining a fasting blood glucose level between 100-140 mg/dL and glucose at any time of day less than 180 mg/dL. The insulin application method most recommended consisting in a basal-bolus regimen which has shown efficacy with a low risk of hypoglycemia. The usual practice of the application of insulin through a correction scheme should be abandoned because it is inefficient and involves risks.

  17. Making Decisions for Hospitalized Older Adults: Ethical Factors Considered by Family Surrogates

    PubMed Central

    Fritch, Jenna; Petronio, Sandra; Helft, Paul R.; Torke, Alexia

    2013-01-01

    Background Hospitalized older adults frequently have impaired cognition and must rely on surrogates to make major medical decisions. Ethical standards for surrogate decision making are well delineated, but little is known about what factors surrogates actually consider when making decisions. Objectives To determine factors surrogate decision makers consider when making major medical decisions for hospitalized older adults, and whether or not they adhere to established ethical standards. Design Semi-structured interview study of the experience and process of decision making. Setting A public safety-net hospital and a tertiary referral hospital in a large city in the Midwest. Participants Thirty-five surrogates with a recent decision making experience for an inpatient age 65 and older. Measurements Key factors surrogates considered when making decisions. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed using the grounded theory method of qualitative analysis. Results Surrogates considered patient-centered factors and surrogate-centered factors. Patient-centered factors included: 1) respecting the patient’s input, (2) using past knowledge of patient to infer the patient’s wishes, and (3) considering what is in the patient’s best interests. Some surrogates expressed a desire for more information about the patient’s prior wishes. Surrogate-centered factors included 1) Surrogate’s wishes as a guide, (2) The surrogate’s religious beliefs and/or spirituality, (3) The surrogate’s interests, (4) Family consensus and (5) Obligation and guilt. Conclusion These data show that surrogate decision making is more complex than the standard ethical models, which are limited to patient autonomy and beneficence. Because surrogates also imagine what they would want under the circumstances and consider their own needs and preferences, models of surrogate decision making must account for these additional considerations. Surrogates’ desire for more information about patient

  18. Do patients "like" good care? measuring hospital quality via Facebook.

    PubMed

    Timian, Alex; Rupcic, Sonia; Kachnowski, Stan; Luisi, Paloma

    2013-01-01

    With the growth of Facebook, public health researchers are exploring the platform's uses in health care. However, little research has examined the relationship between Facebook and traditional hospital quality measures. The authors conducted an exploratory quantitative analysis of hospitals' Facebook pages to assess whether Facebook "Likes" were associated with hospital quality and patient satisfaction. The 30-day mortality rates and patient recommendation rates were used to quantify hospital quality and patient satisfaction; these variables were correlated with Facebook data for 40 hospitals near New York, NY. The results showed that Facebook "Likes" have a strong negative association with 30-day mortality rates and are positively associated with patient recommendation. These exploratory findings suggest that the number of Facebook "Likes" for a hospital may serve as an indicator of hospital quality and patient satisfaction. These findings have implications for researchers and hospitals looking for a quick and widely available measure of these traditional indicators.

  19. The Use of Physical Restraint in Norwegian Adult Psychiatric Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Background. The use of coercion within the psychiatric services is problematic and raises a range of ethical, legal, and clinical questions. “Physical restraint” is an emergency procedure used in psychiatric hospitals to control patients that pose an imminent physical danger. We wished to review the literature published in scientific peer-reviewed journals describing studies on the use of physical restraint in Norway, in order to identify the current state of knowledge and directions for future research. Design. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for studies relating to physical restraint (including holding) in Norwegian psychiatric hospitals, supplemented with hand searches. Results. 28 studies were included. Most of the studies were on rates of restraint, but there were also some studies on perceptions of patients and staff, case studies, and ethnographic studies. There was only one intervention study. There are differences in use between wards and institutions, which in part may be explained by differences in patient populations. Staff appear to be less negative to the use of restraint than patients. Conclusions. The studies that were identified were primarily concerned with rates of use and with patients' and staff's perspectives. More interventional studies are needed to move the field forward. PMID:26682211

  20. Alternate Level of Care Patients in Public General Hospital Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcos, Luis R.; Gil, Rosa M.

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes the interaction between psychiatric services in public general hospitals and in other institutional settings. A one-day census of patients in a New York general hospital showed the hospital was providing care to a large number of patients in need of other, less intensive institutional settings. (BH)

  1. Rural Hospital Patient Safety Systems Implementation in Two States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Daniel R.; Hewett, John E.; Ge, Bin; Schubert, Shari

    2007-01-01

    Context and Purpose: With heightened attention to medical errors and patient safety, we surveyed Utah and Missouri hospitals to assess the "state of the art" in patient safety systems and identify changes over time. This study examines differences between urban and rural hospitals. Methods: Survey of all acute care hospitals in Utah and Missouri…

  2. Hospital-based patient education programs and the role of the hospital librarian.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, C L

    1978-01-01

    This paper examines current advances in hospital-based patient education, and delineates the role of the hospital librarian in these programs. Recently, programs of planned patient education have been recognized by health care personnel and the public as being an integral part of health care delivery. Various key elements, including legislative action, the advent of audiovisual technology, and rising health care costs have contributed to the development of patient education programs in hospitals. As responsible members of the hospital organization, hospital librarians should contribute their expertise to patient education programs. They are uniquely trained with skills in providing information on other health education programs; in assembling, cataloging, and managing collections of patient education materials; and in providing documentation of their use. In order to demonstrate the full range of their skills and to contribute to patient care, education, and research, hospital librarians should actively participate in programs of planned patient education. PMID:418835

  3. Tolerance studies with brotizolam in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    von Delbrück, Orla; Goetzke, Edda; Nagel, Cornelia

    1983-01-01

    1 A long-term study of brotizolam (minimum 4 weeks: maximum 26 weeks) was carried out in hospitalized patients (29 to 95 years) who complained of sleep disturbance. 3.0% of the patients used 0.125 mg, 86.4% used 0.25 mg, and 10.0% used 0.5 mg daily. During the trial there was no evidence of tolerance. 2 There were no symptoms of overdosage, physical and psychological dependency or withdrawal, and there were no interactions with the concurrently prescribed drugs. 3 There were no changes in vital functions, haematology, or in the biochemical investigations of blood or urine which could be attributed to the drug. PMID:6362697

  4. Integrated Patient Education on U.S. Hospital Web Sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edgar; Wu, Kerong; Edwards, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    Based on a census of the 2015 Most Wired Hospitals, this content analysis aimed to find out how patient education has been integrated on these best IT hospitals' Web sites to serve the purposes of marketing and meeting online visitors' needs. This study will help hospitals to understand where the weaknesses are in their interactive patient education implementation and come up with a smart integration strategy. The study found that 70% of these hospitals had adopted interactive patient education contents, 76.6% of such contents were from a third-party developer, and only 20% of the hospitals linked their patient education contents to one or more of the hospital's resources while 26% cross-references such contents. The authors concluded that more hospitals should take advantage of modern information communication technology to cross-reference their patient education contents and to integrate such contents into their overall online marketing strategy to benefit patients and themselves.

  5. Integrated Patient Education on U.S. Hospital Web Sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edgar; Wu, Kerong; Edwards, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    Based on a census of the 2015 Most Wired Hospitals, this content analysis aimed to find out how patient education has been integrated on these best IT hospitals' Web sites to serve the purposes of marketing and meeting online visitors' needs. This study will help hospitals to understand where the weaknesses are in their interactive patient education implementation and come up with a smart integration strategy. The study found that 70% of these hospitals had adopted interactive patient education contents, 76.6% of such contents were from a third-party developer, and only 20% of the hospitals linked their patient education contents to one or more of the hospital's resources while 26% cross-references such contents. The authors concluded that more hospitals should take advantage of modern information communication technology to cross-reference their patient education contents and to integrate such contents into their overall online marketing strategy to benefit patients and themselves. PMID:27139406

  6. Highlighting Hospital and Patient Concerns this Election Year.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Campaign 2016 is in full swing, and the American Hospital Association is seizing the opportunity to make sure the concerns of patients and hospitals are heard. On the front burner: escalating drug prices.

  7. Epidemiological data and comorbidities of 428 patients hospitalized with erysipelas.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Godoy, José Maria; Galacini Massari, Patricia; Yoshino Rosinha, Mônica; Marinelli Brandão, Rafael; Foroni Casas, André Luís

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiological data and the main comorbidities of patients with erysipelas admitted to a tertiary hospital. All patients admitted due to erysipelas during the period from 1999 to 2008 were included in a prospective and cross-sectional study. The Fisher exact test and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. A total of 428 individuals were hospitalized with 41 rehospitalizations; 51.17% of the patients were women, the mean age was 58.6 years. The main comorbidities were hypertension (51.6%), diabetes mellitus (41.6%), chronic venous insufficiency (36.2%), other cardiovascular diseases (33.2%) including angina, peripheral arterial insufficiency, acute myocardial infarction, and strokes, obesity (12.1%), chronic renal failure (6.8%), neoplasms (4.9%), cirrhosis (4.9%), chronic lymphedema (4.2%), and leg ulcers (2.6%). Erysipelas is a seasonal disease that affects adults and the elderly people, has a repetitive nature, and is associated with comorbidities.

  8. Falls Prevention Education for Older Adults during and after Hospitalization: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Den-Ching A.; Pritchard, Elizabeth; McDermott, Fiona; Haines, Terry P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of patient education in reducing falls, promoting behavioural change and the uptake of prevention activities in older adults during and after hospitalization. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: A systematic search of five health science databases was performed up to November 2012. Studies…

  9. Screening post-stroke depression in Chinese older adults using the hospital anxiety and depression scale.

    PubMed

    Tang, W K; Ungvari, G S; Chiu, H F K; Sze, K H; Yu, A Chan Shiu; Leung, T Lai Fong

    2004-09-01

    Little is known about the performance of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in screening post-stroke depression (PSD) in Chinese older adult patients. One hundred Chinese geriatric patients with first-ever stroke, consecutively admitted to a rehabilitation facility, were assessed by occupational therapists using the depression subscale of the HADS. Psychiatric diagnoses, which served as the benchmark for judging the usefulness of HADS in screening PSD, were made using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID-DSM-III-R) supplemented by all available clinical information. The optimal cut-off point of HADS was 6/7. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the HADS, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, were 88%, 53%, 0.28, 0.96 and 0.75, respectively. The HADS does not appear to be a useful tool in screening for PSD in Chinese older adults.

  10. Brucellosis among Hospitalized Febrile Patients in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Bouley, Andrew J.; Biggs, Holly M.; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Bartlett, John A.; Afwamba, Isaac A.; Maro, Venance P.; Kinabo, Grace D.; Saganda, Wilbrod; Cleaveland, Sarah; Crump, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Acute and convalescent serum samples were collected from febrile inpatients identified at two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed brucellosis was defined as a positive blood culture or a ≥ 4-fold increase in microagglutination test titer, and probable brucellosis was defined as a single reciprocal titer ≥ 160. Among 870 participants enrolled in the study, 455 (52.3%) had paired sera available. Of these, 16 (3.5%) met criteria for confirmed brucellosis. Of 830 participants with ≥ 1 serum sample, 4 (0.5%) met criteria for probable brucellosis. Brucellosis was associated with increased median age (P = 0.024), leukopenia (odds ratio [OR] 7.8, P = 0.005), thrombocytopenia (OR 3.9, P = 0.018), and evidence of other zoonoses (OR 3.2, P = 0.026). Brucellosis was never diagnosed clinically, and although all participants with brucellosis received antibacterials or antimalarials in the hospital, no participant received standard brucellosis treatment. Brucellosis is an underdiagnosed and untreated cause of febrile disease among hospitalized adult and pediatric patients in northern Tanzania. PMID:23091197

  11. Brucellosis among hospitalized febrile patients in northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Bouley, Andrew J; Biggs, Holly M; Stoddard, Robyn A; Morrissey, Anne B; Bartlett, John A; Afwamba, Isaac A; Maro, Venance P; Kinabo, Grace D; Saganda, Wilbrod; Cleaveland, Sarah; Crump, John A

    2012-12-01

    Acute and convalescent serum samples were collected from febrile inpatients identified at two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed brucellosis was defined as a positive blood culture or a ≥ 4-fold increase in microagglutination test titer, and probable brucellosis was defined as a single reciprocal titer ≥ 160. Among 870 participants enrolled in the study, 455 (52.3%) had paired sera available. Of these, 16 (3.5%) met criteria for confirmed brucellosis. Of 830 participants with ≥ 1 serum sample, 4 (0.5%) met criteria for probable brucellosis. Brucellosis was associated with increased median age (P = 0.024), leukopenia (odds ratio [OR] 7.8, P = 0.005), thrombocytopenia (OR 3.9, P = 0.018), and evidence of other zoonoses (OR 3.2, P = 0.026). Brucellosis was never diagnosed clinically, and although all participants with brucellosis received antibacterials or antimalarials in the hospital, no participant received standard brucellosis treatment. Brucellosis is an underdiagnosed and untreated cause of febrile disease among hospitalized adult and pediatric patients in northern Tanzania. PMID:23091197

  12. Pharmacotherapy for Hyperglycemia in Noncritically Ill Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Carlos E.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2014-01-01

    In Brief Hyperglycemia in the hospital setting affects 38-46% of noncritically ill hospitalized patients. Evidence from observational studies indicates that inpatient hyperglycemia, in patients with and without diabetes, is associated with increased risks of complications and mortality. Substantial evidence indicates that correction of hyperglycemia through insulin administration reduces hospital complications and mortality in critically ill patients, as well as in general medicine and surgery patients. This article provides a review of the evidence on the different therapies available for hyperglycemia management in noncritically ill hospitalized patients. PMID:26246777

  13. Effects of Hospital-Based Physical Therapy on Hospital Discharge Outcomes among Hospitalized Older Adults with Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Declining Physical Function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Joo Hun; Han, Boram; Lam, Julia; Bukowy, Elizabeth; Rao, Avinash; Vulcano, Jordan; Andreeva, Anelia; Bertelson, Heather; Shin, Hyun Phil; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-06-01

    To examine whether hospital-based physical therapy is associated with functional changes and early hospital readmission among hospitalized older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. Study design was a retrospective observation study. Participants were community-dwelling older adults admitted to medicine floor for community-acquired pneumonia (n = 1,058). Their physical function using Katz activities of daily living (ADL) Index declined between hospital admission and 48 hours since hospital admission (Katz ADL Index 6→5). The intervention group was those receiving physical therapy for ≥ 0.5 hour/day. Outcomes were Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge and all-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate. The intervention and control groups did not differ in the Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge (p = 0.11). All-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate was lower in the intervention than in control groups (OR = 0.65, p = 0.02). Hospital-based physical therapy has the benefits toward reducing 30-day hospital readmission rate of acutely ill older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. PMID:26029475

  14. Effects of Hospital-Based Physical Therapy on Hospital Discharge Outcomes among Hospitalized Older Adults with Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Declining Physical Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Joo Hun; Han, Boram; Lam, Julia; Bukowy, Elizabeth; Rao, Avinash; Vulcano, Jordan; Andreeva, Anelia; Bertelson, Heather; Shin, Hyun Phil; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether hospital-based physical therapy is associated with functional changes and early hospital readmission among hospitalized older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. Study design was a retrospective observation study. Participants were community-dwelling older adults admitted to medicine floor for community-acquired pneumonia (n = 1,058). Their physical function using Katz activities of daily living (ADL) Index declined between hospital admission and 48 hours since hospital admission (Katz ADL Index 6→5). The intervention group was those receiving physical therapy for ≥ 0.5 hour/day. Outcomes were Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge and all-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate. The intervention and control groups did not differ in the Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge (p = 0.11). All-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate was lower in the intervention than in control groups (OR = 0.65, p = 0.02). Hospital-based physical therapy has the benefits toward reducing 30-day hospital readmission rate of acutely ill older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. PMID:26029475

  15. Transitions in Care from the Hospital to Home for Patients With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hirschman, Karen B.; Bixby, M. Brian

    2014-01-01

    In Brief Diabetes is a common coexisting chronic condition among older adults that can complicate a hospitalization and transition back to the community. The Transitional Care Model, which offers a set of time-limited, hospital-to-home services coordinated by a master's-prepared advanced practice nurse, is one option that could improve outcomes for patients with diabetes. A descriptive case study is presented. PMID:26246779

  16. Transitions in Care from the Hospital to Home for Patients With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hirschman, Karen B; Bixby, M Brian

    2014-08-01

    In Brief Diabetes is a common coexisting chronic condition among older adults that can complicate a hospitalization and transition back to the community. The Transitional Care Model, which offers a set of time-limited, hospital-to-home services coordinated by a master's-prepared advanced practice nurse, is one option that could improve outcomes for patients with diabetes. A descriptive case study is presented.

  17. Testing a family-centered intervention to promote functional and cognitive recovery in hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Marie; Resnick, Barbara; Chippendale, Tracy; Galvin, James

    2014-12-01

    A comparative trial using a repeated-measures design was designed to evaluate the feasibility and outcomes of the Family-Centered Function-Focused-Care (Fam-FFC) intervention, which is intended to promote functional recovery in hospitalized older adults. A family-centered resource nurse and a facility champion implemented a three-component intervention (environmental assessment and modification, staff education, individual and family education and partnership in care planning with follow-up after hospitalization for an acute illness). Control units were exposed to function-focused-care education only. Ninety-seven dyads of medical patients aged 65 and older and family caregivers (FCGs) were recruited from three medical units of a community teaching hospital. Fifty-three percent of patients were female, 89% were white, 51% were married, and 40% were widowed, and they had a mean age of 80.8 ± 7.5. Seventy-eight percent of FCGs were married, 34% were daughters, 31% were female spouses or partners, and 38% were aged 46 to 65. Patient outcomes included functional outcomes (activities of daily living (ADLs), walking performance, gait, balance) and delirium severity and duration. FCG outcomes included preparedness for caregiving, anxiety, depression, role strain, and mutuality. The intervention group demonstrated less severity and shorter duration of delirium and better ADL and walking performance but not better gait and balance performance than the control group. FCGs who participated in Fam-FFC showed a significant increase in preparedness for caregiving and a decrease in anxiety and depression from admission to 2 months after discharge but no significant differences in strain or quality of the relationship with the care recipient from FCGs in the control group. Fam-FFC is feasible and has the potential to improve outcomes for hospitalized older adults and their caregivers.

  18. Cardiac changes in hospitalized patients of trauma.

    PubMed

    Gawande, Ninad B; Tumram, Nilesh Keshav; Dongre, Anand Paikuji

    2014-09-01

    Modern clinical management of the patients sustaining traumatic injuries and thermal burns has resulted in their longer survival, but the clinical and pathological effects of these traumatic injuries over the myocardium have been largely neglected. It is speculated that certain factors such as the inflammatory and degenerative lesions of the heart, prolonged clinical course, and the subsequent stress and strain may play role in hastening the death. In the present study, 125 hospitalized cases of traumatic injuries and thermal burns brought for medicolegal autopsy were examined, with the purpose to find out the incidence, its significance, and the extent of the myocardial lesions due to stress and strain following trauma. About 20% patients had myocardial lesions recognized at gross and histological examination at autopsy. A myocardial lesion does develop in the cases of traumatic injuries and thermal burns. No significant sex difference is seen in the cases showing positive myocardial lesions. However, a relationship exists between these myocardial lesions and the after-effects developing in the cases of trauma. These myocardial lesions seen in the cases of traumatic injuries can be termed as early ischemic or anoxic lesions in the absence of any specific coronary pathology. The intensity of myocardial lesions increases with increase in the survival period of the patient. The findings in the study support the concept of human stress cardiomyopathy and demonstrate the potential significance of stress in precipitating death.

  19. Variability in patient experiences at 15 New York City hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Rogut, L.; Newman, L. S.; Cleary, P. D.

    1996-01-01

    To examine how patient experiences of the interpersonal aspects of quality of care varied among a group of 15 New York City hospitals, and the extent to which hospital and patient characteristics explained interhospital variability, a telephone survey was conducted with 3,423 randomly selected patients discharged from 15 New York City hospitals. Bivariate analysis, multiple linear regression, and least square means were used to assess the effects of 5 hospital characteristics and 15 patient characteristics on reports about problems with care. Outcome measures included patients' reported problems with selected aspects of care, patients' ratings of care, and patients' willingness to recommend the hospitals from which they had been discharged. The 15 hospitals varied widely in the rates at which patients reported problems with their care (10.7-21.7, mean = 14.8, p < 0.001). A multivariate model showed that patients in fair or poor health, those without a regular doctor, younger patients, and minorities other than black and Hispanic were more likely to report problems with aspects of their care. Medicaid volume was also a strong, significant predictor of problem scores. Patient reports can be used to measure differences in quality of interpersonal care among hospitals. Only some of these differences are explained by patient and hospital characteristics, indicating that other factors facilitate or inhibit the delivery of high-quality interpersonal care. PMID:8982524

  20. Are Older Adults Receiving Evidence-Based Advice to Prevent Falls Post-Discharge from Hospital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Den-Ching A.; Brown, Ted; Stolwyk, Rene; O'Connor, Daniel W.; Haines, Terry P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Older adults experience a high rate of falls when they transition to community-living following discharge from hospital. Objectives: To describe the proportion of older adults who could recall having discussed falls and falls prevention strategies with a health professional within 6 months following discharge from hospital. To describe…

  1. Community services' involvement in the discharge of older adults from hospital into the community

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Michelle; Grimmer, Karen; Kumar, Saravana

    2013-01-01

    Background Community services are playing an increasing role in supporting older adults who are discharged from hospital with ongoing non-acute care needs. However, there is a paucity of information regarding how community services are involved in the discharge process of older individuals from hospital into the community. Methods Twenty-nine databases were searched from 1980 to 2012 (inclusive) for relevant primary published research, of any study design, as well as relevant unpublished work (e.g. clinical guidelines) which investigated community services' involvement in the discharge of older individuals from hospital into the community. Data analysis and quality appraisal (using McMaster critical appraisal tools) were undertaken predominately by the lead author. Data was synthesised qualitatively. Results Twelve papers were eligible for inclusion (five randomised controlled trials, four before and after studies and three controlled trials), involving a total of 8440 older adults (>65 years). These papers reported on a range of interventions. During data synthesis, descriptors were assigned to four emergent discharge methods: Virtual Interface Model, In-reach Interface Model, Out-reach Interface Model and Independent Interface Model. In each model, the findings were mixed in terms of health care and patient and carer outcomes. Conclusions It is plausible that each model identified in this systematic review has a role to play in successfully discharging different cohorts of older adults from hospital. Further research is required to identify appropriate population groups for various discharge models and to select suitable outcome measures to determine the effectiveness of these models, considering all stakeholders' involved. PMID:24179455

  2. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  3. Communication problems for patients hospitalized with chest pain.

    PubMed

    Simon, S R; Lee, T H; Goldman, L; McDonough, A L; Pearson, S D

    1998-12-01

    In many settings, primary care physicians have begun to delegate inpatient care to hospitalists, but the impact of this change on patients' hospital experience is unknown. To determine the effect on physician-patient communication of having the regular outpatient physician (continuity physician) continue involvement in hospital care, we surveyed 1,059 consecutive patients hospitalized with chest pain. Patients whose continuity physicians remained involved in their hospital care were less likely to report communication problems regarding tests (20% vs 31%, p =.03), activity after discharge (42% vs 51%, p =.02), and health habits (31% vs 38%, p =. 07). In a setting without a designated hospitalist system, communication problems were less frequent among patients whose continuity physicians were involved in their hospital care. New models of inpatient care delivery can maintain patient satisfaction but to do so must focus attention on improving physician-patient communication.

  4. Identifying effective and feasible interventions to accelerate functional recovery from hospitalization in older adults: A randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Deer, Rachel R; Dickinson, Jared M; Fisher, Steve R; Ju, Hyunsu; Volpi, Elena

    2016-07-01

    Hospitalization induces functional decline in older adults. Many geriatric patients fail to fully recover physical function after hospitalization, which increases the risk of frailty, disability, dependence, re-hospitalization, and mortality. There is a lack of evidence-based therapies that can be implemented following hospitalization to accelerate functional improvements. The aims of this Phase I clinical trial are to determine 1) the effect size and variability of targeted interventions in accelerating functional recovery from hospitalization and 2) the feasibility of implementing such interventions in community-dwelling older adults. Older patients (≥65years, n=100) will be recruited from a single site during hospitalization for an acute medical condition. Subjects will be randomized to one of five interventions initiated immediately upon discharge: 1. protein supplementation, 2. in-home rehabilitation plus placebo supplementation, 3. in-home rehabilitation plus protein supplementation, 4. single testosterone injection, or 5. isocaloric placebo supplementation. Testing will occur during hospitalization (baseline) and at 1 and 4weeks post-discharge. Each testing session will include measures of muscle strength, physical function/performance, body composition, and psychological function. Physical activity levels will be continuously monitored throughout study participation. Feasibility will be determined through collection of the number of eligible, contacted, and enrolled patients; intervention adherence and compliance; and reasons for declining enrollment and study withdrawal. This research will determine the feasibility of post-hospitalization strategies to improve physical function in older adults. These results will also provide a foundation for performing larger, multi-site clinical trials to improve physical function and reduce readmissions in geriatric patents. PMID:27178766

  5. Vitamin D Status and the Risk for Hospital-Acquired Infections in Critically Ill Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kempker, Jordan A.; West, Kathryn G.; Kempker, Russell R.; Siwamogsatham, Oranan; Alvarez, Jessica A.; Tangpricha, Vin; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Martin, Greg S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To identify patient characteristics associated with low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations in the medical intensive care unit (ICU) and examine the relationship between serum 25(OH)D and the risk for hospital-acquired infections. Methods This is a prospective observational cohort of adult patients admitted to the medical ICU at an urban safety net teaching hospital in Atlanta, Georgia from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012 with an anticipated ICU stay ≥ 1 day. Phlebotomy for serum 25(OH)D measurement was performed on all patients within 5 days of ICU admission. Patients were followed for 30 days or until death or hospital discharge, whichever came first. Hospital-acquired infections were determined using standardized criteria from review of electronic medical record. Results Among the 314 patients analyzed, 178 (57%) had a low vitamin D at a serum 25(OH)D concentration < 15 ng/mL. The patient characteristics associated with low vitamin D included admission during winter months (28% vs. 18%, P = 0.04), higher PaO2/FiO2 (275 vs. 226 torr, P = 0.03) and a longer time from ICU admission to study phlebotomy (1.8 vs. 1.5 days, P = 0.02). A total of 36 (11%) patients were adjudicated as having a hospital-acquired infection and in multivariable analysis adjusting for gender, alcohol use, APACHE II score, time to study phlebotomy, ICU length of stay and net fluid balance, serum 25(OH)D levels < 15 ng/mL were not associated with risk for hospital-acquired infections (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.40-1.80, P = 0.7). Conclusions In this prospective, observational cohort of adults admitted to a single-center medical ICU, we did not find a significant association between low 25(OH)D and the risk for hospital-acquired infections. PMID:25849649

  6. Comparative Investigation of Health Literacy Level of Cardiovascular Patients Hospitalized in Private and Educational Hospitals of Kerman City, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Malekzadeh, Sajedeh; Azami, Mohammad; Mirzaei, Moghadameh; Motamedi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: literacy involves a complex set of abilities to understand and use symbolic systems of a culture for personal development and social development in a diverse set of skills required as an adult to exercise behavior are considered in society Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate Comparative investigation of health literacy level of cardiovascular patients hospitalized in private and public educational hospitals of Kerman city Methods: This study used survey methods, analytical and cross-sectional manner. Data was collected through questionnaires distributed among 200 patients of cardiovascular-hospitalization took place in the city of Kerman. To analyze the data in the description of the mean, standard deviation and frequency distribution tables and the level of analysis to determine the relationship between gender and marital status of health literacy test or nonparametric test Mann-Whitney T-Test and, for the relationship between group employment and residence, a one-way analysis of variance or Kruskal-Wallis test, to evaluate the relationship between age and income, Pearson and Spearman correlation to investigate the relationship between level of education and health literacy of SPPS software version 21 was used. Results: The results showed that 10% of patients at educational hospitals in Kerman adequate health literacy, and 48% of patients in private hospitals had adequate health literacy. As a result, there is a significant difference of health literacy between the two types of hospital (p-value <0/0001). Conclusions: The results showed that most patients had inadequate and border health literacy have been. Health plans, preparation of simple educational system and understanding, spending more time and have a discussion with the lower speed In connection with the patient’s doctor and medical staff, Including ways to help patients with low health literacy and improve their health literacy is. PMID:27041812

  7. Testing a Family-centered Intervention to Promote Functional and Cognitive Recovery in Hospitalized Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Boltz, Marie; Resnick, Barbara; Chippendale, Tracy; Galvin, James

    2016-01-01

    A comparative trial using repeated measures design evaluated the feasibility and outcomes of the Family-centered Function-focused Care (Fam-FFC) intervention intended to promote functional recovery in the hospitalized older adult. A three component intervention (1) environmental assessment/ modification, 2) staff education, 3) family/patient education and partnership in care planning with post-acute follow-up) was implemented by a family-centered resource nurse and a facility champion. Control units were exposed to function-focused care education only. Ninety-seven dyads of medical patients age 65 and older and family caregivers (FCGs) were recruited from three medical units of a community teaching hospital. The majority of patients were female (53%); white (89%), married (51%) or widowed (40%), with a mean age of 80.8 (± 7.5). The majority of FCGs were married (78%) daughters (34%), followed by female spouses/partners (31%), in the age range of 46–65 (38%). Outcomes for patients included: functional outcomes (ADL and walking performance, gait, balance), and delirium severity and duration. FCG outcomes included preparedness for caregiving, anxiety, depression, role strain, and mutuality. The intervention group demonstrated less severity and duration of delirium, and better ADL and walking performance, but not gait/balance as compared to the control group. FCG who participated in Fam-FFC showed a significant increase in preparedness for caregiving, less anxiety and less depression from admission to two months post-discharge, but no significant differences in strain and mutuality, as compared to FCG in the control group. Fam-FFC is feasible and has the potential to improve outcomes for hospitalized older adults and family caregivers. PMID:25481973

  8. Asthma as a Comorbidity in Hospitalized Patients: A Potential Missed Opportunity to Intervene.

    PubMed

    Self, Timothy H; Owens, Ryan E; Mancell, Jimmie; Nahata, Milap C

    2016-06-01

    Asthma is a frequent comorbidity in hospitalized children and adults. Patients with a history of asthma may have no breathing complaints or abnormal chest exam findings to trigger care for this comorbidity during hospitalization. Consequently, this may lead to a potential missed opportunity to discuss asthma as a comorbidity and ongoing issue to ensure its optimal management at home. Our goal is to raise awareness that such patient encounters may represent opportunities for health care professionals to optimize asthma management. Despite focusing on the present illness and limited time availability, asthma care may be improved in a time-efficient manner in these patients.

  9. Food safety of allergic patients in hospitals: implementation of a quality strategy to ensure correct management.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, P; Kanny, G; Morisset, M; Waguet, J C; Bastien, C; Moneret-Vautrin, D A

    2003-04-01

    Food allergy could affect up to 8% of children. Four cases of food anaphylaxis in hospitalized children are reported, pointing to the need of food allergenic safety procedures in hospital settings. The implementation of the operating procedure in hospital food production units (HFPU) of Nancy University Hospital is described. The dietetics Department developed on hypoallergenic diet and specific avoidance diets. Dieticians within HFPU managed the choice of starting materials, the circuit organization in order to avoid any risk of contamination during preparation and cooking of food, product traceability, and trained the staff of HFPU. Within the care units physicians, dieticians, nurses, hospital workers are involved in meal management. A diet monitoring sheet is integrated into the patient's nursing file and enables the dietician to validate the diet in the computer, the nurses to display the patient's diet on the schedule on the wall in their office. The hospital workers finally use a tray form indicating the patient's identity, his/her diet and the menu of the day. Such a procedure absolutely secures the whole circuit and specifies the responsibilities of each person, whilst ensuring effective cooperation between all partners. Since 1999, the implementation of this multi-step strategy has prevented from any further reaction in a department specialized for food allergies in children and in adults. As setting up food allergenic safety in hospitals in not addressed adequately in the European directives, it's judicious to draw attention of hospital catering managers and hospital canteen staff to this necessity.

  10. Factors Affecting the Outcomes of Hospitalized Dementia Patients: From Home to Hospital to Discharge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Carole; Verdieck, Mary Jeanne

    1994-01-01

    Interviewed 179 caregivers of hospitalized patients and studied discharge decisions to examine factors associated with willingness to continue in caregiving role after hospitalization of relative with dementia. Caregivers initially undecided about discharge plans were likely to seek placement for patients with more severe cognitive impairment,…

  11. Hot bitumen burns: 92 hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Baruchin, A M; Schraf, S; Rosenberg, L; Sagi, A A

    1997-08-01

    Bitumen burns while comprising a small percentage of all types of burns are troublesome. They affect persons engaged in gainful employment which the burns then curtail, as well as requiring special attention because the substance adheres to the skin and is therefore difficult to remove. Ninety-two consecutive patients with such burns who were admitted as in-patients over a 10-year period (1985-1995) have been reviewed. Most of the burns occurred on a worksite and involved active young persons (mean age 29.6 years) the mean size of the burn was 3.87 per cent TBSA, mainly affecting the upper extremities and hands. Mean hospitalization time was 10.6 days. Bitumen burns are fully predictable and can easily be prevented by avoiding unsafe practice and/or equipment. Bitumen is a general term for petroleum-derived substances ranging from true petroleum through so-called mineral tars, to asphalt. Asphalt (Asphaltum) is a semi-solid mixture of several hydrocarbons probably formed by the evaporation of the lighter or more volatile constituents. It is amorphous of low specific gravity, 1-2, with a black or brownish black colour and pitchy lustre. At room temperature it is solid becoming molten and spreadable when heated to 93 degrees C and over. Roofing tars and asphalts are usually heated to temperatures of 232 degrees C to achieve desirable viscosities (e.g. for spraying), whereas lower temperatures are required for the manageable form to pave roads. Notable localities for asphaltum are the island of Trinidad and the Dead Sea region where lake asphaltums were long known to the ancient. Ironically, none of the 92 patients who were treated for bitumen injuries in the 'Soroka' (Beer-Sheba, Israel) and 'Barzilai' (Ashkelon, Israel) Medical Centres (80 and 150 km from the lake respectively) had anything to do with the Dead Sea area. PMID:9426915

  12. Health promotion services for lifestyle development within a UK hospitalPatients' experiences and views

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Charlotte L

    2008-01-01

    Background UK public health policy requires hospitals to have in place health promotion services which enable patients to improve their health through adopting healthy behaviours, i.e. health education. This study investigated hospitalised patients' experiences of health education for smoking, alcohol use, diet, physical activity, and weight, and their views concerning the appropriateness of hospitals as a setting for the delivery of health education services. Methods Recently discharged adult hospital patients (n = 322) were sent a questionnaire asking about their smoking, alcohol use, diet, physical activity, and weight. For each of these risk factors, participants were asked whether they agreed with screening for the risk factor, whether they received health education, whether it was "helpful", and if they wanted to change their behaviour. Participants were also asked a set of general questions concerning health education within hospitals. Results 190 patients responded (59%). Over 80% agreed with screening for all risk factors. 80% of smokers, 52% consuming alcohol above recommended limits, 86% of obese, 66% consuming less than five fruit and vegetables a day, and 61% of physically inactive participants wanted to change their respective behaviour. However only a third reported receiving health education. While over 60% of patients wanted health education around discharge, the majority of those receiving health education did so at admission. The majority agreed that "hospital is a good place for patients to receive" health education (87%) and that "the hospital should provide patients with details of community organisations that provide" health education (83%). Only a minority (31%) reported a preference for health education from their GP instead of hospital. Conclusion While the delivery of health education to patients within hospital was poor, hospitals are viewed by patients as an appropriate, and in some cases preferred setting for the screening of risk

  13. Functional decline in older adults one year after hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Helvik, Anne-Sofie; Selbæk, Geir; Engedal, Knut

    2013-01-01

    We studied the change in personal ability to perform the activities of daily living (P-ADL) one year after hospitalization (T2) of patients at least 65 years old at baseline (T1). The study included 363 (175 men) medical inpatients with age range 65-98 (mean 80.2, SD 7.5) years. Information was collected at baseline and at a 12 month follow-up using Lawton and Brody's physical self-maintenance scale (PSMS) (termed the P-ADL score), as the dependent variable, and the mini-mental state examination (MMSE), the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD) and the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire as independent variables. For the total sample, the mean P-ADL was significantly worsened from T1 to T2 (mean change 0.5, SD 2.8; p<0.01). In a fully adjusted linear regression analysis, worsened P-ADL from T1 to T2 was independently associated with cognitive impairment at T1, increasing cognitive impairment from T1 to T2, the tendency to fall between T1 and T2, increase in depressive symptoms from T1 to T2, poor physical QOL at T1 and change toward a poorer QOL from T1 to T2. In conclusion, worse P-ADL at T2 was, independently of age and baseline P-ADL, associated with impaired cognitive function and QOL related to physical ability at baseline, as well as worsening depression, cognition and QOL from T1 to T2. Our findings highlight the importance of applying results from screening measures of cognitive function and emotional health when planning care for older people after hospitalization. PMID:23806790

  14. The Inequality of Patient Profile Information in Japanese Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yukio; Ishida, Haku; Kimura, Ezen; Gochi, Akira; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Shimai, Ken-Ichiro; Nakajima, Noriaki; Tanaka, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Kiyomu; Oohara, Michihiro; Sonoda, Takeharu; Takai, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    A model dataset of patient profile information was created based on the items used at five Japanese university hospitals, the patient information data elements in Health Level 7 (HL7) v2.5, and the standard datasets for medical information exchange used in Japan. In order to check the validity of the model dataset, a cross-sectional survey was performed. A preliminary analysis of 20 Japanese hospitals found that most items were implemented at some hospitals, but the number of items implemented at many hospitals was rather small. This result strongly shows the necessity for a standardized dataset of patient profile information. PMID:27577415

  15. Costs and outcomes associated with hospitalized cancer patients with neutropenic complications: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Schilling, M Blane; Parks, Connie; Deeter, Robert G

    2011-09-01

    The average total hospitalization costs for adult cancer patients with neutropenic complications were quantified and the average length of hospital stay (LOS), all-cause mortality during hospitalization and reimbursement rates were determined. This observational retrospective cohort study identified adult patients with cancer who were hospitalized from January 2005 through June 2008 using a large private US health care database (>342 inpatient facilities). ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes identified patients by cancer type and who had neutropenic complications. The utilization and accounting systems of the hospitals were used to calculate mean (±95% confidence interval) hospitalization costs and LOS and percent all-cause mortality and reimbursement. Costs were adjusted to 2009 US dollars. There were 3,814 patients who had cancer and neutropenia, 1,809 (47.4%) also had an infection or fever and 1,188 (31.1%) had infection. Mean hospitalization costs were $18,042 (95% CI 16,997-19,087) for patients with neutropenia, $22,839 (95% CI 21,006-24,672) for patients with neutropenia plus infection or fever and $27,587 (95% CI 24,927-30,247) for patients with neutropenia plus infection. Mean LOS were 9 days (95% CI 8.7-9.3), 10.7 days (95% CI 10.2-11.2) and 12.6 days (95% CI 11.9-13.3), respectively. Mortality followed a similar trend; 8.3, 13.7 and 19.4%, respectively. By cancer type, hematologic malignancies had the highest average hospitalization costs and longest mean LOS of $52,579 (95% CI 42,183-62,975) and 20.3 days (95% CI 17.4-23.2), and a high mortality rate of 20.0%, while primary breast cancer patients had the lowest cost of $8,413 (95% CI 6,103-10,723), shortest LOS of 5.5 days (95% CI 4.2-6.8) and lowest mortality (0%). Mean reimbursement rates were 100.0, 101.5 and 95.4% for patients with neutropenia, neutropenia plus infection or fever and neutropenia plus infection, respectively. Hospitalized cancer patients with neutropenic complications had a higher all

  16. Acute adult poisoning cases admitted to a university hospital in Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Islambulchilar, M; Islambulchilar, Z; Kargar-Maher, M H

    2009-04-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the etiological and demographical characteristics of acute adult poisoning cases admitted to a university hospital in Tabriz, Iran. This retrospective study was performed on 1342 poisoning admissions to a university hospital from 2003 to 2005, by data collection from the medical records of patients. Poisonings were 5.40% of the total admissions. There was a predominance of female patients (55.7%) compared to male patients (44.3%) with a female-to-male ratio of 1.2:1. Most poisonings occurred in the age range of 11-20 years (38.9%). Drugs were the most common cause of poisonings (60.8%). Among the drug poisonings, benzodiazepines (40.31%) were the most frequent agents, followed by antidepressants (31.98%). The seasonal distribution in poisoning patients suggested a peak in spring (28%) and summer (27.5%). In 9.8% of cases accidental and in 90.2% intentional poisonings were evident. Most suicide attempts were made by women (58.51%) and unmarried people (51.4%).The mean duration of hospitalization was 3.02 +/- 2.8 days. There were 28 (2.3%) deaths; the majority (13 cases) was due to pesticides. This was a university hospital-based study, so these results may not be representative of the general population. Despite this drawback, these data still provide important information on the characteristics of the poisoning in this part of Iran. To prevent such poisonings, the community education about the danger of central nervous system-acting drugs and reducing the exposure period of people to pesticides are recommended. PMID:19734268

  17. Evaluation of Patient Safety Indicators in Semnan City Hospitals by Using the Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative (PSFHI)

    PubMed Central

    Babamohamadi, Hassan; Nemati, Roghayeh Khabiri; Nobahar, Monir; Keighobady, Seifullah; Ghazavi, Soheila; Izadi-Sabet, Farideh; Najafpour, Zhila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, patient safety issue is among one of the main concerns of the hospital policy worldwide. This study aimed to evaluate the patient safety status in hospitals affiliated to Semnan city, using the WHO model for Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiatives (PSFHI) in summer 2014. Methods: That was a cross sectional descriptive study that addressed patient safety, which explained the current status of safety in the Semnan hospitals using by instrument of Patient safety friendly initiative standards (PSFHI). Data was collected from 5 hospitals in Semnan city during four weeks in May 2014. Results: The finding of 5 areas examined showed that some components in critical standards had disadvantages. Critical standards of hospitals including areas of leadership and administration, patient and public involvement and safe evidence-based clinical practice, safe environment with and lifetime education in a safe and secure environment were analyzed. The domain of patient and public involvement obtained the lowest mean score and the domain of safe environment obtained the highest mean score in the surveyed hospitals. Conclusion: All the surveyed hospitals had a poor condition regarding standards based on patient safety. Further, the identified weak points are almost the same in the hospitals. Therefore, In order to achieve a good level of all aspects of the protocol, the goals should be considered in the level of strategic planning at hospitals. An effective execution of patient safety creatively may depend on the legal infrastructure and enforcement of standards by hospital management, organizational liability to expectation of patients, safety culture in hospitals. PMID:27045391

  18. Health information for patients: The hospital library's role.

    PubMed

    Roth, B G

    1978-01-01

    Libraries today, including most hospital-based patients' libraries, are involved only peripherally in providing patient health science information. Hospital libraries should collaborate with health professionals in getting health information to patients--along with the library's more traditional roles of providing recreational reading for patients and serving the informational needs of the physician and medical staff. The library should act as the center for educational materials and programs within the hospital. Many health agencies, health educators, physicians, and librarians have been discussing the need for patient health education, but there are few effectively organized or established education centers. This paper discusses an overview of patient health education and intellectural freedom, proposes a new role for the existing hospital library in patient health education, and suggests guidelines for establishing a patient education center. PMID:626792

  19. Assuring Rural Hospital Patient Safety: What Should Be the Priorities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, Andrew F.; Wakefield, Mary; Casey, Michelle; Moscovice, Ira; Payne, Susan; Loux, Stephenie

    2004-01-01

    Context: Since reports on patient safety were issued by the Institute of Medicine, a number of interventions have been recommended and standards designed to improve hospital patient safety, including the Leapfrog, evidence-based safety standards. These standards are based on research conducted largely in urban hospitals, and it may not be possible…

  20. Pediatric patients, race, and DRG prospective hospital payment.

    PubMed

    Munoz, E; Barrios, E; Johnson, H; Goldstein, J; Mulloy, K; Chalfin, D; Wise, L

    1989-05-01

    The diagnosis related group (DRG) prospective hospital payment system contains inequities in hospital payment for certain groups of patients. Patients of lower socioeconomic status may be underreimbursed by DRGs. We analyzed pediatric patients and hospital resource consumption by race (white, Hispanic, and black) using a DRG prospective payment "all payer" system. All hospitalized pediatric admissions over a 3-year period (N = 14,489) were analyzed by race at a large academic medical center. Mean hospital length of stay and cost per patient (adjusted for DRG weight index) was significantly greater for black and Hispanic pediatric patients compared with whites. Financial risk as measured by outliers and losses under DRGs was greater for blacks and Hispanics compared with whites. Black and Hispanic patients had a higher proportion of emergency admission to the hospital compared with whites, a greater severity of illness (as measured by total International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, Clinical Modification codes), and (on average) higher diagnostic costs for each episode of illness. Our data suggest that black and Hispanic pediatric patients have a greater hospital resource consumption (adjusted for DRG group case mix) compared with whites, at least at our large medical center in the Northeast. Hospitals that treat greater numbers of black and Hispanic pediatric patients may be at a substantial disadvantage under per-case DRG payment.

  1. Noise in hospital rooms and sleep disturbance in hospitalized medical patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Marn Joon; Yoo, Jee Hee; Cho, Byung Wook; Kim, Ki Tae; Jeong, Woo-Chul; Ha, Mina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hospitalized patients are vulnerable to sleep disturbances because of environmental stresses including noise. While most previous studies on hospital noise and sleep have been performed for medical machines in intensive care units, there is a limited data for patients hospitalized in medical wardrooms. The purpose of present study was to measure noise level of medical wardrooms, identify patient-perceived sources of noise, and to examine the association between noise levels and sleep disturbances in hospitalized patients. Methods Noise dosimeters were used to measure noise level in 29 inpatient wardrooms at a university hospital. Sleep pattern and disturbance were assessed in 103 hospitalized patients, using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Results The mean equivalent continuous noise level for 24 hours was 63.5 decibel A (dBA), which was far higher than 30 dBA recommended by the World Health Organization for hospital wardrooms. Other patients sharing a room were perceived as the most common source of noise by the patients, which was usually preventable. Of the patients in the study, 86% had bad sleep as assessed by the PSQI. The sleep disturbance was significantly correlated with increasing noise levels in a dose response manner. Conclusions Systemic organizational interventions are needed to keep wardrooms private and quiet to reduce sleep disturbance. PMID:25163680

  2. Nursing Diagnosis Risk for falls: prevalence and clinical profile of hospitalized patients1

    PubMed Central

    Luzia, Melissa de Freitas; Victor, Marco Antonio de Goes; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to identify the prevalence of the Nursing Diagnosis (ND) Risk for falls in the hospitalizations of adult patients in clinical and surgical units, to characterize the clinical profile and to identify the risk factors of the patients with this ND. Method a cross-sectional study with 174 patients. The data was collected from the computerized nursing care prescriptions system and on-line hospital records, and analyzed statistically. Results the prevalence of the ND Risk for falls was 4%. The patients' profile indicated older adults, males (57%), those hospitalized in the clinical units (63.2%), with a median length of hospitalization of 20 (10-24) days, with neurological illnesses (26%), cardio-vascular illnesses (74.1%) and various co-morbidities (3±1.8). The prevalent risk factors were neurological alterations (43.1%), impaired mobility (35.6%) and extremes of age (10.3%). Conclusion the findings contributed to evidencing the profile of the patients with a risk of falling hospitalized in clinical and surgical wards, which favors the planning of interventions for preventing this adverse event. PMID:26107834

  3. A retrospective analysis of treatment-related hospitalization costs of pediatric, adolescent, and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sapna; Korgenski, Ernest Kent; Ying, Jian; Ng, Christi F; Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Nelson, Richard E; Andrews, Seth; Raetz, Elizabeth; Fluchel, Mark; Lemons, Richard; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective study examined the longitudinal hospital outcomes (costs adjusted for inflation, hospital days, and admissions) associated with the treatment of pediatric, adolescent, and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients between one and 26 years of age with newly diagnosed ALL, who were treated at Primary Children's Hospital (PCH) in Salt Lake City, Utah were included. Treatment and hospitalization data were retrieved from system-wide cancer registry and enterprise data warehouse. PCH is a member of the Children's Oncology Group (COG) and patients were treated on, or according to, active COG protocols. Treatment-related hospital costs of ALL were examined by computing the average annual growth rates (AAGR). Longitudinal regressions identified patient characteristics associated with costs. A total of 505 patients (46.9% female) were included. The majority of patients had B-cell lineage ALL, 6.7% had T-ALL, and the median age at diagnosis was 4 years. Per-patient, first-year ALL hospitalization costs at PCH rose from $24,197 in 1998 to $37,924 in 2012. The AAGRs were 6.1, 13.0, and 7.6% for total, pharmacy, and room and care costs, respectively. Average days (AAGR = 5.2%) and admissions (AAGR = 3.8%) also demonstrated an increasing trend. High-risk patients had 47% higher costs per 6-month period in the first 5 years from diagnosis than standard-risk patients (P < 0.001). Similarly, relapsed ALL and stem cell transplantations were associated with significantly higher costs than nonrelapsed and no transplantations, respectively (P < 0.001). Increasing treatment-related costs of ALL demonstrate an area for further investigation. Value-based interventions such as identifying low-risk fever and neutropenia patients and managing them in outpatient settings should be evaluated for reducing the hospital burden of ALL.

  4. A retrospective analysis of treatment-related hospitalization costs of pediatric, adolescent, and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sapna; Korgenski, Ernest Kent; Ying, Jian; Ng, Christi F; Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Nelson, Richard E; Andrews, Seth; Raetz, Elizabeth; Fluchel, Mark; Lemons, Richard; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective study examined the longitudinal hospital outcomes (costs adjusted for inflation, hospital days, and admissions) associated with the treatment of pediatric, adolescent, and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients between one and 26 years of age with newly diagnosed ALL, who were treated at Primary Children's Hospital (PCH) in Salt Lake City, Utah were included. Treatment and hospitalization data were retrieved from system-wide cancer registry and enterprise data warehouse. PCH is a member of the Children's Oncology Group (COG) and patients were treated on, or according to, active COG protocols. Treatment-related hospital costs of ALL were examined by computing the average annual growth rates (AAGR). Longitudinal regressions identified patient characteristics associated with costs. A total of 505 patients (46.9% female) were included. The majority of patients had B-cell lineage ALL, 6.7% had T-ALL, and the median age at diagnosis was 4 years. Per-patient, first-year ALL hospitalization costs at PCH rose from $24,197 in 1998 to $37,924 in 2012. The AAGRs were 6.1, 13.0, and 7.6% for total, pharmacy, and room and care costs, respectively. Average days (AAGR = 5.2%) and admissions (AAGR = 3.8%) also demonstrated an increasing trend. High-risk patients had 47% higher costs per 6-month period in the first 5 years from diagnosis than standard-risk patients (P < 0.001). Similarly, relapsed ALL and stem cell transplantations were associated with significantly higher costs than nonrelapsed and no transplantations, respectively (P < 0.001). Increasing treatment-related costs of ALL demonstrate an area for further investigation. Value-based interventions such as identifying low-risk fever and neutropenia patients and managing them in outpatient settings should be evaluated for reducing the hospital burden of ALL. PMID:26714675

  5. Using Public Reports of Patient Satisfaction for Hospital Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Judith K; Giannotti, Tierney E; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Duquette, Cathy E; Waters, William J; Petrillo, Marcia K

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of statewide public reporting of hospital patient satisfaction on hospital quality improvement (QI), using Rhode Island (RI) as a case example. Data Source Primary data collected through semi-structured interviews between September 2002 and January 2003. Study Design The design is a retrospective study of hospital executives at all 11 general and two specialty hospitals in RI. Respondents were asked about hospital QI activities at several points throughout the public reporting process, as well as about hospital structure and processes to accomplish QI. Qualitative analysis of the interview data proceeded through an iterative process to identify themes and categories in the data. Principal Findings Data from the standardized statewide patient satisfaction survey process were used by hospitals to identify and target new QI initiatives, evaluate performance, and monitor progress. While all hospitals fully participated in the public reporting process, they varied in the stage of development of their QI activities and adoption of the statewide standardized survey for ongoing monitoring of their QI programs. Most hospitals placed responsibility for QI within each department, with results reported to top management, who were perceived as giving strong support for QI. The external environment facilitated QI efforts. Conclusion Public reporting of comparative data on patient views can enhance and reinforce QI efforts in hospitals. The participation of key stakeholders facilitated successful implementation of statewide public reporting. This experience in RI offers lessons for other states or regions as they move to public reporting of hospital quality data. PMID:16704506

  6. Integrating COPD into Patient-Centered Hospital Readmissions Reduction Programs

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Gussin, Hélène A.; Prieto-Centurion, Valentin; Sullivan, Jamie L.; Zaidi, Farhan; Thomashow, Byron M.

    2015-01-01

    About 1 in 5 patients hospitalized for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the United States are readmitted within 30 days. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has recently expanded its Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program to financially penalize hospitals with higher than expected all-cause 30-day readmission rates following a hospitalization for COPD exacerbation. In October 2013, the COPD Foundation convened a multi-stakeholder National COPD Readmissions Summit to summarize our understanding of how to reduce hospital readmissions in patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbations. Over 225 individuals participated in the Summit, including patients, clinicians, health service researchers, policy makers and representatives of academic health care centers, industry, and payers. Summit participants recommend that programs to reduce hospital readmissions: 1) Include specific recommendations about how to promote COPD self-management skills training for patients and their caregivers; 2) Adequately address co-existing disorders common to COPD in care plans during and after hospitalizations; 3) Include an evaluation of adverse events when implementing strategies to reduce hospital readmissions; and 4) Develop a strategy (e.g., a learning collaboratory) to connect groups who are engaged in developing, testing, and implementing programs to reduce hospital readmissions for COPD and other conditions. PMID:25927076

  7. HOSPITAL VARIATION IN SPHINCTER PRESERVATION FOR ELDERLY RECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of rectal cancer in elderly patients. Methods Using SEER-Medicare linked data, we identified 4,959 stage I–III rectal cancer patients over age 65 diagnosed from 2000–2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. Results The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly rectal cancer patients. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which, combined, explained 31% of procedure variation. Conclusions Receipt of local excision is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. PMID:24750983

  8. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Mattias; Nadjm, Behzad; Dinh, Quynh-Dao; Nilsson, Lennart E.; Rydell, Ulf; Le, Tuyet Thi Diem; Trinh, Son Hong; Pham, Hung Minh; Tran, Cang Thanh; Doan, Hanh Thi Hong; Tran, Nguyen Thua; Le, Nhan Duc; Huynh, Nhuan Van; Tran, Thao Phuong; Tran, Bao Duc; Nguyen, Son Truong; Pham, Thao Thi Ngoc; Dang, Tam Quang; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Lam, Yen Minh; Thwaites, Guy; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Hanberger, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs) across Vietnam. Methods Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included. Results Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing). Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012) of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012]) were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855) acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855) developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76), urinary catheter (OR 2.12), no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94), and surgery after admission (OR 1.66). 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%]), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%]), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%]), with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287) patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively). Conclusion A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts. PMID:26824228

  9. Arrhythmias in Adult Congenital Patients With Bodily Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gupta, Navdeep; Buelow, Matthew; Alla, Venkata; Arora, Rohit R; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-02-01

    There are an increasing number of adults with congenital heart disease, some of whom have bodily isomerism. Bodily isomerism or heterotaxy is a unique clinical entity associated with congenital malformations of the heart which further increases the risk for future cardiovascular complications. We aimed to investigate the frequency of arrhythmias in adults with bodily isomerism. We utilized the 2012 iteration of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to identify adult inpatient admissions associated with arrhythmias in patients with isomerism. Data regarding demographics, comorbidities, and various procedures were collected and compared between those with and without isomerism. A total of 6,907,109 admissions were analyzed with a total of 861 being associated isomerism. The frequency of arrhythmias was greater in those with isomerism (20.8 vs. 15.4 %). Those with isomerism were also more five times more likely to undergo invasive electrophysiology studies. Length and cost of hospitalization for patients with arrhythmias also tended to be greater in those with isomerism. Mortality did not differ between the two groups. Arrhythmias are more prevalent in those with isomerism, with a majority of arrhythmias in isomerism being atrial. Those with isomerism and arrhythmias also tended to have greater length and cost of hospitalization.

  10. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A.; Pfaff, Holger; DerSarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect of such strategies on a range of patient-reported experience measures. Materials and Methods We employed a cross-sectional, multi-level study design randomly recruiting hospitals from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey between May 2011 and January 2012. Each hospital contributed patient level data for four conditions/pathways: acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries. The outcome variables in this study were a set of patient-reported experience measures including a generic 6-item measure of patient experience (NORPEQ), a 3-item measure of patient-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure) and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management functions and patient-centered care strategies. We used directed acyclic graphs to detail and guide the modeling of the complex relationships between predictor variables and outcome variables, and fitted multivariable linear mixed models with random intercept by hospital, and adjusted for fixed effects at the country level, hospital level and patient level. Results Overall, 74 hospitals and 276 hospital departments contributed data on 6,536 patients to this study (acute

  11. Migration of patients between five urban teaching hospitals in Chicago.

    PubMed

    Galanter, William L; Applebaum, Andrew; Boddipalli, Viveka; Kho, Abel; Lin, Michael; Meltzer, David; Roberts, Anna; Trick, Bill; Walton, Surrey M; Lambert, Bruce L

    2013-04-01

    To quantify the extent of patient sharing and inpatient care fragmentation among patients discharged from a cohort of Chicago hospitals. Admission and discharge dates and patient ZIP codes from 5 hospitals over 2 years were matched with an encryption algorithm. Admission to more than one hospital was considered fragmented care. The association between fragmentation and socio-economic variables using ZIP-code data from the 2000 US Census was measured. Using validation from one hospital, patient matching using encrypted identifiers had a sensitivity of 99.3 % and specificity of 100 %. The cohort contained 228,151 unique patients and 334,828 admissions. Roughly 2 % of the patients received fragmented care, accounting for 5.8 % of admissions and 6.4 % of hospital days. In 3 of 5 hospitals, and overall, the length of stay of patients with fragmented care was longer than those without. Fragmentation varied by hospital and was associated with the proportion of non-Caucasian persons, the proportion of residents whose income fell in the lowest quartile, and the proportion of residents with more children being raised by mothers alone in the zip code of the patient. Patients receiving fragmented care accounted for 6.4 % of hospital days. This percentage is a low estimate for our region, since not all regional hospitals participated, but high enough to suggest value in creating Health Information Exchange. Fragmentation varied by hospital, per capita income, race and proportion of single mother homes. This secure methodology and fragmentation analysis may prove useful for future analyses.

  12. Hospital Case Volume and Outcomes among Patients Hospitalized with Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Processes of care are potential determinants of outcomes in patients with severe sepsis. Whether hospitals with more experience caring for patients with severe sepsis also have improved outcomes is unclear. Objectives: To determine associations between hospital severe sepsis caseload and outcomes. Methods: We analyzed data from U.S. academic hospitals provided through University HealthSystem Consortium. We used University HealthSystem Consortium’s sepsis mortality model (c-statistic, 0.826) for risk adjustment. Validated International Classification of Disease, 9th Edition, Clinical Modification algorithms were used to identify hospital severe sepsis case volume. Associations between risk-adjusted severe sepsis case volume and mortality, length of stay, and costs were analyzed using spline regression and analysis of covariance. Measurements and Main Results: We identified 56,997 patients with severe sepsis admitted to 124 U.S. academic hospitals during 2011. Hospitals admitted 460 ± 216 patients with severe sepsis, with median length of stay 12.5 days (interquartile range, 11.1–14.2), median direct costs $26,304 (interquartile range, $21,900–$32,090), and average hospital mortality 25.6 ± 5.3%. Higher severe sepsis case volume was associated with lower unadjusted severe sepsis mortality (R2 = 0.10, P = 0.01) and risk-adjusted severe sepsis mortality (R2 = 0.21, P < 0.001). After further adjustment for geographic region, number of beds, and long-term acute care referrals, hospitals in the highest severe sepsis case volume quartile had an absolute 7% (95% confidence interval, 2.4–11.6%) lower hospital mortality than hospitals in the lowest quartile. We did not identify associations between case volume and resource use. Conclusions: Academic hospitals with higher severe sepsis case volume have lower severe sepsis hospital mortality without higher costs. PMID:24400669

  13. Use of deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis in hospitalized cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Awar, Zeina; Sheikh-Taha, Marwan

    2009-10-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a common complication and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Patients with malignancies have a four-fold greater risk of venous thromboembolism compared with patients without malignancies. Underuse of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis persists, despite guidelines supporting its use in hospitalized cancer patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the use of DVT prophylaxis and its appropriateness in hospitalized cancer patients. This retrospective study included cancer patients admitted to Rafik Hariri University Hospital, a tertiary referral center in Beirut, Lebanon, over 2-month period, who were hospitalized for at least 2 days. We evaluated the use of anticoagulants for DVT prophylaxis in the absence of contraindications for their use. The risk factor profiles of the patients were reported in addition to the choice of the anticoagulant and the use of mechanical prophylaxis in patients with contraindications to anticoagulation. One hundred and thirty patients were studied out of which 34 (26.2%) had contraindications to anticoagulation use. In addition, 21 patients out of 95 (22.1%) who qualified for DVT prophylaxis received pharmacologic DVT prophylaxis. Enoxaparin was the most frequently prescribed anticoagulant (76.2% of the patients). Of those who received anticoagulation, only 47.6% received appropriate agent and dose. Among patients with contraindications to anticoagulation, only three (8.8%) received mechanical devices as nonpharmacologic DVT prophylaxis. DVT prophylaxis in hospitalized cancer patients is significantly underutilized. Several options are available to increase physicians' awareness of the problem.

  14. Pediatric Patients' Malnutrition and Its Relation to Hospitalization Times and Causes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimarey, Luis M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Relates the nutritional status of 1,378 hospitalized pediatric patients to length of hospitalization and definitive hospitalization diagnosis. Findings indicated the length of hospitalization time increased markedly with malnutrition, especially for patients with diarrhea. (BJD)

  15. Connecting Hospitalized Patients with Their Families: Case Series and Commentary

    PubMed Central

    Parsapour, Kourosh; Kon, Alexander A.; Dharmar, Madan; McCarthy, Amy K.; Yang, Hsuan-Hui; Smith, Anthony C.; Carpenter, Janice; Sadorra, Candace K.; Farbstein, Aron D.; Hojman, Nayla M.; Wold, Gary L.; Marcin, James P.

    2011-01-01

    The overall aim of this project was to ascertain the utilization of a custom-designed telemedicine service for patients to maintain close contact (via videoconference) with family and friends during hospitalization. We conducted a retrospective chart review of hospitalized patients (primarily children) with extended hospital length of stays. Telecommunication equipment was used to provide videoconference links from the patient's bedside to friends and family in the community. Thirty-six cases were managed during a five-year period (2006 to 2010). The most common reasons for using Family-Link were related to the logistical challenges of traveling to and from the hospital—principally due to distance, time, family commitments, and/or personal cost. We conclude that videoconferencing provides a solution to some barriers that may limit family presence and participation in care for hospitalized patients, and as a patient-centered innovation is likely to enhance patient and family satisfaction. PMID:22121359

  16. Delirium in Prolonged Hospitalized Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Saadat, Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged hospitalization in the intensive care unit (ICU) can impose long-term psychological effects on patients. One of the most significant psychological effects from prolonged hospitalization is delirium. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prolonged hospitalization of patients and subsequent delirium in the intensive care unit. Patients and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted in the General Intensive Care Unit of the Shariati Hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, from the beginning of 2013 to 2014. All prolonged hospitalized patients and their families were eligible participants. From the 34 eligible patients and 63 family members, the final numbers of actual patients and family members were 9 and 16, respectively. Several semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face with patients and their families in a private room and data were gathered. Results: Two main themes from two different perspectives emerged, 'patients' perspectives' (experiences during ICU hospitalization) and 'family members' perspectives' (supportive-communicational experiences). The main results of this study focused on delirium, Patients' findings were described as pleasant and unpleasant, factual and delusional experiences. Conclusions: Family members are valuable components in the therapeutic process of delirium. Effective use of family members in the delirium caring process can be considered to be one of the key non-medical nursing components in the therapeutic process. PMID:26290854

  17. Haemoptysis in adults: a 5-year study using the French nationwide hospital administrative database.

    PubMed

    Abdulmalak, Caroline; Cottenet, Jonathan; Beltramo, Guillaume; Georges, Marjolaine; Camus, Philippe; Bonniaud, Philippe; Quantin, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Haemoptysis is a serious symptom with various aetiologies. Our aim was to define the aetiologies, outcomes and associations with lung cancer in the entire population of a high-income country.This retrospective multicentre study was based on the French nationwide hospital medical information database collected over 5 years (2008-2012). We analysed haemoptysis incidence, aetiologies, geographical and seasonal distribution and mortality. We studied recurrence, association with lung cancer and mortality in a 3-year follow-up analysis.Each year, ~15 000 adult patients (mean age 62 years, male/female ratio 2/1) were admitted for haemoptysis or had haemoptysis as a complication of their hospital stay, representing 0.2% of all hospitalised patients. Haemoptysis was cryptogenic in 50% of cases. The main aetiologies were respiratory infections (22%), lung cancer (17.4%), bronchiectasis (6.8%), pulmonary oedema (4.2%), anticoagulants (3.5%), tuberculosis (2.7%), pulmonary embolism (2.6%) and aspergillosis (1.1%). Among incident cases, the 3-year recurrence rate was 16.3%. Of the initial cryptogenic haemoptysis patients, 4% were diagnosed with lung cancer within 3 years. Mortality rates during the first stay and at 1 and 3 years were 9.2%, 21.6% and 27%, respectively.This is the first epidemiological study analysing haemoptysis and its outcomes in an entire population. Haemoptysis is a life-threatening symptom unveiling potentially life-threatening underlying conditions.

  18. Patient Characteristics Predicting Readmission Among Individuals Hospitalized for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Melissa; Murtaugh, Christopher M.; Shah, Shivani; Barrón-Vaya, Yolanda; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Peng, Timothy R.; Zhu, Carolyn W.; Feldman, Penny H.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is difficult to manage and increasingly common with many individuals experiencing frequent hospitalizations. Little is known about patient factors consistently associated with hospital readmission. A literature review was conducted to identify heart failure patient characteristics, measured before discharge, that contribute to variation in hospital readmission rates. Database searches yielded 950 potential articles, of which 34 studies met inclusion criteria. Patient characteristics generally have a very modest effect on all-cause or heart failure–related readmission within 7 to 180 days of index hospital discharge. A range of cardiac diseases and other comorbidities only minimally increase readmission rates. No single patient characteristic stands out as a key contributor across multiple studies underscoring the challenge of developing successful interventions to reduce readmissions. Interventions may need to be general in design with the specific intervention depending on each patient's unique clinical profile. PMID:26180045

  19. Outcomes of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized leukemia patients: a nationwide analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ruihong; Greenberg, Alan; Stone, Christian D

    2015-07-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased among hospitalized patients and is a common complication of leukemia. We investigated the risks for and outcomes of CDI in hospitalized leukemia patients. METHODS Adults with a primary diagnosis of leukemia were extracted from the United States Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, 2005-2011. The primary outcomes of interest were CDI incidence, CDI-associated mortality, length of stay (LOS), and charges. In a secondary analysis, we sought to identify independent risk factors for CDI in leukemia patients. Logistic regression was used to derive odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS A total of 1,243,107 leukemia hospitalizations were identified. Overall CDI incidence was 3.4% and increased from 3.0% to 3.5% during the 7-year study period. Leukemia patients had 2.6-fold higher risk for CDI than non-leukemia patients, adjusted for LOS. CDI was associated with a 20% increase in mortality of leukemia patients, as well as 2.6 times prolonged LOS and higher hospital charges. Multivariate analysis revealed that age >65 years (OR, 1.13), male gender (OR, 1.14), prolonged LOS, admission to teaching hospital (OR, 1.16), complications of sepsis (OR, 1.83), neutropenia (OR, 1.35), renal failure (OR, 1.18), and bone marrow or stem cell transplantation (OR, 1.27) were significantly associated with CDI occurrence. CONCLUSIONS Hospitalized leukemia patients have greater than twice the risk of CDI than non-leukemia patients. The incidence of CDI in this population increased 16.7% from 2005 to 2011. Development of CDI in leukemia patients was associated with increased mortality, longer LOS, and higher hospital charges.

  20. Race and diagnostic related group prospective hospital payment for medical patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, E; Barrios, E; Johnson, H; Goldstein, J; Mulloy, K; Chalfin, D; Wise, L

    1989-08-01

    The diagnostic related group (DRG) prospective hospital payment system has been on line for five years with no major changes implemented by the federal government. Data suggest that the DRG system may be inequitable to patients of lower socioeconomic status. We studied the consumption of hospital resources by race (ie, white vs black) for hospitalized medical patients using the DRG prospective payment system. All adult medical admissions (N = 30,097) were analyzed for a three-year period at a large academic medical center using the DRG "all payor" classification scheme in effect for New York State. We found that black patients (N = 3,373) had a significantly greater (P less than .0001) mean length of hospital stay and cost per patient (adjusted for DRG weight index) compared with white patients (N = 26,724). Black patients also exposed the medical center to greater (P less than .0001) financial risk compared with white patients, as measured by outliers and losses under DRGs. Black patients (P less than .0001) had a significantly higher proportion of emergency admissions to the hospital, a greater severity of illness (as measured by total International Classification of Diseases-9-Clinical Modification codes) (P less than .0001), and higher diagnostic costs (P less than .0001) for each episode of illness. These data suggest that at our medical center black medical patients may consume more hospital resources (adjusted for DRG case mix) compared with whites. It is important that methods to modify DRG prospective hospital payment for medical diseases be considered to provide more equitable DRG reimbursement for black Americans in the future.

  1. From Research to Reality: Minimizing the Effects of Hospitalization on Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Admi, Hanna; Shadmi, Efrat; Baruch, Hagar; Zisberg, Anna

    2015-01-01

    This review examines ways to decrease preventable effects of hospitalization on older adults in acute care medical (non-geriatric) units, with a focus on the Israeli experience at the Rambam Health Care Campus, a large tertiary care hospital in northern Israel. Hospitalization of older adults is often followed by an irreversible decline in functional status affecting their quality of life and well-being after discharge. Functional decline is often related to avoidable effects of in-hospital procedures not caused by the patient’s acute disease. In this article we review the literature relating to the recognized effects of hospitalization on older adults, pre-hospitalization risk factors, and intervention models for hospitalized older adults. In addition, this article describes an Israeli comprehensive research study, the Hospitalization Process Effects on Functional Outcomes and Recovery (HoPE-FOR), and outlines the design of a combined intervention model being implemented at the Rambam Health Care Campus. The majority of the reviewed studies identified preadmission personal risk factors and psychosocial risk factors. In-hospital restricted mobility, under-nutrition care, over-use of continence devices, polypharmacy, and environmental factors were also identified as avoidable processes. Israeli research supported the findings that preadmission risk factors together with in-hospital processes account for functional decline. Different models of care have been developed to maintain functional status. Much can be achieved by interdisciplinary teams oriented to the needs of hospitalized elderly in making an impact on hospital processes and continuity of care. It is the responsibility of health care policy-makers, managers, clinicians, and researchers to pursue effective interventions to reduce preventable hospitalization-associated disability. PMID:25973269

  2. Burnout in Hospital Social Workers Who Work with AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oktay, Julianne S.

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 128 hospital social workers who worked with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. Found that hospital AIDS social workers had slightly higher rates of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization on Maslach Burnout Inventory but also felt substantially higher level of personal accomplishment. Age, autonomy, and belonging to…

  3. Patient throughput collaborative yields positive results for New Jersey hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Karen

    2015-05-01

    Collecting and analyzing data was a key step in a process improvement initiative undertaken by several hospitals in New Jersey. The hospitals found that patient flow problems commonly stemmed from uneven use of operating rooms and unenforced admission/discharge policies on inpatient units. Shared solutions included improving staff communication and enforcing admission/discharge policies.

  4. Yeasts in a hospital for patients with skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Dorothy A.

    1972-01-01

    The incidence and acquisition of Candida albicans and other yeasts in two wards of a skin hospital is described. Carriage rates on the skin in hospital patients is higher than is generally supposed, and cutaneous sites may act as sources of infection with these organisms. PMID:4567312

  5. The Spectrum of Central Nervous System Infections in an Adult Referral Hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Walter R.; Nguyen, Kinh; Nguyen, Duc; Nguyen, Huyen; Horby, Peter; Nguyen, Ha L.; Lien, Trinh; Tran, Giang; Tran, Ninh; Nguyen, Ha M.; Nguyen, Thai; Nguyen, Ha H.; Nguyen, Thanh; Tran, Giap; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno; Schultsz, Constance; Tran, Huong; Nguyen, Diep; Vu, Bich; Le, Hoa; Dao, Trinh; Nguyen, Trung; Wertheim, Heiman

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine prospectively the causative pathogens of central nervous system (CNS) infections in patients admitted to a tertiary referral hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam. Methods From May 2007 to December 2008, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 352 adults with suspected meningitis or encephalitis underwent routine testing, staining (Gram, Ziehl-Nielsen, India ink), bacterial culture and polymerase chain reaction targeting Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. suis, Haemophilus influenzae type b, Herpes simplex virus (HSV), Varicella Zoster virus (VZV), enterovirus, and 16S ribosomal RNA. Blood cultures and clinically indicated radiology were also performed. Patients were classified as having confirmed or suspected bacterial (BM), tuberculous (TBM), cryptococcal (CRM), eosinophilic (EOM) meningitis, aseptic encephalitis/meningitis (AEM), neurocysticercosis and others. Results 352 (male: 66%) patients were recruited: median age 34 years (range 13–85). 95/352 (27.3%) diagnoses were laboratory confirmed and one by cranial radiology: BM (n = 62), TBM (n = 9), AEM (n = 19), CRM (n = 5), and neurocysticercosis (n = 1, cranial radiology). S. suis predominated as the cause of BM [48/62 (77.4%)]; Listeria monocytogenese (n = 1), S. pasteurianus (n = 1) and N. meningitidis (n = 2) were infrequent. AEM viruses were: HSV (n = 12), VZV (n = 5) and enterovirus (n = 2). 5 patients had EOM. Of 262/352 (74.4%) patients with full clinical data, 209 (79.8%) were hospital referrals and 186 (71%) had been on antimicrobials. 21 (8%) patients died: TBM (15.2%), AEM (10%), and BM (2.8%). Conclusions Most infections lacked microbiological confirmation. S. suis was the most common cause of BM in this setting. Improved diagnostics are needed for meningoencephalitic syndromes to inform treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:22952590

  6. [Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of acute diarrhea in adults at a hospital from Cordoba city].

    PubMed

    Polo Friz, H; Toloza, S; Acosta, H; Toloza, C; Unsain, F; Marconetto, G; Massanet, P; Canova, S; Celli, J; Abdala, O; Gandini, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the clinical and epidemiologic presentation features of adult acute diarrhea in a general hospital form Córdoba City. All the patients older than 14 years old who assisted to the Hospital Nacional de Clínicas Central Guard for acute diarrhea, during the periods: A (15-12-89 to 15-03-90), B (15-12-93 to 15-03-94) and C (15-12-94 to 15-03-95), were included. 594 patients were studied: 337 female (56.7%) and 257 male, 143 in the period A, 250 in B and 201 in C. The means +/- SD age was 34.6 +/- 13.3 and stool loose per day at admission 7.3 +/- 4.7. Eighty six percent of patients presented liquid consistent stool, 89.6% abdominal pain, 44.7% vomiting and 18.8% bloody stools. The rate of patients who consulted Central Guard referring acute diarrhea increased from period A (2.4%) to B (3.61%); p = 0.002 and decreased form B to C (2.85%); p = 0.01. The mean (+/- SD) days transcurred from the beginning of diarrhea episode till consultation was 3.5 +/- 2.7; 2.7 +/- 2.3 y 2.9 +/- 3.5 in the periods A, B and C respectively, statistically significant difference between A and B, p < 0.01. Thirty six percent, 21.1% and 23.1% of patients presented mucus with their stools in the periods A, B and C (p = 0.01), and high temperature 61.1%, 48.1% and 48.5% respectively (p = 0.04). Twenty seven percent of stools samples cultures became positive in the periods A, 17.6% in B and 11.5% in C, statistically significant difference between A and C; p = 0.008. The results show that in a general hospital from Córdoba City the adult acute diarrhea is a frequent cause of consult. In the last years there were modifications in its clinical an epidemiologic presentation features. PMID:10436614

  7. [Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of acute diarrhea in adults at a hospital from Cordoba city].

    PubMed

    Polo Friz, H; Toloza, S; Acosta, H; Toloza, C; Unsain, F; Marconetto, G; Massanet, P; Canova, S; Celli, J; Abdala, O; Gandini, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the clinical and epidemiologic presentation features of adult acute diarrhea in a general hospital form Córdoba City. All the patients older than 14 years old who assisted to the Hospital Nacional de Clínicas Central Guard for acute diarrhea, during the periods: A (15-12-89 to 15-03-90), B (15-12-93 to 15-03-94) and C (15-12-94 to 15-03-95), were included. 594 patients were studied: 337 female (56.7%) and 257 male, 143 in the period A, 250 in B and 201 in C. The means +/- SD age was 34.6 +/- 13.3 and stool loose per day at admission 7.3 +/- 4.7. Eighty six percent of patients presented liquid consistent stool, 89.6% abdominal pain, 44.7% vomiting and 18.8% bloody stools. The rate of patients who consulted Central Guard referring acute diarrhea increased from period A (2.4%) to B (3.61%); p = 0.002 and decreased form B to C (2.85%); p = 0.01. The mean (+/- SD) days transcurred from the beginning of diarrhea episode till consultation was 3.5 +/- 2.7; 2.7 +/- 2.3 y 2.9 +/- 3.5 in the periods A, B and C respectively, statistically significant difference between A and B, p < 0.01. Thirty six percent, 21.1% and 23.1% of patients presented mucus with their stools in the periods A, B and C (p = 0.01), and high temperature 61.1%, 48.1% and 48.5% respectively (p = 0.04). Twenty seven percent of stools samples cultures became positive in the periods A, 17.6% in B and 11.5% in C, statistically significant difference between A and C; p = 0.008. The results show that in a general hospital from Córdoba City the adult acute diarrhea is a frequent cause of consult. In the last years there were modifications in its clinical an epidemiologic presentation features.

  8. Commercial filming of patient care activities in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Geiderman, Joel M; Larkin, Gregory L

    2002-07-17

    Commercial filming of patient care activities is common in hospital settings. This article reviews common circumstances in which patients are commercially filmed, explores the potential positive and negative aspects of filming, and considers the ethical and legal issues associated with commercial filming of patients in hospital settings. We examine the competing goals of commercial filming and the duties of journalists vs the rights of patients to privacy. Current standards and recommendations for commercial filming of patient care activities are reviewed and additional recommendations are offered.

  9. Intravenous access during pre-hospital emergency care of non-injured patients: a population-based outcome study

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Cooke, Colin R.; Hebert, Paul L.; Rea, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Study objective Advanced, pre-hospital procedures such as intravenous access are commonly performed by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, yet little evidence supports their use among non-injured patients. We evaluated the association between pre-hospital, intravenous access and mortality among non-injured, non-arrest patients. Methods We analyzed a population-based cohort of adult (aged ≥18 years) non-injured, non-arrest patients transported by four advanced life support agencies to one of 16 hospitals from January 1, 2002 until December 31, 2006. We linked eligible EMS records to hospital administrative data, and used multivariable logistic regression to determine the risk-adjusted association between pre-hospital, intravenous access and hospital mortality. We also tested whether this association differed by patient acuity using a previously published, out-of-hospital triage score. Results Among 56,332 eligible patients, one half (N=28,978, 50%) received pre-hospital intravenous access from EMS personnel. Overall hospital mortality in patients who did and did not receive intravenous access was 3%. However, in multivariable analyses, the placement of pre-hospital, intravenous access was associated with an overall reduction in odds of hospital mortality (OR=0.68, 95%CI: 0.56, 0.81). The beneficial association of intravenous access appeared to depend on patient acuity (p=0.13 for interaction). For example, the OR of mortality associated with intravenous access was 1.38 (95%CI: 0.28, 7.0) among those with lowest acuity (score = 0). In contrast, the OR of mortality associated with intravenous access was 0.38 (95%CI: 0.17, 0.9) among patients with highest acuity (score ≥ 6). Conclusions In this population-based cohort, pre-hospital, intravenous access was associated with a reduction in hospital mortality among non-injured, non-arrest patients with the highest acuity. PMID:21872970

  10. Disease patterns and causes of death of hospitalized HIV-positive adults in West Africa: a multicountry survey in the antiretroviral treatment era

    PubMed Central

    Lewden, Charlotte; Drabo, Youssoufou J; Zannou, Djimon M; Maiga, Moussa Y; Minta, Daouda K; Sow, Papa S; Akakpo, Jocelyn; Dabis, François; Eholié, Serge P

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to describe the morbidity and mortality patterns in HIV-positive adults hospitalized in West Africa. Method We conducted a six-month prospective multicentre survey within the IeDEA West Africa collaboration in six adult medical wards of teaching hospitals in Abidjan, Ouagadougou, Cotonou, Dakar and Bamako. From April to October 2010, all newly hospitalized HIV-positive patients were eligible. Baseline and follow-up information until hospital discharge was recorded using standardized forms. Diagnoses were reviewed by a local event validation committee using reference definitions. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality were studied with a logistic regression model. Results Among 823 hospitalized HIV-positive adults (median age 40 years, 58% women), 24% discovered their HIV infection during the hospitalization, median CD4 count was 75/mm3 (IQR: 25–177) and 48% had previously received antiretroviral treatment (ART). The underlying causes of hospitalization were AIDS-defining conditions (54%), other infections (32%), other diseases (8%) and non-specific illness (6%). The most frequent diseases diagnosed were: tuberculosis (29%), pneumonia (15%), malaria (10%) and cerebral toxoplasmosis (10%). Overall, 315 (38%) patients died during hospitalization and the underlying cause of death was AIDS (63%), non-AIDS-defining infections (26%), other diseases (7%) and non-specific illness or unknown cause (4%). Among them, the most frequent fatal diseases were: tuberculosis (36%), cerebral toxoplasmosis (10%), cryptococcosis (9%) and sepsis (7%). Older age, clinical WHO stage 3 and 4, low CD4 count, and AIDS-defining infectious diagnoses were associated with hospital fatality. Conclusions AIDS-defining conditions, primarily tuberculosis, and bacterial infections were the most frequent causes of hospitalization in HIV-positive adults in West Africa and resulted in high in-hospital fatality. Sustained efforts are needed to integrate care of these disease

  11. How Nurses Decide to Ambulate Hospitalized Older Adults: Development of a Conceptual Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty-King, Barbara; Bowers, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Adults over the age of 65 years account for 60% of all hospital admissions and experience consequential negative outcomes directly related to hospitalization. Negative outcomes include falls, delirium, loss in ability to perform basic activities of daily living, and new walking dependence. New walking dependence, defined as the loss in ability to…

  12. Funds for Treatment of Hospitalized Patients: Evidence from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Farhana; Hossain, Akmal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was designed to explore sources of funds for health expenditure of patients if they are hospitalized. We have included 379 patients of 3 private and 7 public hospitals to estimate total expenditure. Of them, 229 (60.4%) were from public and 150 (39.6%) from private hospitals. Mean expenditure was Tk 60,613.3 and 8,262.7, and duration of hospital stay was 10.7 and 11.8 days in private and public hospitals respectively. More than half (55%) of the patients from middle class were treated in private hospitals. Of them, 278 (74.0%) were funded by themselves, 48 (12.8%) by loan with interest rate of 100% to 180%, 23 (6.1%) by loan without interest, 17 (4.5%) by losing their fixed asset, and 4 (1.1%) by begging in the street. Most of the patients did bear expenditure by themselves, followed by loan with high interest rate. ‘Distress’ selling of property was also a source. Middle-class patients could be comfortable with expenditure if they were in public hospitals. PMID:25395909

  13. Funds for treatment of hospitalized patients: evidence from Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Begum, Farhana; Alam, Shahinul; Hossain, Akmal

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to explore sources of funds for health expenditure of patients if they are hospitalized. We have included 379 patients of 3 private and 7 public hospitals to estimate total expenditure. Of them, 229 (60.4%) were from public and 150 (39.6%) from private hospitals. Mean expenditure was Tk 60,613.3 and 8,262.7, and duration of hospital stay was 10.7 and 11.8 days in private and public hospitals respectively. More than half (55%) of the patients from middle class were treated in private hospitals. Of them, 278 (74.0%) were funded by themselves, 48 (12.8%) by loan with interest rate of 100% to 180%, 23 (6.1%) by loan without interest, 17 (4.5%) by losing their fixed asset, and 4 (1.1%) by begging in the street. Most of the patients did bear expenditure by themselves, followed by loan with high interest rate. 'Distress' selling of property was also a source. Middle-class patients could be comfortable with expenditure if they were in public hospitals. PMID:25395909

  14. Deprivation of liberty in psychiatric hospital care: the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Kuosmanen, Lauri; Hätönen, Heli; Malkavaara, Heikki; Kylmä, Jari; Välimäki, Maritta

    2007-09-01

    Deprivation of liberty in psychiatric hospitals is common world-wide. The aim of this study was to find out whether patients had experienced deprivation of their liberty during psychiatric hospitalization and to explore their views about it. Patients (n = 51) in two acute psychiatric inpatient wards were interviewed in 2001. They were asked to describe in their own words their experiences of being deprived of their liberty. The data were analysed by inductive content analysis. The types of deprivation of liberty in psychiatric hospital care reported by these patients were: restrictions on leaving the ward and on communication, confiscation of property, and various coercive measures. The patients' experiences of being deprived of their liberty were negative, although some saw the rationale for using these interventions, considering them as part of hospital care.

  15. Patient satisfaction with nursing care at a university hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uzun, O

    2001-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important measure of service quality (SQ) in health care organizations. Patients' satisfaction and their expectations of care are valid indicators of quality nursing care. This article reports the results of a survey patient satisfaction with nursing care, administered by interview to 422 adults discharged from a university hospital in Turkey. The direct measurement of patient satisfaction with nursing care is a new phenomenon for this university hospital, and this was the first time that such an evaluation had been done in this particular hospital. In this study, SERVQUAL scale was used for determining patient satisfaction with nursing care. Weighted scores in dimensions of SERVQUAL were generally low, and there were statistically significant differences in means paired t-tests (p < .01). Sociodemographic characteristics of the patients (age, gender, education level) with regard to patient satisfaction were determined. Several statistically significant differences were found between the sociodemographic characteristics and weighted scores for dimensions of SERVQUAL (p < 0.5). According to results, the SQ gap scores for five dimensions were negative to meet expectations. The negative scores for tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy indicate areas needing improvement. In this hospital, results of this study support the need for nurses to take steps to improve patient satisfaction with nursing care.

  16. Patient satisfaction with nursing care at a university hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uzun, O

    2001-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important measure of service quality (SQ) in health care organizations. Patients' satisfaction and their expectations of care are valid indicators of quality nursing care. This article reports the results of a survey patient satisfaction with nursing care, administered by interview to 422 adults discharged from a university hospital in Turkey. The direct measurement of patient satisfaction with nursing care is a new phenomenon for this university hospital, and this was the first time that such an evaluation had been done in this particular hospital. In this study, SERVQUAL scale was used for determining patient satisfaction with nursing care. Weighted scores in dimensions of SERVQUAL were generally low, and there were statistically significant differences in means paired t-tests (p < .01). Sociodemographic characteristics of the patients (age, gender, education level) with regard to patient satisfaction were determined. Several statistically significant differences were found between the sociodemographic characteristics and weighted scores for dimensions of SERVQUAL (p < 0.5). According to results, the SQ gap scores for five dimensions were negative to meet expectations. The negative scores for tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy indicate areas needing improvement. In this hospital, results of this study support the need for nurses to take steps to improve patient satisfaction with nursing care. PMID:11668854

  17. Understanding the effects of nurses, patients' hospital rooms, and patients' perception of control on the perceived quality of a hospital.

    PubMed

    Gotlieb, J B

    2000-01-01

    Service marketing researchers suggest that the physical environment, the people, and the process strongly affect consumers' judgements when they evaluate services. Previous research has rarely applied this general framework to help identify specific hospital variables that affect the perceived quality of a hospital. This article presents a proposed model and empirical evidence that is based upon this general framework. That is, this article reports the results of a study which found that the physical environment (i.e., patients' perception of their hospital rooms) and people (i.e., patients' perception of nurses) affected patients' perception of hospital quality. The process (i.e., patients' perception of control over the process) did not directly affect their perception of hospital quality. However, patients' perception of control over the process and their perception of their hospital rooms affected their perception of their nurses. Consequently, this research suggests that the general framework identified by service marketing researchers can be applied to help understand how patients develop their perception of hospital quality. PMID:11184431

  18. Understanding the effects of nurses, patients' hospital rooms, and patients' perception of control on the perceived quality of a hospital.

    PubMed

    Gotlieb, J B

    2000-01-01

    Service marketing researchers suggest that the physical environment, the people, and the process strongly affect consumers' judgements when they evaluate services. Previous research has rarely applied this general framework to help identify specific hospital variables that affect the perceived quality of a hospital. This article presents a proposed model and empirical evidence that is based upon this general framework. That is, this article reports the results of a study which found that the physical environment (i.e., patients' perception of their hospital rooms) and people (i.e., patients' perception of nurses) affected patients' perception of hospital quality. The process (i.e., patients' perception of control over the process) did not directly affect their perception of hospital quality. However, patients' perception of control over the process and their perception of their hospital rooms affected their perception of their nurses. Consequently, this research suggests that the general framework identified by service marketing researchers can be applied to help understand how patients develop their perception of hospital quality.

  19. Prognostic Patterns in Self-Report, Relative Report, and Professional Evaluation Measures for Hospitalized and Day-Care Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sappington, A. A.; Michaux, Mary H.

    1975-01-01

    This study attempted to determine differences between patients who relapse and those who do not in both hospital and day-care settings. Subjects were 142 adult psychiatric patients. Three groups of measures were used: one based on professional evaluation, one based on self-report, and one based on relative report. (Author)

  20. DENGUE PATIENTS AT PHOTHARAM HOSPITAL: A CLINICAL TRIAL SITE OF DENGUE VACCINE.

    PubMed

    Nunthanid, Somboon; Tiawilai, Anongrat

    2015-01-01

    Between 2005 and 2013, 1,868 dengue patients, 916 male and 952 female, were admitted to Photharam Hospital, Ratchaburi, Thailand. Among these patients, there were 1,209 with dengue fever (DF), 598 with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and 61 with dengue shock syndrome (DSS) with 1 death. The disease was seen all year round with a higher incidence in the rainy season. A trend of shift in age group towards older children and adults was seen during the study period. These data show that dengue patient admissions to Photharam Hospital are common, causing a heavy burden on the health system. Only one death was seen during the period of study, indicating that early recognition and effective management of dengue patients occurred. The trend towards higher age in dengue patients during the study period is a problem of concern and needs further clarification. PMID:26506727

  1. DENGUE PATIENTS AT PHOTHARAM HOSPITAL: A CLINICAL TRIAL SITE OF DENGUE VACCINE.

    PubMed

    Nunthanid, Somboon; Tiawilai, Anongrat

    2015-01-01

    Between 2005 and 2013, 1,868 dengue patients, 916 male and 952 female, were admitted to Photharam Hospital, Ratchaburi, Thailand. Among these patients, there were 1,209 with dengue fever (DF), 598 with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and 61 with dengue shock syndrome (DSS) with 1 death. The disease was seen all year round with a higher incidence in the rainy season. A trend of shift in age group towards older children and adults was seen during the study period. These data show that dengue patient admissions to Photharam Hospital are common, causing a heavy burden on the health system. Only one death was seen during the period of study, indicating that early recognition and effective management of dengue patients occurred. The trend towards higher age in dengue patients during the study period is a problem of concern and needs further clarification.

  2. Developing a simple preinterventional score to predict hospital mortality in adult venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Wu, Meng-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sheng; Huang, Chung-Chi; Lin, Pyng-Jing

    2016-07-01

    Despite gaining popularity, venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) remains a controversial therapy for acute respiratory failure (ARF) in adult patients due to its equivocal survival benefits. The study was aimed at identifying the preinterventional prognostic predictors of hospital mortality in adult VV-ECMO patients and developing a practical mortality prediction score to facilitate clinical decision-making.This retrospective study included 116 adult patients who received VV-ECMO for severe ARF in a tertiary referral center, from 2007 to 2015. The definition of severe ARF was PaO2/ FiO2 ratio < 70 mm Hg under advanced mechanical ventilation (MV). Preinterventional variables including demographic characteristics, ventilatory parameters, and severity of organ dysfunction were collected for analysis. The prognostic predictors of hospital mortality were generated with multivariate logistic regression and transformed into a scoring system. The discriminative power on hospital mortality of the scoring system was presented as the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC).The overall hospital mortality rate was 47% (n = 54). Pre-ECMO MV day > 4 (OR: 4.71; 95% CI: 1.98-11.23; P < 0.001), pre-ECMO sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score >9 (OR: 3.16; 95% CI: 1.36-7.36; P = 0.01), and immunocompromised status (OR: 2.91; 95% CI: 1.07-7.89; P = 0.04) were independent predictors of hospital mortality of adult VV-ECMO. A mortality prediction score comprising of the 3 binary predictors was developed and named VV-ECMO mortality score. The total score was estimated as follows: VV-ECMO mortality score = 2 × (Pre-ECMO MV day > 4) + 1 × (Pre-ECMO SOFA score >9) + 1 × (immunocompromised status). The AUROC of VV-ECMO mortality score was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.67-0.85; P < 0.001). The corresponding hospital mortality rates to VV-ECMO mortality scores were 18% (Score 0), 35% (Score 1), 56% (Score 2), 75% (Score

  3. Why are patients with acute stroke admitted to hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, J; Sandercock, P; Warlow, C; Gray, M

    1986-01-01

    Data on 515 consecutive patients registered with the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project were used to compare the characteristics of those patients who were admitted to hospital within one month after their first stroke with those who remained in the community during that time. Twenty eight patients had their stroke while in hospital for other conditions, and of the remaining 487, 266 were admitted. Though patients with a severe neurological deficit were significantly more likely to be admitted, 47 out of 202 such patients were managed in the community. In a substudy of 162 consecutive patients the general practitioners' reasons for either arranging admission to hospital or continuing with community care in the first week after the stroke were ascertained. Sixty patients were admitted. The only reason for admission was diagnostic uncertainty in five cases (though this was a contributing factor in 25) and to provide nursing or general, non-medical care in 25. Patients who lived alone were more likely to be admitted. All 12 patients who presented directly to the casualty department were admitted, though only five had had a severe stroke. A stroke service that provides a facility for rapid outpatient and domiciliary diagnosis as well as a rapidly acting domiciliary nursing team might reduce the number of patients with stroke admitted to hospital without adversely affecting the quality of patient care: this should be properly evaluated. PMID:3085852

  4. Patient and medication-related factors associated with hospital-acquired hyponatremia in patients hospitalized from heart failure.

    PubMed

    Saepudin, S; Ball, Patrick A; Morrissey, Hana

    2016-08-01

    Background Hyponatremia has been known as an important predictor of clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). While information on hyponatremia in patients with HF has been available abundantly, information on factors associated with increased risk of developing hospital-acquired hyponatremia (HAH) is still limited. Objective To identify patients and medication-related factors associated with HAH in patients hospitalized from HF. Setting Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods This is a nested case-control study with patients developing HAH served as case group and each patient in case group was matched by age and gender to three patients in control group. Patients included in this study are patients hospitalized from HF, and coded with I.50 according to ICD-10, during 2011-2013 at Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Information retrieved from patients' medical records included demographic profiles, vital signs and symptoms at admission, past medical history, medication during hospitalization and clinical chemistry laboratory records. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to find out patient and treatment-related factors associated with the development of HAH. Main outcome measures Patients and medication related factors having significant association with HAH. Results Four hundreds sixty-four patients were included in this study and 45 of them (9.7 %) met criteria of developing HAH so then, accordingly, 135 patients were selected as controls. 36 patient- and 22 treatment-related factors were analyzed in univariate logistic regression resulted in 20 factors having p value <0.2 and were included in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Final factors showing significant association with HAH are presence of ascites at admission (odds ratio = 4.7; 95 % confidence interval 1.9-11.5) and administration of amiodarone (3.2; 1.3-7.4) and heparin (3.1; 1.2-7.3) during hospital stay. Conclusion Presence of ascites at

  5. Substance use treatment barriers for patients with frequent hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Raven, Maria C; Carrier, Emily R; Lee, Joshua; Billings, John C; Marr, Mollie; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2010-01-01

    Substance use (SU) disorders adversely impact health status and contribute to inappropriate health services use. This qualitative study sought to determine SU-related factors contributing to repeated hospitalizations and to identify opportunities for preventive interventions. Fifty Medicaid-insured inpatients identified by a validated statistical algorithm as being at high-risk for frequent hospitalizations were interviewed at an urban public hospital. Patient drug/alcohol history, experiences with medical, psychiatric and addiction treatment, and social factors contributing to readmission were evaluated. Three themes related to SU and frequent hospitalizations emerged: (a) barriers during hospitalization to planning long-term treatment and follow-up, (b) use of the hospital as a temporary solution to housing/family problems, and (c) unsuccessful SU aftercare following discharge. These data indicate that homelessness, brief lengths of stay complicating discharge planning, patient ambivalence regarding long-term treatment, and inadequate detox-to-rehab transfer resources compromise substance-using patients' likelihood of avoiding repeat hospitalization. Intervention targets included supportive housing, detox-to-rehab transportation, and postdischarge patient support.

  6. Predictive factors for hospitalization of nonurgent patients in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chip-Jin; Liao, Pei-Ju; Chang, Yu-Che; Kuan, Jen-Tze; Chen, Jih-Chang; Hsu, Kuang-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonurgent emergency department (ED) patients are a controversial issue in the era of ED overcrowding. However, a substantial number of post-ED hospitalizations were found, which prompted for investigation and strategy management. The objective of this study is to identify risk factors for predicting the subsequent hospitalization of nonurgent emergency patients. This was a retrospective study of a database of adult nontrauma ED visits in a medical center for a period of 12 months from January 2013 to December 2013. Patient triages as either Taiwan Triage and Acuity Scale (TTAS) level 4 or 5 were considered “nonurgent.” Basic demographic data, primary and secondary diagnoses, clinical parameters including blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, and chief complaint category in TTAS were analyzed to determine if correlation exists between potential predictors and hospitalization in nonurgent patients. A total of 16,499 nonurgent patients were included for study. The overall hospitalization rate was 12.47 % (2058/16,499). In the multiple logistic regression model, patients with characteristics of males (odds ratio, OR = 1.37), age more than 65 years old (OR = 1.56), arrival by ambulance (OR = 2.40), heart rate more than 100/min (OR = 1.47), fever (OR = 2.73), and presented with skin swelling/redness (OR = 4.64) were predictors for hospitalization. The area under receiver-operator calibration curve (AUROC) for the prediction model was 0.70. Nonurgent patients might still be admitted for further care especially in male, the elderly, with more secondary diagnoses, abnormal vital signs, and presented with dermatologic complaints. Using the TTAS acuity level to identify patients for diversion away from the ED is unsafe and will lead to inappropriate refusal of care for many patients requiring hospital treatment. PMID:27368040

  7. Predictive factors for hospitalization of nonurgent patients in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chip-Jin; Liao, Pei-Ju; Chang, Yu-Che; Kuan, Jen-Tze; Chen, Jih-Chang; Hsu, Kuang-Hung

    2016-06-01

    Nonurgent emergency department (ED) patients are a controversial issue in the era of ED overcrowding. However, a substantial number of post-ED hospitalizations were found, which prompted for investigation and strategy management. The objective of this study is to identify risk factors for predicting the subsequent hospitalization of nonurgent emergency patients. This was a retrospective study of a database of adult nontrauma ED visits in a medical center for a period of 12 months from January 2013 to December 2013. Patient triages as either Taiwan Triage and Acuity Scale (TTAS) level 4 or 5 were considered "nonurgent." Basic demographic data, primary and secondary diagnoses, clinical parameters including blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, and chief complaint category in TTAS were analyzed to determine if correlation exists between potential predictors and hospitalization in nonurgent patients.A total of 16,499 nonurgent patients were included for study. The overall hospitalization rate was 12.47 % (2058/16,499). In the multiple logistic regression model, patients with characteristics of males (odds ratio, OR = 1.37), age more than 65 years old (OR = 1.56), arrival by ambulance (OR = 2.40), heart rate more than 100/min (OR = 1.47), fever (OR = 2.73), and presented with skin swelling/redness (OR = 4.64) were predictors for hospitalization. The area under receiver-operator calibration curve (AUROC) for the prediction model was 0.70. Nonurgent patients might still be admitted for further care especially in male, the elderly, with more secondary diagnoses, abnormal vital signs, and presented with dermatologic complaints. Using the TTAS acuity level to identify patients for diversion away from the ED is unsafe and will lead to inappropriate refusal of care for many patients requiring hospital treatment. PMID:27368040

  8. Treatment concepts of day hospitals for general psychiatric patients. Findings from a national survey in Germany.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Klaus-Peter; Garlipp, Petra; Machleidt, Wielant; Haltenhof, Horst

    2006-03-01

    Psychiatric day hospital treatment concepts have to deal with a wide spectrum of mental disorders. We raised the question, if day hospitals can be differentiated concerning their treatment concepts and if so how much this is reflected in their structural and procedural features. In 1999 a survey was initiated concerning structure, concept and method of treatment in psychiatric day hospitals for adults in Germany. Furthermore data concerning rate of utilization, patients' characteristics and aspects of referral and further treatment were ascertained. One hundred and seventy-three (63.4%) of 273-day hospitals contacted took part in the inquiry. The data were interpreted using multivariate as well as non-parametric procedures. The results show that treatment concepts of day hospitals can be specified as three main areas of function (psychotherapy, crisis intervention orientated treatment alternative, rehabilitation) and four therapeutic orientations (psychodynamic social psychiatric, behavioral social psychiatric, psychodynamic, sociotherapeutic). Structural features are predominantly comparable and the differences found concerning the treatment concepts are especially related to patients' characteristics and some procedural features. The conclusion is that the differentiation of day hospital treatment concepts should be taken into consideration in planning psychosocial treatment services as well as in day hospital evaluation research.

  9. Easy to open? Exploring the 'openability' of hospital food and beverage packaging by older adults.

    PubMed

    Bell, Alison F; Walton, Karen L; Tapsell, Linda C

    2016-03-01

    Food is increasingly a packaged commodity, both in the community and in institutionalised settings such as hospitals, where many older people are malnourished. Previous research with patients aged over 65 years in NSW public hospitals identified difficulties opening milk, water, juices, cereal and tetra packs. The aim of this paper was to assess the ability of well older people living in the community to open food and beverage items routinely used in NSW hospitals in order to gain further insights into the older person/pack interaction and the role of hand and finger strength in pack opening. A sample of 40 older people in good health aged over 65 years from 3 community settings participated in the study. The attempts at pack opening were observed, the time taken to open the pack was measured and the correlation between grip and pinch strengths with opening times was determined. Tetra packs, water bottles, cereal, fruit cups, desserts, biscuits and cheese portions appeared to be the most difficult food products to open. Ten percent of the sample could not open the water bottles and 39% could not open cheese portions. The results were consistent with the previous research involving hospitalised older adults, adding emphasis to the conclusion that food and beverage packaging can be a potential barrier to adequate nutrition when particular types of packaged products are used in hospitals or the community. The ageing population is rapidly becoming a larger and more important group to consider in the provision of goods and services. Designers, manufacturers and providers of food and beverage products need to consider the needs and abilities of these older consumers to ensure good 'openability' and promote adequate nutritional intakes.

  10. Easy to open? Exploring the 'openability' of hospital food and beverage packaging by older adults.

    PubMed

    Bell, Alison F; Walton, Karen L; Tapsell, Linda C

    2016-03-01

    Food is increasingly a packaged commodity, both in the community and in institutionalised settings such as hospitals, where many older people are malnourished. Previous research with patients aged over 65 years in NSW public hospitals identified difficulties opening milk, water, juices, cereal and tetra packs. The aim of this paper was to assess the ability of well older people living in the community to open food and beverage items routinely used in NSW hospitals in order to gain further insights into the older person/pack interaction and the role of hand and finger strength in pack opening. A sample of 40 older people in good health aged over 65 years from 3 community settings participated in the study. The attempts at pack opening were observed, the time taken to open the pack was measured and the correlation between grip and pinch strengths with opening times was determined. Tetra packs, water bottles, cereal, fruit cups, desserts, biscuits and cheese portions appeared to be the most difficult food products to open. Ten percent of the sample could not open the water bottles and 39% could not open cheese portions. The results were consistent with the previous research involving hospitalised older adults, adding emphasis to the conclusion that food and beverage packaging can be a potential barrier to adequate nutrition when particular types of packaged products are used in hospitals or the community. The ageing population is rapidly becoming a larger and more important group to consider in the provision of goods and services. Designers, manufacturers and providers of food and beverage products need to consider the needs and abilities of these older consumers to ensure good 'openability' and promote adequate nutritional intakes. PMID:26686584

  11. Intestinal helminth infections amongst HIV-infected adults in Mthatha General Hospital, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yogeswaran, Parimalaranie; Wright, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Background In South Africa, studies on the prevalence of intestinal helminth co-infection amongst HIV-infected patients as well as possible interactions between these two infections are limited. Aim To investigate the prevalence of intestinal helminth infestation amongst adults living with HIV or AIDS at Mthatha General Hospital. Setting Study participants were recruited at the outpatient department of Mthatha General Hospital, Mthatha, South Africa. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between October and December 2013 amongst consecutive consenting HIV-positive adult patients. Socio-demographic and clinical information were obtained using data collection forms and structured interviews. Stool samples were collected to investigate the presence of helminths whilst blood samples were obtained for the measurement of CD4+ T-cell count and viral load. Results Data were obtained on 231 participants, with a mean age of 34.9 years, a mean CD4 count of 348 cells/µL and a mean viral load of 4.8 log10 copies/mL. Intestinal helminth prevalence was 24.7%, with Ascaris Lumbricoides (42.1%) the most prevalent identified species. Statistically significant association was found between CD4 count of less than 200 cells/µL and helminth infection (p = 0.05). No statistically significant association was found between intestinal helminth infection and the mean CD4 count (p = 0.79) or the mean viral load (p = 0.98). Conclusion A high prevalence of intestinal helminth infections was observed amongst the study population. Therefore, screening and treatment of helminths should be considered as part of the management of HIV and AIDS in primary health care. PMID:26842519

  12. Factors affecting ventriculoperitoneal shunt survival in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Farid; Rehman, Abdul; Shamim, Muhammad S.; Bari, Muhammad E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt insertion remains the mainstay of treatment for hydrocephalus despite a high rate of complications. The predictors of shunt malfunction have been studied mostly in pediatric patients. In this study, we report our 11-year experience with VP shunts in adult patients with hydrocephalus. We also assess the various factors affecting shunt survival in a developing country setting. Methods: A retrospective chart analysis was conducted for all adult patients who had undergone shunt placement between the years 2001 and 2011. Kaplan–Meier curves were used to determine the duration from shunt placement to first malfunction and log-rank (Cox–Mantel) tests were used to determine the factors affecting shunt survival. Results: A total of 227 patients aged 18–85 years (mean: 45.8 years) were included in the study. The top four etiologies of hydrocephalus included post-cranial surgery (23.3%), brain tumor or cyst (22.9%), normal pressure hydrocephalus (15%), and intracranial hemorrhage (13.7%). The overall incidence of shunt malfunction was 15.4% with the median time to first shunt failure being 120 days. Etiology of hydrocephalus (P = 0.030) had a significant association with the development of shunt malfunction. Early shunt failure was associated with age (P < 0.001), duration of hospital stay (P < 0.001), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score less than 13 (P = 0.010), excision of brain tumors (P = 0.008), and placement of extra-ventricular drains (P = 0.033). Conclusions: Patients with increased age, prolonged hospital stay, GCS score of less than 13, extra-ventricular drains in situ, or excision of brain tumors were more likely to experience early shunt malfunction. PMID:25722930

  13. Mobility decline in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Fábio Santos; Paim, Daniel de Macedo; Brito, Juliana de Oliveira; Barros, Idiel de Araujo; Nogueira, Thiago Barbosa; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Pires, Thiago Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variation in mobility during hospitalization in an intensive care unit and its association with hospital mortality. Methods This prospective study was conducted in an intensive care unit. The inclusion criteria included patients admitted with an independence score of ≥ 4 for both bed-chair transfer and locomotion, with the score based on the Functional Independence Measure. Patients with cardiac arrest and/or those who died during hospitalization were excluded. To measure the loss of mobility, the value obtained at discharge was calculated and subtracted from the value obtained on admission, which was then divided by the admission score and recorded as a percentage. Results The comparison of these two variables indicated that the loss of mobility during hospitalization was 14.3% (p < 0.001). Loss of mobility was greater in patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours in the intensive care unit (p < 0.02) and in patients who used vasopressor drugs (p = 0.041). However, the comparison between subjects aged 60 years or older and those younger than 60 years indicated no significant differences in the loss of mobility (p = 0.332), reason for hospitalization (p = 0.265), SAPS 3 score (p = 0.224), use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.117), or hospital mortality (p = 0.063). Conclusion There was loss of mobility during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. This loss was greater in patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours and in those who used vasopressors; however, the causal and prognostic factors associated with this decline need to be elucidated. PMID:27410406

  14. Treatment for positive urine cultures in hospitalized adults: A three medical center survey of prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Grein, Jonathan D.; Kahn, Katherine L.; Eells, Samantha J.; Choi, Seong K.; Go-Wheeler, Marianne; Hossain, Tanzib; Riva, Maya Y.; Nguyen, Megan H.; Murthy, A. Rekha; Miller, Loren G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is prevalent but often in contrast to published guidelines. We evaluated risk factors for treatment of ASB. DESIGN Retrospective observational study SETTING A tertiary academic hospital, county hospital, and community hospital PATIENTS Hospitalized adults with bacteriuria METHODS Patients without documented symptoms of urinary tract infection per Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) criteria were classified as ASB. We examined ASB treatment risk factors, broad-spectrum antibiotic usage, and quantified diagnostic concordance between IDSA and National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) criteria. RESULTS Among 300 patients with bacteriuria, ASB was present in 71% by IDSA criteria. By NHSN criteria, 71% of patients had ASB; within-patient diagnostic concordance with IDSA was moderate (kappa = 0.52). After excluding those given antibiotics for non-urinary indications, antibiotics were given to 38% (62/164) with ASB. Factors significantly associated with ASB treatment were elevated urine white cell count (65 versus 24 white blood cells per high-powered field, p<0.01), hospital identity (Hospital C vs. A, OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.14–0.80, p=0.01), presence of leukocyte esterase (OR 5.48, 95% CI 2.35–12.79, p<0.01), presence of nitrites (OR 2.45, 95% CI 1.11–5.41, p=0.03), and E. coli on culture (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2–4.7, p=0.01). Of patients treated for ASB, broad-spectrum antibiotics were used in 84%. CONCLUSIONS ASB treatment was prevalent across diverse inpatient settings and contributed to broad-spectrum antibiotic use. Associating abnormal urinalysis results with the need for antibiotic treatment, regardless of symptoms, may drive unnecessary antibiotic use and provides an opportunity for antibiotic stewardship interventions. PMID:26607408

  15. Influenza epidemiology in adults admitted to sentinel Australian hospitals in 2014: the Influenza Complications Alert Network (FluCAN).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Holmes, Mark; Senenayake, Sanjaya; Dwyer, Dominic E; Hewagama, Saliya; Korman, Tony; Irving, Louis; Brown, Simon; Waterer, Grant; Hunter, Cameron; Friedman, N Deborah; Wark, Peter; Simpson, Graham; Upman, John; Bowler, Simon; Macartney, Kristine; Blyth, Christopher; Kotsimbos, Tom; Kelly, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The Influenza Complications Alert Network (FluCAN) is a sentinel hospital-based surveillance program that operates at sites in all states and territories in Australia. This report summarises the epidemiology of hospitalisations with laboratory-confirmed influenza during the 2014 influenza season. In this observational study, cases were defined as patients admitted to one of the sentinel hospitals with an acute respiratory illness with influenza confirmed by nucleic acid detection. During the period 3 April to 31 October 2014 (the 2014 influenza season), 1,692 adult patients (>16 years) were admitted with confirmed influenza to one of 15 of 17 FluCAN sentinel hospitals (excluding 2 paediatric hospitals). Of these, 47% were over 65 years of age, 10% were Indigenous Australians, 3.3% were pregnant and 85% had chronic co-morbidities. The majority of cases were due to influenza A. Influenza B was detected in 7% of patients. There were a large number of hospital admissions detected with confirmed influenza in this national observational surveillance system in 2014. These are estimated to represent a national annual burden of around 15,000 admissions and almost 100,000 bed-days nationally. PMID:26620349

  16. Service quality of private hospitals: The Iranian Patients' perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Highly competitive market in the private hospital industry has caused increasing pressure on them to provide services with higher quality. The aim of this study was to determine the different dimensions of the service quality in the private hospitals of Iran and evaluating the service quality from the patients' perspective. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2010 in Tehran, Iran. The study sample was composed of 983 patients randomly selected from 8 private general hospitals. The study questionnaire was the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of 21 items in service quality dimensions. Results The result of factor analysis revealed 3 factors, explaining 69% of the total variance. The total mean score of patients' expectation and perception was 4.91(SD = 0.2) and 4.02(SD = 0.6), respectively. The highest expectation and perception related to the tangibles dimension and the lowest expectation and perception related to the empathy dimension. The differences between perception and expectation were significant (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference between the expectations scores based on gender, education level, and previous hospitalization in that same hospital. Also, there was a significant difference between the perception scores based on insurance coverage, average length of stay, and patients' health conditions on discharge. Conclusion The results showed that SERVQUAL is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to monitor and measure the quality of the services in private hospitals of Iran. Our findings clarified the importance of creating a strong relationship between patients and the hospital practitioners/personnel and the need for hospital staff to be responsive, credible, and empathetic when dealing with patients. PMID:22299830

  17. Impact of obesity on hospital complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Anastasia-Stefania; Fayfman, Maya; Zhao, Liping; Weaver, Jeff; Buehler, Lauren; Smiley, Dawn; Pasquel, Francisco J; Vellanki, Priyathama; Haw, J Sonya; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity is associated with increased risk of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular mortality. Several studies have reported increased length of hospital stay and complications; however, there are also reports of obesity having a protective effect on health, a phenomenon coined the ‘obesity paradox’. We aimed to investigate the impact of overweight and obesity on complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes. Research design and methods This retrospective analysis was conducted on 29 623 patients admitted to two academic hospitals in Atlanta, Georgia, between January 2012 and December 2013. Patients were subdivided by body mass index into underweight (body mass index <18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25–29.9 kg/m2) and obese (>30 kg/m2). Hyperglycemia was defined as a blood glucose >10 mmol/L during hospitalization. Hospital complications included a composite of pneumonia, acute myocardial infarction, respiratory failure, acute kidney injury, bacteremia and death. Results A total of 4.2% were underweight, 29.6% had normal weight, 30.2% were overweight, and 36% were obese. 27.2% of patients had diabetes and 72.8% did not have diabetes (of which 75% had hyperglycemia and 25% had normoglycemia during hospitalization). A J-shaped curve with higher rates of complications was observed in underweight patients in all glycemic groups; however, there was no significant difference in the rate of complications among normal weight, overweight, or obese patients, with and without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Conclusions Underweight is an independent predictor for hospital complications. In contrast, increasing body mass index was not associated with higher morbidity or mortality, regardless of glycemic status. There was no evidence of an obesity paradox among inpatients with diabetes and hyperglycemia. PMID:27486518

  18. Recruiting hospitalized Mexican American elder adults and caregivers: challenges and strategies.

    PubMed

    Crist, Janice D; Ruiz, Maricruz R; Torres-Urquidy, Oscar H; Pasvogel, Alice; Hepworth, Joseph T

    2013-01-01

    Minority group members' participation in clinical research is essential for eliminating health disparities. Early recruitment procedures for a randomized control trial involving minority elder adults at local hospitals were unsuccessful, with challenges at the hospital and individual levels. These challenges included referrals for home health care being written late during hospitalization, hospital staff being reluctant to assist recruiters, ill minority elder adults, and protective or unavailable caregivers. We met these challenges with evidence-based strategies, including changing inclusion criteria, increasing study staff, branding our study, using a consistently respectful manner, and pacing our process. After revising our approaches in various ways, we recruited close to our goal, with relatively good retention. Participants reported that benefiting the community, rather than monetary reward, was a strong motivator to join the study. Unexpected recruitment expenditures exceeded the recruitment budget. Our experiences include strategies that can be more cost effective in future studies at both hospital and individual levels. PMID:23244443

  19. Drug incompatibilities in the adult intensive care unit of a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marsilio, Naiane Roveda; da Silva, Daiandy; Bueno, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to identify the physical and chemical incompatibilities among the drugs administered intravenously to patients admitted to an adult intensive care unit. We also aimed to establish pharmaceutical guidelines for administering incompatible drugs. Methods This cross-sectional, prospective, and quantitative study was conducted from July to September 2015. Drug incompatibilities were identified based on an analysis of the patient prescriptions available in the hospital online management system. A pharmaceutical intervention was performed using the guidelines on the preparation and administration of incompatible drugs. Adherence to those guidelines was subsequently assessed among the nursing staff. Results A total of 100 prescriptions were analyzed; 68 were incompatible with the intravenous drugs prescribed. A total of 271 drug incompatibilities were found, averaging 4.0 ± 3.3 incompatibilities per prescription. The most commonly found drug incompatibilities were between midazolam and hydrocortisone (8.9%), between cefepime and midazolam (5.2%), and between hydrocortisone and vancomycin (5.2%). The drugs most commonly involved in incompatibilities were midazolam, hydrocortisone, and vancomycin. The most common incompatibilities occurred when a drug was administered via continuous infusion and another was administered intermittently (50%). Of the 68 prescriptions that led to pharmaceutical guidelines, 45 (66.2%) were fully adhered to by the nursing staff. Conclusion Patients under intensive care were subjected to a high rate of incompatibilities. Drug incompatibilities can be identified and eliminated by the pharmacist on the multidisciplinary team, thereby reducing undesirable effects among patients. PMID:27410410

  20. Barriers to Early Mobility of Hospitalized General Medicine Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Erik H.; Brotman, Daniel J.; Chan, Kitty; Needham, Dale M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Functional status decline commonly accompanies hospitalization making patients vulnerable to complications. Such decline can be mitigated through hospital-based early mobility programs. Success in implementing patient mobility quality improvement processes requires evaluating providers’ knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Design A cross-sectional, self-administered survey in two different hospital settings was completed by 120 nurses and physical and occupational therapists (rehabilitation therapists, 38; nurses, 82) from six general medicine units. The survey was developed using published guidelines, literature review, and provider meetings and refined through pilot testing. Psychometric properties were assessed, and regression analyses were conducted to examine barriers to early mobility by hospital site, provider discipline, and years of experience. Results Internal consistency reliability, item consistency, and discriminant validity psychometric characteristics were acceptable. In multivariable regression analysis, overall perceived barriers were similar between the two hospitals (P = 0.25) and significantly higher for staff with less experience (P = 0.02) and for nurses vs. rehabilitation therapists (P < 0.001). The survey identified specific barriers common to both nurses and rehabilitation therapists and other barriers that were discipline specific. Conclusions This novel survey identified important barriers to mobilizing medical inpatients that were similar across two hospital settings. These results can assist with the implementation of quality improvement projects for increasing early hospital-based patient mobility. PMID:25133615

  1. Out-of-Hospital Endotracheal Intubation Experience and Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henry E.; Balasubramani, G. K.; Cook, Lawrence J.; Lave, Judith R.; Yealy, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    Study objective Previous studies suggest improved patient outcomes for providers who perform high volumes of complex medical procedures. Out-of-hospital tracheal intubation is a difficult procedure. We seek to determine the association between rescuer procedural experience and patient survival after out-of-hospital tracheal intubation. Methods We analyzed probabilistically linked Pennsylvania statewide emergency medicine services, hospital discharge, and death data of patients receiving out-of-hospital tracheal intubation. We defined tracheal intubation experience as cumulative tracheal intubation during 2000 to 2005; low=1 to 10 tracheal intubations, medium=11 to 25 tracheal intubations, high=26 to 50 tracheal intubations, and very high=greater than 50 tracheal intubations. We identified survival on hospital discharge of patients intubated during 2003 to 2005. Using generalized estimating equations, we evaluated the association between patient survival and out-of-hospital rescuer cumulative tracheal intubation experience, adjusted for clinical covariates. Results During 2003 to 2005, 4,846 rescuers performed tracheal intubation. These individuals performed tracheal intubation on 33,117 patients during 2003 to 2005 and 62,586 patients during 2000 to 2005. Among 21,753 cardiac arrests, adjusted odds of survival was higher for patients intubated by rescuers with very high tracheal intubation experience; adjusted odds ratio (OR) versus low tracheal intubation experience: very high 1.48 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15 to 1.89), high 1.13 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.31), and medium 1.02 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.15). Among 8,162 medical nonarrests, adjusted odds of survival were higher for patients intubated by rescuers with high and very high tracheal intubation experience; adjusted OR versus low tracheal intubation experience: very high 1.55 (95% CI 1.08 to 2.22), high 1.29 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.59), and medium 1.16 (95% CI 0.97 to 1.38). Among 3,202 trauma nonarrests, survival was not

  2. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis in hospitalized patients: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Schleyer, Anneliese M; Jarman, Kenneth M; Calver, Patty; Cuschieri, Joseph; Robinson, Ellen; Goss, J Richard

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, there is a focus on the prevention of hospital-acquired conditions including venous thromboembolism. Many studies have evaluated pulmonary embolism and lower extremity deep vein thrombosis, but less is known about upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) in hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to describe UEDVT incidence, associated risks, outcomes, and management in our institution. Using an information technology tool, we reviewed records of all symptomatic adult inpatients diagnosed with UEDVT at an academic tertiary center between September 2011 and November 2012. Fifty inpatients were diagnosed with 76 UEDVTs. Their mean age was 49 years; 70% were men. Sixteen percent had a history of venous thromboembolism; 20% had a history of malignancy. The mean length of stay (LOS) was 24.6 days (range, 2-91 days); 50% were transferred from outside hospitals. Thirty-eight percent of UEDVTs were in internal jugular veins, 21% in axillary veins, and 25% in brachial veins. Forty-four percent of patients had UEDVT associated with central venous catheters (CVCs). During hospitalization, 78% were fully anticoagulated; 75% of survivors at discharge. Only 38% were discharged to self-care; 10% died during hospitalization. Patients with UEDVT were more likely to have CVCs, malignancy, and severe infection. Many patients were transferred critically ill with prolonged LOS and high in-hospital mortality. Most UEDVTs were treated even in the absence of concurrent lower extremity deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Additional research is needed to modify risks and optimize outcomes. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2014;9:48-53. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  3. Management of Hyperglycemia and Enteral Nutrition in the Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Cynthia Ann; Wien, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    There has been increased attention on the importance of identifying and distinguishing the differences between stress-induced hyperglycemia (SH), newly diagnosed hyperglycemia (NDH), and hyperglycemia in persons with established diabetes mellitus (DM). Inpatient blood glucose control is now being recognized as not only a cost issue for hospitals but also a concern for patient safety and care. The reasons for the increased incidence of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients include preexisting DM, undiagnosed DM or prediabetes, SH, and medication-induced hyperglycemia with resulting transient blood glucose variability. It is clear that identifying and documenting hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with and without a previous diagnosis of DM and initiating prompt insulin treatment are important. Agreement on the optimum treatment goals for hyperglycemia remains quite controversial, and the benefits of intensive glucose management may be lost at the cost of hypoglycemia in intensive care unit patients. Nutrition support in the form of enteral nutrition (EN) increases the risk of hyperglycemia in both critical and non-critically ill hospitalized patients. Reasons for beginning a tube feeding are the same whether a person has NDH or DM. What differs is how to incorporate EN into the established insulin management protocols. The risk for hyperglycemia with the addition of EN is even higher in those without a previous diagnosis of DM. This review discusses the incidence of hyperglycemia, the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia, factors contributing to hyperglycemia in the hospitalized patient, glycemic management goals, current glycemic management recommendations, and considerations for EN formula selection, administration, and treatment.

  4. Predictors of Prolonged Hospitalization in Patients with Fever

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The study was conducted to analyze the predictors of prolonged hospitalization in patients with fever. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study conducted from July - December 2015 at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Pakistan. Convenience sampling was used to enroll the patients who visited the hospital during the study duration. A sample size of 115 patients was calculated. It included patients who presented with a new onset fever which started in the last month, and the cause of fever was undiagnosed at the time of admission. Critical patients were excluded. Data for more than 30 variables was collected on a pro forma. Univariate regression methods were used to analyze the data in the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), version 23. Results: A total of 115 patients were analyzed. Males constituted 66/115 (57.4%). The mean age for patients was 43.6 years (standard deviation (SD) = 20.2). On admission, low platelet counts (p = 0.001), high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) counts (p = 0.007), a high total leukocyte count (TLC) (p = 0.029), and involvement of nervous (p = 0.021), cardiovascular (p = 0.04), respiratory (p = 0.043), gastroenterological (p = 0.042), hematological (p = 0.028), or urogenital system (p = 0.016) were associated with a longer stay in the hospital. Conclusion: Patients with an undiagnosed and new onset fever will have a longer hospital stay if, on admission, they have low platelet counts, a higher ESR, a high TLC, or involvement of nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, hematological, or urogenital systems. An early identification of risk factors can lead to better treatment and may also lead to a decreased hospital stay. PMID:27774357

  5. Delivered dialysis dose is suboptimal in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Obialo, C I; Hernandez, B; Carter, D

    1998-01-01

    Underdialyzed patients have high hospitalization and mortality rates. It is unclear if such patients receive adequate dialysis during hospitalization. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated single treatment delivered dialysis dose during hospitalization and compared this to the dosage received at the free-standing outpatient clinics in the same patients. Eighty-four patients (54% male) aged 23-63 years (means +/- SD 55.5 +/- 14.6) who have been on dialysis for at least 3 months were evaluated. Hypertension and diabetes were the most common diagnoses, while thrombosed graft or fistula accounted for 40% of admissions. The mean dialysis treatment time (Td) was 30 min longer in the outpatient (OP) setting than the hospital (H): 3.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.1 +/- 0.2 h (p < 0.0001). Attained blood flow (QB) was 15% greater in the OP than H: 394 +/- 40 vs. 331 +/- 54 ml/min (p < 0.0001). The Kt/V was analyzed in 49 of 84 patients; the OP Kt/V was 20% greater than the H Kt/V: 1.38 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.11 +/- 0.1 (p < 0.0001). A further breakdown of H Kt/V according to access and membrane types showed that patients with functional grafts/fistula had a higher Kt/V than those with temporary accesses 1.14 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.07 +/- 0.1 (p = 0.01). We conclude that hospitalized patients receive suboptimal dialysis dose, this could have a negative impact on survival if hospitalization is recurrent and prolonged. Kinetic modeling should be routinely performed in such patients and Td should be increased in patients with temporary accesses. PMID:9845829

  6. Intestinal Infections Among Febrile Hospitalized Patients in the Republic of Armenia: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    PubMed

    Zardaryan, Eduard; Paronyan, Lusine; Bakunts, Vahe; Gevorgyan, Zaruhi; Asoyan, Vigen; Apresyan, Hripsime; Hovhannisyan, Alvard; Palayan, Karo; Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Rivard, Robert G; Bautista, Christian T

    2016-10-01

    In the past, several enteric outbreaks in 1996, 1998, 1999, and 2003 caused by Salmonella typhi, a Gram-negative bacterium, have occurred in Armenia. This study describes the demographic, epidemiological, and clinical characteristics of febrile hospitalized patients with intestinal infections in Armenia. Using a chart review study design, medical data from adult patients who were hospitalized at the Nork hospital during 2010-2012 were reviewed. A total of 600 medical charts were reviewed. Of these, 51 % were diagnosed with intestinal infections. Among these patients, 59 % had an intestinal infection of known etiology, with three main pathogens identified: Salmonella sp. (32 %), Shigella sp. (32 %), and Staphylococcus aureus (18 %). After controlling for the calendar year, age in years, and gender, patients detected with Salmonella sp. were more likely to reported the presence of a family member with similar signs or symptoms [odds ratio (OR) 9.0; 95 % CI 2.4-33.7] and the lack of a water tap at home (OR 3.9; 95 % CI 1.7-9.5). Evidence indicates that Salmonella sp., Shigella sp., and S. aureus as the most common etiologies reported among febrile hospitalized patients. A high percentage of patients had intestinal infections of unknown etiology; thus, improvement in laboratory capacity (enabling more advanced tests, such as polymerase chain reaction) would increase the identification of the enteropathogens causing disease in Armenia. PMID:26992893

  7. Improving the provision of meals in hospital. The patients' viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Johns, Nick; Hartwell, Heather; Morgan, Michael

    2010-02-01

    This study examines the provision of hospital meals from the patients' viewpoint, with the aim of improving hospital food service. Patients were approached in early 2008 in a National Health Service hospital in the South of England and invited to comment on the good and bad aspects of eating in hospital. Comments were collected in an abbreviated "key word" format which incurred the minimum of bias and allowed emergent themes to be analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Seven main themes emerged, of which "food" and "choice" were mentioned most frequently, but had a low ratio (1.8 and 1.7, respectively) of approving over disapproving comments. The next most mentioned theme, "service staff", showed the highest approving/disapproving ratio (4.8) overall. Less frequent themes were: "meals and lifestyle", "timing and routine", "service quality" and "food quantity". These data, together with qualitative analysis of the responses showed patients' views of hospital food to be positive, on the whole meeting or surpassing their expectations. However, these expectations were low, the experience of eating in hospital contrasted unfavourably with home, and the meals were at best a distraction from the rigours of hospital treatment. Service staff were positively regarded because they offered an important opportunity for "normal" discourse with a non-medical person. On the basis of the findings, changes are recommended in the management of service staff, menus, food presentation, nutritional intake and patients' lifestyle. Of these, the first is likely to have most impact on the experience and viewpoint of hospital patients. PMID:19857535

  8. Medical causes of admissions to hospital among adults in Africa: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Etyang, Anthony O.; Scott, John Anthony Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the publication of several studies on the subject, there is significant uncertainty regarding the burden of disease among adults in sub-Saharan Africa (sSA). Objectives To describe the breadth of available data regarding causes of admission to hospital, to systematically analyze the methodological quality of these studies, and to provide recommendations for future research. Design We performed a systematic online and hand-based search for articles describing patterns of medical illnesses in patients admitted to hospitals in sSA between 1950 and 2010. Diseases were grouped into bodily systems using International Classification of Disease (ICD) guidelines. We compared the proportions of admissions and deaths by diagnostic category using χ2. Results Thirty articles, describing 86,307 admissions and 9,695 deaths, met the inclusion criteria. The leading causes of admission were infectious and parasitic diseases (19.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 19.6–20.1), respiratory (16.2%, 95% CI 16.0–16.5) and circulatory (11.3%, 95% CI 11.1–11.5) illnesses. The leading causes of death were infectious and parasitic (17.1%, 95% CI 16.4–17.9), circulatory (16%, 95% CI 15.3–16.8) and digestive (16.2%, 95% CI 15.4–16.9). Circulatory diseases increased from 3.9% of all admissions in 1950–59 to 19.9% in 2000–2010 (RR 5.1, 95% CI 4.5–5.8, test for trend p<0.00005). The most prevalent methodological deficiencies, present in two-thirds of studies, were failures to use standardized case definitions and ICD guidelines for classifying illnesses. Conclusions Cardiovascular and infectious diseases are currently the leading causes of admissions and in-hospital deaths in sSA. Methodological deficiencies have limited the usefulness of previous studies in defining national patterns of disease in adults. As African countries pass through demographic and health transition, they need to significantly invest in clinical research capacity to provide an accurate

  9. A study of patients' expectations and satisfaction in Singapore hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lim, P C; Tang, N K

    2000-01-01

    In today's highly competitive healthcare environment, hospitals increasingly realise the need to focus on service quality as a means to improve their competitive position. Customer-based determinants and perceptions of service quality therefore play an important role when choosing a hospital. This paper attempts to determine the expectations and perceptions of patients through the use of a generic, internationally used market research technique called SERVQUAL. An analysis covering 252 patients revealed that there was an overall service quality gap between patients' expectations and perceptions. Thus, improvements are required across all the six dimensions, namely, tangibility, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy and accessibility and affordability.

  10. A study of patients' expectations and satisfaction in Singapore hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lim, P C; Tang, N K

    2000-01-01

    In today's highly competitive healthcare environment, hospitals increasingly realise the need to focus on service quality as a means to improve their competitive position. Customer-based determinants and perceptions of service quality therefore play an important role when choosing a hospital. This paper attempts to determine the expectations and perceptions of patients through the use of a generic, internationally used market research technique called SERVQUAL. An analysis covering 252 patients revealed that there was an overall service quality gap between patients' expectations and perceptions. Thus, improvements are required across all the six dimensions, namely, tangibility, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy and accessibility and affordability. PMID:11484647

  11. Managing diabetes in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shridhar N; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Because few randomized trials have been done, little is known about appropriate glycemic control in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. These patients are at high risk of hypoglycemia. It is prudent to monitor glucose closely, set less-stringent blood sugar goals, avoid oral antidiabetic agents, and possibly reduce insulin dosage. PMID:27055204

  12. Hospital Pre-Admission Orientation and Patient Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ramona L.

    1987-01-01

    The study examined effects of a physician-delivered orientation on patient satisfaction for a short hospital stay (3 days or less). Using a comparative study design, the researcher found that, when patients had an orientation, satisfaction with services improved, as did perception of the physician's professionalism. (Author/CH)

  13. What do patients value in the hospital meal experience?

    PubMed

    Hartwell, Heather J; Shepherd, Paula A; Edwards, John S A; Johns, Nick

    2016-01-01

    A number of previous studies have reported on the aspects of hospital food service that patients value, but usually as a secondary finding, and not generally based upon patient-centred approaches. This study employed a questionnaire produced ab initio from interviews with patients and hospital staff, the data from which were subjected to factor and cluster analysis, in order to identify and prioritise the factors that contribute to the meal experience empirically. The most important factors, food and service were as identified by other authors. In decreasing order of importance were social, personal and situational factors. The results confirm that improving the quality of the food and the efficiency with which it reaches the patients remain the most important objectives of hospital food service. PMID:26408943

  14. Monitoring patients in hospital beds using unobtrusive depth sensors.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanvi; Enayati, Moein; Keller, James M; Skubic, Marjorie; Popescu, Mihail; Rantz, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    We present an approach for patient activity recognition in hospital rooms using depth data collected using a Kinect sensor. Depth sensors such as the Kinect ensure that activity segmentation is possible during day time as well as night while addressing the privacy concerns of patients. It also provides a technique to remotely monitor patients in a non-intrusive manner. An existing fall detection algorithm is currently generating fall alerts in several rooms in the University of Missouri Hospital (MUH). In this paper we describe a technique to reduce false alerts such as pillows falling off the bed or equipment movement. We do so by detecting the presence of the patient in the bed for the times when the fall alert is generated. We test our algorithm on 96 hours obtained in two hospital rooms from MUH.

  15. Medical Nutrition Therapy in Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gosmanov, Aidar R.

    2013-01-01

    Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) plays an important role in management of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with diabetes mellitus. The goals of inpatient MNT are to optimize glycemic control, to provide adequate calories to meet metabolic demands, and to create a discharge plan for follow-up care. All patients with and without diabetes should undergo nutrition assessment on admission with subsequent implementation of physiologically sound caloric support. The use of a consistent carbohydrate diabetes meal-planning system has been shown to be effective in facilitating glycemic control in hospitalized patients with diabetes. This system is based on the total amount of carbohydrate offered rather than on specific calorie content at each meal, which facilitates matching the prandial insulin dose to the amount of carbohydrate consumed. In this article, we discuss general guidelines for the implementation of appropriate MNT in hospitalized patients with diabetes. PMID:21997598

  16. Sex Differences in Clinical Characteristics, Hospital Management Practices, and In-Hospital Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized in a Vietnamese Hospital with a First Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hoa L.; Ha, Duc Anh; Phan, Dat Tuan; Nguyen, Quang Ngoc; Nguyen, Viet Lan; Nguyen, Nguyen Hanh; Nguyen, Ha; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Vietnam. We conducted a pilot study of Hanoi residents hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) at the Vietnam National Heart Institute in Hanoi. The objectives of this observational study were to examine sex differences in clinical characteristics, hospital management, in-hospital clinical complications, and mortality in patients hospitalized with an initial AMI. Methods The study population consisted of 302 Hanoi residents hospitalized with a first AMI at the largest tertiary care medical center in Hanoi in 2010. Results The average age of study patients was 66 years and one third were women. Women were older (70 vs. 64 years) and were more likely than men to have had hyperlipidemia previously diagnosed (10% vs. 2%). During hospitalization, women were less likely to have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) compared with men (57% vs. 74%), and women were more likely to have developed heart failure compared with men (19% vs. 10%). Women experienced higher in-hospital case-fatality rates (CFRs) than men (13% vs. 4%) and these differences were attenuated after adjustment for age and history of hyperlipidemia (OR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.01, 6.89), and receipt of PCI during hospitalization (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 0.77, 5.09). Conclusions Our pilot data suggest that among patients hospitalized with a first AMI in Hanoi, women experienced higher in-hospital CFRs than men. Full-scale surveillance of all Hanoi residents hospitalized with AMI at all Hanoi medical centers is needed to confirm these findings. More targeted and timely educational and treatment approaches for women appear warranted. PMID:24752383

  17. Economic burden to primary informal caregivers of hospitalized older adults in Mexico: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The burden of out of pocket spending for the Mexican population is high compared to other countries. Even patients insured by social security institutions have to face the cost of health goods, services or nonmedical expenses related to their illness. Primary caregivers, in addition, experience losses in productivity by taking up responsibilities in care giving activities. This situation represents a mayor economic burden in an acute care setting for elderly population. There is evidence that specialized geriatric services could represent lower overall costs in these circumstances and could help reduce these burdens. The aim of this study was to investigate economic burden differences in caregivers of elderly patients comparing two acute care services (Geriatric and Internal Medicine). Specifically, economic costs associated with hospitalization of older adults in these two settings by evaluating health care related out of pocket expenditures (OOPE), non-medical OOPE and indirect costs. Methods A comparative analysis of direct and indirect costs in hospitalised elderly patients (60-year or older) and their primary informal caregivers in two health care settings, using a prospective cohort was performed. Economic burden was measured by out of pocket expenses and indirect costs (productivity lost) due to care giving activities. The analysis included a two-part model, the first one allowing the estimation of the probability of observing any health care related and non-medical OOPE; and the second one, the positive observations or expenditures. Results A total of 210 subjects were followed during their hospital stay. Of the total number of subjects 95% reported at least one non-medical OOPE, being daily transportation the most common expense. Regarding medical OOPE, medicines were the most common expense, and the mean numbers of days without income were 4.12 days. Both OOPE and indirect costs were significantly different between type of services, with less

  18. Sleep Disruption is Associated with Increased Ventricular Ectopy and Cardiac Arrest in Hospitalized Adults

    PubMed Central

    Miner, Steven Edward Stuart; Pahal, Dev; Nichols, Laurel; Darwood, Amanda; Nield, Lynne Elizabeth; Wulffhart, Zaev

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine whether sleep disruption increases ventricular ectopy and the risk of cardiac arrest in hospitalized patients. Methods: Hospital emergency codes (HEC) trigger multiple hospital-wide overhead announcements. In 2014 an electronic “code white” program was instituted to protect staff from violent patients. This resulted in an increase in nocturnal HEC. Telemetry data was examined between September 14 and October 2, 2014. The frequency of nocturnal announcements was correlated with changes in frequency of premature ventricular complexes per hour (PVC/h). Cardiac arrest data were examined over a 3-y period. All HEC were assumed to have triggered announcements. The relationship between nocturnal HEC and the incidence of subsequent cardiac arrest was examined. Results: 2,603 hours of telemetry were analyzed in 87 patients. During nights with two or fewer announcements, PVC/h decreased 33% and remained 30% lower the next day. On nights with four or more announcements, PVC/h increased 23% (P < 0.001) and further increased 85% the next day (P = 0.001). In 2014, following the introduction of the code white program, the frequency of all HEC increased from 1.1/day to 6.2/day (P < 0.05). The frequency of cardiac arrest/24 h rose from 0.46/day in 2012–2013 to 0.62/day in 2014 (P = 0.001). During daytime hours (06:00–22:00), from 2012 through 2014, the frequency of cardiac arrest following zero, one or at least two nocturnal HEC were 0.331 ± 0.03, 0.396 ± 0.04 and 0.471 ± 0.09 respectively (R2 = 0.99, P = 0.03). Conclusions: Sleep disruption is associated with increased ventricular ectopy and increased frequency of cardiac arrest. Citation: Miner SE, Pahal D, Nichols L, Darwood A, Nield LE, Wulffart Z. Sleep disruption is associated with increased ventricular ectopy and cardiac arrest in hospitalized adults. SLEEP 2016;39(4):927–935. PMID:26715226

  19. Intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Heller, Axel R

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids contained in fish oils have shown efficacy in the treatment of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases due to their pleiotropic effects on inflammatory cell signalling pathways. In a variety of experimental and clinical studies, omega-3 fatty acids attenuated hyperinflammatory conditions and induced faster recovery. This chapter will shed light on the effects of intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients and will discuss clinical data and recent meta-analyses on the topic. While significant beneficial effects on infection rates and the lengths of ICU and hospital stays have concordantly been identified in three recent meta-analyses on non-ICU surgical patients, the level of evidence is not so clear for critically ill patients. Three meta-analyses published in 2012 or 2013 explored data on the ICU population. Although the present data suggest the consideration of enteral nutrition enriched with fish oil, borage oil and antioxidants in mild to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, only one of the three meta-analyses found a trend (p = 0.08) of lower mortality in ICU patients receiving intravenous omega-3 fatty acids. Two of the meta-analyses indicated a significantly shorter hospital stay (5.17-9.49 days), and one meta-analysis found a significant reduction in ICU days (1.92). As a result of these effects, cost savings were postulated. Unlike in surgical patients, the effects of fish oil on infection rates were not found to be statistically significant in ICU patients, and dose-effect relationships were not established for any cohort. Thus, obvious positive secondary outcome effects with intravenous fish oil have not yet been shown to transfer to lower mortality in critically ill patients. There is a need for adequately powered, well-planned and well-conducted randomized trials to give clear recommendations on the individual utility and dosage of intravenous omega-3 fatty acids in critical illness. PMID:25471809

  20. Impact of meteorological variation on hospital visits of patients with tree pollen allergy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Climate change could affect allergic diseases, especially due to pollen. However, there has been no epidemiologic study to demonstrate the relationship between meteorological factors, pollen, and allergic patients. We aimed to investigate the association between meteorological variations and hospital visits of patients with tree pollen allergy. Methods The study subjects were adult patients who received skin prick tests between April and July from 1999 to 2008. We reviewed the medical records for the test results of 4,715 patients. Patients with tree pollen allergy were defined as those sensitized to more than 1 of 12 tree pollen allergens. We used monthly means of airborne tree pollen counts and meteorological factors: maximum/average/minimum temperature, relative humidity, and precipitation. We analyzed the correlations between meteorological variations, tree pollen counts, and the patient numbers. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the associations between meteorological factors and hospital visits of patients. Results The minimum temperature in March was significantly and positively correlated with tree pollen counts in March/April and patient numbers from April through July. Pollen counts in March/April were also correlated with patient numbers from April through July. After adjusting for confounders, including air pollutants, there was a positive association between the minimum temperature in March and hospital visits of patients with tree pollen allergy from April to July(odds ratio, 1.14; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.25). Conclusions Higher temperatures could increase tree pollen counts, affecting the symptoms of patients with tree pollen allergy, thereby increasing the number of patients visiting hospitals. PMID:22115497

  1. Attitudes toward psychopharmacology among hospitalized patients from diverse ethno-cultural backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Thorens, Gabriel; Gex-Fabry, Marianne; Zullino, Daniele F; Eytan, Ariel

    2008-01-01

    Background Biological factors influencing individual response to drugs are being extensively studied in psychiatry. Strikingly, there are few studies addressing social and cultural differences in attitudes toward psychotropic medications. The objective of this study was to investigate ethno-culturally determined beliefs, expectations and attitudes toward medication among a sample of hospitalized psychiatric patients. Methods An ad hoc questionnaire was designed to assess patients' expectations, attitudes and prejudice toward medication. The study included 100 adult patients hospitalized in Geneva, Switzerland. Results Patients were in majority male (63%), originated from Switzerland (54%) and spoke the local language fluently (93%). They took on the average 3 different psychotropic drugs. Sixty-eight percent of patients expected side effects and 60% were ready to stop medication because of them. Thirty percent of patients expected negative personal changes with treatment and 34% thought that their mental disorder could have been treated without drugs. Thirty six percent of the sample used alternative or complementary medicines. 35% of immigrant patients believed that medication had different effects on them than on local patients. When compared with Swiss patients, they more often reported that significant others had an opinion about medication (p = 0.041) and more frequently valued information provided by other patients about treatment (p = 0.010). Conclusion Patients' attitudes toward medication should be investigated in clinical practice, as specific expectations and prejudice exist. Targeted interventions, especially for immigrant patients, might improve adherence. PMID:18613960

  2. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dae-Hee; Kim, Youn-Jung; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Lim, Ju Yong; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) may be considered as a rescue therapy for patients with refractory cardiac arrest. Identifying patients who might benefit from this potential life-saving procedure is crucial for implementation of ECPR. The objective of this study was to estimate the number of patients who fulfilled a hypothetical set of ECPR criteria and to evaluate the outcome of ECPR candidates treated with conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Methods We performed an observational study using data from a prospective registry of consecutive adults (≥18 years) with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a tertiary hospital between January 2011 and December 2015. We developed a hypothetical set of ECPR criteria including age ≤75 years, witnessed cardiac arrest, no-flow time ≤5 minutes, low-flow time ≤30 minutes, refractory arrest at emergency department >10 minutes, and no exclusion criteria. The primary endpoint was the proportion of good neurologic outcome of ECPR-eligible patients. Results Of 568 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases, 60 cases (10.6%) fulfilled our ECPR criteria. ECPR was performed for 10 of 60 ECPR-eligible patients (16.7%). Three of the 10 patients with ECPR (30.0%), but only 2 of the other 50 patients without ECPR (4.0%) had a good neurologic outcome at 1 month. Conclusion ECPR implementation might be a rescue option for increasing the probability of survival in potentially hopeless but ECPR-eligible patients.

  3. Improving handwashing in hospitals: a patient education and empowerment program.

    PubMed

    McGuckin, M

    2001-11-01

    Each year, about 5% of people admitted to U.S. hospitals (about 2 million people) acquire an infection there. These infections cause nearly 20,000 deaths each year, and cost an estimated $4.5 billion to treat. Handwashing is the single most effective measure for preventing hospital-acquired infections. Despite widespread knowledge of the importance of handwashing, health care workers wash their hands far less often than is indicated. This Issue Brief describes a novel strategy to improve handwashing among hospital personnel, by involving the people with the most to gain--the patients themselves.

  4. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  5. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  6. Adult Native Septic Arthritis in an Inner City Hospital: Effects on Length of Stay.

    PubMed

    Daynes, Jacob; Roth, Matthew F; Zekaj, Mark; Hudson, Ian; Pearson, Claire; Vaidya, Rahul

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to assess what factors affected length of stay (LOS) in 183 adult patients with native septic arthritis. Diagnosis was based on a representative physical examination, fluid cell count/Gram stain, and organisms isolated from joint fluid culture. Data included demographics, comorbidities, laboratory results, treatment, and discharge times. Joint fluid cultures were positive in 55% (100 of 183) of the patients, and these patients were the subjects of this study. Blood cultures were taken for 65 patients and were positive in 54%; when positive, they were found to be the same as isolates from joint fluid analysis 91% of the time. Pathogens found in joint fluid analysis were as follows: methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), 44%; methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA), 21%; Streptococcus species, 14%; Pseudomonas, 10%; and other organisms, 11%. Surgical washout less than 24 hours from diagnosis affected LOS (12.25 vs 16.96 days for >24 hours; P<.05), but pathogen type and comorbid conditions did not. Average time for culture sensitivities was 4±1 days. Almost half of the patients had MSSA. Delays that could be controlled were getting an early diagnosis and expedient surgical washout of the joint. A lack of insurance and a requirement of intravenous antibiotics prolonged stay, whereas age, sex, and ethnicity did not. Waiting for bacterial sensitivities was a factor that could not be controlled. The authors believe that polymerase chain reaction or other technologies could lead to early diagnosis and expedient surgery. Effective oral antibiotics against resistant organisms would help the patients leave the hospital earlier. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e674-e679.].

  7. Impact of Hospital Volume on Outcomes of Endovascular Stenting for Adult Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Parth; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Patel, Achint; Sonani, Rajesh; Patel, Aashay; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Thakkar, Badal; Savani, Chirag; Jhamnani, Sunny; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nish; Pant, Sadip; Patel, Samir; Arora, Shilpkumar; Dave, Abhishek; Singh, Vikas; Chothani, Ankit; Patel, Jay; Ansari, Mohammad; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Bhimani, Ronak; Grines, Cindy; Cleman, Michael; Mangi, Abeel; Forrest, John K; Badheka, Apurva O

    2015-11-01

    Use of transcatheter endovascular stenting has been increasing in the treatment of coarctation of aorta (CoA). The present study was undertaken on adults with CoA who underwent stent placement from 2000 to 2011 to analyze the relation of hospital volumes to the outcomes of stenting in adults with CoA. It was a retrospective study based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2000 to 2011 and identified subjects using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure code of 747.10 (CoA). Annual hospital volume was calculated using unique hospital identifiers. Weights provided by the Nationwide Inpatient Sample were used to generate national estimates. A total of 105 (weighted 521) subjects were identified with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code of 39.90 (Endovascular stent). Hospital volumes were divided into tertiles. We compared the highest tertile (≥3 procedures annually) with other tertiles (<3 procedure annually). The composite outcomes of the analysis were procedure-related complications, length of stay (LOS), and cost in relation to the hospital volume. No inhospital death was reported in either group. Hospitals with ≥3 procedures annually had significantly lower incidence of complications (9.5% vs 23.0%) compared to the hospitals with <3 procedures annually (p-value 0.002). Similar results were obtained after multivariate regression analysis in relation to hospital volume. Shorter LOS and lower cost were observed with annual hospital volume of ≥3 procedures. In conclusion, stenting adults for CoA is remarkably safe, and the outcomes of the procedure have improved in centers with annual hospital volume of ≥3 procedures. There is also decreasing trend of procedure-related complications, shorter LOS, and lower costs compared to centers with annual volume <3 procedures.

  8. Impact of Hospital Volume on Outcomes of Endovascular Stenting for Adult Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Parth; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Patel, Achint; Sonani, Rajesh; Patel, Aashay; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Thakkar, Badal; Savani, Chirag; Jhamnani, Sunny; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nish; Pant, Sadip; Patel, Samir; Arora, Shilpkumar; Dave, Abhishek; Singh, Vikas; Chothani, Ankit; Patel, Jay; Ansari, Mohammad; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Bhimani, Ronak; Grines, Cindy; Cleman, Michael; Mangi, Abeel; Forrest, John K; Badheka, Apurva O

    2015-11-01

    Use of transcatheter endovascular stenting has been increasing in the treatment of coarctation of aorta (CoA). The present study was undertaken on adults with CoA who underwent stent placement from 2000 to 2011 to analyze the relation of hospital volumes to the outcomes of stenting in adults with CoA. It was a retrospective study based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2000 to 2011 and identified subjects using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure code of 747.10 (CoA). Annual hospital volume was calculated using unique hospital identifiers. Weights provided by the Nationwide Inpatient Sample were used to generate national estimates. A total of 105 (weighted 521) subjects were identified with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code of 39.90 (Endovascular stent). Hospital volumes were divided into tertiles. We compared the highest tertile (≥3 procedures annually) with other tertiles (<3 procedure annually). The composite outcomes of the analysis were procedure-related complications, length of stay (LOS), and cost in relation to the hospital volume. No inhospital death was reported in either group. Hospitals with ≥3 procedures annually had significantly lower incidence of complications (9.5% vs 23.0%) compared to the hospitals with <3 procedures annually (p-value 0.002). Similar results were obtained after multivariate regression analysis in relation to hospital volume. Shorter LOS and lower cost were observed with annual hospital volume of ≥3 procedures. In conclusion, stenting adults for CoA is remarkably safe, and the outcomes of the procedure have improved in centers with annual hospital volume of ≥3 procedures. There is also decreasing trend of procedure-related complications, shorter LOS, and lower costs compared to centers with annual volume <3 procedures. PMID:26471501

  9. Clinical outcomes of dialysis-treated acute kidney injury patients at the university of port harcourt teaching hospital, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Emem-Chioma, Pedro Chimezie; Alasia, Datonye Dennis; Wokoma, Friday Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acute kidney injury in adults is a common cause of hospitalization, associated with high morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries. In spite of RRT the in-hospital mortality rates remain high even in the developed countries. Though a proportion of our patients receive renal replacement therapy as part of their management, data on outcomes are sparse. Study Objective. To determine the clinical outcomes of dialysis-treated AKI in our hospital. Methods. A retrospective analysis of the clinical data of all adult AKI patients treated with haemodialysis at the University of Teaching Hospital during an interrupted six-year period was conducted. Analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0. Results. 34 males and 28 females with mean age of 41.3 ± 18.5 years were studied. The leading causes of AKI were sepsis (22.7%), acute glomerulonephritis (20.5%), acute gastroenteritis (15.9%), and toxic nephropathies (11.4%) and presented with mean e-GFR of 14.7 ± 5.8 mls/min/1.73 m(2). Of the 62 patients, 29 (46.8%) were discharged from the hospital, 27 (43.5%) died in hospital, while 6 (9.7%) absconded from treatment. Survivors had better Rifle grade than those who died (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Hospital mortality rate of dialysis-treated AKI patients is high and the severity of renal damage at presentation may be an important factor.

  10. Hospitalization and the composition of mental patients' social networks.

    PubMed

    Holmes-Eber, P; Riger, S

    1990-01-01

    Social networks of 310 chronically mentally ill patients in Chicago-area State mental hospitals were examined to assess the relationship between the number of hospitalizations and network size and composition. As the number and length of admissions increases, although network size remains stable, there are fewer relatives and friends in the network. The networks of patients with frequent admissions are composed primarily of people met through the mental health system and those known for a short time. These differences are neither related to diagnosis nor to severity of mental illness. The results suggest that the process of hospitalization is related to patients' sources of social support. Implications for readmissions are discussed. PMID:2333476

  11. High incidence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism in Thai hospitalized medical patients without thromboprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Aniwan, Satimai; Rojnuckarin, Ponlapat

    2010-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common preventable cause of mortality during hospitalization. However, prophylaxis is frequently under-utilized due to the belief that it is rare in Asia. The objective of the study was to estimate the incidence of symptomatic VTE in hospitalized nonsurgical Thai patients. We performed a prospective study in medical wards in Chulalongkorn Hospital, a tertiary care university-based center, from June 2007 to December 2008. We included adult patients admitted beyond 3 days. Patients with VTE before admissions or undergoing major surgery during hospitalization were excluded. According to the usual practice, heparin prophylaxis was not given. However, the program of primary physician education and fast-track diagnostic imaging were implemented. Forty-two VTEs from 7126 susceptible patients [0.59%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-0.77%] were found; 20 (48%) definite pulmonary embolism, four of which also had symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), 19 (45%) definite DVT and three sudden deaths from possible pulmonary embolism. Immobilization (74%), active cancer (52%) and rheumatologic diseases (12%), including arthritis of lower extremities and systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid, were common VTE risk factors, which were present in our patients. The incidences in total cases of arthritis, cancer, mechanical ventilation and congestive heart failure were 7.7, 1.8, 1.5 and 0.5%, respectively. Notably, nine of 23 (39%) pulmonary embolism cases were fatal and two more patients (9.5%) expired from bleeding after treatment (one pulmonary embolism and one DVT). In conclusion, VTE contributes significant hazard to hospitalized nonsurgical Thai patients. Appropriate measures to assure proper thromboprophylaxis in high-risk patients are strongly needed.

  12. [Hospital-acquired anemia and decrease of hemoglobin levels in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Gianserra, Carina V; Agüero, Andrés P; Chapelet, Adrián G; Paradiso, Bruno; Spanevello, Valeria A; Del Pino, María A

    2011-01-01

    It is common to observe the development of anemia in hospitalized patients, especially in critical cases. Few studies have evaluated its prevalence and associated factors in patients in the general ward. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence, characteristics and associated clinical factors of hospital-acquired anemia and the drop of hemoglobin concentration in hospitalized patients. This is a cross-sectional, prospective and descriptive study. A total of 192 consecutive in-patients in the general ward were studied. Associated risk factors to the drop in hemoglobin by ≥ 2g/dl were analyzed; 139 patients (72.4%) presented anemia; 89 of them (46.4%) had it at admission and 50 (26%) developed hospital-acquired anemia, 47 out of 192 showed a drop in hemoglobin ≥ 2 g/dl(24.48%). They also presented lower values of hematocrite and hemoglobin at discharge (p = 0.01), parenteral hydration at a higher volume (p = 0.01), and lengthier hospitalizations (p = 0.0001). In the univariate analysis, the following variables were statistically significant risk factors: leukocytosis ≥ 11000 mm3 (OR; IC95%: 2,02; 1.03-4; p = 0.01), hospitalization days ≥ 7 (OR; IC95%:3.39; 1.62-7.09; p = 0.0006), parenteral hydration ≥ 1500 ml/day (OR; IC95%: 2.47; 1.06-6.4; p = 0.01), central venous access (OR; IC95%:10.29; 1.75-108.07; p = 0.003) and hospital-acquired anemia (OR; IC95%: 7.06; 3.41-15.83; p = 0.00000004). In the multivariate analysis, the following variables were independent predictive factors of the hemoglobin decrease = 2 g/dl: leukocytosis ≥ 11000 mm3 (OR; IC95%: 2.45; 1.14-5,27; p = 0.02), hospitalization days ≥ 7 (OR; IC95%:5.15; 2.19-12.07; p = 0.0002), parenteral hydration ≥ 1500 ml/day (OR; IC95%: 2.95; 1.13-7.72; p = 0.02), central venous access (OR; IC95%:8.82; 1.37-56.82; p = 0.02). Hospital-acquired anemia has a high prevalence. Lengthier stays, presence of leukocytosis, parenteral hydration and central venous access placement are

  13. Nursing-sensitive outcome change scores for hospitalized older adults with heart failure: a preliminary descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyejin

    2013-10-01

    Nursing has a social mandate to ensure effective practice within its domain and to be accountable for the outcomes of nursing care. Using standardized nursing terminologies makes it possible to measure aspects of nursing care. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a significant difference in outcome ratings exists from admission to discharge for hospitalized older adults with heart failure (HF) using Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC). A retrospective descriptive research design was used. Data were obtained from 268 inpatient records of patients discharged with HF during a 1-year period. All top 10 NOC outcomes demonstrated statistically significant improvement in outcome ratings from admission to discharge. Findings from this study provide insight on the possible contribution of nursing to outcomes of hospitalized older adults with HF. Validating and incorporating nursing-sensitive outcome measures in future prospective experimental research can contribute to the advancement of science regarding effective treatment of older adults hospitalized with HF, while highlighting the contribution of nursing care to outcomes.

  14. Patient- and Hospital-Level Determinants of Rehabilitation for In-Patient Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsung-Tai; Chen, Chia-Pei; Kuang, Shao-Hua; Wang, Vinchi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During acute stroke care, rehabilitation usage may be influenced by patient- and hospital-related factors. We would like to identify patient- and hospital-level determinants of population-level inpatient rehabilitation usage associated with acute stroke care. From data obtained from the claim information from the National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) in Taiwan (2009–2011), we enrolled 82,886 stroke patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction from 207 hospitals. A generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) analyses with patient-level factors specified as random effects were conducted (for cross-level interactions). The rate of rehabilitation usage was 51% during acute stroke care. The hospital-related factors accounted for a significant amount of variability (intraclass correlation, 50%). Hospital type was the only significant hospital-level variable and can explain the large amount of variability (58%). Patients treated in smaller hospitals experienced few benefits of rehabilitation services, and those with surgery in a smaller hospital used fewer rehabilitation services. All patient-level variables were significant. With GLMM analyses, we identified the hospital type and its cross-level interaction, and explained a large portion of variability in rehabilitation for stroke patients in Taiwan. PMID:27175671

  15. [Suicide in hospitalized patients and medical liability].

    PubMed

    Santander, Jaime; Brokering, Walter; Ramos, Paulina; Arenas, Ángela

    2015-04-01

    Suicide is a complex phenomenon that has accompanied human beings throughout history. Its strong association with mental disorders led to its medicalization and psychiatrists became the physicians in charge of diagnosing and treating patients at risk of suicide. This article discusses the potential limitations that psychiatrists may face when diagnosing suicide risk and providing optimal care. Evidence of the eventual inevitability of suicide and the tension that may arise between providing optimal treatments on the one hand and preserving the rights of patient's autonomy and dignity on the other is also presented. We propose that although diagnosing and adequately treating patients at risk of suicide would be the psychiatrist's responsibility, the act of suicide itself is personal and non-transferable. Considering the latter as part of the medical team's responsibilities would turn working with patients with mental disorders into a fearless act. Finally, suicide should be considered to be part of the natural history of the evolution of many mental disorders and, thus, should constitute a specific topic when training specialists.

  16. Strategies for the Care of Adults Hospitalized for Active Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pola, Suresh; Patel, Derek; Ramamoorthy, Sonia; McLemore, Elisabeth; Fahmy, Marianne; Rivera-Nieves, Jesus; Chang, John T; Evans, Elisabeth; Docherty, Michael; Talamini, Mark; Sandborn, William J

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon; as many as 25% of patients with this disease require hospitalization. The goals of hospitalization are to assess disease severity, exclude infection, administer rapidly acting and highly effective medication regimens, and determine response. During the hospitalization, patients should be given venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and monitored for development of toxic megacolon. Patients who do not respond to intravenous corticosteroids should be considered for rescue therapy with infliximab or cyclosporine. Patients who are refractory to medical therapies or who develop toxic megacolon should be evaluated promptly for colectomy. Patients who do respond to medical therapies should be discharged on an appropriate maintenance regimen when they meet discharge criteria. We review practical evidence-based management principles and propose a day-by-day algorithm for managing patients hospitalized for ulcerative colitis. PMID:22835577

  17. Physician Alerts to Prevent Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gregory; Rosenbaum, Erin J.; Pendergast, William; Jacobson, Joseph O.; Pendleton, Robert C.; McLaren, Gordon D.; Elliott, C. Gregory; Stevens, Scott M.; Patton, William F.; Dabbagh, Ousama; Paterno, Marilyn D.; Catapane, Elaine; Li, Zhongzhen; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis remains underutilized among hospitalized patients. We designed and carried out a large multicenter randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that an alert from a hospital staff member to the Attending Physician will reduce the rate of symptomatic VTE among high-risk patients not receiving prophylaxis. Methods and Results We enrolled patients using a validated point score system to detect hospitalized patients at high risk for symptomatic VTE who were not receiving prophylaxis. 2,493 patients (82% on Medical Services) from 25 study sites were randomized to the intervention group (n=1,238), in which the responsible physician was alerted by another hospital staff member, versus the control group (n=1,255), in which no alert was issued. The primary end point was symptomatic, objectively confirmed VTE within 90 days. Patients whose physicians were alerted were more than twice as likely to receive VTE prophylaxis as controls (46.0% versus 20.6%, p<0.0001). The symptomatic VTE rate was lower in the intervention group (2.7% versus 3.4%; hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.50 to 1.25), but the difference did not achieve statistical significance. The rate of major bleeding at 30 days in the alert group was similar to the control group (2.1% versus 2.3%, p=0.68). Conclusions A strategy of direct staff member to physician notification increases prophylaxis utilization and leads toward reducing the rate of symptomatic VTE in hospitalized patients. However, VTE prophylaxis continues to be underutilized even after physician notification, especially among Medical Service patients. PMID:19364975

  18. Appropriateness of hospitalization for CAP-affected pediatric patients: report from a Southern Italy General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Fabio; De Brasi, Daniele; Siani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease, responsible for significant healthcare expenditures, mostly because of hospitalization. Many practice guidelines on CAP have been developed, including admission criteria, but a few on appropriate hospitalization in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate appropriate hospital admission for CAP in a pediatric population. Methods We evaluated appropriate admission to a Pediatric Unit performing a retrospective analysis on CAP admitted pediatric patients from a Southern Italy area. Diagnosis was made based on clinical and radiological signs. Appropriate hospital admission was evaluated following clinical and non-clinical international criteria. Family ability to care children was assessed by evaluating social deprivation status. Results In 2 winter seasons 120 pediatric patients aged 1-129 months were admitted because of CAP. Median age was 28.7 months. Raised body temperature was scored in 68.3% of patients, cough was present in 100% of cases, and abdominal pain was rarely evidenced. Inflammatory indices (ESR and CRP) were found elevated in 33.3% of cases. Anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibodies were found positive in 20.4%. Trans-cutaneous (TC) SaO2 was found lower than 92% in 14.6%. Dyspnoea was present in 43.3%. Dehydration requiring i.v. fluid supplementation was scored in 13.3%. Evaluation of familial ability to care their children revealed that 76% of families (derived from socially depressed areas) were "at social risk", thus not able to appropriately care their children. Furthermore, analysis of CAP patients revealed that "at social risk" people accessed E.D. and were hospitalized more frequently than "not at risk" patients (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% CI: 1,15 to 11,12; p = 0.01), and that admitted "at social risk" people presented without clinical signs of severity (namely dyspnoea, and/or SaO2 ≤ 92%, and/or dehydration) more frequently than "not at risk" population (p = 0.005). Conclusion

  19. STRESS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS--THE EFFECT OF PROLONGED HOSPITALIZATION.

    PubMed

    Mîndru, Dana Elena; Stănescu, Ralnca Stefania; Mioara, Calipsoana Matei; Duceac, Letiţia Doina; Rugina, Aurica; Temneanu, Oana Raluca; Ungureanu, Monica; Florescu, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Long-term hospitalization emotionally impacts any patient, especially children, and is defined as a long period of time during which the patient is hospitalized and experiences isolation from his or her family, friends and home. Stressful situations trigger a nonspecific response that involves multiple physiological mechanisms. Currently, because of the complexity of these mechanisms, there are no laboratory markers that allow the quantification of the stress intensity felt by the patient. Laboratory determinations currently used in evaluating the response to stress are neuroendocrine, immunological and metabolic. The neuroendocrine system is the first to respond to stressful events. Stress stimulates the hypothalamus, leading to the release of CRH, which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce ACTH. Chronic stress directs the synthesis towards cortisol, which may lead to hypo secretion of the other adrenal steroid hormones. The hospital and the disease are stressors for children and caregivers, since stress can interfere with the normal development of young patients, affecting them in the long term. Admitting a child to hospital means interrupting his or her normal daily life and changing the environment that is familiar to him or her. Therefore, the involvement of the family doctor is very important, as many conditions can be solved by visiting his or her office and thus eliminating the need for hospitalization in a pediatric hospital. If, however, the nature of the condition requires that the child should be seen by a pediatrician, the period of hospitalization should not be much extended so as to prevent the appearance of other possible problems that might influence the child's state. PMID:27483728

  20. Incidence of Hospitalized Pneumococcal Pneumonia among Adults in Guatemala, 2008-2012

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Carmen Lucía; Verani, Jennifer R.; Lopez, María Renee; Paredes, Antonio; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Roldan, Aleida; Arvelo, Wences; Lindblade, Kim A.; McCracken, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of pneumonia worldwide. However, the burden of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults in low- and middle-income countries is not well described. Methods Data from 2008–2012 was analyzed from two surveillance sites in Guatemala to describe the incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia in adults. A case of hospitalized pneumococcal pneumonia was defined as a positive pneumococcal urinary antigen test or blood culture in persons aged ≥ 18 years hospitalized with an acute respiratory infection (ARI). Results Among 1595 adults admitted with ARI, 1363 (82%) had either urine testing (n = 1286) or blood culture (n = 338) performed. Of these, 188 (14%) had pneumococcal pneumonia, including 173 detected by urine only, 8 by blood culture only, and 7 by both methods. Incidence rates increased with age, with the lowest rate among 18–24 year-olds (2.75/100,000) and the highest among ≥65 year-olds (31.3/100,000). The adjusted incidence of hospitalized pneumococcal pneumonia was 18.6/100,000 overall, with in-hospital mortality of 5%. Conclusions An important burden of hospitalized pneumococcal pneumonia in adults was described, particularly for the elderly. However, even adjusted rates likely underestimate the true burden of pneumococcal pneumonia in the community. These data provide a baseline against which to measure the indirect effects of the 2013 introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in children in Guatemala. PMID:26488871

  1. Across US Hospitals, Black Patients Report Comparable Or Better Experiences Than White Patients.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, José F; Zheng, Jie; Orav, E John; Jha, Ashish K

    2016-08-01

    Patient-reported experience is a critical part of measuring health care quality. There are limited data on racial differences in patient experience. Using patient-level data for 2009-10 from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS), we compared blacks' and whites' responses on measures of overall hospital rating, communication, clinical processes, and hospital environment. In unadjusted results, there were no substantive differences between blacks' and whites' ratings of hospitals. Blacks were less likely to recommend hospitals but reported more positive experiences, compared to whites. Higher educational attainment and self-reported worse health status were associated with more negative evaluations in both races. Additionally, blacks rated minority-serving hospitals worse than other hospitals on all HCAHPS measures. Taken together, there were surprisingly few meaningful differences in patient experience between blacks and whites across US hospitals. Although blacks tend to receive care at worse-performing hospitals, compared to whites, within any given hospital black patients tend to report better experience than whites do. PMID:27503962

  2. Evaluation of a Collaborative Care Model for Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    McKay, Cheryl; Wieck, K Lynn

    2014-01-01

    The current lack of collaborative care is contributing to higher mortality rates and longer hospital stays in the United States. A method for improving collaboration among health professionals for patients with congestive heart failure, the Clinical Integration Model (CIM), was implemented. The CIM utilized a process tool called the CareGraph to prioritize care for the interdisciplinary team. The CareGraph was used to focus communication and treatment strategies of health professionals on the patient rather than the discipline or specific task. Hospitals who used the collaborative model demonstrated shorter lengths of stay and cost per case.

  3. [Patient safety culture in hospitals: experiences in planning, organising and conducting a survey among hospital staff].

    PubMed

    van Vegten, Amanda; Pfeiffer, Yvonne; Giuliani, Francesca; Manser, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the first hospital-wide survey on patient safety climate, involving all staff (medical and non-medical), in the German-speaking area. Its aim is to share our experiences with planning, organising and conducting this survey. The study was performed at the university hospital in Zurich and had a response rate of 46.8% (2,897 valid questionnaires). The survey instrument ("Patientensicherheitsklimainventar") was based on the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (AHRQ). Primarily it allowed for assessing the current patient safety climate as well as identifying specific areas for improvement and creating a hospital-wide awareness and acceptance for patient safety issues and interventions (e.g., the introduction of a Critical Incident Reporting System [CIRS]). We discuss the basic principles and the feedback concept guiding the organisation of the overall project. Critical to the success of this project were the guaranteed anonymity of the respondents, adequate communication through well-established channels within the organisation and the commitment of the management across all project phases.

  4. [Staff-patient meetings at the psychiatric unit of a university hospital center].

    PubMed

    Gelin, E; Havet, J M; Wargny-Citti, E; Lesage, V; Pascalis, G

    1987-10-01

    Staff/patients meetings have been held for 10 years within a mental teaching hospital for adults. The meeting was initiated by a clinical psychologist still in charge of it. The patients have developed the following themes: (i) entrance conditions, (ii) everyday life information, (iii) inconveniences, (iv) mental illness, (v) the exclusion process. The least severely affected patients will exclude the other ones on ground of insanity. Yet all patients consider themselves banned from society, and even feel rejected by the stall at times. The meeting is meant as a regular talk scène. Individual or collective conflicts arising between the patients can be settled there. Patient passivity may also be counteracted. Staff seminar should work up clearly the data provided by the meeting.

  5. [Protein-energy malnutrition as a consequence of the hospitalization of gastroenterologic patients].

    PubMed

    Papini-Berto, S J; Dichi, J B; Dichi, I; Victória, C R; Burini, R C

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the clinical and dietetics in patient managements on the protein-energy status of hospitalized patients were retrospectively (four yr) investigated in 243 adult (49 +/- 16 yr), male (168) and female (75) patients suffering from chronic liver diseases (42%), intestinal diseases with diarrhea (14%), digestive cancers (11%), chronic pancreatitis (10%), stomach and duodenum diseases (7%), acute pancreatitis (7%), primary protein-energy malnutrition (3%), esophagus diseases (3%), intestinal diseases with constipation 14 (2%) and chronic alcoholism (2%). The protein-energy nutritional status assessed by combinations of anthropometric and blood parameters showed 75% of protein energy malnutrition at the hospital entry mostly (4/5) in severe and moderate grades. The overall average of hospitalization was 20 +/- 15 days being the shortest (13 +/- 5,7 days) for esophagus diseases and the longest (28 +/- 21 days) for the intestinal diseases with diarrhea patients which also received mostly (42%) of the enteral and/or parenteral feedings followed by acute pacreatitis (41%) and digestive cancers (31%) patients. When compared to the entry the protein-energy malnutrition rate at the discharge decreased only 5% despite the increasing of 30% found on the protein-energy intake. The main improvement of the protein-energy nutritional status were attained to those patients showing protein-energy malnutrition milder degrees at the entry which belonged mostly to primary protein-energy malnutrition, acute pancreatitis and intestinal diseases with diarrhea diseases. The later two groups showed protein-energy nutritional status improvement only after the second week of hospitalization. The digestive cancers patients had their protein-energy nutritional status worsened throughout the hospitalization whereas it happened only in the first week for the intestinal diseases with diarrhea and chronic liver diseases patients, improving thereafter up to the discharge. The protein

  6. Clostridium Difficile Infection Worsen Outcome of Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Lin, Qian-Yun; Fei, Jia-Xi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Min-Yi; Jiang, Shuang-Hong; Wang, Pu; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased rapidly over the past several decades in North America and Europe. However, the exact global epidemiology remains unclear because of insufficient data from developing countries. A total of 646 hospitalized adult IBD patients were enrolled; and their fresh stool specimens were obtained and used for Clostridium difficile detection. The incidence of CDI in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients (12.7%) was significantly lower than that in Ulcerative disease (UC) patients (19.3%). Among the toxin types, A+B+ strain was the most common. Length of stay, hospitalization frequency and bowel surgery rate were significantly higher in the CDI than in the non-CDI group in CD or UC patients. More patients in CDI-CD group were still in active and even clinical moderate or severe CD stage than non-CDI-CD group after 2 years of following-up. Fistula, antibiotics and infliximab usage likely increased the CDI rate in CD patients, Infliximab treatment was considered a risk factor in UC patients. CDI is an exacerbating public health issue that may influence IBD course, increase expenditures, and delay the remission of IBD patients. IBD patients with CDI require urgent attention. PMID:27417996

  7. Working with families of hospitalized older adults with dementia: caregivers are useful resources and should be part of the care team.

    PubMed

    Bradway, Christine; Hirschman, Karen B

    2008-10-01

    Families provide a considerable amount of informal care and support for older adults living with dementia. And when an older adult with dementia is hospitalized, family caregivers should be seen as important sources of information and included as valuable members of the health care team. This article describes a best-practice approach to working with families and includes recommendations for using the Information for the Hospital Team About a Patient with Memory Problems form. For a free online video demonstrating the use of this form, go to http://links.lww.com/A301.

  8. Detention of 'psychopathic disorder' patients in special hospitals. Critical issues.

    PubMed

    Grounds, A T

    1987-10-01

    The detention of offenders in the legal category 'psychopathic disorder' in special hospitals for treatment raises a number of critical issues. There are doubts about the nature of the disorder; what constitutes treatment; who is 'treatable'; the effectiveness of treatment; and whether evidence of psychological change implies reduced risk of reoffending. In view of these uncertainties, it is argued that indeterminate hospital orders may provide an unrealistic and unjust legal framework for treating 'psychopaths' in special hospitals, and the use of powers under the Mental Health Act to transfer such patients to hospital during the course of prison sentences is a more appropriate alternative. This provision could be used more frequently, subject to improved safeguards of the right of release at the expiry of sentence.

  9. Carboplatin dosing for adult Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yuichi; Shimokata, Tomoya; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-02-01

    Carboplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug that has been long used to treat many types of solid cancer. Because the clearance of carboplatin strongly correlates with the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), its dosage is calculated with the Calvert formula on the basis of the patient's GFR to achieve the target area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve (AUC) for each patient. However, many lines of evidence from previous clinical studies should be interpreted with caution because different methods were used to estimate drug clearance and derive the dosage of carboplatin. There is a particularly high risk of carboplatin overdosing when the dosage is determined on the basis of standardized serum creatinine values. When deciding the dose of carboplatin for adult Japanese patients, preferred methods to assess renal function instead of directly measuring GFR include (1) 24-h urinary collection-based creatinine clearance adjusted by adding 0.2 mg/dl to the serum creatinine concentration measured by standardized methods, and (2) equation-based GFR (eGFR) with a back calculation to units of ml/min per subject. Given the limitations of serum creatinine-based GFR estimations, the GFR or creatinine clearance should be directly measured in each patient whenever possible. To ensure patient safety and facilitate a medical-team approach, the single most appropriate method available at each institute or medical team should be consistently used to calculate the dose of carboplatin with the Calvert formula.

  10. Management of the hospitalized patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Carlos E; Umpierrez, Guillermo

    2013-08-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have minimal to absent pancreatic β-cell function and rely on the exogenous delivery of insulin to obtain adequate and life-sustaining glucose homeostasis. Maintaining glycemic control is challenging in hospitalized patients with T1DM, as insulin requirements are influenced by the presence of acute medical or surgical conditions, as well as altered nutritional intake. The risks of hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability are increased in hospitalized patients with T1DM. Diabetic ketoacidosis and severe hypoglycemia are the 2 most common emergency conditions that account for the majority of hospital admissions in patients with T1DM. The association between hyperglycemia and increased risk of complications and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is well established; however, the impact of glycemic control on clinical outcomes has not been determined in patients with T1DM who present without ketoacidosis. To decrease complications associated with insulin therapy, health care professionals must be well versed in the use of insulin because it is a common source of medication error. For non-critically ill, hospitalized patients, subcutaneous insulin given to cover basal and prandial needs instead of sliding scale is the preferred method of insulin dosing. Protocols are available for initiating and titrating insulin doses, as well as for transitioning from an insulin infusion to a subcutaneous regimen. In our review, we identify and discuss special considerations related to inpatient glycemic control of non-ketotic patients with T1DM. Additionally, point differences and similarities associated with the management of patients with T2DM are discussed.

  11. Modalities of palliative care in hospitalized patients with advanced AIDS.

    PubMed

    Vincent, I; D'Hérouville, D; Moulin, P; Bugler, C; Fraval, J; Mallet, D; Salamagne, M H; Vildé, J L; Jodelet, D; Leport, C

    2000-04-01

    This prospective multidisciplinary survey started in October 1994. The survey assessed the modalities of care of hospitalized patients with advanced AIDS in an Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit with regards to the practices of palliative care in a Palliative Care Unit. Seventy-eight (78) AIDS patients with CD4 < or = 30/mm3 who had 102 consecutive hospitalizations were recruited. Types (symptomatic or curative) and number of drugs administered to the patients, as well as biological and radiological investigations performed were recorded. Symptoms were concomitantly assessed on a weekly basis by self-evaluation of the patients themselves and by physicians. The results showed that the practices of care were different in the two units according to the specific goals and norms of each unit. A higher density of care was delivered at the Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit. Symptoms assessed by both patients and physicians were underestimated by physicians in frequency and in intensity. In conclusion, an integrated approach including objective and subjective criteria should enable a better adjustment of the palliative and curative therapeutic strategies in advanced AIDS. These would concomitantly take into account the wishes of the patient and the goals regarding care in the unit where the patient is hospitalized.

  12. Histopathological Characteristics of Distal Middle Cerebral Artery in Adult and Pediatric Patients with Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    TAKAGI, Yasushi; HERMANTO, Yulius; TAKAHASHI, Jun C; FUNAKI, Takeshi; KIKUCHI, Takayuki; MINEHARU, Yohei; YOSHIDA, Kazumichi; MIYAMOTO, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a unique progressive steno-occlusive disease of the distal ends of bilateral internal arteries and their proximal branches. The difference in clinical symptoms between adult and children MMD patients has been well recognized. In this study, we sought to investigate the phenomenon through histopathological study. Fifty-one patients underwent surgical procedures for treatment of standard indications of MMD at Kyoto University Hospital. Fifty-nine specimens of MCA were obtained from MMD patients during the surgical procedures. Five MCA samples were also obtained in the same way from control patients. The samples were analyzed by histopathological methods. In this study, MCA specimens from MMD patients had significantly thinner media and thicker intima than control specimens. In subsequent analysis, adult (≥ 20 years) patients had thicker intima of MCA compared to pediatric (< 20 years) patients. There is no difference in internal elastic lamina pathology between adult and pediatric patients. Our results indicated that the pathological feature of MMD in tunica media occurs in both adult and pediatric patients. However, the MMD feature in tunica intima of MCA is more prominent in adult patients. Further analysis from MCA specimens and other researches are necessary to elucidate the pathophysiology of MMD. PMID:27087193

  13. Evaluation of patient wristbands and patient identification process in a training hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Canan; Celik, Yusuf; Hikmet, Neset

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the utilisation of patient wristbands (PWs) and patient identification (PI) process in a training hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Design/methodology/approach This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted in a training hospital with 640 beds, accreditied by Joint Commission International. The views of 348 patients and 419 hospital personnel on the implementation of patient wristbands and identification process were evaluated. Findings The results indicated that lack of information among patients about the importance of PWs and the misknowledge among staff participants on when, where, and by whom PWs should be put on and verified were the weakest points in this hospital. Research limitations/implications PI process must be strictly implemented according to the standard procedures of patient safety. Both patients and hospital personnel should be trained continuously, and training sessions must be held to increase their awareness about the importance of PWs and identification process. Practical implications Finding new ways and using new methods for increasing knowledge about PI and PWs are necessary. Hospital management should prepare a written PI and PW policy and procedure documents by taking the views of patients and hospital personnel and share these with them. Originality/value This study incorporates the views and attitudes of patients and health care personnel in improving health care quality by increasing awareness about PI and wristbands. PMID:27671418

  14. Atlantoaxial Rotatory Fixation in Adults Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sei Woong; Moon, Seung Myung; Choi, Sun Kil

    2009-01-01

    Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation (AARF) in adult is a rare disorder that occurs followed by a trauma. The patients were presented with painful torticollis and a typical 'cock robin' position of the head. The clinical diagnosis is generally difficult and often made in the late stage. In some cases, an irreducible or chronic fixation develops. We reported a case of AARF in adult patient which was treated by immobilization with conservative treatment. A 25-year-old female was presented with a posterior neck pain and limitation of motion of cervical spine after a traffic accident. She had no neurological deficit but suffered from severe defect on the scalp and multiple thoracic compression fractures. Plain radiographs demonstrated torticollis, lateral shift of odontoid process to one side and widening of one side of C1-C2 joint space. Immobilization with a Holter traction were performed and analgesics and muscle relaxants were given. Posterior neck pain and limitation of the cervical spine's motion were resolved. Plain cervical radiographs taken at one month after the injury showed that torticollis disappeared and the dens were in the midline position. The authors reported a case of type I post-traumatic AARF that was successfully treated by immobilization alone. PMID:19444353

  15. Predictive models for identification of hospitalized patients harboring KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tumbarello, Mario; Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Tumietto, Fabio; Del Bono, Valerio; De Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe; Bassetti, Matteo; Losito, Angela Raffaella; Tedeschi, Sara; Saffioti, Carolina; Corcione, Silvia; Giannella, Maddalena; Raffaelli, Francesca; Pagani, Nicole; Bartoletti, Michele; Spanu, Teresa; Marchese, Anna; Cauda, Roberto; Viscoli, Claudio; Viale, Pierluigi

    2014-06-01

    The production of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPCs) by Enterobacteriaceae has become a significant problem in recent years. To identify factors that could predict isolation of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae (KPCKP) in clinical samples from hospitalized patients, we conducted a retrospective, matched (1:2) case-control study in five large Italian hospitals. The case cohort consisted of adult inpatients whose hospital stay included at least one documented isolation of a KPCKP strain from a clinical specimen. For each case enrolled, we randomly selected two matched controls with no KPCKP-positive cultures of any type during their hospitalization. Matching involved hospital, ward, and month/year of admission, as well as time at risk for KPCKP isolation. A subgroup analysis was also carried out to identify risk factors specifically associated with true KPCKP infection. During the study period, KPCKP was isolated from clinical samples of 657 patients; 426 of these cases appeared to be true infections. Independent predictors of KPCKP isolation were recent admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), indwelling urinary catheter, central venous catheter (CVC), and/or surgical drain, ≥ 2 recent hospitalizations, hematological cancer, and recent fluoroquinolone and/or carbapenem therapy. A Charlson index of ≥ 3, indwelling CVC, recent surgery, neutropenia, ≥ 2 recent hospitalizations, and recent fluoroquinolone and/or carbapenem therapy were independent risk factors for KPCKP infection. Models developed to predict KPCKP isolation and KPCKP infection displayed good predictive power, with the areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curves of 0.82 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80 to 0.84) and 0.82 (95% CI, 0.80 to 0.85), respectively. This study provides novel information which might be useful for the clinical management of patients harboring KPCKP and for controlling the spread of this organism.

  16. Hospital accreditation and patient satisfaction: testing the relationship.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Albert J

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a study that examines the relationship between two principal measures of institutional healthcare quality: accreditation scores and independently measured patient-satisfaction ratings. This study involved a retrospective review and comparison of summative and selected categorical hospital accreditation scores from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and independently measured patient satisfaction ratings. A total of 41 acute care, 200-plus bed, not-for-profit hospitals in New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania were included. Correlation and multiple-regression statistical methods were employed. The results revealed no relationship between these quality indicators on a summative level and no meaningful pattern categorical relationships. This finding suggests a disassociation between these two quality indicators, thus supporting the use of a balanced scorecard approach to hospital quality management. The study also revealed certain shortcomings in these two quality indicators, relating to insufficient score variability, which should be considered by those using such data to manage quality outcomes. PMID:14763320

  17. The impact of payer-specific hospital case mix on hospital costs and revenues for third-party patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keon-Hyung; Roh, M P H Chul-Young

    2007-02-01

    Competition among hospitals and managed care have forced hospital industry to be more efficient. With higher degrees of hospital competition and managed care penetration, hospitals have argued that the rate of increase in hospital cost is greater than the rate of increase in hospital revenue. By developing a payer-specific case mix index (CMI) for third-party patients, this paper examined the effect of hospital case mix on hospital cost and revenue for third-party patients in California using the hospital financial and utilization data covering 1986-1998. This study found that the coefficients for CMIs in the third-party hospital revenue model were greater than those in the hospital cost model until 1995. Since 1995, however, the coefficients for CMIs in the third-party hospital revenue model have been less than those in hospital cost models. Over time, the differences in coefficients for CMIs in hospital revenue and cost models for third-party patients have become smaller and smaller although those differences are statistically insignificant.

  18. Intelligent transmission of patient sensor data in wireless hospital networks.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Danielle; Yun, Mira; Bragg, Haya; Choi, Hyeong-Ah

    2012-01-01

    Medical data sensors on patients in hospitals produce an increasingly large volume of increasingly diverse real-time data. Because scheduling the transmission of this data through wireless hospital networks becomes a crucial problem, we propose a Reinforcement Learning-based queue management and scheduling scheme. In this scheme, we use a game-theoretical approach where patients compete for transmission resources by assigning different utility values to data packets. These utility functions are largely based on data criticality and deadline, which together determine the data's scheduling priority. Simulation results demonstrate the high performance of this scheme in comparison to a datatype-based scheme, with the drop rate of critical data as a performance measure. We also show how patients can optimize their policies based on the utility functions of competing patients.

  19. [Investigation on acute stroke patients being admitted to hospital].

    PubMed

    Zi, X; Song, Z; Fan, X

    1999-01-01

    One hundred and twelve patients with acute stroke were studied. The results revealed that about 42 percent of 112 patients could get to hospital within 6 hours after onset, in which included 60.4 percent of the hemorrhagic group and 28.1 percent of the infarction group. Comparatively, among 30.3 percent of 112 patients CT scan was carried out within 6 hours, which included 41.7 percent of the hemorrhagic group and 21.8 percent of the infarction group. Linear correlation analysis was studied between admission time(AT) and the assessment of neural function defect(ANFD). The results showed that there was significant negative correlation between AT and ANFD in stroke patients. After analysing the serial reasons of delaying hospitalization, the authors have found that the key factor is the ignorance of the importance of stroke in early stage. PMID:12080684

  20. Intelligent Transmission of Patient Sensor Data in Wireless Hospital Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bragg, Danielle; Yun, Mira; Bragg, Haya; Choi, Hyeong-Ah

    2012-01-01

    Medical data sensors on patients in hospitals produce an increasingly large volume of increasingly diverse real-time data. Because scheduling the transmission of this data through wireless hospital networks becomes a crucial problem, we propose a Reinforcement Learning-based queue management and scheduling scheme. In this scheme, we use a game-theoretical approach where patients compete for transmission resources by assigning different utility values to data packets. These utility functions are largely based on data criticality and deadline, which together determine the data’s scheduling priority. Simulation results demonstrate the high performance of this scheme in comparison to a datatype-based scheme, with the drop rate of critical data as a performance measure. We also show how patients can optimize their policies based on the utility functions of competing patients. PMID:23304390

  1. Integrating patient teaching into bedside patient care: a participant-observation study of hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Barber-Parker, Elaine D

    Today's patients are quickly discharged from hospitals and often continue complex treatments at home. Patient teaching is critical and hospital nurses are encouraged to use "every teachable moment." This study explored and described the nature of integrating patient teaching into daily patient care and the factors influencing the delivery of teaching. A fieldwork method, conducted over 12 months, used participant-observation (PO) and a focus group session to answer the research questions. Three experienced registered nurses working on the oncology unit of an acute care community hospital served as informants. Critical attributes and patterns of observed teaching events were described.

  2. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    PubMed

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective.

  3. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    PubMed

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective. PMID:26790241

  4. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  5. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  6. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  7. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  8. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  9. Upward trend in dengue incidence among hospitalized patients, United States.

    PubMed

    Streit, Judy A; Yang, Ming; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Polgreen, Philip M

    2011-05-01

    International travel and a global expansion of dengue fever have the potential to increase the incidence of dengue in the United States. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of trends in dengue among hospitalized patients by using the National Inpatient Sample (2000-2007); the number of cases more than tripled (p<0.0001).

  10. Self-destructive behavior in hospitalized medical and surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Kellner, C H; Best, C L; Roberts, J M; Bjorksten, O

    1985-06-01

    This article reviews the literature and presents data from the Psychiatric Consultation Service of the Medical University of South Carolina on self-destructive behavior in hospitalized medical and surgical patients. Fatal suicide attempts are rare and usually occur in patients with severe, painful chronic illnesses, psychosis, or dementia. Less overt forms of self-destructive behavior include refusal of medical treatment and uncooperative behavior.

  11. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient’s trust is the service quality. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient’s trust. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. Results: The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P < 0.001) were the strongest factors in predicting patient’s trust, but the quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. Conclusions: The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient’s trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff. PMID:25763258

  12. Applications of Nasal High-Flow Oxygen Therapy in Critically ill Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    Porhomayon, Jahan; El-Solh, Ali A; Pourafkari, Leili; Jaoude, Philippe; Nader, Nader D

    2016-10-01

    The use of nasal high-flow oxygen therapy (NHFOT) has become increasingly common in hospitals across Europe, Asia, and North America. These high utility devices provide an efficient and comfortable access points for providing supplemental oxygen to patients with variety of respiratory disorders. They are relatively easy to set up, and clinicians and patients alike give very positive feedback about their ease of use and comfort for patients in the hospital setting. However, it remains uncertain whether NHFOT improves patient survival or even reduces respiratory complications. Outcome data in adult populations are few and frequently underpowered to guide physicians for their widespread use in hospital setting. In this article, we present a review of the current technology and available studies pertinent to NHFOT. PMID:27142658

  13. Applications of Nasal High-Flow Oxygen Therapy in Critically ill Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    Porhomayon, Jahan; El-Solh, Ali A; Pourafkari, Leili; Jaoude, Philippe; Nader, Nader D

    2016-10-01

    The use of nasal high-flow oxygen therapy (NHFOT) has become increasingly common in hospitals across Europe, Asia, and North America. These high utility devices provide an efficient and comfortable access points for providing supplemental oxygen to patients with variety of respiratory disorders. They are relatively easy to set up, and clinicians and patients alike give very positive feedback about their ease of use and comfort for patients in the hospital setting. However, it remains uncertain whether NHFOT improves patient survival or even reduces respiratory complications. Outcome data in adult populations are few and frequently underpowered to guide physicians for their widespread use in hospital setting. In this article, we present a review of the current technology and available studies pertinent to NHFOT.

  14. Comparing illness presentation, treatment and functioning between patients with adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Christy Lai-Ming; Li, Adrienne Wing-Yee; Leung, Chung-Ming; Chang, Wing-Chung; Chan, Sherry Kit-Wa; Lee, Edwin Ho-Ming; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai

    2014-12-30

    Studies have shown that early- and adult-onset schizophrenia patients differ in pre-morbid traits, illness presentation, psychopathology, and prognosis. We aimed to compare adult-onset patients (age range 26-55 years) with an adolescent-onset cohort (15-25 years) in demographics, illness presentation and functioning at baseline. Participants were from two territory-wide early intervention services for adolescent-onset (n=671) and adult-onset psychosis patients (n=360) in Hong Kong. The adolescent-onset cohort had their initial psychotic episode from 2001-2003; retrospective data collection was done through systematic case note review. The adult-onset cohort was recruited for a larger interventional study from 2009-2011; information was collected via face-to-face interviews. Adult-onset psychosis was significantly associated with more females, more smokers, more non-local birth, more full-time employment, better functioning, poorer medication adherence, more psychiatric hospitalization and fewer with schizophrenia than adolescent-onset psychosis (mean age: 20.4). The effect sizes were small, except for medication adherence where a robust effect was found. No group difference in DUP was found. The finding that adult-onset patients had better functioning challenges the view that adolescent- and adult-onset psychoses share a similar prognostic trajectory. Implications for adapting intervention processes for adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis are discussed.

  15. Falls risk assessment in older patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Matarese, Maria; Ivziku, Dhurata

    2016-07-27

    Falls are the most frequent adverse event reported in hospitals, usually affecting older patients. All hospitals in NHS organisations develop risk prevention policies that include falls risk assessment. Falls risk assessment involves the use of risk screening tools, aimed at identifying patients at increased risk of falls, and risk assessment tools, which identify a patient's risk factors for falls. Various risk screening tools have been used in clinical practice, but no single tool is able to identify all patients at risk of falls or to accurately exclude all those who are not at risk of falls. Guidelines recommend that patients aged 65 years and over who are admitted to hospital should be considered at high risk of falls and that a multifactorial falls risk assessment should be performed. Therefore, falls risk assessment tools should be used to identify the risk factors for each inpatient aged 65 years or over, in order to determine the most appropriate care plan for falls prevention and to maximise patient mobility and independence. PMID:27461329

  16. A Review of the Accuracy and Utility of Motion Sensors to Measure Physical Activity of Frail, Older Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Ruth; Brady, Noeleen M; Dillon, Christina; Horgan, N Frances; Timmons, Suzanne

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the utility and accuracy of commercially available motion sensors to measure step-count and time spent upright in frail older hospitalized patients. A database search (CINAHL and PubMed, 2004-2014) and a further hand search of papers' references yielded 24 validation studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Fifteen motion sensors (eight pedometers, six accelerometers, and one sensor systems) have been tested in older adults. Only three have been tested in hospital patients, two of which detected postures and postural changes accurately, but none estimated step-count accurately. Only one motion sensor remained accurate at speeds typical of frail older hospitalized patients, but it has yet to be tested in this cohort. Time spent upright can be accurately measured in the hospital, but further validation studies are required to determine which, if any, motion sensor can accurately measure step-count. PMID:26583827

  17. Hospital Re-Admissions among Patients with Decompensated Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Michael L.; Tocco, Rachel S.; Bazick, Jessica; Rakoski, Mina O.; Lok, Anna S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Early re-hospitalizations have been well characterized in many disease states, but not among patients with cirrhosis. The aims of this study were to identify the frequency, costs, predictors, and preventable causes of hospital re-admissions among patients with decompensated cirrhosis. METHODS Rates of re-admission were calculated for 402 patients discharged after one of the following complications of cirrhosis: ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, renal failure, hepatic encephalopathy or variceal hemorrhage. Costs of re-admissions were calculated using the hospital accounting system. Predictors of time to first re-admission were determined using Cox regression, and predictors of hospitalization rate/person-years using negative binomial regression. The independent association between re-admission rate and mortality was determined using Cox regression. Admissions within 30 days of discharge were assessed by two reviewers to determine if preventable. RESULTS 276 (69%) subjects had at least one non-elective re-admission, with a median time to first re-admission of 67 days. By one week after discharge 14% of subjects had been re-admitted, and 37% were re-admitted within one month. The mean costs for re-admissions within one week and between weeks 1–4 were $28,898 and %20,581, respectively. During a median follow-up of 203 days, the median number of re-admissions was 2 (range 0–40), with an overall rate of 3 hospitalizations/person-years. Patients with more frequent re-admissions had higher risk of subsequent mortality, despite adjustment for confounders including the Model for End-stage Liver Disease score. Predictors of time to first re-admission included MELD score, serum sodium, and number of medications on discharge; predictors of hospitalization rate included these variables as well as the number of cirrhosis complications and being on the transplant list at discharge. Among 165 re-admissions within 30 days, 22% were possibly preventable

  18. An Intelligent Robotic Hospital Bed for Safe Transportation of Critical Neurosurgery Patients Along Crowded Hospital Corridors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Savkin, Andrey V; Clout, Ray; Nguyen, Hung T

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel design of an intelligent robotic hospital bed, named Flexbed, with autonomous navigation ability. The robotic bed is developed for fast and safe transportation of critical neurosurgery patients without changing beds. Flexbed is more efficient and safe during the transportation process comparing to the conventional hospital beds. Flexbed is able to avoid en-route obstacles with an efficient easy-to-implement collision avoidance strategy when an obstacle is nearby and to move towards its destination at maximum speed when there is no threat of collision. We present extensive simulation results of navigation of Flexbed in the crowded hospital corridor environments with moving obstacles. Moreover, results of experiments with Flexbed in the real world scenarios are also presented and discussed.

  19. A systematic review of hospital foodservice patient satisfaction studies.

    PubMed

    Dall'Oglio, Immacolata; Nicolò, Rosanna; Di Ciommo, Vincenzo; Bianchi, Natalia; Ciliento, Gaetano; Gawronski, Orsola; Pomponi, Manuel; Roberti, Marco; Tiozzo, Emanuela; Raponi, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    The quality of hospital foodservice is one of the most relevant items of health care quality perceived by patients and by their families. Patient satisfaction is considered a way of measuring the quality of services provided. The purpose of this study was to retrieve and review the literature describing patient satisfaction with hospital foodservices. The systematic review was conducted on three electronic archives, PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (1988 through 2012), to search for any articles reporting patient satisfaction with hospital foodservices. A total of 319 studies were identified. After removing duplicates, 149 abstracts were reviewed, particular attention being given to the presence of a description of the tool used. Thirty-one articles were selected and the full texts were reviewed. Half the studies (n=15) were performed in North America. Patient satisfaction scores were generally high, with some variation among hospitals and different modes of food delivery that was investigated through intervention studies. Qualitative studies were also reported (ethnographic-anthropologic methods with interviews and focus groups). Quantitative tools were represented by questionnaires, some of which relied on previous literature and only a few were validated with factorial analysis and/or Cronbach's α for internal consistency. Most analyses were conducted assuming a parametric distribution of results, an issue not primarily tested. More studies on the quality of hospital foodservice have been carried out in North America than in Europe. Also, a variety of tools, most of which have not been validated, have been used by the different investigating facilities. PMID:25634093

  20. Preoperative risk stratification models fail to predict hospital cost of cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preoperative risk stratification models have previously been suggested to predict cardiac surgery unit costs. However, there is a lack of consistency in their reliability in this field. In this study we aim to test the correlation between the values of six commonly known preoperative scoring systems and evaluate their reliability at predicting unit costs of cardiac surgery patients. Methods Over a period of 14 months all consecutive adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass were prospectively classified using six preoperative scoring models (EuroSCORE, Parsonnet, Ontario, French, Pons and CABDEAL). Transplantation patients were the only patients we excluded. Total hospital costs for each patient were calculated independently on a daily basis using the bottom up method. The full unit costs were calculated including preoperative diagnostic tests, operating room cost, disposable materials, drugs, blood components as well as costs for personnel and fixed hospital costs. The correlation between hospital cost and the six models was determined by linear regression analysis. Both Spearman’s and Pearson’s correlation coefficients were calculated from the regression lines. An analysis of residuals was performed to determine the quality of the regression. Results A total of 887 patients were operated on for CABG (n = 608), valve (n = 142), CABG plus valve (n = 100), thoracic aorta (n = 33) and ventricular assist devices (n = 4). Mean age of the patients was 68.3±9.9 years, 27.6% were female. 30-day mortality rate was 4.1%. Correlation between the six models and hospital cost was weak (Pearson’s: r < 0.30; Spearman’s: r < 0.40). Conclusion The risk stratification models in this study are not reliable at predicting total costs of cardiac surgical patients. We therefore do not recommend their use for this purpose. PMID:23659251

  1. Which Patients, and Where: A Qualitative Study of Patient Transfers from Community Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Bosk, Emily A.; Veinot, Tiffany; Iwashyna, Theodore J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Interhospital transfer of patients is a routine part of the care at community hospitals, but the current process may lead to sub-optimal patient outcomes. A micro-level analysis of the processes of patient transfer has not previously been performed. Research Design We carried out semi-structured qualitative interviews with care providers at 3 purposively sampled community hospitals in order to describe patient transfer mechanisms, focusing on perceptions of transfers and transfer candidates, choice of transfer destination, and perceived process. We interviewed physicians, nurses and care technicians from emergency departments and intensive care units at the hospitals, and analyzed the resultant transcripts via content analysis. Results Appropriate triage and transfer of patients was a highly valued skill at community hospitals. Based on participant accounts, the transfer process had four components: (1) Identifying Transfer-Eligible Patients; (2) Identifying a Destination Hospital; (3) Negotiating the Transfer; and (4) Accomplishing the Transfer. There were common challenges at each component across hospitals. Protocolization of care was perceived to substantially facilitate transfers. Informal arrangements played a key role in the identification of the receiving hospital, but patient preferences and hospital quality were not discussed as important in decision-making. The process of arranging a patient transfer placed a significant burden on the staff of community hospitals. Conclusions The patient transfer process is often cumbersome, varies by condition, and may not be focused on optimizing patient outcomes. Development of a more fluid transfer infrastructure may aid in implementing policies such as selective referral and regionalization. PMID:21430581

  2. Medicines availability at a Swaziland hospital and impact on patients

    PubMed Central

    Suleman, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in low- and middle-income countries is increasing. Where patients are expected to make increased out-of-pocket payments this can lead to treatment interruptions or non-adherence. Swaziland is no exception in this regard. Aim The aim of the study was to investigate the availability of medicines for NCDs in a hospital and the impact of out-of-pocket spending by patients for medicines not available at the hospital. Setting The study was conducted at Raleigh Fitkin Memorial Hospital in Manzini, Swaziland. Methods Exit interviews to assess availability of a selected basket of medicines were conducted with 300 patients diagnosed with diabetes, hypertension or asthma. The stock status record of a basket of medicines for these conditions in 2012 was assessed at the Central Medical Stores. Results were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20.0. Results Most of the patients (n = 213; 71%) confirmed not receiving all of their prescribed medicines at each visit to the hospital in the past six months. On average patients spent 10–50 times more on their medicines at private pharmacies compared to user fees in the health facility. Stock-outs at the Central Medical Stores ranging from 30 days to over 180 days were recorded during the course of the assessment period (12 months), and were found to contribute to inconsistent availability of medicines in the health facility. Conclusion Out-of-pocket expenditure is common for patients with chronic conditions using this health facility, which suggests the possibility of patients defaulting on treatment due to lack of affordability.

  3. An instrument assessing patient satisfaction with day care in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is an important indicator of quality of care in hospitals. Reliable and valid instruments to measure clinical and outpatient satisfaction already exist. Recently hospitals have increasingly provided day care, i.e., admitting patients for one day without an overnight stay. This article describes the adaption of the ‘Core questionnaire for the assessment of Patient Satisfaction’ (COPS) for general Day care (COPS-D), and the subsequent validation of the COPS-D. Methods The clinical COPS was supplemented with items to cover two new dimensions: Pre-admission visit and Operation Room. It was sent to a sample of day care patients of five general Dutch hospitals to investigate dimensionality, acceptability, reliability, construct and external validity. Construct validity was established by correlating the dimensions of the COPS-D with patients’ overall satisfaction. Results The COPS-D was returned by 3802 patients (response 46%). Factor analysis confirmed its’ structure: Pre-intake visit, Admission, Operation room, Nursing care, Medical care, Information, Autonomy and Discharge and aftercare (extraction communality 0.63-0.90). The internal consistency of the eight dimensions was good (α = 0.82-0.90); the item internal consistency corrected for overlap was satisfactory (>0.40); all inter-item correlations were higher than 0.45 but not too high (<0.90). The construct validity of all dimensions was good (r from 0.52-0.62, p < 0.01). The Information dimension had the strongest correlation with overall day care satisfaction. Conclusions The COPS-D is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring satisfaction with day care. It complements the model of measuring patient satisfaction with clinical and outpatient care given in hospitals. It also fulfils the conditions made while developing the clinical and outpatient COPS: a short, core instrument to screen patient satisfaction. PMID:22624677

  4. Bacterial bloodstream infections in HIV-infected adults attending a Lagos teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Adeleye I; Sulaiman, Akanmu A; Solomon, Bamiro B; Chinedu, Obosi A; Victor, Inem A

    2010-08-01

    An investigation was carried out during October 2005-September 2006 to determine the prevalence of bloodstream infections in patients attending the outpatient department of the HIV/AIDS clinic at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. Two hundred and one patients--86 males and 115 females--aged 14-65 years were recruited for the study. Serological diagnosis was carried out on them to confirm their HIV status. Their CD4 counts were done using the micromagnetic bead method. Twenty mL of venous blood sample collected from each patient was inoculated into a pair of Oxoid Signal blood culture bottles for 2-14 days. Thereafter, 0.1 mL of the sample was plated in duplicates on MacConkey, blood and chocolate agar media and incubated at 37 degrees C for 18-24 hours. The CD4+ counts were generally low as 67% of 140 patients sampled had < 200 cells/microL of blood. Twenty-six bacterial isolates were obtained from the blood samples and comprised 15 (58%) coagulase-negative staphylococci as follows: Staphylococcus epidermidis (7), S. cohnii cohnii (1), S. cohnii urealyticum (2), S. chromogenes (1), S. warneri (2), S. scuri (1), and S. xylosus (1). Others were 6 (23%) Gram-negative non-typhoid Salmonella spp., S. Typhimurium (4), S. Enteritidis (2); Pseudomonas fluorescens (1), Escherichia coli (1), Ochrobactrum anthropi (1), Moraxella sp. (1), and Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. Results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed that coagulase-negative staphylococci had good sensitivities to vancomycin and most other antibiotics screened but were resistant mainly to ampicilin and tetracycline. The Gram-negative organisms isolated also showed resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and septrin. This study demonstrates that coagulase-negative staphylococci and non-typhoidal Salmonellae are the most common aetiological agents of bacteraemia among HIV-infected adults attending the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. The organisms were

  5. Outcomes of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Hospitalized Patients at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Gundogan, Kursat; Yurci, Alper M.; Coskun, Ramazan; Baskol, Mevlut; Gursoy, Sebnem; Hebbar, Gautam; Sungur, Murat; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND / OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to perform a retrospective analysis characterizing patients receiving tube feeding following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy ( PEG) tube placement between 2004 and 2012 at Erciyes University Hospital in Turkey. METHODS Patients above the age of 18 years, who required long term enteral tube feeding were studied. All PEGs were performed using the pull-through technique by one experienced endoscopist Demographic, clinical outcomes, and PEG-related complication data were collected. RESULTS Of the 128 subjects studied, 91 were male (71%) and 37 were female (29%). The mean age of this patient population was 54±19 years. The most common reason for PEG tube insertion was inability to consume oral diet due to complications of cerebrovascular disease (CVD; 27%), while cerebral hypoxia, occuring after non-neurological medical disorders, was the second most common indication (23%). A total of 70 patients (55%) had chronic comorbidities, with hypertension the most common (20%). The most common procedure related complication was insertion site bleeding, which occurred in 4 % of patients. Long term complications, during one year were insertion site cellulitis, gastric contents leakage, and peristomal ulceration occurred in 14%, 5%, and 0.5% of patients, respectively. There were no PEG insertion-related mortalities; one-year mortality was unrelated to the indication for PEG tube insertion. CONCLUSIONS PEG tube insertion was a safe method to provide enteral access for nutrition support in this hospitalized patient population. PMID:24518749

  6. Adverse outcomes following hospitalization in acutely ill older patients

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Roger Y; Miller, William C

    2008-01-01

    Background The longitudinal outcomes of patients admitted to acute care for elders units (ACE) are mixed. We studied the associations between socio-demographic and functional measures with hospital length of stay (LOS), and which variables predicted adverse events (non-independent living, readmission, death) 3 and 6 months later. Methods Prospective cohort study of community-living, medical patients age 75 or over admitted to ACE at a teaching hospital. Results The population included 147 subjects, median LOS of 9 days (interquartile range 5–15 days). All returned home/community after hospitalization. Just prior to discharge, baseline timed up and go test (TUG, P < 0.001), bipedal stance balance (P = 0.001), and clinical frailty scale scores (P = 0.02) predicted LOS, with TUG as the only independent predictor (P < 0.001) in multiple regression analysis. By 3 months, 59.9% of subjects remained free of an adverse event, and by 6 months, 49.0% were event free. The 3 and 6-month mortality was 10.2% and 12.9% respectively. Almost one-third of subjects had developed an adverse event by 6 months, with the highest risk within the first 3 months post discharge. An abnormal TUG score was associated with increased adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03 to 1.59, P = 0.03. A higher FMMSE score (adjusted HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.96, P = 0.003) and independent living before hospitalization (adjusted HR 0.42, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.84, P = 0.01) were associated with reduced risk of adverse outcome. Conclusion Some ACE patients demonstrate further functional decline following hospitalization, resulting in loss of independence, repeat hospitalization, or death. Abnormal TUG is associated with prolonged LOS and future adverse outcomes. PMID:18479512

  7. Pediatric Patient Blood Management Programs: Not Just Transfusing Little Adults.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchika; Cushing, Melissa M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell transfusions are a common life-saving intervention for neonates and children with anemia, but transfusion decisions, indications, and doses in neonates and children are different from those of adults. Patient blood management (PBM) programs are designed to assist clinicians with appropriately transfusing patients. Although PBM programs are well recognized and appreciated in the adult setting, they are quite far from standard of care in the pediatric patient population. Adult PBM standards cannot be uniformly applied to children, and there currently is significant variation in transfusion practices. Because transfusing unnecessarily can expose children to increased risk without benefit, it is important to design PBM programs to standardize transfusion decisions. This article assesses the key elements necessary for a successful pediatric PBM program, systematically explores various possible pediatric specific blood conservation strategies and the current available literature supporting them, and outlines the gaps in the evidence suggesting need for further/improved research. Pediatric PBM programs are critically important initiatives that not only involve a cooperative effort between pediatric surgery, anesthesia, perfusion, critical care, and transfusion medicine services but also need operational support from administration, clinical leadership, finance, and the hospital information technology personnel. These programs also expand the scope for high-quality collaborative research. A key component of pediatric PBM programs is monitoring pediatric blood utilization and assessing adherence to transfusion guidelines. Data suggest that restrictive transfusion strategies should be used for neonates and children similar to adults, but further research is needed to assess the best oxygenation requirements, hemoglobin threshold, and transfusion strategy for patients with active bleeding, hemodynamic instability, unstable cardiac disease, and cyanotic cardiac

  8. Pediatric Patient Blood Management Programs: Not Just Transfusing Little Adults.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchika; Cushing, Melissa M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell transfusions are a common life-saving intervention for neonates and children with anemia, but transfusion decisions, indications, and doses in neonates and children are different from those of adults. Patient blood management (PBM) programs are designed to assist clinicians with appropriately transfusing patients. Although PBM programs are well recognized and appreciated in the adult setting, they are quite far from standard of care in the pediatric patient population. Adult PBM standards cannot be uniformly applied to children, and there currently is significant variation in transfusion practices. Because transfusing unnecessarily can expose children to increased risk without benefit, it is important to design PBM programs to standardize transfusion decisions. This article assesses the key elements necessary for a successful pediatric PBM program, systematically explores various possible pediatric specific blood conservation strategies and the current available literature supporting them, and outlines the gaps in the evidence suggesting need for further/improved research. Pediatric PBM programs are critically important initiatives that not only involve a cooperative effort between pediatric surgery, anesthesia, perfusion, critical care, and transfusion medicine services but also need operational support from administration, clinical leadership, finance, and the hospital information technology personnel. These programs also expand the scope for high-quality collaborative research. A key component of pediatric PBM programs is monitoring pediatric blood utilization and assessing adherence to transfusion guidelines. Data suggest that restrictive transfusion strategies should be used for neonates and children similar to adults, but further research is needed to assess the best oxygenation requirements, hemoglobin threshold, and transfusion strategy for patients with active bleeding, hemodynamic instability, unstable cardiac disease, and cyanotic cardiac

  9. Severe metapneumovirus infections among immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients admitted to hospital with respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Souza, Juliana Sinohara; Watanabe, Aripuana; Carraro, Emerson; Granato, Celso; Bellei, Nancy

    2013-03-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is considered an important cause of acute respiratory infections. hMPV can cause morbidity in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients and recent research has demonstrated that it is an important virus in patients admitted to hospital with respiratory infections and suspected of having pandemic 2009 influenza A (H1N1pdm09) virus. The purpose of this study was to investigate infections caused by hMPV in two groups of patients admitted to hospital: Immunocompromized patients with a potential risk of severe outcomes and immunocompetent patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome. A total of 288 samples were tested: 165 samples were collected from patients with suspected influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 infection during the first pandemic wave in 2009; and 123 samples were collected from patients of a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation program in 2008-2009. Amplification of the hMPV genes was performed by polymerase chain reaction. This was followed by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. hMPV was detected in 14.2% (41/288) of all samples: 17% (28/165) of immunocompetent patients with suspected H1N1 infection and 10.6% (13/123) among hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. hMPV accounted for 12.1% (8/66) of immunocompetent adults patients with severe respiratory infections (median age, 55.9 years). Two hMPV subtypes were identified, A2 (26.9%; 7/26) and B2 (73.1%; 19/26) but no difference was observed between the patient groups in terms of age or immunosuppression level. This study highlights the significance of hMPV in immunocompetent adult patients with severe infections and further investigations are recommended for understanding the impact of this virus.

  10. The working hours of hospital staff nurses and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Ann E; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Scott, Linda D; Aiken, Linda H; Dinges, David F

    2004-01-01

    The use of extended work shifts and overtime has escalated as hospitals cope with a shortage of registered nurses (RNs). Little is known, however, about the prevalence of these extended work periods and their effects on patient safety. Logbooks completed by 393 hospital staff nurses revealed that participants usually worked longer than scheduled and that approximately 40 percent of the 5,317 work shifts they logged exceeded twelve hours. The risks of making an error were significantly increased when work shifts were longer than twelve hours, when nurses worked overtime, or when they worked more than forty hours per week.

  11. [Historicizing nursing and patients at a psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Borenstein, Miriam Süsskind; Pereira, Valdete Preve; Ribas, Dorotéa Löes; Ribeiro, Anesilda Alves de Almeida

    2003-01-01

    This is a historical research whose objective is to historicize the nursing team and the patients at the Hospital Colônia Sant'Ana (HCS), in the period from 1941 to 1960. Five employees that worked at the Hospital in the period of the study were interviewed and other documental sources were used. To analyze the data Foucault's theory was used. HCS was the main pole of psychiatric care in the Santa Catarina. The nursing team was constituted by the nuns, "male nurses" and "watchmen". The institution received indigent, private, and health insurance covered patients, who were diagnosed with many different problems, and some who were more of a social case than anything else. The general conditions of the Hospital were precarious. The studied period made possible visualize that the treatment given to the patients, as well as the work conditions offered to the workers, were distant from the ideal, and that it was part of a national policy, characterized by the creation of state macro psychiatric hospitals.

  12. Screening of hospital patients for HIV: an experience in a tertiary care hospital of West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Joardar, G K; Chatterjee, C; Sadhukhan, S K; Banerjee, P; Dan, A; Mandal, A

    2012-09-01

    The clinical consequences of HIV infection encompass a wide spectrum. Early recognition of persons who have HIV will help in early interventions to halt or slow down the progress of HIV disease and to extend fruitful lives.This cross-sectional study was conducted among patients referred to the voluntary counselling and testing centre (VCTC) from various departments in North Bengal Medical College & Hospital, Darjeeling, West Bengal, to find out the pattern of disease/symptoms, high risk behaviour (HRB) for HIV, and HIV serostatus among the hospital patients. Following the guidelines prescribed by the National AIDS Control Organisation (NACO), anonymous data were collected through interview from 407 individuals. Where specific diagnosis of a disease was obtained, it was analysed as mutually exclusive disease; and where specific diagnosis was not obtained, mutually exclusive symptoms were considered for analysis.The major diseases/symptoms observed among those patients were tuberculosis in 32.19%, STD in 29.97%, prolonged unexplained fever in 19.41% of patients. The overall rate of HIV seroreactivity was 17.44%. The HIV serostatus by disease/symptoms showed that 32.91% of patients with prolonged unexplained fever were HIV seroreactive; the rate was 12.90% among patients with skin diseases, 12.29% in STD and 12.21% in tuberculosis patients. Overall, 270 patients (66.34%) had HRB for HIV/AIDS.The rate of HIV seroreactivity was more among patients who had HRB for HIV/ AIDS and who were referred from indoor departments (23.24%) compared to outdoor departments (13.65%).The patients suffering from prolonged unexplained fever need greater attention for HIV screening. Early detection of HIV positive patients makes Intervention possible at a very early stage and this can slow down/block the progress of HIV disease and, as a result, can extend fruitful life.

  13. Clinical predictors of self-mutilation in hospitalized forensic patients.

    PubMed

    Hillbrand, M; Krystal, J H; Sharpe, K S; Foster, H G

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical correlates and inpatient course of self-mutilation in a diagnostically diverse sample of hospitalized forensic patients. Fifty-three male forensic inpatients, treated in a maximum-security hospital, who engaged in at least one instance of self-mutilation during a 2-year period, were studied and compared with 50 male forensic patients at the same hospital who had not engaged in self-mutilation. Self-mutilating patients were younger, more likely to carry a diagnosis of personality disorder or mental retardation, engaged in more outwardly directed aggressive behavior as assessed by the Overt Aggression Scale, were treated with substantially higher doses of neuroleptics, and were more likely to be civil or correctional patients than insanity acquittees. The two groups did not differ on variables such as history of suicide, history of violence, neurological characteristics, and other demographic variables. After an incident of self-mutilation, the probability of recurrence was high. The substantially higher level of outwardly directed aggression of self-mutilating patients, along with their higher apparent need for neuroleptization and the high risk of recurrence of the self-mutilation, suggest that they are a subset of violent individuals who are relatively unresponsive to treatment and who are dangerous to self and others.

  14. Patient rehabilitation through hospital work under Fair Labor Standards.

    PubMed

    Safier, D; Barnum, R

    1975-05-01

    Payment of patients for hospital work assignments has become a matter of great concern for mental health institutions since the 1973 federal court ruling requiring the Department of Labor to enforce the 1966 amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act. A work program in compliance with Fair Labor Standards has been operating at Binghamton (N.Y.) Psychiatric Center since 1971. Certificates from the labor department permit the hospital to pay less than the minimum wage for patients in occupational training or in sheltered employment in a regular job. The authors believe that work therapy has important clinical and rehabilitative functions, and that patients should not be denied the opportunity for such work because of the court ruling.

  15. Development of an assistive patient mobile system for hospital environments.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy Hoang; Nguyen, Tuan Nghia; Clout, Raymont; Gibson, Alexander; Nguyen, Hung T

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an assistive patient mobile system for hospital environments, which focuses on transferring the patient without nursing help. The system is a combination of an advanced hospital bed and an autonomous navigating robot. This intelligent bed can track the robot and routinely navigates and communicates with the bed. The work centralizes in building a structure, hardware design and robot detection and tracking algorithms by using laser range finder. The assistive patient mobile system has been tested and the real experiments are shown with a high performance of reliability and practicality. The accuracy of the method proposed in this paper is 91% for the targeted testing object with the error rate of classification by 6%. Additionally, a comparison between our method and a related one is also described including the comparison of results. PMID:24110232

  16. How I manage venous thromboembolism risk in hospitalized medical patients.

    PubMed

    Dobromirski, Mark; Cohen, Alexander T

    2012-08-23

    Venous thromboembolism is a significant cause of illness and death worldwide. Large bodies of evidence support the heightened risk status of hospitalized medical patients, and that prophylactic measures significantly reduce the risk of thrombosis, yet these patients often fail to receive adequate prophylactic therapy. This failure may be accounted for by a lack of awareness of the relevant indications, poorly designed implementation systems, and clinical concerns over the side effects of anticoagulant medications. This article briefly summarizes our understanding of the clinical factors relevant to the evaluation of venous thromboembolism risk in hospitalized medical patients. We describe our approach to the use of thromboprophylaxis, through which we aim to minimize the disease burden of this under-recognized and preventable pathology.

  17. Family Participation in the Nursing Care of the Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khosravan, Shahla; Mazlom, Behnam; Abdollahzade, Naiemeh; Jamali, Zeinab; Mansoorian, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies, especially in Iran, have assessed the status of family participation in the care of the hospitalized patients. Objectives: This study was conducted to assess why family members partake in caregiving of their patients in hospitals, the type of care that family provide, and the outcomes of the participation in the opinions of nurses and family members. Patients and Methods: In this comparative-descriptive study, data was collected by a two- version researcher-developed questionnaire, from 253 family members of patients by quota sampling method and 83 nurses by census sampling method from wards which had licensed for entering the families. Each questionnaire has three sections: the care needs of the patients which family participated to provide, the reasons to take part, and the outcomes of this collaborative care. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and also chi-squared test through SPSS software version 11.5. Results: The patients received more unskilled and non- professional nursing care from their family members. Most of the nurses and families believed that family participation is both voluntary and compulsory. The shortage of personnel in different categories of nursing and speeding up the patient-related affairs were the most important outcome of the participation, from the nurses’ viewpoint was speeding up the patient-related affairs and from the side of the family members, it was the patients’ feeling of satisfaction from the presence of one of their relatives beside them. Conclusions: Co understanding, skillfulness and competence of families and nurses in collaboration with each other were not good enough.Few studies, especially in Iran, have assessed the status of family participation in the care of the hospitalized patients. PMID:24719705

  18. A system-wide analysis using a senior-friendly hospital framework identifies current practices and opportunities for improvement in the care of hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ken S; Ryan, David P; Liu, Barbara A

    2014-11-01

    Older adults are vulnerable to hospital-associated complications such as falls, pressure ulcers, functional decline, and delirium, which can contribute to prolonged hospital stay, readmission, and nursing home placement. These vulnerabilities are exacerbated when the hospital's practices, services, and physical environment are not sufficiently mindful of the complex, multidimensional needs of frail individuals. Several frameworks have emerged to help hospitals examine how organization-wide processes can be customized to avoid these complications. This article describes the application of one such framework-the Senior-Friendly Hospital (SFH) framework adopted in Ontario, Canada-which comprises five interrelated domains: organizational support, processes of care, emotional and behavioral environment, ethics in clinical care and research, and physical environment. This framework provided the blueprint for a self-assessment of all 155 adult hospitals across the province of Ontario. The system-wide analysis identified practice gaps and promising practices within each domain of the SFH framework. Taken together, these results informed 12 recommendations to support hospitals at all stages of development in becoming friendly to older adults. Priorities for system-wide action were identified, encouraging hospitals to implement or further develop their processes to better address hospital-acquired delirium and functional decline. These recommendations led to collaborative action across the province, including the development of an online toolkit and the identification of accountability indicators to support hospitals in quality improvement focusing on senior-friendly care.

  19. Aetiologies of Central Nervous System infections in adults in Kathmandu, Nepal: A prospective hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Abhishek; Arjyal, Amit; Koirala, Samir; Karkey, Abhilasha; Dongol, Sabina; Thapa, Sudeep Dhoj; Shilpakar, Olita; Shrestha, Rishav; van Tan, Le; Thi Thuy Chinh, Bkrong Nguyen; Krishna K. C., Radheshyam; Pathak, Kamal Raj; Shakya, Mila; Farrar, Jeremy; Van Doorn, H. Rogier; Basnyat, Buddha

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a prospective hospital based study from February 2009-April 2011 to identify the possible pathogens of central nervous system (CNS) infections in adults admitted to a tertiary referral hospital (Patan Hospital) in Kathmandu, Nepal. The pathogens of CNS infections were confirmed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using molecular diagnostics, culture (bacteria) and serology. 87 patients were recruited for the study and the etiological diagnosis was established in 38% (n = 33). The bacterial pathogens identified were Neisseria meningitidis (n = 6); Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 5) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 2) in 13/87(14%). Enteroviruses were found in 12/87 (13%); Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) in 2/87(2%). IgM against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was detected in the CSF of 11/73 (15%) tested samples. This is the first prospective molecular and serology based CSF analysis in adults with CNS infections in Kathmandu, Nepal. JEV and enteroviruses were the most commonly detected pathogens in this setting. PMID:23924886

  20. [Oropharyngeal aerobic flora in patients hospitalized in an ORL department].

    PubMed

    Dumont, Y; Borderon, E; Farcy, M C; Penot, J C

    1986-01-01

    As patients with E.N.T. carcinoma have relative frequent infectious complications of E.N.T. area, we have carried out a study or oropharyngeal colonization by aerobic bacteria and fungi in 84 hospitalized patients. The results of the tests are analysed according to different parameters, essentially the presence or the absence of neoplasia and antibiotherapy. The presence of one of these two factors does not substantially modify oropharyngeal flora of patients. However their association coincides with a height percentage of colonies of enterobacteriaceae, of pseudomonas and of fungi.

  1. Goals of care among hospitalized patients: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Haberle, Tyler H; Shinkunas, Laura A; Erekson, Zachary D; Kaldjian, Lauris C

    2011-08-01

    Our objective was to validate 6 literature-derived goals of care by analyzing open-ended and closed-ended responses about goals of care from a previous study of hospitalized patients. Eight clinicians categorized patients' open-ended articulations of their goals of care using a literature-derived framework and then compared those categorizations to patients' own closed-ended selections of their most important goal of care. Clinicians successfully categorized patients' open-ended responses using the literature-derived framework 83.5% of the time, and their categorizations matched patients' closed-ended most important goal of care 87.8% of the time. Goals that did not fit within the literature-derived framework all pertained to the goal of understanding a patient's diagnosis or prognosis; this seventh potential goal can be added to the literature-derived framework of 6 goals of care.

  2. Modern Matrons: can they be easily identified by hospital patients?

    PubMed

    Bufton, Sally

    The Modern Matron was introduced into hospital Trusts in April 2002 to improve the basics of patient care. They were to be easily identifiable, highly visible and authoritative figures. This article reports on a quantitative study done to ascertain if patients can identify the Modern Matron in one acute NHS Trust. A researcher-developed questionnaire was sent to 20 Modern Matrons and a different questionnaire was distributed to 72 randomly selected patients. The results demonstrated that only 5% of patients surveyed were able to correctly identify the Modern Matron by their uniform. This may be explained by the response from the Modern Matrons when asked how much time was spent with patients; 67% of their normal working day was taken up with management of staff, paperwork and meetings, leaving very little direct patient time.

  3. Innovations in Calculating Precise Nutrient Intake of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Sheila Cox; Bopp, Melinda M.; Weaver, Dennis L.; Sullivan, Dennis H.

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a detailed assessment of a hospitalized patient’s nutrient intake is often critically important to ensuring the patient’s successful recovery. However, this process is often laborious and prone to error. Inaccurate nutrient intake assessments result in the inability of the healthcare team to recognize patients with developing nutritional deficits that contribute to delayed recovery and prolonged lengths of stay. This paper describes an innovative, easy to use system designed to increase the precision of calorie count reports by using a combination of photography, direct observation, and a specially developed computer program. Although the system was designed specifically for use in a Department of Veterans Affairs Hospital, it has the potential to be adapted for use in other hospital environments. PMID:27384584

  4. Hospital Utilization and Characteristics of Patients Experiencing Recurrent Readmissions Within Children’s Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jay G.; Hall, David E.; Kuo, Dennis Z.; Cohen, Eyal; Agrawal, Rishi; Feudtner, Chris; Hall, Matt; Kueser, Jacqueline; Kaplan, William; Neff, John

    2011-01-01

    Context Early hospital readmission is emerging as an indicator of care quality. Some children with chronic illnesses may be readmitted on a recurrent basis, but there are limited data describing their rehospitalization patterns and impact. Objectives To describe the inpatient resource utilization, clinical characteristics, and admission reasons of patients recurrently readmitted to children’s hospitals. Design, Setting, and Patients Retrospective cohort analysis of 317 643 patients (n=579 504 admissions) admitted to 37 US children’s hospitals in 2003 with follow-up through 2008. Main Outcome Measure Maximum number of readmissions experienced by each child within any 365-day interval during the 5-year follow-up period. Results In the sample, 69 294 patients (21.8%) experienced at least 1 readmission within 365 days of a prior admission. Within a 365-day interval, 9237 patients (2.9%) experienced 4 or more readmissions; time between admissions was a median 37 days (interquartile range [IQR], 21–63). These patients accounted for 18.8% (109 155 admissions) of all admissions and 23.2% ($3.4 billion) of total inpatient charges for the study cohort during the entire follow-up period. Tests for trend indicated that as the number of readmissions increased from 0 to 4 or more, the prevalences increased for a complex chronic condition (from 22.3% [n=55 382/248 349] to 89.0% [n=8225/9237]; P <.001), technology assistance (from 5.3% [n = 13 163] to 52.6% [n=4859]; P <.001), public insurance use (from 40.9% [n = 101 575] to 56.3% [n=5202]; P <.001), and non-Hispanic black race (from 21.8% [n=54 140] to 34.4% [n=3181]; P <.001); and the prevalence decreased for readmissions associated with an ambulatory care–sensitive condition (from 23.1% [62 847/272 065] to 14.0% [15 282/109 155], P<.001). Of patients readmitted 4 or more times in a 365-day interval, 2633 (28.5%) were rehospitalized for a problem in the same organ system across all admissions during the interval

  5. Hospital to community transitions for adults: discharge planners and community service providers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chapin, Rosemary Kennedy; Chandran, Devyani; Sergeant, Julie F; Koenig, Terry L

    2014-01-01

    Discharges from the hospital to community-based settings are more difficult for older adults when there is lack of communication, resource sharing, and viable partnerships among service providers in these settings. The researchers captured the perspectives of three different groups of participants from hospitals, independent living centers, and Area Agencies on Aging, which has rarely been done in studies on discharge planning. Findings include identification of barriers in the assessment and referral process (e.g., timing of discharge, inattention to client goals, lack of communication and partnerships between hospital discharge planners and community providers), and strategies for overcoming these barriers. Implications are discussed including potential for Medicaid and Medicare cost reductions due to fewer re-hospitalizations.

  6. Application of the Beers Criteria to Alternate Level of Care Patients in Hospital Inpatient Units

    PubMed Central

    Slaney, Heather; MacAulay, Stacey; Irvine-Meek, Janice; Murray, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Beers criteria were developed to help in identifying potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) for elderly patients. These medications are often associated with adverse events and limited effectiveness in older adults. Patients awaiting an alternate level of care (ALC patients) are those who no longer require acute care hospital services and are waiting for placement elsewhere. They are often elderly, have complex medication regimens, and are at high risk of adverse events. At the time of this study no studies had applied the Beers criteria to ALC patients in Canadian hospitals. Objectives: To determine the proportion of ALC patients receiving PIMs and the proportion experiencing selected PIM-related adverse events. Methods: A retrospective chart review of ALC patients 65 years of age or older was performed to identify PIMs and the occurrence of selected adverse events (specifically central nervous system [CNS] events, falls, bradycardia, hypoglycemia, seizures, insomnia, gastrointestinal bleeding, and urinary tract infections). A logistic regression model with a random intercept for each patient was constructed to estimate odds ratios and probabilities of adverse events. Results: Fifty-two ALC patients were included in the study. Of these, 48 (92%) were taking a PIM. Of the 922 adverse events evaluated, 407 (44.1%) were associated with a regularly scheduled PIM. Among patients who were taking regularly scheduled PIMs, there was a significantly increased probability of an adverse CNS event and of a fall (p < 0.001 for both). The most common PIM medication classes were first-generation antihistamines (24 [46%] of the 52 patients), antipsychotics (21 patients [40%]), short-acting benzodiazepines (15 patients [29%]), and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics (14 patients [27%]). Conclusions: A high proportion of ALC patients were taking PIMs and experienced an adverse event that may have been related to these drugs. These findings suggest that the ALC

  7. Severe Acquired Toxoplasmosis in Immunocompetent Adult Patients in French Guiana

    PubMed Central

    Carme, B.; Bissuel, F.; Ajzenberg, D.; Bouyne, R.; Aznar, C.; Demar, M.; Bichat, S.; Louvel, D.; Bourbigot, A. M.; Peneau, C.; Neron, P.; Dardé, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    The most common presentation of symptomatic postnatally acquired toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients is painless cervical adenopathy. Acute visceral manifestations are associated in rare cases. We report 16 cases of severe primary toxoplasmosis diagnosed in French Guiana during a 6.5-year period. All of the subjects were immunocompetent adults hospitalized with clinical presentations consisting of a marked, nonspecific infectious syndrome accompanied by an altered general status with at least one visceral localization, mainly pulmonary involvement (14 cases). Acute toxoplasmosis was diagnosed according to the results of serological tests suggestive of recent primary infection and the absence of an alternative etiology. Recovery was rapid following specific antitoxoplasmosis treatment. Thirteen of the 16 patients had consumed game in the 2 weeks before the onset of the symptoms, and in eight cases the game was considered to have been undercooked. Toxoplasma strains, which were virulent in mice, were isolated from three patients. Microsatellite analysis showed that all of these isolates exhibited an atypical multilocus genotype, with one allele found only for isolates of this region. PMID:12409371

  8. Hospitals In ‘Magnet’ Program Show Better Patient Outcomes On Mortality Measures Compared To Non-‘Magnet’ Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Friese, Christopher R.; Xia, Rong; Ghaferi, Amir A.; Birkmeyer, John D.; Banerjee, Mousumi

    2015-01-01

    Hospital executives pursue external recognition to improve market share and demonstrate institutional commitment to quality of care. The Magnet Recognition Program of the American Nurses Credentialing Center identifies hospitals that epitomize nursing excellence, but it is not clear that receiving Magnet recognition improves patient outcomes. Using Medicare data on patients hospitalized for coronary artery bypass graft surgery, colectomy, or lower extremity bypass in 1998–2010, we compared rates of risk-adjusted thirty-day mortality and failure to rescue (death after a postoperative complication) between Magnet hospitals and non-Magnet hospitals matched on hospital characteristics. Surgical patients treated in Magnet hospitals, compared to those treated in non-Magnet hospitals, were 7.7 percent less likely to die within thirty days and 8.6 percent less likely to die after a postoperative complication. Across the thirteen–year study period, patient outcomes were significantly better in Magnet hospitals than in non-Magnet hospitals. However, outcomes did not improve for hospitals after they received Magnet recognition, which suggests that the Magnet program recognizes existing excellence and does not lead to additional improvements in surgical outcomes. PMID:26056204

  9. Impact of Insurance and Hospital Ownership on Hospital Length of Stay Among Patients With Ambulatory Care–Sensitive Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mainous, Arch G.; Diaz, Vanessa A.; Everett, Charles J.; Knoll, Michele E.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Some studies suggest proprietary (for-profit) hospitals are maximizing financial margins from patient care by limiting therapies or decreasing length of stay for uninsured patients. This study examines the role of insurance related to length of stay once the patient is in the hospital and risk for mortality, particularly in a for-profit environment. METHODS We undertook an analysis of hospitalizations in the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) of the 5-year period of 2003 to 2007 for patients aged 18 to 64 years (unweighted n = 849,866; weighted n = 90 million). The analysis included those who were hospitalized with both ambulatory care–sensitive conditions (ACSCs), hospitalizations considered to be preventable, and non-ACSCs. We analyzed the transformed mean length of stay between individuals who had Medicaid or all other insurance types while hospitalized and those who were hospitalized without insurance. This analysis was stratified by hospital ownership. We also examined the relationship between in-hospital mortality and insurance status. RESULTS After controlling for comorbidities; age, sex, and race/ethnicity; and hospitalizations with either an ACSC or non-ACSC diagnosis, patients without insurance tended to have a significantly shorter length of stay. Across all hospital types, the mean length of stay for ACSCs was significantly shorter for individuals without insurance (2.77 days) than for those with either private insurance (2.89 days, P = .04) or Medicaid (3.19, P <.01). Among hospitalizations for ACSCs, inhospital mortality rate for individuals with either private insurance or Medicaid was not significantly different from the mortality rate for those without insurance. CONCLUSIONS Patients without insurance have shorter lengths of stay for both ACSCs and non-ACSCs. Future research should examine whether patients without insurance are being discharged prematurely. PMID:22084259

  10. Measuring patient-perceived hospital service quality: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Pai, Yogesh P; Chary, Satyanarayana T

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Although measuring healthcare service quality is not a new phenomenon, the instruments used to measure are timeworn. With the shift in focus to patient centric processes in hospitals and recognizing healthcare to be different compared to other services, service quality measurement needs to be tuned specifically to healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to design a conceptual framework for measuring patient perceived hospital service quality (HSQ), based on existing service quality literature. Design/methodology/approach - Using HSQ theories, expanding existing healthcare service models and literature, a conceptual framework is proposed to measure HSQ. The paper outlines patient perceived service quality dimensions. Findings - An instrument for measuring HSQ dimensions is developed and compared with other service quality measuring instruments. The latest dimensions are in line with previous studies, but a relationship dimension is added. Practical implications - The framework empowers managers to assess healthcare quality in corporate, public and teaching hospitals. Originality/value - The paper helps academics and practitioners to assess HSQ from a patient perspective.

  11. Measuring patient-perceived hospital service quality: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Pai, Yogesh P; Chary, Satyanarayana T

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Although measuring healthcare service quality is not a new phenomenon, the instruments used to measure are timeworn. With the shift in focus to patient centric processes in hospitals and recognizing healthcare to be different compared to other services, service quality measurement needs to be tuned specifically to healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to design a conceptual framework for measuring patient perceived hospital service quality (HSQ), based on existing service quality literature. Design/methodology/approach - Using HSQ theories, expanding existing healthcare service models and literature, a conceptual framework is proposed to measure HSQ. The paper outlines patient perceived service quality dimensions. Findings - An instrument for measuring HSQ dimensions is developed and compared with other service quality measuring instruments. The latest dimensions are in line with previous studies, but a relationship dimension is added. Practical implications - The framework empowers managers to assess healthcare quality in corporate, public and teaching hospitals. Originality/value - The paper helps academics and practitioners to assess HSQ from a patient perspective. PMID:27120508

  12. [Handicap and rehabilitation in hospitalized hemodialized patients: study of 20 patients].

    PubMed

    Ghoussoub, Khalil; Mallat, Samir; Moussaly, Aïda; Chelala, Dania; Abou Zogheib, Wissam

    2003-01-01

    Twenty hemodialyzed patients, received rehabilitation while they were hospitalized. They were all handicapped in the beginning; when they left the hospital, 10 patients were completely independent, six needed help at home and 4 were completely dependent. The authors search, from their own practice, the etiologies of handicap with hemodialyzed patients and how to prevent this handicap, with the target of giving to their patients the best quality of life. The rehabilitation is very important in the strategies of global care of these patients. PMID:15181957

  13. Paramedics' and pre-hospital physicians' assessments of anatomic injury in trauma patients: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pre-hospital assessment of a blunt trauma is difficult. Common triage tools are the mechanism of injury (MOI), vital signs, and anatomic injury (AI). Compared to the other tools, the clinical assessment of anatomic injury is more subjective than the others, and, hence, more dependent on the skills of the personnel. The aim of the study was to estimate whether the training and qualifications of the personnel are associated with the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury and the completion of pre-hospital procedures indicated by local guidelines. Methods Adult trauma patients met by a trauma team at Helsinki University Trauma Centre during a 12-month period (n = 422) were retrospectively analysed. To evaluate the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury, clinically assessed pre-hospital injuries in six body regions were compared to injuries assessed at hospital in two patient groups, the patients treated by pre-hospital physicians (group 1, n = 230) and those treated by paramedics (group 2, n = 190). Results The groups were comparable in respect to age, sex, and MOI, but the patients treated by physicians were more severely injured than those treated by paramedics [ISS median (interquartile range) 16 (6-26) vs. 6 (2-10)], thus rendering direct comparison of the groups ineligible. The positive predictive values (95% confidence interval) of assessed injury were highest in head injury [0,91 (0,84-0,95) in group 1 and 0,86 (0,77-0,92) in group 2]. The negative predictive values were highest in abdominal injury [0,85 (0,79-0,89) in group 1 and 0,90 (0,84-0,93) in group 2]. The measurements of agreement between injuries assessed pre- and in-hospitally were moderate in thoracic and extremity injuries. Substantial kappa values (95% confidence interval) were achieved in head injury, 0,67 (0,57-0,77) in group 1 and 0,63 (0,52-0,74) in group 2. The rate of performing the pre-hospital procedures as indicated by the local instructions was 95-99%, except for

  14. EXPLORING THE IMPACT OF A COMMUNITY HOSPITAL CLOSURE ON OLDER ADULTS: A FOCUS GROUP STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Countouris, Malamo; Gilmore, Sandra; Yonas, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The closing of hospitals has exacerbated challenges for older adults in accessing healthcare, especially those living in economically underserved settings. Through focus groups and a community-engaged approach, our study examined and documented the emergent health needs of older adults following the closing of a local hospital in an economically disadvantaged community. Focus groups were reconvened to assess progress and health needs over time. Analyses of the focus groups (n=37, mean age 77, 84% female) illustrated the impact of the closure and the emergence of the following dominant themes: perceptions of the hospital system, including feelings of abandonment and social isolation; transportation challenges in accessing health care resources; and lack of knowledge and literacy regarding available health care and obtaining health services. Discussion sessions with hospital administrators and participants afforded an opportunity for sharing data and additional assessment. The data and relationships developed with community participants and health system representatives resulted in the production of an information resource about access to health services, tailored for older adults. PMID:24448403

  15. [Adverse events in patients from a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Arriaga-Dávila, José de Jesús; Domínguez-Serrano, María Isabel; Guzmán-Bihouet, Beatriz Filomena; Navarrete-Navarro, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Background: detection of adverse events is part of the safety management in hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of adverse events that occurred in a pediatric hospital. Methods: cross-sectional study of the adverse events occurred in a pediatric hospital from 2007 to 2009. Factors associated with their developmental causes were identified. The statistical analysis was descriptive and bivariate, with contingency tables to estimate the relationship between those factors. A p value = 0.05 was considered significant. Results: a total of 177 adverse events were registered. When they began, human factor occurred in 23 cases (13 %, OR = 1.41, p = 0.001), organizational factor was present in 71 cases (40 %, OR = 1.91, p = 0.236) and technical factor in 46 cases (26 %, OR = 0.87, p = 0.01). Blows or bruises from falls as a result of adverse events occurred in 71 cases (40 %, 95 % CI = 64-78). Conclusions: we found 1.84 events per 100 hospital discharges during the study period. The fall of patients ranked first of the adverse events identified.

  16. MRSA infection in patients hospitalized at Sanglah Hospital: a case series.

    PubMed

    Gayatri, A A Ayu Yuli; Utama, Susila; Somia, Agus; Merati, Tuti P

    2015-01-01

    This is the first report of MRSA infection in Sanglah Hospital. We reviewed eight patients with MRSA infection from microbiologi laboratory records between January and May 2011, than followed by tracing medical records to obtained data of the patients. Five of cases with sepsis, 1 case with osteomyelitis, and the two others with mediastinitis and pneumonia. The patients were kept in private isolated room and barrier-nursing technique was strictly followed. Further action was culturing specimen taken from the patients nose, throat, axilla, and samples taken from the health care workers, with no MRSA colonization were found. Five patients demonstrated good respond to intravenous administration of either vancomycin or linezolide. Three were died due to septic shock before the laboratory culture and antimicrobial susceptibility availabled. All of the strains isolated more than 48 hours after admission and also demonstrated clinical risk factors for hospitalized acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA). These strains had resistance to b-lactams but remain susceptible to many non b-lactam antibiotics, as reported in some community acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) isolates. Future study using molecular typing required to fully understand the magnitude and ongoing evolution of MRSA infections.

  17. Patient expectations and their satisfaction in the context of public hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Berhane, Adugnaw; Enquselassie, Fikre

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient expectations have been recognized as a factor for patient satisfaction in medical consultations. Although various studies explored the relationship between patient expectations and patient satisfaction in developed countries, there is a lack of research evidence in Ethiopia where the meeting of patient expectations could relate to satisfaction. Objective To assess the relationship between patients’ expectations and their satisfaction in the consultation of patients at the outpatient department. Study design Data were collected regarding preconsultation expectations and postconsultation experiences of adult patients attending nine public hospitals. A systematic random sampling method was used where every fifth patient attending an outpatient department was selected. The patients were interviewed before consultation and after consultation to assess whether their pre-consultation expectations were met and to assess how satisfied they were with the consultation. Cronbach’s alpha statistic was used to assess the reliability of the expectation questionnaires, and paired t-test was used to assess any differences between previsit expectations and postvisit experiences. Logistic regression techniques were used to assess variables considered as independent factors for patient satisfaction. Results A total of 776 patients were interviewed, giving a response rate of 92.3%. About 93.7% mentioned a diagnosis for their condition as a reason for their current hospital visits. There is a significant difference between preconsultation expectation and postconsultation expectation. Postconsultation expectation, perceived health status, and perceived control on health were factors identified as increasing patient satisfaction. In addition, the presence of any disappointments or worries, previous experience in health care, and extent of influence on the consultation had a negative influence on satisfaction. Conclusion Postconsultation expectation impacts patient

  18. [Effects of prophylactic doses of potassium iodide on the course of thyroid diseases (1986-1990) diagnosed due to the atomic accident at Czernobyl in adult patients at the outpatient endocrinologic hospital clinic in Lodz].

    PubMed

    Lewiński, A; Swietosławski, J; Wajs, E; Sewerynek, E; Karbownik, M; Rybicka, I; Kułak, J; Skowrońska-Jóźwiak, E; Małolepsza, A

    1991-01-01

    2521 patients of the Lódź Outpatient Endocrinological Clinic (2290 females, 231 males; inhabitants of the central region of Poland Lódź City, Lódź Metropolitan Area, Piotrków, Płock, Sieradz, Skierniewice and Włocławek Provinces in which committed dose equivalent to the thyroid was between 2.7-7.0 mSv [min.-max.] in Skierniewice Province and 4.6-11.7 mSv in Płock Province) were included in the study. The patients were divided into 5 groups: I--persons who did not take the protective dose of potassium iodide (KI) after Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident and did not received any treatment with thyroid preparations or hormones at that time (n = 1282), II--patients who receive KI, once or several times (n = 774), III--patients who took orally iodine tincture or other iodine-containing preparations for the above purposes (n-37), IV--patients who took tablets of Thyroideum (Polfa) Thyroideum siccum (dry thyroid extract), once or several times, as a prophylactic action (n = 79), V--patients who were in the course of continuous treatment with Thyreoideum or thyroid hormones at the time of Chernobyl accident (n = 349). The analysis was performed for all the patients jointly, as well as separately for: either sex, three age groups (18-30, 31-55, 56-70 yrs) and 7 administrative areas specified above. All the patients were subjected into complex clinical examination, serum TSH, T3, T4 concentrations, anti-thyroid membrane antibodies (ATMA) and antithyroglobulin antibodies (ATg) titres, as well as ultrasound, scintigraphy, and fine needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid (the last two according to indications) included. The patients were also examined by means of a special questionnaire (Patient's Inquiry Sheet), which was subsequently submitted to computer analysis. All the doctors' diagnoses from 1986 (17 different diagnoses) and 1990 (27 different diagnoses), as well as the course of diseases, were verified with use of a specially prepared IBM PC/AT computer

  19. Inter-hospital and intra-hospital patient transfer: Recent concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Ashish; Singh, Jasveer

    2016-01-01

    The intra- and inter-hospital patient transfer is an important aspect of patient care which is often undertaken to improve upon the existing management of the patient. It may involve transfer of patient within the same facility for any diagnostic procedure or transfer to another facility with more advanced care. The main aim in all such transfers is maintaining the continuity of medical care. As the transfer of sick patient may induce various physiological alterations which may adversely affect the prognosis of the patient, it should be initiated systematically and according to the evidence-based guidelines. The key elements of safe transfer involve decision to transfer and communication, pre-transfer stabilisation and preparation, choosing the appropriate mode of transfer, i.e., land transport or air transport, personnel accompanying the patient, equipment and monitoring required during the transfer, and finally, the documentation and handover of the patient at the receiving facility. These key elements should be followed in each transfer to prevent any adverse events which may severely affect the patient prognosis. The existing international guidelines are evidence based from various professional bodies in developed countries. However, in developing countries like India, with limited infrastructure, these guidelines can be modified accordingly. The most important aspect is implementation of these guidelines in Indian scenario with periodical quality assessments to improve the standard of care. PMID:27512159

  20. Inter-hospital and intra-hospital patient transfer: Recent concepts.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Ashish; Singh, Jasveer

    2016-07-01

    The intra- and inter-hospital patient transfer is an important aspect of patient care which is often undertaken to improve upon the existing management of the patient. It may involve transfer of patient within the same facility for any diagnostic procedure or transfer to another facility with more advanced care. The main aim in all such transfers is maintaining the continuity of medical care. As the transfer of sick patient may induce various physiological alterations which may adversely affect the prognosis of the patient, it should be initiated systematically and according to the evidence-based guidelines. The key elements of safe transfer involve decision to transfer and communication, pre-transfer stabilisation and preparation, choosing the appropriate mode of transfer, i.e., land transport or air transport, personnel accompanying the patient, equipment and monitoring required during the transfer, and finally, the documentation and handover of the patient at the receiving facility. These key elements should be followed in each transfer to prevent any adverse events which may severely affect the patient prognosis. The existing international guidelines are evidence based from various professional bodies in developed countries. However, in developing countries like India, with limited infrastructure, these guidelines can be modified accordingly. The most important aspect is implementation of these guidelines in Indian scenario with periodical quality assessments to improve the standard of care. PMID:27512159

  1. Inter-hospital and intra-hospital patient transfer: Recent concepts.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Ashish; Singh, Jasveer

    2016-07-01

    The intra- and inter-hospital patient transfer is an important aspect of patient care which is often undertaken to improve upon the existing management of the patient. It may involve transfer of patient within the same facility for any diagnostic procedure or transfer to another facility with more advanced care. The main aim in all such transfers is maintaining the continuity of medical care. As the transfer of sick patient may induce various physiological alterations which may adversely affect the prognosis of the patient, it should be initiated systematically and according to the evidence-based guidelines. The key elements of safe transfer involve decision to transfer and communication, pre-transfer stabilisation and preparation, choosing the appropriate mode of transfer, i.e., land transport or air transport, personnel accompanying the patient, equipment and monitoring required during the transfer, and finally, the documentation and handover of the patient at the receiving facility. These key elements should be followed in each transfer to prevent any adverse events which may severely affect the patient prognosis. The existing international guidelines are evidence based from various professional bodies in developed countries. However, in developing countries like India, with limited infrastructure, these guidelines can be modified accordingly. The most important aspect is implementation of these guidelines in Indian scenario with periodical quality assessments to improve the standard of care.

  2. The factors that influence patients' choice of hospital and treatment.

    PubMed

    Dealey, Carol

    The Government has published a series of papers that aim to turn the NHS into a patient-led service. One aspect of this change is to allow patients choice in their selection of a hospital for elective surgery. This programme hopes eventually to extend choice to other areas of care. This article reviews the literature surrounding patient choice and identifies the issues that affect how patients will reach a decision. Although there is limited information on the subject, a clear difference has been identified between those with acute conditions and those with chronic conditions. Nurses need to be aware of both the policy and the underpinning concepts and patients' views of the topic because it will bring about a major change in the culture of the NHS. PMID:15928577

  3. Should psychiatric patients be granted access to their hospital records?

    PubMed

    Sergeant, H

    1986-12-01

    Beginning in September 1987, the British public will have the right to consult their computerized medical records and by extension, it is expected, noncomputerized ones as well. The author analyzed the case notes of 100 consecutive patients admitted under his care to a psychiatric day hospital. He classified material likely to affect patients adversely as puzzling or unintelligible, alarming, apparently insulting or objectionable, or sensitive information from or about others. Sergeant rejects proposals to omit sensitive material, to keep secret notes, or to grant access only to some psychiatric patients or to deny access to psychiatric patients as a class. Maintaining that there is no dividing line between somatic and psychological medicine, he concludes that access to personal health data for all patients should be limited to the disclosure of bare administrative details. Further information should be supplied within the traditional medical consultation.

  4. Acoustical criteria for hospital patient rooms: Resolving competing requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Bennett M.

    2003-10-01

    The acoustical criteria for patient rooms in hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation facilities may be based on several needs. One important requirement is that noise levels in the room be conducive to restful sleep. Also, caregivers must have easy auditory and visual access to the patients, and be able to hear vital sign monitor alarms. This often means that patient rooms are located near central nurse stations and that patient room doors are left open. Further, the recently published federal privacy standards developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HSS) under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) require that ``appropriate physical safeguards'' be put in place to protect the confidentiality of patient health information. The simultaneous and competing requirements for speech privacy, caregiver access, and good sleeping conditions present a serious acoustical challenge to health care facility designers. Specific facility design issues and potential solution strategies are presented.

  5. Effects of a comprehensive nutritional program on pressure ulcer healing, length of hospital stay, and charges to patients.

    PubMed

    Allen, Beverlin

    2013-05-01

    The burden of pressure ulcers will intensify because of a rapidly increasing elderly population. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a comprehensive, interdisciplinary nutritional protocol on pressure ulcer wound healing, length of hospital stays, and charges for pressure ulcer management. The pre/post quasi-experimental design study comprised of 100 patients (50 patients in each group) 60 years or older with pressure ulcer. Research questions were analyzed using descriptive statistics, frequencies, chi-square tests, and t tests. Study findings indicate that the intervention was effective in improving pressure ulcer wound healing, decreasing both hospital length of stay (LOS) for treatment of pressure ulcer and total hospital LOS, while showing no significant additional charges for treatment of pressure ulcers. The older adults are at the highest risk of developing pressure ulcers that result in prolonged hospitalization, high health care costs, increased mortality, and decreased quality of life.

  6. New rights for deaf patients; new responsibilities for mental hospitals.

    PubMed

    Raifman, L J; Vernon, M

    1996-01-01

    In an era in which mental hospital administrators are confronted by shrinking budgets and cost containment strategies in order to survive, the recently enacted Americans with Disabilities Act requires their special attention. This article addresses the anticipated effect of the ADA upon inpatient psychiatric facilities. We assume that adminstrators should anticipate increased ligation and settlement costs associated with specialized services to deaf and other qualifying patients who seek equal access to psychiatric services provided in mental hospitals. It is our view that administrators can reduce the cost of implementing specialized services to deaf patient by developing a proactive plan of implementation. The authors analyze recent court consent decrees, and offer a three step plan for implementation.

  7. Risk Factors for Inpatient Hospital Admission in Pediatric Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to determine the risk factors for inpatient admission of pediatric burn patients. Materials & methods This cross-sectional study uses data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (HCUP KID) for the years of 2003, 2006, 2009, and 2012 to estimate the risk factors for inpatient admission for pediatric patients who sustained a burn injury. Patients who sustained a burn between the ages of 1 and 18 years were included. Results A total of 43,453 patients met inclusion criteria. Of those, 42.3% were Caucasian, 20.1% were African American, and 19.3% were Hispanic. Males comprised 63.5% of the studied population. The month of July was associated with a 31.8% increased chance (p=.011) of being admitted to hospital for a pediatric burn. It was found that patients being admitted had a 32.2% increased chance (p=.002) of a fluid and electrolyte abnormality and a 61.0% increased chance (p=.027) of drug abuse.  Conclusions Pediatric burn patients are more likely to be admitted to the hospital having a fluid and electrolyte abnormality, having a drug abuse status, and/or during the month of July. PMID:27335714

  8. Disclosing discourses: biomedical and hospitality discourses in patient education materials.

    PubMed

    Öresland, Stina; Friberg, Febe; Määttä, Sylvia; Öhlen, Joakim

    2015-09-01

    Patient education materials have the potential to strengthen the health literacy of patients. Previous studies indicate that readability and suitability may be improved. The aim of this study was to explore and analyze discourses inherent in patient education materials since analysis of discourses could illuminate values and norms inherent in them. Clinics in Sweden that provided colorectal cancer surgery allowed access to written information and 'welcome letters' sent to patients. The material was analysed by means of discourse analysis, embedded in Derrida's approach of deconstruction. The analysis revealed a biomedical discourse and a hospitality discourse. In the biomedical discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as the messenger of medical information while that of the patients as the carrier of diagnoses and recipients of biomedical information. In the hospitality discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as hosts who invite and welcome the patients as guests. The study highlights the need to eliminate paternalism and fosters a critical reflective stance among professionals regarding power and paternalism inherent in health care communication.

  9. The Association Between an Ultra-Brief Cognitive Screening in Older Adults and Hospital Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yevchak, Andrea M; Doherty, Kelly; Archambault, Elizabeth G; Kelly, Brittany; Fonda, Jennifer R.; Rudolph, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Background While frequently recommended, hospital cognitive assessment is infrequently completed due to clinical and time constraints Objective This analysis aimed to evaluate the relationship between performance on ultra-brief cognitive screening instruments and hospital outcomes. Design This is a secondary data analysis of a quality improvement project Setting Tertiary Veterans Administration Hospital in New England Patients Patients, ≥60 years old, admitted to the hospital Intervention none Measurements Upon admission, patients were administered two cognitive screening tools. The modified Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale (mRASS) is a measure of arousal that can be completed in 15 seconds. The months of the year backward (MOYB) is a measure of attention that can be administered in ≤1 minute. In-hospital outcomes included: restraints and mortality, while discharge outcomes included length of stay (LOS), discharge not home, and variable direct costs. Risk ratios were calculated for dichotomous outcomes and unadjusted Poisson regression for continuous outcomes. Results Patients (n=3,232) were screened. Altered arousal occurred in 15% of patients (n=495); incorrect MOYB was recorded in 45% (n=1,457). Relative to those with normal arousal and attention, those with abnormal mRASS and incorrect MOYB had increased length of stay (IRR 1.23; 95%CI 1.17, 1.30), restraint use (RR 5.05; 95%CI 3.29, 7.75), in-hospital mortality (RR 3.46; 95%CI 1.24, 9.63), and decreased discharge home (RR 2.97; 95%CI 2.42, 3.64). Hospital variable direct costs were slightly, but not significantly, higher (IRR 1.02; 95%CI 0.88, 1.17). Conclusion Impaired performance on ultra-brief cognitive assessments of arousal and attention provide valuable insights regarding hospital outcomes. PMID:26374602

  10. Auditing the nutrition content of patient charts: one hospital's perspective.

    PubMed

    Skopelianos, S

    1993-01-01

    Chart audits are traditionally based on patient charts categorized by disease. An alternate approach, using categorization by four types of nutrition care intervention, has been developed by University Hospital. This paper describes the process followed, criteria developed and the results of two complete chart audits. It was shown that nutrition profile forms improved documentation. Overall norms increased significantly from 81.5% to 90% (p < .05). Discussion centres on the evolutionary process from quality assurance to continuous quality improvement. PMID:10128409

  11. Spontaneous gram-negative bacillary meningitis in adult patients: characteristics and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spontaneous meningitis caused by gram-negative bacilli in adult patients is uncommon and poorly characterized. Our objective is to describe and compare the characteristics and the outcome of adult patients with spontaneous gram-negative bacilli meningitis (GNBM) and spontaneous meningitis due to other pathogens. Methods Prospective single hospital-based observational cohort study conducted between 1982 and 2006 in a university tertiary hospital in Barcelona (Spain). The Main Outcome Measure: In-hospital mortality. Results Gram-negative bacilli meningitis was diagnosed in 40 (7%) of 544 episodes of spontaneous acute bacterial meningitis. The most common pathogens were Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas species. On admission, characteristics associated with spontaneous gram-negative bacilli meningitis by multivariate modeling were advanced age, history of cancer, nosocomial acquisition of infection, urinary tract infection as distant focus of infection, absence of rash, hypotension, and a high cerebrospinal fluid white-cell count. Nine (23%) episodes were acquired in the hospital and they were most commonly caused by Pseudomonas. The in-hospital mortality rate was 53%. The mortality rate was higher among patients with Gram-negative bacillary meningitis than among those with other bacterial meningitis and their risk of death was twenty times higher than among patients infected with Neisseria meningitidis (odds ratio 20.47; 95% confidence interval 4.03-103.93; p<0.001). Conclusions Gram-negative bacilli cause 9% of spontaneous bacterial meningitis of known etiology in adults. Characteristics associated with GNBM include advanced age, history of cancer, nosocomial acquisition, and urinary tract infection as distant focus of infection. The mortality rate is higher among patients with gram-negative bacillary meningitis than among those with other bacterial meningitides. PMID:24079517

  12. AARC Clinical Practice Guideline: Effectiveness of Pharmacologic Airway Clearance Therapies in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Shawna L; Rubin, Bruce K; Haas, Carl F; Volsko, Teresa A; Drescher, Gail S; O'Malley, Catherine A

    2015-07-01

    Aerosolized medications are used as airway clearance therapy to treat a variety of airway diseases. These guidelines were developed from a systematic review with the purpose of determining whether the use of these medications to promote airway clearance improves oxygenation and respiratory mechanics, reduces ventilator time and ICU stay, and/or resolves atelectasis/consolidation compared with usual care. Recombinant human dornase alfa should not be used in hospitalized adult and pediatric patients without cystic fibrosis. The routine use of bronchodilators to aid in secretion clearance is not recommended. The routine use of aerosolized N-acetylcysteine to improve airway clearance is not recommended. Aerosolized agents to change mucus biophysical properties or promote airway clearance are not recommended for adult or pediatric patients with neuromuscular disease, respiratory muscle weakness, or impaired cough. Mucolytics are not recommended to treat atelectasis in postoperative adult or pediatric patients, and the routine administration of bronchodilators to postoperative patients is not recommended. There is no high-level evidence related to the use of bronchodilators, mucolytics, mucokinetics, and novel therapy to promote airway clearance in these populations. PMID:26113566

  13. AARC clinical practice guideline: effectiveness of nonpharmacologic airway clearance therapies in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Shawna L; Rubin, Bruce K; Drescher, Gail S; Haas, Carl F; O'Malley, Catherine A; Volsko, Teresa A; Branson, Richard D; Hess, Dean R

    2013-12-01

    Airway clearance therapy (ACT) is used in a variety of settings for a variety of ailments. These guidelines were developed from a systematic review with the purpose of determining whether the use of nonpharmacologic ACT improves oxygenation, reduces length of time on the ventilator, reduces stay in the ICU, resolves atelectasis/consolidation, and/or improves respiratory mechanics, versus usual care in 3 populations. For hospitalized, adult and pediatric patients without cystic fibrosis, 1) chest physiotherapy (CPT) is not recommended for the routine treatment of uncomplicated pneumonia; 2) ACT is not recommended for routine use in patients with COPD; 3) ACT may be considered in patients with COPD with symptomatic secretion retention, guided by patient preference, toleration, and effectiveness of therapy; 4) ACT is not recommended if the patient is able to mobilize secretions with cough, but instruction in effective cough technique may be useful. For adult and pediatric patients with neuromuscular disease, respiratory muscle weakness, or impaired cough, 1) cough assist techniques should be used in patients with neuromuscular disease, particularly when peak cough flow is < 270 L/min; CPT, positive expiratory pressure, intrapulmonary percussive ventilation, and high-frequency chest wall compression cannot be recommended, due to insufficient evidence. For postoperative adult and pediatric patients, 1) incentive spirometry is not recommended for routine, prophylactic use in postoperative patients, 2) early mobility and ambulation is recommended to reduce postoperative complications and promote airway clearance, 3) ACT is not recommended for routine postoperative care. The lack of available high-level evidence related to ACT should prompt the design and completion of properly designed studies to determine the appropriate role for these therapies. PMID:24222709

  14. Risk Factors for Nonelective Hospitalization in Frail and Older Adult, Inner-City Outpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damush, Teresa M.; Smith, David M.; Perkins, Anthony J.; Dexter, Paul R.; Smith, Faye

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: In our study, we sought to improve the accuracy of predicting the risk of hospitalization and to identify older, inner-city patients who could be targeted for preventive interventions. Design and Methods: Participants (56% were African American) in a randomized trial were from a primary care practice and included 1,041 patients living in…

  15. Education to improve the triage of mental health patients in general hospital emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Diana E; Brown, Anne-Marie; Hughes, Linda; Motluk, Lori

    2006-10-01

    General hospital emergency departments (EDs) are obvious places for individuals in distress or in a mental health crisis to seek assistance. However, triage nurses admit to a lack of expertise and confidence in psychiatric assessment which can result in less accurate assessments than for medical or trauma presentations. The objectives of a collaborative project between an Adult Mental Health Program and an Adult Emergency Program in a Canadian regional health authority were to: provide education and training to triage nurses regarding mental health and illness; monitor the transit of mental health patients through the ED; monitor wait times; and determine the adequacy of the Canadian Triage Acuity and Assessment Scale in the triage of psychiatric presentations. Although the percentages of patients triaged as "emergent" did not change as a result of the education, the percentage of patients who were triaged as "not urgent" but required hospitalization was significantly reduced. Although average lengths of stay in the ED were also reduced after the education, this may or may not have been related to the educational sessions. The project was successful in increasing collaboration between the two departments and has resulted in enhanced, on-going mental health education for ED nurses.

  16. Extensive antibiotic prescription rate among hospitalized patients in Uganda: but with frequent missed-dose days

    PubMed Central

    Kiguba, Ronald; Karamagi, Charles; Bird, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the patterns of systemic antibiotic use and missed-dose days and detail the prescription, dispensing and administration of frequently used hospital-initiated antibiotics among Ugandan inpatients. Methods This was a prospective cohort of consented adult inpatients admitted on the medical and gynaecological wards of the 1790 bed Mulago National Referral Hospital. Results Overall, 79% (603/762; 95% CI: 76%–82%) of inpatients received at least one antibiotic during hospitalization while 39% (300/762; 95% CI: 36%–43%) had used at least one antibiotic in the 4 weeks pre-admission; 1985 antibiotic DDDs, half administered parenterally, were consumed in 3741 inpatient-days. Two-fifths of inpatients who received at least one of the five frequently used hospital-initiated antibiotics (ceftriaxone, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, amoxicillin and azithromycin) missed at least one antibiotic dose-day (44%, 243/558). The per-day risk of missed antibiotic administration was greatest on day 1: ceftriaxone (36%, 143/398), metronidazole (27%, 67/245), ciprofloxacin (34%, 39/114) and all inpatients who missed at least one dose-day of prescribed amoxicillin and azithromycin. Most patients received fewer doses than were prescribed: ceftriaxone (74%, 273/371), ciprofloxacin (90%, 94/105) and metronidazole (97%, 222/230). Of prescribed doses, only 62% of ceftriaxone doses (1178/1895), 35% of ciprofloxacin doses (396/1130) and 27% of metronidazole doses (1043/3862) were administered. Seven percent (13/188) of patients on intravenous metronidazole and 6% (5/87) on intravenous ciprofloxacin switched to oral route. Conclusions High rates of antibiotic use both pre-admission and during hospitalization were observed, with low parenteral/oral switch of hospital-initiated antibiotics. Underadministration of prescribed antibiotics was common, especially on the day of prescription, risking loss of efficacy and antibiotic resistance. PMID:26945712

  17. Bringing international patients to American hospitals: the Johns Hopkins perspective.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, J J

    1998-01-01

    American health care institutions are reaching out to the foreign market, assiduously cultivating patients from overseas. This innovative strategy, designed in part to help U.S. medical centers cope with cuts in federal funding, HMO pressures, and decreasing patient volumes, dovetails nicely with the current climate of global expansion in business and worldwide awareness of American medical expertise. This article describes the International Services Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The author and program director addresses its origins, implementation, outcomes, and the obstacles planners faced in launching a vigorous, international outreach initiative. PMID:10182529

  18. Ten Years, Forty Decision Aids, And Thousands Of Patient Uses: Shared Decision Making At Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Sepucha, Karen R; Simmons, Leigh H; Barry, Michael J; Edgman-Levitan, Susan; Licurse, Adam M; Chaguturu, Sreekanth K

    2016-04-01

    Shared decision making is a core component of population health strategies aimed at improving patient engagement. Massachusetts General Hospital's integration of shared decision making into practice has focused on the following three elements: developing a culture receptive to, and health care providers skilled in, shared decision making conversations; using patient decision aids to help inform and engage patients; and providing infrastructure and resources to support the implementation of shared decision making in practice. In the period 2005-15, more than 900 clinicians and other staff members were trained in shared decision making, and more than 28,000 orders for one of about forty patient decision aids were placed to support informed patient-centered decisions. We profile two different implementation initiatives that increased the use of patient decision aids at the hospital's eighteen adult primary care practices, and we summarize key elements of the shared decision making program.

  19. Factors Associated with Decision to Hospitalize Emergency Department Patients with Skin and Soft Tissue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Talan, David A.; Salhi, Bisan A.; Moran, Gregory J.; Mower, William R.; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Krishnadasan, Anusha; Rothman, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Emergency department (ED) hospitalizations for skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) have increased, while concern for costs has grown and outpatient parenteral antibiotic options have expanded. To identify opportunities to reduce admissions, we explored factors that influence the decision to hospitalize an ED patient with a SSTI. Methods We conducted a prospective study of adults presenting to 12 U.S. EDs with a SSTI in which physicians were surveyed as to reason(s) for admission, and clinical characteristics were correlated with disposition. We employed chi-square binary recursive partitioning to assess independent predictors of admission. Serious adverse events were recorded. Results Among 619 patients, median age was 38.7 years. The median duration of symptoms was 4.0 days, 96 (15.5%) had a history of fever, and 46 (7.5%) had failed treatment. Median maximal length of erythema was 4.0cm (IQR, 2.0–7.0). Upon presentation, 39 (6.3%) had temperature >38°C, 81 (13.1%) tachycardia, 35 (5.7%), tachypnea, and 5 (0.8%) hypotension; at the time of the ED disposition decision, these findings were present in 9 (1.5%), 11 (1.8%), 7 (1.1%), and 3 (0.5%) patients, respectively. Ninety-four patients (15.2%) were admitted, 3 (0.5%) to the intensive care unit (ICU). Common reasons for admission were need for intravenous antibiotics in 80 (85.1%; the only reason in 41.5%), surgery in 23 (24.5%), and underlying disease in 11 (11.7%). Hospitalization was significantly associated with the following factors in decreasing order of importance: history of fever (present in 43.6% of those admitted, and 10.5% discharged; maximal length of erythema >10cm (43.6%, 11.3%); history of failed treatment (16.1%, 6.0%); any co-morbidity (61.7%, 27.2%); and age >65 years (5.4%, 1.3%). Two patients required amputation and none had ICU transfer or died. Conclusion ED SSTI patients with fever, larger lesions, and co-morbidities tend to be hospitalized, almost all to non-critical areas

  20. Identifying Patients with Bacteremia in Community-Hospital Emergency Rooms: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Taro; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Maki, Nobuyuki; Gibo, Koichiro; Tsugihashi, Yukio; Doi, Asako; Fukuma, Shingo; Yamazaki, Shin; Kajii, Eiji; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) To develop a clinical prediction rule to identify patients with bacteremia, using only information that is readily available in the emergency room (ER) of community hospitals, and (2) to test the validity of that rule with a separate, independent set of data. Design Multicenter retrospective cohort study. Setting To derive the clinical prediction rule we used data from 3 community hospitals in Japan (derivation). We tested the rule using data from one other community hospital (validation), which was not among the three “derivation” hospitals. Participants Adults (age ≥ 16 years old) who had undergone blood-culture testing while in the ER between April 2011 and March 2012. For the derivation data, n = 1515 (randomly sampled from 7026 patients), and for the validation data n = 467 (from 823 patients). Analysis We analyzed 28 candidate predictors of bacteremia, including demographic data, signs and symptoms, comorbid conditions, and basic laboratory data. Chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression were used to derive an integer risk score (the “ID-BactER” score). Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (i.e., the AUC) were computed. Results There were 241 cases of bacteremia in the derivation data. Eleven candidate predictors were used in the ID-BactER score: age, chills, vomiting, mental status, temperature, systolic blood pressure, abdominal sign, white blood-cell count, platelets, blood urea nitrogen, and C-reactive protein. The AUCs was 0.80 (derivation) and 0.74 (validation). For ID-BactER scores ≥ 2, the sensitivities for derivation and validation data were 98% and 97%, and specificities were 20% and 14%, respectively. Conclusions The ID-BactER score can be computed from information that is readily available in the ERs of community hospitals. Future studies should focus on developing a score with a higher specificity while maintaining the desired sensitivity

  1. Depression Increases Stroke Hospitalization Cost: An Analysis of 17,010 Stroke Patients in 2008 by Race and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Husaini, Baqar; Levine, Robert; Sharp, Linda; Cain, Van; Novotny, Meggan; Hull, Pamela; Orum, Gail; Sampson, Uchechukwu; Moonis, Majaz

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This analysis focuses on the effect of depression on the cost of hospitalization of stroke patients. Methods. Data on 17,010 stroke patients (primary diagnosis) were extracted from 2008 Tennessee Hospital Discharge Data System. Three groups of patients were compared: (1) stroke only (SO, n = 7,850), (2) stroke + depression (S+D, n = 3,965), and (3) stroke + other mental health diagnoses (S+M, n = 5,195). Results. Of all adult patients, 4.3% were diagnosed with stroke. Stroke was more prevalent among blacks than whites (4.5% versus 4.2%, P < 0.001) and among males than females (5.1% versus 3.7%, P < 0.001). Nearly one-quarter of stroke patients (23.3%) were diagnosed with depression/anxiety. Hospital stroke cost was higher among depressed stroke patients (S+D) compared to stroke only (SO) patients ($77,864 versus $47,790, P < 0.001), and among S+D, cost was higher for black males compared to white depressed males ($97,196 versus $88,115, P < 0.001). Similar racial trends in cost emerged among S+D females. Conclusion. Depression in stroke patients is associated with increased hospitalization costs. Higher stroke cost among blacks may reflect the impact of comorbidities and the delay in care of serious health conditions. Attention to early detection of depression in stroke patients might reduce inpatient healthcare costs. PMID:23555070

  2. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotypes and disability in hospitalized older patients.

    PubMed

    Seripa, Davide; Paroni, Giulia; Matera, Maria G; Gravina, Carolina; Scarcelli, Carlo; Corritore, Michele; D'Ambrosio, Luigi P; Urbano, Maria; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Copetti, Massimiliano; Kehoe, Patrick G; Panza, Francesco; Pilotto, Alberto

    2011-09-01

    The association between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotypes and functional decline in older adults remains controversial. To assess if ACE gene variations influences functional abilities at older age, the present study explored the association between the common ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and disability measured with activities of daily living (ADL) in hospitalized older patients. We analyzed the frequency of the ACE genotypes (I/I, I/D, and D/D) in a population of 2,128 hospitalized older patients divided according to presence or absence of ADL disability. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for possible confounding factors, identified an association between the I/I genotype with ADL disability (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.04-2.29). This association was significant in men (OR=2.01, 95% CI 1.07-3.78), but not in women (OR=1.36, 95% CI 0.82-2.25). These results suggested a possible role of the ACE polymorphism as a genetic marker for ADL disability in hospitalized older patients.

  3. Thermal comfort of patients in hospital ward areas.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R. M.; Rae, A.

    1977-01-01

    The patient is identified as being of prime importance for comfort standards in hospital ward areas, other ward users being expected to adjust their dress to suit the conditions necessary for patients comfort. A study to identify the optimum steady state conditions for patients comfort is then described. Although this study raises some doubts as to the applicability of the standard thermal comfort assessment techniques to ward areas, it is felt that its results give a good indication of the steady-state conditions preferred by the patients. These were an air temperature of between 21-5 degrees and 22 degrees C and a relative humidity of between 30% and 70%, where the air velocity was less than 0-1 m/s and the mean radiant temperature was close to air temperature. PMID:264497

  4. Epilepsy in Adults with Supratentorial Glioblastoma: Incidence and Influence Factors and Prophylaxis in 184 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuli; Zhang, Junchen; Zhang, Shaohui; Fu, Xiangping

    2016-01-01

    Aim To analyze the incidence of epilepsy in adult patients with supratentorial glioblastoma, assess the factors influencing the development of epilepsy in these cases, and evaluate patients’ response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a series of 184 patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the 184 adult patients diagnosed with supratentorial glioblastoma. All subjects were treated within our hospital and subsequently died between 2003 and 2013. The incidence of epilepsy was assessed before and after initial resection and reexamined every 2 months thereafter. We evaluated the efficacy of prophylactic AEDs in this patient population based on the gathered incidence data. Results Of 184 patients, 43 (23.37%) were diagnosed with epilepsy before their initial resection. The total incidence of epilepsy (both pre- and postoperative) was 68.48%. The prevalence of active epilepsy reached over 80% in patients with epilepsy and survival of greater than 13 months postoperatively. Patients with glioblastoma in the frontal and/or temporal lobes had a higher prevalence of epilepsy. In the 43 patients with preoperative epilepsy, total resection of glioblastoma resulted in significantly lower seizure frequency. Patients who received epilepsy prophylaxis with AEDs for at least 6 months had significantly fewer seizures and higher Karnofsky scores than those receiving AEDs for less than one month or not at all. Conclusion The incidence of epilepsy in adult patients with glioblastoma was high and responded poorly to AEDs in the short term. However, when taken for longer periods, AEDs can reduce the frequency of seizures in patients with glioblastoma. PMID:27438472

  5. Patient and Hospital Characteristics Associated with Inappropriate Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul S.; Rao, Sunil V.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Rumsfeld, John S.; Gurm, Hitinder S.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Cavender, Matthew A.; Kennedy, Kevin; Spertus, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine whether rates of inappropriate PCI differ by demographic characteristics and insurance status. Background Prior studies have found that blacks, women and those with public or no health insurance are less likely to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Whether this reflects potential overuse in whites, men, and privately insured patients, in addition to underuse in disadvantaged populations, is unknown. Methods Within the NCDR® CathPCI Registry®, we identified 221,254 non-acute PCIs performed between July 2009 and March 2011. PCI appropriateness was determined using Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. Multivariable hierarchical regression models evaluated the association between patient demographics and insurance status with AUC-defined inappropriate PCI. Results Of 211,254 non-acute PCIs, 25,749 (12.2%) were classified as inappropriate. After multivariable adjustment, men (adjusted OR, 1.08 [95% CI: 1.05–1.11]; P<0.001) and whites (adjusted OR, 1.09 [1.05–1.14]; P<0.001) were more likely to undergo an inappropriate PCI, compared with women and non-whites. Compared with privately insured patients, those with Medicare (adjusted OR, 0.85 [0.83–0.88]), other public insurance (adjusted OR, 0.78 [0.73–0.83]) and no insurance (adjusted OR, 0.56 [0.50–0.61]) were less likely to undergo an inappropriate PCI (P<0.001). Additionally, compared with urban hospitals, those admitted at rural hospitals were less likely to undergo inappropriate PCI, whereas those at suburban hospitals were more likely. Conclusion For non-acute indications, PCIs categorized as inappropriate were more commonly performed in men, patients of white race, and those with private insurance. Higher rates of PCI in these patient populations may be, in part, due to procedural overuse. PMID:24055743

  6. National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH): results of the national audit of adult epilepsy in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Peter A; Kirkham, Jamie J; Marson, Anthony G; Pearson, Mike G

    2015-01-01

    Objectives About 100 000 people present to hospitals each year in England with an epileptic seizure. How they are managed is unknown; thus, the National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH) set out to assess prior care, management of the acute event and follow-up of these patients. This paper describes the data from the second audit conducted in 2013. Setting 154 emergency departments (EDs) across the UK. Participants Data from 4544 attendances (median age of 45 years, 57% men) showed that 61% had a prior diagnosis of epilepsy, 12% other neurological problems and 22% were first seizure cases. Each ED identified 30 consecutive adult cases presenting due to a seizure. Primary and secondary outcome measures Details were recorded of the patient's prior care, management at hospital and onward referral to neurological specialists onto an online database. Descriptive results are reported at national level. Results Of those with epilepsy, 498 (18%) were on no antiepileptic drug therapy and 1330 (48%) were on monotherapy. Assessments were often incomplete and witness histories were sought in only 759 (75%) of first seizure patients, 58% were seen by a senior doctor and 57% were admitted. For first seizure patients, advice on further seizure management was given to 264 (27%) and only 55% were referred to a neurologist or epilepsy specialist. For each variable, there was wide variability among sites that was not explicable. For the sites who partook in both audits, there was a trend towards better care in 2013, but this was small and dwarfed by the intersite variability. Conclusions These results have parallels with the Sentinel Audit of Stroke performed a decade earlier. There is wide intersite variability in care covering the entire care pathway, and a need for better organised and accessible care for these patients. PMID:25829372

  7. Patient factors contributing to variation in same-hospital readmission rate.

    PubMed

    Henke, Rachel Mosher; Karaca, Zeynal; Lin, Hollis; Wier, Lauren M; Marder, William; Wong, Herbert S

    2015-06-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Hospital Readmission Reduction Program and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Innovations Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Initiative hold hospitals accountable for readmissions that occur at other hospitals. A few studies have described the extent to which hospital readmissions occur at the original place of treatment (i.e., same-hospital readmissions). This study uses data from 16 states to describe variation in same-hospital readmissions by patient characteristics across multiple conditions. We found that the majority of 30-day readmissions occur at the same hospital, although rates varied considerably by condition. A significant number of hospitals had very low rates of same-hospital readmissions, meaning that the majority of their readmissions went to other hospitals. Future research should examine why some hospitals are able to retain patients for a same-hospital readmission and others are not.

  8. 78 FR 6819 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From The Connecticut Hospital Association...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Relinquishment From The Connecticut Hospital Association Federal Patient Safety Organization AGENCY: Agency for... The Connecticut Hospital Association Federal Patient Safety Organization of its status as a PSO, and... PSOs. AHRQ has accepted a notification from The Connecticut Hospital Association Federal Patient...

  9. Intraoperative Core Temperature Patterns, Transfusion Requirement, and Hospital Duration in Patients Warmed with Forced Air

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhuo; Honar, Hooman; Sessler, Daniel I.; Dalton, Jarrod E.; Yang, Dongsheng; Panjasawatwong, Krit; Deroee, Armin F.; Salmasi, Vafi; Saager, Leif; Kurz, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Core temperature patterns in patients warmed with forced-air remain poorly characterized. Also unknown is the extent to which transient and mild intraoperative hypothermia contributes to adverse outcomes in broad populations. Methods We evaluated esophageal (core) temperatures in 58,814 adults having surgery lasting >60 min who were warmed with forced air. Independent associations between hypothermic exposure and transfusion requirement and duration of hospitalization was evaluated. Results In every percentile subgroup, core temperature decreased during the first hour and subsequently increased. The mean lowest core temperature during the first hour was 35.7 ± 0.6°C. Sixty-four percent of the patients reached a core temperature threshold of <36°C 45 min after induction; 29% reached a core temperature threshold of <35.5°C. Nearly half the patients had continuous core temperatures <36°C for more than an hour, and 20% of the patients were <35.5°C for more than an hour. Twenty percent of patients had continuous core temperatures <36°C for more than 2 h, and 8% of the patients were below 35.5°C for more than 2 h. Hypothermia was independently associated with both transfusion and duration of hospitalization, although prolongation of hospitalization was small. Conclusions Even in actively warmed patients, hypothermia is routine in the first hour of anesthesia. Thereafter, average core temperatures progressively increase. Nonetheless, intraoperative hypothermia was common, and often prolonged. Hypothermia was associated with increased transfusion requirement which is consistent with numerous randomized trials. PMID:25603202

  10. Socioeconomic analysis of patient-centric networks: effects of patients and hospitals' characteristics and network structure on hospitalization costs.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Alireza; Uddin, Shahadat; Hossain, Liaquat

    2012-06-01

    Improving operations and delivery of cost-effective healthcare services is considered to be an important area of investigation due to the challenges in allocation of resources in meeting the increasing cost of health care for the twenty-first century. To date, appropriate mechanisms for systematic evaluation of hospital operations and its impact of the delivery of cost-effective healthcare services are lacking. This is, perhaps, the first study, which focuses on using large insurance claims data to develop a social network-based model for exploring the effect of patient-doctor tie strength and patient socio-demographic factors for exploring the social structure of operations and delivery of cost-effective healthcare services. We suggest that delivery of cost-effective healthcare services and operation is embedded within the social structure of hospitals. By exploring the mode of hospital operations in terms of their patient-centric care network, we are able to develop a better understanding of the operation and delivery of cost-effective healthcare services. PMID:21347691

  11. Missed Opportunities to Diagnose Tuberculosis Are Common Among Hospitalized Patients and Patients Seen in Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron C.; Polgreen, Linnea A.; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Hornick, Douglas B.; Polgreen, Philip M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Delayed diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) may lead to worse outcomes and additional TB exposures. Methods. To estimate the potential number of misdiagnosed TB cases, we linked all hospital and emergency department (ED) visits in California′s Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) databases (2005–2011). We defined a potential misdiagnosis as a visit with a new, primary diagnosis of TB preceded by a recent respiratory-related hospitalization or ED visit. Next, we calculated the prevalence of potential missed TB diagnoses for different time windows. We also computed odds ratios (OR) comparing the likelihood of a previous respiratory diagnosis in patients with and without a TB diagnosis, controlling for patient and hospital characteristics. Finally, we determined the correlation between a hospital′s TB volume and the prevalence of potential TB misdiagnoses. Results. Within 30 days before an initial TB diagnosis, 15.9% of patients (25.7% for 90 days) had a respiratory-related hospitalization or ED visit. Also, within 30 days, prior respiratory-related visits were more common in patients with TB than other patients (OR = 3.83; P < .01), controlling for patient and hospital characteristics. Respiratory diagnosis-related visits were increasingly common until approximately 90 days before the TB diagnosis. Finally, potential misdiagnoses were more common in hospitals with fewer TB cases (ρ = −0.845; P < .01). Conclusions. Missed opportunities to diagnose TB are common and correlate inversely with the number of TB cases diagnosed at a hospital. Thus, as TB becomes infrequent, delayed diagnoses may increase, initiating outbreaks in communities and hospitals. PMID:26705537

  12. Predictors of ertapenem therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in hospitalized adults: the importance of renal insufficiency and urinary pH.

    PubMed

    Cunha, B A; Giuga, J; Gerson, S

    2016-04-01

    In hospitalized adults acute uncomplicated cystitis (AUC) and catheter associated bacteriuria (CAB) may be treated with oral antibiotics. With AUC or CAB due to extended spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL) + Gram negative bacilli (GNB) physicians often use intravenous therapy, e.g., ertapenem. We reviewed our recent experience in hospitalized adults with AUC and CAB treated with ertapenem. Therapeutic efficacy of ertapenem was assessed by decreased pyuria/bacteriuria, and elimination of the uropathogen. The effectiveness of ertapenem in the presence of renal insufficiency (CrCl < 50 ml/min) and acid and alkaline urinary pH were evaluated. In addition, rapidity of eradication of bacteriuria was assessed by time to negative urine cultures (TTNC). In those with an acid urinary pH ertapenem was highly effective in eliminating bacteriuria (TTNC < 3 days). TTNC was prolonged ( >3 days) in patients with decreased renal function and alkaline urinary pH. We reviewed 45 hospitalized adults with AUC or CAB to determine if renal insufficiency and or alkaline urinary pH affected ertapenem efficacy. In the 33 adult hospitalized patients with AUC and 12 with CAB, we found that ertapenem was consistently effective in eliminating the GNB bacteriuria. In hospitalized adults, the presence of renal insufficiency and acid urine, bacteriuria was eliminated in < 3 days. However, in those with renal insufficiency and an alkaline urine pH, the rapidity of cure, i.e., time to negative cultures (TTNC) was prolonged, i.e., > 3 days which has not been previously reported. PMID:26873378

  13. Predictors of ertapenem therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in hospitalized adults: the importance of renal insufficiency and urinary pH.

    PubMed

    Cunha, B A; Giuga, J; Gerson, S

    2016-04-01

    In hospitalized adults acute uncomplicated cystitis (AUC) and catheter associated bacteriuria (CAB) may be treated with oral antibiotics. With AUC or CAB due to extended spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL) + Gram negative bacilli (GNB) physicians often use intravenous therapy, e.g., ertapenem. We reviewed our recent experience in hospitalized adults with AUC and CAB treated with ertapenem. Therapeutic efficacy of ertapenem was assessed by decreased pyuria/bacteriuria, and elimination of the uropathogen. The effectiveness of ertapenem in the presence of renal insufficiency (CrCl < 50 ml/min) and acid and alkaline urinary pH were evaluated. In addition, rapidity of eradication of bacteriuria was assessed by time to negative urine cultures (TTNC). In those with an acid urinary pH ertapenem was highly effective in eliminating bacteriuria (TTNC < 3 days). TTNC was prolonged ( >3 days) in patients with decreased renal function and alkaline urinary pH. We reviewed 45 hospitalized adults with AUC or CAB to determine if renal insufficiency and or alkaline urinary pH affected ertapenem efficacy. In the 33 adult hospitalized patients with AUC and 12 with CAB, we found that ertapenem was consistently effective in eliminating the GNB bacteriuria. In hospitalized adults, the presence of renal insufficiency and acid urine, bacteriuria was eliminated in < 3 days. However, in those with renal insufficiency and an alkaline urine pH, the rapidity of cure, i.e., time to negative cultures (TTNC) was prolonged, i.e., > 3 days which has not been previously reported.

  14. Predictors, treatment, and outcomes of STEMI occurring in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xuming; Kaul, Prashant; Smith, Sidney C; Stouffer, George A

    2016-03-01

    ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is most commonly caused by an acute thrombotic occlusion of a coronary artery. For patients in whom the onset of STEMI occurs outside of hospital (outpatient STEMI), early reperfusion therapy with either fibrinolysis or primary percutaneous coronary intervention reduces complications and improves survival, compared with delayed reperfusion. STEMI systems of care are defined as integrated groups of separate entities focused on reperfusion therapy for STEMI, generally including emergency medical services, emergency medicine, cardiology, nursing, and hospital administration. These systems of care have been successful at reducing total ischaemia time and outpatient STEMI mortality. By contrast, much less is known about STEMI that occurs in hospitalized patients (inpatient STEMI), which has unique clinical features and much worse outcomes than outpatient STEMI. Inpatient STEMI is associated with older age, a higher female:male ratio, and more comorbidities than outpatient STEMI. Delays in diagnosis and infrequent use of reperfusion therapy probably also contribute to unfavourable outcomes for inpatient STEMI.

  15. Food Anxiety Is Associated with Poor Health Status Among Recently Hospital-Discharged Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Vaudin, Anna; Sahyoun, Nadine R

    2015-01-01

    Older adults returning home from the hospital may encounter health issues that cause anxiety about their ability to obtain enough food. Home-delivered meal (HDM) programs support nutritional needs and improve food security of those who cannot provide for themselves. A study conducted in six states examined feelings of anxiety about getting enough food in older adults (aged 60 years and older), comparing three time points: prior to hospitalization, at hospitalization (n = 566) and after receiving HDMs for two months posthospitalization (n = 377). Food anxiety during hospitalization was significantly higher among Hispanic ethnicity, current and former smokers, diabetics, and those who eat alone or have difficulty shopping. Food anxiety was significantly lower from baseline to two months follow-up (P < 0.0001), and participants showed improvements in certain coping strategies they used to get their meals. Indicators of food anxiety can help the health care system and community nutrition programs target those at highest risk of negative health outcomes. PMID:26106991

  16. [Hemorrhagic complications of antivitamin K. Report of 75 hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Constans, J; Sampoux, F; Jarnier, P; Le Métayer, P; Midy, D; Morlat, P; Bakhach, S; Longy-Boursier, M; Le Bras, M; Beylot, J; Baste, J C; Conri, C

    1999-06-01

    Hemorrhagic complications are the most frequent complications of antivitamin K (AVK) treatments and can be life-threatening. We report 75 patients from a University Hospital. They were 40 males and 35 females (median age 74 years, 20-94), and were classified into 3 grades according to clinical picture: grade 1 (no surgery or transfusion, grade 2: surgery or blood transfusion needed, grade 3: death). 43 patients had grade 1 complications, 27 grade 2, and 5 grade 3 complications. The most frequent complications were muscular hematomas (36 patients), sub-cutaneous hematomas (14 patients), digestive bleeding (13 patients), hematuria (12 subjects). Eight patients had intracerebral bleeding, of whom 3 died. The treatment time was very variable (1 to 988 weeks). Only half patients had a prothrombin rate (PR) below 20% but two thirds had an INR above 5. This study showed that PR was a poor predictor of hemorrhagic complications. INR was a better parameter. For 15 patients, we considered that the indication was unadapted or questionable, among whom 2 died. This work suggests that the promotion of AVK prescription rules should go on.

  17. [Blastocystis hominis in patients at the Ruiz y Paez University Hospital from Bolivar City, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Devera, R; Azacon, B; Jiménez, M

    1998-01-01

    Blastocystis hominis is a polymorphic protozoan of discussed taxonomic position, which is currently associated with human intestinal disease. In order to determine the prevalence of the microorganism in a sample of hospitalized patients, a study was carried out from november 1996 to april 1997 on 100 adult patients of both sexes aged 20 to 79 years at the "Ruíz y Páez" University Hospital of Bolivar city, Venezuela. A coproparasitological study was carried out using direct examination and Faust method. Infection by parasites and/or commensals was demonstrated in 48 patients. The most frequent agent was B. hominis with a prevalence of 42.0%. We did not find a statistically association between sex (P > 0.05) or age (X2 = 3.52; d.f; = 3) and B. hominis infection. B. hominis was most frequently identified as the single parasite (88.1%), and with a number of less than 5 cells per 400X microscopic field (73.8%). The infection was more common in patients with base chronic-immunosuppressive diseases, the major one being cancer. Diarrhea was observed in 27.0% of cases. Due to its high prevalence, especially as a single agent, together with the particular immunological characteristics of the patients studied, a potential pathogenic role of the opportunistic type is suggested for B. hominis. PMID:10413881

  18. Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Psychiatric Hospitals in Ontario: Clinical Profile and Service Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsky, Yona; Gracey, Carolyn; Bradley, Elspeth

    2009-01-01

    Background: Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) represent a small, but challenging sub-group of patients within Ontario's mental health care system. However, few studies have documented the clinical characteristics of this population and examined how such individuals differ from other psychiatric patients, with or without intellectual…

  19. Population Dynamics of Patients with Bacterial Resistance in Hospital Environment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Leilei; Pan, Qiuhui; Gao, Xubin; He, Mingfeng

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, the increase of antibiotic resistance has become a major concern worldwide. The researchers found that superbugs with new type of resistance genes (NDM-1) have two aspects of transmission characteristics; the first is that the antibiotic resistance genes can horizontally transfer among bacteria, and the other is that the superbugs can spread between humans through direct contact. Based on these two transmission mechanisms, we study the dynamics of population in hospital environment where superbugs exist. In this paper, we build three mathematic models to illustrate the dynamics of patients with bacterial resistance in hospital environment. The models are analyzed using stability theory of differential equations. Positive equilibrium points of the system are investigated and their stability analysis is carried out. Moreover, the numerical simulation of the proposed model is also performed which supports the theoretical findings.

  20. Population Dynamics of Patients with Bacterial Resistance in Hospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Leilei; Pan, Qiuhui; Gao, Xubin; He, Mingfeng

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, the increase of antibiotic resistance has become a major concern worldwide. The researchers found that superbugs with new type of resistance genes (NDM-1) have two aspects of transmission characteristics; the first is that the antibiotic resistance genes can horizontally transfer among bacteria, and the other is that the superbugs can spread between humans through direct contact. Based on these two transmission mechanisms, we study the dynamics of population in hospital environment where superbugs exist. In this paper, we build three mathematic models to illustrate the dynamics of patients with bacterial resistance in hospital environment. The models are analyzed using stability theory of differential equations. Positive equilibrium points of the system are investigated and their stability analysis is carried out. Moreover, the numerical simulation of the proposed model is also performed which supports the theoretical findings. PMID:26904150

  1. Anemia and functional capacity in elderly Brazilian hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Raquel de Macedo; Assis, Elisa Priscila Souza; Pinheiro, Renata Rosseti; Queiroz, Luiza Cristina Viana de; Pereira, Leani S M; Antunes, Carlos Maurício Figueiredo

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the association between anemia and physical functional capacity in a cross-sectional population-based sample of 709 hospitalized elderly patients aged 60 years and over admitted to the Madre Teresa Hospital, Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The Mann-Whitney or "t" test, and chi-square or Fisher exact test were used for quantitative and categorical variables, respectively, and hierarchical binary logistic regression was used to identify significant predictors. The presence of anemia was found in 30% of participants and was significantly associated with decreased functionality according to the two measures which were used - ADL (activities of daily living) and IADL (instrumental activities of daily living). Anemia was also independently associated with older age. The results of this study demonstrate a strong association between the presence of anemia and lower levels of functional capacity. Further investigations are needed to assess the impact of anemia treatment on the functionality and independence of older people.

  2. [Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients in China].

    PubMed

    Lang, Xiabing; Yang, Yi; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a disease spectrum ranging from minimal elevation of serum creatinine to complete renal failure. It is significantly associated with increased mortality, length of hospital stay and medical care cost. With the increasing awareness of the importance of AKI, several high quality and multicenter epidemiological studies have been published recently in China. However, the results differ a lot due to the differences in regional economic development, the selection of target population and testing indicators, the disease definition and study strategies. The reported incidence of AKI in China is much lower than that in the developed countries. This article will analyze the current status and the problems facing AKI epidemiological studies of hospitalized patients with our own data and those from literature. The article intends to clarify the burden of AKI,to increase the awareness of AKI among clinicians and policy makers for achieving the goal of "zero by 2025" in China. PMID:27273996

  3. Population Dynamics of Patients with Bacterial Resistance in Hospital Environment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Leilei; Pan, Qiuhui; Gao, Xubin; He, Mingfeng

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, the increase of antibiotic resistance has become a major concern worldwide. The researchers found that superbugs with new type of resistance genes (NDM-1) have two aspects of transmission characteristics; the first is that the antibiotic resistance genes can horizontally transfer among bacteria, and the other is that the superbugs can spread between humans through direct contact. Based on these two transmission mechanisms, we study the dynamics of population in hospital environment where superbugs exist. In this paper, we build three mathematic models to illustrate the dynamics of patients with bacterial resistance in hospital environment. The models are analyzed using stability theory of differential equations. Positive equilibrium points of the system are investigated and their stability analysis is carried out. Moreover, the numerical simulation of the proposed model is also performed which supports the theoretical findings. PMID:26904150

  4. Role of relatives of ethnic minority patients in patient safety in hospital care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    van Rosse, Floor; Suurmond, Jeanine; Wagner, Cordula; de Bruijne, Martine; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2016-01-01

    Objective Relatives of ethnic minority patients often play an important role in the care process during hospitalisation. Our objective was to analyse the role of these relatives in relation to the safety of patients during hospital care. Setting Four large urban hospitals with an ethnic diverse patient population. Participants On hospital admission of ethnic minority patients, 20 cases were purposively sampled in which relatives were observed to play a role in the care process. Outcome measures We used documents (patient records) and added eight cases with qualitative interviews with healthcare providers, patients and/or their relatives to investigate the relation between the role of relatives and patient safety. An inductive approach followed by selective coding was used to analyse the data. Results Besides giving social support, family members took on themselves the role of the interpreter, the role of substitutes of the patient and the role of care provider. The taking over of these roles can have positive and negative effects on patient safety. Conclusions When family members take over various roles during hospitalisation of a relative, this can lead to a safety risk and a safety protection for the patient involved. Although healthcare providers should not hand over their responsibilities to the relatives of patients, optimising collaboration with relatives who are willing to take part in the care process may improve patient safety. PMID:27056588

  5. Bottle-blowing in hospital-treated patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Björkqvist, M; Wiberg, B; Bodin, L; Bárány, M; Holmberg, H

    1997-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine whether bottle-blowing has any positive effects in patients with pneumonia. In a prospective open study 145 adults with untreated community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization were randomized to early mobilization (group A), to sit up and take 20 deep breaths on 10 occasions daily (group B), or to sit up and to blow bubbles in a bottle containing 10 cm water through a plastic tube 20 times on 10 occasions daily (group C). Peak expiratory flow (PEF), vital capacity (VC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) and serum concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) were determined on admission, and on days 4 and 42. Fever duration and hospital stay were recorded. In a subset of 16 patients, single breath diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide was measured on 3 occasions. The patients in group A were hospitalized for a mean of 5.3 days, group B for 4.6 days and group C for 3.9 days. Treatment was a significant factor (p = 0.037) in a Cox regression model, with group C significantly better than group A (p = 0.01). The number of days with fever was 2.3, 1.7 and 1.6 in groups A, B and C respectively. These differences were not significant (p = 0.28). No significant differences were found between the groups regarding CRP, PEF, VC, FEV1, or diffusion capacity. Intensive bottle-blowing shortens the hospital stay in patients with pneumonia. The underlying mechanism is not clear.

  6. Chest Compression Fraction Determines Survival in Patients with Out-of-hospital Ventricular Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Jim; Andrusiek, Douglas; Everson-Stewart, Siobhan; Kudenchuk, Peter; Hostler, David; Powell, Judy; Callaway, Clifton W.; Bishop, Dan; Vaillancourt, Christian; Davis, Dan; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Idris, Ahamed; Stouffer, John A.; Stiell, Ian; Berg, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background Quality CPR contributes to cardiac arrest survival. The proportion of time in which chest compressions are performed in each minute of CPR is an important modifiable aspect of quality CPR. We sought to estimate the effect of an increasing proportion of time spent performing chest compressions during cardiac arrest on survival to hospital discharge in patients with out-of hospital ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Methods and Results This is a prospective observational cohort study of adult patients from the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Cardiac Arrest Epistry with confirmed ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia, no defibrillation prior to emergency medical services arrival, electronically recorded cardiopulmonary resuscitation prior to the first shock and a confirmed outcome. Patients were followed to discharge from hospital or death. In the 506 cases, the mean age was 64 years, 80% were male, 71% were witnessed by a bystander, 51% received bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 34% occurred in a public location, and 23% survived. After adjustment for age, gender, location, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, bystander witness status, and response time the odds ratios of surviving to hospital discharge in the two highest categories of chest compression fraction compared to the reference category were 3.01 (95% CI, 1.37, 6.58) and 2.33 (95% CI, 0.96, 5.63). The estimated adjusted linear effect on odds ratio of survival for a 10% change in chest compression fraction was 1.11 (95% CI, 1.01, 1.21). Conclusion Increased chest compression fraction is independently predictive of better survival in patients suffering a prehospital ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia cardiac arrest. PMID:19752324

  7. Patient satisfaction and non-UK educated nurses: a cross-sectional observational study of English National Health Service Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Peter; Sloane, Douglas M; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Ball, Jane E; Aiken, Linda H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether patient satisfaction with nursing care in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England is associated with the proportion of non-UK educated nurses providing care. Design Cross-sectional analysis using data from the 2010 NHS Adult Inpatient Survey merged with data from nurse and hospital administrator surveys. Logistic regression models with corrections for clustering were used to determine whether the proportions of non-UK educated nurses were significantly related to patient satisfaction before and after taking account of other hospital, nursing and patient characteristics. Setting 31 English NHS trusts. Participants 12 506 patients 16 years of age and older with at least one overnight stay that completed a satisfaction survey; 2962 bedside care nurses who completed a nurse survey; and 31 NHS trusts. Main outcome measure Patient satisfaction. Results The percentage of non-UK educated nurses providing bedside hospital care, which ranged from 1% to 52% of nurses, was significantly associated with patient satisfaction. After controlling for potential confounding factors, each 10-point increase in the percentage of non-UK educated nurses diminished the odds of patients reporting good or excellent care by 12% (OR=0.88), and decreased the odds of patients agreeing that they always had confidence and trust in nurses by 13% (OR=0.87). Other indicators of patient satisfaction also revealed lower satisfaction in hospitals with higher percentages of non-UK educated nurses. Conclusions Use of non-UK educated nurses in English NHS hospitals is associated with lower patient satisfaction. Importing nurses from abroad to substitute for domestically educated nurses may negatively impact quality of care. PMID:26634400

  8. [Bacterial parotitis in an immunocompromised patient in adult ICU].

    PubMed

    Vassal, O; Bernet, C; Wallet, F; Friggeri, A; Piriou, V

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial parotitis is a common childhood disease with a favorable outcome. Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently involved pathogen. Clinical presentation in adult patients can be misleading, Onset occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities, making diagnosis difficult--particularly in ICU. Different pathogens are found in adults with worse outcomes observed. We report here the case of a critically ill patient and discuss diagnosis and management of bacterial parotitis.

  9. Early Hospital Readmission After Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation: Patient and Center-Level Factors.

    PubMed

    King, E A; Kucirka, L M; McAdams-DeMarco, M A; Massie, A B; Al Ammary, F; Ahmed, R; Grams, M E; Segev, D L

    2016-02-01

    Early hospital readmission is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and cost. Following simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation, rates of readmission and risk factors for readmission are unknown. We used United States Renal Data System data to study 3643 adult primary first-time simultaneous pancreas-kidney recipients from December 1, 1999 to October 31, 2011. Early hospital readmission was any hospitalization within 30 days of discharge. Modified Poisson regression was used to determine the association between readmission and patient-level factors. Empirical Bayes statistics were used to determine the variation attributable to center-level factors. The incidence of readmission was 55.5%. Each decade increase in age was associated with an 11% lower risk of readmission to age 40, beyond which there was no association. Donor African-American race was associated with a 13% higher risk of readmission. Each day increase in length of stay was associated with a 2% higher risk of readmission until 14 days, beyond which each day increase was associated with a 1% reduction in the risk of readmission. Center-level factors were not associated with readmission. The high incidence of early hospital readmission following simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant may reflect clinical complexity rather than poor quality of care.

  10. Diagnosis, Clinical Presentation, and In-Hospital Mortality of Severe Malaria in HIV-Coinfected Children and Adults in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Ilse C. E.; Ferro, Josefo; Montoya, Pablo; Chhaganlal, Kajal D.; Seni, Amir; Gomes, Ermelinda; Silamut, Kamolrat; Lee, Sue J.; Lucas, Marcelino; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Fanello, Caterina I.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Severe falciparum malaria with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection is common in settings with a high prevalence of both diseases, but there is little information on whether HIV affects the clinical presentation and outcome of severe malaria. Methods. HIV status was assessed prospectively in hospitalized parasitemic adults and children with severe malaria in Beira, Mozambique, as part of a clinical trial comparing parenteral artesunate versus quinine (ISRCTN50258054). Clinical signs, comorbidity, complications, and disease outcome were compared according to HIV status. Results. HIV-1 seroprevalence was 11% (74/655) in children under 15 years and 72% (49/68) in adults with severe malaria. Children with HIV coinfection presented with more severe acidosis, anemia, and respiratory distress, and higher peripheral blood parasitemia and plasma Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP2). During hospitalization, deterioration in coma score, convulsions, respiratory distress, and pneumonia were more common in HIV-coinfected children, and mortality was 26% (19/74) versus 9% (53/581) in uninfected children (P < .001). In an age- and antimalarial treatment–adjusted logistic regression model, significant, independent predictors for death were renal impairment, acidosis, parasitemia, and plasma PfHRP2 concentration. Conclusions. Severe malaria in HIV-coinfected patients presents with higher parasite burden, more complications, and comorbidity, and carries a higher case fatality rate. Early identification of HIV coinfection is important for the clinical management of severe malaria. PMID:22752514

  11. [Adverse effects of antidepressive agents in hospitalized geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Korínková, V; Kolibás, E; Králová, M; Novotný, V; Konceoj, V A; Pjatnickij, A N; Andrusenkova, M P

    1992-11-01

    The frequency, intensity and profile of adverse effects of antidepressants was studied in elderly patients. The series consisted of 102 patients with depression admitted to hospitals in Bratislava and Moscow. The adverse effects of amitriptyline (Amitriptylin Spofa) and maprotiline (Ludiomil Ciba-Geigy) were compared. The assessment done on days 0, 7, and 28 of treatment showed that xerostomia had the highest occurrence rate with both preparations studied. In patients treated with amitriptyline adverse effects were more severe and were recorded more frequently, requiring treatment withdrawal in 3 patients. The overall intensity of adverse effects was significantly higher with amitriptyline (p < 0.05). In the group of patients treated with amitriptyline the adverse effects were more marked in those with severe somatic pathology. The risk of amitriptyline treatment in elderly patients is being emphasized along with the need for monitoring and correcting adverse effects of the treatment. Although maprotiline exhibited a lower occurrence rate of adverse effects, cardiac functions should be regularly checked in patients with preexisting cardiac pathology. (Tab. 2, Fig. 3, Ref. 6.).

  12. Palliative care of cancer patients: audit of current hospital procedures.

    PubMed

    Sessa, C; Pampallona, S; Carobbio, M; Neuenschwander, H; Cavalli, F

    1998-05-01

    The palliative care of cancer patients admitted for tumour-related symptoms to three different departments (medical oncology, radiotherapy, internal medicine) of a general hospital was prospectively audited. The physicians directly responsible for the patients provided prospective data by reporting both the diagnostic and therapeutic interventions performed and the degree of control achieved for each symptom. A patient form for evaluation of the control achieved in the case of each symptom by means of linear analogue scales was also provided. The appropriateness of all procedures was evaluated by two external auditors. Over 6 months, 125 such admissions were recorded: 24 patients entered the study and the management of 56 symptoms, the most common of which were pain and dyspnoea, was reviewed. A total of 72 diagnostic procedures were performed, deemed necessary for only 50% of symptoms, optional for 15%, and performed as part of a logical sequence for 38%. A total of 130 therapeutic interventions were undertaken, deemed necessary for 55% of symptoms, optional for 15% and carried out as part of a logical sequence for 44%. Re-evaluations of symptoms and physician and patient evaluations of the degree of control achieved could not be assessed because of lack of information. The audit could not be repeated owing to the low accrual of patients and incompleteness of the data collection. Reasons for failure of the study and proposals for feasible methods of auditing the management of symptoms in cancer patients are discussed.

  13. Patient Bypass Behavior and Critical Access Hospitals: Implications for Patient Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jiexin (Jason); Bellamy, Gail R.; McCormick, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the extent of bypass for inpatient care among patients living in Critical Access Hospital (CAH) service areas, and to determine factors associated with bypass, the reasons for bypass, and what CAHs can do to retain patients locally. Methods: Six hundred and forty-seven subjects, aged 18 years and older, who had been admitted to…

  14. Hospitalized patients with COPD: analysis of prior treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Giacomelli, Irai Luis; Steidle, Leila John Marques; Moreira, Frederico Fernandes; Meyer, Igor Varela; Souza, Ricardo Goetten; Pincelli, Mariângela Pimentel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Although COPD is a prevalent disease, it is undertreated, and there are no available data regarding previous treatment of COPD in Brazil. This study aimed to determine the appropriateness of maintenance treatment in COPD patients prior to their hospitalization and to identify variables associated with inappropriate treatment. Methods: This was an observational, cross-sectional, analytical study involving 50 inpatients with COPD at two hospitals in the city of Florianópolis, Brazil. The patients completed a questionnaire on parameters related to the maintenance treatment of COPD. Non-pharmacological management and pharmacological treatment were assessed based on the recommendations made by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) in 2011 and by the Brazilian National Ministry of Health in the chronic respiratory diseases section of its Caderno de Atenção Básica (CAB, Primary Care Guidebook). Results: In most of the patients, the COPD was classified as being severe or very severe. Regarding non-pharmacological management, 33% of the patients were smokers, only 32% had been advised to receive the flu vaccine, 28% had received pneumococcal vaccine, and only 6.5% of the patients in the B, C, and D categories received pulmonary rehabilitation. Regarding GOLD and CAB recommendations, pharmacological treatment was inappropriate in 50% and 74% of the patients, respectively. Based on GOLD recommendations, 38% were undertreated. A low level of education, low income, not receiving oxygen therapy, and not receiving the flu vaccine were associated with inappropriate treatment. Conclusions: The application of various non-pharmacological management recommendations was unsatisfactory. Regarding the GOLD recommendations, the high rate of inappropriate maintenance treatment was mainly due to undertreatment. In Brazil, even in severe COPD cases, optimizing treatment to achieve greater benefits continues to be a challenge. PMID:25029645

  15. Metabolic syndrome in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Slavova, Yanina; Tsakova, Adelina; Genova, Marianka; Kostadinov, Dimitar; Minchev, Delcho; Marinova, Dora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The metabolic syndrome (MS) affects 21–53% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with a higher prevalence in the early stages of COPD, with results being highly variable between studies. MS may also affect natural course of COPD—number of exacerbations, quality of life and lung function. Aim. To examine the prevalence of MS and its correlation with comorbidities and COPD characteristics in patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation. Material and methods. 152 patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation were studied for presence of MS. All of them were also assessed for vitamin D status and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM). Data were gathered for smoking status and exacerbations during the last year. All patients completed CAT (COPD assessment test) and mMRC (Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea scale) questionnaires and underwent spirometry. Duration of current hospital stay was recorded. Results. 25% of patients have MS. 23.1% of the male and 29.5% of the female patients have MS (p > 0.05). The prevalence of MS in this study is significantly lower when compared to a national representative study (44.6% in subjects over 45 years). 69.1% of all patients and 97.4% from MS patients have arterial hypertension. The presence of MS is associated with significantly worse cough and sleep (1st and 7th CAT questions; p = 0.002 and p = 0.001 respectively) and higher total CAT score (p = 0.017). Average BMI is 27.31. None of the patients have MS and BMI <25. There is a correlation between the presence of MS and DM (p = 0.008) and with the number of exacerbations in the last year (p = 0.015). There is no correlation between the presence of MS and the pulmonary function. Conclusion. This study among hospitalized COPD patients finds comparable but relatively low prevalence of MS (25%) compared to previously published data (21–53%) and lower prevalence compared to general population (44.6%). MS may impact quality of life and the

  16. THE EFFECT OF FEVER ON HOSPITAL PRESENTATION, DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT IN PATIENTS WITH H1N1/09 INFLUENZA

    PubMed Central

    Sopirala, Madhuri M.; Haas, Douglas M; Ali, Naeem A.; Mangino, Julie E.; Pan, Xueliang; Turner, Abigail Norris

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fever is typically considered part of the influenza-like illness in H1N1/09 influenza. We assessed the proportion of patients that did not have fever as part of their illness prior to hospital presentation. We assessed the role of fever on the delay in hospital presentation, diagnosis and treatment of these patients. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of all hospitalized adult patients with laboratory-confirmed pandemic H1N1/09 at a tertiary care center in the United States from June 1 to December 31, 2009. Results Fifty-six of 135 study patients (42%) had no fever; 31 (23%) required ICU admission and nine (7%) died. Those without fever had higher Charlson index (p=0.01), significantly longer time to hospital presentation (median four vs. two days, p<0.001), longer time to treatment since the onset of illness (median five vs. two days, p =0.001), and were more frequently in an ICU (p=0.01). After adjustment for age (<40 vs ≥40) and Charlson index (0, 1-2, ≥3), patients without fever had significantly increased likelihood of late hospital presentation (greater than two days from the onset of illness) (p=0.001) and also had increased likelihood of ICU stay (p=0.05). Conclusions Forty-two percent of patients with laboratory-confirmed H1N1/09 did not have fever as part of their illness prior to hospital presentation. Patients without fever had delayed presentation to the hospital and thus experienced delayed treatment. PMID:23024066

  17. Association of Hyperchloremia with Hospital Mortality in Critically Ill Septic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Neyra, Javier A.; Canepa-Escaro, Fabrizio; Li, Xilong; Manllo, John; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Yee, Jerry; Yessayan, Lenar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperchloremia is frequently observed in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Our study aimed to examine the association of serum chloride (Cl) levels with hospital mortality in septic ICU patients. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Urban academic medical center ICU. Patients ICU adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock who had Cl measured on ICU admission were included. Those with baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate < 15 ml/min/1.73 m2 or chronic dialysis were excluded. Intervention: None. Measurements and Main Results Of 1940 patients included in the study, 615 (31.7%) had hyperchloremia (Cl ≥ 110 mEq/L) on ICU admission. All-cause hospital mortality was the dependent variable. Cl on ICU admission (Cl0), Cl at 72 h (Cl72), and delta Cl (ΔCl = Cl72 – Cl0) were the independent variables. Those with Cl0 ≥ 110 mEq/L were older and had higher cumulative fluid balance, base deficit, and sequential organ failure assessment scores. Multivariate analysis showed that higher Cl72 but not Cl0 was independently associated with hospital mortality in the subgroup of patients with hyperchloremia on ICU admission [adjusted odds ratio (OR) for Cl72 per 5 mEq/L increase = 1.27, 95% CI (1.02–1.59), P = 0.03]. For those who were hyperchloremic on ICU admission, every within-subject 5 mEq/L increment in Cl72 was independently associated with hospital mortality [adjusted OR for ΔCl 5 mEq/L = 1.37, 95% CI [1.11–1.69], P = 0.003]. Conclusions In critically ill septic patients manifesting hyperchloremia (Cl ≥110 mEq/L) on ICU admission, higher Cl levels and within-subject worsening hyperchloremia at 72 h of ICU stay were associated with all-cause hospital mortality. These associations were independent of base deficit, cumulative fluid balance, acute kidney injury, and other critical illness parameters. PMID:26154934

  18. Healthcare-associated, community-acquired and hospital-acquired bacteraemic urinary tract infections in hospitalized patients: a prospective multicentre cohort study in the era of antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Horcajada, J P; Shaw, E; Padilla, B; Pintado, V; Calbo, E; Benito, N; Gamallo, R; Gozalo, M; Rodríguez-Baño, J

    2013-10-01

    The clinical and microbiological characteristics of community-onset healthcare-associated (HCA) bacteraemia of urinary source are not well defined. We conducted a prospective cohort study at eight tertiary-care hospitals in Spain, from October 2010 to June 2011. All consecutive adult patients hospitalized with bacteraemic urinary tract infection (BUTI) were included. HCA-BUTI episodes were compared with community-acquired (CA) and hospital-acquired (HA) BUTI. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify 30-day mortality risk factors. We included 667 episodes of BUTI (246 HCA, 279 CA and 142 HA). Differences between HCA-BUTI and CA-BUTI were female gender (40% vs 69%, p <0.001), McCabe score II-III (48% vs 14%, p <0.001), Pitt score ≥2 (40% vs 31%, p 0.03), isolation of extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaciae (13% vs 5%, p <0.001), median hospital stay (9 vs 7 days, p 0.03), inappropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy (21% vs 13%, p 0.02) and mortality (11.4% vs 3.9%, p 0.001). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was more frequently isolated in HA-BUTI (16%) than in HCA-BUTI (4%, p <0.001). Independent factors for mortality were age (OR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01-1.07), McCabe score II-III (OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.8-5.5), Pitt score ≥2 (OR 3.2 (1.8-5.5) and HA-BUTI OR 3.4 (1.2-9.0)). Patients with HCA-BUTI are a specific group with significant clinical and microbiological differences from patients with CA-BUTI, and some similarities with patients with HA-BUTI. Mortality was associated with patient condition, the severity of infection and hospital acquisition.

  19. Hospitalized cardiovascular events in patients with diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microvascular and macrovascular complications in diabetes stem from chronic hyperglycemia and are thought to have overlapping pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence rate of hospitalized myocardial infarctions (MI) and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) compared with diabetic patients without retinal diseases. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of a commercially insured population in an administrative claims database. DME subjects (n = 3519) and diabetes controls without retinal disease (n = 10557) were matched by age and gender. Healthcare claims were analyzed for the study period from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2005. Incidence and adjusted rate ratios of hospitalized MI and CVA events were then calculated. Results The adjusted rate ratio for MI was 2.50 (95% CI: 1.83-3.41, p < 0.001) for DME versus diabetes controls. Predictors of MI events were heart disease, history of acute MI, and prior use of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs. The adjusted rate ratio for CVA was 1.98 (95% CI: 1.39-2.83, p < 0.001) for DME versus diabetes controls. Predictors of CVA events were cardiac arrhythmia, Charlson comorbidity scores, history of CVA, hyperlipidemia, and other cerebrovascular diseases. Conclusion Event rates of MI or CVA were higher in patients with DME than in diabetes controls. This study is one of few with sufficient sample size to accurately estimate the relationship between DME and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:22646811

  20. Factors associated with the patient safety climate at a teaching hospital1

    PubMed Central

    Luiz, Raíssa Bianca; Simões, Ana Lúcia de Assis; Barichello, Elizabeth; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to investigate the association between the scores of the patient safety climate and socio-demographic and professional variables. Methods: an observational, sectional and quantitative study, conducted at a large public teaching hospital. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire was used, translated and validated for Brazil. Data analysis used the software Statistical Package for Social Sciences. In the bivariate analysis, we used Student's t-test, analysis of variance and Spearman's correlation of (α=0.05). To identify predictors for the safety climate scores, multiple linear regression was used, having the safety climate domain as the main outcome (α=0.01). Results: most participants were women, nursing staff, who worked in direct care to adult patients in critical areas, without a graduate degree and without any other employment. The average and median total score of the instrument corresponded to 61.8 (SD=13.7) and 63.3, respectively. The variable professional performance was found as a factor associated with the safety environment for the domain perception of service management and hospital management (p=0.01). Conclusion: the identification of factors associated with the safety environment permits the construction of strategies for safe practices in the hospitals. PMID:26487138

  1. Hospital volume and other risk factors for in-hospital mortality among diverticulitis patients: A nationwide analysis

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Michael J; Coward, Stephanie; Buie, W Donald; MacLean, Anthony; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G; Schaffer, Samuel; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have found that a higher volume of colorectal surgery was associated with lower mortality rates. While diverticulitis is an increasingly common condition, the effect of hospital volume on outcomes among diverticulitis patients is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between hospital volume and other factors on in-hospital mortality among patients admitted for diverticulitis. METHODS: Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (years 1993 to 2008) were analyzed to identify 822,865 patients representing 4,108,726 admissions for diverticulitis. Hospitals were divided into quartiles based on the volume of diverticulitis cases admitted over the study period, adjusted for years contributed to the dataset. Mortality according to hospital volume was modelled using logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, race, comorbidities, health care insurance, admission type, calendar year, colectomy, disease severity and clustering. Risk estimates were expressed as adjusted ORs with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Patients at high-volume hospitals were more likely to be admitted emergently, undergo surgical treatment and have more severe disease. In-hospital mortality was higher among the lowest quartile of hospital volume compared with the highest volume (OR 1.13 [95% CI 1.05 to 1.21]). In-hospital mortality was increased among patients admitted emergently (OR 2.58 [95% CI 2.40 to 2.78]) as well as those receiving surgical treatment (OR 3.60 [95% CI 3.42 to 3.78]). CONCLUSIONS: Diverticulitis patients admitted to hospitals with a low volume of diverticulitis cases had an increased risk for death compared with those admitted to high-volume centres. PMID:25965439

  2. External validation of the Hospital-patient One-year Mortality Risk (HOMR) model for predicting death within 1 year after hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    van Walraven, Carl; McAlister, Finlay A.; Bakal, Jeffrey A.; Hawken, Steven; Donzé, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background: Predicting long-term survival after admission to hospital is helpful for clinical, administrative and research purposes. The Hospital-patient One-year Mortality Risk (HOMR) model was derived and internally validated to predict the risk of death within 1 year after admission. We conducted an external validation of the model in a large multicentre study. Methods: We used administrative data for all nonpsychiatric admissions of adult patients to hospitals in the provinces of Ontario (2003–2010) and Alberta (2011–2012), and to the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston (2010–2012) to calculate each patient’s HOMR score at admission. The HOMR score is based on a set of parameters that captures patient demographics, health burden and severity of acute illness. We determined patient status (alive or dead) 1 year after admission using population-based registries. Results: The 3 validation cohorts (n = 2 862 996 in Ontario, 210 595 in Alberta and 66 683 in Boston) were distinct from each other and from the derivation cohort. The overall risk of death within 1 year after admission was 8.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.7% to 8.8%). The HOMR score was strongly and significantly associated with risk of death in all populations and was highly discriminative, with a C statistic ranging from 0.89 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.91) to 0.92 (95% CI 0.91 to 0.92). Observed and expected outcome risks were similar (median absolute difference in percent dying in 1 yr 0.3%, interquartile range 0.05%–2.5%). Interpretation: The HOMR score, calculated using routinely collected administrative data, accurately predicted the risk of death among adult patients within 1 year after admission to hospital for nonpsychiatric indications. Similar performance was seen when the score was used in geographically and temporally diverse populations. The HOMR model can be used for risk adjustment in analyses of health administrative data to predict long-term survival among hospital patients

  3. Using case-mix information in strategic hospital marketing. Deriving market research from patient data.

    PubMed

    Little, A

    1992-01-01

    Hospital survival requires adaptation, adaptation requires understanding, and understanding requires information. These are the basic equations behind hospital strategic marketing, and one of the answers may lie in hospitals' own patient-data systems. Marketers' and administrators' enlightened application of case-mix information could become one more hospital survival tool.

  4. Financial Pressures Prompt Teaching Hospitals to Cut Costs, Raising Fears about Medical Education and Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grassmuck, Karen

    1991-01-01

    Financial pressures are forcing the closure of some teaching hospitals and retrenchment using such strategies as development of ambulatory care and satellite facilities, merging with or acquiring other hospitals, and shortening patient hospital stays. A table lists revenues and profit margins for the 20 largest university-owned teaching hospitals.…

  5. Public Reporting of Hospital Patient Satisfaction: The Rhode Island Experience

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Judith K.; Boni, Cathy E.; Kochurka, Kimberly A.; Nolan, Patricia; Petrillo, Marcia; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Waters, William

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative process for legislatively mandated public reporting of health care performance in Rhode Island that began with hospital patient satisfaction. The goals of the report were both quality improvement and public accountability. Key features addressed include: the legislative context for public reporting; widespread participation of stakeholders; the structure for decisionmaking; and the use of formative testing with cognitive interviews to get responses of consumers and others about the report's readability and comprehensibility. This experience and the lessons learned can guide other States considering public reporting on health care performance. PMID:12500470

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of enterococci isolated from hospitalized patients.

    PubMed Central

    Venditti, M; Tarasi, A; Gelfusa, V; Nicastri, E; Penni, A; Martino, P

    1993-01-01

    One hundred and one isolates of Enterococcus species isolated recently from hospitalized patients were evaluated in vitro for antibiotic susceptibility. Teicoplanin and mideplanin were the most active agents, followed by ramoplanin, vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, and imipenem. High-level resistance to gentamicin (MIC > 500 micrograms/ml) and/or streptomycin (MIC > 2,000 micrograms/ml) was found in 60 isolates. High-level resistance to ampicillin (MIC > or = 16 micrograms/ml) was found in 17 isolates. MBC studies revealed that ramoplanin possesses significant bactericidal activity. PMID:8517714

  7. An unusual cause of cardiac arrest in a hospitalized patient.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ranjan K; Tumkur, Anil; Bhat, Krishnamurthy; Chacko, Biby

    2013-01-01

    We present an unusual case of 24 year old male who was hospitalized for dental procedure and developed cardiac arrest 2 days after the procedure. The patient presented with swelling of buccal cavity for which a biopsy was taken. Two days after the procedure, apparently normal patient suddenly presented at mid night with VT and VF, which were intractable requiring multiple DC shocks. During this period arterial blood gas analysis revealed severe acidosis. The circumstances led us to suspect poisoning as one of the cause for his medical condition. We looked for commonly available toxins. One of the commonly available toxins is hand sanitizer which contains Isopropyl alcohol, glycerin and perfume. Due to prolonged cardiac arrest and intractable arrhythmia patient had sustained hypoxic brain injury. Patient remained hemodynamically stable for next 9 days although his CNS status did not improve. Patient succumbed to sepsis on 9(th) day. Healthcare professionals should be aware of such possibilities and treat the patients at the earliest and put a check on the easy availability of IPA based hand sanitizers.

  8. An unusual cause of cardiac arrest in a hospitalized patient.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ranjan K; Tumkur, Anil; Bhat, Krishnamurthy; Chacko, Biby

    2013-01-01

    We present an unusual case of 24 year old male who was hospitalized for dental procedure and developed cardiac arrest 2 days after the procedure. The patient presented with swelling of buccal cavity for which a biopsy was taken. Two days after the procedure, apparently normal patient suddenly presented at mid night with VT and VF, which were intractable requiring multiple DC shocks. During this period arterial blood gas analysis revealed severe acidosis. The circumstances led us to suspect poisoning as one of the cause for his medical condition. We looked for commonly available toxins. One of the commonly available toxins is hand sanitizer which contains Isopropyl alcohol, glycerin and perfume. Due to prolonged cardiac arrest and intractable arrhythmia patient had sustained hypoxic brain injury. Patient remained hemodynamically stable for next 9 days although his CNS status did not improve. Patient succumbed to sepsis on 9(th) day. Healthcare professionals should be aware of such possibilities and treat the patients at the earliest and put a check on the easy availability of IPA based hand sanitizers. PMID:23662032

  9. Using inpatient hospital discharge data to monitor patient safety events.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer A; Pandian, Ravi S; Mao, Lu; Michael, Yvonne L

    2013-01-01

    The development of systematic and sustainable surveillance systems is necessary for the creation of patient safety prevention programs and the evaluation of improvement resulting from innovations. To that end, inpatient hospital discharges collected by the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council were used to investigate patient safety events (PSEs) in Pennsylvania in 2006. PSEs were identified using external cause of injury codes (E-codes) in combination with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's patient safety indicators (PSIs). Encounters with and without PSEs were compared with regard to patient age, sex, race, length of stay, and cost. Approximately 9% of all Pennsylvania inpatient discharges had a PSE in 2006. Patients with a PSE were on average older, male, and white. The average length of stay for a PSE was 3 days longer and $35 000 more expensive than a non-PSE encounter. It was concluded that E-codes and PSIs were useful tools for the surveillance of PSEs in Pennsylvania, and that administrative data from healthcare organizations provide a consistent source of standardized data related to patient encounters, creating an opportunity to describe PSEs at the population level.

  10. Leadership in nursing and patient satisfaction in hospital context.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Elisabete Maria Garcia Teles; Gaspar, Maria Filomena Mendes

    2016-06-01

    Objectives to know the quality of the leadership relationship from the perspective of a chief nurse and nurse, patient satisfaction, the relationship between the quality of the relationship perceived for both and patient satisfaction. Methods a quantitative, transverse and correlational approach. Non-probabilistic convenience sample consists of 15 chief nurses, 342 nurses, 273 patients. Data collected at the Central Lisbon Hospital Center, between January and March 2013, through the LMX-7, CLMX-7 and SUCEH21 scales. Statistical analysis was performed through SPSS ® Statistics 19. Results the chief nurse considers the quality of the leadership relationship good, the nurses consider it satisfactory, patients are considered to be satisfied with nursing care; there is a statistically significant correlation between the quality of the leadership relationship from the perspective of chief nurses and patient satisfaction, there is no statistically significant correlation between the quality of the leadership relationship in the nurse's perspective and satisfaction. Conclusion the chief nurse has a major role in patient satisfaction. PMID:27253595

  11. Using inpatient hospital discharge data to monitor patient safety events.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer A; Pandian, Ravi S; Mao, Lu; Michael, Yvonne L

    2013-01-01

    The development of systematic and sustainable surveillance systems is necessary for the creation of patient safety prevention programs and the evaluation of improvement resulting from innovations. To that end, inpatient hospital discharges collected by the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council were used to investigate patient safety events (PSEs) in Pennsylvania in 2006. PSEs were identified using external cause of injury codes (E-codes) in combination with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's patient safety indicators (PSIs). Encounters with and without PSEs were compared with regard to patient age, sex, race, length of stay, and cost. Approximately 9% of all Pennsylvania inpatient discharges had a PSE in 2006. Patients with a PSE were on average older, male, and white. The average length of stay for a PSE was 3 days longer and $35 000 more expensive than a non-PSE encounter. It was concluded that E-codes and PSIs were useful tools for the surveillance of PSEs in Pennsylvania, and that administrative data from healthcare organizations provide a consistent source of standardized data related to patient encounters, creating an opportunity to describe PSEs at the population level. PMID:23609974

  12. Profile of patients receiving medical care at a reference, support, and treatment center for psoriasis patients at a university hospital*

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro Júnior, Túlio Germano Machado; Andrade, Bruno D' Paula; Palitot, Esther Bastos; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina; Mascarenhas, Sandra Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, immune-mediated disease affecting 1-3% of the population worldwide. This work seeks to draw a profile of patients with psoriasis, analyzing socioeconomic, anthropometric, and clinical aspects. For this, medical records from 81 individuals who received medical care in a university hospital in 2014 were consulted. It was observed that the patients were mostly dark-skinned black adult men, with a low education level and a low income, who were sedentary, former smokers, obese, with an increase in waist circumference, and who did not consume alcohol. Psoriasis vulgaris predominated, beginning mainly on the scalp, hands, and feet. In addition, many presented some type of associated comorbidity and had relatives with psoriasis.

  13. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    duTreil, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. PMID:25093002

  14. Attitudes, knowledge and perceptions towards whooping cough and pertussis vaccine in hospitalized adults.

    PubMed

    Ridda, Iman; Gao, Zhanhai; Macintyre, C Raina

    2014-02-19

    Whooping cough or pertussis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality for adults and children around the world. There has been a rise in pertussis-related deaths in the elderly; pertussis vaccination is not currently routinely recommended in adults, excepting new parents and other adults household members including grandparents and care-givers of young children. Currently, there is lack of clear vaccine recommendations after the age of 50 years. Given the increase in adult pertussis, adult vaccine recommendations are a policy consideration. The study surveyed a convenience sample of patients previously recruited in a case control study designed to examine the burden of influenza with and without AMI in adults aged ≥ 40 years. Our findings showed that only 9.6% had received the pertussis vaccination within the past five years and 79.4% of participants had no knowledge of the pertussis adult booster vaccine, and 30.7% of participants who had regular contact with children under the age of two years in the past 12 months. The results showed that even though there is general acceptance of prevention by vaccines, there is low awareness about pertussis vaccination. This lack of knowledge presents a barrier against pertussis vaccination thus it is imperative that any future adult immunisation policy recommendations around pertussis vaccine include awareness programs in the target population.

  15. Measuring patient-perceived quality of care in US hospitals using Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Jared B; Brownstein, John S; Tuli, Gaurav; Nsoesie, Elaine O; McIver, David J; Rozenblum, Ronen; Wright, Adam; Bourgeois, Florence T; Greaves, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients routinely use Twitter to share feedback about their experience receiving healthcare. Identifying and analysing the content of posts sent to hospitals may provide a novel real-time measure of quality, supplementing traditional, survey-based approaches. Objective To assess the use of Twitter as a supplemental data stream for measuring patient-perceived quality of care in US hospitals and compare patient sentiments about hospitals with established quality measures. Design 404 065 tweets directed to 2349 US hospitals over a 1-year period were classified as having to do with patient experience using a machine learning approach. Sentiment was calculated for these tweets using natural language processing. 11 602 tweets were manually categorised into patient experience topics. Finally, hospitals with ≥50 patient experience tweets were surveyed to understand how they use Twitter to interact with patients. Key results Roughly half of the hospitals in the US have a presence on Twitter. Of the tweets directed toward these hospitals, 34 725 (9.4%) were related to patient experience and covered diverse topics. Analyses limited to hospitals with ≥50 patient experience tweets revealed that they were more active on Twitter, more likely to be below the national median of Medicare patients (p<0.001) and above the national median for nurse/patient ratio (p=0.006), and to be a non-profit hospital (p<0.001). After adjusting for hospital characteristics, we found that Twitter sentiment was not associated with Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) ratings (but having a Twitter account was), although there was a weak association with 30-day hospital readmission rates (p=0.003). Conclusions Tweets describing patient experiences in hospitals cover a wide range of patient care aspects and can be identified using automated approaches. These tweets represent a potentially untapped indicator of quality and may be valuable to

  16. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  17. [Blastocystis infection in symptomatic patients at the Regional Hospital of Temuco, Chile].

    PubMed

    Biolley, M A; Oberg, C

    1993-01-01

    At the Regional Hospital of Temuco, 670 adult and children patients, with intestinal complaints, were studied to determine the prevalence of infection by enteroparasites or commensals in a general way, and by Blastocystis hominis in a particular attempt. A coproparasitological study was carried out using a modified Telemann method. Infection by parasites and/or commensals was demonstrated in 446 (66.6%) patients. The most frequent agent was B. hominis (35.8%) followed by Giardia intestinalis (22.5%) among the protozoa. The frequencies of helminths and commensals were 7.7 and 42.5% respectively. The endemic characteristics of intestinal infections by parasites was ratified and the prevalence of infection by B. hominis was proved to be higher in comparison to other zones of the country. PMID:8110370

  18. SNAKE BITE: CASE SERIES OF PATIENTS PRESENTED TO GONDAR UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, NORTH WEST ETHIOPIA.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Desalew; Mitiku, Tadesse; Tamir, Yenesew; Azazh, Aklilu

    2016-04-01

    Snakebite is an important public health challenge. Venomous snake bites cause significant morbidity and mortality if treatment measures, especially antivenom therapy, are delayed. We did a case series of 27 adult patients admitted after snakebite to the medical wards of Gondar University Hospital (GUH) from September 2013 to August 2014. The age range was from 15 to 74 years. The male to female ratio was 8:1. The majority (25) of patients presented after 12 hours of being bitten. Most of the bites occurred on the legs. Hematologic complications, including prolonged bedside whole blood clotting test, bleeding complications and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation, were the common complications detected. The case fatality rate was 4/27 (14.8%). Availability of affordable snake specific antivenom is recommended. A large population study is needed to address the burden in Ethiopia. PMID:27476228

  19. Patient Hand Hygiene at Home Predicts Their Hand Hygiene Practices in the Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Anna; Sethi, Ajay; Shulkin, Emily; Caniza, Rachell; Zerbel, Sara; Safdar, Nasia

    2014-01-01

    We examine factors associated with hand hygiene practices of hospital patients. Hygiene decreased compared to at home, and home practices were strongly associated with hospital practices. Understanding and leveraging the intrinsic value some patients associate with hand hygiene may be important for improving overall hospital hygiene and decreasing healthcare-associated infections. PMID:24709731

  20. Nurses' Patient-Centeredness and Perceptions of Care among Medicaid Patients in Hospital Obstetrical Units.

    PubMed

    Aragon, Stephen J; Richardson, Liana J; Lawrence, Wanda; Gesell, Sabina B

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study examined to what degree patient-centeredness-measured as an underlying ability of obstetrical nurses-influenced Medicaid patients' satisfaction with care in hospital obstetrical units. Design. Multigroup structural equation modeling design, using three cross-sectional random samples (n = 300 each) from the 2003 Press Ganey National Inpatient Database. Setting. Self-administered mail surveys. Participants. 900 Medicaid recipients recently discharged from inpatient hospital obstetrical units across the United States. Methods. Multigroup structural equation modeling was used to test the goodness of fit between a hypothesized model based on the Primary Provider Theory and patients' ratings of nurses. Results. The model fitted the data well, was stable across three random samples, and was sustained when compared to a competing model. The patient-centeredness of nurses significantly influenced overall patient satisfaction and explained 66% of its variability. When nurses' patient-centeredness increased by one standard deviation, patients' satisfaction increased by 0.80 standard deviation. Conclusion. This study offers a novel approach to the measurement of the patient-centeredness of nurses and a paradigm for increasing it and its influence on Medicaid patients' satisfaction in hospital obstetrical units.

  1. Nurses' Patient-Centeredness and Perceptions of Care among Medicaid Patients in Hospital Obstetrical Units

    PubMed Central

    Aragon, Stephen J.; Richardson, Liana J.; Lawrence, Wanda; Gesell, Sabina B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study examined to what degree patient-centeredness—measured as an underlying ability of obstetrical nurses—influenced Medicaid patients' satisfaction with care in hospital obstetrical units. Design. Multigroup structural equation modeling design, using three cross-sectional random samples (n = 300 each) from the 2003 Press Ganey National Inpatient Database. Setting. Self-administered mail surveys. Participants. 900 Medicaid recipients recently discharged from inpatient hospital obstetrical units across the United States. Methods. Multigroup structural equation modeling was used to test the goodness of fit between a hypothesized model based on the Primary Provider Theory and patients' ratings of nurses. Results. The model fitted the data well, was stable across three random samples, and was sustained when compared to a competing model. The patient-centeredness of nurses significantly influenced overall patient satisfaction and explained 66% of its variability. When nurses' patient-centeredness increased by one standard deviation, patients' satisfaction increased by 0.80 standard deviation. Conclusion. This study offers a novel approach to the measurement of the patient-centeredness of nurses and a paradigm for increasing it and its influence on Medicaid patients' satisfaction in hospital obstetrical units. PMID:24027634

  2. Sinus pilonidalis in patients of German military hospitals: a review.

    PubMed

    Kueper, Janina; Evers, Theo; Wietelmann, Kai; Doll, Dietrich; Roffeis, Jana; Schwabe, Philipp; Märdian, Sven; Wichlas, Florian; Krapohl, Björn-Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Pilonidal sinus disease (PSD) most commonly presents in young men when hair follicles enter through damaged epithelium and cause an inflammatory reaction. This results in the formation of fistular tracts. We reviewed studies based on a shared cohort of patients who presented at German military hospitals with PSD. The effect of the morphology of the sinus, perioperative protocol, and aftercare of the surgical treatment on the recurrence of PSD were evaluated. The drainage of acute abscesses before surgery, the application of methylene blue during surgery and open wound treatment were generally found to reduce the recurrence rate. A positive family history, postoperative epilation and primary suture as the healing method were found to elevate the recurrence rate. Long-term follow up of over 15 years was found to be a vital component of patient care as only 60% of the overall recurrences recorded had taken place by year 5 postoperatively.

  3. Health Literacy, Education Levels, and Patient Portal Usage During Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sharon E.; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kripalani, Sunil; Goggins, Kathryn M.; Jackson, Gretchen Purcell

    2015-01-01

    Patient portal adoption has rapidly increased, and portal usage has been associated with patients’ sociodemographics, health literacy, and education. Research on patient portals has primarily focused on the outpatient setting. We explored whether health literacy and education were associated with portal usage in an inpatient population. Among 60,159 admissions in 2012–2013, 23.3% of patients reported limited health literacy; 50.4% reported some post-secondary education; 34.4% were registered for the portal; and 23.4% of registered patients used the portal during hospitalization. Probability of registration and inpatient portal use increased with educational attainment. Health literacy was associated with registration but not inpatient use. Among admissions with inpatient use, educational attainment was associated with viewing health record data, and health literacy was associated use of appointment and health education tools. The inpatient setting may provide an opportunity to overcome barriers to patient portal adoption and reduce disparities in use of health information technologies. PMID:26958286

  4. Technology advances in hospital practices: robotics in treatment of patients.

    PubMed

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is widely considered as the treatment of choice for acute cholecystitis. The safety of the procedure and its minimal invasiveness made it a valid treatment option for a patient not responding to antibiotic therapy. Our research shows that patients positively assess this treatment method, but the world's tendency is to turn to a more sophisticated method utilizing robot-assisted surgery as a gold standard. Providing patient with minimally invasive surgical procedures that utilize the state-of-the-art equipment like the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System underscores the commitment to high-quality patient care while enhancing patient safety. The advantages include minimal invasive scarring, less pain and bleeding, faster recovery time, and shorter hospital stay. The move toward less invasive and less morbid procedures and a need to re-create the true open surgical experience have paved the way for the development and application of robotic and computer-assisted systems in surgery in Poland as well as the rest of the world.

  5. Technology advances in hospital practices: robotics in treatment of patients.

    PubMed

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is widely considered as the treatment of choice for acute cholecystitis. The safety of the procedure and its minimal invasiveness made it a valid treatment option for a patient not responding to antibiotic therapy. Our research shows that patients positively assess this treatment method, but the world's tendency is to turn to a more sophisticated method utilizing robot-assisted surgery as a gold standard. Providing patient with minimally invasive surgical procedures that utilize the state-of-the-art equipment like the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System underscores the commitment to high-quality patient care while enhancing patient safety. The advantages include minimal invasive scarring, less pain and bleeding, faster recovery time, and shorter hospital stay. The move toward less invasive and less morbid procedures and a need to re-create the true open surgical experience have paved the way for the development and application of robotic and computer-assisted systems in surgery in Poland as well as the rest of the world. PMID:25782187

  6. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN DIABETIC PATIENTS IN SOHAG UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS, EGYPT.

    PubMed

    Elnadi, Nada A; Hassanien, Hassan A; Ahmad, Amal M; Abd Ellah, Asmaa K

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal parasites usually create benign diseases, though they may induce complications with high morbidity and mortality to the immunocompromised, including diabetic patients. The study detected the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in diabetic patients, comparing to non-diabetic controls and other parameters. A total of 100 fecal samples were collected from diabetic patients at the outpatient clinic of Sohag University Hospitals and another 100 from cross matched controls. The samples were examined macroscopically and microscopically by direct smear and different concentration methods then stained by Modified Ziehl-Neelsen Acid fast stain. Glycated hemoglobin (Hb Alc) was measured to detect DM controlled patients. The data were organized, tabulated, and statistically analyzed. Intestinal parasites were found in 25 (25%) cases out of 100 patients in diabetic group and 7(7%) cases out of 100 controls with high significance (P<0.001)). In the diabetic group, Giardia lamblia was detected in 22 cases (22%) and 5 (5%) among controls, Entamoeba histolytica in 7 cases (7%) and 3 (3%) among controls, Hymenolypis nana in 5 cases (5%) and 3 (3%) among controls, Entamoeba coli in 8 patients (8%), Entamoeba hartmanni in 3 cases (3%), Dientamoeba fragilis in a case (1%), Cryptosporidium parvum in 5 cases (5%) and microsporidia in 3 cases (3%). But, E. coli, E. hartmanni, D. fragilis and C. parvum nor microsporidia were detected in controls. The rate of G. lamblia in DM patients compared to controls was high significant (P<0.001). Hymenolepis nana was 5% (5 cases) in diabetic patients compared to 3% (3 cases) in controls. Residence and sex differences were not significant, while age, >10 years showed the highest prevalence (P< 0.003), type I infection rate was significantly higher than type II (P<0.001). DM control was also significantly affected the infection rates (P<0.007 in type I and P< 0.01 in type II). PMID:26485865

  7. Determinants of hospital choice of rural hospital patients: the impact of networks, service scopes, and market competition.

    PubMed

    Roh, Chul-Young; Lee, Keon-Hyung; Fottler, Myron D

    2008-08-01

    Among 10,384 rural Colorado female patients who received MDC 14 (obstetric services) from 2000 to 2003, 6,615 (63.7%) were admitted to their local rural hospitals; 1,654 (15.9%) were admitted to other rural hospitals; and 2,115 (20.4%) traveled to urban hospitals for inpatient services. This study is to examine how network participation, service scopes, and market competition influences rural women's choice of hospital for their obstetric care. A conditional logistic regression analysis was used. The network participation (p < 0.01), the number of services offered (p < 0.05), and the hospital market competition had a positive and significant relationship with patients' choice to receive obstetric care. That is, rural patients prefer to receive care from a hospital that participates in a network, that provides more number of services, and that has a greater market share (i.e., a lower level of market competition) in their locality. Rural hospitals could actively increase their competitiveness and market share by increasing the number of health care services provided and seeking to network with other hospitals. PMID:18619098

  8. Improve Hospital-to-Home Transitions

    MedlinePlus

    ... rehabilitation in the home. The result is often readmission to the hospital. One study found that seniors ... medical conditions, and they have the highest hospital readmission rate of all adult patient groups. This indicates ...

  9. Pattern, Clinical Characteristics, and Outcome of Meningitis among HIV-Infected Adults Admitted in a Tertiary Hospital in North Western Tanzania: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Boaz, Matobogolo M; Kalluvya, Samuel; Downs, Jennifer A; Mpondo, Bonaventura C T; Mshana, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    Background. Limited information exists on the etiologies, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of meningitis among HIV-infected patients in Africa. We conducted a study to determine the etiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of meningitis among HIV-infected adults. Methods. A prospective cross-sectional hospital based study was conducted among HIV-infected patients aged ≥18 years admitted to the medical wards with symptoms and signs of meningitis. Sociodemographic and clinical information were collected using a standardized data collection tool. Lumbar puncture was performed to all patients; cerebrospinal fluid samples were sent for analysis. Results. Among 60 HIV-infected adults clinically diagnosed to have meningitis, 55 had CSF profiles consistent with meningitis. Of these, 14 (25.5%) had a laboratory-confirmed etiology while 41 (74.5%) had no isolate identified. Cryptococcus neoformans was the commonest cause of meningitis occurring in 11 (18.3%) of patients followed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (6.7%). The in-hospital mortality was 20/55 (36.4%). Independent predictors of mortality were low baseline CD4 count and turbid CSF appearance. Conclusion. Cryptococcal meningitis is the most prevalent laboratory-confirmed etiological agent among adult HIV-infected patients with suspected meningitis admitted to medical wards in Western Tanzania. Mortality rate in this population remains unacceptably high. Improving diagnostic capacity and early treatment may help to decrease the mortality rate. PMID:27651801

  10. Pattern, Clinical Characteristics, and Outcome of Meningitis among HIV-Infected Adults Admitted in a Tertiary Hospital in North Western Tanzania: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Limited information exists on the etiologies, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of meningitis among HIV-infected patients in Africa. We conducted a study to determine the etiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of meningitis among HIV-infected adults. Methods. A prospective cross-sectional hospital based study was conducted among HIV-infected patients aged ≥18 years admitted to the medical wards with symptoms and signs of meningitis. Sociodemographic and clinical information were collected using a standardized data collection tool. Lumbar puncture was performed to all patients; cerebrospinal fluid samples were sent for analysis. Results. Among 60 HIV-infected adults clinically diagnosed to have meningitis, 55 had CSF profiles consistent with meningitis. Of these, 14 (25.5%) had a laboratory-confirmed etiology while 41 (74.5%) had no isolate identified. Cryptococcus neoformans was the commonest cause of meningitis occurring in 11 (18.3%) of patients followed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (6.7%). The in-hospital mortality was 20/55 (36.4%). Independent predictors of mortality were low baseline CD4 count and turbid CSF appearance. Conclusion. Cryptococcal meningitis is the most prevalent laboratory-confirmed etiological agent among adult HIV-infected patients with suspected meningitis admitted to medical wards in Western Tanzania. Mortality rate in this population remains unacceptably high. Improving diagnostic capacity and early treatment may help to decrease the mortality rate.

  11. Pattern, Clinical Characteristics, and Outcome of Meningitis among HIV-Infected Adults Admitted in a Tertiary Hospital in North Western Tanzania: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Limited information exists on the etiologies, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of meningitis among HIV-infected patients in Africa. We conducted a study to determine the etiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of meningitis among HIV-infected adults. Methods. A prospective cross-sectional hospital based study was conducted among HIV-infected patients aged ≥18 years admitted to the medical wards with symptoms and signs of meningitis. Sociodemographic and clinical information were collected using a standardized data collection tool. Lumbar puncture was performed to all patients; cerebrospinal fluid samples were sent for analysis. Results. Among 60 HIV-infected adults clinically diagnosed to have meningitis, 55 had CSF profiles consistent with meningitis. Of these, 14 (25.5%) had a laboratory-confirmed etiology while 41 (74.5%) had no isolate identified. Cryptococcus neoformans was the commonest cause of meningitis occurring in 11 (18.3%) of patients followed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (6.7%). The in-hospital mortality was 20/55 (36.4%). Independent predictors of mortality were low baseline CD4 count and turbid CSF appearance. Conclusion. Cryptococcal meningitis is the most prevalent laboratory-confirmed etiological agent among adult HIV-infected patients with suspected meningitis admitted to medical wards in Western Tanzania. Mortality rate in this population remains unacceptably high. Improving diagnostic capacity and early treatment may help to decrease the mortality rate. PMID:27651801

  12. Social networks enabled coordination model for cost management of patient hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed Shahadat; Hossain, Liaquat

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we introduce a social networks enabled coordination model for exploring the effect of network position of "patient," "physician," and "hospital" actors in a patient-centered care network that evolves during patient hospitalization period on the total cost of coordination. An actor is a node, which represents an entity such as individual and organization in a social network. In our analysis of actor networks and coordination in the healthcare literature, we identified that there is significant gap where a number of promising hospital coordination model have been developed (e.g., Guided Care Model, Chronic Care Model) for the current healthcare system focusing on quality of service and patient satisfaction. The health insurance dataset for total hip replacement (THR) from hospital contribution fund, a prominent Australian Health Insurance Company, are analyzed to examine our proposed coordination model. We consider network attributes of degree, connectedness, in-degree, out-degree, and tie strength to measure network position of actors. To measure the cost of coordination for a particular hospital, average of total hospitalization expenses for all THR hospital admissions is used. Results show that network positions of "patient," "physician," and "hospital" actors considering all hospital admissions that a particular hospital has have effect on the average of total hospitalization expenses of that hospital. These results can be used as guidelines to set up a cost-effective healthcare practice structure for patient hospitalization expenses. PMID:23845132

  13. Social networks enabled coordination model for cost management of patient hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed Shahadat; Hossain, Liaquat

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we introduce a social networks enabled coordination model for exploring the effect of network position of "patient," "physician," and "hospital" actors in a patient-centered care network that evolves during patient hospitalization period on the total cost of coordination. An actor is a node, which represents an entity such as individual and organization in a social network. In our analysis of actor networks and coordination in the healthcare literature, we identified that there is significant gap where a number of promising hospital coordination model have been developed (e.g., Guided Care Model, Chronic Care Model) for the current healthcare system focusing on quality of service and patient satisfaction. The health insurance dataset for total hip replacement (THR) from hospital contribution fund, a prominent Australian Health Insurance Company, are analyzed to examine our proposed coordination model. We consider network attributes of degree, connectedness, in-degree, out-degree, and tie strength to measure network position of actors. To measure the cost of coordination for a particular hospital, average of total hospitalization expenses for all THR hospital admissions is used. Results show that network positions of "patient," "physician," and "hospital" actors considering all hospital admissions that a particular hospital has have effect on the average of total hospitalization expenses of that hospital. These results can be used as guidelines to set up a cost-effective healthcare practice structure for patient hospitalization expenses.

  14. Opioid Use and Storage Patterns by Patients after Hospital Discharge following Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Karsten; Mayes, Lena M.; Dingmann, Colleen; Bullard, Kenneth J.; Hopfer, Christian J.; Binswanger, Ingrid A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Opioid-based analgesic therapy represents a cornerstone of pain management after surgery. The recent rise in opioid sales and opioid overdoses suggests it is important to maximize the safety of opioid prescribing after surgery. Given that patients may live with other family members in the home, safe storage and appropriate disposal of excess opioids after hospital discharge are necessary to prevent unintended secondary exposures. Identifying characteristics of patients who are likely to be prescribed excess opioids after surgery may enable more targeted prescription practices and safety interventions. Our study aimed to elucidate patient-reported opioid use patterns and modes of home storage of opioids among patients discharged home after Cesarean section (C-section) and thoracic surgery. Specifically, we sought to identify characteristics of patients who reported using about half or more versus less of the opioids prescribed to them for use after hospital discharge. Methods For this cohort study, we developed a survey on quality of analgesia following hospital discharge, amounts of opioids taken relative to the amount prescribed, reasons for not taking all prescribed medications, and storage and disposal methods for leftover opioids. Adult patients, who had C-section or thoracic surgery at a tertiary academic medical center, were given a web-based self-administered survey after discharge. Descriptive statistics (means and standard deviations, proportions) were used to describe the study sample and survey results. Comparisons between patients who reported taking about half or more versus less of the opioids prescribed to them for use after hospital discharge were made using unpaired t-tests, Mann-Whitney tests, and Chi-square tests as appropriate. Results The majority (53%) of respondents after C-section (N = 30) reported taking either no or very few (less than 5) prescribed opioid pills; 83% reported taking half or less; and 17% of women, reported

  15. Development of a Patient Registry to Evaluate Hospital Admissions Related to Chemotherapy Toxicity in a Community Cancer Center1

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowska, Monika K.; Treacy, Jean; Maloney, Betty; Lavino, Antoinette; Jacobson, Joseph O.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose Most chemotherapy (CT) administration occurs in routine care settings, yet little is known about treatment-related toxicity outside of clinical trials. To examine trends in toxicity, modify practice, and establish benchmarks for severe toxicity in a community cancer center we created a prospective registry of all treatment-related hospitalizations at the North Shore Medical Center Cancer Center, a community-based cancer facility in Peabody, MA. Methods Eligible population consisted of all adult cancer patients admitted to the hospital within 30 days of their last CT administration. Each admission was reviewed by a panel of hospital staff to determine whether admission was treatment-related. Information on admission was collected using a standard form. Results Between October 2001 and December 2003, there were 365 hospitalizations among patients receiving CT, 117 (32%) of which were deemed treatment-related. The median age of the cohort with treatment-related toxicity was 67 years, and 41% were male. Most frequent diagnoses were non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (23%) and colorectal cancer (21%), with 49% of the patients receiving treatment with palliative intent. The most common reasons for admission were gastrointestinal toxicity or infection. The mean length of stay was 7.1 days. Seven patients (6%) died during hospitalization. When the registry was reviewed to identify areas where care may be improved, several admissions for decadron-related hyperglycemia in nondiabetic patients with myeloma were noted. This led to introduction of glucose monitoring guidelines with no subsequent admissions for this toxicity since then. Conclusions About one third of hospital admissions in patients receiving CT are treatment-related and most occur in patients with advanced disease. Collection of data on toxicity in the routine care setting is feasible and may facilitate quality improvement. PMID:20871674

  16. The Triage of Injured Patients: Mechanism of Injury, Regardless of Injury Severity, Determines Hospital Destination.

    PubMed

    Staudenmayer, Kristan; Wang, N Ewen; Weiser, Thomas G; Maggio, Paul; Mackersie, Robert C; Spain, David; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-04-01

    The target rate for trauma undertriage is <5 per cent, but rates are as high as 30 to 40 per cent in many trauma systems. We hypothesized that high undertriage rates were due to the tendency to undertriage injured elderly patients and a growing elderly population. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all hospital visits in California using the Office of Statewide Health Plannin