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Sample records for adult patients recorded

  1. Facilitators and Barriers of Electronic Health Record Patient Portal Adoption by Older Adults: A Literature Study.

    PubMed

    Wildenbos, Gaby Anne; Peute, Linda; Jaspers, Monique

    2017-01-01

    Patient portal usage by older adults, patients aged 50 years old and above, is intended to improve their access and quality of care. Acceptance of patient portals by this target group is low. This paper discusses the results of a literature review to determine the facilitators and barriers that drive or inhibit older patients to adopt patient portals. Articles were included when they described an acceptance, adoption or usability evaluation study of a patient portal. From a total of 245 potentially relevant articles, 8 articles were finally included. We used the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) as a classification model to analyze factors influencing older adults' acceptance of patient portals. Main facilitators for acceptance were 'performance expectancy' and 'voluntariness of use' related to a higher level of education and experienced health. Main barriers were limited health literacy and motivation related to involuntariness to use a patient portal. Poor facilitation conditions (limited technology access and no prior knowledge on existence of a patient portal) hampered access to a portal. More thorough insight into the latter is needed to improve the reach and effectiveness of patient portals among older patients.

  2. Multicenter Patient Records Research

    PubMed Central

    Behlen, Fred M.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    1999-01-01

    The expanding health information infrastructure offers the promise of new medical knowledge drawn from patient records. Such promise will never be fulfilled, however, unless researchers first address policy issues regarding the rights and interests of both the patients and the institutions who hold their records. In this article, the authors analyze the interests of patients and institutions in light of public policy and institutional needs. They conclude that the multicenter study, with Institutional Review Board approval of each study at each site, protects the interests of both. “Anonymity” is no panacea, since patient records are so rich in information that they can never be truly anonymous. Researchers must earn and respect the trust of the public, as responsible stewards of facts about patients' lives. The authors find that computer security tools are needed to administer multicenter patient records studies and describe simple approaches that can be implemented using commercial database products. PMID:10579601

  3. If you did not document it, it did not happen: rates of documentation of discussion of infertility risk in adolescent and young adult oncology patients' medical records.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Block, Rebecca G; Clayman, Marla L; Kelvin, Joanne; Arvey, Sarah R; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Reinecke, Joyce; Sehovic, Ivana; Jacobsen, Paul B; Reed, Damon; Gonzalez, Luis; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Laronga, Christine; Lee, M Catherine; Pow-Sang, Julio; Eggly, Susan; Franklin, Anna; Shah, Bijal; Fulp, William J; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon

    2015-03-01

    The adolescent and young adult (AYA) population is underserved because of unique late-effect issues, particularly future fertility. This study sought to establish rates of documentation of discussion of risk of infertility, fertility preservation (FP) options, and referrals to fertility specialists in AYA patients' medical records at four cancer centers. All centers reviewed randomized records within the top four AYA disease sites (breast, leukemia/lymphoma, sarcoma, and testicular). Eligible records included those of patients: diagnosed in 2011, with no prior receipt of gonadotoxic therapy; age 18 to 45 years; with no multiple primary cancers; and for whom record was not second opinion. Quality Oncology Practice Initiative methods were used to evaluate documentation of discussion of risk of infertility, discussion of FP options, and referral to a fertility specialist. Of 231 records, 26% documented infertility risk discussion, 24% documented FP option discussion, and 13% documented referral to a fertility specialist. Records were less likely to contain evidence of infertility risk and FP option discussions for female patients (P = .030 and .004, respectively) and those with breast cancer (P = .021 and < .001, respectively). Records for Hispanic/Latino patients were less likely to contain evidence of infertility risk discussion (P = .037). Records were less likely to document infertility risk discussion, FP option discussion, and fertility specialist referral for patients age ≥ 40 years (P < .001, < .001, and .002, respectively) and those who already had children (all P < .001). The overall rate of documentation of discussion of FP is low, and results show disparities among specific groups. Although greater numbers of discussions may be occurring, there is a need to create interventions to improve documentation. Copyright © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. Patient access to medical records.

    PubMed

    Mair, J L

    1996-01-01

    The issue of, and access to, medical records has been a contentious matter for some years in Australia. The recent High Court decision of Breen v Williams has clarified the law nationwide. The High Court confirmed that the ownership of medical records is vested in the creator of the records. The High Court further held that a patient has no right at law to access his or her medical records in the absence of any statute granting such a right, or other legal process.

  5. Implementing an interprofessional patient record.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul; Anderson, Alan; Coyne, Clare; Beastall, Helen; Hill, Joanne

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an interprofessional patient record (IPPR) at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (STHFT). The IPPR was a two-year project, commencing in May 2008, aimed at creating a single IPPR to which all staff contribute. Prior to the IPPR, records were profession specific with nursing, medical and therapy staff keeping separate ones. This paper describes the process for the project including the stakeholder engagement plan, the development of IPPR standards, the education and training programme and the key measures used to assess implementation. The staff survey and clinical audit data suggest that the IPPR was successfully implemented with many of the perceived benefits realised. The keys to success of this major change project were: time spent engaging clinical staff, board level support, the appointment of a dedicated project team and the involvement and support of many staff involved in patient records throughout STHFT.

  6. Internet patient records: new techniques.

    PubMed

    Brelstaff, G; Moehrs, S; Anedda, P; Tuveri, M; Zanetti, G

    2001-01-01

    The ease by which the Internet is able to distribute information to geographically-distant users on a wide variety of computers makes it an obvious candidate for a technological solution for electronic patient record systems. Indeed, second-generation Internet technologies such as the ones described in this article--XML (eXtensible Markup Language), XSL (eXtensible Style Language), DOM (Document Object Model), CSS (Cascading Style Sheet), JavaScript, and JavaBeans--may significantly reduce the complexity of the development of distributed healthcare systems. The demonstration of an experimental Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system built from those technologies that can support viewing of medical imaging exams and graphically-rich clinical reporting tools, while conforming to the newly emerging XML standard for digital documents. In particular, we aim to promote rapid prototyping of new reports by clinical specialists. We have built a prototype EPR client, InfoDOM, that runs in both the popular web browsers. In this second version it receives each EPR as an XML record served via the secure SSL (Secure Socket Layer) protocol. JavaBean software components manipulate the XML to store it and then to transform it into a variety of useful clinical views. First a web page summary for the patient is produced. From that web page other JavaBeans can be launched. In particular, we have developed a medical imaging exam Viewer and a clinical Reporter bean parameterized appropriately for the particular patient and exam in question. Both present particular views of the XML data. The Viewer reads image sequences from a patient-specified network URL on a PACS (Picture Archiving and Communications System) server and presents them in a user-controllable animated sequence, while the Reporter provides a configurable anatomical map of the site of the pathology, from which individual "reportlets" can be launched. The specification of these reportlets is achieved using standard HTML forms

  7. Internet Patient Records: new techniques

    PubMed Central

    Moehrs, Sascha; Anedda, Paolo; Tuveri, Massimiliano; Zanetti, Gianluigi

    2001-01-01

    Background The ease by which the Internet is able to distribute information to geographically-distant users on a wide variety of computers makes it an obvious candidate for a technological solution for electronic patient record systems. Indeed, second-generation Internet technologies such as the ones described in this article - XML (eXtensible Markup Language), XSL (eXtensible Style Language), DOM (Document Object Model), CSS (Cascading Style Sheet), JavaScript, and JavaBeans - may significantly reduce the complexity of the development of distributed healthcare systems. Objective The demonstration of an experimental Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system built from those technologies that can support viewing of medical imaging exams and graphically-rich clinical reporting tools, while conforming to the newly emerging XML standard for digital documents. In particular, we aim to promote rapid prototyping of new reports by clinical specialists. Methods We have built a prototype EPR client, InfoDOM, that runs in both the popular web browsers. In this second version it receives each EPR as an XML record served via the secure SSL (Secure Socket Layer) protocol. JavaBean software components manipulate the XML to store it and then to transform it into a variety of useful clinical views. First a web page summary for the patient is produced. From that web page other JavaBeans can be launched. In particular, we have developed a medical imaging exam Viewer and a clinical Reporter bean parameterized appropriately for the particular patient and exam in question. Both present particular views of the XML data. The Viewer reads image sequences from a patient-specified network URL on a PACS (Picture Archiving and Communications System) server and presents them in a user-controllable animated sequence, while the Reporter provides a configurable anatomical map of the site of the pathology, from which individual "reportlets" can be launched. The specification of these reportlets is

  8. Accuracy of Step Recording in Free-Living Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Timothy K.; Dinger, Mary K.; Vesely, Sara K.; Fields, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how accurately free-living adults record their pedometer steps on step logs. Researchers used three different methods to examine the accuracy of participant-recorded steps: tests of equivalence, correlation coefficients, and Bland-Altman plots. Findings indicate that participant-recorded steps…

  9. [Patients' access to their medical records].

    PubMed

    Laranjo, Liliana; Neves, Ana Luisa; Villanueva, Tiago; Cruz, Jorge; Brito de Sá, Armando; Sakellarides, Constantitno

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, the medical record was seen exclusively as being the property of health institutions and doctors. Its great technical and scientific components, as well as the personal characteristics attributed by each doctor, have been the reasons appointed for that control. However, nowadays throughout the world that paradigm has been changing. In Portugal, since 2007 patients are allowed full and direct access to their medical records. Nevertheless, the Deontological Code of the Portuguese Medical Association (2009) explicitly states that patients' access to their medical records should have a doctor as intermediary and that the records are each physician's intellectual property. Furthermore, several doctors and health institutions, receiving requests from patients to access their medical records, end up requesting the legal opinion of the Commission for access to administrative documents. Each and every time, that opinion goes in line with the notion of full and direct patient access. Sharing medical records with patients seems crucial and inevitable in the current patient-centred care model, having the potential to improve patient empowerment, health literacy, autonomy, self-efficacy and satisfaction with care. With the recent technological developments and the fast dissemination of Personal Health Records, it is foreseeable that a growing number of patients will want to access their medical records. Therefore, promoting awareness on this topic is essential, in order to allow an informed debate between all the stakeholders.

  10. Prevalence of adult Huntington's disease in the UK based on diagnoses recorded in general practice records

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Stephen JW; Douglas, Ian; Rawlins, Michael D; Wexler, Nancy S; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Smeeth, Liam

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The prevalence of Huntington's disease (HD) in the UK is uncertain. Recently, it has been suggested that the prevalence may be substantially greater than previously reported. This study was undertaken to estimate the overall UK prevalence in adults diagnosed with HD, using data from primary care. Methods The electronic medical records of patients aged 21 years or more, with recorded diagnoses of HD, were retrieved from the UK's General Practice Research Database. Prevalence was estimated from the number of persons with recorded diagnoses of HD, on 1 July each year, between 1990 and 2010. This number was divided by the total number of persons registered with participating general practices on that same date. These data were also used to estimate both age specific prevalence and prevalence in various regions of the UK. Results A total of 1136 patients diagnosed with HD, aged 21 years or more, were identified from the database. The estimated prevalence (expressed per 100 000 population) rose from 5.4 (95% CI 3.8 to 7.5) in 1990 to 12.3 (95% CI 11.2 to 13.5) in 2010. Although an increased prevalence was observed within every age group, the most dramatic was in older patients. Age specific prevalence was highest in the 51–60 year age range (15.8 95% CI 9.0 to 22.3). The prevalence of adult HD was lowest in the London region (5.4 (95% CI 3.0 to 8.9)) and highest in the North East of England (18.3 (95% CI 8.6 to 34.6)) and Scotland (16.1 (95% CI 10.8 to 22.9)). Conclusions The prevalence of diagnosed HD is clearly substantially higher in the UK than suggested from previous studies. By extrapolation to the UK as a whole, it is estimated that there are more than 5700 people, aged 21 years or more, with HD. There has also been a surprising doubling of the HD population between 1990 and 2010. Many factors may have caused this increase, including more accurate diagnoses, better and more available therapies and an improved life expectancy

  11. Patient Perceptions of Electronic Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulejian, Armine

    2011-01-01

    Research objective. Electronic Health Records (EHR) are expected to transform the way medicine is delivered with patients/consumers being the intended beneficiaries. However, little is known regarding patient knowledge and attitudes about EHRs. This study examined patient perceptions about EHR. Study design. Surveys were administered following…

  12. Patient Perceptions of Electronic Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulejian, Armine

    2011-01-01

    Research objective. Electronic Health Records (EHR) are expected to transform the way medicine is delivered with patients/consumers being the intended beneficiaries. However, little is known regarding patient knowledge and attitudes about EHRs. This study examined patient perceptions about EHR. Study design. Surveys were administered following…

  13. Why facilitate patient access to medical records.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana; Correia, Ana; Silva, Ana; Corte, Ana; Pinto, Ana; Saavedra, Ana; Pereira, Ana Luís; Pereira, Ana Filipa; Cruz-Correia, Ricardo; Antunes, Luís Filipe

    2007-01-01

    The wider use of healthcare information systems and the easier integration and sharing of patient clinical information can facilitate a wider access to medical records. The main goal of this paper is to perform a systematic review to analyze published work that studied the impact of facilitating patients' access to their medical record. Moreover, this review includes the analysis of the potential benefits and drawbacks on patient attitudes, doctor-patient relationship and on medical practice. In order to fill a gap in terms of the electronic medical record (EMR) impact within this issue, this review will focus on the use of EMR for patients to access their medical records as well as the advantages and disadvantages that this can bring. The articles included in the study were identified using MEDLINE and Scopus databases and revised according to their title and abstract and, afterwards, their full text was read considering inclusion and exclusion criteria. From the 165 articles obtained in MEDLINE a total of 12 articles were selected. From Scopus, 2 articles were obtained, so a total of 14 articles were included in the review. The studies revealed that patients' access to medical records can be beneficial for both patients and doctors, since it enhances communication between them whilst helping patients to better understand their health condition. The drawbacks (for instance causing confusion and anxiety to patients) seem to be minimal. However, patients continue to show concerns about confidentiality and understanding what is written in their records. The studies showed that the use of EMR can bring several advantages in terms of security solutions as well as improving the correctness and completeness of the patient records.

  14. Patient information: confidentiality and the electronic record.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    The rise of the electronic record now allows nurses to access a large archive of patient information that was more difficult to obtain when records consisted of manually held paper files. There have been several instances where curiosity and, occasionally, more malicious motivations have led nurses to access these records and read the notes of a celebrity or a person they know. In this article, Richard Griffith considers whether nurses' accessing and reading of the record of someone who is not in their care is in breach of their duty of confidentiality.

  15. Electrophysiological Recording in the Brain of Intact Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Lindsey; Ball, Rebecca E.; Acuff, Seth; Gaudet, John; Sornborger, Andrew; Lauderdale, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, electrophysiological studies in adult zebrafish have been limited to slice preparations or to eye cup preparations and electrorentinogram recordings. This paper describes how an adult zebrafish can be immobilized, intubated, and used for in vivo electrophysiological experiments, allowing recording of neural activity. Immobilization of the adult requires a mechanism to deliver dissolved oxygen to the gills in lieu of buccal and opercular movement. With our technique, animals are immobilized and perfused with habitat water to fulfill this requirement. A craniotomy is performed under tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222; tricaine) anesthesia to provide access to the brain. The primary electrode is then positioned within the craniotomy window to record extracellular brain activity. Through the use of a multitube perfusion system, a variety of pharmacological compounds can be administered to the adult fish and any alterations in the neural activity can be observed. The methodology not only allows for observations to be made regarding changes in neurological activity, but it also allows for comparisons to be made between larval and adult zebrafish. This gives researchers the ability to identify the alterations in neurological activity due to the introduction of various compounds at different life stages. PMID:24300281

  16. [Prevalence in adults of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder using the medical records of primary care].

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Enric; Lluís Piñol, Josep; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; López-Cortacans, German; Caballero, Antònia; Bosch, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    ADHD in adults is not uncommon and, according to recent epidemiological data, has a population prevalence of 3-4%. However, there is major unawareness of this disorder among doctors, particularly in primary care. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of the diagnosis of ADHD recorded in adults and the proportion of patients with drug prescriptions for this disorder in primary care. This is a cross-sectional study on databases of computerised primary care medical records. The target population is adults (18-44 years) assigned to primary care centres of the Catalan Health Institute (n = 2,452,107). We obtained the proportion of patients with ADHD (F90/ICD- 10 code) registered as active problem, and the proportion of patients with a specific prescription for ADHD in adults: methylphenidate, methylphenidate extended release or atomoxetine. The prevalence of recorded ADHD is 0.04% (0.07% in men, 0.02% in women). The percentage of patients with a specific prescription for ADHD is 0.07% (0.08% in men, 0.05% in women). 32.05% of ADHD patients had specific prescription. The diagnosis of ADHD in adults and specific treatment are extremely low in primary care. These results contrast with population data: registered ADHD is 1/85 of the population prevalence.

  17. Representing and Retrieving Patients' Falls Risk Factors and Risk for Falls among Adults in Acute Care through the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Jann

    2013-01-01

    Defining fall risk factors and predicting fall risk status among patients in acute care has been a topic of research for decades. With increasing pressure on hospitals to provide quality care and prevent hospital-acquired conditions, the search for effective fall prevention interventions continues. Hundreds of risk factors for falls in acute care…

  18. Representing and Retrieving Patients' Falls Risk Factors and Risk for Falls among Adults in Acute Care through the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Jann

    2013-01-01

    Defining fall risk factors and predicting fall risk status among patients in acute care has been a topic of research for decades. With increasing pressure on hospitals to provide quality care and prevent hospital-acquired conditions, the search for effective fall prevention interventions continues. Hundreds of risk factors for falls in acute care…

  19. Regenerative Endodontics for Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    He, Ling; Kim, Sahng G; Gong, Qimei; Zhong, Juan; Wang, Sainan; Zhou, Xuedong; Ye, Ling; Ling, Junqi; Mao, Jeremy J

    2017-09-01

    The goal of endodontics is to save teeth. Since inception, endodontic treatments are performed to obturate disinfected root canals with inert materials such as gutta-percha. Although teeth can be saved after successful endodontic treatments, they are devitalized and therefore susceptible to reinfections and fractures. The American Association of Endodontists (AAE) has made a tremendous effort to revitalize disinfected immature permanent teeth in children and adolescents with diagnoses including pulp necrosis or apical periodontitis. The American Dental Association (ADA) in 2011 issued several clinical codes for regenerative endodontic procedures or apical revascularization in necrotic immature permanent teeth in children and adolescents. These AAE and ADA initiatives have stimulated robust interest in devising a multitude of tissue engineering approaches for dental pulp and dentin regeneration. Can the concept of regenerative endodontics be extended to revitalize mature permanent teeth with diagnoses including irreversible pulpitis and/or pulp necrosis in adults? The present article was written not only to summarize emerging findings to revitalize mature permanent teeth in adult patients but also to identify challenges and strategies that focus on realizing the goal of regenerative endodontics in adults. We further present clinical cases and describe the biological basis of potential regenerative endodontic procedures in adults. This article explores the frequently asked question if regenerative endodontic therapies should be developed for dental pulp and/or dentin regeneration in adults, who consist of the great majority of endodontic patients. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. HARVEST, a longitudinal patient record summarizer

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Jamie S; Tanenbaum, Jessica S; Lipsky Gorman, Sharon; Liu, Connie; Schmitz, Eric; Hashorva, Dritan; Ervits, Artem; Vawdrey, David; Sturm, Marc; Elhadad, Noémie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe HARVEST, a novel point-of-care patient summarization and visualization tool, and to conduct a formative evaluation study to assess its effectiveness and gather feedback for iterative improvements. Materials and methods HARVEST is a problem-based, interactive, temporal visualization of longitudinal patient records. Using scalable, distributed natural language processing and problem salience computation, the system extracts content from the patient notes and aggregates and presents information from multiple care settings. Clinical usability was assessed with physician participants using a timed, task-based chart review and questionnaire, with performance differences recorded between conditions (standard data review system and HARVEST). Results HARVEST displays patient information longitudinally using a timeline, a problem cloud as extracted from notes, and focused access to clinical documentation. Despite lack of familiarity with HARVEST, when using a task-based evaluation, performance and time-to-task completion was maintained in patient review scenarios using HARVEST alone or the standard clinical information system at our institution. Subjects reported very high satisfaction with HARVEST and interest in using the system in their daily practice. Discussion HARVEST is available for wide deployment at our institution. Evaluation provided informative feedback and directions for future improvements. Conclusions HARVEST was designed to address the unmet need for clinicians at the point of care, facilitating review of essential patient information. The deployment of HARVEST in our institution allows us to study patient record summarization as an informatics intervention in a real-world setting. It also provides an opportunity to learn how clinicians use the summarizer, enabling informed interface and content iteration and optimization to improve patient care. PMID:25352564

  1. Patient health record on a smart card.

    PubMed

    Naszlady, A; Naszlady, J

    1998-02-01

    A validated health questionnaire has been used for the documentation of a patient's history (826 items) and of the findings from physical examination (591 items) in our clinical ward for 25 years. This computerized patient record has been completed in EUCLIDES code (CEN TC/251) for laboratory tests and an ATC and EAN code listing for the names of the drugs permanently required by the patient. In addition, emergency data were also included on an EEPROM chipcard with a 24 kb capacity. The program is written in FOX-PRO language. A group of 5000 chronically ill in-patients received these cards which contain their health data. For security reasons the contents of the smart card is only accessible by a doctor's PIN coded key card. The personalization of each card was carried out in our health center and the depersonalized alphanumeric data were collected for further statistical evaluation. This information served as a basis for a real need assessment of health care and for the calculation of its cost. Code-combined with an optical card, a completely paperless electronic patient record system has been developed containing all three information carriers in medicine: Texts, Curves and Pictures.

  2. Jaundice in primary care: a cohort study of adults aged >45 years using electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Anna; Stapley, Sally; Hamilton, William

    2012-08-01

    Jaundice is a rare but important symptom of malignant and benign conditions. When patients present in primary care, understanding the relative likelihood of different disease processes can help GPs to investigate and refer patients appropriately. To identify and quantify the various causes of jaundice in adults presenting in primary care. Historical cohort study using electronic primary care records. UK General Practice Research Database. Participants (186 814 men and women) aged >45 years with clinical events recorded in primary care records between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2007. Data were searched for episodes of jaundice and explanatory diagnoses identified within the subsequent 12 months. If no diagnosis was found, the patient's preceding medical record was searched for relevant chronic diseases. From the full cohort, 277 patients had at least one record of jaundice between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2006. Ninety-two (33%) were found to have bile duct stones; 74 (27%) had an explanatory cancer [pancreatic cancer 34 (12%), cholangiocarcinoma 13 (5%) and other diagnosed primary malignancy 27 (10%)]. Liver disease attributed to excess alcohol explained 26 (9%) and other diagnoses were identified in 24 (9%). Sixty-one (22%) had no diagnosis related to jaundice recorded. Although the most common cause of jaundice is bile duct stones, cancers are present in over a quarter of patients with jaundice in this study, demonstrating the importance of urgent investigation into the underlying cause.

  3. Electronic Health Records and the Disappearing Patient.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Linda M; Bell, Hannah S; Baker, Allison M; Howard, Heather A

    2017-09-01

    With rapid consolidation of American medicine into large-scale corporations, corporate strategies are coming to the forefront in health care delivery, requiring a dramatic increase in the amount and detail of documentation, implemented through use of electronic health records (EHRs). EHRs are structured to prioritize the interests of a myriad of political and corporate stakeholders, resulting in a complex, multi-layered, and cumbersome health records system, largely not directly relevant to clinical care. Drawing on observations conducted in outpatient specialty clinics, we consider how EHRs prioritize institutional needs manifested as a long list of requisites that must be documented with each consultation. We argue that the EHR enforces the centrality of market principles in clinical medicine, redefining the clinician's role to be less of a medical expert and more of an administrative bureaucrat, and transforming the patient into a digital entity with standardized conditions, treatments, and goals, without a personal narrative. © 2017 by the American Anthropological Association.

  4. Comparison of video-recorded consultations with those in which patients' consent is withheld.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, T; Manku-Scott, T

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Video-recorded consultations are widely used for research in general practice. Recently, video recordings have begun to be used for the purposes of general practitioner (GP) registrar assessment. It is unknown, however, whether consultations in which patients withhold consent for recording differ from those that are recorded. AIM: To compare clinical problems and demographic characteristics of adult patients who consent to the video recording of consultations with those who withhold consent. METHOD: This was prospective study of 538 adult patients consulting 42 GPs, based in practices throughout Leicestershire. Each patient attended a surgery session with one of the 42 GPs between April 1995 and March 1996. Clinical presentations and demographic characteristics of patients consenting and withholding consent to the video recording of their consultations were compared. GPs' perceptions of whether patients in these two groups were distressed/upset or embarrassed were also compared. RESULTS: A total of 85.9% (462/538) of adults consented to video recording, and 14.1% (76/538) withheld consent. Multiple logistic regression revealed that patients who presented with a mental health problem were more likely to withhold consent to recording (odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.4-4.6). Younger patients were also more likely to withhold consent to video recording. Additionally, where patients' consent was withheld, GPs perceived patients to be more distressed or embarrassed. CONCLUSION: Younger patients and those suffering from mental health problems are more likely than others to withhold consent to being video recorded for research purposes in general practice. The implications of this study for the assessment of registrar GPs using video-recorded consultations are discussed. PMID:9624767

  5. Architecture for networked electronic patient record systems.

    PubMed

    Takeda, H; Matsumura, Y; Kuwata, S; Nakano, H; Sakamoto, N; Yamamoto, R

    2000-11-01

    There have been two major approaches to the development of networked electronic patient record (EPR) architecture. One uses object-oriented methodologies for constructing the model, which include the GEHR project, Synapses, HL7 RIM and so on. The second approach uses document-oriented methodologies, as applied in examples of HL7 PRA. It is practically beneficial to take the advantages of both approaches and to add solution technologies for network security such as PKI. In recognition of the similarity with electronic commerce, a certificate authority as a trusted third party will be organised for establishing networked EPR system. This paper describes a Japanese functional model that has been developed, and proposes a document-object-oriented architecture, which is-compared with other existing models.

  6. Applicability of different types of Patient Records for Patient Recruitment Systems.

    PubMed

    Schreiweis, Björn; Bergh, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Patient records--types of Electronic Medical Records--are implemented to support patient recruitment. Different types of patient records have not yet been analyzed as to the number of Patient Recruitment System requirements can be found in each type of patient record. According to our analysis, personal electronic health records (PEHRs) tend to allow for most requirements to be found.

  7. Clinical phenotypes in adult patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Stefano; Lonni, Sara; Dore, Simone; McDonnell, Melissa J; Goeminne, Pieter C; Dimakou, Katerina; Fardon, Thomas C; Rutherford, Robert; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Chalmers, James D

    2016-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a heterogeneous disease. This study aimed at identifying discrete groups of patients with different clinical and biological characteristics and long-term outcomes.This was a secondary analysis of five European databases of prospectively enrolled adult outpatients with bronchiectasis. Principal component and cluster analyses were performed using demographics, comorbidities, and clinical, radiological, functional and microbiological variables collected during the stable state. Exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during a 3-year follow-up were recorded. Clusters were externally validated in an independent cohort of patients with bronchiectasis, also investigating inflammatory markers in sputum.Among 1145 patients (median age 66 years; 40% male), four clusters were identified driven by the presence of chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosaor other pathogens and daily sputum: "Pseudomonas" (16%), "Other chronic infection" (24%), "Daily sputum" (33%) and "Dry bronchiectasis" (27%). Patients in the four clusters showed significant differences in terms of quality of life, exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during follow-up. In the validation cohort, free neutrophil elastase activity, myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin-1β levels in sputum were significantly different among the clusters.Identification of four clinical phenotypes in bronchiectasis could favour focused treatments in future interventional studies designed to alter the natural history of the disease.

  8. [Electronic patient record as the tool for better patient safety].

    PubMed

    Schneider, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate again that there is a deficit in the use of electronic health records (EHR) in German hospitals. Despite good arguments in favour of their use, such as the rapid availability of data, German hospitals shy away from a wider implementation. The reason is the high cost of installing and maintaining the EHRs, for the benefit is difficult to evaluate in monetary terms for the hospital. Even if a benefit can be shown it is not necessarily evident within the hospital, but manifests itself only in the health system outside. Many hospitals only manage to partly implement EHR resulting in increased documentation requirements which reverse their positive effect.In the United States, electronic medical records are also viewed in light of their positive impact on patient safety. In particular, electronic medication systems prove the benefits they can provide in the context of patient safety. As a result, financing systems have been created to promote the digitalisation of hospitals in the United States. This has led to a large increase in the use of IT systems in the United States in recent years. The Universitätsklinikum Eppendorf (UKE) introduced electronic patient records in 2009. The benefits, in particular as regards patient safety, are numerous and there are many examples to illustrate this position. These positive results are intended to demonstrate the important role EHR play in hospitals. A financing system of the ailing IT landscape based on the American model is urgently needed to benefit-especially in terms of patient safety-from electronic medical records in the hospital.

  9. Shallow medication extraction from hospital patient records.

    PubMed

    Boytcheva, Svetla

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents methods for shallow Information Extraction (IE) from the free text zones of hospital Patient Records (PRs) in Bulgarian language in the Patient Safety through Intelligent Procedures in medication (PSIP) project. We extract automatically information about drug names, dosage, modes and frequency and assign the corresponding ATC code to each medication event. Using various modules for rule-based text analysis, our IE components in PSIP perform a significant amount of symbolic computations. We try to address negative statements, elliptical constructions, typical conjunctive phrases, and simple inferences concerning temporal constraints and finally aim at the assignment of the drug ACT code to the extracted medication events, which additionally complicates the extraction algorithm. The prototype of the system was used for experiments with a training corpus containing 1,300 PRs and the evaluation results are obtained using a test corpus containing 6,200 PRs. The extraction accuracy (f-score) for drug names is 98.42% and for dose 93.85%.

  10. Access control for electronic patient records.

    PubMed

    Glagola, M J

    1998-01-01

    The transition from hardcopy records to electronic records is in the forefront for healthcare today. For healthcare facilities, a major issue is determining who can access patients' medical information and how access to this information can be controlled. There are three components to access control: identification, authentication and authorization. Checking proof of identity is a means of authenticating someone--through a driver's license, passport or their fingerprints. Similar processes are needed in a computer environment, through the use of passwords, one-time passwords or smartcards, encryption and kerberos, and call-back procedures. New in the area of access control are biometric devices, which are hardware/software combinations that digitize a physical characteristic and compare the sample with previously stored samples. Fingerprints, voiceprints and facial features are examples. Their cost is currently prohibitive, but in time, they may become more common. Digital certificates and certification authorities are other means used to authenticate identify. When a system challenges a user's identity at log on, the user provides a certification that tells the system to go to the issuing certification authority and find proof the user's claim is valid. Low-level certifications offer little value for sensitive data, but high-level certification is now being introduced. It requires more specific, detailed information on the applicant. Authorization, the final component of access control, establishes what a specific user can and cannot access. To have effective access control, transaction logging and system monitoring are needed to ensure the various techniques are being used and performing properly.

  11. Patients' use of digital audio recordings in four different outpatient clinics.

    PubMed

    Wolderslund, Maiken; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Holst, René; Ammentorp, Jette

    2015-12-01

    To investigate a new technology of digital audio recording (DAR) of health consultations to provide knowledge about patients' use and evaluation of this recording method. A cross-sectional feasibility analysis of the intervention using log data from the recording platform and data from a patient-administered questionnaire. Four different outpatient clinics at a Danish hospital: Paediatrics, Orthopaedics, Internal Medicine and Urology. Two thousand seven hundred and eighty-four outpatients having their consultation audio recorded by one of 49 participating health professionals. DAR of outpatient consultations provided to patients permitting replay of their consultation either alone or together with their relatives. Replay of the consultation within 90 days from the consultation. In the adult outpatient clinics, one in every three consultations was replayed; however, the rates were significantly lower in the paediatric clinic where one in five consultations was replayed. The usage of the audio recordings was positively associated with increasing patient age and first time visits to the clinic. Patient gender influenced replays in different ways; for instance, relatives to male patients replayed recordings more often than relatives to female patients did. Approval of future recordings was high among the patients who replayed the consultation. Patients found that recording health consultations was an important information aid, and the digital recording technology was found to be feasible in routine practice. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondrial epilepsy in pediatric and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J; Zarrouk Mahjoub, S

    2013-09-01

    Few data are available about the difference between epilepsy in pediatric mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and adult MIDs. This review focuses on the differences between pediatric and adult mitochondrial epilepsy with regard to seizure type, seizure frequency, and underlying MID. A literature search via Pubmed using the keywords 'mitochondrial', 'epilepsy', 'seizures', 'adult', 'pediatric', and all MID acronyms, was carried out. Frequency of mitochondrial epilepsy strongly depends on the type of MID included and is higher in pediatric compared to adult patients. In pediatric patients, mitochondrial epilepsy is more frequent due to mutations in nDNA-located than mtDNA-located genes and vice versa in adults. In pediatric patients, mitochondrial epilepsy is associated with a syndromic phenotype in half of the patients and in adults more frequently with a non-syndromic phenotype. In pediatric patients, focal seizures are more frequent than generalized seizures and vice versa in adults. Electro-clinical syndromes are more frequent in pediatric MIDs compared to adult MIDs. Differences between pediatric and adult mitochondrial epilepsy concern the onset of epilepsy, frequency of epilepsy, seizure type, type of electro-clinical syndrome, frequency of syndromic versus non-syndromic MIDs, and the outcome. To optimize management of mitochondrial epilepsy, it is essential to differentiate between early and late-onset forms. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. BMI is Associated with the Willingness to Record Diet with a Mobile Food Record among Adults Participating in Dietary Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Deborah A.; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S.; Pollard, Christina M.; Norman, Richard; Wright, Janine L.; Harray, Amelia J.; Shoneye, Charlene L.; Solah, Vicky A.; Hunt, Wendy J.; Zhu, Fengqing; Delp, Edward J.; Boushey, Carol J.

    2017-01-01

    Image-based dietary assessment methods have the potential to address respondent burden and improve engagement in the task of recording for dietary interventions. The aim of this study was to assess factors associated with the willingness of adults to take images of food and beverages using a mobile food record (mFR) application. A combined sample of 212 young adults and 73 overweight and obese adults completed a 4-day mobile food record on two occasions and a follow-up usability questionnaire. About 74% of participants stated they would record using the mFR for a longer period compared with a written record (29.4 ± 69.3 vs. 16.1 ± 42.6 days respectively; p < 0.0005). Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify those who were more likely to record mFR in the top tertile (≥14 days). After adjusting for age and gender, those with a BMI ≥ 25 were 1.68 times more likely (Odds Ratio 95% Confidence Interval: 1.02–2.77) than those with BMI < 25 to state a willingness to record with the mFR for ≥14 days. The greater willingness of overweight and obese individuals to record dietary intake using an mFR needs further examination to determine if this translates to more accurate estimates of energy intake. PMID:28272343

  14. 78 FR 45454 - Patient Access to Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... records if VA determines that such release could have an adverse effect on the physical or mental health... ``would not be injurious to the physical or mental health of the claimant.'' VA developed a special...(d), in those cases where records contain information that may be injurious to the physical or...

  15. The sensitivity of acoustic cough recording relative to intraesophageal pressure recording and patient report during reflux testing.

    PubMed

    Rosen, R; Amirault, J; Heinz, N; Litman, H; Khatwa, U

    2014-11-01

    One of the primary indications for reflux testing with multichannel intraluminal impedance with pH (pH-MII) is to correlate reflux events with symptoms such as cough. Adult and pediatric studies have shown, using cough as a model, that patient report of symptoms is inaccurate. Unfortunately, intraesophageal pressure recording (IEPR) to record coughs is more invasive which limits its utility in children. The primary aim of this study was to validate the use of acoustic cough recording (ACR) during pH-MII testing. We recruited children undergoing pH-MII testing for the evaluation of cough. We simultaneously placed IEPR and pH-MII catheters and an ACR device in each patient. Each 24 h ACR, pH-MII, and IEPR tracing was scored by blinded investigators. Sensitivities for each method of symptom recording were calculated. A total of 2698 coughs were detected; 1140 were patient reported PR, 2425 were IEPR detected, and 2400 were ACR detected. The sensitivity of PR relative to ACR was 45.9% and the sensitivity of IEPR relative to ACR was 93.6%. There was strong inter-rater reliability (κ = 0.78) for the identification of cough by ACR. Acoustic recording is a non-invasive, sensitive method of recording cough during pH-MII testing that is well suited for the pediatric population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Cystic fibrosis lung disease in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Vender, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    As the longevity of all patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) continues to increase (median 2005 survival=36.8 years), more adult patients will be receiving their medical care from nonpediatric adult-care providers. Cystic fibrosis remains a fatal disease, with more than 80% of patients dying after the age of 18 years, and most deaths resulting from pulmonary disease. The changing epidemiology requires adult-care providers to become knowledgeable and competent in the clinical management of adults with CF. Physicians must understand the influence of specific genotype on phenotypic disease presentation and severity, the pathogenic factors determining lung disease onset and progression, the impact of comorbid disease factors such as CF-related diabetes and malnutrition upon lung disease severity, and the currently approved or standard accepted therapies used for chronic management of CF lung disease. This knowledge is critical to help alleviate morbidity and improve mortality for the rapidly expanding population of adults with CF.

  17. Implementing security in computer based patient records clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Iversen, K R; Heimly, V; Lundgren, T I

    1995-01-01

    In Norway, organizational changes in hospitals and a stronger focus on patient safety have changed the way of organizing and managing paper based patient records. Hospital-wide patient records tend to replace department based records. Since not only clinicians, but also other non-medical staff have access to the paper records, they also have easy access to all the information which is available on a specific patient; such a system has obvious 'side effects' on privacy and security. Computer based patient records (CPRs) can provide the solution to this apparent paradox if the complex aspects of security, privacy, effectiveness, and user friendliness are focused on jointly from the outset in designing such systems. Clinical experiences in Norway show that it is possible to design patient record systems that provide a very useful tool for clinicians and other health care personnel (HCP) while fully complying with comprehensive security and privacy requirements.

  18. Toward an integrated computerized patient record.

    PubMed

    Dole, T R; Luberti, A A

    2000-04-01

    Developing a comprehensive electronic medical record system to serve ambulatory care providers in a large health care enterprise requires significant time and resources. One approach to achieving this system is to devise a series of short-term, workable solutions until a complete system is designed and implemented. The initial solution introduced a basic (mini) medical record system that provided an automated problem/summary sheet and decentralization of ambulatory-based medical records. The next step was to partner with an information system vendor committed to continued development of the long-term system capable of supporting the health care organization well into the future.

  19. Customer-oriented medical records can promote patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1988-04-01

    The customer-oriented medical record helps promote patient satisfaction by providing a mechanism to monitor and document quality of care from the patient's perspective. Information that should be contained in the record includes the following: Personal and family information. Reasons for selecting the provider. Reasons for patient visit. Patient requests and responses thereto. Provider and staff observations. Patient feedback. Summaries of previous visits. Record of progress made. In addition to promoting patient satisfaction, the customer-oriented medical record provides a data base for analyzing the current market that can be used in designing marketing communications to attract new patients. It also contributes to provider success by reminding care givers of their commitment to patient satisfaction, motivating them to be sensitive to patients' needs and expectations, and helping them to personalize the care experience.

  20. Patient records: from single events to elements for health planning.

    PubMed

    Pisanelli, D M; Ricci, F L

    1994-12-01

    Data collected in patient records are not only the kernel of a ward information system, but also the groundwork for planning and evaluating services in health care. The aim of this study was to analyze the problem of aggregate data generation starting from separate items in patient records. After describing the different uses of patient record data, we outline the process which generates aggregates data starting from individual records. This process leads to the definition of the "view on aggregation" as an intermediate step between patient records and aggregate data. A simplified schema is presented based on the Entity-Relationship model representing a conceptual model of the integration of aggregate data and patient record items. Finally, the role is discussed of automation in this process and the perspectives for its implementation.

  1. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  2. Adult Education Sound and Video Recordings--E. S. Bird Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, Alexander N., Comp.; Abbott, George, Comp.

    This publication lists items from the sound and video recording collection in the area of adult and continuing education in Bird Library, Syracuse University (Syracuse, New York). The major categories are sound recordings and video recordings. The items are listed in numerical order by call number. The following information is provided for sound…

  3. TeleMed: A distributed virtual patient record system

    SciTech Connect

    Forslund, D.W.; Phillips, R.L.; Kilman, D.G.; Cook, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    TeleMed is a distributed diagnosis and analysis system, which permits physicians who are not collocated to consult on the status of a patient. The patient`s record is dynamically constructed from data that may reside at several sites but which can be quickly assembled for viewing by pointing to the patient`s name. Then, a graphical patient record appears, through which consulting physicians can retrieve textual and radiographic data with a single mouse click. TeleMed uses modern distributed object technology and emerging telecollaboration tools. The authors describe in this paper some of the motivation for this change, what they mean by a virtual patient record, and some results of some early implementations of a virtual patient record.

  4. 42 CFR 137.178 - May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at... SELF-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Records § 137.178 May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers? Yes, at the option of a Self-Governance Tribe, patient records...

  5. The electronic patient records of the Hannover Medical School.

    PubMed

    Porth, A J; Niehoff, C; Matthies, H K

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, the successful introduction of a commercially available electronic patient record archiving system at the Hannover Medical School is described. Since 1996, more than 11 million document sheets of 130,000 patient records have been stored electronically. Currently, 100,000 sheets are stored each week.

  6. Body Composition in Adult Patients with Thalassemia Major

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, Evangelos; Thriskos, Paschalis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vassiou, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess body composition in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to compare the findings with a group of healthy age-matched controls. Methods. Our study group included sixty-two patients (27 males, mean age 36 years, and 35 females, mean age 36.4 years) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls. All patients had an established diagnosis of thalassemia major and followed a regular blood transfusion scheme since childhood and chelation treatment. Fat, lean, and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ferritin levels and body mass index of all patients and controls were also recorded. Student t-test and Wilcoxon test were performed and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results. BMD and whole body lean mass are lower in both male and female adult patients compared with controls (p < 0.01 in both groups), whereas whole body fat mass was found to have no statistically significant difference compared to controls. Regional trunk fat around the abdomen was found to be lower in male patients compared to controls (p = 0.02). Conclusion. Severe bone loss and diminished lean mass are expected in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major. Fat changes seem to affect mainly male patients. PMID:27956899

  7. Body Composition in Adult Patients with Thalassemia Major.

    PubMed

    Vlychou, Marianna; Alexiou, Evangelos; Thriskos, Paschalis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vassiou, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess body composition in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to compare the findings with a group of healthy age-matched controls. Methods. Our study group included sixty-two patients (27 males, mean age 36 years, and 35 females, mean age 36.4 years) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls. All patients had an established diagnosis of thalassemia major and followed a regular blood transfusion scheme since childhood and chelation treatment. Fat, lean, and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ferritin levels and body mass index of all patients and controls were also recorded. Student t-test and Wilcoxon test were performed and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results. BMD and whole body lean mass are lower in both male and female adult patients compared with controls (p < 0.01 in both groups), whereas whole body fat mass was found to have no statistically significant difference compared to controls. Regional trunk fat around the abdomen was found to be lower in male patients compared to controls (p = 0.02). Conclusion. Severe bone loss and diminished lean mass are expected in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major. Fat changes seem to affect mainly male patients.

  8. Solving incompatibilities between electronic records for orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Magni, Antonio; de Oliveira Albuquerque, Robson; de Sousa, Rafael Timóteo; Hans, Mark G; Magni, Franco G

    2007-07-01

    Today, orthodontists should not need to burden their work load with tasks such as figuring out how to send patient information to colleagues or how to share the same patient record across different software programs. In a long-term attempt to lighten these tasks, we are developing a standard for electronic orthodontic patient records to enable a seamless interchange of data between software programs. This article describes a practical proposal that integrates 2 existing standards, HL7 and DICOM, to create a standard for electronic orthodontic patient records.

  9. Multicenter patient records research: security policies and tools.

    PubMed

    Behlen, F M; Johnson, S B

    1999-01-01

    The expanding health information infrastructure offers the promise of new medical knowledge drawn from patient records. Such promise will never be fulfilled, however, unless researchers first address policy issues regarding the rights and interests of both the patients and the institutions who hold their records. In this article, the authors analyze the interests of patients and institutions in light of public policy and institutional needs. They conclude that the multicenter study, with Institutional Review Board approval of each study at each site, protects the interests of both. "Anonymity" is no panacea, since patient records are so rich in information that they can never be truly anonymous. Researchers must earn and respect the trust of the public, as responsible stewards of facts about patients' lives. The authors find that computer security tools are needed to administer multicenter patient records studies and describe simple approaches that can be implemented using commercial database products.

  10. Population pharmacokinetics of micafungin in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Gumbo, Tawanda; Hiemenz, John; Ma, Lei; Keirns, James J; Buell, Donald N; Drusano, George L

    2008-03-01

    We performed population pharmacokinetic analysis of micafungin in adult patients treated with doses between 12.5 and 200 mg/day. Our analysis identified a breakpoint patient weight of 66.3 kg above which serum clearance increased by approximately 50%. Patients with weight >66.3 kg may need larger doses to achieve similar exposures to those <66.3 kg. However, the clinical implications are still unknown.

  11. Motor Activity in Adult Patients with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mjeldheim, Kristin; Førland, Wenche; Hansen, Anita L.; Dilsaver, Steven; Oedegaard, Ketil J.; Berle, Jan Øystein

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperactivity is a core symptom of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but limited information is available on analysis of activity patterns in this disorder. The aim of the study was to analyze motor activity during daily living in adult patients with ADHD. Methods Patients (n=76) from the private psychiatric practice of two of the authors were recruited, and were compared to patients with other psychiatric disorders and to normal controls. Actigraphs were used to record motor activity for six days, with one minute intervals, and data were analysed using linear and non-linear mathematical methods. Results For short recording periods (300 minutes) the activity levels of ADHD patients do not differ from normal controls, but the autocorrelation (lag 1) is lower and Fourier analysis shows higher power in the high frequency range, corresponding to the period from 2-8 min. During recordings for six days there are no significant differences between ADHD patients and the control groups. The combined and inattentive subgroups differ only in the six days recordings. The Fourier analyses show that the combined type has lower power in the high frequency range, corresponding to the period from 4-8 hours, and in the analysis of rhythms the intra-daily variability is lower, compared to the inattentive type. Conclusion Adult ADHD patients do not show evidence of hyperactivity, but have levels of activity similar to normal controls. However, on several measures ADHD patients display altered activity patterns, indicating that the regulation of motor activity in this disorder is different from controls. PMID:26508958

  12. The Adult Diabetic Patient: An Education Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    finding that he/she, too, must care for sicker patients. To better prepare these patients for life after discharge, patient education must be initiated as...admitted, patient education often begins at the physicians’ office. This paper explores diabetes mellitus in relation to concepts of self-care and adult...betting foj.L eduuation and iio.w, wore ofteni, patient education and follow-up sercvices- a:leL beiny p~rovided on ani outpatient bcdtsis" (p. 36) . Thet

  13. Patient access to medical records on a psychiatric inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Stein, E J; Furedy, R L; Simonton, M J; Neuffer, C H

    1979-03-01

    The authors studied the effects of patient access to medical records during hospitalization in a psychiatric unit of a community general hospital. Questionnaires were completed by about 20 staff and 88 patients, and records were compared with those from an earlier period to note any changes in the written record. Patients reported feeling better informed and more involved in their treatment, and staff said that they became more thoughtful about their notes in the chart. The availability of staff seems crucial to this process and facilitates the working alliance.

  14. Patient Access to Their Health Record Using Open Source EHR.

    PubMed

    Chelsom, John; Dogar, Naveed

    2015-01-01

    In both Europe and North America, patients are beginning to gain access to their health records in electronic form. Using the open source cityEHR as an example, we have focussed on the needs of clinical users to gather requirements for patient access and have implemented these requirements in a new application called cityEHR-PA. The development of a separate application for patient access was necessary to address requirements for security and ease of use. The use of open standards throughout the design of the EHR allows the possibility of third parties to develop applications for patient access, consuming the individual patient record extracted from the full EHR.

  15. An electronic patient record implementation using clinical document architecture.

    PubMed

    Poulymenopoulou, M; Vassilacopoulos, G

    2004-01-01

    Electronic patient records (EPRs) provide the means for integrated access to patient information that may be scattered across dispersed healthcare organizations that, in general, use heterogeneous systems in order to support their internal functions. XML language and Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) provides a mechanism for defining, structuring, manipulating and visualizing patient medical data using the same semantics through web. In this paper, a prototype implementation of a web-based electronic patient record (EPR) system using XML for data format and CDA for defining and structuring patient clinical documents is presented.

  16. Characteristics of Homeless Adults Who Died of Drug Overdose: A Retrospective Record Review

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Jennifer K.; León, Casey; Baggett, Travis P.

    2016-01-01

    Drug overdose is a major cause of death among homeless people, but little is known about the characteristics of homeless overdose decedents. We conducted a retrospective record review of 219 adult patients of Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) who died of drug overdose in 2003–2008. We assessed the substances implicated in overdose and the health and service use characteristics of decedents prior to death. Eighty-one percent of overdose deaths involved opioids and 40% involved multiple drugs. Problem substance use (85%), psychiatric illness (61%), and chronic pain (45%) were common, and 32% had documentation of all three. Half were well-connected to BHCHP, and 35% had a clinic visit within 90 days of death. The complex health histories and frequent health care contacts of homeless drug overdose decedents suggest that clinical facilities may be an important frontline venue for overdose education, naloxone distribution, and integrated substance use treatment programming. PMID:27180712

  17. Autism and behavior in adult patients with Dravet syndrome (DS).

    PubMed

    Berkvens, J J L; Veugen, I; Veendrick-Meekes, M J B M; Snoeijen-Schouwenaars, F M; Schelhaas, H J; Willemsen, M H; Tan, I Y; Aldenkamp, A P

    2015-06-01

    Autism and behavioral characteristics in adults with Dravet syndrome (DS) have rarely been systematically studied. Three scales were used to assess the outcomes of DS in adulthood in terms of autism and behavior. All the adult patients with DS, nine male and four female, aged between 18 and 60 years, living at the Epilepsy Center Kempenhaeghe in The Netherlands were included in the study. In addition, the past medical history of each patient was systematically screened for diagnoses like autism, Pervasive Development Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), hyperactivity, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and self-mutilation. Information concerning past and current use of psychoactive drugs was also evaluated. Eight patients (61.5%) were classified as having autism spectrum disorder (ASD) according to the AVZ-R or according to the medical record. Self-mutilation was seen in four patients (30.8%), hyperactivity in none. Three patients (23.1%) currently used psychoactive drugs. Autism spectrum disorders persist in adult patients with DS, while certain characteristics associated with behavioral problems, such as hyperactivity or use of psychoactive medication, seem to be less prominent than in childhood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Patient-initiated electronic health record amendment requests

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David A; Preib, Rebecca; Zheng, Kai; Choi, Sung W

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Providing patients access to their medical records offers many potential benefits including identification and correction of errors. The process by which patients ask for changes to be made to their records is called an ‘amendment request’. Little is known about the nature of such amendment requests and whether they result in modifications to the chart. Methods We conducted a qualitative content analysis of all patient-initiated amendment requests that our institution received over a 7-year period. Recurring themes were identified along three analytic dimensions: (1) clinical/documentation area, (2) patient motivation for making the request, and (3) outcome of the request. Results The dataset consisted of 818 distinct requests submitted by 181 patients. The majority of these requests (n=636, 77.8%) were made to rectify incorrect information and 49.7% of all requests were ultimately approved. In 6.6% of the requests, patients wanted valid information removed from their record, 27.8% of which were approved. Among all of the patients requesting a copy of their chart, only a very small percentage (approximately 0.2%) submitted an amendment request. Conclusions The low number of amendment requests may be due to inadequate awareness by patients about how to make changes to their records. To make this approach effective, it will be important to inform patients of their right to view and amend records and about the process for doing so. Increasing patient access to medical records could encourage patient participation in improving the accuracy of medical records; however, caution should be used. PMID:24863430

  19. Food hypersensitivity among adult patients: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R; Delgado, J; Quiralte, J; Blanco, C; Carrillo, T

    1996-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity (FH) is lesser frequent among adult patients than in childhood. Foods implicated in hypersensitivity reactions vary with sociocultural and diet habits from a geographic place to other. We studied 142 adult patients sensitized to foods, among 7698 patients visited at our Outpatient Clinic. Hundred and twenty patients referred clinical symptoms after consumption of one or more foods consistently. From the latest, 107 patients (89.2%) were atopics (92 of them sensitizes to dust mites) and 54 (45%) referred atopic familiar background. Most frequent recorded symptoms were: urticaria/angioedema 84 cases (70%), oral syndrome 65 (54%), asthma 48 (37%) and anaphylaxis 33 patients (27.5%). Shellfish sensitization occurred in 50 patients, fresh fruits in 33 and nuts in 29 cases. Shrimp (48 patients), squid (33), kiwi (14), papaya (14), avocado (13) and banana (12 cases) were the most frequent causes of FH. Significant statistical association between foods and inhalants was observed for fresh fruits and latex (p < 0.001), fresh fruits and pollens (p < 0.01), and shellfish and Blatta germanica (p < 0.001). Prevalence of FH among patients at our Area is around 1.6%. Tropical fruits, as other kind of fruits, seem to share common IgE-epitopes to pollens. High prevalence of shellfish and cockroach hypersensitivity could be more easily developed by previous domestic mites sensitization.

  20. Keeping record of the postoperative nursing care of patients.

    PubMed

    Roets, L; Aucamp, M C; de Beer, H; Niemand, M

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this research project was to evaluate the record-keeping of postoperative nursing care. A total of 186 randomly selected patient records were evaluated in terms of a checklist that included the most important parameters for postoperative nursing care. All the patients underwent operations under general anaesthetic in one month in a Level 3 hospital and were transferred to general wards after the operations. The data collected was analysed by means of frequencies. One finding was that the neurological status of most patients was assessed but that little attention was paid in the patient records to emotional status and physical comfort. The respiratory and circulatory status of the patients and their fluid balance were inadequately recorded. The patients were well monitored for signs of external haemorrhage, but in most cases haemorrhage was checked only once, on return from the theatre. Although the patients' pain experience were well-monitored, follow-up actions after the administration of pharmacological agents was poor. The surgical intervention was fully described and, generally speaking, the records were complete and legible, but the signatures and ranks of the nurses were illegible. Allergies were indicated in the most important records. The researchers recommend that a comprehensive and easily usable documentation form be used in postoperative nursing care. Such a form would serve as a checklist and could ensure to a large degree that attention is given to the most important postoperative parameters. Errors and negligence could also be reduced by this means.

  1. The Health of the Computer-Based Patient Record.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    The newly incorporated Computer-Based Patient Record Institute (CPRI) is discussed in the context of the history of medical records, the need for change (mainly because of health care reimbursement and regulation), and the need for involvement by all medical professionals in the development of standards of data collection which reflect public…

  2. The Health of the Computer-Based Patient Record.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    The newly incorporated Computer-Based Patient Record Institute (CPRI) is discussed in the context of the history of medical records, the need for change (mainly because of health care reimbursement and regulation), and the need for involvement by all medical professionals in the development of standards of data collection which reflect public…

  3. Development of a knowledge-based electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Safran, C; Rind, D M; Sands, D Z; Davis, R B; Wald, J; Slack, W V

    1996-01-01

    To help clinicians care for patients with HIV infection, we developed an interactive knowledge-based electronic patient record that integrates rule-based decision support and full-text information retrieval with an online patient record. This highly interactive clinical workstation now allows the clinicians at a large primary care practice (30,000 ambulatory visits per year) to use online information resources and fully electronic patient records during all patient encounters. The resulting practice database is continually updated with outcome data on a cohort of 700 patients with HIV infection. As a byproduct of this integrated system, we have developed improved statistical methods to measure the effects of electronic alerts and reminders.

  4. Patient ECG recording control for an automatic implantable defibrillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, Glen H. (Inventor); Lee, Jr., David G. (Inventor); Kitchin, David A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An implantable automatic defibrillator includes sensors which are placed on or near the patient's heart to detect electrical signals indicative of the physiology of the heart. The signals are digitally converted and stored into a FIFO region of a RAM by operation of a direct memory access (DMA) controller. The DMA controller operates transparently with respect to the microprocessor which is part of the defibrillator. The implantable defibrillator includes a telemetry communications circuit for sending data outbound from the defibrillator to an external device (either a patient controller or a physician's console or other) and a receiver for sensing at least an externally generated patient ECG recording command signal. The patient recording command signal is generated by the hand held patient controller. Upon detection of the patient ECG recording command, DMA copies the contents of the FIFO into a specific region of the RAM.

  5. Audio-visual recording in the surgery: do patients mind?

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, I. K.

    1982-01-01

    The results of questionnaires completed by 145 patients following audio-visual recording of their consultations are analysed. It is concluded that the technique is well accepted and non-intrusive. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:7143315

  6. Information integrity and privacy for computerized medical patient records

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, J.; Hamilton, V.; Gaylor, T.; McCurley, K.; Meeks, T.

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Oceania, Inc. entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in November 1993 to provide ``Information Integrity and Privacy for Computerized Medical Patient Records`` (CRADA No. SC93/01183). The main objective of the project was to develop information protection methods that are appropriate for databases of patient records in health information systems. This document describes the findings and alternative solutions that resulted from this CRADA.

  7. Challenges and methodology for indexing the computerized patient record.

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Frédéric; Ruch, Patrick; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Lovis, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Patient records contain most crucial documents for managing the treatments and healthcare of patients in the hospital. Retrieving information from these records in an easy, quick and safe way helps care providers to save time and find important facts about their patient's health. This paper presents the scalability issues induced by the indexing and the retrieval of the information contained in the patient records. For this study, EasyIR, an information retrieval tool performing full text queries and retrieving the related documents has been used. An evaluation of the performance reveals that the indexing process suffers from overhead consequence of the particular structure of the patient records. Most IR tools are designed to manage very large numbers of documents in a single index whereas in our hypothesis, one index per record, which usually implies few documents, has been imposed. As the number of modifications and creations of patient records are significant in a day, using a specialized and efficient indexation tool is required.

  8. Adult Patients' Experiences of Nursing Care Dependence.

    PubMed

    Piredda, Michela; Matarese, Maria; Mastroianni, Chiara; D'Angelo, Daniela; Hammer, Marilyn J; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2015-09-01

    Care dependence can be associated with suffering and humiliation. Nurses' awareness of patients' perception of care dependence is crucial to enable them in helping the dependent persons. This study aimed to describe adult patients' experience of nursing care dependence. A metasynthesis was conducted to integrate qualitative findings from 18 studies published through December 2014 on adult patients' experiences of care dependency. Procedures included the Johanna Briggs Institute approach for data extraction, quality appraisal, and integration of findings. The experience of dependence revealed the concept of the embodied person, particularly in relation to care of the physical body. The relationship between the individual and nurses within the context of care had a major impact for dependent patients. When the care relation was perceived as positive, the experience led to the development of the person in finding new balances in life, but when it was perceived as negative, it increased patient' suffering. Care dependence is manifested mostly as bodily dependence and is consistent with its relational nature. The nurse-patient relationship is important to the dependent patients' experience. A greater understanding of patients' experiences of dependence is crucial to enable nurses in improving care and decreasing patient suffering. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. The adult patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Baum, V C

    1996-02-01

    In adults with congenital heart disease who are confronted with noncardiac surgery, perioperative risks can be reduced, often appreciably, when problems inherent to this patient population are anticipated. The first necessity is to clarify the diagnosis and to be certain that appropriate information is obtained from a cardiologist with adequate knowledge of congenital heart disease in adults. Physiology and anatomy can vary significantly among patients who superficially carry identical diagnoses. Elective noncardiac surgery should be preceded by clinical assessment including review of clinical and laboratory data and securing the results of necessary diagnostic studies. Preoperative assessment should be performed far enough in advance of the anticipated date of surgery to allow critical assessment of the data and potential discussions with colleagues. Appropriate cardiovascular laboratory studies to be obtained or reviewed include electrocardiograms, chest radiographs, echocardiograms, and cardiac catheterization data, which may include specialized intracardiac electrophysiologic testing. Congenital heart disease in adults is a new and evolving area of special interest and expertise in cardiovascular medicine. Multidisciplinary centers for the care of these patients are being developed. The 22nd Bethesda Conference recommended that these centers include among their consultants anesthesiologists with special expertise in managing patients with congenital heart disease. These anesthesiologists can have the option of serving either as the attending anesthesiologists when patients require noncardiac surgery or as consultants and resource individuals to other anesthesiologists.

  10. Patient experiences at primary care practices using electronic health records.

    PubMed

    De Leon, Samantha F; Silfen, Sheryl L; Wang, Jason J; Kamara, Taafoi S; Wu, Winfred Y; Shih, Sarah C

    2012-01-01

    We assessed patient experiences before and one year after electronic health record (EHR) implementation among primary care practices in New York City. These practices represented an ethnically diverse population in lower-income, urban communities. Surveys, available in English, Spanish, and Chinese languages, were administered at 10 sites. Generally, patients reported positive responses during both periods. After EHR implementation, patients were more likely to want e-mail communication with their doctors' office. The 70% of patients with Internet access were generally more satisfied with their experience and more likely to recognize benefits of EHRs. However, older patients and those with lower education levels or chronic diseases were significantly less likely than their counterparts to use the Internet. Therefore, disparities in Internet access could potentially lead to unequal access and use of healthcare if not addressed. Practices should routinely record patient communication preferences within the EHR, to tailor communications and improve patient experiences.

  11. The usability of electronic personal health record systems for an underserved adult population.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Sara J; Zarcadoolas, Christina; Vaughon, Wendy L; Lee, Chin Chin; Rockoff, Maxine L; Levy, Joslyn

    2015-05-01

    The goals of this study were to identify the demands associated with using electronic personal health records (PHRs) and to evaluate the ability of adults of lower socioeconomic status and low health literacy to use PHRs to perform health management activities. PHRs are proliferating in clinical practices and health care organizations. These systems offer the potential of increasing the active involvement of patients in health self-management. However, little is known about the actual usability of these tools for health consumers. We used task analysis and health literacy load analysis to identify the cognitive and literacy demands inherent in the use of PHRs and evaluated the usability of three currently available PHR systems with a sample of 54 adults. Participants used the systems to perform tasks related to medication management, interpretation of lab/test results, and health maintenance. Data were also gathered on the participants' perception of the potential value of using a PHR. The results indicated that a majority of the participants had difficulty completing the tasks and needed assistance. There was some variability according to task and PHR system. However, most participants perceived the use of PHRs as valuable. Although considered a valuable tool by consumers, the use of PHR systems may be challenging for many people. Strategies are needed to enhance the usability of these systems, especially for people with low literacy, low health literacy, or limited technology skills. The data from this study have implications for the design of PHRs. © 2014, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  12. The Usability of Electronic Personal Health Record Systems for an Underserved Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Sara J.; Zarcadoolas, Christina; Vaughon, Wendy L.; Lee, Chin Chin; Rockoff, Maxine L.; Levy, Joslyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goals of this study were to identify the demands associated with using electronic personal health records (PHRs) and to evaluate the ability of adults of lower socioeconomic status and low health literacy to use PHRs to perform health management activities. Background PHRs are proliferating in clinical practices and health care organizations. These systems offer the potential of increasing the active involvement of patients in health self-management. However, little is known about the actual usability of these tools for health consumers. Method We used task analysis and health literacy load analysis to identify the cognitive and literacy demands inherent in the use of PHRs and evaluated the usability of three currently available PHR systems with a sample of 54 adults. Participants used the systems to perform tasks related to medication management, interpretation of lab/test results, and health maintenance. Data were also gathered on the participants’ perception of the potential value of using a PHR. Results The results indicated that a majority of the participants had difficulty completing the tasks and needed assistance. There was some variability according to task and PHR system. However, most participants perceived the use of PHRs as valuable. Conclusions Although considered a valuable tool by consumers, the use of PHR systems may be challenging for many people. Strategies are needed to enhance the usability of these systems, especially for people with low literacy, low health literacy, or limited technology skills. Application The data from this study have implications for the design of PHRs. PMID:25875437

  13. From medical record to patient record through electronic data interchange (EDI).

    PubMed

    Kinkhorst, O M; Lalleman, A W; Hasman, A

    1996-07-01

    In this contribution the role of Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) for patient records is discussed. It is our opinion that unlimited access to patient records of different care provides is not a wise thing to do and may even not be acceptable legally. The exchange of EDI messages may be a solution in that the relevant information is exchanged on a need to know basis under the responsibility of the care provider that generated the information. The state of the art with respect to the availability of EDI messages in Europe is presented.

  14. Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder Patient Records. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2017-01-18

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is issuing this final rule to update and modernize the Confidentiality of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Patient Records regulations and facilitate information exchange within new health care models while addressing the legitimate privacy concerns of patients seeking treatment for a substance use disorder. These modifications also help clarify the regulations and reduce unnecessary burden.

  15. The electronic patient record: a strategic planning framework.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D B; Marafioti, S; Carter, M; Kunov, H; Dolan, A

    1995-01-01

    Sunnybrook Health Science Center (Sunnybrook) is a multifacility academic teaching center. In May 1994, Sunnybrook struck an electronic patient record taskforce to develop a strategic plan for the implementation of a comprehensive, facility wide electronic patient record (EPR). The taskforce sought to create a conceptual framework which provides context and integrates decision-making related to the comprehensive electronic patient record. The EPR is very much broader in scope than the traditional paper-based record. It is not restricted to simply reporting individual patient data. By the Institute of Medicine's definition, the electronic patient record resides in a system specifically designed to support users through availability of complete and accurate data, practitioner reminders and alerts, clinical decision support systems, links to bodies of medical knowledge, and other aids [1]. It is a comprehensive resource for patient care. The taskforce proposed a three domain model for determining how the EPR affects Sunnybrook. The EPR enables Sunnybrook to have a high performance team structure (domain 1), to function as an integrated organization (domain 2), and to reach out and develop new relationships with external organizations to become an extended enterprise (domain 3) [2]. Domain 1: Sunnybrook's high performance teams or patient service units' (PSUs) are decentralized, autonomous operating units that provide care to patients grouped by 'like' diagnosis and resource needs. The EPR must provide functions and applications which promote patient focused care, such as cross functional charting and care maps, group scheduling, clinical email, and a range of enabling technologies for multiskilled workers. Domain 2: In the integrated organization domain, the EPR should facilitate closer linkages between the arrangement of PSUs into clinical teams and with other facilities within the center in order to provide a longitudinal record that covers a continuum of care

  16. Imaging adult patients with Fontan circulation.

    PubMed

    Ginde, Salil; Goot, Benjamin H; Frommelt, Peter C

    2017-09-01

    Survival after the Fontan procedure for palliation of single ventricle congenital heart disease has improved. However, adults with Fontan circulation are at risk for several complications including heart failure, thromboembolism, and protein-losing enteropathy. This review discusses the role of noninvasive imaging for surveillance and early detection of anatomic and functional abnormalities of the Fontan circulation that can impact the risk for Fontan failure over time. Echocardiography is the first-line imaging modality for the adult Fontan patient. Use of established techniques, such as tissue Doppler imaging, and newer techniques, such as myocardial deformation and three-dimensional imaging, has improved the ability of echocardiography to serially assess ventricular and valvular function in this population. Strain imaging, in particular, is effective for early detection of subclinical ventricular dysfunction, is reproducible and can be incorporated into a routine clinical echocardiography protocol. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging complements echocardiography and overcomes the limitation of poor acoustic windows in adult patients, especially with regards to visualizing the cavopulmonary anastomoses and pulmonary arteries. High resolution imaging with CMR provides reliable assessment of ventricular size and function. Novel techniques utilizing CMR, such as computational fluid dynamics, have provided important insights into Fontan fluid dynamics, and the impact of Fontan geometry on flow efficiency through the circulation. Recent advances in echocardiography and CMR have improved detection of structural and functional abnormalities in adults with Fontan circulation and are essential in monitoring for complications in this growing population.

  17. [Difficult situations in radiotherapy: agitated adult patients].

    PubMed

    Noël, S; Noël, G

    2013-10-01

    The causes of agitation in adult patients are numerous. Agitation may cause difficulty or impossibility to initiate the radiotherapy technique but also can lead to accidents harmful to patients. However, the decision to not irradiate agitated patients may lead to a loss of curability chance or chance to palliate symptoms. Before taking such a decision, thinking about the possibilities available to calm the patient should be undertaken with the patient and the referring practitioners to attempt to make this therapy if it is considered major in the management of cancer. In all cases, current adaptations of radiotherapy should be used to deliver an effective radiation of a suitable time and safely. It is notable that the medical literature is extremely rare on this subject. Copyright © 2013 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Medical record search engines, using pseudonymised patient identity: an alternative to centralised medical records.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Jaquet-Chiffelle, David-Olivier; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Benzenine, Eric; Allaert, François-André

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of our multidisciplinary study was to define a pragmatic and secure alternative to the creation of a national centralised medical record which could gather together the different parts of the medical record of a patient scattered in the different hospitals where he was hospitalised without any risk of breaching confidentiality. We first analyse the reasons for the failure and the dangers of centralisation (i.e. difficulty to define a European patients' identifier, to reach a common standard for the contents of the medical record, for data protection) and then propose an alternative that uses the existing available data on the basis that setting up a safe though imperfect system could be better than continuing a quest for a mythical perfect information system that we have still not found after a search that has lasted two decades. We describe the functioning of Medical Record Search Engines (MRSEs), using pseudonymisation of patients' identity. The MRSE will be able to retrieve and to provide upon an MD's request all the available information concerning a patient who has been hospitalised in different hospitals without ever having access to the patient's identity. The drawback of this system is that the medical practitioner then has to read all of the information and to create his own synthesis and eventually to reject extra data. Faced with the difficulties and the risks of setting up a centralised medical record system, a system that gathers all of the available information concerning a patient could be of great interest. This low-cost pragmatic alternative which could be developed quickly should be taken into consideration by health authorities. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient-held records for undocumented immigrants: a blind spot. A systematic review of patient-held records.

    PubMed

    Schoevers, M A; van den Muijsenbergh, M E T C; Lagro-Janssen, A L M

    2009-10-01

    As a result of inadequate medical record information, the medical care for undocumented immigrants in general practice is time consuming and often unsatisfactory. The availability of medical record information might improve the medical care for undocumented immigrants. Therefore, we executed a systematic review of literature to investigate the potential benefits of a patient-held record (PHR) for undocumented immigrants. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PSYCH info and the Cochrane database of systematic reviews. Search terms were: patient-held medical records, client-held medical records, PHRs, client-held records, home-based medical record, medical passport and/or illegal immigrants, and undocumented immigrants. Inclusion criteria were: information on patient and/or doctors compliance of PHRs OR information about views of patient and/or doctors on PHRs and age over 18 years. Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the selected articles. No studies were found about undocumented immigrants and PHRs. Therefore, we decided to eliminate the search terms illegal immigrants, and undocumented immigrants, and perform a broader search about the use of PHRs in general. This search yielded 61 articles; 42 articles were excluded. Sixteen articles were screened for methodological quality: seven articles met the criteria, six quantitative studies and one qualitative study. In these studies the use and appreciation of PHRs by patients is satisfactory. The use and appreciation of the PHRs by physicians in the studies is lower than the use by patients. The most important obstacle for physicians is the time investment required. A PHR for undocumented immigrants seems to be appropriate because in most cases there is no other record available. However, the uncertainty of our findings is considerable. Therefore, we recommend a pilot evaluation of the use of PHRs for undocumented immigrants. In addition, a qualitative approach might be useful to solicit the views of

  20. Cognitive Analysis of the Summarization of Longitudinal Patient Records

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Daniel; Kaufman, David; Bloxham, Benjamin; Chase, Herbert; Elhadad, Noémie

    2010-01-01

    Electronic health records contain an abundance of valuable information that can be used to guide patient care. However, the large volume of information embodied in these records also renders access to relevant information a time-consuming and inefficient process. Our ultimate objective is to develop an automated summarizer that succinctly captures all relevant information in the patient record. In this paper, we present a cognitive study of 8 clinicians who were asked to create summaries based on data contained in the patients’ electronic health record. The study characterized the primary sources of information that were prioritized by clinicians, the temporal strategies used to develop a summary and the cognitive operations used to guide the summarization process. Although we would not expect the automated summarizer to emulate human performance, we anticipate that this study will inform its development in instrumental ways. PMID:21347062

  1. Patient-reported neuropathic pain in adolescent and young adult cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Acquazzino, Melissa A; Igler, Eva C; Dasgupta, Mahua; Simpson, Pippa; Browning, Meghen B; Brandow, Amanda M

    2017-03-01

    Neuropathic pain, a known complication of cancer and its treatments, negatively impacts quality of life. There are limited data using screening tools to aid in the diagnosis of neuropathic pain in cancer patients. Our primary objective was to determine the proportion of adolescent and young adult cancer patients reporting neuropathic pain on a patient-completed, neuropathic pain screening tool. This prospective, cohort study enrolled patients 14-39 years of age who were receiving therapy for primary cancer diagnosis, cancer relapse, or had recently completed treatment. The painDETECT, a patient-completed, neuropathic pain screening tool used down to age 14, was administered a maximum of three times in on-therapy patients and once in off-therapy patients. Provider documentation of neuropathic pain at the corresponding visit was abstracted from the medical record. Seventy-eight patients participated. Median (interquartile range) age at study enrollment was 18.1 (16-19.4) years and 47% were female. Cancer diagnoses included 41% leukemia, 26% solid tumor, 23% lymphoma, and 10% central nervous system tumor. The proportion of patients reporting neuropathic pain was 26% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16-40%) in on-therapy patients and 11% (95% CI 3-27%) in off-therapy patients. In patients reporting neuropathic pain, only 26% had a clinical diagnosis of neuropathic pain documented in the medical record at the corresponding visit. Neuropathic pain occurs in one in four adolescents and young adults receiving cancer therapy. Use of screening tools may increase the detection of neuropathic pain in adolescents and young adults receiving cancer therapy and could ultimately improve pain treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Redundancy-aware topic modeling for patient record notes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Raphael; Aviram, Iddo; Elhadad, Michael; Elhadad, Noémie

    2014-01-01

    The clinical notes in a given patient record contain much redundancy, in large part due to clinicians' documentation habit of copying from previous notes in the record and pasting into a new note. Previous work has shown that this redundancy has a negative impact on the quality of text mining and topic modeling in particular. In this paper we describe a novel variant of Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) topic modeling, Red-LDA, which takes into account the inherent redundancy of patient records when modeling content of clinical notes. To assess the value of Red-LDA, we experiment with three baselines and our novel redundancy-aware topic modeling method: given a large collection of patient records, (i) apply vanilla LDA to all documents in all input records; (ii) identify and remove all redundancy by chosing a single representative document for each record as input to LDA; (iii) identify and remove all redundant paragraphs in each record, leaving partial, non-redundant documents as input to LDA; and (iv) apply Red-LDA to all documents in all input records. Both quantitative evaluation carried out through log-likelihood on held-out data and topic coherence of produced topics and qualitative assessment of topics carried out by physicians show that Red-LDA produces superior models to all three baseline strategies. This research contributes to the emerging field of understanding the characteristics of the electronic health record and how to account for them in the framework of data mining. The code for the two redundancy-elimination baselines and Red-LDA is made publicly available to the community.

  3. Redundancy-Aware Topic Modeling for Patient Record Notes

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Raphael; Aviram, Iddo; Elhadad, Michael; Elhadad, Noémie

    2014-01-01

    The clinical notes in a given patient record contain much redundancy, in large part due to clinicians’ documentation habit of copying from previous notes in the record and pasting into a new note. Previous work has shown that this redundancy has a negative impact on the quality of text mining and topic modeling in particular. In this paper we describe a novel variant of Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) topic modeling, Red-LDA, which takes into account the inherent redundancy of patient records when modeling content of clinical notes. To assess the value of Red-LDA, we experiment with three baselines and our novel redundancy-aware topic modeling method: given a large collection of patient records, (i) apply vanilla LDA to all documents in all input records; (ii) identify and remove all redundancy by chosing a single representative document for each record as input to LDA; (iii) identify and remove all redundant paragraphs in each record, leaving partial, non-redundant documents as input to LDA; and (iv) apply Red-LDA to all documents in all input records. Both quantitative evaluation carried out through log-likelihood on held-out data and topic coherence of produced topics and qualitative assessement of topics carried out by physicians show that Red-LDA produces superior models to all three baseline strategies. This research contributes to the emerging field of understanding the characteristics of the electronic health record and how to account for them in the framework of data mining. The code for the two redundancy-elimination baselines and Red-LDA is made publicly available to the community. PMID:24551060

  4. Considering Governance for Patient Access to E-Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Day, Karen; Wells, Susan

    2015-01-01

    People having access to their medical records could have a transformative improvement effect on healthcare delivery and use. Our research aimed to explore the concerns and attitudes of giving people electronic access to their medical records through patient portals. We conducted 28 semi-structured interviews with 30 people, asking questions about portal design, organisational implications and governance. We report the findings of the governance considerations raised during the interviews. These revealed that (1) there is uncertainty about the possible design and extent of giving people access to their medical records to view/use, (2) existing policies about patient authentication, proxy, and privacy require modification, and (3) existing governance structures and functions require further examination and adjustment. Future research should include more input from patients and health informaticians.

  5. Patient experiences with electronic medical records: Lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Dale; Richter, Louiseann T; Kapustin, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the lived experience of patients communicating with their nurse practitioners and physicians while using paper health records (PHRs) and electronic health records (EHRs) in the examination rooms. The significance of the study lies in the salience of communication between the patient and provider in promoting optimal clinical outcomes and the highest level of patient satisfaction. Data sources The study used a qualitative, phenomenological design. Audio-taped focus group interviews were conducted with 21 patients from a diabetes clinic in Baltimore, Maryland. Patients had visits with the provider before and after implementation of EHRs in the clinic. Conclusions The four themes that emerged from the three focus groups included communication issues, patient preferences for electronic records, safety and security concerns, and transition problems with implementation of EHRs. Implications for practice Potential benefits for nurse practitioners implementing the recommendations in this study include enhanced communication between patients and providers while using EHRs, increased patient satisfaction, higher levels of nurse practitioner and physician satisfaction, and avoidance of communication issues during implementation of EHR systems. PMID:25234112

  6. How Patients Can Improve the Accuracy of their Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Dullabh, Prashila M.; Sondheimer, Norman K.; Katsh, Ethan; Evans, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Assess (1) if patients can improve their medical records’ accuracy if effectively engaged using a networked Personal Health Record; (2) workflow efficiency and reliability for receiving and processing patient feedback; and (3) patient feedback’s impact on medical record accuracy. Background: Improving medical record’ accuracy and associated challenges have been documented extensively. Providing patients with useful access to their records through information technology gives them new opportunities to improve their records’ accuracy and completeness. A new approach supporting online contributions to their medication lists by patients of Geisinger Health Systems, an online patient-engagement advocate, revealed this can be done successfully. In late 2011, Geisinger launched an online process for patients to provide electronic feedback on their medication lists’ accuracy before a doctor visit. Patient feedback was routed to a Geisinger pharmacist, who reviewed it and followed up with the patient before changing the medication list shared by the patient and the clinicians. Methods: The evaluation employed mixed methods and consisted of patient focus groups (users, nonusers, and partial users of the feedback form), semi structured interviews with providers and pharmacists, user observations with patients, and quantitative analysis of patient feedback data and pharmacists’ medication reconciliation logs. Findings/Discussion: (1) Patients were eager to provide feedback on their medications and saw numerous advantages. Thirty percent of patient feedback forms (457 of 1,500) were completed and submitted to Geisinger. Patients requested changes to the shared medication lists in 89 percent of cases (369 of 414 forms). These included frequency—or dosage changes to existing prescriptions and requests for new medications (prescriptions and over-the counter). (2) Patients provided useful and accurate online feedback. In a subsample of 107 forms

  7. SU-E-T-502: Biometrically Accepted Patient Records

    SciTech Connect

    Basavatia, A; Kalnicki, S; Garg, M; Lukaj, A; Hong, L; Fret, J; Yaparpalvi, R; Tome, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To implement a clinically useful palm vein pattern recognition biometric system to treat the correct treatment plan to the correct patient each and every time and to check-in the patient into the department to access the correct medical record. Methods: A commercially available hand vein scanning system was paired to Aria and utilized an ADT interface from the hospital electronic health system. Integration at two points in Aria, version 11 MR2, first at the appointment tracker screen for the front desk medical record access and second at the queue screen on the 4D treatment console took place for patient daily time-out. A test patient was utilized to check accuracy of identification as well as to check that no unintended interactions take place between the 4D treatment console and the hand vein scanning system. This system has been in clinical use since December 2013. Results: Since implementation, 445 patients have been enrolled into our biometric system. 95% of patients learn the correct methodology of hand placement on the scanner in the first try. We have had two instances of patient not found because of a bad initial scan. We simply erased the scanned metric and the patient enrolled again in those cases. The accuracy of the match is 100% for each patient, we have not had one patient misidentified. We can state this because we still use patient photo and date of birth as identifiers. A QA test patient is run monthly to check the integrity of the system. Conclusion: By utilizing palm vein scans along with the date of birth and patient photo, another means of patient identification now exits. This work indicates the successful implementation of technology in the area of patient safety by closing the gap of treating the wrong plan to a patient in radiation oncology. FOJP Service Corporation covered some of the costs of the hardware and software of the palm vein pattern recognition biometric system.

  8. Pyridoxine deficiency in adult patients with status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Dave, Hina N; Eugene Ramsay, Richard; Khan, Fawad; Sabharwal, Vivek; Irland, Megan

    2015-11-01

    An 8-year-old girl treated at our facility for superrefractory status epilepticus was found to have a low pyridoxine level at 5 μg/L. After starting pyridoxine supplementation, improvement in the EEG for a 24-hour period was seen. We decided to look at the pyridoxine levels in adult patients admitted with status epilepticus. We reviewed the records on patients admitted to the neurological ICU for status epilepticus (SE). Eighty-one adult patients were identified with documented pyridoxine levels. For comparison purposes, we looked at pyridoxine levels in outpatients with epilepsy (n=132). Reported normal pyridoxine range is >10 ng/mL. All but six patients admitted for SE had low normal or undetectable pyridoxine levels. A selective pyridoxine deficiency was seen in 94% of patients with status epilepticus (compared to 39.4% in the outpatients) which leads us to believe that there is a relationship between status epilepticus and pyridoxine levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intussusception in traditional pediatric, nontraditional pediatric, and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Alexis A; Higgins, George L; Strout, Tania D

    2011-06-01

    We sought to determine the rate of intussusception in 3 age groups (traditional pediatric-age [T], nontraditional pediatric-age [N], and adult-age [A]) and to compare group characteristics. We conducted a retrospective records review for patients discharged with diagnosis of intussusception between October 1999 and June 2008. Ninety-five cases of intussusception were diagnosed as follows: 61 T (64%), 12 N (13%), and 22 A (23%). Bloody stool was more common in T patients (P = .016). Air contrast enema (36%) and ultrasound (33%) were the most common diagnostic tests in T, whereas computed tomography was most common in N (83%) and A (68%) patients. Bowel resection occurred more often in older (T) patients (P = .001). The most frequent causative pathologic conditions were adenitis (T), Peutz-Jeghers polyp (N), and carcinoma (A) and prior gastric bypass in 10 A patients. The incidence of intussusception is substantially higher in nontraditional age groups than previously reported. Symptoms, management strategies, and causative pathologic conditions varied with age. All adults with intussusception require definitive diagnostic testing to determine the cause, given the concerning list of possibilities we observed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  11. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  12. Psychosocial impact of cancer on adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Yasmin Abdul; Ghafoor, Zahra Abdul; Masood, Nehal; Mehmood, Talha; Awan, Safia; Ansar, Tooba; Mirza, Murtaza; Rashid, Uzma Abdul

    2012-09-01

    To explore the effects of cancer on psychosocial aspects of Pakistani patients and their families, assessing the need for interventions to improve their quality of life. A prospective, Cross-sectional study was performed on 200 patients visiting the oncology outpatient facility of AKUH from December 2010 to May 2011 through an interview. Responses were recorded on pre-designed questionnaires including FACT-G QOL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General Quality Of Life) component. Out of the 200 patients 52 (26%) were males and 148 (74%) were females. Mean age was 51.8 +/- 14.2 years. Breast cancer accounted for the commonest cancer in females 116 (58%) and lung in males 30 (15%), 100 (50%) patients were currently undergoing chemotherapy. In all 148 (74%) patients were well aware of their diagnosis and were able to cope better and 142 (71%) were well supported by families (majority being financially stable). Major financial impact was found in 42 (21%) cases. Religious/spiritual help was sought by 138 (69%) patients predominantly females- 113 (76%) and 22 (11%) patients consulted a psychiatrist; 20 (94%) subjects of this group felt this intervention was helpful. Responses regarding effect on the patient's sexual life were poor and 126 (63%) denied answering the question. In our study one third of cancer patients were found to be depressed mainly affecting those who were receiving multimodality treatment or facing financial issues. Religious help was the main coping strategy for them.

  13. An object oriented computer-based patient record reference model.

    PubMed Central

    Doré, L.; Lavril, M.; Jean, F. C.; Degoulet, P.

    1995-01-01

    In the context of health care information systems based on client/server architecture, we address the problem of a common Computer-based Patient Record (CPR). We define it as a collection of faithful observations about patients care, with respect to the free expression of physicians. This CPR model supports several views of the medical data, in order to provide applications with a comprehensive and standardized access to distributed patient data. Finally, we validated our CPR approach as a primary data model server for an application for hypertensive patient management. PMID:8563306

  14. Trauma injury in adult underweight patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ching-Hua; Lai, Wei-Hung; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the injury characteristics, severity, and outcome between underweight and normal-weight patients hospitalized for the treatment of all kinds of trauma injury. This study was based on a level I trauma center Taiwan. The detailed data of 640 underweight adult trauma patients with a body mass index (BMI) of <18.5 kg/m2 and 6497 normal-weight adult patients (25 > BMI ≥ 18.5 kg/m2) were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014. Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and independent Student's t-test were performed to compare the differences. Propensity score matching with logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of underweight on mortality. Underweight patients presented a different bodily injury pattern and a significantly higher rate of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU) than did normal-weight patients; however, no significant differences in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, injury severity score (ISS), in-hospital mortality, and hospital length of stay were found between the two groups. However, further analysis of the patients stratified by two major injury mechanisms (motorcycle accident and fall injury) revealed that underweight patients had significantly lower GCS scores (13.8 ± 3.0 vs 14.5 ± 2.0, P = 0.020), but higher ISS (10.1 ± 6.9 vs 8.4 ± 5.9, P = 0.005), in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.69–11.35; P = 0.006), and ICU admittance rate (24.1% vs 14.3%, P = 0.007) than normal-weight patients in the fall accident group, but not in the motorcycle accident group. However, after propensity score matching, logistic regression analysis of well-matched pairs of patients with either all trauma, motorcycle accident, or fall injury did not show a significant influence of underweight on mortality. Exploratory data analysis revealed that underweight patients

  15. What do patients with glaucoma think about personal health records?

    PubMed

    Somner, John E A; Sii, Freda; Bourne, Rupert; Cross, Vinette; Shah, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Putting patients in control of their records is one way of promoting patient centred care and patients with chronic health problems may benefit most from personal health records (PHRs). Glaucoma management is often complicated by incomplete understanding and poor adherence to treatment, two areas which a PHR may help to address. This study aimed to discover what patients with glaucoma think about PHRs and what type of information a glaucoma PHR should contain. A consultation exercise using a focus group approach involving 71 participants was undertaken to discuss if a PHR would be useful and what it would be like. Narrative data were collected through written notes and an online forum in addition to transcripts of the focus group feedback session and individual interviews. Recordings were transcribed and analysed with simple thematic analysis facilitated by NVivo software (www.qsrinternational.com). The consultation exercise indicated enthusiasm for PHRs. Views varied on the best format, some participants strongly favoured electronic records and others preferred a low-tech, paper based format. A comprehensive dataset of 24 items was developed which highlighted areas which are not covered by existing guidance to developers. A model for how PHRs may be useful as an education tool in clinical practice was devised. Asking patients what they thought about a glaucoma PHR raised challenging questions and adds perspective to predominantly clinician led development. Listening and responding to such viewpoints is fundamental to developing more patient centred PHRs which may act both as health record and self-care educational tool to promote more holistic, efficient glaucoma care. © 2013 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2013 The College of Optometrists.

  16. Access to records by persons other than the patient.

    PubMed

    Dimond, Bridgit

    This article explores what rights persons, other than the patient, have to access health records which come under Data Protection Act and other statutory provisions. These other persons could include the relatives of a patient, the parents of a child or those concerned with the estate of a deceased person. In addition, there are other rights of disclosure recognized by the common law and these will be considered in a later article.

  17. Giving Patients Access to Their Medical Records via the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Masys, Daniel; Baker, Dixie; Butros, Amy; Cowles, Kevin E.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The Patient-Centered Access to Secure Systems Online (pcasso) project is designed to apply state-of-the-art-security to the communication of clinical information over the Internet. Design: The authors report the legal and regulatory issues associated with deploying the system, and results of its use by providers and patients. Human subject protection concerns raised by the Institutional Review Board focused on three areas—unauthorized access to information by persons other than the patient; the effect of startling or poorly understood information; and the effect of patient access to records on the record-keeping behavior of providers. Measurements: Objective and subjective measures of security and usability were obtained. Results: During its initial deployment phase, the project enrolled 216 physicians and 41 patients; of these, 68 physicians and 26 patients used the system one or more times. The system performed as designed, with no unauthorized information access or intrusions detected. Providers rated the usability of the system low because of the complexity of the secure login and other security features and restrictions limiting their access to those patients with whom they had a professional relationship. In contrast, patients rated the usability and functionality of the system favorably. Conclusion: High-assurance systems that serve both patients and providers will need to address differing expectations regarding security and ease of use. PMID:11861633

  18. A critical assessment of early warning score records in 168,000 patients.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Niels Egholm; Rasmussen, Lars Simon; Petersen, John Asger; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Østergaard, Doris; Lippert, Anne

    2017-02-25

    The national early warning score (NEWS) is recommended to detect deterioration in hospitalised patients. In 2013, a NEWS-based system was introduced in a hospital service with over 250,000 annual admissions, generating large amounts of NEWS data. The quality of such data has not been described. We critically assessed NEWS data recorded over 12 months. This observational study included NEWS records from adult inpatients hospitalized in the Capital Region of Denmark during 2014. Physiological variables and the use of supplementary oxygen (NEWS variables) were recorded. We identified implausible records and assessed the distributions of NEWS variable values. Of 2,835,331 NEWS records, 271,103 (10%) were incomplete with one or more variable missing and 0.2% of records containing implausible values. Digit preferences were identified for respiratory rate, supplementation oxygen flow, pulse rate, and systolic blood pressure. There was an accumulation of pulse rate records below 91 beats per minute. Among complete NEWS records, 64% had NEWS ≥ 1; 29% had NEWS ≥ 3; and 8% had NEWS ≥ 6. In a large set of NEWS data, 10% of the records were incomplete. In a system where data were manually entered into an electronic medical record, digit preferences and the accumulation of pulse rate records below 91 beats per minute, which is the limit for NEWS point generation, showed that staff practice influenced the recorded values. This indicates a potential limitation of transferability of research results obtained in such systems to fully automated systems.

  19. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  20. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  1. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  2. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  3. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  4. Confidentiality of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Patient Records. Participant Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coggins, Patrick C.; And Others

    This participant manual is designed to provide an overview of federal laws and regulations pertaining to the confidentiality of alcohol and drug abuse patient records. The relationship of federal laws to state laws and regulations is also discussed. The materials, useful for persons involved in the fields of substance abuse treatment or…

  5. Predicting Major Adverse Kidney Events among Critically Ill Adults Using the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    McKown, Andrew C; Wang, Li; Wanderer, Jonathan P; Ehrenfeld, Jesse; Rice, Todd W; Bernard, Gordon R; Semler, Matthew W

    2017-08-31

    Prediction of major adverse kidney events in critically ill patients may help target therapy, allow risk adjustment, and facilitate the conduct of clinical trials. In a cohort comprised of all critically ill adults admitted to five intensive care units at a single tertiary care center over one year, we developed a logistic regression model for the outcome of Major Adverse Kidney Events within 30 days (MAKE30), the composite of persistent renal dysfunction, new renal replacement therapy (RRT), and in-hospital mortality. Proposed risk factors for the MAKE30 outcome were selected a priori and included age, race, gender, University Health System Consortium (UHC) expected mortality, baseline creatinine, volume of isotonic crystalloid fluid received in the prior 24 h, admission service, intensive care unit (ICU), source of admission, mechanical ventilation or receipt of vasopressors within 24 h of ICU admission, renal replacement therapy prior to ICU admission, acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease as defined by baseline creatinine value, and renal failure as defined by the Elixhauser index. Among 10,983 patients in the study population, 1489 patients (13.6%) met the MAKE30 endpoint. The strongest independent predictors of MAKE30 were UHC expected mortality (OR 2.32 [95%CI 2.06-2.61]) and presence of acute kidney injury at ICU admission (OR 4.98 [95%CI 4.12-6.03]). The model had strong predictive properties including excellent discrimination with a bootstrap-corrected area-under-the-curve (AUC) of 0.903, and high precision of calibration with a mean absolute error prediction of 1.7%. The MAKE30 composite outcome can be reliably predicted from factors present within 24 h of ICU admission using data derived from the electronic health record.

  6. Medical record keeping and system performance in orthopaedic trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Cosic, Filip; Kimmel, Lara; Edwards, Elton

    2016-02-18

    Objective The medical record is critical for documentation and communication between healthcare professionals. The aim of the present study was to evaluate important aspects of the orthopaedic medical record and system performance to determine whether any deficiencies exist in these areas.Methods Review of 200 medical records of surgically treated traumatic lower limb injury patients was undertaken. The operative report, discharge summary and first and second outpatient reviews were evaluated.Results In all cases, an operative report was completed by a senior surgeon. Weight-bearing status was adequately documented in 91% of reports. Discharge summaries were completed for 82.5% of admissions, with 87.3% of these having instructions reflective of those in the operative report. Of first and second outpatient reviews, 69% and 73%, respectively, occurred within 1 week of the requested time. Previously documented management plans were changed in 30% of reviews. At 6-months post-operatively, 42% of patients had been reviewed by a member of their operating team.Discussion Orthopaedic medical record documentation remains an area for improvement. In addition, hospital out-patient systems perform suboptimally and may affect patient outcomes.What is known about the topic? Medical records are an essential tool in modern medical practice. Despite the importance of comprehensive documentation in the medical record, numerous examples of poor documentation have been demonstrated, including substandard documentation during consultant ward rounds by junior doctors leading to a breakdown in healthcare professional communication and potential patient mismanagement. Further inadequacies of medical record documentation have been demonstrated in surgical discharge notes, with complete and correct documentation reported to be as low as 65%.What does this paper add? Standards of patient care should be constantly monitored and deficiencies identified in order to implement a remedy and close

  7. Factors related to orthodontic treatment time in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ana Camila Esteves de Oliveira; Carneiro, Lilianne Oliveira Thiers; Pontes, Luana Farias; Cecim, Rodolpho Lobão; de Mattos, José Nazareno Rufino; Normando, David

    2013-01-01

    The length of time that it takes an orthodontist to treat adult patients varies widely. The aim of this study was to investigate how different variables influence treatment time. Seventy clinical case reports of successfully treated adult patients were examined. The patients were selected from 4,723 records held by three experienced orthodontists. The influence exerted by the following variables on treatment time was assessed: age, sex, facial pattern, severity of malocclusion (measured by the PAR index), sagittal relationship of canines, type of brackets (ceramic or metal), tooth extractions, missed appointments and orthodontic appliance issues/breakages, the latter being the dependent variable. Assessment was performed by multiple linear regression analysis, followed by the stepwise method with p < 0.05. The number of times a patient missed their appointment (no-show) (R² = 14.4%, p < 0.0001) and the number of appliance issues/breakages (R² = 29.71%, p = 0.0037) significantly affected variability in treatment time, and these two variables together can predict 43.75% (R² total) of the overall variability in treatment time. Other factors, such as canine relationship at the beginning of treatment, bracket type (metal or ceramic), tooth extractions, age at start of treatment, severity of the initial malocclusion, sex and facial pattern had no significant bearing on treatment time. The duration of orthodontic treatment in adults, when performed by experienced orthodontists, is mainly influenced by factors related to patient compliance. However, several factors which were not included in this study may contribute to variability in orthodontic treatment time.

  8. Contact topical anesthesia for strabismus surgery in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Vallés-Torres, J; García-Martín, E; Peña-Calvo, P; Sanjuan-Villarreal, A; Gil-Arribas, L M; Fernández-Tirado, F J

    2015-05-01

    To analyze the effectiveness and usefulness of contact topical anesthesia in strabismus surgery in adult patients. A prospective study was conducted on 20 patients undergoing strabismus surgery using contact topical anesthesia and sedation with remifentanil. The intensity of pain was recorded using a numeric pain rating scale at the time of anesthesia implementation, during the surgical procedure, 30 min afterwards, and during the first postoperative day. The incidence of oculocardiac reflex, postoperative nausea and vomiting, corneal ulcers, patient satisfaction (numerically from 0 to 10) and the degree of residual ocular deviation were also assessed. The operation was performed successfully in all patients. Average pain intensity was 1.40 ± 1.73 during anesthesia implementation, 4.20 ± 2.57 during the surgical procedure, 2.50 ± 2.54 30 min after surgery, and 3.55 ± 2.89 during the first postoperative day. Oculocardiac reflex was observed in 7 patients (35%), postoperative nausea and vomiting in 4 (20%), and corneal ulcer in 4 (20%). The patient satisfaction was 9.53 ± 2.51. More than two-thirds (70%) of patients had a residual ocular deviation less than 10 prism diopters. Contact topical anesthesia is a safe and effective alternative for strabismus surgery in adult patients. Contact topical anesthesia provides adequate pain control, lower incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting and oculocardiac reflex, and optimal setting of ocular alignment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Can Patient Record Summarization Support Quality Metric Abstraction?

    PubMed Central

    Pivovarov, Rimma; Coppleson, Yael Judith; Gorman, Sharon Lipsky; Vawdrey, David K.; Elhadad, Noémie

    2016-01-01

    We present a pre/post intervention study, where HARVEST, a general-purpose patient record summarization tool, was introduced to ten data abstraction specialists. The specialists are responsible for reviewing hundreds of patient charts each month and reporting disease-specific quality metrics to a variety of online registries and databases. We qualitatively and quantitatively investigated whether HARVEST improved the process of quality metric abstraction. Study instruments included pre/post questionnaires and log analyses of the specialists’ actions in the electronic health record (EHR). The specialists reported favorable impressions of HARVEST and suggested that it was most useful when abstracting metrics from patients with long hospitalizations and for metrics that were not consistently captured in a structured manner in the EHR. A statistically significant reduction in time spent per chart before and after use of HARVEST was observed for 50% of the specialists and 90% of the specialists continue to use HARVEST after the study period. PMID:28269899

  10. A computer-based patient record: Emory's approach.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J J; Alligood, R; Beck, K L; Dardeen, K; Payne, L

    1993-05-01

    The replacement of the paper medical record at Emory will be gradual over the next several years. We foresee milestone events after which portions of the patient record are no longer retained in paper form. As these milestones are identified, the HIM professionals at the three institutions will begin the formidable task of managing the transition to a paperless system. Evaluation of business processes and the skill sets needed by staff members can be accomplished and a plan for each phase of transition developed.

  11. Secondary bacteraemia in adult patients with prolonged dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Premaratna, R; Dissanayake, D; Silva, F H D S; Dassanayake, M; de Silva, H J

    2015-03-01

    Although dengue management guidelines do not advice on use of antibiotics in dengue shock syndrome, unrecognised bactraemia is likely to contribute to morbidity and mortality. To assess the occurance of secondary bacteraemia in adult patients with prolonged dengue fever. A prospective study was conducted recruiting patients with confirmed acute dengue infection who had prolonged fever (>5 days). Two sets of blood cultures were taken in such patients prior to institution of antibiotic therapy. Demographic, clinical, haematological and biochemical parameters were recorded. Development of ascites and pleural effusions were detected using ultrasonography. Fourty patients (52.5% males) with a mean age of 29.8 years (SD 13.6) were studied. The average duration of fever was 7.9 days (SD 1.8). Ten patients (25%) had bacterial isolates in their blood cultures; Staphylococcus aureus (n=2), coliforms (n=3), pseudomonas (n=1) and 4 had mixed growths. The culture positive group had severe body aches at admission and higher fever, third space fluid accumulation, a significant drop in platelets and a higher CRP. A quarter of dengue patients with prolonged fever had a bacterial isolate. Culture positive patients appeared more ill with body aches and had higher degrees of fever during the latter part of the illness. Increased vascular permeability may predispose to bacterial seepage into blood. Although white cell count is not helpful in detecting bacteraemia, low platelet count and elevation of CRP seem to be helpful.

  12. Designing a patient-centered personal health record to promote preventive care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence-based preventive services offer profound health benefits, yet Americans receive only half of indicated care. A variety of government and specialty society policy initiatives are promoting the adoption of information technologies to engage patients in their care, such as personal health records, but current systems may not utilize the technology's full potential. Methods Using a previously described model to make information technology more patient-centered, we developed an interactive preventive health record (IPHR) designed to more deeply engage patients in preventive care and health promotion. We recruited 14 primary care practices to promote the IPHR to all adult patients and sought practice and patient input in designing the IPHR to ensure its usability, salience, and generalizability. The input involved patient usability tests, practice workflow observations, learning collaboratives, and patient feedback. Use of the IPHR was measured using practice appointment and IPHR databases. Results The IPHR that emerged from this process generates tailored patient recommendations based on guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and other organizations. It extracts clinical data from the practices' electronic medical record and obtains health risk assessment information from patients. Clinical content is translated and explained in lay language. Recommendations review the benefits and uncertainties of services and possible actions for patients and clinicians. Embedded in recommendations are self management tools, risk calculators, decision aids, and community resources - selected to match patient's clinical circumstances. Within six months, practices had encouraged 14.4% of patients to use the IPHR (ranging from 1.5% to 28.3% across the 14 practices). Practices successfully incorporated the IPHR into workflow, using it to prepare patients for visits, augment health behavior counseling, explain test results, automatically issue patient

  13. Designing a patient-centered personal health record to promote preventive care.

    PubMed

    Krist, Alex H; Peele, Eric; Woolf, Steven H; Rothemich, Stephen F; Loomis, John F; Longo, Daniel R; Kuzel, Anton J

    2011-11-24

    Evidence-based preventive services offer profound health benefits, yet Americans receive only half of indicated care. A variety of government and specialty society policy initiatives are promoting the adoption of information technologies to engage patients in their care, such as personal health records, but current systems may not utilize the technology's full potential. Using a previously described model to make information technology more patient-centered, we developed an interactive preventive health record (IPHR) designed to more deeply engage patients in preventive care and health promotion. We recruited 14 primary care practices to promote the IPHR to all adult patients and sought practice and patient input in designing the IPHR to ensure its usability, salience, and generalizability. The input involved patient usability tests, practice workflow observations, learning collaboratives, and patient feedback. Use of the IPHR was measured using practice appointment and IPHR databases. The IPHR that emerged from this process generates tailored patient recommendations based on guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and other organizations. It extracts clinical data from the practices' electronic medical record and obtains health risk assessment information from patients. Clinical content is translated and explained in lay language. Recommendations review the benefits and uncertainties of services and possible actions for patients and clinicians. Embedded in recommendations are self management tools, risk calculators, decision aids, and community resources--selected to match patient's clinical circumstances. Within six months, practices had encouraged 14.4% of patients to use the IPHR (ranging from 1.5% to 28.3% across the 14 practices). Practices successfully incorporated the IPHR into workflow, using it to prepare patients for visits, augment health behavior counseling, explain test results, automatically issue patient reminders for overdue

  14. Electronic patient record and archive of records in Cardio.net system for telecardiology.

    PubMed

    Sierdziński, Janusz; Karpiński, Grzegorz

    2003-01-01

    In modern medicine the well structured patient data set, fast access to it and reporting capability become an important question. With the dynamic development of information technology (IT) such question is solved via building electronic patient record (EPR) archives. We then obtain fast access to patient data, diagnostic and treatment protocols etc. It results in more efficient, better and cheaper treatment. The aim of the work was to design a uniform Electronic Patient Record, implemented in cardio.net system for telecardiology allowing the co-operation among regional hospitals and reference centers. It includes questionnaires for demographic data and questionnaires supporting doctor's work (initial diagnosis, final diagnosis, history and physical, ECG at the discharge, applied treatment, additional tests, drugs, daily and periodical reports). The browser is implemented in EPR archive to facilitate data retrieval. Several tools for creating EPR and EPR archive were used such as: XML, PHP, Java Script and MySQL. The separate question is the security of data on WWW server. The security is ensured via Security Socket Layer (SSL) protocols and other tools. EPR in Cardio.net system is a module enabling the co-work of many physicians and the communication among different medical centers.

  15. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in adult Brugia malayi muscle

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, A. P.; Buxton, S. K.; Martin, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a debilitating disease caused by clade III parasites like Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti. Current recommended treatment regimen for this disease relies on albendazole, ivermectin and diethylcarbamazine, none of which targets the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in these parasitic nematodes. Our aim therefore has been to develop adult B. malayi for electrophysiological recordings to aid in characterizing the ion channels in this parasite as anthelmintic target sites. In that regard, we recently demonstrated the amenability of adult B. malayi to patch-clamp recordings and presented results on the single-channel properties of nAChR in this nematode. We have built on this by recording whole-cell nAChR currents from adult B. malayi muscle. Acetylcholine, levamisole, pyrantel, bephenium and tribendimidine activated the receptors on B. malayi muscle, producing robust currents ranging from > 200 pA to ~1.5 nA. Levamisole completely inhibited motility of the adult B. malayi within 10 min and after 60 min, motility had recovered back to control values. PMID:23562945

  16. Personal Health Records for Patients with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblum, R.; Park, A.; Dunn, M.; Bates, D.W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Personal health records (PHRs) connected to a physician’s electronic health record system hold substantial promise for supporting and engaging patients with chronic disease. Objectives: To explore how U.S. health care organizations are currently utilizing PHRs for chronic disease populations. Methods A mixed methods study including semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire was conducted. A purposive sample was developed of health care organizations which were recognized as exemplars for PHRs and were high performers in national patient satisfaction surveys (H-CAHPS or CAHPS). Within each organization, participants were health IT leaders or those managing high-risk or chronic disease populations. Results Interviews were conducted with 30 informants and completed questionnaires were received from 16 organizations (84% response rate). Most PHRs allowed patients to access health records and educational material, message their provider, renew prescriptions and request appointments. Patient generated data was increasingly being sought and combined with messaging, resulted in greater understanding of patient health and functioning outside of the clinic visit. However for chronic disease populations, there was little targeted involvement in PHR design and few tools to help interpret and manage their conditions beyond those offered for all. The PHR was largely uncoupled from high risk population management interventions and no clear framework for future PHR development emerged. Conclusion This technology is currently underutilized and represents a major opportunity given the potential benefits of patient engagement and shared decision making. A coherent patient-centric PHR design and evaluation strategy is required to realize its potential and maximize this natural hub for multidisciplinary care co-ordination. PMID:25024758

  17. Electrophysiological recording of deep tendon reflexes: normative data in children and in adults.

    PubMed

    Péréon, Yann; Nguyen The Tich, Sylvie; Fournier, Emmanuel; Genet, Robert; Guihéneuc, Pierre

    2004-10-01

    Latency measurement of myoelectric deep tendon (T) reflex responses is not usually performed in EMG laboratories. We investigated the optimal conditions of reliable recording of T reflex in children and adults. Two hundred and sixty-eight normal subjects (139 males, 129 females, age rank 2 days-80 years) were studied. T reflexes were recorded from soleus and rectus femoris muscles (children and adults) and from triceps brachialis, biceps brachialis and flexor carpi radialis (adults). Specially devised hammers were used. They were fitted with a spring switch system in order to trigger the trace display on the EMG machine. Distinct technical options for the synchronisation delay assessment were tested. The nerve conduction velocities along reflex pathways were computed by referring the T wave latencies to subject's height. Reliable recordings could be obtained in all cases, with a strong linear correlation of the response latency with height. T reflex conduction velocities increased as the log value of subject age. Normative data from birth to 80 years are provided. T reflex recording represents a painless and easily performed technique. It may be helpful for the assessment of proximal conduction velocities, especially in children during maturation of the peripheral nervous system.

  18. An in vitro spinal cord slice preparation for recording from lumbar motoneurons of the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Pratip; Brownstone, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    The development of central nervous system slice preparations for electrophysiological studies has led to an explosion of knowledge of neuronal properties in health and disease. Studies of spinal motoneurons in these preparations, however, have been largely limited to the early postnatal period, as adult motoneurons are vulnerable to the insults sustained by the preparation. We therefore sought to develop an adult spinal cord slice preparation that permits recording from lumbar motoneurons. To accomplish this, we empirically optimized the composition of solutions used during preparation in order to limit energy failure, reduce harmful ionic fluxes, mitigate oxidative stress, and prevent excitotoxic cell death. In addition to other additives, this involved the use of ethyl pyruvate, which serves as an effective nutrient and antioxidant. We also optimized and incorporated a host of previously published modifications used for other in vitro preparations, such as the use of polyethylene glycol. We provide an in-depth description of the preparation protocol and discuss the rationale underlying each modification. By using this protocol, we obtained stable whole cell patch-clamp recordings from identified fluorescent protein-labeled motoneurons in adult slices; here, we describe the firing properties of these adult motoneurons. We propose that this preparation will allow further studies of how motoneurons integrate activity to produce adult motor behaviors and how pathological processes such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis affect these neurons.

  19. Description of the computer-based patient record and computer-based patient record system. CPRI Work Group on CPR Description.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Computer-based patient records and computer-based patient record systems support health care effectiveness and efficiency with appropriate safeguards for confidentiality. Achieving a health information infrastructure with computer-based patient records supported by fully integrated computer-based patient record systems is obviously a process of incremental steps. However, CPRI believes significant benefits in health care delivery are certain to be realized over the full course of this process.

  20. Lack of weight recording in patients being administered narrow therapeutic index antibiotics: a prospective cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Charani, Esmita; Gharbi, Myriam; Hickson, Mary; Othman, Shokri; Alfituri, Aisha; Frost, Gary; Holmes, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient weight is a key measure for safe medication management and monitoring of patients. Here we report the recording of patient's body weight on admission in three hospitals in West London and its relationship with the prescription of antibiotic drugs where it is essential to have the body weight of the patient. Methods A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in three teaching hospitals in West London. Data were collected during March 2011–September 2011 and July 2012–August 2012, from adult admissions units, medical and surgical wards. Data from each ward were collected on a single day to provide a point prevalence data on weight recording. Patient medication charts, nursing and medical notes were reviewed for evidence of weight and height recording together with all the medication prescribed for the patients. An observational study collecting data on the weight recording process was conducted on two randomly selected wards to add context to the data. Results Data were collected on 1012 patients. Weight was not recorded for 46% (474) of patients. Eighty-nine patients were prescribed a narrow therapeutic antibiotic, in 39% (35/89) of these weight was not recorded for the patient. Intravenous vancomycin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic requiring therapeutic monitoring. In total 61 patients were receiving intravenous vancomycin and of these 44% (27/61) did not have their weight recorded. In the observational study, the most frequently identified barrier to weight not being recorded was interruptions to the admission process. Conclusions Despite the clinical importance of body weight measurement it is poorly recorded in hospitalised patients, due to interruptions to the workflow and heavy staff workloads. In antibiotics a correct, recent patient weight is required for accurate dosing and to keep drugs within the narrow therapeutic index, to ensure efficacy of prescribing and reduce toxicity. PMID:25838504

  1. Giving patients a copy of their computer medical record.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, M G

    1982-02-01

    Medical summaries were prepared by a general practitioner for inclusion in a computer system. Both the medical records and a patient-filled questionnaire were used. A representative sample of the practice population were then sent their summaries. In creating the summaries the general practitioner felt the need to exclude 11 diagnoses whenever they appeared (5 per cent of the patients), and to suppress one or more diagnoses in a further 14 per cent of patients. In 2 per cent of summaries the general practitioner felt unable to give a copy to the patient because he was afraid of an adverse reaction by the patient or immediate relatives.The patients' views of the usefulness of the summaries, and of their accuracy and completeness, were sought by a questionnaire. Replies were received from 71 per cent; of these, 91 per cent reported that they thought the summary useful. However, in 18 per cent of cases, the patients requested additions, corrections or deletions. Only 1 per cent of patients replied that they definitely did not like the idea of a computer containing their medical information.Some of the benefits and difficulties both of using a computer to store medical information, and of giving the patient a copy of the medical summary, are discussed.

  2. Comparing patient-generated blood glucose diary records with meter memory in diabetes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Given, J E; O'Kane, M J; Bunting, B P; Coates, V E

    2013-08-01

    To synthesize evidence relating to comparisons between patient-generated blood glucose records and meter memory in diabetes and to identify any predictors of agreement. A systematic literature search was performed to identify articles comparing meter and diary records in those unaware of this assessment. Eleven observational studies, covering patients with Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes were included spanning 1984-2009. Failure to record blood glucose measurements in the diary was the most extensive 'error', but addition of values, which were not measured, was a greater cause for concern. When present to a high degree, 'errors' lead to decreased variability in diary records compared with meter records. Allowing for a minimal amount of disagreement, just over 50% of adult diaries can be considered as 'accurate/reliable'. Disagreements were most extensive in teenagers and young adults, but the pregnant populations were only slightly better. Agreement was not related to sex, number of insulin injections or duration of monitoring. Those who were younger were more likely to have 'errors', while those who monitored more frequently had more 'accurate' diaries. The lack of meter-diary agreement suggests that the real reason for monitoring is not understood by many patients, raising issues about motivation, perceived need to impress healthcare providers and denial of poor control. Considering that diaries are used to inform decisions about therapy when HbA1c is raised or in pregnancy, when HbA1c is not suitable, there is significant cause for concern in relation to their clinical utility. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  3. Contextualization in automatic extraction of drugs from hospital patient records.

    PubMed

    Boytcheva, Svetla; Tcharaktchiev, Dimitar; Angelova, Galia

    2011-01-01

    Information Extraction (IE) from medical texts aims at the automatic recognition of entities and relations of interests. IE is based on shallow analysis and considers only sentences containing important words. Thus IE of drugs from discharge letters can identify as 'current' some past or future medication events. This article presents heuristic observations enabling to filter drugs that are taken by the patients during the hospitalization. These heuristics are based on the default PR structure and linguistic expressions signaling temporal and conditional markers. They are integrated in a system for drug extraction from hospital Patient Records (PRs) in Bulgarian language. Present evaluation results are summarized as well.

  4. The electronic health record audit file: the patient is waiting.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Annemarie G; Jones, J B; Lerch, Virginia R; Tang, Xiaoqin; Berger, Andrea; Clark, Deserae N; Stewart, Walter F

    2017-04-01

    We describe how electronic health record (EHR) audit files can be used to understand how time is spent in primary care (PC). We used audit file data from the Geisinger Clinic to quantify elements of the clinical workflow and to determine how these times vary by patient and encounter factors. We randomly selected audit file records representing 36 437 PC encounters across 26 clinic locations. Audit file data were used to estimate duration and variance of: (1) time in the waiting room, (2) nurse time with the patient, (3) time in the exam room without a nurse or physician, and (4) physician time with the patient. Multivariate modeling was used to test for differences by patient and by encounter features. On average, a PC encounter took 54.6 minutes, with 5 minutes of nurse time, 15.5 minutes of physician time, and the remaining 62% of the time spent waiting to see a clinician or check out. Older age, female sex, and chronic disease were associated with longer wait times and longer time with clinicians. Level of service and numbers of medications, procedures, and lab orders were associated with longer time with clinicians. Late check-in and same-day visits were associated with shorter wait time and clinician time. This study provides insights on uses of audit file data for workflow analysis during PC encounters. Scalable ways to quantify clinical encounter workflow elements may provide the means to develop more efficient approaches to care and improve the patient experience.

  5. Assisting sexually abused adults. Practical guide to interviewing patients.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, M. M.; Bethune, C.

    1996-01-01

    Millions of adults have been sexually abused. Patients often confide in their family physicians concerning their abuse. Physicians must understand their own issues surrounding sexual abuse and its sequelae before they attempt to treat sexually abused patients. The PLISSIT model offers a practical guide for assisting abused adult patients. PMID:8924817

  6. A clerking tool for the patient record system.

    PubMed

    McDermott, D; Heathfield, H; Kirby, J

    1995-01-01

    1. BACKGROUND. The goal of the PEN&PAD (Elderly Care) project is to develop a patient record system to assist the many different professionals that care for patients in a hospital setting. At the core of the project is the use of structured data which can be reused in a variety of ways--both within the system for further manipulation and display, and externally for auditing and statistical purposes. To accommodate these needs, a compositional method of data entry called Structured Data Entry (SDE) was used in this application. SDE was developed in an earlier project PEN&PAD (GP)(1). Our application utilizes a network representation of the medical semantics that can be queried to obtain what is sensible to "say" about a particular concept. This functionality is contained within a separate application known as the Terminology Server (TeS), which has been developed within the GALEN project (2). The client application (the patient record system) requests information from the TeS which can then be used to produce compositional data entry forms that require the user to choose values for given attributes (e.g., if information pertaining to chest pain were being recorded, the attribute 'location' and a choice of possible values i.e., 'left' 'right' and 'bilateral' might appear on the form). Given the importance of capturing clinical information in a highly structured format, SDE is a valuable tool. However, its long term success depends on a very comprehensive model of the medical terminology corpus. This component is currently being studied by the GALEN team. 2. CURRENT WORK. We are developing a clerking tool to be used to create records for the newly admitted patient. The clinician seeks to identify a patient's problems based on physical examination and information obtained through conversation with the patient. Patients are usually admitted with a presenting complaint and obtaining more information about this complaint is an important part of the clerking process. While

  7. Proof of age required--estimating age in adults without birth records.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christine; Narayanasamy, Shanti

    2010-07-01

    Many adults from refugee source countries do not have documents of birth, either because they have been lost in flight, or because the civil infrastructure is too fragile to support routine recording of birth. In Western countries, date of birth is used as a basic identifier, and access to services and support tends to be age regulated. Doctors are not infrequently asked to write formal reports estimating the true age of adult refugees; however, there are no existing guidelines to assist in this task. To provide an overview of methods to estimate age in living adults, and outline recommendations for best practice. Age should be estimated through physical examination; life history, matching local or national events with personal milestones; and existing nonformal documents. Accuracy of age estimation should be subject to three tests: biological plausibility, historical plausibility, and corroboration from reputable sources.

  8. Patient access to complex chronic disease records on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Access to medical records on the Internet has been reported to be acceptable and popular with patients, although most published evaluations have been of primary care or office-based practice. We tested the feasibility and acceptability of making unscreened results and data from a complex chronic disease pathway (renal medicine) available to patients over the Internet in a project involving more than half of renal units in the UK. Methods Content and presentation of the Renal PatientView (RPV) system was developed with patient groups. It was designed to receive information from multiple local information systems and to require minimal extra work in units. After piloting in 4 centres in 2005 it was made available more widely. Opinions were sought from both patients who enrolled and from those who did not in a paper survey, and from staff in an electronic survey. Anonymous data on enrolments and usage were extracted from the webserver. Results By mid 2011 over 17,000 patients from 47 of the 75 renal units in the UK had registered. Users had a wide age range (<10 to >90 yrs) but were younger and had more years of education than non-users. They were enthusiastic about the concept, found it easy to use, and 80% felt it gave them a better understanding of their disease. The most common reason for not enrolling was being unaware of the system. A minority of patients had security concerns, and these were reduced after enrolling. Staff responses were also strongly positive. They reported that it aided patient concordance and disease management, and increased the quality of consultations with a neutral effect on consultation length. Neither patient nor staff responses suggested that RPV led to an overall increase in patient anxiety or to an increased burden on renal units beyond the time required to enrol each patient. Conclusions Patient Internet access to secondary care records concerning a complex chronic disease is feasible and popular, providing an increased

  9. Attitudes toward inter-hospital electronic patient record exchange: discrepancies among physicians, medical record staff, and patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jong-Yi; Ho, Hsiao-Yun; Chen, Jen-De; Chai, Sinkuo; Tai, Chih-Jaan; Chen, Yung-Fu

    2015-07-12

    In this era of ubiquitous information, patient record exchange among hospitals still has technological and individual barriers including resistance to information sharing. Most research on user attitudes has been limited to one type of user or aspect. Because few analyses of attitudes toward electronic patient records (EPRs) have been conducted, understanding the attitudes among different users in multiple aspects is crucial to user acceptance. This proof-of-concept study investigated the attitudes of users toward the inter-hospital EPR exchange system implemented nationwide and focused on discrepant behavioral intentions among three user groups. The system was designed by combining a Health Level 7-based protocol, object-relational mapping, and other medical informatics techniques to ensure interoperability in realizing patient-centered practices. After implementation, three user-specific questionnaires for physicians, medical record staff, and patients were administered, with a 70 % response rate. The instrument showed favorable convergent construct validity and internal consistency reliability. Two dependent variables were applied: the attitudes toward privacy and support. Independent variables comprised personal characteristics, work characteristics, human aspects, and technology aspects. Major statistical methods included exploratory factor analysis and general linear model. The results from 379 respondents indicated that the patients highly agreed with privacy protection by their consent and support for EPRs, whereas the physicians remained conservative toward both. Medical record staff was ranked in the middle among the three groups. The three user groups demonstrated discrepant intentions toward privacy protection and support. Experience of computer use, level of concerns, usefulness of functions, and specifically, reason to use electronic medical records and number of outpatient visits were significantly associated with the perceptions. Overall, four

  10. Optimizing swept-tone protocols for recording distortion-product otoacoustic emissions in adults and newborns

    PubMed Central

    Abdala, Carolina; Luo, Ping; Shera, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), which are routinely used in the audiology clinic and research laboratory, are conventionally recorded with discrete tones presented sequentially across frequency. However, a more efficient technique sweeps tones smoothly across frequency and applies a least-squares-fitting (LSF) procedure to compute estimates of otoacoustic emission phase and amplitude. In this study, the optimal parameters (i.e., sweep rate and duration of the LSF analysis window) required to record and analyze swept-tone DPOAEs were tested and defined in 15 adults and 10 newborns. Results indicate that optimal recording of swept-tone DPOAEs requires use of an appropriate analysis bandwidth, defined as the range of frequencies included in each least squares fit model. To achieve this, the rate at which the tones are swept and the length of the LSF analysis window must be carefully considered and changed in concert. Additionally, the optimal analysis bandwidth must be adjusted to accommodate frequency-dependent latency shifts in the reflection-component of the DPOAE. Parametric guidelines established here are equally applicable to adults and newborns. However, elevated noise during newborn swept-tone DPOAE recordings warrants protocol adaptations to improve signal-to-noise ratio and response quality. PMID:26723333

  11. Optimizing swept-tone protocols for recording distortion-product otoacoustic emissions in adults and newborns.

    PubMed

    Abdala, Carolina; Luo, Ping; Shera, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), which are routinely used in the audiology clinic and research laboratory, are conventionally recorded with discrete tones presented sequentially across frequency. However, a more efficient technique sweeps tones smoothly across frequency and applies a least-squares-fitting (LSF) procedure to compute estimates of otoacoustic emission phase and amplitude. In this study, the optimal parameters (i.e., sweep rate and duration of the LSF analysis window) required to record and analyze swept-tone DPOAEs were tested and defined in 15 adults and 10 newborns. Results indicate that optimal recording of swept-tone DPOAEs requires use of an appropriate analysis bandwidth, defined as the range of frequencies included in each least squares fit model. To achieve this, the rate at which the tones are swept and the length of the LSF analysis window must be carefully considered and changed in concert. Additionally, the optimal analysis bandwidth must be adjusted to accommodate frequency-dependent latency shifts in the reflection-component of the DPOAE. Parametric guidelines established here are equally applicable to adults and newborns. However, elevated noise during newborn swept-tone DPOAE recordings warrants protocol adaptations to improve signal-to-noise ratio and response quality.

  12. An archive of longitudinal recordings of the vocalizations of adult Gombe chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Plooij, Frans X.; van de Rijt-Plooij, Hetty; Fischer, Martha; Wilson, Michael L.; Pusey, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Studies of chimpanzee vocal communication provide valuable insights into the evolution of communication in complex societies, and also comparative data for understanding the evolution of human language. One particularly valuable dataset of recordings from free-living chimpanzees was collected by Frans X. Plooij and the late Hetty van de Rijt-Plooij at Gombe National Park, Tanzania (1971–73). These audio specimens, which have not yet been analysed, total over 10 h on 28 tapes, including 7 tapes focusing on adult individuals with a total of 605 recordings. In 2014 the first part of that collection of audio specimens covering the vocalizations of the immature Gombe chimpanzees was made available. The data package described here covers the vocalizations of the adult chimpanzees. We expect these recordings will prove useful for studies on topics including referential signalling and the emergence of dialects. The digitized sound recordings were stored in the Macaulay Library and the Dryad Repository. In addition, the original notes on the contexts of the calls were translated and transcribed from Dutch into English. PMID:26029380

  13. Lateral positioning for critically ill adult patients.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Nicky; Bucknall, Tracey; Faraone, Nardene M

    2016-05-12

    Critically ill patients require regular body position changes to minimize the adverse effects of bed rest, inactivity and immobilization. However, uncertainty surrounds the effectiveness of lateral positioning for improving pulmonary gas exchange, aiding drainage of tracheobronchial secretions and preventing morbidity. In addition, it is unclear whether the perceived risk levied by respiratory and haemodynamic instability upon turning critically ill patients outweighs the respiratory benefits of side-to-side rotation. Thus, lack of certainty may contribute to variation in positioning practice and equivocal patient outcomes. To evaluate effects of the lateral position compared with other body positions on patient outcomes (mortality, morbidity and clinical adverse events) in critically ill adult patients. (Clinical adverse events include hypoxaemia, hypotension, low oxygen delivery and global indicators of impaired tissue oxygenation.) We examined single use of the lateral position (i.e. on the right or left side) and repeat use of the lateral position (i.e. lateral positioning) within a positioning schedule. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1950 to 23 May 2015), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1937 to 23 May 2015), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (1984 to 23 May 2015), Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1901 to 23 May 2015), Web of Science (1945 to 23 May 2015), Index to Theses in Great Britain and Ireland (1950 to 23 May 2015), Trove (2009 to 23 May 2015; previously Australasian Digital Theses Program (1997 to December 2008)) and Proquest Dissertations and Theses (2009 to 23 May 2015; previously Proquest Digital Dissertations (1980 to 23 May 2015)). We handsearched the reference lists of potentially relevant reports and two nursing journals. We included randomized and quasi-randomized trials examining effects of

  14. Outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair in adult coarctation patients.

    PubMed

    Lala, Salim; Scali, Salvatore T; Feezor, Robert J; Chandrekashar, Satish; Giles, Kristina A; Fatima, Javairiah; Berceli, Scott A; Back, Martin R; Huber, Thomas S; Beaver, Thomas M; Beck, Adam W

    2017-09-22

    Aortic coarctation (AC) is most commonly identified in pediatric patients; however, adults can present with late sequelae of untreated coarctation or complications of prior open repair. To date, there are limited data about the role of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in this group of patients. The purpose of this analysis was to describe our experience with management of adult coarctation patients using TEVAR. All TEVAR patients treated for primary coarctation or late sequelae of previous open repair (eg, pseudoaneurysm, recurrent coarctation or anastomotic stenosis related to index open coarctation repair) were reviewed. Demographics, comorbidities, procedure-related variables, postoperative outcomes, and reintervention were recorded. Computed tomography centerline assessments of endograft morphology were completed to delineate stent anatomy at the coarctation site. Survival and reintervention were estimated using life-table analysis. A total of 21 patients were identified (median age, 46 years [range, 33-71 years]; 67% male [n = 14]). Nine patients (43%) were treated for symptomatic primary (n = 6) or recurrent (n = 3) coarctation. Other indications included degenerative thoracic aneurysm (n = 6), pseudoaneurysm (n = 4), and dissection (n = 2). Technical success was 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84%-100%). No 30-day mortality or paraplegia events occurred; however, two patients (10%) experienced postoperative nondisabling stroke. In primary or recurrent coarctation patients with available computed tomography imaging (n = 8 of 9), nominal stent graft diameters were achieved proximal and distal to the coarctation (range, -0.4 to -1.2 mm of desired final stent diameter). Specific to the coarctation site, there was a significant increase in aortic diameter after TEVAR (before stenting, 11.5 [95% CI, 6.8-12.3] mm; after stenting, 15 [95% CI, 13.7-15.7] mm; P = .004). Concurrently, systolic arterial blood pressure at time of discharge was

  15. Automated NFC enabled rural healthcare for reliable patient record maintainance.

    PubMed

    Sethia, Divyashikha; Jain, Shantanu; Kakkar, Himadri

    2012-01-01

    Body sensor networks can be used for health monitoring of patients by expert medical doctors, in remote locations like rural areas in developing countries, and can also be used to provide medical aid to areas affected by natural disasters in any part of the world. An important issue to be addressed, when the number of patients is large, is to reliably maintain the patient records and have simple automated mobile applications for healthcare helpers to use. We propose an automated healthcare architecture using NFC-enabled mobile phones and patients having their patient ID on RFID tags. It utilizes NFC-enabled mobile phones to read the patient ID, followed by automated gathering of healthcare vital parameters from body sensors using Bluetooth, analyses the information and transmits it to a medical server for expert feedback. With limited hospital resources and less training requirement for healthcare helpers through simpler applications, this automation of healthcare processing can provide time effective and reliable mass health consultation from medical experts in remote locations.

  16. Interpretation of multiple isolate urine cultures in adult male patients.

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, M. A.; Abdoh, A. A.; Silva, F. G.; Flournoy, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective analytical study examined the records of 220 adult males (mean age 64.9 years) to determine the relative probability that multiple urine culture isolates (MUI) represent urinary tract infection (UTI) versus contamination or colonization. Nonculture laboratory data were used to determine the likelihood of UTI. Patients were classified into three categories: group 1 (those with single isolate cultures; n = 110), group 2 (those with MUI and either symptomatic UTI or an underlying pathologic condition; n = 71) and group 3 (those with MUI and either surgically altered urinary passages or absence of UTI symptoms; n = 39). Nonculture laboratory data suggested UTI in 48.2% of patients in group 1, 46.5% in group 2, and 23.1% in group 3. Patients in groups 1 or 2 with cultures yielding isolate counts of 10(5) colony forming units/mL were 6.2 times more likely to be classified as having a UTI (by nonculture laboratory data) compared with patients having only one or more of these two criteria. This study proposes a more objective approach to interpretation of MUI cultures using the results of nonculture laboratory data, clinical profiles, and colony counts. PMID:7897687

  17. Patient-Reported Use of Personalized Video Recordings to Improve Neurosurgical Patient-Provider Communication

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Randall

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing patients with a video recording of their visit with a medical professional is a common-sense method for improving patient-provider communication. Objective: To describe the patient and provider experiences to video recording clinical medical encounters and providing the patient with a copy of the video for informational purposes. Methods: Since 2009, over 2,800 patients of eight different neurosurgeons chose to be video recorded during their encounter with the doctor and were provided access to the recording to watch over again as a way to recall what the doctor had said. The video system was set up as a handheld video camera, and video files were downloaded and made accessible to patients via a secure Internet patient portal. Between 2012 and 2014, patients who participated were surveyed regarding their use of the video and what was recorded on the video. The experience of the providers from a clinical and medico-legal standpoint was also reviewed. Results: Three hundred and thirty-three responses to the survey were received (39.2% response rate). More than half of patients (N=333; 56.2%) watched their video more than once, and over two-thirds (N=333; 68.6%) shared their video with a family member, friend, or another physician. Patients self-reported improved memory after watching their videos (N=299; 73.6% could remember more) and 50.2% responded that having the video made them feel more “at ease” with their medical problem (N=299). Overall, 88.0% of respondents indicated that their video had been helpful to them, and 98.5% would recommend having future visits video recorded. No patient made a comment that the video was intrusive or had prevented them from being open with their doctor. Finally, in the high-risk specialty of neurosurgery, none of the 2,807 patients who have been recorded since 2009 have used a video in a medico-legal action. Conclusions: Patient responses to the recording system and having a copy of their video

  18. Privacy protections afforded by computer-based patient record systems.

    PubMed

    Amatayakul, M

    1996-05-01

    Computer-based patient record (CPR) systems can afford greater protection of private health information. Key factors that enhance security of CPR systems include the capability to identify the user, verify authorization, determine legitimacy of use, restrict retrieval to only specific "need-to-know" information, encrypt access mechanisms and content, and track all access. The public demands greater protections for computer systems than for paper-based systems. Coupled with appropriate internal management controls and federal preemptive privacy law, breaches of confidentiality from CPRs would occur virtually through the only means that cannot be safeguarded: human communication.

  19. The challenges in making electronic health records accessible to patients

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Leslie; Schein, Rebecca; Morra, Dante; Wilson, Kumanan

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that there is a tension between growing consumer demands for access to information and a healthcare system that may not be prepared to meet these demands. Designing an effective solution for this problem will require a thorough understanding of the barriers that now stand in the way of giving patients electronic access to their health data. This paper reviews the following challenges related to the sharing of electronic health records: cost and security concerns, problems in assigning responsibilities and rights among the various players, liability issues and tensions between flexible access to data and flexible access to physicians. PMID:22120207

  20. Reviewing 741 patients records in two hours with FASTVISU

    PubMed Central

    Escudié, Jean-Baptiste; Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Zapletal, Eric; Cohen, Sarah; Malamut, Georgia; Burgun, Anita; Rance, Bastien

    2015-01-01

    The secondary use of electronic health records opens up new perspectives. They provide researchers with structured data and unstructured data, including free text reports. Many applications been developed to leverage knowledge from free-text reports, but manual review of documents is still a complex process. We developed FASTVISU a web-based application to assist clinicians in reviewing documents. We used FASTVISU to review a set of 6340 documents from 741 patients suffering from the celiac disease. A first automated selection pruned the original set to 847 documents from 276 patients’ records. The records were reviewed by two trained physicians to identify the presence of 15 auto-immune diseases. It took respectively two hours and two hours and a half to evaluate the entire corpus. Inter-annotator agreement was high (Cohen’s kappa at 0.89). FASTVISU is a user-friendly modular solution to validate entities extracted by NLP methods from free-text documents stored in clinical data warehouses. PMID:26958189

  1. Anomalous systemic arterial supply of pulmonary sequestration in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaomeng; Li, Ji; Li, Jing; Cai, Baiqiang

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study described the characteristics of the systemic arterial supply of pulmonary sequestration (PS) in an attempt to better distinguish PS from other acquired lesions. METHODS: We identified 25 patients hospitalized at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital during January 2013 to December 2015 with the assistance of medical catalogers. Twenty-three patients with a definite diagnosis of “pulmonary sequestration” clinically or pathologically were included in the study. The medical records, imaging information, and pathological data were reviewed retrospectively. The general characteristics of the patients and the features of the anomalous arteries were summarized. RESULTS: Aberrant arterial supply of PS was found in all 23 (100%) cases. Among them, twenty patients received surgery, including 14 (70%) with aberrant arterial supply found before surgery, and the other 6 (30%) found during surgery. Nineteen (82.6%) patients had a single systematic arterial supply, with a median diameter of 8 mm. More than one arterial supplies were found in four (17.4%) cases. In 21 (91.3%) cases, the anomalous systemic artery originated from the descending thoracic aorta just adjacent to the sequestrated lung which it supplied, without the presence of accompanying bronchi. In twenty (87.0%) patients who received the surgical intervention, samples of 12 (85.7%) were proved to have elastic vessel walls, out of the 14 samples in which the anomalous systemic arteries were available for analysis. CONCLUSIONS: There are no certain pathology diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of PS. The detecting of the aberrant systematic artery and distinguishing it from the bronchial arteries corresponded to certain lung abnormalities are the keys to the accurate diagnosis of pulmonary sequestration in adult patients. We propose that the characteristic features of the anomalous arteries include: Originating from aorta and its main branches, adjacent to the sequestrated area

  2. The standard data model approach to patient record transfer.

    PubMed

    Canfield, K; Silva, M; Petrucci, K

    1994-01-01

    This paper develops an approach to electronic data exchange of patient records from Ambulatory Encounter Systems (AESs). This approach assumes that the AES is based upon a standard data model. The data modeling standard used here is IDEFIX for Entity/Relationship (E/R) modeling. Each site that uses a relational database implementation of this standard data model (or a subset of it) can exchange very detailed patient data with other such sites using industry standard tools and without excessive programming efforts. This design is detailed below for a demonstration project between the research-oriented geriatric clinic at the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center (BVAMC) and the Laboratory for Healthcare Informatics (LHI) at the University of Maryland.

  3. Dietary intake and nutritional status in cancer patients; comparing adults and older adults.

    PubMed

    Gómez Valiente da Silva, Henyse; Fonseca de Andrade, Camila; Bello Moreira, Annie Seixas

    2014-04-01

    Evaluate the nutrient intake and nutritional status of food in cancer patients admitted to a university hospital, with comparison of adult and older adult age category. Cross-sectional study. This study involved cancer patients admitted to a hospital in 2010. Dietary habits were collected using a Brazilian food frequency questionnaire. Participants were divided in two groups: adults or older adults and in 4-cancer category: hematologic, lung, gastrointestinal and others. Body Mass Index evaluated nutritional status. A total of 86 patients with a mean age of 56.5 years, with 55% males and 42% older adults were evaluated. The older adult category had a higher frequency of being underweight (24.4% vs 16.3%, p < 0.01) and a lower frequency of being overweight (7% vs. 15.1%, p < 0.01) than adults. Both, adult and older adults had a high frequency of smoking, alcohol consumption and physical inactivity. The older adults had lower consumption of calories, intake of iron and folic acid. Inadequacy of vitamin intake was observed in both groups; respectively, 52%, 43%, 95%, 76% and 88% for Vitamin A, C, D, E and folic acid. The older adults had a higher folic acid and calcium inadequacy than the adults (97% vs 82%, p <0.01; 88% vs 72%, p < 0.01). There was no association of micronutrient intake with cancer, nor with nutritional status. The food intake, macro and micronutrients ingestion is insufficient among cancer individuals. Food intake of older adults was inferior, when compared to the adult category. There was a high prevalence of BMI excess in the adult group and a worst nutritional status in the older adult category. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. Consumers' Perceptions of Patient-Accessible Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. Objective The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers’ response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. Methods This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Results Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor’s visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Conclusions Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually

  5. Consumers' perceptions of patient-accessible electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Zarcadoolas, Christina; Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-08-26

    Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers' response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor's visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually engaging, and have user-friendly navigation.

  6. Automatic Application of Health Care Criteria to Narrative Patient Records

    PubMed Central

    Hirschman, Lynette; Sager, Naomi; Lyman, Margaret

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental computer program for the application of health care review criteria to hospital discharge summaries. The use of the computer in this process would make it possible to speed up the routine screening of patient records; it could also facilitate experimental evaluation of alternate proposed audit criteria. The computer program has two components. The first component creates a structured form of the information contained in natural language medical records. It maps the words of each sentence into labelled columns of a table (or information format) according to the type of medical information contained in each word. This structured information is suitable for use as a data base in many areas of clinical research. The second component consists of a set of retrieval routines, each of which corresponds to a criterion of the health care evaluation form, e.g., was the patient afebrile at discharge? The retrieval component is built up in modular fashion, so that basic routines can be used in other applications. The application of this program to a sample hospital discharge summary is presented and compared to the results obtained by a physician reviewer.

  7. An exploratory study of the personal health records adoption model in the older adult with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Logue, Melanie D; Effken, Judith A

    2012-01-01

    Despite international efforts moving toward integrated care using health information technologies and the potential of electronic PHRs to help us better coordinate patient-centered care, PHR adoption in the United States remains low among patients who have been offered free access to them from private-sector companies. If older adult stand to benefit from the use of PHRs for its usefulness in self-managing chronic illness, why have they not been more readily adopted? Since the chronically ill older adult has unique circumstances that impact their decision to participate in self-directed care, a theoretical framework to help understand factors that influence the adoption of PHRs is important. Here we describe the results of an exploratory study that provided an initial test of such a framework. The study used a descriptive survey methodology with 38 older adults. The survey questionnaire asked about the personal barriers and facilitators associated with personal health record adoption and included items measuring each of the PHRAM's four interacting factors (environmental factors, personal factors, technology factors, and self-management), and the resulting behavioral outcome. Younger seniors had a more positive attitude toward computers, knew what health resources were available on the internet, agreed that they had the resources in place to use PHRs, and would be more influenced by a family member than a healthcare provider to use them. Conversely, older seniors reported less confidence in their ability to use Internet-based PHRs and did not perceive that they had the resources in place to use them. The results of this study indicated that personal, environmental, technology, chronic illness, and behavioral factors operated concurrently as personal barriers and/or facilitators to the adoption of PHRs among the older adult with chronic illness. These factors cannot be isolated because the person commonly weighs risk with benefit and determines the personal value of

  8. Injuries Reported and Recorded for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Who Live with Paid Support in Scotland: A Comparison with Scottish Adults in the General Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petropoulou, Evangelia; Finlayson, Janet; Hay, Margaret; Spencer, Wendy; Park, Richard; Tannock, Hugh; Galbraith, Erin; Godwin, Jon; Skelton, Dawn A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Providers of supported living services to adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) in the United Kingdom have procedures in place to monitor injuries; this provides opportunity to learn about the injuries being reported and recorded. The aim was to determine the incidence, causes and types of injuries experienced by 593 adults with…

  9. Injuries Reported and Recorded for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Who Live with Paid Support in Scotland: A Comparison with Scottish Adults in the General Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petropoulou, Evangelia; Finlayson, Janet; Hay, Margaret; Spencer, Wendy; Park, Richard; Tannock, Hugh; Galbraith, Erin; Godwin, Jon; Skelton, Dawn A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Providers of supported living services to adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) in the United Kingdom have procedures in place to monitor injuries; this provides opportunity to learn about the injuries being reported and recorded. The aim was to determine the incidence, causes and types of injuries experienced by 593 adults with…

  10. Intraoperative nerve action and compound motor action potential recordings in patients with obstetric brachial plexus lesions.

    PubMed

    Pondaag, Willem; van der Veken, Lieven P A J; van Someren, Paul J; van Dijk, J Gert; Malessy, Martijn J A

    2008-11-01

    A typical finding in supraclavicular exploration of infants with severe obstetric brachial plexus lesions (OBPLs) is a neuroma-in-continuity with the superior trunk and/or a root avulsion at C-5, C-6, or C-7. The operative strategy in these cases is determined by the intraoperative assessment of the severity of the lesion. Intraoperative nerve action potential (NAP) and evoked compound motor action potential (CMAP) recordings have been shown to be helpful diagnostic tools in adults, whereas their value in the intraoperative assessment of infants with OBPLs remains to be determined. Intraoperative NAPs and CMAPs were systematically recorded from damaged and normal nerves of the upper brachial plexus in a consecutive series of 95 infants (mean age 175 days) with OBPLs. A total of 599 intraoperative NAP and 836 CMAP recordings were analyzed. The severity of the nerve lesions was graded as normal, axonotmesis, neurotmesis, or root avulsion, based on surgical, clinical, histological, and radiographic criteria. The correlation of NAP and CMAP recordings with the severity of the lesion was assessed. The specificity of an absent NAP or CMAP to predict a severe lesion (neurotmesis or avulsion) was > 0.9. However, the sensitivity of an absent NAP or CMAP for predicting a severe lesion was low (typically < 0.3). The severity of the nerve lesion was related to CMAP and NAP amplitudes. Cutoff points useful for intraoperative decision making could not be found to differentiate between lesion types in individual patients. Intraoperative NAP and CMAP recordings do not assist in decision making in the surgical treatment of infants with OBPLs. The authors' findings in infants cannot be generalized to adults.

  11. Electronic Health Record Innovations for Healthier Patients and Happier Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H.

    2015-01-01

    This special issue explores a range of health information technology (HIT) issues that can help primary care practices and patients. Findings address the design of HIT systems, primarily electronic health records (EHRs), the utility of various functionalities, and implementation strategies that ensure the greatest value. The articles also remind us that, while HIT can support the delivery of care, it is not a panacea. To be effective, functionality needs to be relevant and timely for both the clinician and patient. Prompts and better documentation can improve care, and “prompt fatigue” is not inevitable. Information presented within EHRs needs to be actionable. There is an ongoing tension between information overload and the right—and helpful—information. Even the order of presentation of information can make a difference in the outcome. Whether supported by HIT or not, basic tenants of care, such as including the whole care team in trainings, communicating with other providers, and engaging patients, remain essential. The studies in this issue will prove useful for informatics developers, practices and health systems making HIT decisions, and care teams refining HIT to support the needs of their patients. PMID:25957359

  12. Inviting patients and care partners to read doctors' notes: OpenNotes and shared access to electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jennifer L; Darer, Jonathan D; Berger, Andrea; Clarke, Deserae; Green, Jamie A; Stametz, Rebecca A; Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Jan

    2016-08-07

    We examined the acceptability and effects of delivering doctors' visit notes electronically (via OpenNotes) to patients and care partners with authorized access to patients' electronic medical records. Adult patients and care partners at Geisinger Health System were surveyed at baseline and after 12 months of exposure to OpenNotes. Reporting on care partner access to OpenNotes, patients and care partners stated that they had better agreement about patient treatment plans and more productive discussions about their care. At follow-up, patients were more confident in their ability to manage their health, felt better prepared for office visits, and reported understanding their care better than at baseline. Care partners were more likely to access and use patient portal functionality and reported improved communication with patients' providers at follow-up. Our findings suggest that offering patients and care partners access to doctors' notes is acceptable and improves communication and patients' confidence in managing their care.

  13. e-Patients Perceptions of Using Personal Health Records for Self-management Support of Chronic Illness.

    PubMed

    Gee, Perry M; Paterniti, Debora A; Ward, Deborah; Soederberg Miller, Lisa M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic illness self-management is largely moving from healthcare professionals and into the hands of the patient. One tool that has been promoted to facilitate self-management support of chronic illness by policymakers, health advocates, providers, and consumers is the personal health record. Little is known about how consumers effectively use personal health records for self-management support and for productive patient-provider interactions. The purpose of this study was to learn from chronically ill engaged, experienced, and educated (e-patient) adults how and why they use personal health records for self-management support and productive patient-provider interactions. Eighteen purposively selected consumers were interviewed in two communities. Qualitative description methods were used, and we used a grounded theory approach to analyzing interview data, which was digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. We identified four major thematic categories that capture the perceptions of the chronically ill using personal health records: (1) patient engagement and health self-management, (2) access to and control over personal health data, (3) promotion of productive communication, and (4) opportunities for training and education. Knowledge gained from the e-patient personal health record users suggest that making improvements to the portal system and providing education to consumers and providers will increase the utility among the experienced users and encourage new users to embrace adoption and use.

  14. Extracorporeal respiratory support in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Romano, Thiago Gomes; Mendes, Pedro Vitale; Park, Marcelo; Costa, Eduardo Leite Vieira

    2017-01-01

    In patients with severe respiratory failure, either hypoxemic or hypercapnic, life support with mechanical ventilation alone can be insufficient to meet their needs, especially if one tries to avoid ventilator settings that can cause injury to the lungs. In those patients, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), which is also very effective in removing carbon dioxide from the blood, can provide life support, allowing the application of protective lung ventilation. In this review article, we aim to explore some of the most relevant aspects of using ECMO for respiratory support. We discuss the history of respiratory support using ECMO in adults, as well as the clinical evidence; costs; indications; installation of the equipment; ventilator settings; daily care of the patient and the system; common troubleshooting; weaning; and discontinuation. RESUMO Em pacientes com insuficiência respiratória grave (hipoxêmica ou hipercápnica), o suporte somente com ventilação mecânica pode ser insuficiente para suas necessidades, especialmente quando se tenta evitar o uso de parâmetros ventilatórios que possam causar danos aos pulmões. Nesses pacientes, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, oxigenação extracorpórea por membrana), que também é muito eficaz na remoção de dióxido de carbono do sangue, pode manter a vida, permitindo o uso de ventilação pulmonar protetora. No presente artigo de revisão, objetivamos explorar alguns dos aspectos mais relevantes do suporte respiratório por ECMO. Discutimos a história do suporte respiratório por ECMO em adultos; evidências clínicas; custos; indicações; instalação do equipamento; parâmetros ventilatórios; cuidado diário do paciente e do sistema; solução de problemas comuns; desmame e descontinuação.

  15. Use of electronic patient records for research: views of patients and staff in general practice.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Fiona; Lloyd, Nigel; Harrington, Louise; Wallace, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Electronic patient records offer unique opportunities to undertake population-based research. The Health Research Support Service (HRSS) pilot project sought to extract electronic records on a national basis from across health and social care and transfer them together with identifiers to a designated 'safe haven'. To determine the feasibility and acceptability of the HRSS pilot in primary care. Interviews and focus groups with patients and practice staff. There was general support from both patients and staff for the principle of the HRSS. The 'opt-out' basis for participation in the HRSS drew mixed responses from patients and staff, with an appreciation of the advantages in relation to participation by default, but concerns about the extent to which this constituted true consent. Concerns were expressed about confidentiality and the safety and security of the extracted data. The patient information pack was roundly criticized by both patients and staff. Trust in individual GPs, practices and the National Health Service (NHS) was a crucial factor in patients' decisions about participation. Although patients and staff were generally supportive of the HRSS, they require clear information about the proposed use of medical records for research purposes. The question of 'opt out' versus 'opt in' remains controversial and further consideration will be needed if research using routine medical records is to achieve its full potential as a 'core' activity in the NHS.

  16. [Clinical features of patients with juvenile and adult dermatomyositis].

    PubMed

    Szalmás, Orsolya; Nagy-Vince, Melinda; Dankó, Katalin; Farkas, Flóra

    2015-09-13

    Juvenile and adult dermatomysitis are chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory myopathies characterized by progressive proximal muscle weakness and typical skin symptoms. To compare the symptoms, laboratory and serological findings, treatment and disease course in children and adults suffering from dermatomyositis. In this retrospective study, juvenile and adult dermatomyositis groups were formed. There were 27 patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (mean age, 8.7 years; mean follow-up time: 104.6 months) and 30 adult patients (mean age, 50.3; mean follow-up time: 58.1 months). In patients with juvenile dermatomyositis, treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and cyclosporine A were more frequent as compared to adult patients. Acute onset of the disease was more frequent in adult patients than in those with juvenile disease. In children symptoms of the disease developed gradually. The findings confirm previously published data showing that there are differences between juvenile and adult patients with dermatomyositis. The authors recommend to follow the patients regularly after reaching remission to avoid bad patient compliance and decrease the number and severity of relapses.

  17. Exploring Adult Care Experiences and Barriers to Transition in Adult Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bemrich-Stolz, CJ; Halanych, JH; Howard, TH; Hilliard, LM; Lebensburger, JD

    2015-01-01

    Background Young adults with sickle cell anemia are at high risk for increased hospitalization and death at the time of transition to adult care. This may be related to failure of the transition system to prepare young adults for the adult healthcare system. This qualitative study was designed to identify factors related to transition that may affect the health of adults with sickle cell anemia. Procedure Ten patients currently treated in an adult hematology clinic participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews to describe their experience transitioning from pediatric to adult care and differences in adult and pediatric healthcare systems. Results Participants were generally unprepared for the adult healthcare system. Negative issues experienced by participants included physician mistrust, difficulty with employers, keeping insurance, and stress in personal relationships. Positive issues experienced by participants included improved self efficacy with improved self care and autonomy. Conclusions In the absence of a formalized transition program, adults with sickle cell anemia experience significant barriers to adult care. In addition to medical history review and identification of an adult provider, transition programs should incorporate strategies to navigate the adult medical system, insurance and relationships as well as encouraging self efficacy. PMID:26900602

  18. Physicians, Patients, and the Electronic Health Record: An Ethnographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ventres, William; Kooienga, Sarah; Vuckovic, Nancy; Marlin, Ryan; Nygren, Peggy; Stewart, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Little is known about the effects of the electronic health record (EHR) on physician-patient encounters. The objectives of this study were to identify the factors that influence the manner by which physicians use the EHR with patients. METHODS This ethnographic study included 4 qualitative components: 80 hours of participant observation in 4 primary care offices in the Pacific Northwest; individual interviews with 52 patients, 12 office staff members, 23 physicians, and 1 nurse-practitioner; videotaped reviews of 29 clinical encounters; and 5 focus-group interviews with physicians and computer advocates. The main outcome measures were factors that influence how physicians use the EHR. Researchers qualitatively derived these factors through serial reviews of data. RESULTS This study identified 14 factors that influence how EHRs are used and perceived in medical practice today. These factors were categorized into 4 thematic domains: (1) spatial—effect of the physical presence and location of EHRs on interactions between physicians and patients; (2) relational—perceptions of physicians and patients about the EHR and how those perceptions affected its use; (3) educational—issues of developing physicians’ proficiency with and improving patients’ understandings about EHR use; and (4) structural—institutional and technological forces that influence how physicians perceived their use of EHR. CONCLUSIONS This study found that the introduction of EHRs into practice influences multiple cognitive and social dimensions of the clinical encounter. It brings into focus important questions that through further inquiry can determine how to make best use of the EHR to enhance therapeutic relationships. PMID:16569715

  19. Where should electronic records for patients be stored?

    PubMed

    Lapsia, Vijay; Lamb, Kenneth; Yasnoff, William A

    2012-12-01

    The importance of a nationwide health information infrastructure (NHII) is widely recognized. Patient data may be stored where it happens to be created (the distributed or institution-centric model) or in one place for a given patient (the centralized or patient-centric model). Minimal data is available regarding the performance implications of these alternative architectural choices. To help identify the architecture best suited for efficient and complete nationwide health information exchange based on the large-scale operational characteristics of these architectures. We used simulation to study the impact of health care record (data) fragmentation and probability of encounter on transaction volume and data retrieval failure rate as markers of performance for each of the above architectures. Data fragmentation and the probability of encounter directly correlate with transaction volume and are significantly higher for the distributed model when the number of data nodes >4 (p<0.0001). The number of data retrieval failures increases in proportion to fragmentation and is significantly higher for the distributed model when the number of data nodes ≥2 (p<0.0059). In simulation studies, the distributed model scaled poorly in terms of data availability and integrity with a higher failure rate when compared to the centralized model of data storage. Choice of architecture may have implications on the efficiency, usability, and effectiveness of the NHII at the point of care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolic Characteristics and Risks Associated with Stone Recurrence in Korean Young Adult Stone Patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Won; Seo, Sung Pil; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Yong-June; Yun, Seok-Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae; Lee, Sang-Cheol

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the metabolic characteristics and risks of stone recurrence in young adult stone patients in Korea. The medical records of 1532 patients presenting with renal or ureteric stones at our stone clinic between 1994 and 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were grouped according to age (young adult, 18-29 years; intermediate onset, 30-59 years; old age, ≥60 years) at first presentation, and measurements of clinicometabolic characteristics and risks of stone recurrence were compared. Overall, excretion of urinary stone-forming substances was highest in the intermediate onset group, followed by the young adult and old age groups. Importantly, excretion of urinary citrate was lowest in the young adult group. Kaplan-Meier analyses identified a significant difference between the three age groups in terms of stone recurrence (log rank test, p < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that age at first stone presentation was an independent risk factor for stone recurrence. Urinary citrate excretion was an independent risk factor for stone recurrence in young adult stone patients. Younger age (18-29 years) at first stone presentation was a significant risk factor for stone recurrence, and urinary citrate excretion was an independent risk factor affecting recurrence in this group. Metabolic evaluation and potassium citrate therapy should be considered for young adult stone patients to prevent recurrence.

  1. Laser in situ keratomileusis in adult patients with anisometropic amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Agca, Alper; Özgürhan, Engin Bilge; Baz, Ökkeş; Bozkurt, Ercüment; Ozkaya, Abdullah; Yaşa, Dilek; Demirok, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the increase in corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in adults with anisometropic amblyopia. METHODS The medical records of consecutive patients diagnosed with anisometropic amblyopia at the time of refractive evaluation who underwent LASIK were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with at least a two-line difference of visual acuity (VA) between the eyes with a spherical refractive error difference of at least 3.00 diopters (D) or an astigmatic difference of at least 2.00D were included. Patients with any other possible reason for amblyopia other than anisometropia or those who had undergone previous amblyopia treatment were excluded. Amblyopic eyes with myopia or myopic astigmatism were considered as group 1, hypermetropia or hypermetropic astigmatism constituted group 2, and mixed astigmatism patients comprised group 3. Uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), subjective manifest refraction, and CDVA were analyzed at 1 week and 1 month, 3, and 6 months. RESULTS The study included 57 eyes of 57 patients. There were 33 eyes in group 1, 12 eyes in group 2, and 12 eyes in group 3. The preoperative mean values for spherical equivalent of subjective manifest refraction (SE) in groups 1, 2, and 3 were (-4.66±1.97)D, (4.40±1.00)D, and (0.15±1.05)D, respectively. Mean CDVA improved 0.1 log units (1 line LogMAR) at 6 months (P<0.05). Sixteen eyes (28%) exhibited an improvement in CDVA in week 1. Fourteen eyes (25%) experienced two or more lines of CDVA improvement at month 6. There were no statistically significant differences among the groups in terms of CDVA (P>0.05). Moreover, age, the amount of preoperative refractive error, and the levels of preoperative corrected and UDVA had no effect on postoperative CDVA improvement (P>0.05). CONCLUSION Correction of refractive errors with LASIK produced significant CDVA improvement in adult patients with anisometropic amblyopia and no previous amblyopia treatment

  2. Patients, privacy and trust: patients' willingness to allow researchers to access their medical records.

    PubMed

    Damschroder, Laura J; Pritts, Joy L; Neblo, Michael A; Kalarickal, Rosemarie J; Creswell, John W; Hayward, Rodney A

    2007-01-01

    The federal Privacy Rule, implemented in the United States in 2003, as part of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), created new restrictions on the release of medical information for research. Many believe that its restrictions have fallen disproportionately on researchers prompting some to call for changes to the Rule. Here we ask what patients think about researchers' access to medical records, and what influences these opinions. A sample of 217 patients from 4 Veteran Affairs (VA) facilities deliberated in small groups at each location with the opportunity to question experts and inform themselves about privacy issues related to medical records research. After extensive deliberation, these patients were united in their inclination to share their medical records for research. Yet they were also united in their recommendations to institute procedures that would give them more control over whether and how their medical records are used for research. We integrated qualitative and quantitative results to derive a better understanding of this apparent paradox. Our findings can best be presented as answers to questions related to five dimensions of trust: Patients' trust in VA researchers was the most powerful determinant of the kind of control they want over their medical records. More specifically, those who had lower trust in VA researchers were more likely to recommend a more stringent process for obtaining individual consent. Insights on the critical role of trust suggest actions that researchers and others can take to more fully engage patients in research.

  3. Accelerometer recorder and display system for ambulatory patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berka, Martin; Żyliński, Marek; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Cybulski, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the design of a compact, wearable, rechargeable acceleration recorder to support long-term monitoring of ambulatory patients with motor disorders, and of software to display and analyze its output. The device consists of a microcontroller, operational amplifier, accelerometer, SD card, indicator LED, rechargeable battery, and associated minor components. It can operate for over a day without charging and can continuously collect data for three weeks without downloading to an outside system, as currently configured. With slight modifications, this period could be extended to several months. The accompanying software provides flexible visualization of the acceleration data over long periods, basic file operations and compression for easier archiving, annotation of segments of interest, and functions for calculation of various parameters and detection of immobility and vibration frequencies. Applications in analysis of gait and other movements are discussed.

  4. Security architecture for multi-site patient records research.

    PubMed Central

    Behlen, F. M.; Johnson, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    A security system was developed as part of a patient records research database project intended for both local and multi-site studies. A comprehensive review of ethical foundations and legal environment was undertaken, and a security system comprising both administrative policies and computer tools was developed. For multi-site studies, Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval is required for each study, at each participating site. A sponsoring Principal Investigator (PI) is required at each site, and each PI needs automated enforcement tools. Systems fitting this model were implemented at two academic medical centers. Security features of commercial database systems were found to be adequate for basic enforcement of approved research protocols. PMID:10566404

  5. When to allow or deny adult access to children's health records.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2013-03-01

    The Data Protection Act 1998, section 7, has long granted patients the right of access to their health records. The right is exercised by a subject access request and a person with parental responsibility may exercise this right on behalf of a child. However, once the child is considered Gillick competent then a subject access request to a child's records must only be granted with the consent of the child. In this article the author sets out the requirements for a subject access request and why community nurses and specialist practitioners must proceed with caution when a request is received in respect of a child from the age of 12 years.

  6. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.1 Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records. The restrictions of...

  7. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.1 Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records. The restrictions of...

  8. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.1 Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records. The restrictions of...

  9. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.1 Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records. The restrictions of...

  10. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.1 Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records. The restrictions of...

  11. Assessment of the impact on time to complete medical record using an electronic medical record versus a paper record on emergency department patients: a study.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jeffrey J; Sutherland, Jane; Symington, Cheryl; Dorland, Katie; Mansour, Marlene; Stiell, Ian G

    2014-12-01

    Electronic medical records are becoming an integral part of healthcare delivery. The goal of this study was to compare paper documentation versus electronic medical record for non-traumatic chest pain to determine differences in time for physicians to complete medical records using paper versus electronic mediums. We also assessed physician satisfaction with the electronic format. We conducted this before-after study in a single large tertiary care academic emergency department. In the 'Before Period', stopwatches determined the time for paper medical recording. In the 'After Period', a template-based electronic medical record was introduced and the time for electronic recording was measured. The time to record in the before and after periods were compared using a two-sided t test. We surveyed physicians to assess satisfaction. We enrolled 100 non-traumatic patients with chest pain in the before period and 73 in the after period. The documentation time was longer using electronic charting, (9.6±5.9 min vs 6.1±2.5 min; p<0.001). 18 of 20 physicians participating in the after period completed surveys. Physicians were not satisfied with the electronic patient recording for non-traumatic chest pain. This is the first study that we are aware of which compared paper versus electronic medical records in the emergency department. Electronic recording took longer than paper records. Physicians were not satisfied using this electronic record. Given the time pressures on emergency physicians, a solution to minimise the charting time using electronic medical records must be found before widespread uptake of electronic charting will be possible. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Differences in chewing behaviors between healthy fully dentate young and older adults assessed by electromyographic recordings.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong; Hollis, James H

    2015-01-01

    To characterize changes in chewing behaviors associated with healthy aging, 10 young and 10 older fully dentate healthy participants were enrolled in this study. They chewed carrot samples that differed in hardness until their normal swallowing threshold. Their chewing behaviors were assessed using an electromyographic recording device. Adjusting for gender and body mass index, older adults had a higher number of chewing cycles (p = 0.020), a longer chewing duration (p < 0.001), a slower chewing rate (p = 0.002), a greater maximal electromyographic voltage (p = 0.003) and a greater muscle activity (p = 0.002) before they could comfortably swallow the food bolus. A statistically significant main effect of food hardness on the number of chewing cycles, chewing duration, chewing rate and muscle activity was also observed (p < 0.001 for all). These results suggest that reduced mastication efficiency is associated with healthy aging in fully dentate adults. This ingestive behavior may contribute to aging-related reduction in appetite in older adults.

  13. Relationship between perceived sleep and polysomnography in older adult patients

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Silva, Mayra; Bazzana, Caroline Moreira; de Souza, Altay Lino; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Tufik, Sergio; Lucchesi, Lígia M.; Lopes, Guiomar Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Aging is a multifactorial process that elicits changes in the duration and quality of sleep. Polysomnography is considered to be the standard examination for the analysis of sleep and consists of the simultaneous recording of selected physiological variables during sleep. Objective The objective of this study was to use polysomnography to compare sleep reported by senior citizens. Methods We selected 40 patients, both male and female, with ages ranging from 64 to 89 years from the Center for the Study of Aging at the Federal University of São Paulo. Patients answered questions about sleep on the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment and underwent polysomnography. Results The results were compared, and agreement between perceived sleep and polysomnography was found in several areas. There was an association between difficulty sleeping and sleep onset latency (p=0.015), waking up at night with sleep onset latency (p=0.005), total sleep time with daytime sleepiness (0.005) and snoring (0.027), sleep efficiency with sleepiness (0.004), snoring (0.033) and pause in breathing (p=0.024), awakenings with snoring (p=0.012) and sleep apnea with pauses in breathing (p=0.001). Conclusion These results suggest that the older adult population have a good perception of their sleep. The questionnaires aimed at this population should be used as an alternative to polysomnography. PMID:26483948

  14. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Portal Implementation Toolkit for Ambulatory Clinics: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Diblasi, Catherine; Gonzales, Eva; Silver, Kristi; Zhu, Shijun; Sagherian, Knar; Kongs, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Personal health records and patient portals have been shown to be effective in managing chronic illnesses. Despite recent nationwide implementation efforts, the personal health record and patient portal adoption rates among patients are low, and the lack of support for patients using the programs remains a critical gap in most implementation processes. In this study, we implemented the Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit in a large diabetes/endocrinology center and assessed its preliminary impact on personal health record and patient portal knowledge, self-efficacy, patient-provider communication, and adherence to treatment plans. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit is composed of Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General, clinic-level resources for clinicians, staff, and patients, and Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit Plus, an optional 4-week online resource program for patients ("MyHealthPortal"). First, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General was implemented, and all clinicians and staff were educated about the center's personal health record and patient portal. Then general patient education was initiated, while a randomized controlled trial was conducted to test the preliminary effects of "MyHealthPortal" using a small sample (n = 74) with three observations (baseline and 4 and 12 weeks). The intervention group showed significantly greater improvement than the control group in patient-provider communication at 4 weeks (t56 = 3.00, P = .004). For other variables, the intervention group tended to show greater improvement; however, the differences were not significant. In this preliminary study, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit showed potential for filling the gap in the current

  15. Medical narratives and patient analogs: the ethical implications of electronic patient records.

    PubMed

    Kluge, E H

    1999-12-01

    An electronic patient record consists of electronically stored data about a specific patient. It therefore constitutes a data-space. The data may be combined into a patient profile which is relative to a particular specialty as well as phenomenologically unique to the specific professional who constructs the profile. Further, a diagnosis may be interpreted as a path taken by a health care professional with a certain specialty through the data-space relative to the patient profile constructed by that professional. This way of looking at electronic patient records entails certain ethical implications about privacy and accessibility. However, it also permits the construction of artificial intelligence and competence algorithms for health care professionals relative to their specialties.

  16. A rigorous algorithm to detect and clean inaccurate adult height records within EHR systems.

    PubMed

    Muthalagu, A; Pacheco, J A; Aufox, S; Peissig, P L; Fuehrer, J T; Tromp, G; Kho, A N; Rasmussen-Torvik, L J

    2014-01-01

    Height is a critical variable for many biomedical analyses because it is an important component of Body Mass Index (BMI). Transforming EHR height measures into meaningful research-ready values is challenging and there is limited information available on methods for "cleaning" these data. We sought to develop an algorithm to clean adult height data extracted from EHR using only height values and associated ages. The algorithm we developed is sensitive to normal decreases in adult height associated with aging, is implemented using an open-source software tool and is thus easily modifiable, and is freely available. We checked the performance of our algorithm using data from the Northwestern biobank and a replication sample from the Marshfield Clinic biobank obtained through our participation in the eMERGE consortium. The algorithm identified 1262 erroneous values from a total of 33937 records in the Northwestern sample. Replacing erroneous height values with those identified as correct by the algorithm resulted in meaningful changes in height and BMI records; median change in recorded height after cleaning was 7.6 cm and median change in BMI was 2.9 kg/m(2). Comparison of cleaned EHR height values to observer measured values showed that 94.5% (95% C.I 93.8-% - 95.2%) of cleaned values were within 3.5 cm of observer measured values. Our freely available height algorithm cleans EHR height data with only height and age inputs. Use of this algorithm will benefit groups trying to perform research with height and BMI data extracted from EHR.

  17. Propranolol Dosing Practices in Adult Burn Patients: Implications for Safety and Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Brown, David A; Gibbons, Janet; Honari, Shari; Klein, Matthew B; Pham, Tam N; Gibran, Nicole S

    2016-01-01

    Studies in children with burn injuries have demonstrated that propranolol improves metabolism and reduces muscle protein wasting. However, safety and efficacy in adults are less well established than in children. The purpose of this study was to determine safety of propranolol use in adult patients with burn injuries. Medical records were reviewed for burn-injured adults receiving propranolol. Patients between 18 and 65 years old and with ≥20% TBSA burn were included. Fifty-four patients met the criteria with mean age of 37 years and mean burn size of 38% TBSA. Propranolol dosages ranged from 0.1 to 3.8 mg/kg/day, with an average maximum dosage of 0.61 mg/kg/day. Mean heart rate decreased by 25% during 4 weeks. Seventy-two percent of patients experienced at least one episode of hypotension and 15% experienced bradycardia. Propranolol doses were most frequently held for low blood pressure; 32% of patients had at least one dose held for hypotension. This retrospective analysis suggests that modest dosing of propranolol results in frequent episodes of hypotension or bradycardia. Our data suggest that adults do not tolerate the higher doses reported in a pediatric population. Despite potential beneficial anti-catabolic effects of propranolol, burn care providers must recognize potential iatrogenic hemodynamic effects of this intervention. Our data support the need for prospective multicenter studies to delineate the safety and efficacy of propranolol in adult burn-injured patients.

  18. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    duTreil, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. PMID:25093002

  19. Association between personal health record enrollment and patient loyalty.

    PubMed

    Turley, Marianne; Garrido, Terhilda; Lowenthal, Alex; Zhou, Yi Yvonne

    2012-07-01

    To examine the association between patient loyalty, as measured by member retention in the health plan, and access to My Health Manager (MHM), Kaiser Permanente's PHR, which is linked to its electronic health record, KP HealthConnect. We conducted a retrospective cohort observational quality improvement project from the third quarter of 2005 to the fourth quarter of 2008 for approximately 394,000 Kaiser Permanente Northwest members. To control for self-selection bias, we used propensity scores to perform exact 1-to-1 matching without replacement between MHM users and nonusers. We estimated retention rates of the matched data and assessed the association between MHM use and retention versus voluntary termination. We also estimated odds ratios of significant variables impacting member retention. The probability of remaining a member or being involuntarily terminated versus voluntary termination was 96.7% for users (95% confidence interval [CI], 96.6%-96.7%) and 92.2% for nonusers (95% CI, 92.1%-92.4%; P <.001). In the logistic model, MHM use was a significant predictor; only tenure and illness burden were stronger predictors. Users were 2.578 (95% CI, 2.487%-2.671%) times more likely to choose to remain members than were nonusers. The impact was more substantial among newer members. MHM use was significantly associated with voluntary membership retention. An indicator of patient loyalty, retention is critical to healthcare organizations.

  20. The Effects of Promoting Patient Access to Medical Records: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Stephen E.; Lin, Chen-Tan

    2003-01-01

    The Health Insurance Privacy and Portability Act (HIPPA) stipulates that patients must be permitted to review and amend their medical records. As information technology makes medical records more accessible to patients, it may become more commonplace for patients to review their records routinely. This article analyzes the potential benefits and drawbacks of facilitating patient access to the medical record by reviewing previously published research. Previous research includes analysis of clinical notes, surveys of patients and practitioners, and studies of patient-accessible medical records. Overall, studies suggest the potential for modest benefits (for instance, in enhancing doctor-patient communication). Risks (for instance, increasing patient worry or confusion) appear to be minimal in medical patients. The studies, however, were of limited quality and low statistical power to detect the variety of outcomes that may result from implementation of a patient-accessible medical record. The data from these studies lay the foundation for future research. PMID:12595402

  1. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  2. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  3. Sexual health discussions with older adult patients during periodic health exams.

    PubMed

    Ports, Katie A; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L; Syme, Maggie L; Perera, Robert A; Lafata, Jennifer Elston

    2014-04-01

    Sexual health is an integral part of overall health across the lifespan. In order to address sexual health issues, such as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and sexual functioning, the sexual history of adult patients should be incorporated as a routine part of the medical history throughout life. Physicians and health-care professionals cite many barriers to attending to and assessing the sexual health needs of older adult patients, underscoring the importance of additional research to improve sexual history taking among older patients. The purpose of this article is to explore the content and context of physician-patient sexual health discussions during periodic health exams (PHEs) with adults aged 50-80 years. Patients completed a pre-visit telephone survey and attended a scheduled PHE with their permission to audio-record the exam. Transcribed audio recordings of 483 PHEs were analyzed according to the principles of qualitative content analysis. Frequency of sexual history taking components as observed in transcripts of PHEs. Physician characteristics were obtained from health system records and patient characteristics were obtained from the pre-visit survey. Analyses revealed that approximately one-half of the PHEs included some discussion about sexual health, with the majority of those conversations initiated by physicians. A two-level logistic regression model revealed that patient-physician gender concordance, race discordance, and increasing physician age were significantly associated with sexual health discussions. Interventions should focus on increasing physician self-efficacy for assessing sexual health in gender discordant and race/ethnicity concordant patient interactions. Interventions for older adults should increase education about sexual health and sexual risk behaviors, as well as empower individuals to seek information from their health-care providers. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  4. Using an automated 3D-tracking system to record individual and shoals of adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Maaswinkel, Hans; Zhu, Liqun; Weng, Wei

    2013-12-05

    Like many aquatic animals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) moves in a 3D space. It is thus preferable to use a 3D recording system to study its behavior. The presented automatic video tracking system accomplishes this by using a mirror system and a calibration procedure that corrects for the considerable error introduced by the transition of light from water to air. With this system it is possible to record both single and groups of adult zebrafish. Before use, the system has to be calibrated. The system consists of three modules: Recording, Path Reconstruction, and Data Processing. The step-by-step protocols for calibration and using the three modules are presented. Depending on the experimental setup, the system can be used for testing neophobia, white aversion, social cohesion, motor impairments, novel object exploration etc. It is especially promising as a first-step tool to study the effects of drugs or mutations on basic behavioral patterns. The system provides information about vertical and horizontal distribution of the zebrafish, about the xyz-components of kinematic parameters (such as locomotion, velocity, acceleration, and turning angle) and it provides the data necessary to calculate parameters for social cohesions when testing shoals.

  5. Medication adherence, medical record accuracy, and medication exposure in real-world patients using comprehensive medication monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Timothy P; Morrison, Ryan D; Sutherland, Jeffrey J; Milne, Stephen B; Ryan, Kendall A; Daniels, J Scott; Misra-Hebert, Anita; Hicks, J Kevin; Vogan, Eric; Teng, Kathryn; Daly, Thomas M

    2017-01-01

    Poor adherence to medication regimens and medical record inconsistencies result in incomplete knowledge of medication therapy in polypharmacy patients. By quantitatively identifying medications in the blood of patients and reconciling detected medications with the medical record, we have defined the severity of this knowledge gap and created a path toward optimizing medication therapy. We validated a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay to detect and/or quantify 38 medications across a broad range of chronic diseases to obtain a comprehensive survey of patient adherence, medical record accuracy, and exposure variability in two patient populations. In a retrospectively tested 821-patient cohort representing U.S. adults, we found that 46% of medications assessed were detected in patients as prescribed in the medical record. Of the remaining medications, 23% were detected, but not listed in the medical record while 30% were prescribed to patients, but not detected in blood. To determine how often each detected medication fell within literature-derived reference ranges when taken as prescribed, we prospectively enrolled a cohort of 151 treatment-regimen adherent patients. In this cohort, we found that 53% of medications that were taken as prescribed, as determined using patient self-reporting, were not within the blood reference range. Of the medications not in range, 83% were below and 17% above the lower and upper range limits, respectively. Only 32% of out-of-range medications could be attributed to short oral half-lives, leaving extensive exposure variability to result from patient behavior, undefined drug interactions, genetics, and other characteristics that can affect medication exposure. This is the first study to assess compliance, medical record accuracy, and exposure as determinants of real-world treatment and response. Variation in medication detection and exposure is greater than previously demonstrated, illustrating the scope of current

  6. Brain abscess caused by Ureaplasma urealyticum in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Deetjen, Philipp; Maurer, Christoph; Rank, Andreas; Berlis, Ansgar; Schubert, Sören; Hoffmann, Reinhard

    2014-02-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum is a fastidious bacterium usually residing in the female genitourinary tract. We present an exceedingly complicated case of a brain abscess secondary to mastoiditis by U. urealyticum in an adult hypogammaglobulinemic patient after rituximab treatment 3 years earlier.

  7. Patient-centered care in adult trauma intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Gwendolyn L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover unique aspects of caring for adult trauma intensive care unit patients with respect to implementing patient-centered care. The concept of patient-centered care has been discussed since 2000, but the actual implementation is currently becoming the focus of health care. The Institute of Medicine defined patient-centered care as "providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values, and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions" in the 2001 Crossing the Quality Chasm report. Discussion and documentation of patient centered-care of the intensive care trauma patient population are limited and yield no results for publication search. This article explores the concept of delivering patient-centered care specifically in a trauma adult intensive care unit.

  8. Examination of an Electronic Patient Record Display Method to Protect Patient Information Privacy.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Yukari; Ota, Katsumasa

    2017-02-01

    Electronic patient records facilitate the provision of safe, high-quality medical care. However, because personnel can view almost all stored information, this study designed a display method using a mosaic blur (pixelation) to temporarily conceal information patients do not want shared. This study developed an electronic patient records display method for patient information that balanced the patient's desire for personal information protection against the need for information sharing among medical personnel. First, medical personnel were interviewed about the degree of information required for both individual duties and team-based care. Subsequently, they tested a mock display method that partially concealed information using a mosaic blur, and they were interviewed about the effectiveness of the display method that ensures patient privacy. Participants better understood patients' demand for confidentiality, suggesting increased awareness of patients' privacy protection. However, participants also indicated that temporary concealment of certain information was problematic. Other issues included the inconvenience of removing the mosaic blur to obtain required information and risk of insufficient information for medical care. Despite several issues with using a display method that temporarily conceals information according to patient privacy needs, medical personnel could accept this display method if information essential to medical safety remains accessible.

  9. Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Jean E; Israelsson, Johan; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Göran I; Bath, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC™ Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety.

  10. Will electronic personal health records benefit providers and patients in rural America?

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, John S

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to educate stakeholders (e.g., providers, patients, insurers, government) in the healthcare industry about electronic personal health records (PHRs) and their potential application in rural America. Extensive research was performed on PHRs through standard literature search, product demonstrations, educational webinars, and fact finding via news releases. Various stakeholders are eager to transform the healthcare industry into the digital age like other industries (i.e., banking, retail). Despite low adoption of PHRs in 2008 (2.7% of U.S. adults), patients are interested in secure messaging and eVisits with their physicians, online appointment scheduling and reminders, and online access to their laboratory and radiology results. Federal agencies (e.g., Health and Human Services, Department of Defense, Veterans Affairs [VA]), popular information technology (IT) vendors (e.g., Google, Microsoft), and large insurers (e.g., Aetna) have energized the industry through pilot programs and new product announcements. It remains to be seen if barriers to adoption, including privacy concerns, lack of interoperability standards and funding, and provider resistance, can be overcome to enable PHRs to become a critical tool in the creation of a more efficient and less costly U.S. healthcare industry. Electronic PHRs hold great promise to enhance access and improve the quality of care provided to patients in rural America. Government, vendors, and insurers should create incentives for providers and patients to implement PHRs. Likewise, patients need to become more aware of PHRs and their ability to improve health outcomes.

  11. Pedunculopontine nucleus microelectrode recordings in movement disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Moran; Hamani, Clement; Hutchison, William D; Moro, Elena; Lozano, Andres M; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O

    2008-06-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) lies within the brainstem reticular formation and is involved in the motor control of gait and posture. Interest has focused recently on the PPN as a target for implantation of chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes for Parkinson's disease (PD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) therapy. The aim of this study was to examine the neurophysiology of the human PPN region and to identify neurophysiological landmarks that may aid the proper placement of DBS electrodes in the nucleus for the treatment of PD and PSP. Neuronal firing and local field potentials were recorded simultaneously from two independently driven microelectrodes during stereotactic neurosurgery for implantation of a unilateral DBS electrode in the PPN in five PD patients and two PSP patients. Within the PPN region, the majority (57%) of the neurons fired randomly while about 21% of the neurons exhibited 'bursty' firing. In addition, 21% of the neurons had a long action potential duration and significantly lower firing rate suggesting they were cholinergic neurons. A change in firing rate produced by passive and/or active contralateral limb movement was observed in 38% of the neurons that were tested in the PPN region. Interestingly, oscillatory local field potential activity in the beta frequency range ( approximately 25 Hz) was also observed in the PPN region. These electrophysiological characteristics of the PPN region provide further support for the proposed role of this region in motor control. It remains to be seen to what extent the physiological characteristics of the neurons and the stimulation-evoked effects will permit reliable identification of PPN and determination of the optimal target for DBS therapy.

  12. Initial Usability and Feasibility Evaluation of a Personal Health Record-Based Self-Management System for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Barbara; Lucero, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Electronic personal health record-based (ePHR-based) self-management systems can improve patient engagement and have an impact on health outcomes. In order to realize the benefits of these systems, there is a need to develop and evaluate heath information technology from the same theoretical underpinnings. Using an innovative usability approach based in human-centered distributed information design (HCDID), we tested an ePHR-based falls-prevention self-management system-Self-Assessment via a Personal Health Record (i.e., SAPHeR)-designed using HCDID principles in a laboratory. And we later evaluated SAPHeR's use by community-dwelling older adults at home. The innovative approach used in this study supported the analysis of four components: tasks, users, representations, and functions. Tasks were easily learned and features such as text-associated images facilitated task completion. Task performance times were slow, however user satisfaction was high. Nearly seven out of every ten features desired by design participants were evaluated in our usability testing of the SAPHeR system. The in vivo evaluation suggests that older adults could improve their confidence in performing indoor and outdoor activities after using the SAPHeR system. We have applied an innovative consumer-usability evaluation. Our approach addresses the limitations of other usability testing methods that do not utilize consistent theoretically based methods for designing and testing technology. We have successfully demonstrated the utility of testing consumer technology use across multiple components (i.e., task, user, representational, functional) to evaluate the usefulness, usability, and satisfaction of an ePHR-based self-management system.

  13. Intensive care of the adult patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Allan, Catherine K

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of congenital heart disease in the adult population has increased out of proportion to that of the pediatric population as survival has improved, and adult congenital heart disease patients make up a growing percentage of pediatric and adult cardiac intensive care unit admissions. These patients often develop complex multiorgan system disease as a result of long-standing altered cardiac physiology, and many require reoperation during adulthood. Practitioners who care for these patients in the cardiac intensive care unit must have a strong working knowledge of the pathophysiology of complex congenital heart disease, and a full team of specialists must be available to assist in the care of these patients. This chapter will review some of the common multiorgan system effects of long-standing congenital heart disease (eg, renal and hepatic dysfunction, coagulation abnormalities, arrhythmias) as well as some of the unique cardiopulmonary physiology of this patient population.

  14. What Matters Most: A Perspective From Adult Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patients.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Michael; Heatwole, Chad; Luebbe, Elizabeth; Johnson, Nicholas E

    2016-08-30

    There are multiple symptoms that affect adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The extent of these symptoms and their impact on individuals' lives is not fully known. We interviewed 15 adults with genetically confirmed SMA. Participants were asked to identify issues that have significant impact on their lives. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed. Participants provided 1045 direct quotes. 177 potential symptoms of importance were identified. Symptoms were grouped by like topics into fourteen symptomatic themes. The symptoms and issues identified by SMA patients alter their physical, mental, and social health and may be amendable to therapeutic intervention.

  15. Long-term needs of adult patients with organic acidaemias: outcome and prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Martín-Hernández, E; Lee, P J; Micciche, A; Grunewald, S; Lachmann, R H

    2009-08-01

    With improvements in the treatment of children with organic acidaemias (OA), the number surviving to adulthood is increasing. To plan appropriate services for their care it is important to know what their needs are. To describe the clinical and social problems affecting adult patients with OA. We reviewed the medical records of 15 adult patients diagnosed with OA. Social attainment (housing, schooling and occupation) was analysed. Nutritional status was evaluated by body mass index (BMI) and laboratory studies. Neurological and visceral complications were noted. Cognitive outcome was evaluated by psychometric testing and/or educational attainment. Seven had methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA), 4 isovaleric acidaemia (IVA) and 4 propionic acidaemia (PA). Ten were female, and median age was 23.5 years (range 18-48). All but three had late-onset disease. Two patients became pregnant during follow up. Four patients had obtained university degrees and were working. Three-quarters of the patients required some kind of social support. All had a good nutritional status. Height was normal in IVA and 3 PA patients. Osteoporosis was present in 2 out of 8 patients assessed. A variety of neurocognitive or visceral complications were seen in two-thirds of the patients. Metabolic decompensations were unusual. The approach to adult patients with OA has to be multidisciplinary, with the clinician and dietician as the core of the team, but with the collaboration of clinical nurses specialists, social workers and other specialist services and the support of a biochemical and molecular laboratory.

  16. Engaging primary care patients to use a patient-centered personal health record.

    PubMed

    Krist, Alex H; Woolf, Steven H; Bello, Ghalib A; Sabo, Roy T; Longo, Daniel R; Kashiri, Paulette; Etz, Rebecca S; Loomis, John; Rothemich, Stephen F; Peele, J Eric; Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Health care leaders encourage clinicians to offer portals that enable patients to access personal health records, but implementation has been a challenge. Although large integrated health systems have promoted use through costly advertising campaigns, other implementation methods are needed for small to medium-sized practices where most patients receive their care. We conducted a mixed methods assessment of a proactive implementation strategy for a patient portal (an interactive preventive health record [IPHR]) offered by 8 primary care practices. The practices implemented a series of learning collaboratives with practice champions and redesigned workflow to integrate portal use into care. Practice implementation strategies, portal use, and factors influencing use were assessed prospectively. A proactive and customized implementation strategy designed by practices resulted in 25.6% of patients using the IPHR, with the rate increasing 1.0% per month over 31 months. Fully 23.5% of IPHR users signed up within 1 day of their office visit. Older patients and patients with comorbidities were more likely to use the IPHR, but blacks and Hispanics were less likely. Older age diminished as a factor after adjusting for comorbidities. Implementation by practice varied considerably (from 22.1% to 27.9%, P <.001) based on clinician characteristics and workflow innovations adopted by practices to enhance uptake. By directly engaging patients to use a portal and supporting practices to integrate use into care, primary care practices can match or potentially surpass the usage rates achieved by large health systems. © 2014 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  17. Engaging Primary Care Patients to Use a Patient-Centered Personal Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H.; Woolf, Steven H.; Bello, Ghalib A.; Sabo, Roy T.; Longo, Daniel R.; Kashiri, Paulette; Etz, Rebecca S.; Loomis, John; Rothemich, Stephen F.; Peele, J. Eric; Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Health care leaders encourage clinicians to offer portals that enable patients to access personal health records, but implementation has been a challenge. Although large integrated health systems have promoted use through costly advertising campaigns, other implementation methods are needed for small to medium-sized practices where most patients receive their care. METHODS We conducted a mixed methods assessment of a proactive implementation strategy for a patient portal (an interactive preventive health record [IPHR]) offered by 8 primary care practices. The practices implemented a series of learning collaboratives with practice champions and redesigned workflow to integrate portal use into care. Practice implementation strategies, portal use, and factors influencing use were assessed prospectively. RESULTS A proactive and customized implementation strategy designed by practices resulted in 25.6% of patients using the IPHR, with the rate increasing 1.0% per month over 31 months. Fully 23.5% of IPHR users signed up within 1 day of their office visit. Older patients and patients with comorbidities were more likely to use the IPHR, but blacks and Hispanics were less likely. Older age diminished as a factor after adjusting for comorbidities. Implementation by practice varied considerably (from 22.1% to 27.9%, P <.001) based on clinician characteristics and workflow innovations adopted by practices to enhance uptake. CONCLUSIONS By directly engaging patients to use a portal and supporting practices to integrate use into care, primary care practices can match or potentially surpass the usage rates achieved by large health systems. PMID:25354405

  18. Healthcare system supports for young adult patients with pediatric onset chronic conditions: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Szalda, Dava E; Jimenez, Manuel E; Long, Jeremiah E; Ni, Amelia; Shea, Judy A; Jan, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Over 90% of children with chronic conditions survive into adulthood necessitating primary care teams to care for adults with pediatric-onset chronic conditions. This study explores practice supports and barriers to care for this population via qualitative techniques. Using in depth interviews with twenty-two healthcare providers practice supports identified include: formalizing intake processes, interoperable electronic medical records, and leveraging care coordination. Barriers identified included: definition of the medical team, lack of appropriate medical records, time and administrative burden, lack of training, and financial constraints. Themes may be utilized to design interventions and improve care coordination for patients with pediatric-onset chronic conditions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. The Accuracy of Recording Patient Problems in Family Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentsen, Bent Gutterm

    1976-01-01

    Reports studies of the validity of medical data recorded and computerized at University of Western Ontario family medical centers. In the 59 encounters observed residents recorded an average of 1.51 problems and observers 2.45. Implications for medical education, audit, research, computer systems, and quality of care are discussed. (JT)

  20. Adult-onset amenorrhea: a study of 262 patients.

    PubMed

    Reindollar, R H; Novak, M; Tho, S P; McDonough, P G

    1986-09-01

    A series of 262 patients with amenorrhea of adult onset are reported. Hypothalamic suppression followed by inappropriate positive feedback, and then hyperprolactinemia and ovarian failure are the most frequently encountered etiologies. Other etiologies are diverse and numerically less frequent. Amenorrhea after use of oral contraceptives, or postpill amenorrhea, occurred in 77 (29%) of all patients. The average age of presentation, prior menstrual history, associated morbidity, and subsequent reproductive potential of each diagnostic group are reported. Adult-onset amenorrhea has a less significant impact on future wellbeing than was reported for a similar-sized group of patients whose amenorrhea developed as a result of pubertal aberrancy.

  1. [Bacterial parotitis in an immunocompromised patient in adult ICU].

    PubMed

    Vassal, O; Bernet, C; Wallet, F; Friggeri, A; Piriou, V

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial parotitis is a common childhood disease with a favorable outcome. Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently involved pathogen. Clinical presentation in adult patients can be misleading, Onset occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities, making diagnosis difficult--particularly in ICU. Different pathogens are found in adults with worse outcomes observed. We report here the case of a critically ill patient and discuss diagnosis and management of bacterial parotitis. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Audit: medical record documentation among advanced cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Elise; Chirac, Anne; Rhondali, Wadih; Ruer, Murielle; Chabloz, Claire; Filbet, Marilène

    2014-02-01

    Medical record documentation of cancer inpatients is a core component of continuity of care. The main goal of the study was an assessment of medical record documentation in a palliative care unit (PCU) using a targeted clinical audit based on deceased inpatients' charts. Stage 1 (2010): a clinical audit of medical record documentation assessed by a list of items (diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, power of attorney directive, advance directives). Stage 2 (2011): corrective measures. Stage 3 (2012): re-assessment with the same items' list after six month. Forty cases were investigated during stage 1 and 3. After the corrective measures, inpatient's medical record documentation was significantly improved, including for diagnosis (P = 0.01), diseases extension and treatment (P < 0.001). Our results highlighted the persistence of a weak rate of medical record documentation for advanced directives (P = 0.145).

  3. Yoga in adult cancer: an exploratory, qualitative analysis of the patient experience.

    PubMed

    McCall, Marcy; Thorne, Sally; Ward, Alison; Heneghan, Carl

    2015-07-22

    Some patients receiving treatment in conventional health care systems access therapeutic yoga outside their mainstream care to improve cancer symptoms. Given the current knowledge gap around patient preferences and documented experiences of yoga in adult cancer, this study aimed to describe patient-reported benefits, barriers and characteristics of programming for yoga practice during conventional treatment. In depth semi-structured interviews (n=10) were conducted in men and women recruited from cancer care clinics in Vancouver, Canada using a purposive sampling technique. The exploratory interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed using Interpretive Description methodology and constant comparative analysis methods. Four themes emerged from the data to address our research objectives: patient-perceived benefits of yoga, reasons and motivations for practising yoga, hurdles and barriers to practising yoga, and advice for effective yoga program delivery in adult cancer. Several patients reported yoga reduced stress and other symptoms associated with cancer treatment. Thematic analysis found the social dimension of group yoga was important, as well as yoga's ability to encourage personal empowerment and awareness of physical body and self. Barriers to yoga adherence from the patient perspective included lack of time, scheduling conflicts and worries about financial burden. This small, diverse sample of patients reported positive experiences and no adverse effects following yoga practice for management of cancer and its symptoms. Results of this qualitative study identified patient-reported preferences, barriers and characteristics of yoga intervention optimal during adult cancer treatment.

  4. Comparing the security risks of paper-based and computerized patient record systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collmann, Jeff R.; Meissner, Marion C.; Tohme, Walid G.; Winchester, James F.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-05-01

    How should hospital administrators compare the security risks of paper-based and computerized patient record systems. There is a general tendency to assume that because computer networks potentially provide broad access to hospital archives, computerized patient records are less secure than paper records and increase the risk of breaches of patient confidentiality. This assumption is ill-founded on two grounds. Reasons exist to say that the computerized patient record provides better access to patient information while enhancing overall information system security. A range of options with different trade-offs between access and security exist in both paper-based and computerized records management systems. The relative accessibility and security of any particular patient record management system depends, therefore, on administrative choice, not simply on the intrinsic features of paper or computerized information management systems.

  5. Patient-Centered Outcomes in Older Adults with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Wendy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Older adults have the highest incidence of new-onset epilepsy, yet there is a lack of self-management interventions to ensure that this population achieves desirable outcomes. In order to develop patient-centered interventions for older adults with epilepsy, self-management outcomes of importance to these patients must first be explored. The purpose of this study was to describe what outcomes older adults diagnosed with epilepsy late in life hope to achieve in self-managing their condition. Method Qualitative description was used. 20 older adults took part in semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Results Six themes emerged--Maintaining Normalcy, We Want to be Involved, Well-Equipped, Seizure Freedom, Fitting Epilepsy in with Other Conditions, Incongruence with Provider Goals. Conclusion These results add to the extant literature, and provide knowledge on which patient-centered epilepsy self-management interventions can be developed. In addition, these results can inform the development of a patient-centered outcome measure for older adults with epilepsy. Such a measure could be used in conjunction with existing measures related to disease status (seizure frequency, etc.) to ensure that outcomes pertinent to both patients and providers are targeted and measured. PMID:24838071

  6. Effect of an electronic medical record alert for severe sepsis among ED patients.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Navaneeth; Gross, A Kendall; Pintens, Megan; Fee, Christopher; MacDougall, Conan

    2016-02-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are a major health concern worldwide. The objective of this study is to determine if Severe Sepsis Best Practice Alert (SS-BPA) implementation was associated with improved processes of care and clinical outcomes among patients with severe sepsis or septic shock presenting to the emergency department (ED). This is a single-center, before-and-after observational study. The intervention group (n = 103) consisted of adult patients presenting to the ED with severe sepsis or septic shock during a 7-month period after implementation of the SS-BPA. The control group (n = 111) consisted of patients meeting the same criteria over a prior 7-month period. The SS-BPA primarily acts by automated, real-time, algorithm-based detection of severe sepsis or septic shock via the electronic medical record system. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included hospital length of stay (LOS), time to antibiotic administration, and proportion of patients who received antibiotics within the target 60 minutes. Time to antibiotics was significantly reduced in the SS-BPA cohort (29 vs 61.5 minutes, P < .001). In addition, there was a higher proportion of patients who received antibiotics within 60 minutes (76.7 vs 48.6%; P < .001). On multivariable analysis, in-hospital mortality was not significantly reduced in the intervention group (odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.26-1.57). Multivariable analysis of LOS indicated a significant reduction among patients in the SS-BPA cohort (geometric mean ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.53-0.82). Implementation of the SS-BPA for severe sepsis or septic shock among ED patients is associated with significantly improved timeliness of antibiotic administration and reduced hospital LOS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. From planning to realisation of an electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Krämer, T; Rapp, R; Krämer, K-L

    1999-03-01

    The high complex requirements on information and information flow in todays hospitals can only be accomplished by the use of modern Information Systems (IS). In order to achieve this, the Stiftung Orthopädische Universitätsklinik has carried out first the Project "Strategic Informations System Planning" in 1993. Then realizing the neccessary infrastructure (network; client-server) from 1993 to 1997, and finally started the introduction of modern IS (SAP R/3 and IXOS-Archive) in the clinical area. One of the approved goal was the replacement of the paper medical record by an up-to-date electronical medical record. In this article the following three topics will be discussed: the difference between the up-to-date electronical medical record and the electronically archived finished cases, steps performed by our clinic to realize the up-to-date electronical medical record and the problems occured during this process.

  8. Low bone mineral density in adult patients with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Jadwiga; Bohdanowicz-Pawlak, Anna; Waszczuk, Ewa; Jakubowska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Calcium and vitamin D malabsorption in coeliac disease (CD) predispose to skeletal demineralisation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of bone mineral density (BMD) and calcium deficiencies in adult patients with CD and assess whether a gluten-free diet is sufficiently effective for BMD restoration. BMD and biochemical parameters of bone and mineral metabolism were measured in 35 adult CD patients receiving (19) or not receiving (16) a gluten-free diet (GFD) and in 36 controls. Then the CD patients were treated with a GFD and calcium (1.0 g/day) plus alfacalcidol (0.25-1 μg/day) for one year. Reduced BMD was diagnosed in 57-77% of the patients. Mean calcaemia, calciuria, and 25(OH) vitamin D were lower, but serum PTH and bone-turnover markers (ALP, osteocalcin, ICTP) were significantly higher in the CD patients than in the controls. In the patients on the diet (GFD(+)), BMD was higher than in the GFD(-) patients, but lower than in the controls. The biochemical parameters were normal in the GFD(+) patients except for diminished calciuria. Mean BMD after one year of treatment significantly increased (p < 0.05), mostly in the lumbar spine (mean: 7.3%), but decreased in five patients who did not strictly adhere to the GFD. Deficiencies in calcium, vitamin D, and BMD are very common in adult CD patients. Gluten avoidance increased BMD, although the values remained markedly lower in several patients. Because of chronic calcium deficiency despite GFD, calcium and vitamin D supplementation in most adult CD patients is proposed.

  9. Getting Patients Walking: A Pilot Study of Mobilizing Older Adult Patients via a Nurse-Driven Intervention.

    PubMed

    King, Barbara J; Steege, Linsey M; Winsor, Katie; VanDenbergh, Shelly; Brown, Cynthia J

    2016-10-01

    To develop a system-based intervention including five components that target barriers to nurse-initiated patient ambulation. Pilot study of Mobilizing Older adult patients VIa a Nurse-driven intervention (MOVIN). Twenty-six bed general medical unit. Nursing staff (registered nurses and certified nursing assistants) were recruited to participate in focus groups. Information on frequency and distance patients ambulated and nursing staff documentation of patient ambulation were retrieved from the electronic medical record. Regression discontinuity analysis was used to determine a difference between the preintervention and intervention periods in ambulation occurrence, ambulation distance, and percentage of numeric documentation of ambulation. Thematic analysis was used to analyze focus group interviews. A statistically significant increase in number of occurrences (t = 4.18, P = .001) and total distance (t = 2.75, P = .01) and a significantly higher positive slope in percentage of numeric documentation was found during the intervention than before the intervention. Thematic analysis identified three central categories (shifting ownership, feeling supported, making ambulation visible) that describe the effect of MOVIN on nursing staff behaviors and perceptions of the intervention. Decreasing loss of independent ambulation in hospitalized older adults requires new and innovative approaches to addressing barriers that prevent nurse-initiated patient ambulation. MOVIN is a promising system-based intervention to promoting patient ambulation and improving outcomes for hospitalized older adults. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Direct comparison of two actigraphy devices with polysomnographically recorded naps in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Nicola; Buman, Matthew P; McDevitt, Elizabeth A; Ricker, Ashley A; Mednick, Sara C

    2013-06-01

    The last 20 yrs have seen a marked increase in studies utilizing actigraphy in free-living environments. The aim of the present study is to directly compare two commercially available actigraph devices with concurrent polysomnography (PSG) during a daytime nap in healthy young adults. Thirty healthy young adults, ages 18-31 (mean 20.77 yrs, SD 3.14 yrs) simultaneously wore AW-64 and GT3X+ devices during a polysomnographically recorded nap. Mann-Whitney U (M-U) test, intraclass correlation coefficients, and Bland-Altman statistic were used to compare total sleep time (TST), sleep onset latency (SOL), wake after sleep onset (WASO), and sleep efficiency (SE) between the two actigraphs and PSG. Epoch-by-epoch (EBE) agreement was calculated to determine accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, predictive values for sleep (PVS) and wake (PVW), and kappa and prevalence- and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) coefficients. All frequency settings provided by the devices were examined. For both actigraphs, EBE analysis found accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PVS, and PVW comparable to previous reports of other similar devices. Kappa and PABAK coefficients showed moderate to high agreement with PSG depending on device settings. The GT3X+ overestimated TST and SE, and underestimated SOL and WASO, whereas no significant difference was found between AW-64 and PSG. However, GT3X+ showed overall better EBE agreements to PSG than AW-64. We conclude that both actigraphs are valid and reliable devices for detecting sleep/wake diurnal patterns. The choice between devices should be based on several parameters as reliability, cost of the device, scoring algorithm, target population, experimental condition, and aims of the study (e.g., sleep and/or physical activity).

  11. Similarities and differences between pediatric and adult patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Tarr, T; Dérfalvi, B; Győri, N; Szántó, A; Siminszky, Z; Malik, A; Szabó, A J; Szegedi, G; Zeher, M

    2015-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease with highest prevalence among women of childbearing age. However, children younger than 16 years also can develop SLE (childhood-onset lupus/juvenile-type SLE). The aim of our study was to compare the clinical course of adult and pediatric-onset SLE. Data from 342 adult patients followed at the University of Debrecen, Hungary, and 79 children documented in the Hungarian National Pediatric SLE registry were analyzed using hospital medical records. Organ manifestations, laboratory parameters, and immunoserological characteristics were reviewed and the results were evaluated using SPSS for Windows software.Gender distribution was not significantly different between groups with disease starting in childhood vs adulthood. The prevalence of the following manifestations was significantly higher for pediatric than for adult-onset disease including: lupus nephritis (43% pediatric vs 26.4% for adult-onset), hematological disorders (57% vs 36.4%), photosensitivity (20% vs 9%), butterfly rash (61% vs 35.5%) and mucosal ulceration (11.4% vs 4%). For adult-onset SLE, neurological symptoms (30% vs 6%) and polyarthritis (86% vs 68%) occurred significantly more frequently than in children. Anti-SSA, anti-SSB and antiphospholipid antibodies were detected at significantly higher levels in adult-onset patients compared to those in pediatrics. Children were more commonly given high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin treatment (6.3% vs 0.6%) and mycophenolate mofetil (15.2% vs 5.3%) than adults.These results suggest that pediatric and adult-onset SLE differ in multiple aspects, and it is important to recognize these differences for optimal treatment and prognosis of these patients.

  12. Accuracy of dialysis medical records in determining patients' interest in and suitability for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Huml, Anne M; Sullivan, Catherine M; Pencak, Julie A; Sehgal, Ashwini R

    2013-01-01

    We sought to determine the accuracy of dialysis medical records in identifying patients' interest in and suitability for transplantation. Cluster randomized controlled trial. A total of 167 patients recruited from 23 hemodialysis facilities. Navigators met with intervention patients to provide transplant information and assistance. Control patients continued to receive usual care. Agreement at study initiation between medical records and (i) patient self-reported interest in transplantation and (ii) study assessments of medical suitability for transplant referral. Medical record assessments, self-reports, and study assessments of patient's interest in and suitability for transplantation. There was disagreement between medical records and patient self-reported interest in transplantation for 66 (40%) of the 167 study patients. In most of these cases, patients reported being more interested in transplantation than their medical records indicated. The study team determined that all 92 intervention patients were medically suitable for transplant referral. However, for 38 (41%) intervention patients, medical records indicated that they were not suitable. About two-thirds of these patients successfully moved forward in the transplant process. Dialysis medical records are frequently inaccurate in determining patient's interest in and suitability for transplantation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Accuracy of Dialysis Medical Records in Determining Patient Interest in and Suitability for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Huml, Anne M.; Sullivan, Catherine M.; Pencak, Julie A.; Sehgal, Ashwini R.

    2013-01-01

    Background We sought to determine the accuracy of dialysis medical records in identifying patient interest in and suitability for transplantation. Study Design Cluster randomized controlled trial Setting and Participants 167 patients recruited from 23 hemodialysis facilities. Intervention Navigators met with intervention patients to provide transplant information and assistance. Control patients continued to receive usual care. Outcomes Agreement at study initiation between medical records and (a) patient self-reported interest in transplantation and (b) study assessments of medical suitability for transplant referral. Measurements Medical record assessments, self-reports, and study assessments of patient interest in and suitability for transplantation. Results There was disagreement between medical records and patient self-reported interest in transplantation for 66 (40%) of the 167 study patients. In most of these cases, patients reported being more interested in transplantation than their medical records indicated. The study team determined that all 92 intervention patients were medically suitable for transplant referral. However, for 38 (41%) intervention patients, medical records indicated that they were not suitable. About two-thirds of these patients successfully moved forward in the transplant process. Conclusion Dialysis medical records are frequently inaccurate in determining patient interest in and suitability for transplantation. PMID:23803012

  14. [Cystic fibrosis in adults: study of 111 patients].

    PubMed

    de Gracia, Javier; Alvarez, Antonio; Mata, Fernando; Guarner, Luisa; Vendrell, Montserrat; Gadtner, Silvia; Cobos, Nicolás

    2002-11-09

    Our goal was to establish the clinical and genetic characteristics of patients diagnosed with adult-onset cystic fibrosis (CF). This was a retrospective observational descriptive comparative study of CF patients according to their age at the time of diagnosis. All adult patients (> 16 years old) attended in our CF Unit until November 2001 were included in the study. Those patients diagnosed of CF at their childhood (< 16 years old) were categorized as Group A patients, and those diagnosed in adulthood (>= 16 years old) were categorized as group B patients. Anthropometric parameters, respiratory and digestive clinical abnormalities, chest and abdominal radiological exams, sputum bacteriology, respiratory function and genetic tests were evaluated. Statistical analysis between groups was performed by comparing chi square test for qualitative values and the Student t test for quantitative values. One hundred and eleven patients (60 women, mean age 28, range 16-69 years) out of a total sample of 245 (45.3%) patients attended at the CF unit were enrolled in the study. Group A included 61 patients (32 women; mean age 23) and group B included 50 patients (28 women; mean age 32). The comparative study between both groups showed that patients in group B were older, had a higher weight and less incidence of initial digestive abnormalities, pancreatic insufficiency, malnutrition, hepatic disease, chronic bronchial colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, admissions, lung transplantation and deaths due to CF. On the contrary, these patients had a higher incidence of pancreatitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis at diagnosis and better respiratory function test parameters. The sweat test was negative in 4 patients of group B and 1 of group A. The genetic study showed 31 different CF mutations, from which only 10 were observed in group B. CF can also be diagnosed in adult age. Patients diagnosed in adulthood have less digestive abnormalities, better lung function and

  15. Assessment of motivation and psychological characteristics of adult orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Pabari, Sona; Moles, David R; Cunningham, Susan J

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, the demand for adult orthodontic treatment has grown rapidly; yet there is a paucity of information on this subgroup of patients. It is well known that understanding the psychological characteristics and motives of any patient is fundamental and that these factors might affect patient satisfaction and adherence with treatment. There is therefore a need for clinicians to improve their understanding of this subgroup to enhance the patient's experience of treatment delivery and to increase the potential for a successful treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to develop a measure for the assessment of motivating factors and psychological characteristics of adults seeking orthodontic treatment. This study involved the qualitative development of a valid patient-centered questionnaire to assess motivating factors for adults seeking orthodontic treatment. This was achieved through semi-structured in-depth interviews; key themes were identified and used to construct a questionnaire assessing motivation for treatment. This was then combined with 3 previously validated questionnaires to measure self-esteem, anxiety or depression, and body image and facial body image. The questionnaire was distributed to 172 adult orthodontic patients at different stages of treatment in a large teaching hospital in the United Kingdom. In addition, the self-esteem, body image, and facial body image scores were compared with data on orthognathic patients from the same hospital and with data from members of the general public. Desire to straighten the teeth and improve the smile were the key motivating factors for the adult group studied. Other motives included to improve the bite, improve facial appearance, and close (dental) spacing. With respect to the psychological characteristics of self-esteem, body image, and facial body image, the adult orthodontic group was comparable with the general public. However, differences were noted when comparing data from the adult

  16. Acne in the adult female patient: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Kamangar, Faranak; Shinkai, Kanade

    2012-10-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common reason why adult women present to dermatologists and can be a clinical challenge to treat. It may also be an important sign of an underlying endocrine disease such as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Although standard acne therapies can be successfully used to treat acne in adult female patients, hormonal treatment is a safe and effective therapeutic option that may provide an opportunity to better target acne in this population, even when other systemic therapies have failed. In this article, a practical approach to the adult female patient with acne will be reviewed to enhance the dermatologist's ability to use hormonal acne therapies and to better identify and evaluate patients with acne in the setting of a possible endocrine disorder.

  17. Crisis homes for adult psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Freiesleben, Michael; Foldager, Leslie

    2008-05-01

    Inspired by the Crisis Home programme in Madison, we have adapted and evaluated the programme at the Community Mental Health (CMH) Centre in Tønder, Denmark. Procedures and schedules from the Crisis Home programme were applied in this open trial. Questionnaire data concerning satisfaction with the stay and registration data concerning the admissions and bed days two years before and two years after the first stay were obtained. During four years, 52 different patients had a total of 187 stays in a crisis home. Twenty (38.5%) of the patients were attached to the ACT team. The average duration of the stays was 4.0 days. The number of readmissions and bed days after the first stay showed a significant downward tendency for the subgroup of patients with a more severe mental disorder, but not for the whole group. The patients, the crisis homes families and the referrers were very satisfied with the programme and the treatment. Crisis home stays represent a quality improvement in the treatment package, especially for patients with a more severe mental disorder. Further documentation will require a controlled study.

  18. Differential diagnosis and treatment planning for the adult nonsurgical orthodontic patient.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R G; Sinclair, P M; Goates, L J

    1986-02-01

    Increasing numbers of adult patients are seeking orthodontic care and some, despite significant skeletal malocclusions, elect not to have combined orthodontic-surgical treatment. The purpose of this article is to outline some of the diagnostic and therapeutic principles that can be used in the adult nonsurgical orthodontic patient. The importance of realistic goal setting in the face of compromised occlusions is emphasized. Diagnosis should include evaluation of all three dimensions and recognize the limitations of therapy in each dimension for the nongrowing patient. Periodontal considerations, extraction decisions, and retention regimens are of vital importance to the achievement and maintenance of an optimum result. Clinical records will demonstrate four commonly seen problems and their resolution.

  19. Lifetime Increased Risk of Adult Onset Atopic Dermatitis in Adolescent and Adult Patients with Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hsu-Sheng; Tu, Hung-Pin; Hong, Chien-Hui; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis. Atopic dermatitis (AD) causes intense itching and impaired quality of life. Previous studies have shown that patients with classical early-onset AD tend to develop food allergy and that 10% of adults with food allergies have concomitant AD. However, it is not known whether late-onset food allergy leads to adult-onset AD, a recently recognized disease entity. Using an initial cohort of one-million subjects, this study retrospectively followed-up 2851 patients with food allergy (age > 12 years) for 14 years and compared them with 11,404 matched controls. While 2.8% (81) of the 2851 food allergy patients developed AD, only 2.0% (227) of the 11,404 controls developed AD. Multivariate regression analysis showed that food allergy patients were more likely to develop AD (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.49, p < 0.0001). Controls had a 1.99% risk of developing AD, while food allergy patients had a significantly higher risk (7.18% and 3.46% for patients with ≥3 and <3 food allergy claims, respectively) of developing adult-onset AD. This is the first study to describe the chronological and dose-dependent associations between food allergy in adolescence and the development of adult-onset AD. PMID:28035995

  20. Participation of family members and quality of patient care - the perspective of adult surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Gröndahl, Weronica; Katajisto, Jouko; Nurminen, Matti; Suhonen, Riitta

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the participation of family members in the care of Finnish adult surgical patients and the connection of the participation with the quality of patient care as perceived by surgical patients. The family members of adult surgical patients are important. Earlier studies vary concerning the nature of participation, its meaning and the connection of participation with patient-centred quality of care. In this study, we aim to produce new knowledge about adult surgical patients whose family members have participated in their care. This was a cross-sectional descriptive survey study. The data were collected among adult surgical patients (N = 481) before being discharged home from hospital with two instruments: the Good Nursing Care scale and the Received Knowledge of Hospital Patients. Based on the results, most adult surgical patients report that family members participate in their care. Participation was connected with received knowledge and preconditions of care, which are components of the quality of patient care. In future, testing of different solutions for improving the participation of surgical patients' family members in patient care should be implemented. Furthermore, the preconditions of family members' participation in care and the concept of participation should be analysed to emphasise the active role of family members. The results emphasised the importance of family members for the patients in surgical care. Family members' participation is connected with the quality of patient care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Dreaming during anaesthesia in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Kate; Skrzypek, Hannah

    2007-09-01

    Dreaming during anaesthesia is defined as any recalled experience (excluding awareness) that occurred between induction of anaesthesia and the first moment of consciousness upon emergence. Dreaming is a commonly-reported side-effect of anaesthesia. The incidence is higher in patients who are interviewed immediately after anaesthesia (approximately 22%) than in those who are interviewed later (approximately 6%). A minority of dreams, which include sensory perceptions obtained during anaesthesia, provide evidence of near-miss awareness. These patients may have risk factors for awareness and this type of dreaming may be prevented by depth of anaesthesia monitoring. Most dreaming however, occurs in younger, fitter patients, who have high home dream recall, who receive propofol-based anaesthesia and who emerge rapidly from anaesthesia. Their dreams are usually short and pleasant, are related to work, family and recreation, are not related to inadequate anaesthesia and probably occur during recovery. Dreaming is a common, fascinating, usually pleasant and harmless phenomenon.

  2. The immunocompromised adult patient and surgery.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Keith E

    2008-09-01

    The perioperative management of immunosuppressed patients remains relatively unsophisticated. Rational management involves understanding the normal immune response to injury as modified by the preexisting or imposed abnormalities that immunosuppressed patients manifest on the basis of their disease and/or treatment. Patients with cancer, infected with human immunodeficiency virus, and having had an organ transplant are extreme examples of disordered immunity and it is important to understand the effects of their diseases and treatments. In the future, however, more appropriate management will require anticipation and appreciation of frequent preoperative immunotherapy, a more complete understanding of the immunological response to anesthesia and surgery, the ability to assess immune reserve and stratify risk within the context of that profile, and a better knowledge of the immunological effect of anesthetic agents.

  3. Using Tablet Computers to Increase Patient Engagement With Electronic Personal Health Records: Protocol For a Prospective, Randomized Interventional Study

    PubMed Central

    Magan Mendoza, Yimdriuska; Rosenthal, Jaime; Jacolbia, Ronald; Rajkomar, Alvin; Lee, Herman; Auerbach, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background Inadequate patient engagement in care is a major barrier to successful transitions from the inpatient setting and can lead to preventable adverse events after discharge, particularly for older adults. While older adults may be less familiar with mobile devices and applications, they may benefit from focused bedside training to engage them in using their Personal Health Record (PHR). Mobile technologies such as tablet computers can be used in the hospital to help bridge this gap in experience by teaching older, hospitalized patients to actively manage their medication list through their PHR during hospitalization and continue to use their PHR for other post-discharge tasks such as scheduling follow-up appointments, viewing test results, and communicating with providers. Bridging this gap is especially important for older, hospitalized adults as they are at higher risk than younger populations for low engagement in transitions of care and poor outcomes such as readmission. Greater understanding of the advantages and limitations of mobile devices for older adults may be important for improving transitions of care. Objective To better understand the effective use of mobile technologies to improve transitions in care for hospitalized, older adults and leverage these technologies to improve inpatient and postdischarge care for older adults. Methods We will compare an intervention group with tablet-based training to engage effectively with their PHR to a control group also receiving tablets and basic access to their PHR but no additional training on how to engage with their PHR. Results Patient enrollment is ongoing. Conclusions Through this grant, we will further develop our preliminary dataset and practical experience with these mobile technologies to catalyze patient engagement during hospitalization. ClinicalTrial ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02109601; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02109601 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6jpXjkwM8

  4. To What Extent Can Arm-Hand Skill Performance--of Both Healthy Adults and Children-Be Recorded Reliably Using Multiple Bodily Worn Sensor Devices?

    PubMed

    Lemmens, Ryanne J M; Seelen, Henk A M; Timmermans, Annick A A; Schnackers, Marlous L A P; Eerden, Annet; Smeets, Rob J E M; Janssen-Potten, Yvonne J M

    2015-07-01

    Neurological patients often encounter arm-hand problems in daily life. Bodily worn sensors may be used to assess actual performance by quantifying specific movement patterns associated with specific activities. However, signal reliability during activities of daily living should be determined first. The aim is to determine to what extent standardized arm-hand skill performance of both healthy adults and healthy children can be recorded reliably using a combination of multiple sensor devices. Thirty adults (aged > 50 years) and thirty-two children (aged between 6-18 years) performed the activities drinking, eating and combing five times in a standardized setting. Sensor devices, each containing a triaxial accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer were attached to the arms, hands and trunk of the participants. Within-subject and between-subject reliability of the signal patterns amongst skill repetitions was determined by calculating Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs). Median reliability was good to very good for all activities performed (both within and between subjects). Regarding within-subject reliability (instruction-condition), median ICCs ranged between 0.76-0.90 and 0.68-0.92 for the adults and children, respectively. For between-subject reliability (instruction-condition), median ICCs ranged 0.75-0.86 and 0.61-0.90 for the adults and children, respectively. It can be concluded that the above-mentioned sensor system can reliably record activities of daily living in a standardized setting.

  5. [ADHD: Burden of Disease According to Subtypes in Adult Patients].

    PubMed

    Retz-Junginger, Petra; Rösler, Michael; Giesen, Lisa Katharina; Philipp-Wiegmann, Florence; Römer, Konstanze; Zinnow, Toivo; Retz, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    In consideration of ADHD subtype we assessed burden of disease of adult ADHD patients and neuroticism. 511 adult ADHD patients were enrolled in the study. We measured ADHD symptoms categorically and dimensionally by the "Homburger ADHS-Skalen für Erwachsene (HASE)". All participants rated their ADHD associated level of suffering. To assess personality traits, the psychometric instrument NEO-PI-R was used. In patients with higher levels of neuroticism, there was no significant difference in the level of suffering between the ADHD subtypes. In the group of ADHD patients which scored low on the neuroticism scale, ADHD combined patients are significant more affected compared to the predominantly hyperactive-impulsive or the predominantly inattentive type. These results underline the hypothesis that the burden of disease is not only related to the level of ADHD symptoms and subtype but also moderated by neuroticism. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. A survey of user acceptance of electronic patient anesthesia records

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyun Seung; Lee, Suk Young; Jeong, Hui Yeon; Choi, Soo Joo; Lee, Hye Won

    2012-01-01

    Background An anesthesia information management system (AIMS), although not widely used in Korea, will eventually replace handwritten records. This hospital began using AIMS in April 2010. The purpose of this study was to evaluate users' attitudes concerning AIMS and to compare them with manual documentation in the operating room (OR). Methods A structured questionnaire focused on satisfaction with electronic anesthetic records and comparison with handwritten anesthesia records was administered to anesthesiologists, trainees, and nurses during February 2011 and the responses were collected anonymously during March 2011. Results A total of 28 anesthesiologists, 27 trainees, and 47 nurses responded to this survey. Most participants involved in this survey were satisfied with AIMS (96.3%, 82.2%, and 89.3% of trainees, anesthesiologists, and nurses, respectively) and preferred AIMS over handwritten anesthesia records in 96.3%, 71.4%, and 97.9% of trainees, anesthesiologists, and nurses, respectively. However, there were also criticisms of AIMS related to user-discomfort during short, simple or emergency surgeries, doubtful legal status, and inconvenient placement of the system. Conclusions Overall, most of the anesthetic practitioners in this hospital quickly accepted and prefer AIMS over the handwritten anesthetic records in the OR. PMID:22558502

  7. Adipsic diabetes insipidus in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Martín; Hannon, Mark J; Thompson, Christopher J

    2017-06-01

    Adipsic diabetes insipidus (ADI) is a very rare disorder, characterized by hypotonic polyuria due to arginine vasopressin (AVP) deficiency and failure to generate the sensation of thirst in response to hypernatraemia. As the sensation of thirst is the key homeostatic mechanism that prevents hypernatraemic dehydration in patients with untreated diabetes insipidus (DI), adipsia leads to failure to respond to aquaresis with appropriate fluid intake. This predisposes to the development of significant hypernatraemia, which is the typical biochemical manifestation of adipsic DI. A literature search was performed to review the background, etiology, management and associated complications of this rare condition. ADI has been reported to occur in association with clipping of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm following subarachnoid haemorrhage, major hypothalamic surgery, traumatic brain injury and toluene exposure among other conditions. Management is very difficult and patients are prone to marked changes in plasma sodium concentration, in particular to the development of severe hypernatraemia. Associated hypothalamic disorders, such as severe obesity, sleep apnoea and thermoregulatory disorders are often observed in patients with ADI. The management of ADI is challenging and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Prognosis is variable; hypothalamic complications lead to early death in some patients, but recent reports highlight the possibility of recovery of thirst.

  8. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  9. Intravenous lipids in adult surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Klek, Stanislaw; Waitzberg, Dan L

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is considered an essential element of the perioperative management of surgical patients. It is recommended in patients who require nutritional therapy but in whom the enteral route is contraindicated, not recommended or non-feasible. The new generation of lipid emulsions (LEs) based on olive and fish oils are safe and may improve clinical outcome in surgical patients. The increased provision of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oil-containing LEs seems to be associated with fewer infectious complications and shorter ICU and hospital stays following major abdominal surgery. Increased provision of olive oil in the absence of fish oil may also exert beneficial effects, but a clear conclusion on this is limited due to the low number of available studies. Hence, at the moment, the evidence supports the use of n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acid-enriched LEs as a part of the parenteral nutrition regimen for selected groups of patients, such as those with major surgical trauma or those undergoing extended resections or liver transplantation.

  10. An Evaluation of the Implementation of Hand Held Health Records with Adults with Learning Disabilities: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Vicky; Burchell, Sarah; Burrha, Sukhjinder; Corney, Roslyn; Elliott, Sandra; Kerry, Sally; Molloy, Catherine; Painter, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    Background: Personal health records were implemented with adults with learning disabilities (AWLD) to try to improve their health-care. Materials and Method: Forty GP practices were randomized to the Personal Health Profile (PHP) implementation or control group. Two hundred and one AWLD were interviewed at baseline and 163 followed up after 12…

  11. An Evaluation of the Implementation of Hand Held Health Records with Adults with Learning Disabilities: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Vicky; Burchell, Sarah; Burrha, Sukhjinder; Corney, Roslyn; Elliott, Sandra; Kerry, Sally; Molloy, Catherine; Painter, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    Background: Personal health records were implemented with adults with learning disabilities (AWLD) to try to improve their health-care. Materials and Method: Forty GP practices were randomized to the Personal Health Profile (PHP) implementation or control group. Two hundred and one AWLD were interviewed at baseline and 163 followed up after 12…

  12. Installing and Implementing a Computer-based Patient Record System in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Mosoriot Medical Record System

    PubMed Central

    Rotich, Joseph K.; Hannan, Terry J.; Smith, Faye E.; Bii, John; Odero, Wilson W.; Vu, Nguyen; Mamlin, Burke W.; Mamlin, Joseph J.; Einterz, Robert M.; Tierney, William M.

    2003-01-01

    The authors implemented an electronic medical record system in a rural Kenyan health center. Visit data are recorded on a paper encounter form, eliminating duplicate documentation in multiple clinic logbooks. Data are entered into an MS-Access database supported by redundant power systems. The system was initiated in February 2001, and 10,000 visit records were entered for 6,190 patients in six months. The authors present a summary of the clinics visited, diagnoses made, drugs prescribed, and tests performed. After system implementation, patient visits were 22% shorter. They spent 58% less time with providers (p < 0.001) and 38% less time waiting (p = 0.06). Clinic personnel spent 50% less time interacting with patients, two thirds less time interacting with each other, and more time in personal activities. This simple electronic medical record system has bridged the “digital divide.” Financial and technical sustainability by Kenyans will be key to its future use and development. PMID:12668697

  13. Changes to criminal records checks used to safeguard vulnerable patients.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2012-07-01

    The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 is introducing changes to the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) checks carried out on those people who work with vulnerable groups. The new law is the coalition Government's response to the criticism of the Safeguarding Vulnerable Group Act 2006. It will merge the CRB and Independent Safeguarding Authority into a new Disclosure and Barring Service and will enhance the rights of applicants to challenge the CRB's right to disclose non-conviction information as part of an enhanced criminal records check. In the first of two articles on the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012, Richard Griffith and Cassam Tengnah discuss the current framework for disclosing criminal records and the impact of the changes on district nurses applying for new posts.

  14. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome lowers seizure threshold in adult patients without epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wither, Robert G; Borlot, Felippe; MacDonald, Alex; Butcher, Nancy J; Chow, Eva W C; Bassett, Anne S; Andrade, Danielle M

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies examining seizures in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have focused primarily on children and adolescents. In this study we investigated the prevalence and characteristics of seizures and epilepsy in an adult 22q11.2DS population. The medical records of 202 adult patients with 22q11.2DS were retrospectively reviewed for documentation of seizures, electroencephalography (EEG) reports, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Epilepsy status was assigned in accordance with 2010 International League Against Epilepsy Classification. Of 202 patients, 32 (15.8%) had a documented history of seizure. Of these 32, 23 (71.8%) had acute symptomatic seizures, usually associated with hypocalcemia and/or antipsychotic or antidepressant use. Nine patients (9/32, 28%; 9/202, 4%) met diagnostic criteria for epilepsy. Two patients had genetic generalized epilepsy; two patients had focal seizures of unknown etiology; two had epilepsy due to malformations of cortical development; in two the epilepsy was due to acquired structural changes; and in one patient the epilepsy could not be further classified. Similarly to children, the prevalence of epilepsy and acute symptomatic seizures in adults with 22q11.2DS is higher than in the general population. Hypocalcemia continues to be a risk factor for adults, but differently from kids, the main cause of seizures in adults with 22q11.2DS is exposure to antipsychotics and antidepressants. Further prospective studies are warranted to investigate how 22q11.2 microdeletion leads to an overall decreased seizure threshold. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. On the usage of health records for the design of virtual patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The process of creating and designing Virtual Patients for teaching students of medicine is an expensive and time-consuming task. In order to explore potential methods of mitigating these costs, our group began exploring the possibility of creating Virtual Patients based on electronic health records. This review assesses the usage of electronic health records in the creation of interactive Virtual Patients for teaching clinical decision-making. Methods The PubMed database was accessed programmatically to find papers relating to Virtual Patients. The returned citations were classified and the relevant full text articles were reviewed to find Virtual Patient systems that used electronic health records to create learning modalities. Results A total of n = 362 citations were found on PubMed and subsequently classified, of which n = 28 full-text articles were reviewed. Few articles used unformatted electronic health records other than patient CT or MRI scans. The use of patient data, extracted from electronic health records or otherwise, is widespread. The use of unformatted electronic health records in their raw form is less frequent. Patient data use is broad and spans several areas, such as teaching, training, 3D visualisation, and assessment. Conclusions Virtual Patients that are based on real patient data are widespread, yet the use of unformatted electronic health records, abundant in hospital information systems, is reported less often. The majority of teaching systems use reformatted patient data gathered from electronic health records, and do not use these electronic health records directly. Furthermore, many systems were found that used patient data in the form of CT or MRI scans. Much potential research exists regarding the use of unformatted electronic health records for the creation of Virtual Patients. PMID:24011027

  16. Maternity patients' access to their electronic medical records: use and perspectives of a patient portal.

    PubMed

    Megan Forster, Megan; Dennison, Kerrie; Callen, Joanne; Andrew, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2015-01-01

    Patients have been able to access clinical information from their paper-based health records for a number of years. With the advent of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) access to this information can now be achieved online using a secure electronic patient portal. The purpose of this study was to investigate maternity patients' use and perceptions of a patient portal developed at the Mater Mothers' Hospital in Brisbane, Australia. A web-based patient portal, one of the first developed and deployed in Australia, was introduced on 26 June 2012. The portal was designed for maternity patients booked at Mater Mothers' Hospital, as an alternative to the paper-based Pregnancy Health Record. Through the portal, maternity patients are able to complete their hospital registration form online and obtain current health information about their pregnancy (via their EMR), as well as access a variety of support tools to use during their pregnancy such as tailored public health advice. A retrospective cross-sectional study design was employed. Usage statistics were extracted from the system for a one year period (1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013). Patients' perceptions of the portal were obtained using an online survey, accessible by maternity patients for two weeks in February 2013 (n=80). Descriptive statistics were employed to analyse the data. Between July 2012 and June 2013, 10,892 maternity patients were offered a patient portal account and access to their EMR. Of those 6,518 created one (60%; 6,518/10,892) and 3,104 went on to request access to their EMR (48%; 3,104/6,518). Of these, 1,751 had their access application granted by 30 June 2013. The majority of maternity patients submitted registration forms online via the patient portal (56.7%). Patients could view their EMR multiple times: there were 671 views of the EMR, 2,781 views of appointment schedules and 135 birth preferences submitted via the EMR. Eighty survey responses were received from EMR account holders, (response

  17. Patients Reading Their Medical Records: Differences in Experiences and Attitudes between Regular and Inexperienced Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto; Daniels, Mats; Cajander, Åsa; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We report results of a study of how ordering and reading of printouts of medical records by regular and inexperienced readers relate to how the records are used, to the health information practices of patients, and to their expectations of the usefulness of new e-Health services and online access to medical records. Method: The study…

  18. A Patient Record-Filing System for Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Cheryl

    1988-01-01

    The efficient storage and easy retrieval of quality records are a central concern of good family practice. Many physicians starting out in practice have difficulty choosing a practical and lasting system for storing their records. Some who have established practices are installing computers in their offices and finding that their filing systems are worn, outdated, and incompatible with computerized systems. This article describes a new filing system installed simultaneously with a new computer system in a family-practice teaching centre. The approach adopted solved all identifiable problems and is applicable in family practices of all sizes.

  19. Intellectual functioning of adolescent and adult patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Christina M T; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Snellen, Wim M; Sternheim, Lot C; Hoek, Hans W; Danner, Unna N

    2017-05-01

    Intelligence is a known vulnerability marker in various psychiatric disorders. In eating disorders (ED) intelligence has not been studied thoroughly. Small-scale studies indicate that intelligence levels might be above general population norms, but larger scale studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine intellectual functioning in ED patients and associations with severity of the disorder. Wechsler's Full scale IQ (FSIQ), Verbal IQ (VIQ) and Performance IQ (PIQ) of 703 adolescent and adult ED patients were compared with population norms. Exploratory analyzes were performed on associations between IQ and both somatic severity (BMI and duration of the disorder) and psychological/behavioral severity (Eating Disorder Inventory [EDI-II] ratings) of the ED. Mean IQ's were significantly higher than population means and effect-sizes were small-to-medium (d = .28, .16 and .23 for VIQ, PIQ, and FSIQ). No linear associations between IQ and BMI were found, but the most severely underweight adult anorexia nervosa (AN) patients (BMI ≤ 15) had higher VIQ (107.7) than the other adult AN patients (VIQ 102.1). In adult AN patients PIQ was associated with psychological/behavioral severity of the ED. Our findings suggest that, in contrast with other severe mental disorders where low intelligence is a risk factor, higher than average intelligence might increase the vulnerability to develop an ED. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:481-489). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Jantina C; Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H; Bel, Elisabeth H D; Ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-04-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×10(9) L(-1)) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×10(9) L(-1)) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7-8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1-8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3-4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice.

  1. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B.; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H.; Bel, Elisabeth H.D.; ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×109 L−1) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×109 L−1) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7–8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1–8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice. PMID:27730197

  2. Linking social media and medical record data: a study of adults presenting to an academic, urban emergency department.

    PubMed

    Padrez, Kevin A; Ungar, Lyle; Schwartz, Hansen Andrew; Smith, Robert J; Hill, Shawndra; Antanavicius, Tadas; Brown, Dana M; Crutchley, Patrick; Asch, David A; Merchant, Raina M

    2016-06-01

    Social media may offer insight into the relationship between an individual's health and their everyday life, as well as attitudes towards health and the perceived quality of healthcare services. To determine the acceptability to patients and potential utility to researchers of a database linking patients' social media content with their electronic medical record (EMR) data. Adult Facebook/Twitter users who presented to an emergency department were queried about their willingness to share their social media data and EMR data with health researchers for the purpose of building a databank for research purposes. Shared posts were searched for select terms about health and healthcare. Of the 5256 patients approached, 2717 (52%) were Facebook and/or Twitter users. 1432 (53%) of those patients agreed to participate in the study. Of these participants, 1008 (71%) consented to share their social media data for the purposes of comparing it with their EMR. Social media data consisted of 1 395 720 posts/tweets to Facebook and Twitter. Participants sharing social media data were slightly younger (29.1±9.8 vs 31.9±10.4 years old; p<0.001), more likely to post at least once a day (42% vs 29%; p=0.003) and more likely to present to the emergency room via self-arrival mode and have private insurance. Of Facebook posts, 7.5% (95% CI 4.8% to 10.2%) were related to health. Individuals with a given diagnosis in their EMR were significantly more likely to use terms related to that diagnosis on Facebook than patients without that diagnosis in their EMR (p<0.0008). Many patients are willing to share and link their social media data with EMR data. Sharing patients have several demographic and clinical differences compared with non-sharers. A database that merges social media with EMR data has the potential to provide insights about individuals' health and health outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  3. Promoting consultation recording practice in oncology: identification of critical implementation factors and determination of patient benefit.

    PubMed

    Hack, Thomas F; Ruether, J Dean; Weir, Lorna M; Grenier, Debjani; Degner, Lesley F

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this implementation study were to (i) address the evidentiary, contextual, and facilitative mechanisms that serve to retard or promote the transfer and uptake of consultation recording use in oncology practice and (ii) follow patients during the first few days following receipt of the consultation recording to document, from the patient's perspective, the benefits realized from listening to the recording. Nine medical and nine radiation oncologists from cancer centers in three Canadian cities (Calgary, Vancouver, and Winnipeg) recorded their primary consultations for 228 patients newly diagnosed with breast (n = 174) or prostate cancer (n = 54). The Digital Recording Use Semi-Structured Interview was conducted at 2 days and 1 week postconsultation. Each oncologist was provided a feedback letter summarizing the consultation recording benefits reported by their patients. Sixty-nine percent of patients listened to at least a portion of the recording within the first week following the consultation. Consultation recording favorableness ratings were high: 93.6% rated the intervention between 75 and 100 on a 100-point scale. Four main areas of benefit were reported: (i) anxiety reduction; (ii) enhanced retention of information; (iii) better informed decision making; and (iv) improved communication with family members. Eight fundamental components of successful implementation of consultation recording practice were identified. Further randomized trials are recommended, using standardized measures of the patient-reported benefit outcomes reported herein, to strengthen the evidence base for consultation recording use in oncology practice. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Development of the electronic patient record system based on problem oriented system.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yumiko; Iwaanakuchi, Takashi; Muranaga, Fuminori; Kumamoto, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    In Japan, POS (problem oriented system) is recommended in the clinical guideline. Therefore, the records are mainly made by SOAP. We developed a system mainly with a function which enabled our staff members of all kinds of professions including doctors to enter the patients' clinical information as an identical record, regardless if they were outpatients or inpatients, and to observe the contents chronologically. This electric patient record system is called "e-kanja recording system". On this system, all staff members in the medical team can now share the same information. Moreover, the contents can be reviewed by colleagues; the quality of records has been improved as it is evaluated by the others.

  5. Deep Patient: An Unsupervised Representation to Predict the Future of Patients from the Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Riccardo; Li, Li; Kidd, Brian A; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-05-17

    Secondary use of electronic health records (EHRs) promises to advance clinical research and better inform clinical decision making. Challenges in summarizing and representing patient data prevent widespread practice of predictive modeling using EHRs. Here we present a novel unsupervised deep feature learning method to derive a general-purpose patient representation from EHR data that facilitates clinical predictive modeling. In particular, a three-layer stack of denoising autoencoders was used to capture hierarchical regularities and dependencies in the aggregated EHRs of about 700,000 patients from the Mount Sinai data warehouse. The result is a representation we name "deep patient". We evaluated this representation as broadly predictive of health states by assessing the probability of patients to develop various diseases. We performed evaluation using 76,214 test patients comprising 78 diseases from diverse clinical domains and temporal windows. Our results significantly outperformed those achieved using representations based on raw EHR data and alternative feature learning strategies. Prediction performance for severe diabetes, schizophrenia, and various cancers were among the top performing. These findings indicate that deep learning applied to EHRs can derive patient representations that offer improved clinical predictions, and could provide a machine learning framework for augmenting clinical decision systems.

  6. [Screening for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adult patients in primary care].

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Enric; Cañisá, Anna; Caballero, Antònia; Piñol-Moreso, Josep Lluís

    2013-05-01

    AIMS. To estimate the proportion of adult patients in primary care with a positive screening test for attention deficit hyper-activity disorder (ADHD) and to analyse their characteristics. PATIENTS AND METHODS. A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed in nine primary care clinics in the province of Tarragona. The sample consisted of 432 consecutive patients in primary care who visited for any reason, with ages ranging from 18 to 55 years. Screening for ADHD was carried out by means of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS). Data about functional impact (Sheehan Disability Inventory) were obtained and a review of the patient records provided data concerning psychiatric comorbidity and the consumption of psychopharmaceuticals. RESULTS. The percentage of positive results in the screening tests was 19.9% (95% CI = 16.4-23.9%). Taking into account the sensitivity and specificity of the ASRS, the 'real' prevalence was estimated to be 12.5% (95% CI = 8.2-16.8%). None of these patients were diagnosed or treated for ADHD. Positive screening tests are associated with occupational, social and familial dysfunction, and greater perceived stress. There is also a higher level of comorbidity with affective disorders and substance abuse, as well as greater use of psychopharmaceuticals. CONCLUSIONS. Screening for ADHD in adult patients in primary care gives rise to a notably high proportion of positive screening test results, which suggests that there could be a significant prevalence of patients with ADHD. These data contrast with the absence of this diagnosis in the patient records. Further research is needed to determine the usefulness of the diagnosis of ADHD and the possible role that must be played by primary care.

  7. Splenic Doppler resistive index for early detection of occult hemorrhagic shock after polytrauma in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Francesco; Brusasco, Claudia; Garlaschi, Alessandro; Santori, Gregorio; Vezzani, Antonella; Moscatelli, Paolo; Pelosi, Paolo

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether direct assessment of splenic circulation by splenic Doppler resistive index (Doppler RI) is a clinically useful noninvasive method for an early detection of occult hemorrhagic shock after polytrauma in adult patients. Splenic Doppler RI was measured in 49 hemodynamically stable adult patients admitted to the emergency department because of polytrauma. Renal Doppler RI was also determined in 20 patients. Spleen size, Injury Severity Score, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, blood lactate, standard base excess, pH, hemoglobin, and inferior vena cava diameter values were recorded at admission and at 24 h. Patients were grouped according to whether signs of hemorrhagic shock did (n = 22) or did not (n = 27) occur within the first 24 h from admission. Patients who developed hemorrhagic shock had significantly higher splenic and renal Doppler RI, higher Injury Severity Score, and lower standard base excess at admission. By multivariate logistic regression, splenic Doppler RI resulted to be a predictor of hemorrhagic shock development within the first 24 h from admission. Splenic Doppler RI may represent a clinically useful noninvasive method for early detection of occult hemorrhagic shock and persistent occult hypoperfusion after polytrauma in adult patients.

  8. Outcomes for adult scoliosis patients receiving chiropractic rehabilitation: a 24-month retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to retrospectively report the results of patients who completed an exercise-based chiropractic program and its potential to alter the natural progression of adult scoliosis at 24 months after the clinic portion of treatment was concluded. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted at 2 spine clinics in Michigan, USA. Each clinic uses the same chiropractic rehabilitation program to treat patients with adult scoliosis. Multidimensional patient outcomes included radiographic, respiratory, disability, and pain parameters. Outcomes were measured at baseline, at end of active treatment, and at long-term follow-up. Results A total of 28 patients fit the inclusion criteria for the study. The average beginning primary Cobb angle was 44° ± 6°. Patients received the same chiropractic rehabilitation program for approximately 6 months. At the end of active treatment, improvements were recorded in Cobb angle, pain scores, spirometry, and disability rating. All radiographic findings were maintained at 24-month follow-up. Conclusion This report is among the first to demonstrate sustained radiographic, self-rated, and physiologic benefits after treatment ceased. After completion of a multimodal chiropractic rehabilitation treatment, a retrospective cohort of 28 adult scoliosis patients reported improvements in pain, Cobb angle, and disability immediately following the conclusion of treatment and 24 months later. PMID:22014907

  9. Hemispherectomy in adults patients with severe unilateral epilepsy and hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuli; Zhang, Guojun; Li, Yunlin; Ding, Chengyun; Yu, Tao; Wang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Shaohui; He, Sailin

    2013-09-01

    To study postoperative seizure control of hemispherectomy in adults with epilepsy and evaluate changes of movement and speech function, intelligence quotient (IQ) and quality of life (QOL) after hemispherectomy. We retrospectively analyzed 25 adults who presented severe unilateral epilepsy and hemiplegia and underwent anatomic or functional hemispherectomy in between 2006 and 2011. Surgical outcomes, including seizure-control at last follow-up, changes of aphasia quotient, hemiplegic side motor function, IQ and QOL from pre-operative to 2 years follow-up, were investigated. Results were statistically analyzed with SPSS 18.0. Nine functional hemispherectomies and 16 anatomic hemispherectomies were performed. Ninety-two percent of patients were seizure-free and 8% displayed Engel II grade seizure control after the procedure. Impaired movement function was present in 9 (36%) adults' upper limbs and 5 (20%) patients' lower limbs. The patients with age at seizure onset <3 years showed improvement in mean motor function of the upper limbs. Impaired speech was seen in 7 patients with left hemispherectomies. There was an overall improvement in the mean aphasia quotient and significant difference was found in amount of change in aphasia quotients between patients with different ages of onset. All of the patients' postoperative scores of overall QOL, full IQ, verbal IQ and performance IQ improved compared with pretreatment scores and those improvements were not associated with patient's age at seizure onset or surgical approach. However, significant difference was found in change of verbal IQ between patients with right hemispherectomies and those with left hemispherectomies. Surgical complications included a single case of hydrocephalus, and 6 transient complications. Hemispherectomy presented good seizure control and improvement in QOL and IQ, and impairment on motor and speech function were mild. Furthermore, patients with early seizure onset could maintain movement

  10. Barriers to Retrieving Patient Information from Electronic Health Record Data: Failure Analysis from the TREC Medical Records Track

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Tracy; Cohen, Aaron M.; Bedrick, Steven; Ambert, Kyle; Hersh, William

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Secondary use of electronic health record (EHR) data relies on the ability to retrieve accurate and complete information about desired patient populations. The Text Retrieval Conference (TREC) 2011 Medical Records Track was a challenge evaluation allowing comparison of systems and algorithms to retrieve patients eligible for clinical studies from a corpus of de-identified medical records, grouped by patient visit. Participants retrieved cohorts of patients relevant to 35 different clinical topics, and visits were judged for relevance to each topic. This study identified the most common barriers to identifying specific clinic populations in the test collection. Methods: Using the runs from track participants and judged visits, we analyzed the five non-relevant visits most often retrieved and the five relevant visits most often overlooked. Categories were developed iteratively to group the reasons for incorrect retrieval for each of the 35 topics. Results: Reasons fell into nine categories for non-relevant visits and five categories for relevant visits. Non-relevant visits were most often retrieved because they contained a non-relevant reference to the topic terms. Relevant visits were most often infrequently retrieved because they used a synonym for a topic term. Conclusions: This failure analysis provides insight into areas for future improvement in EHR-based retrieval with techniques such as more widespread and complete use of standardized terminology in retrieval and data entry systems. PMID:23304287

  11. Barriers to retrieving patient information from electronic health record data: failure analysis from the TREC Medical Records Track.

    PubMed

    Edinger, Tracy; Cohen, Aaron M; Bedrick, Steven; Ambert, Kyle; Hersh, William

    2012-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health record (EHR) data relies on the ability to retrieve accurate and complete information about desired patient populations. The Text Retrieval Conference (TREC) 2011 Medical Records Track was a challenge evaluation allowing comparison of systems and algorithms to retrieve patients eligible for clinical studies from a corpus of de-identified medical records, grouped by patient visit. Participants retrieved cohorts of patients relevant to 35 different clinical topics, and visits were judged for relevance to each topic. This study identified the most common barriers to identifying specific clinic populations in the test collection. Using the runs from track participants and judged visits, we analyzed the five non-relevant visits most often retrieved and the five relevant visits most often overlooked. Categories were developed iteratively to group the reasons for incorrect retrieval for each of the 35 topics. Reasons fell into nine categories for non-relevant visits and five categories for relevant visits. Non-relevant visits were most often retrieved because they contained a non-relevant reference to the topic terms. Relevant visits were most often infrequently retrieved because they used a synonym for a topic term. This failure analysis provides insight into areas for future improvement in EHR-based retrieval with techniques such as more widespread and complete use of standardized terminology in retrieval and data entry systems.

  12. The electronic patient record in primary care—regression or progression? A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Hippisley-Cox, Julia; Pringle, Mike; Cater, Ruth; Wynn, Alison; Hammersley, Vicky; Coupland, Carol; Hapgood, Rhydian; Horsfield, Peter; Teasdale, Sheila; Johnson, Christine

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether paperless medical records contained less information than paper based medical records and whether that information was harder to retrieve. Design Cross sectional study with review of medical records and interviews with general practitioners. Setting 25 general practices in Trent region. Participants 53 British general practitioners (25 using paperless records and 28 using paper based records) who each provided records of 10 consultations. Main outcome measures Content of a sample of records and doctor recall of consultations for which paperless or paper based records had been made. Results Compared with paper based records, more paperless records were fully understandable (89.2% v 69.9%, P=0.0001) and fully legible (100% v 64.3%, P < 0.0001). Paperless records were significantly more likely to have at least one diagnosis recorded (48.2% v 33.2%, P=0.05), to record that advice had been given (23.7% vs 10.7%, P=0.017), and, when a referral had been made, were more likely to contain details of the specialty (77.4% v 59.5%, P=0.03). When a prescription had been issued, paperless records were more likely to specify the drug dose (86.6% v 66.2%, P=0.005). Paperless records contained significantly more words, abbreviations, and symbols (P < 0.01 for all). At doctor interview, there was no difference between the groups for the proportion of patients or consultations that could be recalled. Doctors using paperless records were able to recall more advice given to patients (38.6% v 26.8%, P=0.03). Conclusion We found no evidence to support our hypotheses that paperless records would be truncated and contain more local abbreviations; and that the absence of writing would decrease subsequent recall. Conversely we found that the paperless records compared favourably with manual records. PMID:12829558

  13. Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases: General concepts and presentation in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Ruiz-Ortiz, Estíbaliz; Yagüe, Jordi

    2017-09-15

    Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases (AIFD) are rare disorders characterized by an uncontrolled increase of the systemic inflammatory response, which is caused by mutations in genes involved in inflammatory pathways. Over the last few years, new genes and proteins responsible for new monogenic AIFD have been identified and a substantial improvement in their treatment has been achieved. Monogenic AIFD manifestations typically begin during childhood, but they can also occur in adults. Compared to pediatric patients, adults usually present with a less severe disease and fewer long-term complications. In addition, patients with adult-onset disease carry low-penetrance mutations more often than pathogenic variants. A late-onset of AIFD may be occasionally associated with the presence of somatic mutations. In this study, we review the most frequent monogenic AIFD, and others recently described, which may occur during adulthood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Movement disorders in adult patients with classical galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Carecchio, Miryam; Bhatia, Kailash P; Kojovic, Maja; Parees, Isabel; Chandrashekar, Hoskote S; Footitt, Emma J; Burke, Derek; Edwards, Mark J; Lachmann, Robin H L; Murphy, Elaine

    2013-06-01

    Classical galactosemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism leading to toxic accumulation of galactose and derived metabolites. It presents with acute systemic complications in the newborn. Galactose restriction resolves these symptoms, but long-term complications, such as premature ovarian failure and neurological problems including motor dysfunction, may occur despite adequate treatment. The objective of the current study was to determine the frequency and phenotype of motor problems in adult patients with classical galactosemia. In this cross-sectional study, adult patients with a biochemically confirmed diagnosis of galactosemia attending our clinic were assessed with an interview and neurological examination and their notes retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified according to the presence/absence of motor dysfunction on examination. Patients with motor dysfunction were further categorized according to the presence/absence of reported motor symptoms. Forty-seven patients were included. Thirty-one patients showed evidence of motor dysfunction including: tremor (23 patients), dystonia (23 patients), cerebellar signs (6 patients), and pyramidal signs (4 patients). Tremor and dystonia were often combined (16 patients). Thirteen patients reported motor symptoms, with 8 describing progressive worsening. Symptomatic treatment was effective in 4 of 5 patients. Nonmotor neurological features (cognitive, psychiatric, and speech disorders) and premature ovarian failure were more frequent in patients with motor dysfunction. Motor dysfunction is a common complication of classical galactosemia, with tremor and dystonia the most frequent findings. Up to one third of patients report motor symptoms and may benefit from appropriate treatment. Progressive worsening is not uncommon and may suggest ongoing brain damage in a subset of patients.

  15. Nutritional profile of adult patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, L; Delibasic, M; Peta, V; Turkulov, V; De Lorenzo, A; Medić-Stojanoska, M

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated gluten dependent enteropathy induced by ingestion of gluten, characterized by intestinal malabsorption and subtotals or total atrophy of intestinal villi. The predominant consequence of CD in untreated patients, is malnutrition as a result of malabsorption. Moreover, several and increasing extra-intestinal clinical manifestations have been described in the CD patients. Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves nutritional status, inducing an increase in fat and bone compartments, but does not completely normalize body composition and nutritional deficiencies. An early and accurate evaluation of nutritional status can be of the pivotal step in the clinical management of the adult CD patients. The aim of this review is to present the most important and recent data on nutritional and metabolic features in the CD adult patients, the related implications and the effects of the GFD on these conditions.

  16. High-flow nasal cannula therapy for adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Lin, Ling; Pan, Konghan; Zhou, Jiancang

    2016-01-01

    High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy has several physiological advantages over traditional oxygen therapy devices, including decreased nasopharyngeal resistance, washing out of the nasopharyngeal dead space, generation of positive pressure in the pharynx, increasing alveolar recruitment in the lungs, humidification of the airways, increased fraction of inspired oxygen and improved mucociliary clearance. Recently, the use of HFNC in treating adult critical illness patients has significantly increased, and it is now being used in many patients with a range of different disease conditions. However, there are no established guidelines to direct the safe and effective use of HFNC for these patients. This review article summarizes the available published literature on the positive physiological effects, mechanisms of action, and the clinical applications of HFNC, compared with traditional oxygen therapy devices. The available literature suggests that HFNC oxygen therapy is an effective modality for the early treatment of critically adult patients. PMID:27698207

  17. Incorporating Personal Health Records into the Disease Management of Rural Heart Failure Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Karen Parsley

    2012-01-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs) allow patients to access and in some cases manage their own health records. Their potential benefits include access to health information, enhanced asynchronous communication between patients and clinicians, and convenience of online appointment scheduling and prescription refills. Potential barriers to PHR use…

  18. Incorporating Personal Health Records into the Disease Management of Rural Heart Failure Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Karen Parsley

    2012-01-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs) allow patients to access and in some cases manage their own health records. Their potential benefits include access to health information, enhanced asynchronous communication between patients and clinicians, and convenience of online appointment scheduling and prescription refills. Potential barriers to PHR use…

  19. Fledgling CPRI (Computer-Based Patient Record Institute) faces difficult challenges as legislative clock ticks.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, M L

    1992-09-01

    A diverse group of users, vendors, employers, insurers and government officials met in Washington in July for the Computer-Based Patient Record Institute's First Annual Meeting. Deemed "the focal point" of legislation demanding automated patient records, their task was to overcome a myriad of differences and form a true coalition that can meet an ambitious, and some say unrealistic, deadline.

  20. Clinical Profiles and Short-Term Outcomes of Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis in Adult Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hong-Qi; Zhao, Wen-Cong; Yang, Wei-Min; Li, Yong-Li; Sun, Zhi-Kun; Chen, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder that predominantly affects children. Previous studies have mostly involved children in Western developed countries. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed the clinical profiles of ADEM in adult Chinese patients. Results ADEM occurred during summer and autumn in about two-thirds of the 42 included patients. Prior infection was found in five patients and no preimmunization was recorded. The most frequent clinical presentations were alterations in consciousness (79%) and behavior changes (69%), followed by motor deficits (64%) and fever (50%). About one-quarter (26%) of the patients showed positive results for oligoclonal bands, and about half of them exhibited increases in the IgG index and 24-hour IgG synthesis rate. Magnetic resonance imaging showed white- and gray-matter lesions in 83% and 23% of the patients, respectively. Steroids were the main treatment, and full recovery occurred in 62% of the patients, with residual focal neurological deficits recorded in a few patients. After a mean follow-up period of 3.4 years, two patients exhibited recurrence and one patient exhibited a multiphasic course. One patient was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). Conclusions With the exception of the seasonal distribution pattern and prior vaccine rate, the clinical profiles of ADEM in adult Chinese patients are similar to those in pediatric populations. No specific markers are available for distinguishing ADEM from MS at the initial presentation. Careful clinical evaluations, cerebrospinal fluid measurements, and neuroradiological examinations with long-term follow-up will aid the correct diagnosis of ADEM. PMID:27449911

  1. Patient-specific FDG dosimetry for adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, Erin

    Fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical in Positron Emission Tomography, with applications in neurology, cardiology, and oncology. Despite its routine use worldwide, the radiation absorbed dose estimates from FDG have been based primarily on data obtained from two dogs studied in 1977 and 11 adults (most likely males) studied in 1982. In addition, the dose estimates calculated for FDG have been centered on the adult male, with little or no mention of variations in the dose estimates due to sex, age, height, weight, nationality, diet, or pathological condition. Through an extensive investigation into the Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema for calculating absorbed doses, I have developed a simple patient-specific equation; this equation incorporates the parameters necessary for alterations to the mathematical values of the human model to produce an estimate more representative of the individual under consideration. I have used this method to determine the range of absorbed doses to FDG from the collection of a large quantity of biological data obtained in adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants. Therefore, a more accurate quantification of the dose to humans from FDG has been completed. My results show that per unit administered activity, the absorbed dose from FDG is higher for infants compared to adults, and the dose for adult women is higher than for adult men. Given an injected activity of approximately 3.7 MBq kg-1, the doses for adult men, adult women, and full-term newborns would be on the order of 5.5, 7.1, and 2.8 mSv, respectively. These absorbed doses are comparable to the doses received from other nuclear medicine procedures.

  2. The influence of the type and design of the anesthesia record on ASA physical status scores in surgical patients: paper records vs. electronic anesthesia records.

    PubMed

    Marian, Anil A; Bayman, Emine O; Gillett, Anita; Hadder, Brent; Todd, Michael M

    2016-03-02

    The American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status classification (ASA PS) of surgical patients is a standard element of the preoperative assessment. In early 2013, the Department of Anesthesia was notified that the distribution of ASA PS scores for sampled patients at the University of Iowa had recently begun to deviate from national comparison data. This change appeared to coincide with the transition from paper records to a new electronic Anesthesia Information Management System (AIMS). We hypothesized that the design of the AIMS was unintentionally influencing how providers assigned ASA PS values. Primary analyses were based on 12-month blocks of data from paper records and AIMS. For the purpose of analysis, ASA PS was dichotomized to ASA PS 1 and 2 vs. ASA PS >2. To ensure that changes in ASA PS were not due to "real" changes in our patient mix, we examined other relevant covariates (e.g. age, weight, case distribution across surgical services, emergency vs. elective surgeries etc.). There was a 6.1 % (95 % CI: 5.1-7.1 %) absolute increase in the fraction of ASA PS 1&2 classifications after the transition from paper (54.9 %) to AIMS (61.0 %); p < 0.001. The AIMS was then modified to make ASA PS entry clearer (e.g. clearly highlighting ASA PS on the main anesthesia record). Following the modifications, the AS PS 1&2 fraction decreased by 7.7 % (95 % CI: 6.78-8.76 %) compared to the initial AIMS records (from 61.0 to 53.3 %); p < 0.001. There were no significant or meaningful differences in basic patient characteristics and case distribution during this time. The transition from paper to electronic AIMS resulted in an unintended but significant shift in recorded ASA PS scores. Subsequent design changes within the AIMS resulted in resetting of the ASA PS distributions to previous values. These observations highlight the importance of how user interface and cognitive demands introduced by a computational system can impact the recording of

  3. Deep Patient: An Unsupervised Representation to Predict the Future of Patients from the Electronic Health Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotto, Riccardo; Li, Li; Kidd, Brian A.; Dudley, Joel T.

    2016-05-01

    Secondary use of electronic health records (EHRs) promises to advance clinical research and better inform clinical decision making. Challenges in summarizing and representing patient data prevent widespread practice of predictive modeling using EHRs. Here we present a novel unsupervised deep feature learning method to derive a general-purpose patient representation from EHR data that facilitates clinical predictive modeling. In particular, a three-layer stack of denoising autoencoders was used to capture hierarchical regularities and dependencies in the aggregated EHRs of about 700,000 patients from the Mount Sinai data warehouse. The result is a representation we name “deep patient”. We evaluated this representation as broadly predictive of health states by assessing the probability of patients to develop various diseases. We performed evaluation using 76,214 test patients comprising 78 diseases from diverse clinical domains and temporal windows. Our results significantly outperformed those achieved using representations based on raw EHR data and alternative feature learning strategies. Prediction performance for severe diabetes, schizophrenia, and various cancers were among the top performing. These findings indicate that deep learning applied to EHRs can derive patient representations that offer improved clinical predictions, and could provide a machine learning framework for augmenting clinical decision systems.

  4. Deep Patient: An Unsupervised Representation to Predict the Future of Patients from the Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Miotto, Riccardo; Li, Li; Kidd, Brian A.; Dudley, Joel T.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health records (EHRs) promises to advance clinical research and better inform clinical decision making. Challenges in summarizing and representing patient data prevent widespread practice of predictive modeling using EHRs. Here we present a novel unsupervised deep feature learning method to derive a general-purpose patient representation from EHR data that facilitates clinical predictive modeling. In particular, a three-layer stack of denoising autoencoders was used to capture hierarchical regularities and dependencies in the aggregated EHRs of about 700,000 patients from the Mount Sinai data warehouse. The result is a representation we name “deep patient”. We evaluated this representation as broadly predictive of health states by assessing the probability of patients to develop various diseases. We performed evaluation using 76,214 test patients comprising 78 diseases from diverse clinical domains and temporal windows. Our results significantly outperformed those achieved using representations based on raw EHR data and alternative feature learning strategies. Prediction performance for severe diabetes, schizophrenia, and various cancers were among the top performing. These findings indicate that deep learning applied to EHRs can derive patient representations that offer improved clinical predictions, and could provide a machine learning framework for augmenting clinical decision systems. PMID:27185194

  5. Why do people want a paper copy of their electronic patient record?

    PubMed

    Wibe, Torunn; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Hellesø, Ragnhild; Slaughter, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Changes have recently been passed in the Norwegian legislation, allowing for more exchange of patient information between health personnel. These legal changes came as a result of a long and still ongoing debate concerning the potential conflict between confidentiality issues and patient safety as health care is getting more fragmented. At the same time, an increasing number of patients now make use of their legal right to access their patient record. In this paper, we shed light on some of the reasons why patients request a copy of their record. We report the preliminary results from an interview study in which seventeen patients who have asked for a copy of their patient record following a hospital stay have been interviewed. In our interview study, securing transmission of information between health care workers is one of the main reasons for requesting a copy of the record. We will discuss how this finding might contribute to the ongoing debate.

  6. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  7. Improvement with Duloxetine in an Adult ADHD Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourjman, Smadar Valerie; Bilodeau, Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and disabling disorder among adults and is treated with stimulant and non stimulant medication. Objective: To report the case of a patient with ADHD showing good clinical response to duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI). Case…

  8. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  9. A meta-narrative review of recorded patient-pharmacist interactions: exploring biomedical or patient-centered communication?

    PubMed

    Murad, Muna S; Chatterley, Trish; Guirguis, Lisa M

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacists worldwide require improved patient-centered communication skills as they transition from a dispensing role to enhanced involvement in patient care. Researchers have studied pharmacist communication through audio and video recordings of patient-pharmacist encounters. A meta-narrative review of research using these recordings will offer insight into the extent of biomedical vs. patient-centered communication in patient-pharmacist exchanges. This review aimed to characterize research on patient-pharmacists interactions using audio or video recordings and explore the 1) focus of research questions, 2) study design, 3) data analysis methods, 4) main findings and 5) presence of patient-centered vs. biomedical models of interaction. Drawing on the principles of meta-narrative systematic review, a literature search was performed to identify studies published in English. No publication date limits were implemented. Key search terms included: "audio recording", "video recording", "communication", "patient counseling", "patient interaction", "discourse analysis", "conversation analysis", "narrative analysis", and "content analysis". The search was conducted in five databases: Medline, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA), Web of Science, and Academic Search Complete. Forty-one articles met the inclusion criteria and represent 32 unique collections of patient-pharmacist recordings. The 23 quantitative studies focused on "what" was in the interaction, whereas the 5 qualitative studies characterized specialized pharmacy practice and 13 studies used conversational analysis to describe "how" patients and pharmacists interact. The majority of research described the content of recorded interactions in community pharmacies. Twenty-three studies presented evidence of a biomedical model, whereas 8 studies characterized a patient-centered focus. A developing body of research used recordings to describe the content of patient-pharmacist communication and

  10. Using Health Information Technology to Foster Engagement: Patients' Experiences with an Active Patient Health Record.

    PubMed

    Rief, John J; Hamm, Megan E; Zickmund, Susan L; Nikolajski, Cara; Lesky, Dan; Hess, Rachel; Fischer, Gary S; Weimer, Melissa; Clark, Sunday; Zieth, Caroline; Roberts, Mark S

    2017-03-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) typically employ "passive" communication strategies, such as non-personalized medical text, rather than direct patient engagement in care. Currently there is a call for more active PHRs that directly engage patients in an effort to improve their health by offering elements such as personalized medical information, health coaches, and secure messaging with primary care providers. As part of a randomized clinical trial comparing "passive" with "active" PHRs, we explore patients' experiences with using an "active" PHR known as HealthTrak. The "passive" elements of this PHR included problem lists, medication lists, information about patient allergies and immunizations, medical and surgical histories, lab test results, health reminders, and secure messaging. The active arm included all of these elements and added personalized alerts delivered through the secure messaging platform to patients for services coming due based on various demographic features (including age and sex) and chronic medical conditions. Our participants were part of the larger clinical trial and were eligible if they had been randomized to the active PHR arm, one that included regular personalized alerts. We conducted focus group discussions on the benefits of this active PHR for patients who are at risk for cardiovascular disease. Forty-one patients agreed to participate and were organized into five separate focus group sessions. Three main themes emerged from the qualitatively analyzed focus groups: participants reported that the active PHR promoted better communication with providers; enabled them to more effectively partner with their providers; and helped them become more proactive about tracking their health information. In conclusion, patients reported improved communication, partnership with their providers, and a sense of self-management, thus adding insights for PHR designers hoping to address low adoption rates and other patient barriers to the development

  11. Patient-perceived usefulness and practical obstacles of patient-held records for cancer patients in Japan: OPTIM study.

    PubMed

    Komura, Kazue; Yamagishi, Akemi; Akizuki, Nobuya; Kawagoe, Shohei; Kato, Masashi; Morita, Tatsuya; Eguchi, Kenji

    2013-02-01

    Although the use of a patient-held record (PHR) for cancer patients has been introduced in many settings, little is known about the role of the PHR in palliative care settings and use in Asian cultures. This study investigated the patient-perceived usefulness and practical obstacles of using the PHR specifically designed for palliative care patients. This study adopted a qualitative design based on semi-structured interviews and content analysis. Fifty cancer patients were recruited from two regions in Japan. They used the PHR for more than three months, and then were asked to participate in a face-to-face interview. The content analysis revealed the following patient-perceived usefulness of the PHR: (1) increase in patient-staff communication; (2) increase in patient-family communication; (3) increase in patient-patient communication; (4) increase in understanding of medical conditions and treatments; and (5) facilitating end-of-life care discussion. The practical obstacles to using the PHR were also indicated: (1) the lack of adequate instruction about the role of the PHR; (2) undervaluing the role of the PHR and sharing information by medical professionals; (3) patients' unwillingness to participate in decision making; (4) concerns about privacy; (5) burdensome nature of self-reporting; and (6) patients' preference for their own ways of recording. The PHR can be helpful in facilitating communication, understanding medical conditions and treatments, and facilitating end-of-life care discussion; however, for wide-spread implementation, resolving the obstacles related to both patients and health-care professionals is required.

  12. Embedded-structure template for electronic records affects patient note quality and management for emergency head injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Sonoo, Tomohiro; Iwai, Satoshi; Inokuchi, Ryota; Gunshin, Masataka; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Along with article-based checklists, structured template recording systems have been reported as useful to create more accurate clinical recording, but their contributions to the improvement of the quality of patient care have been controversial. An emergency department (ED) must manage many patients in a short time. Therefore, such a template might be especially useful, but few ED-based studies have examined such systems. A structured template produced according to widely used head injury guidelines was used by ED residents for head injury patients. The study was conducted by comparing each 6-month period before and after launching the system. The quality of the patient notes and factors recorded in the patient notes to support the head computed tomography (CT) performance were evaluated by medical students blinded to patient information. The subject patients were 188 and 177 in respective periods. The numbers of patient notes categorized as “CT indication cannot be determined” were significantly lower in the postintervention term (18% → 9.0%), which represents the patient note quality improvement. No difference was found in the rates of CT performance or CT skip without clearly recorded CT indication in the patient notes. The structured template functioned as a checklist to support residents in writing more appropriately recorded patient notes in the ED head injury patients. Such a template customized to each clinical condition can facilitate standardized patient management and can improve patient safety in the ED. PMID:27749590

  13. [Respiratory virus infections in adult patients hospitalized in an internal medicine unit].

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Raúl; Rioseco, María Luisa; Agüero, Yasna; Ubilla, Daniela; Mechsner, Pamela; Inzunza, Carlos; Riquelme, Mauricio

    2014-06-01

    Respiratory viral infections (RVi) can be associated with a wide range of clinical manifestations. To investigate the frequency and clinical manifestations of RVi among adult patients during winter hospitalizations. All patients admitted to the hospital with flu like disease and those with fever or exacerbation of any underlying disease during hospitalization without an evident cause, were prospectively enrolled. A direct immunofluorescence (DIF) of nasopharyngeal aspirate for influenza A (IA) and B, parainfluenza 1, 2 and 3, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and metapneumovirus, was performed. Epidemiological and clinical data were recorded. Between May and September 2012, 975 adults were admitted to the Internal Medicine Unit of Puerto Montt Hospital and in 128 (13%) patients, DIF was carried out. DIF was positive in 44 patients (34%) aged 65 ± 20 years, 68.2% females, corresponding to 4.5% of total hospitalizations. Eighty six percent of the latter had at least one co-morbidity, mainly asthma and chronic respiratory diseases in 34.1%, diabetes in 29.5%, cardiac problems in 25% and congestive heart failure in 20.5%. The most common RVi were RSV (n = 21, 48%) and IA (n = 17, 39%). Six patients had a nosocomial RVi. Patients infected with IA had a significantly higher frequency of fever and bronchial hyper reactivity than those infected with RSV. RVi were associated with exacerbation of underlying disease in 62% of cases and pneumonia in 27%. Two patients had a viral pericarditis. RVi are an important cause of adult morbidity and their detection should be routine in adult patients hospitalized during winter.

  14. Prevalence of Mental Health Illness Among Patients with Adult-onset Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Basil; Hodge, David O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Children diagnosed with some forms of strabismus were recently found to have an increased risk of developing mental illness by early adulthood. The purpose of this case-controlled study was to determine if adults with non-paralytic forms of strabismus are similarly at an elevated risk for developing mental illness. Methods The medical records of all patients diagnosed as adults (≥ 19 years of age) with convergence insufficiency (CI, n=118), divergence insufficiency (DI, n=80), and small angle hypertropia (HT, n=99) from January 1, 1985, through December 31, 2004, were retrospectively reviewed. Each case was compared with a sex- and birthdate-matched non-strabismic control. The medical records were reviewed for mental health diagnoses, including inpatient and outpatient encounters, psychiatric ER visits, and medication use. Results Mental health disorders were diagnosed in 65 (55.1%) patients with CI compared to 54 (45.8%) controls (p=0.15), in 51 (63.8%) patients with DI compared to 42 (52.5%) controls (p=0.15), and in 63 (63.6%) patients with HT compared to 57 (57.6%) controls (p=0.38). CI patients were not more likely to have mental health disorders than their controls (p=0.15). Mental health hospitalizations (p=0.02), psychiatric medication use (p=0.04), and unspecified anxiety disorders (p=0.03) were higher in DI patients compared to controls. HT patients were found to have more generalized anxiety disorders (p=0.003) than controls. Conclusions Adults with some forms of strabismus (DI and HT) appear to have an increased risk of mental illness and its comorbidities, compared to age- and gender-matched non-strabismic controls. PMID:26559866

  15. Neuropsychological profile of adult patients with nonsymptomatic occipital lobe epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Leonilda; Santangelo, Gabriella; Improta, Ilaria; Vitale, Carmine; Meo, Roberta; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    To explore the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile in adult patients affected by nonsymptomatic (cryptogenic and idiopathic) occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE), with normal intelligence, we enrolled 20 adult patients with nonsymptomatic OLE and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent neuropsychiatric assessment scales, and standardized neuropsychological tests tapping memory, executive functions, constructional, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, patients performed significantly worse than controls on several tests tapping complex visuospatial skills and frontal lobe functions. The analysis of single patients' performance revealed that a significantly higher number of OLE patients achieved age- and education-adjusted pathological scores on three tests (Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Freehand Copying of Drawings Test, color-word interference task of Stroop test) with respect to controls. Patients did not differ from control subjects on neuropsychiatric aspects. The direct comparison between OLE subtypes showed that cryptogenetic OLE patients tended to achieve lower scores than idiopathic OLE patients on most tests, but no difference between the two groups was fully significant. In summary, patients with nonsymptomatic OLE can be affected by clinically relevant impairments in selected neuropsychological domains: complex visuospatial skills and executive functions. It could be speculated that frontal and visuospatial cognitive deficits might be the result of epileptic activity spreading within a neural network that includes structures far beyond the occipital lobe.

  16. [Diagnosis and therapy of adult patients with facial asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Kuroda, Shingo

    2009-09-01

    The goal of orthodontic treatment is to improve the patient's life by enhancing dental and jaw functions and dentofacial esthetics [Graber TM, et al., Orthodontics current principles and techniques. 4(e) ed. St Louis: Elsevier, 2005.]. Harmonious occlusion is achieved following improvements of malocclusion via orthodontic treatment [Ehmer U and Broll P, Int J Adult Orthod Orthognath Surg 1992;7:153-159. Throckmorton GS, et al., J Prosthet Dent 1984;51:252-261.]. Perfect facial symmetry is extremely rare, and normal faces have a degree of asymmetry. Patients with dentofacial deformity more frequently have asymmetry of the face and jaws. There was a relationship between the type of malocclusion and the prevalence of asymmetry; 28% of the Class III group, but 40% to 42% of the Class I, Class II and long face groups respectively, were asymmetric [Severt TR and Proffit WR, Int J Adult Orthod Orthogn Surg 1997;12:171-176.]; therefore, facial asymmetry is a common complaint among orthodontic patients. Treatment of severe facial asymmetry in adults consists mainly of surgically repositioning the maxilla or the mandible [Bardinet E, et al., Orthod Fr 2002;73:243-315. Guyuron B, Clin Plast Surg 1989;16:795-801. Proffit WR, et al., Contemporary treatment of dentofacial deformity. 2003. St Louis: Mosby, 2003:574-644.], however, new methods, i.e. orthodontic tooth movement with implant anchorage, have recently been introduced [Costa A, et al., Int J Adult Orthod Orthognath Surg 1998;3:201-209. Creekmore TD and Eklund MK, J Clin Orthod 1983;17:266-269. Miyawaki S,et al., Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2003;124:373-378. Park HS, et al., J Clin Orthod 2001;35:417-422. Roberts WE, et al., Angle Orthod 1989;59:247-256.], and various treatment options can be chosen in patients with facial asymmetry. In this article, we describe the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with facial asymmetry.

  17. Cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online access to their electronic medical records: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rexhepi, Hanife; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie; Cajander, Åsa; Huvila, Isto

    2016-07-19

    Patients' access to their online medical records serves as one of the cornerstones in the efforts to increase patient engagement and improve healthcare outcomes. The aim of this article is to provide in-depth understanding of cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online medical records, as well as an increased understanding of the complexities of developing and launching e-Health services. The study result confirms that online access can help patients prepare for doctor visits and to understand their medical issues. In contrast to the fears of many physicians, the study shows that online access to medical records did not generate substantial anxiety, concerns or increased phone calls to the hospital.

  18. Identifying Patients for Clinical Studies from Electronic Health Records: TREC 2012 Medical Records Track at OHSU

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    C0007570, which has several different MeSH entry terms: "celiac disease", " gluten enteropathy", " gluten - sensitive enteropathy", "nontropical sprue...in the final query.3 For example, for topic 165 ("Patients who have gluten intolerance or celiac disease"), " gluten intolerance" is mapped to CUI...34, etc. The resulting query fragment for that part of the topic would look something like "’celiac disease’ OR ’ gluten enteropathy’ OR ...". During

  19. The impact of electronic health records on care of heart failure patients in the emergency room

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Taek; Du, Jing; Theera-Ampornpunt, Nawanan; Gordon, Bradley D; Bershow, Barry A; Gensinger, Raymond A; Shrift, Michael; Routhe, Daniel T; Speedie, Stuart M

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if electronic health records (EHR) have observable effects on care outcomes, we examined quality and efficiency measures for patients presenting to emergency departments (ED). Materials and methods We conducted a retrospective study of 5166 adults with heart failure in three metropolitan EDs. Patients were termed internal if prior information was in the EHR upon ED presentation, otherwise external. Associations of internality with hospitalization, mortality, length of stay (LOS), and numbers of tests, procedures, and medications ordered in the ED were examined after adjusting for age, gender, race, marital status, comorbidities and hospitalization as a proxy for acuity level where appropriate. Results At two EDs internals had lower odds of mortality if hospitalized (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.38 to 0.81 and 0.45; 0.21 to 0.96), fewer laboratory tests during the ED visit (−4.6%; −8.9% to −0.1% and −14.0%; −19.5% to −8.1%) as well as fewer medications (−33.6%; −38.4% to −28.4% and −21.3%; −33.2% to −7.3%). At one of these two EDs, internals had lower odds of hospitalization (0.37; 0.22 to 0.60). At the third ED, internal patients only experienced a prolonged ED LOS (32.3%; 6.3% to 64.8%) but no other differences. There was no association with hospital LOS or number of procedures ordered. Discussion EHR availability was associated with salutary outcomes in two of three ED settings and prolongation of ED LOS at a third, but evidence was mixed and causality remains to be determined. Conclusions An EHR may have the potential to be a valuable adjunct in the care of heart failure patients. PMID:22071528

  20. Stratifying Risk for Renal Insufficiency Among Lithium-Treated Patients: An Electronic Health Record Study.

    PubMed

    Castro, Victor M; Roberson, Ashlee M; McCoy, Thomas H; Wiste, Anna; Cagan, Andrew; Smoller, Jordan W; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F; Ostacher, Michael; Perlis, Roy H

    2016-03-01

    Although lithium preparations remain first-line treatment for bipolar disorder, risk for development of renal insufficiency may discourage their use. Estimating such risk could allow more informed decisions and facilitate development of prevention strategies. We utilized electronic health records from a large New England health-care system between 2006 and 2013 to identify patients aged 18 years or older with a lithium prescription. Renal insufficiency was identified using the presence of renal failure by ICD9 code or laboratory-confirmed glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min. Logistic regression was used to build a predictive model in a random two-thirds of the cohort, which was tested in the remaining one-third. Risks associated with aspects of pharmacotherapy were also examined in the full cohort. We identified 1445 adult lithium-treated patients with renal insufficiency, matched by risk set sampling 1 : 3 with 4306 lithium-exposed patients without renal insufficiency. In regression models, features associated with risk included older age, female sex, history of smoking, history of hypertension, overall burden of medical comorbidity, and diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (p<0.01 for all contrasts). The model yielded an area under the ROC curve exceeding 0.81 in an independent testing set, with 74% of renal insufficiency cases among the top two risk quintiles. Use of lithium more than once daily, lithium levels greater than 0.6 mEq/l, and use of first-generation antipsychotics were independently associated with risk. These results suggest the possibility of stratifying risk for renal failure among lithium-treated patients. Once-daily lithium dosing and maintaining lower lithium levels where possible may represent strategies for reducing risk.

  1. Stratifying Risk for Renal Insufficiency Among Lithium-Treated Patients: An Electronic Health Record Study

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Victor M; Roberson, Ashlee M; McCoy, Thomas H; Wiste, Anna; Cagan, Andrew; Smoller, Jordan W; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F; Ostacher, Michael; Perlis, Roy H

    2016-01-01

    Although lithium preparations remain first-line treatment for bipolar disorder, risk for development of renal insufficiency may discourage their use. Estimating such risk could allow more informed decisions and facilitate development of prevention strategies. We utilized electronic health records from a large New England health-care system between 2006 and 2013 to identify patients aged 18 years or older with a lithium prescription. Renal insufficiency was identified using the presence of renal failure by ICD9 code or laboratory-confirmed glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min. Logistic regression was used to build a predictive model in a random two-thirds of the cohort, which was tested in the remaining one-third. Risks associated with aspects of pharmacotherapy were also examined in the full cohort. We identified 1445 adult lithium-treated patients with renal insufficiency, matched by risk set sampling 1 : 3 with 4306 lithium-exposed patients without renal insufficiency. In regression models, features associated with risk included older age, female sex, history of smoking, history of hypertension, overall burden of medical comorbidity, and diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (p<0.01 for all contrasts). The model yielded an area under the ROC curve exceeding 0.81 in an independent testing set, with 74% of renal insufficiency cases among the top two risk quintiles. Use of lithium more than once daily, lithium levels greater than 0.6 mEq/l, and use of first-generation antipsychotics were independently associated with risk. These results suggest the possibility of stratifying risk for renal failure among lithium-treated patients. Once-daily lithium dosing and maintaining lower lithium levels where possible may represent strategies for reducing risk. PMID:26294109

  2. Childrens Hospital Integrated Patient Electronic Record System Continuation (CHIPERS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    testing  CDS  in  the  Newborn  ICU  with  prolonged  and  complex   nutritional   needs  (Specific  Aim  2)  as...more complex, time-sensitive areas such as the management of patients with severe sepsis/shock, or patients with complex nutritional needs, is unknown...spans minutes to hours. We are also testing CDS in the Newborn ICU with prolonged and complex nutritional needs (Specific Aim 2) as these patients

  3. Visualizing collaborative electronic health record usage for hospitalized patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Soulakis, Nicholas D; Carson, Matthew B; Lee, Young Ji; Schneider, Daniel H; Skeehan, Connor T; Scholtens, Denise M

    2015-03-01

    To visualize and describe collaborative electronic health record (EHR) usage for hospitalized patients with heart failure. We identified records of patients with heart failure and all associated healthcare provider record usage through queries of the Northwestern Medicine Enterprise Data Warehouse. We constructed a network by equating access and updates of a patient's EHR to a provider-patient interaction. We then considered shared patient record access as the basis for a second network that we termed the provider collaboration network. We calculated network statistics, the modularity of provider interactions, and provider cliques. We identified 548 patient records accessed by 5113 healthcare providers in 2012. The provider collaboration network had 1504 nodes and 83 998 edges. We identified 7 major provider collaboration modules. Average clique size was 87.9 providers. We used a graph database to demonstrate an ad hoc query of our provider-patient network. Our analysis suggests a large number of healthcare providers across a wide variety of professions access records of patients with heart failure during their hospital stay. This shared record access tends to take place not only in a pairwise manner but also among large groups of providers. EHRs encode valuable interactions, implicitly or explicitly, between patients and providers. Network analysis provided strong evidence of multidisciplinary record access of patients with heart failure across teams of 100+ providers. Further investigation may lead to clearer understanding of how record access information can be used to strategically guide care coordination for patients hospitalized for heart failure. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  4. [Video Instruction for Synchronous Video Recording of Mimic Movement of Patients with Facial Palsy].

    PubMed

    Schaede, Rebecca Anna; Volk, Gerd Fabian; Modersohn, Luise; Barth, Jodi Maron; Denzler, Joachim; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2017-05-03

    Photografy and video are necessary to record the severity of a facial palsy or to allow offline grading with a grading system. There is no international standard for the video recording urgently needed to allow a standardized comparison of different patient cohorts. A video instruction was developed. The instruction was shown to the patient and presents several mimic movements. At the same time the patient is recorded while repeating the presented movement using commercial hardware. Facial movements were selected in such a way that it was afterwards possible to evaluate the recordings with standard grading systems (House-Brackmann, Sunnybrook, Stennert, Yanagihara) or even with (semi)automatic software. For quality control, the patients evaluated the instruction using a questionnaire. The video instruction takes 11 min and 05 and is divided in 3 parts: 1) Explanation of the procedure; 2) Foreplay and recreating of the facial movements; 3) Repeating of sentences to analyze the communication skills. So far 13 healthy subjects and 10 patients with acute or chronic facial palsy were recorded. All recordings could be assessed by the above mentioned grading systems. The instruction was rated as well explaining and easy to follow by healthy persons and patients. There is now a video instruction available for standardized recording of facial movement. This instruction is recommended for use in clinical routine and in clinical trials. This will allow a standardized comparison of patients within Germany and international patient cohorts. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. A Patient-Centric Taxonomy for Personal Health Records (PHRs)

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Adam; Kaelber, David C.; Pan, Eric; Shah, Sapna; Johnston, Douglas; Middleton, Blackford

    2008-01-01

    Today, the nascent field of personal health records (PHRs) lacks a comprehensive taxonomy that encompasses the full range of PHRs currently in existence and what may be possible. The Center for Information Technology Leadership (CITL) has created a taxonomy that broadly defines a PHR as having both an infrastructure component, which allows for data viewing and sharing, and an application component, allowing for selfmanagement and information exchange. The taxonomy also accounts for different PHR architectures – provider, payer, third-party, or interoperable. This comprehensive taxonomy may help to define the field of PHRs and provide a framework for assessing PHR value. PMID:18998912

  6. Alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotypes in adult liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Alempijevic, Tamara; Milutinovic, Aleksandra Sokic; Kovacevic, Nada

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is an important serine protease inhibitor in humans. Hereditary alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) affects lungs and liver. Liver disease caused by AATD in paediatric patients has been previously well documented. However, the association of liver disease with alpha-1-antitrypsin gene polymorphisms in adults is less clear. Therefore, we aimed to study AAT polymorphisms in adults with liver disease. We performed a case-control study. AAT polymorphisms were investigated by isoelectric focusing in 61 patients with liver cirrhosis and 9 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The control group consisted of 218 healthy blood donors. A significant deviation of observed and expected frequency of AAT phenotypes from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (chi-square = 34.77, df 11, P = 0.000) in the patient group was caused by a higher than expected frequency of Pi ZZ homozygotes (f = 0.0143 and f = 0.0005, respectively, P = 0.000). In addition, Pi M homozygotes were more frequent in patients than in controls (63% and 46%, respectively, P = 0.025). Our study results show that Pi ZZ homozygosity in adults could be associated with severe liver disease. Presence of Pi M homozygosity could be associated with liver disease via some mechanism different from Z allele-induced liver damage through accumulation of AAT polymers. PMID:19961268

  7. Pneumococci Can Persistently Colonize Adult Patients with Chronic Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, A.; Balsalobre, L.; Marti, S.; Calatayud, L.; De la Campa, A. G.; Brueggemann, A. B.; Liñares, J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae plays an important role in causing acute exacerbations in patients with chronic respiratory disease. However, few data are available regarding pneumococcal persistence in adult patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Fifty pneumococci recovered from sputum samples (1995 to 2010) from 13 adult patients with ≥3 episodes of acute exacerbation or pneumonia, with the same serotype and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern, were studied. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) loci, penicillin-binding protein (PBP) genes (pbp2x, pbp1a, pbp2b), and the quinolone-resistant determining regions (QRDRs) of parC, parE, and gyrA were PCR amplified and sequenced. The average time between the first and last episode was 582 days (standard deviation [SD], ±362). All but two patients received multiple courses of β-lactam treatment, and all persistent strains were resistant to penicillin; however, the PBP sequences were stable over time apart from one variable nucleotide in pbp2x, observed among pneumococci isolated from three patients. In contrast, 7/11 patients treated with fluoroquinolones had fluoroquinolone-resistant pneumococci. In three patients, the initially fluoroquinolone-susceptible strain developed resistance after fluoroquinolone therapy, and in the remaining four patients, the persistent strain was fluoroquinolone resistant from the first episode. QRDR changes involved in fluoroquinolone resistance were frequently observed in persistent strains after fluoroquinolone treatment; however, the PBP sequences and MLST genotypes of these strains were stable over time. PMID:23052300

  8. [Eye contact in adult patients with Asperger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Roy, M; Wolfgang, D

    2015-05-01

    It is unclear if individuals with autism spectrum disorders rarely hold direct eye contact because eyes are unimportant for them, or if it is actively avoided. The aim of the current investigation was to gain a better understanding for their views on direct eye contact by exploring adult patients with Asperger syndrome. 63 adult patients with Asperger syndrome (28 females, 35 males, 21 - 62 years old) were explored about using and sensing direct eye contact by means of a standardised questionnaire. 87 % of investigated patients depict direct eye contact as being disagreeable. They describe it as arduous and distracting. Therefore they mostly actively avoid direct eye contact. The here gained knowledge about aversion towards direct eye contact in individuals with autism should lead to a stronger understanding and acceptance of this problem in the non-autistic population. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. The use of nationwide on-line prescription records improves the drug history in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Glintborg, Bente; Poulsen, Henrik E; Dalhoff, Kim P

    2008-02-01

    Structured medication interviews improve the medication history upon hospitalization. Pharmacy records are valid lists of the prescribed medications available to individual patients. In Denmark, treating doctors now have access to their patients' pharmacy records through a real-time online electronic database What this study adds: Omission errors are frequent among hospitalized patients despite structured drug interviews and home visits. Pharmacy records may be used to minimize patients' recall bias and improve the medication lists. Structured medication interviews improve the medication history in hospitalized patients. In Denmark, a nationwide electronic version of individual pharmacy records (PR) has recently been introduced. Use of these records could improve the medication lists in hospitalized patients. We prospectively included 500 patients admitted to an acute medical department. In individual patients, the PR was compared with (i) the medication list written in the patient chart and (ii) drug information provided by the patient during a structured drug interview upon admission and during a home visit after discharge. Median patient age was 72 years. Upon admission, patients reported using 1958 prescription-only medications (POM) (median four drugs per patient, range 0-14), of which 114 (6%) were not registered in PR. In PR, 1153 POM (median one per patient, range 0-11) were registered during the month preceding admission. The patients did not report 309 (27%) of these upon admission. Home visits were performed in a subgroup of 115 patients. During home visits, 18% of POM registered in PR during the preceding month were not reported. Drug type was predictive of reporting irrespective of patient sex or age. Cardiovascular drugs were reported most and dermatological were reported less frequently. Underreporting might be due to recall bias, non-adherence or discontinuation of drugs. Omission errors are frequent despite structured medication interviews

  10. [Identification and mapping of prescribed nursing actions for patients in an adult ICU].

    PubMed

    Salgado, Patricia Oliveira; Tannure, Meire Chucre; Oliveira, Cleydson Rodrigues; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado

    2012-01-01

    Descriptive study that aimed to identify nursing actions prescribed by nurses in the medical records of patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) for adults, in Belo Horizonte (MG), the terms used, their frequency and map the actions to the Theory of Basic Human Needs and NIC interventions. It was obtained a sample of 44 patient records. It was identified 2,260 nursing actions. After exclusion of repetitions, it was found 124 different actions. All nursing actions have been mapped to physiological needs and also to NIC interventions. It was obtained 100% of agreement among experts in the validation of the mapping process. It is suggested that similar studies in ICUs from other locations and different contexts / specialties should be driven to identify nursing actions developed and its evolution.

  11. Digital Recording and Documentation of Endoscopic Procedures: Do Patients and Doctors Think Alike?

    PubMed

    Willner, Nadav; Peled-Raz, Maya; Shteinberg, Dan; Shteinberg, Michal; Keren, Dean; Rainis, Tova

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Methods. Conducting a survey study of a large number of patients and gastroenterologists aimed at identifying relevant predictors of interest in digital recording and documentation (DRD) of endoscopic procedures. Outpatients presenting to the endoscopy unit at our institution for an endoscopy examination were anonymously surveyed, regarding their views and opinions of a possible recording of the procedure. A parallel survey for gastroenterologists was conducted. Results. 417 patients and 62 gastroenterologists participated in two parallel surveys regarding DRD of endoscopic procedures. 66.4% of the patients expressed interest in digital documentation of their endoscopic procedure, with 90.5% of them requesting a copy. 43.6% of the physicians supported digital recording while 27.4% opposed it, with 48.4% opposing to making a copy of the recording available to the patient. No sociodemographic or background factors predicted patient's interest in DRD. 66% of the physicians reported having recording facilities in their institutions, but only 43.6% of them stated performing recording. Having institutional guidelines for DRD was found to be the only significant predictor for routine recording. Conclusions. Our study exposes patients' positive views of digital recording and documentation of endoscopic procedures. In contrast, physicians appear to be much more reluctant towards DRD and are centrally motivated by legal concerns when opposing DRD, as well as when supporting it.

  12. Digital Recording and Documentation of Endoscopic Procedures: Do Patients and Doctors Think Alike?

    PubMed Central

    Peled-Raz, Maya; Shteinberg, Dan; Shteinberg, Michal; Keren, Dean; Rainis, Tova

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Methods. Conducting a survey study of a large number of patients and gastroenterologists aimed at identifying relevant predictors of interest in digital recording and documentation (DRD) of endoscopic procedures. Outpatients presenting to the endoscopy unit at our institution for an endoscopy examination were anonymously surveyed, regarding their views and opinions of a possible recording of the procedure. A parallel survey for gastroenterologists was conducted. Results. 417 patients and 62 gastroenterologists participated in two parallel surveys regarding DRD of endoscopic procedures. 66.4% of the patients expressed interest in digital documentation of their endoscopic procedure, with 90.5% of them requesting a copy. 43.6% of the physicians supported digital recording while 27.4% opposed it, with 48.4% opposing to making a copy of the recording available to the patient. No sociodemographic or background factors predicted patient's interest in DRD. 66% of the physicians reported having recording facilities in their institutions, but only 43.6% of them stated performing recording. Having institutional guidelines for DRD was found to be the only significant predictor for routine recording. Conclusions. Our study exposes patients' positive views of digital recording and documentation of endoscopic procedures. In contrast, physicians appear to be much more reluctant towards DRD and are centrally motivated by legal concerns when opposing DRD, as well as when supporting it. PMID:27999770

  13. Optimal serum phenylalanine for adult patients with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Okano, Yoshiyuki; Nagasaka, Hironori

    2013-12-01

    High serum phenylalanine in adult patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) causes neuropsychological and psychosocial problems that can be resolved by phenylalanine-restricted diet. Therefore, PKU patients must continue to adhere to phenylalanine-restricted diet for life, although the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life has yet to be established. The purpose of this review was to establish the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life of PKU patients. We evaluated oxidative stress status, nitric oxide metabolism, cholesterol-derived oxysterols, vitamin D and bone status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adult PKU patients according to serum phenylalanine level. Oxidative stress increased markedly at serum phenylalanine of 700-800 μmol/L. Serum phenylalanine higher than 700-850 μmol/L correlated with the disturbance of nitric oxide regulatory system. Adult PKU patients had poor vitamin D status and exhibited predominance of bone resorption over bone formation. In the brain, the levels of 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a marker of brain cholesterol elimination, were low at serum phenylalanine levels exceeding 650 μmol/L. MRI studies showed high signal intensity in deep white matter on T2-weighted and FLAIR images of PKU patients with serum phenylalanine greater than 500 μmol/L, with decreased apparent diffusion coefficients. Changes in most parameters covering the entire body organs in adult PKU were almost acceptable below 700-800 μmol/L of phenylalanine level. However, the optimal serum phenylalanine level should be 500 μmol/L or less in later life for the brain to be safe. © 2013.

  14. Visualizing collaborative electronic health record usage for hospitalized patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Matthew B; Lee, Young Ji; Schneider, Daniel H; Skeehan, Connor T; Scholtens, Denise M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To visualize and describe collaborative electronic health record (EHR) usage for hospitalized patients with heart failure. Materials and methods We identified records of patients with heart failure and all associated healthcare provider record usage through queries of the Northwestern Medicine Enterprise Data Warehouse. We constructed a network by equating access and updates of a patient’s EHR to a provider-patient interaction. We then considered shared patient record access as the basis for a second network that we termed the provider collaboration network. We calculated network statistics, the modularity of provider interactions, and provider cliques. Results We identified 548 patient records accessed by 5113 healthcare providers in 2012. The provider collaboration network had 1504 nodes and 83 998 edges. We identified 7 major provider collaboration modules. Average clique size was 87.9 providers. We used a graph database to demonstrate an ad hoc query of our provider-patient network. Discussion Our analysis suggests a large number of healthcare providers across a wide variety of professions access records of patients with heart failure during their hospital stay. This shared record access tends to take place not only in a pairwise manner but also among large groups of providers. Conclusion EHRs encode valuable interactions, implicitly or explicitly, between patients and providers. Network analysis provided strong evidence of multidisciplinary record access of patients with heart failure across teams of 100+ providers. Further investigation may lead to clearer understanding of how record access information can be used to strategically guide care coordination for patients hospitalized for heart failure. PMID:25710558

  15. Amelogenesis imperfecta - lifelong management. Restorative management of the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; McDonnell, S T; Iram, S; Chan, M F W-Y

    2013-11-08

    The biggest challenge restorative dentists face in rehabilitating patients with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is trying to restore aesthetics, function and occlusal stability while keeping the treatment as conservative as possible. The goals of treatment should be to prolong the life of the patient's own teeth and avoid or delay the need for extractions and subsequent replacement with conventional fixed, removable or implant retained prostheses. In order to achieve these goals a stepwise approach to treatment planning is required starting with the most conservative but aesthetically acceptable treatment. This article discusses the management of AI and presents the various treatment options available for restoring the adult patient who presents to the dentist with AI.

  16. Acute rheumatic fever in adults: case report together with an analysis of 25 patients with acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Kasitanon, Nuntana; Sukitawut, Waraporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2009-07-01

    We reported the oldest acute rheumatic fever (ARF) patient with initial attack at the age of 90 years and experience with ARF in adults in 20 years of observation. The case files of all ARF patients treated by rheumatology unit, Chiang Mai University, were reviewed. Demographic data and clinical profile were recorded and compared between patients with initial attack and patients with recurrent attack. A total of 25 patients with ARF were included. There was no different incidence of arthritis and carditis between two groups. Initial attack patients have higher incidence of prolonged PR-interval (67 vs. 12%, P = 0.049) and longer duration of admission to diagnosis (5 vs. 2 days, P = 0.05). Thirty percent presented initial attack after 30 years of age. ARF is more common in adults than previously recognized. Therefore, clinicians should be aware of this condition and include it in their differential diagnosis of the febrile patients with arthritis.

  17. Coronary Arteriovenous Fistulas in Adult Patients: Surgical Management and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Albeyoglu, Sebnem; Aldag, Mustafa; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Sargin, Murat; Oz, Tugba Kemaloglu; Kutlu, Hakan; Dagsali, Sabri

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical and anatomic characteristics of coronary arteriovenous fistulas in adult patients who underwent open cardiac surgery and to review surgical management and outcomes. Methods Twenty-one adult patients (12 female, 9 male; mean age: 56.1±7.9 years) who underwent surgical treatment for coronary arteriovenous fistulas were retrospectively included in this study. Coronary angiography, chest X-ray, electrocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography were preoperatively performed in all patients. Demographic and clinical data were also collected. Postoperative courses of all patients were monitored and postoperative complications were noted. Results A total of 25 coronary arteriovenous fistulas were detected in 21 patients; the fistulas originated mainly from left anterior descending artery (n=9, 42.8%). Four (19.4%) patients had bilateral fistulas originating from both left anterior descending and right coronary artery. The main drainage site of coronary arteriovenous fistulas was the pulmonary artery (n=18, 85.7%). Twelve (57.1%) patients had isolated coronary arteriovenous fistulas and 4 (19.4%), concomitant coronary artery disease. Twenty (95.3%) of all patients were symptomatic. Seventeen patients were operated on with and 4 without cardiopulmonary bypass. There was no mortality. Three patients had postoperative atrial fibrillation. One patient had pericardial effusion causing cardiac tamponade who underwent reoperation. Conclusion The decision of surgical management should be made on the size and the anatomical location of coronary arteriovenous fistulas and concomitant cardiac comorbidities. Surgical closure with ligation of coronary arteriovenous fistulas can be performed easily with on-pump or off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting, even in asymptomatic patients to prevent fistula related complications with very low risk of mortality and morbidity.

  18. A Patient Registry to Improve Patient Safety: Recording General Neurosurgery Complications

    PubMed Central

    Sarnthein, Johannes; Stieglitz, Lennart; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Regli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Background To improve the transparency of the local health care system, treatment cost was recently referenced to disease related groups. Treatment quality must be legally documented in a patient registry, in particular for the highly specialized treatments provided by neurosurgery departments. Methods In 2013 we have installed a patient registry focused on cranial neurosurgery. Surgeries are characterized by indication, treatment, location and other specific neurosurgical parameters. Preoperative state and postoperative outcome are recorded prospectively using neurological and sociological scales. Complications are graded by their severity in a therapy-oriented complication score system (Clavien-Dindo-Grading system, CDG). Results are presented at the monthly clinical staff meeting. Results Data acquisition compatible with the clinic workflow permitted to include all eligible patients into the registry. Until December 2015, we have registered 2880 patients that were treated in 3959 surgeries and 8528 consultations. Since the registry is fully operational (August 2014), we have registered 325 complications on 1341 patient discharge forms (24%). In 64% of these complications, no or only pharmacological treatment was required. At discharge, there was a clear correlation of the severity of the complication and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS, ρ = -0.3, slope -6 KPS percentage points per increment of CDG) and the length of stay (ρ = 0.4, slope 1.5 days per increment of CDG). Conclusions While the therapy-oriented complication scores correlate reasonably well with outcome and length of stay, they do not account for new deficits that cannot be treated. Outcome grading and complication severity grading thus serve a complimentary purpose. Overall, the registry serves to streamline and to complete information flow in the clinic, to identify complication rates and trends early for the internal quality monitoring and communication with patients. Conversely, the

  19. Self-reported stressors among patients with Exhaustion Disorder: an exploratory study of patient records

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several researchers imply that both work-related and non-work-related stress exposure are likely to contribute to stress-related mental illness. Yet empirical studies investigating both domains seem to be limited, particularly in a clinical population. The purpose of this study was to a) explore which stressors (non-work and work-related) are reported as important for the onset of illness by patients seeking medical care for stress-related exhaustion and b) explore the prevalence of each stressor and examine whether the pattern differs between men and women. Methods This is an exploratory mixed method study, comprising patients at a specialist outpatient stress clinic. Information from medical records of 20 patients was initially used in a first qualitative step to construct the instrument, using a combination of a conventional content analysis and a directed content analysis. In the second phase patient records from 50 men and 50 women were selected and coded in accordance with the coding instrument. Frequency statistics were calculated for all stressors. Results A total of 24 categories of stressors (11 related to work and 13 related to private life) were identified in the first qualitative step. A median of four stressors, usually both work and non-work-related was reported by the patients. The most common stressors were 1) quantitative demands at work, 2) private relational conflicts and 3) emotional demands at work. Conclusions Work demands are, by far, the most prevalent stressor, followed by relational problems in private life. The pattern was similar for women and men, with a slight difference in the distribution between work and non-work stressors. Men and women also show similar patterns when comparing the occurrence of each stressor. Slight differences were seen, in particular with regard to managerial responsibility that was reported by 6% of the women compared to 36% of the men. One important practical implication of this study is that

  20. Unique medical issues in adult patients with mucopolysaccharidoses.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John; Berger, Kenneth I; Borgo, Andrea; Braunlin, Elizabeth A; Burton, Barbara K; Ghotme, Kemel A; Kircher, Susanne G; Molter, David; Orchard, Paul J; Palmer, James; Pastores, Gregory M; Rapoport, David M; Wang, Raymond Y; White, Klane

    2016-10-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses are a group of inherited metabolic diseases caused by deficiencies in enzymes involved in the sequential degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) leading to substrate accumulation in various tissues and organs. GAG accumulation can cause growth retardation and progressive damage to respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, nervous, gastrointestinal, auditory, and visual systems. In the past, few people with severe phenotypic mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) reached adulthood. However, better methods for diagnosis, multi-disciplinary care, and new therapies have extended lifespan, leading to an increasing number of patients surviving beyond childhood. The growing number of adult MPS patients poses significant challenges for clinicians who may not be familiar with the clinical manifestations of MPS. In addition, as new interventions have changed the natural history of these disorders, it is difficult to anticipate both the impact on life expectancy and other complications that may occur as these patients age. Because the MPS disorders are multi-organ diseases, their management requires a coordinated multi-disciplinary approach. Here we discuss the unique pattern of medical issues and multi-organ involvement in adult patients with MPS and identify the challenges that are associated with management of MPS. This review is based on information from an expert investigator meeting with MPS specialists held October 2-4, 2014 in Dublin, Ireland, as well as on current literature searches focusing on MPS and adults.

  1. Neuropsychological Assessment of Adult Patients with Shunted Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Bakar, Emel Erdogan

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study is planned to determine the neurocognitive difficulties of hydrocephalic adults. Methods The research group contained healthy adults (control group, n : 15), and hydrocephalic adults (n : 15). Hydrocephalic group consisted of patients with idiopathic aquaduct stenosis and post-meningitis hydrocephalus. All patients were followed with shunted hydrocephalus and not gone to shunt revision during last two years. They were chosen from either asymptomatic or had only minor symptoms without motor and sensorineural deficit. A neuropsychological test battery (Raven Standart Progressive Matrices, Bender-Gestalt Test, Cancellation Test, Clock Drawing Test, Facial Recognition Test, Line Orientation Test, Serial Digit Learning Test, Stroop Color Word Interference Test-TBAG Form, Verbal Fluency Test, Verbal Fluency Test, Visual-Aural Digit Span Test-B) was applied to all groups. Results Neuropsychological assessment of hydrocephalic patients demonstrated that they had poor performance on visual, semantic and working memory, visuoconstructive and frontal functions, reading, attention, motor coordination and executive function of parietal lobe which related with complex and perseverative behaviour. Eventually, these patients had significant impairment on the neurocognitive functions of their frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. On the other hand, the statistical analyses performed on demographic data showed that the aetiology of the hydrocephalus, age, sex and localization of the shunt (frontal or posterior parietal) did not affect the test results. Conclusion This prospective study showed that adult patients with hydrocephalus have serious neuropsychological problems which might be directly caused by the hydrocephalus; and these problems may cause serious adaptive difficulties in their social, cultural, behavioral and academic life. PMID:20379471

  2. ACG Clinical Guideline: Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    McClave, Stephen A; DiBaise, John K; Mullin, Gerard E; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-03-01

    The value of nutrition therapy for the adult hospitalized patient is derived from the outcome benefits achieved by the delivery of early enteral feeding. Nutritional assessment should identify those patients at high nutritional risk, determined by both disease severity and nutritional status. For such patients if they are unable to maintain volitional intake, enteral access should be attained and enteral nutrition (EN) initiated within 24-48 h of admission. Orogastric or nasogastric feeding is most appropriate when starting EN, switching to post-pyloric or deep jejunal feeding only in those patients who are intolerant of gastric feeds or at high risk for aspiration. Percutaneous access should be used for those patients anticipated to require EN for >4 weeks. Patients receiving EN should be monitored for risk of aspiration, tolerance, and adequacy of feeding (determined by percent of goal calories and protein delivered). Intentional permissive underfeeding (and even trophic feeding) is appropriate temporarily for certain subsets of hospitalized patients. Although a standard polymeric formula should be used routinely in most patients, an immune-modulating formula (with arginine and fish oil) should be reserved for patients who have had major surgery in a surgical ICU setting. Adequacy of nutrition therapy is enhanced by establishing nurse-driven enteral feeding protocols, increasing delivery by volume-based or top-down feeding strategies, minimizing interruptions, and eliminating the practice of gastric residual volumes. Parenteral nutrition should be used in patients at high nutritional risk when EN is not feasible or after the first week of hospitalization if EN is not sufficient. Because of their knowledge base and skill set, the gastroenterologist endoscopist is an asset to the Nutrition Support Team and should participate in providing optimal nutrition therapy to the hospitalized adult patient.

  3. A patient-controlled journal for an electronic medical record: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wald, Jonathan S; Middleton, Blackford; Bloom, Amy; Walmsley, Dan; Gleason, Mary; Nelson, Elizabeth; Li, Qi; Epstein, Marianna; Volk, Lynn; Bates, David W

    2004-01-01

    Partners Healthcare System, Boston, MA, has developed a patient Web portal that features a patient-controlled electronic "journal" to allow patients to interact with their physician's electronic medical record. Patients can view and respond to health reminders, critique electronic chart information maintained by their doctor's office, enter additional clinical information, and prepare information summaries before an office visit. Creating shared information resources to support a collaborative care model required analysis of the business, architectural, and workflow requirements of the patient-controlled clinical portal and the physician-controlled electronic medical record system. In this paper we describe the challenges in aligning the two systems and serving the different user groups. Coupling the Patient Gateway system, serving over 8700 patients of 90 physicians as of September, 2003, with the Longitudinal Medical Record system, serving over 4000 physicians, has required a clear definition of user goals and workflow, well-defined interfaces, and careful consideration of system assumptions to succeed.

  4. Patients' acceptance of medical photography in a French adult and paediatric dermatology department: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Hacard, F; Maruani, A; Delaplace, M; Caille, A; Machet, L; Lorette, G; Samimi, M

    2013-08-01

    Despite the increasing use of medical photography by dermatologists, no study on patients' perceptions of photography in dermatology has been performed to date. Firstly, to evaluate patients' perceptions of medical photography. Secondly, to assess whether perceptions differed between patients in our adult department and parents accompanying a child in our paediatric department. An opinion survey was conducted at the Hospital of Tours (France) among adult patients (adult department) and accompanying parents (paediatric department) by completion of a questionnaire after any medical photography had been performed. We collected 272 questionnaires regarding 158 adults and 114 children. A camera used only in the department, and storage of the images in the department's records were the most accepted modalities (> 90%), especially in the paediatric survey. Respondents agreed with the sharing of the images with other practitioners and in medical meetings (> 85%) rather than distribution via publications (58·3%), e-mails (45·5%), health magazines (44·3%) and websites (32·0%). Most (78·8%) considered that the consent form should list all the possible uses of the images. Need for renewed consent for each use of the images was significantly more often expressed in the paediatric than the adult survey (44·5% vs. 24·5%, P = 0·001). More than 95% of respondents considered medical photography to be useful for improving diagnosis, monitoring of skin disease and aiding teaching. These findings could be used to improve practice, to increase the acceptability of medical photography and for devising a standardized consent form for medical practitioners performing medical photography. © 2013 The Authors BJD © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  5. Patient experiences with full electronic access to health records and clinical notes through the My HealtheVet Personal Health Record Pilot: qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Woods, Susan S; Schwartz, Erin; Tuepker, Anais; Press, Nancy A; Nazi, Kim M; Turvey, Carolyn L; Nichol, W Paul

    2013-03-27

    Full sharing of the electronic health record with patients has been identified as an important opportunity to engage patients in their health and health care. The My HealtheVet Pilot, the initial personal health record of the US Department of Veterans Affairs, allowed patients and their delegates to view and download content in their electronic health record, including clinical notes, laboratory tests, and imaging reports. A qualitative study with purposeful sampling sought to examine patients' views and experiences with reading their health records, including their clinical notes, online. Five focus group sessions were conducted with patients and family members who enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot at the Portland Veterans Administration Medical Center, Oregon. A total of 30 patients enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot, and 6 family members who had accessed and viewed their electronic health records participated in the sessions. Four themes characterized patient experiences with reading the full complement of their health information. Patients felt that seeing their records positively affected communication with providers and the health system, enhanced knowledge of their health and improved self-care, and allowed for greater participation in the quality of their care such as follow-up of abnormal test results or decision-making on when to seek care. While some patients felt that seeing previously undisclosed information, derogatory language, or inconsistencies in their notes caused challenges, they overwhelmingly felt that having more, rather than less, of their health record information provided benefits. Patients and their delegates had predominantly positive experiences with health record transparency and the open sharing of notes and test results. Viewing their records appears to empower patients and enhance their contributions to care, calling into question common provider concerns about the effect of full record access on patient well-being. While shared

  6. Developing and Implementing Patients' Full-Scale Electronic Access to Their Health Record.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Tove; Johansen, Monika A

    2016-01-01

    To increase patients' empowerment and involvement in their own health, several countries has decided to provide patients with electronic access to their health record. This paper reports on the main findings from sub-studies and pilots prior to the implementation of patients' access to their medical records in large-scale in the Northern Norway Region. The largest pilot included nearly 500 patients. Data for the participatory design process was collected through questionnaires and interviews. The results revealed that the service in general functioned as expected. The patients reported that they would continue to use the service, recommend it to others, and generally had no problems in understanding the content.

  7. Acute Alcohol Use and Injury Patterns in Young Adult Prehospital Patients.

    PubMed

    Barton, David J; Tift, Frank W; Cournoyer, Lauren E; Vieth, Julie T; Hudson, Korin B

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine if acute alcohol consumption is associated with differences in injury pattern among young adult patients with traumatic injuries presenting to emergency medical services (EMS). A cross-sectional, retrospective review of prehospital patient care reports (PCRs) was conducted evaluating injured patients who presented to a collegiate EMS agency from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2012. Included patients were age 18-24 y and sustained an injury within the previous 24 h. PCRs were reviewed independently by two abstractors to determine if the patient was documented to have acutely consumed alcohol proximate to his/her injury. Primary and secondary sites of regional body injury were recorded. Injury severity was recorded using the Revised Trauma Score (RTS). The association between primary injury site and acute alcohol use was assessed using a chi-square test. Multiple logistic regression was used to control for sex in predicting injury type. Of 440 injured patients, 135 (30.6%) had documented alcohol use prior to injury. Acute alcohol consumption altered the overall pattern of regional injury (p < 0.001). Alcohol users were more likely to present with injury secondary to assault, fall/trip, and unknown mechanism of injury (p < 0.001, all comparisons). RTS scores were statistically lower in the alcohol group (p < 0.001), although the clinical significance of this is unclear. Controlling for sex, acute alcohol consumption predicted increased risk of head/neck injury 5.59-fold (p < 0.001). Acute alcohol use in collegiate EMS patients appears to alter injury patterns in young adults and increases risk of head/neck injury. EMS providers in similar agencies should consider these trends when assessing and treating injured college-aged patients.

  8. [Automatic registration of patients in digital radiology facilities: dosimetric record].

    PubMed

    Ten Morón, J I; Vañó Carruana, E; Arrazola García, J

    2013-12-01

    There is a consensus in the international community regarding both the need for and benefits of systematic registration and planning of the dosage indicators in patients exposed to ionizing radiation. The main interest is in the registration and follow-up of the techniques and procedures that can involve the greatest risk from exposure to radiation. This register should be planned to include the structure and tools necessary to take the radiological safety of the patients into account, enabling the physicians requesting the studies to access the most important information in the register so they can appropriately justify the request for additional studies. Likewise, it should be considered a priority to establish diagnostic reference levels for the different magnitudes that are defined in function of the modality and techniques used; this information is useful for the staff involved in procedures that use ionizing radiation. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Childrens Hospital Integrated Patient Electronic Record System Continuation (CHIPERS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    patients  with   sepsis  (Pediatric  Intensive  Care  Unit,  Emergency  Department,  Ward,  and   Hematology /Oncology).    These...specific   need  to  focus  on   hematology  oncology  department,  residents   and  the  antibiotic  table   “I  think

  10. Hypernatraemia in an adult in-patient population.

    PubMed Central

    Long, C. A.; Marin, P.; Bayer, A. J.; Shetty, H. G.; Pathy, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    We report a retrospective study of hypernatraemia (serum sodium concentration greater than 150 mmol/l) in an adult in-patient population of a health district during one year. The incidence was 0.3% with at least 60% of cases developing after hospital admission, mainly in elderly patients. Dehydration appeared to be the major cause, with the use of diuretics, depressed conscious level or febrile illness implicated in a majority. Most patients had more than one contributory factor and iatrogenic causes were common. Associated illnesses were often severe and the in-hospital mortality was high (54%) regardless of age. Hypernatraemia in hospitalized patients should be largely avoidable and there is a need for greater awareness of the importance of active maintenance of hydration in susceptible patients. PMID:1924049

  11. Ebstein's anomaly in adult patients over 50 years of age.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Shigeaki; Yoshitake, Kiyonobu; Matsuo, Atsutoshi; Tayama, Kei-Ichiro; Hida, Satoru; Mito, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly (EA) is a rare congenital heart disease of the tricuspid valve, and less than 5% of patients with EA survive beyond the age of 50. We report two unoperated cases of EA in adult patients aged over 50 years. Two patients, a 70-year-old Japanese woman and a 59-year-old Chinese woman, were referred to us for tachyarrhythmias. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated apical displacement (>8 mm/m(2) body surface area) of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve from the atrioventricular ring with tricuspid regurgitation in both patients. The former suddenly expired 20 months later after suffering from repetitive supraventricular tachyarrhythmias and/or heart failure, and the latter is alive with minimal signs of heart failure 12 months after the diagnosis of EA. Although the natural history of EA is extremely variable, these two patients are exceptional in that they tolerated EA well for over 50 years without any surgical intervention.

  12. Managing body image difficulties of adult cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cororve Gingeret, Michelle; Teo, Irene; Epner, Daniel E

    2014-03-01

    Body image is a critical psychosocial issue for patients with cancer because they often undergo significant changes to appearance and functioning. The primary purpose of this review article was to identify empirically-supported approaches to treat body image difficulties of adult cancer patients that can be incorporated into high-quality comprehensive cancer care. An overview was provided of theoretical models of body image relevant to cancer patients, and findings were presented from published literature on body image and cancer from 2003 to 2013. These data were integrated with information from the patient-doctor communication literature to delineate a practical approach for assessing and treating body image concerns of adult cancer patients. Body image difficulties were found across patients with diverse cancer sites, and were most prevalent in the immediate postoperative and treatment period. Age, body mass index, and specific cancer treatments have been identified as potential risk factors for body image disturbance in cancer patients. Current evidence supports the use of time-limited cognitive behavioral therapy interventions for addressing these difficulties. Other intervention strategies also show promise but require further study. Potential indicators of body image difficulties were identified to alert health care professionals when to refer patients for psychosocial care, and a framework was proposed for approaching conversations about body image that can be used by the oncologic treatment team. Body image issues affect a wide array of cancer patients. Providers can use available evidence combined with information from the health care communication literature to develop practical strategies for treating body image concerns of patients with cancer. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  13. Emotional deficits in adult ADHD patients: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Martin J; Schreppel, Theresa; Biehl, Stefanie C; Jacob, Christian; Heine, Monika; Boreatti-Hümmer, Andrea; Mühlberger, Andreas; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2009-12-01

    This study examined general deficits in positive stimuli evaluation in adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). We investigated the event-related potentials to positive, negative and neutral pictures in 32 adults with ADHD and 32 control subjects. For this study we measured 21 electrodes placed in accordance with the international 10-20 system and calculated the early posterior negativity (EPN), which physiologically is characterized by more negative values for emotional as compared to neutral stimuli. We found significantly reduced EPN values for the ADHD patients compared to the healthy controls, but only in the positive stimuli condition, without any significant differences in the negative stimuli condition. Our data indicate that ADHD patients show less reactivity to positive visual stimuli which might be relevant in the context of described dysfunctions of the motivational-reward system in ADHD.

  14. Infective Dermatitis in an Adult Patient With HTLV-1

    PubMed Central

    Riveros, Rosalba; Medina, Raquel; Morel, Maida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Infective dermatitis is a chronic exudative eczematous eruption presenting in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)–infected people. It presents with relapsing erythematous, scaly, and crusted lesions affecting simultaneously the scalp, external ear, retroauricular area, eyelid, paranasal skin, neck axilla, and groin. Superimposed Staphylococcus and Streptococcus infection are common. It mainly affects children and exceptionally adults, and there are only a few published cases. The authors present the first reported case in Paraguay of an adult patient who had symptoms of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1–associated progressive tropical spastic paraparesis, and 6 years after the onset of the neurological symptoms, the patient developed infective dermatitis lesions on the skin, with frequent exacerbations since then. PMID:26588341

  15. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension in adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Serino, G; Giacomazzi, F

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) is definited by a mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAPm) >25 mmHg at rest. The Dana Point 2008 Revised Classification System represents the most recent classification system update with respect of various etiologies of PH. About 10 % of adolescents or adults with uncorrected congenital heart disease (CHD) with left-to-right shunt and high pulmonary blood flow develop Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) . Progressive vascular remodeling and increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) may ultimately lead to reversal of the shunt (pulmonary to systemic) causing cyanosis and determining the so-called Eisenmenger Syndrome (ES). Recent advances in the early diagnosis and medical targeted treatment of adult patients with CHD-PAH and ES can improve PAP, PVR and exercise tolerance, together with NYHA Class and survival, and may potentially reverse the vascular remodeling process in selected patients.

  16. A framework for transitioning patients from pediatric to adult health settings for patients with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer; Frimberger, Dominic; Haddad, Emily; Slobodov, Gennady

    2017-04-01

    Adolescents with neurogenic bladder are a vulnerable population that severely lacks consistent transitional care from pediatric to adult urology settings. Our practice determined that 100 patients with spina bifida and other neurogenic bladder conditions were not appropriately transferred to the adult setting once reaching adulthood. We initiated a transitional program to establish a dedicated and formal process for adolescent patients to transition to adult urology. The REACH clinic implements a formalized staging framework to facilitate migration of adolescents and young adults to the adult health setting. A social worker was incorporated to act as a patient advocate, behavioral health consultant, and resource specialist. To date 45 patients have been enrolled in the transition program. We have identified and categorized according to the appropriate stage. The REACH clinic has appropriately outlined the goals and mission of the program and resources utilized are financially practical and feasible by conducting a monthly combined clinic. The program has been instrumental in improving tracking and monitoring of these patients through their transition period. Through the efforts of the pediatric and adult urology teams, the REACH program is a dedicated framework that provides structure for transition of the adolescent patient. The addition of a social worker has resulted in enriched rapport and will likely result in improved compliance. This program allows for surveillance and evaluation of patient outcome indicators in this patient population. We believe that early introduction and frequent encounters with the adult urologic team is crucial to successful transitions. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:973-978, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Are low income patients receiving the benefits of electronic health records? A statewide survey.

    PubMed

    Butler, Matthew J; Harootunian, Gevork; Johnson, William G

    2013-06-01

    There are concerns that physicians serving low-income, Medicaid patients, in the United States are less likely to adopt electronic health records and, if so, that Medicaid patients will be denied the benefits from electronic health record use. This study seeks to determine whether physicians treating Medicaid patients were less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Physician surveys completed during physicians' license renewal process in Arizona were merged with the physician licensing data and Medicaid administrative claims data. Survey responses were received from 50.7 percent (6,780 out of 13,380) of all physicians practicing in Arizona. Physician survey responses were used to identify whether the physician used electronic health records and the degree to which the physician exchanged electronic health records with other health-care providers. Medicaid claims data were used to identify which physicians provided health care to Medicaid beneficiaries. The primary outcome of interest was whether Medicaid providers were more or less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate average marginal effects. In multivariate analysis, physicians with 20 or more Medicaid patients during the survey cycle were 4.1 percent more likely to use an electronic health record and 5.2 percent more likely to be able to transmit electronic health records to at least one health-care provider outside of their practice. These effects increase in magnitude when the analysis is restricted to solo practice physicians This is the first study to find a pro-Medicaid gap in electronic health record adoption suggesting that the low income patients served by Arizona's Health Care Cost Containment System are not at a disadvantage with regard to electronic health record access and that Arizona's model of promoting electronic health record adoption merits further study.

  18. Using the Electronic Medical Record to Enhance Physician-Nurse Communication Regarding Patients' Discharge Status.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Molly; Gurka, David

    2015-01-01

    The fast-paced environment of hospitals contributes to communication failures between health care providers while impacting patient care and patient flow. An effective mechanism for sharing patients' discharge information with health care team members is required to improve patient throughput. The communication of a patient's discharge plan was identified as crucial in alleviating patient flow delays at a tertiary care, academic medical center. By identifying the patients who were expected to be discharged the following day, the health care team could initiate discharge preparations in advance to improve patient care and patient flow. The patients' electronic medical record served to convey dynamic information regarding the patients' discharge status to the health care team via conditional discharge orders. Two neurosciences units piloted a conditional discharge order initiative. Conditional discharge orders were designed in the electronic medical record so that the conditions for discharge were listed in a dropdown menu. The health care team was trained on the conditional discharge order protocol, including when to write them, how to find them in the patients' electronic medical record, and what actions should be prompted by these orders. On average, 24% of the patients discharged had conditional discharge orders written the day before discharge. The average discharge time for patients with conditional discharge orders decreased by 83 minutes (0.06 day) from baseline. Qualitatively, the health care team reported improved workflows with conditional orders. The conditional discharge orders allowed physicians to communicate pending discharges electronically to the multidisciplinary team. The initiative positively impacted patient discharge times and workflows.

  19. Motocross-associated head and spine injuries in adult patients evaluated in an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lucas Oliveira J E; Fernanda Bellolio, M; Smith, Elisa M; Daniels, David J; Lohse, Christine M; Campbell, Ronna L

    2017-10-01

    Motor vehicle-related injuries (including off-road) are the leading cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and acute traumatic spinal cord injury in the United States. To describe motocross-related head and spine injuries of adult patients presenting to an academic emergency department (ED). We performed an observational cohort study of adult ED patients evaluated for motocross-related injuries from 2010 through 2015. Electronic health records were reviewed and data extracted using a standardized review process. A total of 145 motocross-related ED visits (143 unique patients) were included. Overall, 95.2% of patients were men with a median age of 25years. Sixty-seven visits (46.2%) were associated with head or spine injuries. Forty-three visits (29.7%) were associated with head injuries, and 46 (31.7%) were associated with spine injuries. Among the 43 head injuries, 36 (83.7%) were concussions. Seven visits (16.3%) were associated with at least 1 head abnormality identified by computed tomography, including skull fracture (n=2), subdural hematoma (n=1), subarachnoid hemorrhage (n=4), intraparenchymal hemorrhage (n=3), and diffuse axonal injury (n=3). Among the 46 spine injuries, 32 (69.6%) were acute spinal fractures. Seven patients (4.9%) had clinically significant and persistent neurologic injuries. One patient (0.7%) died, and 3 patients had severe TBIs. Adult patients evaluated in the ED after motocross trauma had high rates of head and spine injuries with considerable morbidity and mortality. Almost half had head or spine injuries (or both), with permanent impairment for nearly 5% and death for 0.7%. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. [Treatment of Adult Schizophrenic Patients With Depot Antipsychotics].

    PubMed

    Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; García Valencia, Jenny; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Ávila-Guerra, Mauricio; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    To determine the indications of long-acting antipsychotic injection and what its effectiveness and safety in adult patients with schizophrenia during the treatment maintenance phase. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. The evidence of NICE guide 82 was adopted and updated. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. The literature review shows that the evidence has moderate to low quality. 8 articles were used. The risk of relapse was lower with depot risperidone and paliperidone palmitate when compared with placebo. For the risk of hospitalizations comparing depot antipsychotics (APD) versus oral AP, the result is inconclusive. Globally the second-generation APD had a lower risk of discontinuation when compared with placebo. The second generation AP had higher risk of extrapyramidal syndromes than placebo, as in the use of antiparkinsonian. The comparison of second-generation AP injections versus placebo showed an increased risk of early weight gain. The use of depot antipsychotics in the maintenance phase of adult patients diagnosed with schizophrenia is recommended if there is no adherence to oral antipsychotics as the patient's preference. It is not recommended depot antipsychotics in the acute phase of schizophrenia in adults. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Correlates of Neuropsychological Impairment in Older Adult Pain Clinic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Jordan F.; Reynolds, Charles F.; Butters, Meryl; Dew, Mary Amanda; Mazumdar, Sati; Begley, Amy E.; Lenze, Eric; Weiner, Debra K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Persistent pain and cognitive impairment are common in older adults. Memory and mental flexibility are cognitive domains which may be vulnerable in the aging brain. We were interested in examining the effects of persistent pain and opioid use on cognition in community dwelling, non-demented older adults. Setting Older Adult Pain Management Program. Design 57 new patients (mean age 76.1) were recruited to describe 1) rates of persistent pain conditions and pain intensity, 2) cognition (memory and mental flexibility), 3) rates and severity of depression, and 4) sleep quality. All patients had non-malignant pain for at least 3 months. Pain intensity was measured with the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Diagnosis of depression was via the Patient Health Questionnaire and depression severity assessed with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Cognition was assessed with: 1) Mini Mental State Examination, 2) number-letter-switching and motor speed trail-making subtests, 3) Digit Symbol Subtest of the WAIS-R, and 4) free and paired recall of the WAIS-R. To determine which variables predicted poorer outcomes on mental flexibility tests, these variables were entered into a multiple regression. Results Pain severity was associated with impaired number-letter switching (r = −0.42, p = 0.002). Multiple regression showed pain severity was associated with impaired mental flexibility (parameter estimate = −0.29 (t = −2.00), p = 0.05). Patients taking opioids had worse memory (t = 2.17, df = 39, p = 0.04). Conclusions In community-dwelling older adults, pain severity is associated with impaired mental flexibility. In addition, opioids may increase memory problems. PMID:17014605

  2. Hypohidrosis induced by topiramate in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Karachristianou, Styliani; Papamichalis, Evangelos; Sarantopoulos, Alexandros; Boura, Panagiota; Georgiadis, George

    2013-06-01

    Hypohidrosis is an uncommon and reversible side effect of topiramate treatment, reported mainly in children. This report presents an adult patient with complex partial seizures who was treated with topiramate and developed hypohidrosis coupled with hyperthermia, related to high environmental temperature and physical exercise. Reduced sweat response was confirmed using the Neuropad test. Signs and symptoms ceased after drug discontinuation. During topiramate treatment, it is important to recognise this side effect, although the exact causal mechanism has not yet been clarified.

  3. Modified Fontan Conversion: An Alternative Technique for Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    González-López, María-Teresa; Pita-Fernández, Ana-María; Gil-Jaurena, Juan-Miguel; Pérez-Caballero-Martínez, Ramón; Sánchez-Valenzuela, Diego; Las, Cynthia-Jahavee

    2015-07-01

    A need persists for Fontan conversion that provides alternative approaches for the individual anatomical challenges occurring in these unusual and complex adult patients. The pulmonary arteries present unique variations and the surgical technique needs to be intraoperatively addressed. We describe a technique for Fontan conversion for performing the distal anastomosis of the extracardiac conduit, allowing adequate matching to the pulmonary arteries and preserving an optimal flow into the Fontan circuit.

  4. Microsurgical Posterolateral Foraminotomy on Patients with Adult Isthmic Spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Han Soo

    2017-04-01

    The standard surgical treatment for adult isthmic spondylolisthesis consists of various techniques of arthrodesis supplemented with instrumentation. However, the superiority of this strategy has not been irrefutably proved. Considering the risk associated with the instrumentation surgery, examining a less invasive approach is justified. We describe a series of 9 patients with adult isthmic spondylolisthesis, in whom we microsurgically decompressed the responsible nerve root in the intervertebral foramen through the posterolateral intermuscular approach. Technical details specific to isthmic spondylolisthesis were reviewed. The 2-year outcome was assessed with Short Form 36 and visual analog scale scores. The mean age of the patients was 68 ± 7 years (standard deviation [SD]). The mean slip rate of spondylolisthesis measured on the preoperative lumbar radiography was 20% ± 12% (SD). All patients successfully underwent the procedure without complications. All the examined scores remained significantly better than the preoperative values 2 years after surgery; the mean visual analog scale score decreased from 7.8 ± 2.8 (SD) preoperatively to 2.8 ± 1.4 (SD) at 2 years (P = 0.008), average physical score of Short Form 36 improved from 33.1 ± 9.7 to 52.5 ± 9.4 (P = 0.001), and the bodily pain score improved from 28.0 ± 13.5 to 55.1 ± 9.7 (P = 0.001). Microsurgical decompression through the posterolateral intermuscular approach was effective in producing good 2-year outcome in patients with adult isthmic spondylolisthesis. This procedure may be considered as a less invasive alternative in the surgical treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Addressing patients' psychosocial concerns regarding hearing aids within audiology appointments for older adults.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, Katie; Grenness, Caitlin; Hickson, Louise

    2014-09-01

    It has long been documented that patients may experience emotional reactions to a diagnosis of hearing impairment and recommendation of hearing aids. Because of this, patients may raise psychosocial concerns regarding their hearing rehabilitation during audiology appointments, particularly in relation to getting hearing aids. However, thus far there has been little systematic research exploring how patients' concerns about hearing aids are addressed by audiologists within appointments. This study used conversation analysis to examine a corpus of 63 video-recorded initial audiology appointments with older adults with hearing impairment. The findings demonstrated that when patients expressed concerns regarding hearing aids, these concerns were typically psychosocial in nature and expressed in a way that carried a negative emotional stance. These types of turns thus invited an empathic response. However, patients' concerns were not typically addressed by audiologists during the appointment. As a consequence, patients persistently re-raised their concerns in subsequent turns, leading to expanded sequences of interaction during the management phase of the appointment. Older adults' psychosocial concerns regarding hearing aids may not always be sufficiently addressed within audiology appointments. A greater emphasis on emotionally focused communication within audiology could result in improved outcomes from hearing health care services.

  6. Multicenter study on caries risk assessment in Japanese adult patients.

    PubMed

    Arino, Masumi; Ataru, Ito; Fujiki, Shozo; Sugiyama, Seiichi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to identify significant risk factors for the onset and the accumulation of new caries in adult patients undergoing regular preventive therapy. The data of 732 patients from nine Japanese general dental practices were retrospectively analyzed. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was applied to develop a caries prediction model using the following patient parameters: age, number of teeth with caries experience (DMFT), levels of mutans streptococci (SM) and lactobacilli (LB), saliva flow rate and buffer capacity, and compliance with a preventive program. Poisson regression analysis was conducted to identify factors affecting caries accumulation within three years. CART analysis identified patients at high risk for primary caries with an odds ratio of 3.08 (95%CI, 1.55-5.79; p=0.0018) according to SM levels and compliance; and those for secondary caries with an odds ratio of 3.69 (95%CI, 2.29-5.91; p<0.0001) according to LB and SM levels. Poisson regression analyses showed that accumulation of primary caries was affected by compliance (p<0.001), SM (p<0.001) and LB (p=0.013). Accumulation of secondary caries was affected by DMFT (p<0.001), SM (p<0.001) and LB (p<0.001). CART is an important tool in identifying the risk of caries development in individual adult patients. Cariogenic bacteria are important factors for both the onset and accumulation of primary and secondary caries. Participation in a regular preventive program limits the onset and the accumulation of primary caries in adult patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Premonitory urges for tics in adult patients with Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Eleanor; Seri, Stefano; Stern, Jeremy S; Robertson, Mary M; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) often report characteristic sensory experiences, also called premonitory urges (PUs), which precede tic expression and have high diagnostic relevance. This study investigated the usefulness of a scale developed and validated in children and adolescents-the Premonitory Urge for Tics Scale (PUTS, Woods et al., 2005 [13])-for the assessment of PUs in adult patients with TS. Standard statistical methods were applied to test the psychometric properties of the PUTS in 102 adult TS outpatients recruited from two specialist clinics in the United Kingdom. The PUTS showed good acceptability and endorsement rates, with evenly distributed scores and low floor and ceiling effects. Item-total correlations were moderate to strong; PUTS total scores were significantly correlated with quantitative measures of TS severity. The PUTS showed excellent internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.85) and Spearman's correlations demonstrated satisfactory convergent and discriminant validity. Although originally devised to assess urges to tic in young patients with TS, the PUTS demonstrated good psychometric properties in a large sample of adults recruited at specialist TS clinics. This instrument is therefore recommended for use across the life span as a valid and reliable self-report measure of sensory experiences accompanying tic expression. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationship of Hemoglobin Concentration in Adult Asthmatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Nasreen, S; Nessa, A; Islam, M F; Husain, M F; Khatun, N; Wahed, F; Zannat, M R; Tajkia, T

    2016-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, in which many cells and cellular elements play a role. Asthma is one of the most common diseases globally and currently affects 300 million people. The epidemic rise in anemia, asthma, and related allergic disease is a common major public health problem worldwide. Asthma and anemia associated with acute infections occur both in children and adults. This descriptive type of cross sectional study was done to find out the levels of hemoglobin concentration in adult asthmatic patients and carried out in the Department of Physiology, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh from July 2014 to January 2016. Fifty (50) male and 50 (fifty) female adult asthmatic patients aged 18-60 years were included in the study group. They are enrolled from the Department of Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh and also from locality. For comparison age matched 50 male and 50 female apparently healthy persons were also studied as control. Hemoglobin concentration was estimated by Cyanmethemoglobin method. For statistical analysis unpaired student's 't' test was used. Mean hemoglobin concentration was significantly decreased in study group in comparison to control group and the result was statistically significant (p<0.001). The study findings showed a high prevalence of anemia among asthmatic patients than non asthmatic healthy persons.

  9. [understanding of pavor nocturnus in adults. Discussion of a case using polygraphy and infrared light video recording].

    PubMed

    Schneider-Helmert, D

    1980-01-01

    Direct observations of night terrors in adults are rare. Our understanding of this sleep disorder is therefore fragmentary. In a single-case study, 17 night terror attacks and 5 utterances of sleep talking were examined by polygraphic and infrared-video recordings, which provided new material. These observations are compared with the literature and discussed under 3 aspects. 1) Phenomenology of behaviour: The behaviour following the initial stereotype terror attacks was found to be extremely expressive, especially in the nonverbal dimension. Mainly defensive or counteraggressve patterns were acted out. As to the contents of verbal utterances self-assertion and sexuality were main themes. In contrast to the stereotype of the initial terror, the patient's reaction seems specific for the individual and therefore psychodynamically relevant. -2) Psychophysiology: Broughton's disorder of arousal-hypothesis, which actually refers to the James-Lange-theory of emotions, is rejected in favour of the concept that the initial terror elicits an emergency state (Cannon). For the discrimination between night terrors and sleep talking, basic skin resistance is a reliable psychophysiological parameter proving full accordance with behavioural criteria. Increases in heart rate are partially due to intense emotions during an attack. -3) Psychiatric considerations of pathogenesis and aetiology: The night terror attack is considered as a psychogenic dissociative state during which suppressed aggressive impulses are acted out. Psychoanalytic interpretations should focus primarily on the defense and aggression rather than the anxiety of the initial terror. The aetiology of this disorder is still unknown. It seems likely that dispositional factors are involved.

  10. Using the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) in a regional electronic patient record for patients with malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Wolff, A C; Mludek, V; van der Haak, M; Bork, W; Bülzebruck, H; Drings, P; Schmücker, P; Wannenmacher, M; Haux, R

    2001-01-01

    Communication between different institutions which are responsible for the treatment of the same patient is of outstanding significance, especially in the field of tumor diseases. Regional electronic patient records could support the co-operation of different institutions by providing ac-cess to all necessary information whether it belongs to the own institution or to a partner. The Department of Medical Informatics, University of Heidelberg is performing a project in co-operation with the Thoraxclinic-Heidelberg and the Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Heidelberg with the goal: to define an architectural concept for interlinking the electronic patient record of the two clinical institutions to build a common virtual electronic patient record and carry out an exemplary implementation, to examine composition, structure and content of medical documents for tumor patients with the aim of defining an XML-based markup language allowing summarizing overviews and suitable granularities, and to integrate clinical practice guidelines and other external knowledge with the electronic patient record using XML-technologies to support the physician in the daily decision process. This paper will show, how a regional electronic patient record could be built on an architectural level and describe elementary steps towards a on content-oriented structuring of medical records.

  11. Blood pressure level impacts risk of death among HIV seropositive adults in Kenya: a retrospective analysis of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Gerald S; Hogan, Joseph W; Keter, Alfred; Holland, Thomas L; Sang, Edwin; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Velazquez, Eric J

    2014-05-22

    Mortality among people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is increasingly due to non-communicable causes. This has been observed mostly in developed countries and the routine care of HIV infected individuals has now expanded to include attention to cardiovascular risk factors. Cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure are often overlooked among HIV seropositive (+) individuals in sub-Saharan Africa. We aimed to determine the effect of blood pressure on mortality among HIV+ adults in Kenya. We performed a retrospective analysis of electronic medical records of a large HIV treatment program in western Kenya between 2005 and 2010. All included individuals were HIV+. We excluded participants with AIDS, who were <16 or >80 years old, or had data out of acceptable ranges. Missing data for key covariates was addressed by inverse probability weighting. Primary outcome measures were crude mortality rate and mortality hazard ratio (HR) using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for potential confounders including HIV stage. There were 49,475 (74% women) HIV+ individuals who met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Mortality rates for men and women were 3.8 and 1.8/100 person-years, respectively, and highest among those with the lowest blood pressures. Low blood pressure was associated with the highest mortality incidence rate (IR) (systolic <100 mmHg IR 5.2 [4.8-5.7]; diastolic <60 mmHg IR 9.2 [8.3-10.2]). Mortality rate among men with high systolic blood pressure without advanced HIV (3.0, 95% CI: 1.6-5.5) was higher than men with normal systolic blood pressure (1.1, 95% CI: 0.7-1.7). In weighted proportional hazards regression models, men without advanced HIV disease and systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg carried a higher mortality risk than normotensive men (HR: 2.39, 95% CI: 0.94-6.08). Although there has been little attention paid to high blood pressure among HIV+ Africans, we show that blood pressure level among HIV+ patients in Kenya

  12. Lipoprotein(a) concentrations in adult congenital heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2014-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) contributes to the formation to atherosclerosis, promotes inflammation and stimulates prothrombotic processes. One hundred seventeen adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients and 152 controls were studied to compare serum Lp(a) concentrations in different subgroups of congenital heart abnormalities. Analytically, Lp(a), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were studied. In congenital heart disease patients, N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels were also determined. Thirty-nine (25.6%) patients in the control group and 33 (28.2) ACHD patients (2 hypoxemic and 31 nonhypoxemic) had a Lp(a) concentration higher than 30 mg/dL. No significant differences were seen between patients with Lp(a) concentration ≤30 or >30 mg/dL after performing a binary logistic regression multivariate analysis including as covariates all the variables that showed significance (P < .001) between the case and control groups (age, gender, CRP, and total, LDL, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) besides being congenital or not. Similarly, no significant differences were found between ACHD patients with Lp(a) concentration lower and higher than 30 mg/dL after performing a multivariate analysis in which age, sex, body mass index, LDL-cholesterol levels, and being or not hypoxemic were included as covariates. Pearson's correlation showed a significant positive correlation (0.27) between LDL-cholesterol and Lp(a) concentrations (P = .004) and between CRP and N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels (0.19) in ACHD patients (P = .035). Adult congenital heart disease patients showed lower serum total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels than no-congenital patients although no significant differences were seen in Lp(a) concentrations between both groups. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Empowerment of patients over their personal health record implies sharing responsibility with the physician.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Benzenine, Eric; Auverlot, Bertrand; Jaquet-Chiffelle, David-Olivier; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François-André

    2011-01-01

    Through this article, we point out the unavoidable empowerment of patients with regard to their personal health record and propose the mixed management of patients' medical records. This mixed management implies sharing responsibilities between the patient and the Medical Practitioner (MP) by making patients responsible for the validation of their administrative information, and MPs responsible for the validation of their patients' medical information. We propose a solution to gather and update patients' administrative and medical data in order to reconstitute patients' medical histories accurately. This method is based on two processes. The aim of the first process is to provide patients administrative data, in order to know where and when they received care (name of the health structure or health practitioner, type of care: outpatient or inpatient). The aim of the second process is to provide patients' medical information and to validate it under the responsibility of the MP with the help of patients if needed. During these two processes, the patients' privacy will be ensured through cryptographic hash functions like the Secure Hash Algorithm, which allows the pseudonymization of patients' identities. The Medical Record Search Engine we propose will be able to retrieve and to provide upon a request formulated by the MP all the available information concerning a patient who has received care in different health structures without divulging the patient's true identity. Associated with strong traceability of all access, modifications or deletions, our method can lead to improved efficiency of personal medical record management while reinforcing the empowerment of patients over their medical records.

  14. Stepping to stability and fall prevention in adult psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Emory, Sara L; Silva, Susan G; Christopher, Eric J; Edwards, Pamela B; Wahl, Leanne E

    2011-12-01

    Fall prevention is a major area of concern in inpatient settings. This article reports on the feasibility of implementing a daily exercise program that features line dancing to promote stability, balance, and flexibility in adult psychiatric patients and describes the impact of that program. Six hundred sixty-five patient charts drawn from before and after the practice change were reviewed. The fall rate after the introduction of line dancing was 2.8% compared with 3.2% before implementation. In a setting that treats both men and women of many ages and with varying levels of mobility, line dancing offers a viable approach to exercise in a secure setting.

  15. Vaccination of Adult Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca; Antunes, Ana Margarida; Gruner, Heidi; Riso, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the Portuguese vaccination program 50th anniversary it seems appropriate to review vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Controversial issues as regards the association between autoimmune diseases, infections, and vaccines are discussed as well as vaccine safety and efficacy issues as regards chronic immunosuppressant (IS) drug therapy. After a brief overview of national policies, specific recommendations are made as regards vaccination for adult patients with SLE with a particular focus on current IS therapy and unmet needs. PMID:27069477

  16. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  17. Organ doses to adult patients for chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to estimate organ doses for chest CT examinations using volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) data as well as accounting for patient weight. Methods: A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator) was used to compute organ doses for a 70 kg patient undergoing chest CT examinations, as well as volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) in a body CT dosimetry phantom at the same CT technique factors. Ratios of organ dose to CTDI{sub vol} (f{sub organ}) were generated as a function of anatomical location in the chest for the breasts, lungs, stomach, red bone marrow, liver, thyroid, liver, and thymus. Values of f{sub organ} were obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV for 1, 4, 16, and 64 slice CT scanners from two vendors. For constant CT techniques, we computed ratios of dose in water phantoms of differing diameter. By modeling patients of different weights as equivalent water cylinders of different diameters, we generated factors that permit the estimation of the organ doses in patients weighing between 50 and 100 kg who undergo chest CT examinations relative to the corresponding organ doses received by a 70 kg adult. Results: For a 32 cm long CT scan encompassing the complete lungs, values of f{sub organ} ranged from 1.7 (thymus) to 0.3 (stomach). Organs that are directly in the x-ray beam, and are completely irradiated, generally had f{sub organ} values well above 1 (i.e., breast, lung, heart, and thymus). Organs that are not completely irradiated in a total chest CT scan generally had f{sub organ} values that are less than 1 (e.g., red bone marrow, liver, and stomach). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV resulted in modest increases in f{sub organ} for the heart (9%) and thymus (8%), but resulted in larger increases for the breast (19%) and red bone marrow (21%). Adult patient chests have been modeled by water cylinders with diameters between

  18. Event related potentials recorded in patients with locked-in syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Onofrj, M.; Thomas, A.; Paci, C.; Scesi, M.; Tombari, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the possibility of recording "cognitive" event related potentials (ERPs) in locked-in patients and therefore to determine whether ERPs can have a role in differential diagnosis of coma.
METHODS—ERPs to classic auditory or visual "odd ball paradigms" were recorded three to four days, seven to eight days, and 30 to 60days after admission to the intensive care unit, in four patients affected by basilar artery thrombembolism resulting in locked-in syndrome. Two patients (one 32 year old man, one 31 year old woman) could move the eyes laterally and vertically spontaneously and on command. One patient (a 39 year old man) had a "one and half syndrome", one patient (a 40 year old woman) could only elevate the left eyelid and eye. Results were compared with data from 30 age matched controls. In the last recording session a letter recognition paradigm was applied, in which ERPs were produced by the identification of letters forming a word. Results were compared with five age matched controls. Brainstem lesions extending to the pontomesencephalic junction were found on MRI and CT.
RESULTS—ERPs to the oddball paradigms were recorded in three patients in the first recording session, in all patients in the second recording session. Latency, amplitude, and topographic distribution of ERP components were inside normal limits. With the letter recognition paradigm the patients could emit a P3 component to correspond with target letters, with the same margin of error as controls.
CONCLUSION—It is possible to record ERPs in patients with locked-in syndrome shortly after the acute ischaemic lesion, and therefore to assess objectively cognitive activities. Furthermore the letter recognition paradigm could be implemented to facilitate linguistic communication with patients with locked-in syndrome.

 PMID:9416812

  19. Complications of nonbreast tissue expansion: 9 Years experience with 44 adult patients and 119 pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Adler, Neta; Elia, Jhonatan; Billig, Allan; Margulis, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Tissue expansion is a common reconstructive technique that has been associated with significant complications since its inception. However, the existing literature mostly focuses on complications associated with pediatric tissue expansion only or describes a combined population of adult and pediatric patients, including breast tissue expansion; despite the fact that each of these groups of patients has different characteristics that may affect tissue expansion. In this study we present a critical review of our experience with complications of nonbreast tissue expansion in adult and pediatric patients and compare between these groups. The charts of patients who underwent nonbreast tissue expansion at Hadassah Medical Center between January 2003 and July 2012 were reviewed. Data were collected including the age of the patient, anatomical site of the expansion, indication and complications. A total of 202 expansion procedures were performed on 119 pediatric patients (<16 years) and 56 expansion procedures on 44 adult patients. The overall complication rate was 18.2%, with 40 pediatric procedures having complications (19.8%) and 7 adult procedures (12.5%). The difference in complication rates between the two groups was not found to be statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference in complication rate between the different anatomical areas of expansion in both adult and pediatric patients or between the indications for operation. Most (68%) of the cases with complications underwent subsequent successful reconstruction. Despite the consistent high complication rate, tissue expansion can be used as a good reconstructive method in both adult and pediatric patients in all anatomic areas and for different indications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality of life of adult patients with severe burns.

    PubMed

    Elsherbiny, Ola Ebrahim Ebrahim; Salem, Maha Adel; El-Sabbagh, Ahmed Hassan; Elhadidy, Mohamed Radwan; Eldeen, Sanaa Mohamed Alaa

    2011-08-01

    Burns are one of the most significant health problems throughout the world, leading to prolonged hospitalisation and hence increased expense for the patients, their families and society. Today, the prognosis of patients with burns is dependent, apart from adequate treatment, upon the health-care system and health-care professionals, regarding not only survival, but also lifelong quality of life. This study aims to assess quality of life of adult patients with severe burns. This study was conducted on 100 adult patients with severe burns in the burn outpatient clinic (male and female) at Mansoura University Hospital. Parameters of burn and Burn Specific Health Scale (BSHS-B) were used to assess quality of life following burns. The study revealed that burns has negative impact on most dimensions of the quality of life of patients with burns. The quality of life for people who have sustained a burns should be recognised and valued by the burn team in all phases of burn care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. [The definition of the medical clown's role with adult patients].

    PubMed

    Scheyer, Rachel; Nuttman-Shwartz, Orit; Ziyoni, Herzel

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the healthcare system has grown increasingly aware of the need to develop and adopt new models and intervention methods aimed at improving patients' quality of life. As part of this perception, medical clowns have been integrated into hospitals, primarily in work with children. Recently, there have been attempts to integrate clowns into work with adult patients in emergency rooms, but this intervention method has not yet been systematically implemented and studied. This article describes and examines the definition of the medical clown's role as an intervention strategy with adult outpatients suffering from chronic and life-threatening illnesses. The study is qualitative and based on a content analysis of the documentation of the work of two medical clowns over two years. The dominant theme arising from this analysis involves the definition of the clown's role within the medical space of the hospital and includes perspectives on his integration into the hospital's multidisciplinary medical staff and his impact on the staff and on patients and their families. The findings indicate that, from the clowns' point of view, integrated medical clowns as part of the medical team, would contribute to the functioning of both patients and staff. This is in accord with additional studies conducted recently in medical centers around the world. Since this is a pioneering study, there is room to further probe and research the medical clown's contribution to assisting and improving patients' and staff's quality of life and to develop ways of increasing his integration and professionalism.

  2. Patients Know Best: Qualitative Study on How Families Use Patient-Controlled Personal Health Records.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Hanna; Hill, Susan; Blandford, Ann

    2016-02-24

    Self-management technologies, such as patient-controlled electronic health records (PCEHRs), have the potential to help people manage and cope with disease. This study set out to investigate patient families' lived experiences of working with a PCEHR. We conducted a semistructured qualitative field study with patient families and clinicians at a children's hospital in the UK that uses a PCEHR (Patients Know Best). All families were managing the health of a child with a serious chronic condition, who was typically under the care of multiple clinicians. As data gathering and analysis progressed, it became clear that while much of the literature assumes that patients are willing and waiting to take more responsibility for and control over their health management (eg, with PCEHRs), only a minority of participants in our study responded in this way. Their experiences with the PCEHR were diverse and strongly shaped by their coping styles. Theory on coping identifies a continuum of coping styles, from approach to avoidance oriented, and proposes that patients' information needs depend on their style. We identified 3 groups of patient families and an outlier, distinguished by their coping style and their PCEHR use. We refer to the outlier as controlling (approach oriented, highly motivated to use PCEHR), and the 3 groups as collaborating (approach oriented, motivated to use PCEHR), cooperating (avoidance oriented, less motivated to use PCEHR), and avoiding (very avoidance oriented, not motivated to use PCEHR). The PCEHR met the needs of controller and collaborators better than the needs of cooperators and avoiders. We draw on the Self-Determination Theory to propose ways in which a PCEHR design might better meet the needs of avoidance-oriented users. Further, we highlight the need for families to also relinquish control at times, and propose ways in which PCEHR design might support a better distribution of control, based on effective training, ease of use

  3. Assessing nutritional status in chronically critically ill adult patients.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Patricia A; Daly, Barbara J; Lipson, Amy R; Guo, Su-Er

    2006-03-01

    Numerous methods are used to measure and assess nutritional status of chronically critically ill patients. To discuss the multiple methods used to assess nutritional status in chronically critically ill patients, describe the nutritional status of chronically critically ill patients, and assess the relationship between nutritional indicators and outcomes of mechanical ventilation. A descriptive, longitudinal design was used to collect weekly data on 360 adult patients who required more than 72 hours of mechanical ventilation and had a hospital stay of 7 days or more. Data on body mass index and biochemical markers of nutritional status were collected. Patients' nutritional intake compared with physicians' orders, dieticians' recommendations, and indirect calorimetry and physicians' orders compared with dieticians' recommendations were used to assess nutritional status. Relationships between nutritional indicators and variables of mechanical ventilation were determined. Inconsistencies among nurses' implementation, physicians' orders, and dieticians' recommendations resulted in wide variations in patients' calculated nutritional adequacy. Patients received a mean of 83% of the energy intake ordered by their physicians (SD 33%, range 0%-200%). Patients who required partial or total ventilator support upon discharge had a lower body mass index at admission than did patients with spontaneous respirations (Mann-Whitney U = 8441, P = .001). In this sample, the variability in weaning progression and outcomes most likely reflects illness severity and complexity rather than nutritional status or nutritional therapies. Further studies are needed to determine the best methods to define nutritional adequacy and to evaluate nutritional status.

  4. A one-appointment impression and centric relation record technique for compromised complete denture patients.

    PubMed

    Ansari, I H

    1997-09-01

    This article describes a two-in-one modified custom tray and record block system that is recommended for compromised elderly patients. Custom trays, which are made on primary casts and formed from a patient's functionally corrected old dentures, are used to make final impressions and centric jaw relation records in one clinical appointment. The clinical visits are reduced without compromising the quality of denture construction.

  5. Perinatal computerized patient record and archiving systems: pitfalls and enhancements for implementing a successful computerized medical record.

    PubMed

    Kelly, C S

    1999-03-01

    Interest in purchasing and installing a perinatal computerized patient record (CPR) and archiving system is growing in the United States as a result of increased patient satisfaction demands, cost containment, and quality improvement. Perinatal nurses are commonly charged with researching available computer software and hardware, making purchasing decisions, developing menus and forms, orienting users, and maintaining and upgrading systems. The decision to chart and archive by computer as well as installation and maintenance issues mandate that nurses increase their computer-related knowledge. The article reviews information related to CPR capabilities and rationales for purchase decisions, implementation and staff development issues, ergonomic and maintenance considerations, and realistic expectations of a CPR to provide perinatal nurses who are involved in purchasing, implementing, and maintaining these systems with a timely understanding of important elements that they need to know to make this effort successful.

  6. Congruence of Self-Reported Medications with Pharmacy Prescription Records in Low-Income Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caskie, Grace I. L.; Willis, Sherry L.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the congruence of self-reported medications with computerized pharmacy records. Design and Methods: Pharmacy records and self-reported medications were obtained for 294 members of a state pharmaceutical assistance program who also participated in ACTIVE, a clinical trial on cognitive training in nondemented elderly…

  7. Congruence of Self-Reported Medications with Pharmacy Prescription Records in Low-Income Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caskie, Grace I. L.; Willis, Sherry L.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the congruence of self-reported medications with computerized pharmacy records. Design and Methods: Pharmacy records and self-reported medications were obtained for 294 members of a state pharmaceutical assistance program who also participated in ACTIVE, a clinical trial on cognitive training in nondemented elderly…

  8. Adult Individual Criminal Records and the News Media: Inherent Problems for Access and Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Jay B.

    Public access to criminal records, facilitated by the use of computerized information storage and retrieval systems, sometimes appears to infringe on individual rights of privacy. Examples may be cited to show that the records compiled on individuals do not always present an accurate picture, due to factual inaccuracies, incomplete information, or…

  9. Clofarabine in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-04

    Solid Tumors; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Adult; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Adult; Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Adult

  10. Problematic hospital experiences among adult patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lattimer, Lakshmi; Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Ratanawongsa, Neda; Bediako, Shawn M; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2010-11-01

    Adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) have often reported difficulties obtaining care during vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) in qualitative studies. We measured the experiences of 45 SCD patients who received in-hospital care for VOC using the Picker Patient Experience Questionnaire (PPE-15), and used the one sample binomial test to compare with national norms. Most SCD patients reported that they were insufficiently involved in decisions (86%), staff gave conflicting information (64%), it wasn't easy to find someone to discuss concerns (61%), doctors' answers to questions were not clear (58%), nurses' answers to questions were not clear (56%), doctors did not always discuss fears and anxieties (53%), and nurses did not always discuss fears and anxieties (52%). A greater percentage of SCD patients than the U.S. sample in 9 of 12 areas reported problems. Further research is needed to determine the consequences of and potential interventions to improve these poor experiences.

  11. Study of inhaler technique in asthma patients: differences between pediatric and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Manríquez, Pablo; Acuña, Ana María; Muñoz, Luis; Reyes, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Inhaler technique comprises a set of procedures for drug delivery to the respiratory system. The oral inhalation of medications is the first-line treatment for lung diseases. Using the proper inhaler technique ensures sufficient drug deposition in the distal airways, optimizing therapeutic effects and reducing side effects. The purposes of this study were to assess inhaler technique in pediatric and adult patients with asthma; to determine the most common errors in each group of patients; and to compare the results between the two groups. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Using a ten-step protocol, we assessed inhaler technique in 135 pediatric asthma patients and 128 adult asthma patients. The most common error among the pediatric patients was failing to execute a 10-s breath-hold after inhalation, whereas the most common error among the adult patients was failing to exhale fully before using the inhaler. Pediatric asthma patients appear to perform most of the inhaler technique steps correctly. However, the same does not seem to be true for adult patients.

  12. Study of inhaler technique in asthma patients: differences between pediatric and adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Manríquez, Pablo; Acuña, Ana María; Muñoz, Luis; Reyes, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Inhaler technique comprises a set of procedures for drug delivery to the respiratory system. The oral inhalation of medications is the first-line treatment for lung diseases. Using the proper inhaler technique ensures sufficient drug deposition in the distal airways, optimizing therapeutic effects and reducing side effects. The purposes of this study were to assess inhaler technique in pediatric and adult patients with asthma; to determine the most common errors in each group of patients; and to compare the results between the two groups. Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Using a ten-step protocol, we assessed inhaler technique in 135 pediatric asthma patients and 128 adult asthma patients. Results: The most common error among the pediatric patients was failing to execute a 10-s breath-hold after inhalation, whereas the most common error among the adult patients was failing to exhale fully before using the inhaler. Conclusions: Pediatric asthma patients appear to perform most of the inhaler technique steps correctly. However, the same does not seem to be true for adult patients. PMID:26578130

  13. Privacy preservation and information security protection for patients' portable electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu-Chou; Chu, Huei-Chung; Lien, Chung-Yueh; Hsiao, Chia-Hung; Kao, Tsair

    2009-09-01

    As patients face the possibility of copying and keeping their electronic health records (EHRs) through portable storage media, they will encounter new risks to the protection of their private information. In this study, we propose a method to preserve the privacy and security of patients' portable medical records in portable storage media to avoid any inappropriate or unintentional disclosure. Following HIPAA guidelines, the method is designed to protect, recover and verify patient's identifiers in portable EHRs. The results of this study show that our methods are effective in ensuring both information security and privacy preservation for patients through portable storage medium.

  14. Peptic ulcer as a risk factor for postherpetic neuralgia in adult patients with herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Lan, Kuo-Mao; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Tseng, Su-Feng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of herpes zoster. Identifying predictors for postherpetic neuralgia may help physicians screen herpes zoster patients at risk of postherpetic neuralgia and undertake preventive strategies. Peptic ulcer has been linked to immunological dysfunctions and malnutrition, both of which are predictors of postherpetic neuralgia. The aim of this retrospective case-control study was to determine whether adult herpes zoster patients with peptic ulcer were at greater risk of postherpetic neuralgia. Adult zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and postherpetic neuralgia patients were automatically selected from a medical center's electronic database using herpes zoster/postherpetic neuralgia ICD-9 codes supported with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Consequently, medical record review was performed to validate the diagnostic codes and all pertaining data including peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and ulcerogenic medications. Because no standard pain intensity measurement exists, opioid usage was used as a proxy measurement for moderate to severe pain. In total, 410 zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and 115 postherpetic neuralgia patients were included. Multivariate logistic regressions identified 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain as independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia. Among etiologies of peptic ulcer, H. pylori infection and usage of non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were significantly associated with the increased risk of postherpetic neuralgia; conversely, other etiologies were not significantly associated with the postherpetic neuralgia risk. In conclusion, 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain are independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia in adult herpes zoster patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Characterisation and outcomes of adult patients with paracetamol overdose presenting to a tertiary hospital in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, Christina Jiun-Yu; Sklar, Grant E

    2016-10-18

    Paracetamol is the most common pharmaceutical agent implicated in toxic exposure in Singapore. This study aimed to describe the characteristics of paracetamol overdose in the adult population managed at a tertiary healthcare facility in Singapore. Medical records of adult patients hospitalised with a diagnosis of paracetamol overdose at National University Hospital, Singapore, over a three-year period from January 2011 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. There were 177 patients with paracetamol overdose. The median age was 25 years, with a significant female predominance (71.2%). Intentional ingestion accounted for the majority (76.8%) of the cases. The median dose of paracetamol ingested was 10 (interquartile range 8-15) g. Among patients who reported an ingestion of greater than 10 g, 46.5% perceived the overdose as non-lethal. N-acetylcysteine was administered in 76.3% of patients, among whom 24.4% experienced an anaphylactoid reaction. 10 (5.6%) patients developed severe hepatotoxicity, among whom 2 (1.1%) developed acute liver failure. Most patients had resolving transaminases at discharge, and none required liver transplantation. The median length of hospitalisation was 3 days. There were no fatalities. Paracetamol overdose occurred predominantly in young adults with intentional ingestion, suggesting that preventive measures targeted at promoting public awareness may not suffice. However, the perceived lack of lethality by many patients who ingested potentially toxic amounts of paracetamol reflects a certain level of knowledge gap. Healthcare providers should proactively educate consumers on the proper use of paracetamol and the consequences of its overdose.

  16. Fibromyalgia in 300 adult index patients with primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Barton, James C; Bertoli, Luigi F; Barton, Jackson C; Acton, Ronald T

    2017-01-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence and clinical and laboratory associations of fibromyalgia in adults with primary immunodeficiency (immunoglobulin (Ig) G subclass deficiency (IgGSD) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We performed a retrospective analysis of these observations in 300 non-Hispanic white adult index patients with recurrent/severe respiratory tract infections and IgGSD or CVID: age; sex; IgGSD; fibromyalgia; chronic fatigue; autoimmune conditions (ACs); interstitial cystitis (IC); diabetes; body mass index; serum Ig isotypes; blood lymphocytes and subsets; and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A and -B types and haplotypes. We performed univariate comparisons, logistic multivariable regressions, and an analysis of covariance. Mean age was 49 ± 12 (standard deviation) y. There were 246 women (82.0%). IgGSD was diagnosed in 276 patients (92.0%). Fifty-six patients had fibromyalgia (18.7%; female:male 13:1). Other characteristics included: chronic fatigue, 63.0%; aggregate ACs, 35.3%; Sjögren's syndrome, 8.0%; IC, 3.0%; diabetes, 10.3%; and HLA-A*29, B*44 positivity, 9.7%. Prevalences of female sex; chronic fatigue; IC; and HLA-A*29, B*44 positivity were greater in patients with fibromyalgia. Logistic regression on fibromyalgia revealed three positive associations: chronic fatigue (p=0.0149; odds ratio 2.6 [95% confidence interval 1.2, 5.6]); Sjögren's syndrome (p=0.0004; 5.2 [2.1, 13.2]); and IC (p=0.0232; 5.7 [1.3, 25.7]). In an analysis of covariance, there were significant interactions of chronic fatigue, Sjögren's syndrome, and interstitial cystitis on fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia is common in non-Hispanic white adult index patients with primary immunodeficiency, especially women. Chronic fatigue, Sjögren's syndrome, and IC are significantly associated with fibromyalgia after adjustment for other independent variables.

  17. Patients Know Best: Qualitative Study on How Families Use Patient-Controlled Personal Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Hanna; Hill, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-management technologies, such as patient-controlled electronic health records (PCEHRs), have the potential to help people manage and cope with disease. Objective This study set out to investigate patient families’ lived experiences of working with a PCEHR. Methods We conducted a semistructured qualitative field study with patient families and clinicians at a children’s hospital in the UK that uses a PCEHR (Patients Know Best). All families were managing the health of a child with a serious chronic condition, who was typically under the care of multiple clinicians. As data gathering and analysis progressed, it became clear that while much of the literature assumes that patients are willing and waiting to take more responsibility for and control over their health management (eg, with PCEHRs), only a minority of participants in our study responded in this way. Their experiences with the PCEHR were diverse and strongly shaped by their coping styles. Theory on coping identifies a continuum of coping styles, from approach to avoidance oriented, and proposes that patients’ information needs depend on their style. Results We identified 3 groups of patient families and an outlier, distinguished by their coping style and their PCEHR use. We refer to the outlier as controlling (approach oriented, highly motivated to use PCEHR), and the 3 groups as collaborating (approach oriented, motivated to use PCEHR), cooperating (avoidance oriented, less motivated to use PCEHR), and avoiding (very avoidance oriented, not motivated to use PCEHR). Conclusions The PCEHR met the needs of controller and collaborators better than the needs of cooperators and avoiders. We draw on the Self-Determination Theory to propose ways in which a PCEHR design might better meet the needs of avoidance-oriented users. Further, we highlight the need for families to also relinquish control at times, and propose ways in which PCEHR design might support a better distribution of control

  18. Can multilingual machine translation help make medical record content more comprehensible to patients?

    PubMed

    Zeng-Treitler, Qing; Kim, Hyeoneui; Rosemblat, Graciela; Keselman, Alla

    2010-01-01

    With the development of electronic personal health records, more patients are gaining access to their own medical records. However, comprehension of medical record content remains difficult for many patients. Because each record is unique, it is also prohibitively costly to employ human translators to solve this problem. In this study, we investigated whether multilingual machine translation could help make medical record content more comprehensible to patients who lack proficiency in the language of the records. We used a popular general-purpose machine translation tool called Babel Fish to translate 213 medical record sentences from English into Spanish, Chinese, Russian and Korean. We evaluated the comprehensibility and accuracy of the translation. The text characteristics of the incorrectly translated sentences were also analyzed. In each language, the majority of the translations were incomprehensible (76% to 92%) and/or incorrect (77% to 89%). The main causes of the translation are vocabulary difficulty and syntactical complexity. A general-purpose machine translation tool like the Babel Fish is not adequate for the translation of medical records; however, a machine translation tool can potentially be improved significantly, if it is trained to target certain narrow domains in medicine.

  19. Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-05-03

    Patient falls within hospitals have been identified as serious but largely preventable incidents, particularly among older adult patients. Previous literature has explored intrinsic factors associated with patient falls, but literature identifying possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls is lacking. This study seeks to identify patient motions and activities along with associated environmental design factors in a patient bathroom and clinician zone setting that may lead to falls. A motion capture experiment was conducted in a laboratory setting on 27 subjects over the age of seventy using scripted tasks and mockups of the bathroom and clinician zone of a patient room. Data were post-processed using Cortex and Visual3D software. A potential fall was characterized by a set of criteria based on the jerk of the upper body׳s center of mass (COM). Results suggest that only motion-related factors, particularly turning, pushing, pulling, and grabbing, contribute most significantly to potential falls in the patient bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute significantly in the clinician zone. Future work includes identifying and changing precise environmental design factors associated with these motions for an updated patient room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup.

  20. The epidemiology of adult Rapid Response Team patients in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jones, D

    2014-03-01

    Rapid Response Teams (RRT) are specialised teams that review deteriorating ward patients in an attempt to prevent morbidity and mortality. Most studies have assessed the effect of implementing an RRT into a hospital. There is much less literature on the characteristics and outcomes of RRT patients themselves. This article reviews the epidemiology of adult RRT patients in Australia and proposes three models of RRT syndromes. The number of RRT calls varies considerably in Australian hospitals from 1.35 to 71.3/1000 hospital admissions. Common causes of RRT calls include sepsis, atrial fibrillation, seizures and pulmonary oedema. Approximately 20% of patients to whom an RRT has responded have more than one RRT call, and up to one-third have issues around end-of-life care. Calls are least common overnight. Between 10 to 25% of patients are admitted to a critical care area after the call. The in-hospital mortality for RRT patients is approximately 25% overall but only 15% in patients without a limitation of medical therapy. RRT syndromes can be conceptually described by the trigger for the call (e.g. hypotension) or the clinical condition causing the call (e.g. sepsis). Alternatively, the RRT call can be described by the major theme of the call: "end-of-life care", "requiring critical care" and "stable enough to initially remain on the ward". Based on these themes, education strategies and quality improvement initiatives may be developed to reduce the incidence of RRT calls, further improving patient outcome.

  1. Patients' experiences of technology and care in adult intensive care.

    PubMed

    Stayt, Louise Caroline; Seers, Kate; Tutton, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    To investigate patients' experiences of technology in an adult intensive care unit. Technology is fundamental to support physical recovery from critical illness in Intensive Care Units. As well as physical corollaries, psychological disturbances are reported in critically ill patients at all stages of their illness and recovery. Nurses play a key role in the physical and psychological care of patients;, however, there is a suggestion in the literature that the presence of technology may dehumanise patient care and distract the nurse from attending to patients psychosocial needs. Little attention has been paid to patients' perceptions of receiving care in a technological environment. This study was informed by Heideggerian phenomenology. The research took place in 2009-2011 in a university hospital in England. Nineteen participants who had been patients in ICU were interviewed guided by an interview topic prompt list. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using Van Manen's framework. Participants described technology and care as inseparable and presented their experiences as a unified encounter. The theme 'Getting on with it' described how participants endured technology by 'Being Good' and 'Being Invisible'. 'Getting over it' described why participants endured technology by 'Bowing to Authority' and viewing invasive technologies as a 'Necessary Evil'. Patients experienced technology and care as a series of paradoxical relationships: alienating yet reassuring, uncomfortable yet comforting, impersonal yet personal. By maintaining a close and supportive presence and providing personal comfort and care nurses may minimize the invasive and isolating potential of technology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Increased risk of thromboembolic events in adult congenital heart disease patients with atrial tachyarrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Keita; Ishizu, Tomoko; Niwa, Koichiro; Takechi, Fumie; Tateno, Shigeru; Horigome, Hitoshi; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2017-05-01

    Atrial tachyarrhythmias are a major morbidity in patients with adult congenital heart disease (ACHD). However, few studies have investigated risk stratification of thromboembolic events in ACHD patients with atrial tachyarrhythmias. This retrospective cohort study reviewed the clinical records of 2314 ACHD patients from 1977 to 2014. We found 242 (10.4%) patients with atrial tachyarrhythmias and excluded 84 patients already being treated with anticoagulant therapy. The remaining 158 patients without anticoagulant therapy were retrospectively followed up from the onset of atrial tachyarrhythmia to the incidence of thromboembolic events. Fourteen thromboembolic events and 5 hemorrhagic events occurred. All patients with thromboembolic events had atrial fibrillation (AF). Thromboembolic events occurred even in the patients with low or intermediate risk as indicated by CHADS2 or CHA2DS2-VASc score. Event rates were higher than those in data from the general adult population in previous studies. Univariate analysis revealed that age≥60years (OR 4.54, 95% CI 1.47-14.06, P=0.009), vascular disease (OR 7.83, 95% CI 1.19-51.53, P=0.032), and persistent AF (OR 5.60, 95% CI 1.73-18.11, P=0.004) were the independent risk factors of thromboembolic events. ACHD patients with atrial tachyarrhythmias and even those with low or intermediate risk as indicated by the CHADS2 or CHA2DS2-VASc score had a higher risk of thromboembolic events. Therefore, anticoagulation should be considered earlier than in the general population in patients with risk factors of age≥60years, vascular disease, or persistent AF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Matching prosthetics order records in VA National Prosthetics Patient Database to healthcare utilization databases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark W; Su, Pon; Phibbs, Ciaran S

    2010-01-01

    The National Prosthetics Patient Database (NPPD) is the national Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) dataset that records characteristics of individual prosthetic and assistive devices. It remains unknown how well NPPD records can be matched to encounter records for the same individuals in major VA utilization databases. We compared the count of prosthetics records in the NPPD with the count of prosthetics-related procedures for the same individuals recorded in major VA utilization databases. We then attempted to match the NPPD records to the utilization records by person and date. In general, 40% to 60% of the NPPD records could be matched to outpatient utilization records within a 14-day window around the NPPD dataset entry date. Match rates for inpatient data were lower: 10% to 16% within a 14-day window. The NPPD will be particularly important for studies of certain veteran groups, such as those with spinal cord injury or blast-related polytraumatic injury. Health services researchers should use both the NPPD and utilization databases to develop a full understanding of prosthetics use by individual patients.

  4. Approach to the patient: the adult with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Auchus, Richard J; Arlt, Wiebke

    2013-07-01

    The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia is steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). When the nonclassical (mild) form is included, 21OHD is the most common genetic disease in human beings. With the advent of pharmaceutical preparation of glucocorticoids starting in the 1960s and newborn screening starting in the 1990s, the majority of children with 21OHD are reaching adulthood, which has yielded a cohort of patients with, in essence, a new disease. Only recently have some data emerged from cohorts of adults with 21OHD, and in some centers, experience with the management of these patients is growing. These patients suffer from poor health, infertility, characteristic tumors in the adrenal glands and gonads, and consequences of chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Their care is fragmented and inconsistent, and many stop taking their medications out of frustration. Internal medicine residents and endocrinology fellows receive little training in their care, which further discourages their seeking medical attention. Adults with 21OHD have a different physiology from patients with Addison's disease or other androgen excess states, and their needs are different than those of young children with 21OHD. Consequently, their care requires unorthodox treatment and monitoring strategies foreign to most endocrine practitioners. Our goal for this article is to review their physiology, complications, and needs in order to develop rational and effective treatment and monitoring strategies.

  5. Approach to the Patient: The Adult With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Wiebke

    2013-01-01

    The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia is steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). When the nonclassical (mild) form is included, 21OHD is the most common genetic disease in human beings. With the advent of pharmaceutical preparation of glucocorticoids starting in the 1960s and newborn screening starting in the 1990s, the majority of children with 21OHD are reaching adulthood, which has yielded a cohort of patients with, in essence, a new disease. Only recently have some data emerged from cohorts of adults with 21OHD, and in some centers, experience with the management of these patients is growing. These patients suffer from poor health, infertility, characteristic tumors in the adrenal glands and gonads, and consequences of chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Their care is fragmented and inconsistent, and many stop taking their medications out of frustration. Internal medicine residents and endocrinology fellows receive little training in their care, which further discourages their seeking medical attention. Adults with 21OHD have a different physiology from patients with Addison's disease or other androgen excess states, and their needs are different than those of young children with 21OHD. Consequently, their care requires unorthodox treatment and monitoring strategies foreign to most endocrine practitioners. Our goal for this article is to review their physiology, complications, and needs in order to develop rational and effective treatment and monitoring strategies. PMID:23837188

  6. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Guida, Gustavo; Angelini, Gianni D

    2015-03-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was the impact of modified ultrafiltration on adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in terms of inflammatory and metabolic changes, blood loss and early clinical outcomes. A total of 155 papers were identified using the search as described below. Of these, six papers presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question as they reported data to reach conclusions regarding the issues of interest for this review. The author, date and country of publication, patient group, study type and weaknesses and relevant outcomes were tabulated. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery seems to attenuate the levels of inflammatory molecules associated with surgery, reduces blood loss and blood transfusion and improves cardiac output, index and systemic vascular resistance. However, this was not translated in any reduction in length of stay in intensive care unit or hospital. Most studies were single-centre prospective non-blinded trials that included a small cohort of elective coronary artery bypass grafting patients, which makes it underpowered to provide unbiased evidence regarding clinical outcomes. Properly designed and conducted prospective randomized studies are required to answer whether the beneficial effect of modified ultrafiltration on systemic inflammatory molecules associated with surgery can translate with improvement in clinical outcome.

  7. Systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac risk factors: medical record documentation and patient adherence.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, C; Bengtsson, Aa; Costenbader, Kh; Jönsen, A; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S; Sturfelt, G; Nived, O

    2011-10-01

    This study explores patients' knowledge of cardiac risk factors (CRFs), analyses how information and advice about CRFs are documented in clinical practice, and assesses patient adherence to received instructions to decrease CRFs. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with ≥ 4 ACR criteria participated through completing a validated cardiovascular health questionnaire (CHQ). Kappa statistics were used to compare medical records with the self-reported CHQ (agreement) and to evaluate adherence. Two hundred and eleven (72%) of the known patients with SLE participated. The mean age of the patients was 55 years. More than 70% of the SLE patients considered hypertension, obesity, smoking and hypercholesterolaemia to be very important CRFs. The agreement between medical record documentation and patients' reports was moderate for hypertension, overweight and hypercholesterolaemia (kappa 0.42-0.60) but substantial for diabetes (kappa 0.66). Patients' self-reported adherence to advice they had received regarding medication was substantial to perfect (kappa 0.65-1.0). For lifestyle changes in patients with hypertension and overweight, adherence was only fair to moderate (kappa 0.13-0.47). Swedish SLE patients' awareness of traditional CRFs was good in this study. However, the agreement between patients' self-reports and medical record documentation of CRF profiles, and patients' adherence to medical advice to CRF profiles, could be improved.

  8. Dysnatremias and Survival in Adult Burn Patients: A Retrospective Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-11

    significantly associated with mortality. However, this relationship has not been well described in the burn population. Methods : Ad- missions to the burn...institution. Methods After approval from the institutional review board, we retro- spectively reviewed all admissions to our burn center from Janu- ary...were recorded from these sources. The ISS is a validated method for describing patients with multiple traumatic injuries [13] . Acute kidney injury

  9. The Quality of Emergency Department Pain Care for Older Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ula; Richardson, Lynne D.; Harris, Ben; Morrison, R. Sean

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate if there are differences in emergency department (ED) pain assessment and treatment in older versus younger adults. DESIGN Retrospective observational cohort. SETTING Urban, academic tertiary care ED during July and December 2005. PARTICIPANTS Adult patients with conditions warranting ED pain care. MEASUREMENTS Age, Charlson comorbidity score, number of prior medications, gender, race/ethnicity, triage severity, degree of pain, treating clinician, and final ED diagnosis. Pain care process measures were pain assessment and treatment, and time of activities. RESULTS A total of 1,031 ED visits met inclusion criteria. Ninety-two percent of these had a documented pain assessment. Of those reporting pain, 41% had follow-up pain assessments and 59% received analgesic medication (58% of these as opioid, 24% as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)). In adjusted analyses, there were no differences by age in pain assessment and receiving any analgesic. Older patients (65–84 years) were less likely than younger patients (18–64 years) to receive opioid analgesics for moderate to severe (OR=0.44, 95% CI (0.22, 0.88)) and had a trend to more likely to receive NSAIDs for mild pain (OR=3.72, 95% CI (0.97, 14.24)). Older adults had a lower reduction of initial to final recorded pain scores (p<0.01). CONCLUSION There appear to be differences in acute ED pain care for older adults. Both lower overall reduction of pain scores and decreased opioid use for the treatment of painful conditions in older patients highlight disparities of concern. Future studies should determine if these differences represent inadequate ED pain care. PMID:21054293

  10. The Electronic Health Record Objective Structured Clinical Examination: Assessing Student Competency in Patient Interactions While Using the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Biagioli, Frances E.; Elliot, Diane L.; Palmer, Ryan T.; Graichen, Carla C.; Rdesinski, Rebecca E.; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Galper, Ari B.; Tysinger, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Problem Because many medical students do not have access to electronic health records (EHRs) in the clinical environment, simulated EHR training is necessary. Explicitly training medical students to use EHRs appropriately during patient encounters equips them to engage patients while also attending to the accuracy of the record and contributing to a culture of information safety. Approach Faculty developed and successfully implemented an EHR objective structured clinical examination (EHR-OSCE) for clerkship students at two institutions. The EHR-OSCE objectives include assessing EHR-related communication and data management skills. Outcomes The authors collected performance data for students (n = 71) at the first institution during academic years 2011–2013 and for students (n = 211) at the second institution during academic year 2013–2014. EHR-OSCE assessment checklist scores showed that students performed well in EHR-related communication tasks, such as maintaining eye contact and stopping all computer work when the patient expresses worry. Findings indicated student EHR skill deficiencies in the areas of EHR data management including medical history review, medication reconciliation, and allergy reconciliation. Most students’ EHR skills failed to improve as the year progressed, suggesting that they did not gain the EHR training and experience they need in clinics and hospitals. Next Steps Cross-institutional data comparisons will help determine whether differences in curricula affect students’ EHR skills. National and institutional policies and faculty development are needed to ensure that students receive adequate EHR education, including hands-on experience in the clinic as well as simulated EHR practice. PMID:27332870

  11. Patients' nursing records revealing opportunities for interprofessional workplace learning in primary care: a chart review study.

    PubMed

    Pype, Peter; Wens, Johan; Stes, Ann; Grypdonck, Maria; Eynden, Bart Vanden; Deveugele, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Working and learning go hand in hand during interprofessional collaborative practice. Patients' nursing records are designed to record patient care and health status. It is not known whether these records are also used to keep track of interprofessional contacts or interprofessional learning between team members. This study explored the usefulness of patients' nursing records in optimising interprofessional workplace learning for general practitioners. We utilized a descriptive retrospective chart review. All palliative home care teams of the Dutch speaking part of Belgium were involved. Throughout the year 2010, a representative sample of patient charts was selected. Characteristics of encounters between general practitioners and palliative care nurses were extracted from the charts. Detailed accounts of interprofessional contacts were found in the charts. Palliative care nurses recorded number and type of contacts, topics discussed during contacts and general practitioner's learning activities. Palliative care nurses are sensitive and open towards the general practitioners' learning needs. Patients' nursing records provide useful information for interprofessional team discussions on workplace learning. Healthcare professionals should be trained to respond to each other's learning needs.

  12. [Maintenance Treatment With Antipsychotics for Adult Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; García Valencia, Jenny; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness and security of the antipsychotics available for the management of adult patients with schizophrenia in the maintenance phase. To develop recommendations of treatment for the maintenance phase of the disease. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. The evidence of NICE guide 82 was adopted and updated. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. 18 studies were included to evaluate the effectiveness and / or safety of different antipsychotic drugs first and second generation. Overall, antipsychotics (AP) showed superiority over placebo in relapse rate over 12 months (RR 0.59 95% CI 0.42, 0.82) and hospitalization rate over 24 months of follow-up (RR 0.38 95% 0.27, 0.55); its use is associated with increased risk of treatment dropout (RR 0.53 95% CI 0.46, 0.61) and adverse events such as weight gain, dystonia, extrapyramidal symptoms and sedation. There was no difference in the outcome of re hospitalizations, comparisons on quality of life, negative symptoms or weight gain between AP first and second generation. Continuous or standard dose regimens appear to be superior to intermittent or low doses in reducing the risk of abandonment of treatment regimes. Adult patients diagnosed with schizophrenia should receive maintenance treatment with antipsychotics. The medication of choice will depend on the management of the acute phase, the patient's tolerance to it and the presentation of adverse events. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Transforming patient and family access to medical information: utilisation patterns of a patient-accessible electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Burke, Redmond P; Rossi, Anthony F; Wilner, Bryan R; Hannan, Robert L; Zabinsky, Jennifer A; White, Jeffrey A

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utilisation of a web-based multimedia patient-accessible electronic health record, for patients with congenital cardiac disease. This was a prospective analysis of patients undergoing congenital cardiac surgery at a single institution from 1 September, 2006 to 1 February, 2009. After meetings with hospital administration, physicians, nurses, and patients, we configured a subset of the cardiac program's web-based clinical electronic health record for patient and family access. The Electronic Health Record continuously measured frequency and time of logins, logins during and between hospitalisations, and page views by type (imaging versus textual data). Of the first 270 patients offered access to the system, 252 became users (93% adoption rate). System uptime was 99.9%, and no security breaches were reported. Users accessed the system more often while the patients were in hospital (67% of total logins) than after discharge (33% of total logins). The maximum number of logins by a family was 440, and the minimum was 1. The average number of logins per family was 25. Imaging data were viewed significantly more frequently than textual data (p 0.001). A total of 12 patients died during the study period and 11 members of their families continued to access their Electronic Health Records after the date of death. A web-based Patient Accessible Electronic Health Record was designed for patients with congenital cardiac disease. The adoption rate was high, and utilisation patterns suggest that the Electronic Health Record could become a useful tool for health information exchange.

  14. Congruence of Self-Reported Medications With Pharmacy Prescription Records In Low-Income Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Caskie, Grace I. L.; Willis, Sherry L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the congruence of self-reported medications with computerized pharmacy records. Design and Methods Pharmacy records and self-reported medications were obtained for 294 members of a state pharmaceutical assistance program who also participated in ACTIVE, a clinical trial on cognitive training in nondemented elderly persons. The average age of the sample participants was 74.5 years (range = 65–91); 87.8% were females. Results Congruence between self-report and pharmacy data was generally high. Self-reports omitted drug classes in the pharmacy records less often than the pharmacy records did not include self-reported drug classes. The percentage of individuals with perfect agreement between self-reports and pharmacy records varied from 49% for major drug classes to 81 % for specific cardiovascular and central nervous system drugs. Within a drug class, agreement tended to be higher for individuals without a prescription in that class. Poorer health was consistently related to poorer self-report of medications. Implications Self-reported medications are most likely to be congruent with pharmacy records for drugs prescribed for more serious conditions, for more specific classes of drugs, and for healthier individuals. PMID:15075414

  15. Improvement of surface ECG recording in adult zebrafish reveals that the value of this model exceeds our expectation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi Chi; Li, Li; Lam, Yun Wah; Siu, Chung Wah; Cheng, Shuk Han

    2016-01-01

    The adult zebrafish has been used to model the electrocardiogram (ECG) for human cardiovascular studies. Nonetheless huge variations are observed among studies probably because of the lack of a reliable and reproducible recording method. In our study, an adult zebrafish surface ECG recording technique was improved using a multi-electrode method and by pre-opening the pericardial sac. A convenient ECG data analysis method without wavelet transform was also established. Intraperitoneal injection of KCl in zebrafish induced an arrhythmia similar to that of humans, and the arrhythmia was partially rescued by calcium gluconate. Amputation and cryoinjury of the zebrafish heart induced ST segment depression and affected QRS duration after injury. Only cryoinjury decelerated the heart rate. Different changes were also observed in the QT interval during heart regeneration in these two injury models. We also characterized the electrocardiophysiology of breakdance zebrafish mutant with a prolonged QT interval, that has not been well described in previous studies. Our study provided a reliable and reproducible means to record zebrafish ECG and analyse data. The detailed characterization of the cardiac electrophysiology of zebrafish and its mutant revealed that the potential of the zebrafish in modeling the human cardiovascular system exceeds expectations. PMID:27125643

  16. Safety and clinical outcomes among older adults receiving daptomycin therapy: Insights from a patient registry.

    PubMed

    DePestel, Daryl D; Hershberger, Ellie; Lamp, Kenneth C; Malani, Preeti N

    2010-12-01

    Serious gram-positive bacterial infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality among older adults and can present significant challenges to clinicians. Data evaluating the safety and effectiveness of newer agents in this population are limited. Daptomycin is a lipopeptide with activity against resistant gram-positive organisms. To better understand the overall safety and effectiveness of daptomycin in older adults (≥66 years of age), the authors reviewed the data that were collected as part of an ongoing registry maintained by Cubist Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Lexington, Massachusetts), the manufacturer of daptomycin. The Cubicin Outcomes Registry and Experience (CORE) is a multicenter, retrospective registry designed to collect postmarketing clinical data on patients who received daptomycin. The CORE data collected from 58 institutions across the United States between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2007, were analyzed to better understand the overall safety profile of daptomycin and the clinical outcomes of older adults who were treated with this agent. Patients were considered to be nonevaluable if the medical record did not contain sufficient information to determine response at the end of therapy. Nonevaluable patients were excluded from the clinical outcome analysis but included in the safety analysis. The registry contained 1073 patients aged ≥66 years who received daptomycin; 23.8% (255/1073) were ≥81 years of age. Overall, 18.1% (194/1073) of patients experienced 324 adverse events, and 6.2% (67/1073) of patients experienced 97 adverse events that were considered possibly related to treatment with daptomycin. The most frequently reported adverse events that were considered possibly treatment related included creatine phosphokinase (CPK) elevations, gastrointestinal disorders, and skin rashes. Among the 67 patients who experienced ≥1 adverse event that was possibly related to daptomycin, 30 discontinued therapy due to the adverse event

  17. Epidemiology of Patient Harms in New Zealand: Protocol of a General Practice Records Review Study

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Sharon; Wallis, Katharine A; Eggleton, Kyle S; Cunningham, Wayne K; Williamson, Martyn I; Lillis, Steven; McMenamin, Andrew W; Tilyard, Murray W; Reith, David M; Samaranayaka, Ari; Hall, Jason E

    2017-01-01

    Background Knowing where and why harm occurs in general practice will assist patients, doctors, and others in making informed decisions about the risks and benefits of treatment options. Research to date has been unable to verify the safety of primary health care and epidemiological research about patient harms in general practice is now a top priority for advancing health systems safety. Objective We aim to study the incidence, distribution, severity, and preventability of the harms patients experience due to their health care, from the whole-of-health-system lens afforded by electronic general practice patient records. Methods “Harm” is defined as disease, injury, disability, suffering, and death, arising from the health system. The study design is a stratified, 2-level cluster, retrospective records review study. Both general practices and patients will be randomly selected so that the study’s results will apply nationally, after weighting. Stratification by practice size and rurality will allow comparisons between 6 study groups (large, medium-sized, small; urban and rural practices). Records of equal numbers of patients from each study group will be included in the study because there may be systematic differences in patient harms in different types of practices. Eight general practitioner investigators will review 3 years of electronic general practice health records (consultation notes, prescriptions, investigations, referrals, and summaries of hospital care) from 9000 patients registered in 60 general practices. Double-blinded reviews will check the concordance of reviewers’ assessments. Study data will comprise demographic data of all 9000 patients and reviewers’ assessments of whether patients experienced harm arising from health care. Where patient harm is identified, their types, preventability, severity, and outcomes will be coded using the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) 18.0. Results We have recruited practices and

  18. Dry mouth: a critical topic for older adult patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Phuu; Suarez-Durall, Piedad; Mulligan, Roseann

    2015-01-01

    Diminished salivary flow, or dry mouth impacts the oral health of many older adults, dentate and edentulous. As a result typical oral conditions can prove more challenging to both the patient's comfort and home care and the treatment selected by the clinician. This paper will review issues of dry mouth from a clinical and symptomatic perspective and will include the condition's causes, treatment and prevention. We performed a review of PubMed using the words: older adults, dry mouth, xerostomia, radiation-induced xerostomia, and salivary gland hypofunction. We selected 90 articles with a clinical application perspective. When it comes to treatment of dry mouth conditions, either objective or subjective, there are no easy answers as to the best course of action for a specific individual. While most of the cited studies have examined the most difficult cases of dry mouth (e.g., Sjögren's syndrome, and that seen during and post head and neck cancer treatments), there are many older adults who demonstrate dry mouth from the use of multiple medications. This paper presents a summary of the etiology, diagnosis, prevention, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of dry mouth (salivary hypofunction and xerostomia in older adults). It is important to understand the causes of dry mouth and to educate our patients. Starting a prevention program as early as possible considering the most practical, cost effective and efficient treatments with the best risk-benefit ratio will help to diminish dry mouth symptoms and sequelae. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [POMPE DISEASE - GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF ADULT PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Pećin, Ivan; Muačević-Katanec, Diana; Šimić, Iveta; Fumić, Ksenija; Potočki, Kristina; Šućur, Nediljko; Reiner, Željko

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide a short summary of recommendations on Pompe disease, how to diagnose this disease, management of adult patients with this disease, follow-up of the patients and recommendations on therapy and genetic testing. Early diagnosis and management of patients with Pompe disease requires a multidisciplinary approach of several different experts. These guidelines were produced by the Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Center Zagreb which is a Referral expert center for rare and metabolic diseases of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Croatia. They were endorsed by the Croatian Society for Rare Diseases, Croatian Medical Association.These are the first guidelines published in Croatia on diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of Pompe disease.

  20. “Nothing About Me Without Me”: An Interpretative Review of Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Ryan; Sevdalis, Nick; Mayer, Erik K; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs) enable patients to access and manage personal clinical information that is made available to them by their health care providers (HCPs). It is thought that the shared management nature of medical record access improves patient outcomes and improves patient satisfaction. However, recent reviews have found that this is not the case. Furthermore, little research has focused on PAEHRs from the HCP viewpoint. HCPs include physicians, nurses, and service providers. Objective We provide a systematic review of reviews of the impact of giving patients record access from both a patient and HCP point of view. The review covers a broad range of outcome measures, including patient safety, patient satisfaction, privacy and security, self-efficacy, and health outcome. Methods A systematic search was conducted using Web of Science to identify review articles on the impact of PAEHRs. Our search was limited to English-language reviews published between January 2002 and November 2014. A total of 73 citations were retrieved from a series of Boolean search terms including “review*” with “patient access to records”. These reviews went through a novel scoring system analysis whereby we calculated how many positive outcomes were reported per every outcome measure investigated. This provided a way to quantify the impact of PAEHRs. Results Ten reviews covering chronic patients (eg, diabetes and hypertension) and primary care patients, as well as HCPs were found but eight were included for the analysis of outcome measures. We found mixed outcomes across both patient and HCP groups, with approximately half of the reviews showing positive changes with record access. Patients believe that record access increases their perception of control; however, outcome measures thought to create psychological concerns (such as patient anxiety as a result of seeing their medical record) are still unanswered. Nurses are more likely than

  1. Patients Covertly Recording Clinical Encounters: Threat or Opportunity? A Qualitative Analysis of Online Texts

    PubMed Central

    Tsulukidze, Maka; Grande, Stuart W.; Thompson, Rachel; Rudd, Kenneth; Elwyn, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    Background The phenomenon of patients covertly recording clinical encounters has generated controversial media reports. This study aims to examine the phenomenon and analyze the underlying issues. Methods and Findings We conducted a qualitative analysis of online posts, articles, blogs, and forums (texts) discussing patients covertly recording clinical encounters. Using Google and Google Blog search engines, we identified and analyzed 62 eligible texts published in multiple countries between 2006 and 2013. Thematic analysis revealed four key themes: 1) a new behavior that elicits strong reactions, both positive and negative, 2) an erosion of trust, 3) shifting patient-clinician roles and relationships, and 4) the existence of confused and conflicting responses. When patients covertly record clinical encounters – a behavior made possible by various digital recording technologies – strong reactions are evoked among a range of stakeholders. The behavior represents one consequence of an erosion of trust between patients and clinicians, and when discovered, leads to further deterioration of trust. Confused and conflicting responses to the phenomenon by patients and clinicians highlight the need for policy guidance. Conclusions This study describes strong reactions, both positive and negative, to the phenomenon of patients covertly recording clinical encounters. The availability of smartphones capable of digital recording, and shifting attitudes to patient-clinician relationships, seems to have led to this behavior, mostly viewed as a threat by clinicians but as a welcome and helpful innovation by some patients, possibly indicating a perception of subordination and a lack of empowerment. Further examination of this tension and its implications is needed. PMID:25933002

  2. Personal Health Records: Beneficial or Burdensome for Patients and Healthcare Providers?

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Melissa; Boateng, Samuel; Studeny, Jana; Coustasse, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) have been mandated to be made available to patients to provide increased access to medical care information, encourage participation in healthcare decision making, and enable correction of errors within medical records. The purpose of this study was to analyze the usefulness of PHRs from the perspectives of patients and providers. The methodology of this qualitative study was a literature review using 34 articles. PHRs are powerful tools for patients and healthcare providers. Better healthcare results and correction of medical records have been shown to be positive outcomes of the use of PHRs. PHRs have also been shown to be difficult for patients to use and understand, and providers had concerns about correct information transferring to the portals and patients eliminating information from the record. Concerns regarding patient understanding of medical records, legal liability, and the response time required of providers were also identified. For the PHR to succeed in the US healthcare system, assurance that the information will be protected, useful, and easily accessed is necessary. PMID:27134613

  3. Personal Health Records: Beneficial or Burdensome for Patients and Healthcare Providers?

    PubMed

    Lester, Melissa; Boateng, Samuel; Studeny, Jana; Coustasse, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) have been mandated to be made available to patients to provide increased access to medical care information, encourage participation in healthcare decision making, and enable correction of errors within medical records. The purpose of this study was to analyze the usefulness of PHRs from the perspectives of patients and providers. The methodology of this qualitative study was a literature review using 34 articles. PHRs are powerful tools for patients and healthcare providers. Better healthcare results and correction of medical records have been shown to be positive outcomes of the use of PHRs. PHRs have also been shown to be difficult for patients to use and understand, and providers had concerns about correct information transferring to the portals and patients eliminating information from the record. Concerns regarding patient understanding of medical records, legal liability, and the response time required of providers were also identified. For the PHR to succeed in the US healthcare system, assurance that the information will be protected, useful, and easily accessed is necessary.

  4. Evaluating the Risk of Re-identification of Patients from Hospital Prescription Records.

    PubMed

    Emam, Khaled El; Dankar, Fida K; Vaillancourt, Régis; Roffey, Tyson; Lysyk, Mary

    2009-07-01

    Pharmacies often provide prescription records to private research firms, on the assumption that these records are de-identified (i.e., identifying information has been removed). However, concerns have been expressed about the potential that patients can be re-identified from such records. Recently, a large private research firm requested prescription records from the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), as part of a larger effort to develop a database of hospital prescription records across Canada. To evaluate the ability to re-identify patients from CHEO'S prescription records and to determine ways to appropriately de-identify the data if the risk was too high. The risk of re-identification was assessed for 18 months' worth of prescription data. De-identification algorithms were developed to reduce the risk to an acceptable level while maintaining the quality of the data. The probability of patients being re-identified from the original variables and data set requested by the private research firm was deemed quite high. A new de-identified record layout was developed, which had an acceptable level of re-identification risk. The new approach involved replacing the admission and discharge dates with the quarter and year of admission and the length of stay in days, reporting the patient's age in weeks, and including only the first character of the patient's postal code. Additional requirements were included in the data-sharing agreement with the private research firm (e.g., audit requirements and a protocol for notification of a breach of privacy). Without a formal analysis of the risk of re-identification, assurances of data anonymity may not be accurate. A formal risk analysis at one hospital produced a clinically relevant data set that also protects patient privacy and allows the hospital pharmacy to explicitly manage the risks of breach of patient privacy.

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Listening to Recorded Music for Heart Failure Patients: Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Burrai, Francesco; Hasan, Wohaib; Fancourt, Daisy; Luppi, Marco; Di Somma, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    To describe a conceptual framework and to test the effectiveness of a recorded music-listening protocol on symptom burden and quality of life in heart failure (HF) patients. Heart failure is an important public health problem. Many HF patients experience symptoms burden and poor quality of life, even with current improvements in pharmacological treatments. Recorded music listening has been shown to improve outcomes in cardiovascular patients, but it has never been tested on HF patients and with a specific music protocol and a randomized controlled trial methodology. This study is a multicenter blinded randomized controlled trial that will involve 150 patients. Eligible patients will have a diagnosis of HF, in New York Heart Association functional classification of I to III, and will be recruited from 3 large hospitals in Northern Italy. Patients will be randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to receive recorded music-listening intervention with or without standard care for 3 months. Data will be collected at baseline and at the end of the first, second, and third month during the intervention, and at 6 months for follow-up. The following variables will be collected from HF patients with validated protocols: quality of life (primary endpoint), use of emergency services, rehospitalization rates, all cause mortality, self-care, somatic symptoms, quality of sleep, anxiety and depression symptoms, and cognitive function. This study will examine the effect of recorded music listening on HF patients and will inform clinical practice. If the findings are found to be positive, the protocol could be used as a tool for evidence-based applications of recorded music in HF patients. The framework developed in this study may be helpful for future research focused on the effects of music in HF patients.

  6. The patient's photograph in the medical record as a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Golan-Cohen, Avivit; Horn, Oded; Sive, Philip H; Vinker, Shlomo

    2008-12-01

    Two case reports are presented: one of acromegaly and the other of hyperthyroidism. Previous photographs of the patients that appeared in their military medical record were of considerable assistance in making the correct diagnoses. When "smart cards" are issued in the future, inclusion of a photograph as an integral part of the patient's medical information should be considered.

  7. Body posture recognition and turning recording system for the care of bed bound patients.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Rong-Shue; Mi, Zhenqiang; Yang, Bo-Ru; Kau, Lih-Jen; Bitew, Mekuanint Agegnehu; Li, Tzu-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes body posture recognition and turning recording system for assisting the care of bed bound patients in nursing homes. The system continuously detects the patient's body posture and records the length of time for each body posture. If the patient remains in the same body posture long enough to develop pressure ulcers, the system notifies caregivers to change the patient's body posture. The objective of recording is to provide the log of body turning for querying of patients' family members. In order to accurately detect patient's body posture, we developed a novel pressure sensing pad which contains force sensing resistor sensors. Based on the proposed pressure sensing pad, we developed a bed posture recognition module which includes a bed posture recognition algorithm. The algorithm is based on fuzzy theory. The body posture recognition algorithm can detect the patient's bed posture whether it is right lateral decubitus, left lateral decubitus, or supine. The detected information of patient's body posture can be then transmitted to the server of healthcare center by the communication module to perform the functions of recording and notification. Experimental results showed that the average posture recognition accuracy for our proposed module is 92%.

  8. The use of nationwide on-line prescription records improves the drug history in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Glintborg, Bente; Poulsen, Henrik E; Dalhoff, Kim P

    2008-01-01

    Background Structured medication interviews improve the medication history in hospitalized patients. In Denmark, a nationwide electronic version of individual pharmacy records (PR) has recently been introduced. Use of these records could improve the medication lists in hospitalized patients. Methods We prospectively included 500 patients admitted to an acute medical department. In individual patients, the PR was compared with (i) the medication list written in the patient chart and (ii) drug information provided by the patient during a structured drug interview upon admission and during a home visit after discharge. Results Median patient age was 72 years. Upon admission, patients reported using 1958 prescription-only medications (POM) (median four drugs per patient, range 0–14), of which 114 (6%) were not registered in PR. In PR, 1153 POM (median one per patient, range 0–11) were registered during the month preceding admission. The patients did not report 309 (27%) of these upon admission. Home visits were performed in a subgroup of 115 patients. During home visits, 18% of POM registered in PR during the preceding month were not reported. Drug type was predictive of reporting irrespective of patient sex or age. Cardiovascular drugs were reported most and dermatologicals were reported less frequently. Underreporting might be due to recall bias, non-adherence or discontinuation of drugs. Conclusions Omission errors are frequent despite structured medication interviews. Pharmacy records or medication lists from all treating doctors must be included in medication reviews in order to reduce recall bias. What is already known about this subject Structured medication interviews improve the medication history upon hospitalizationPharmacy records are valid lists of the prescribed medications available to individual patientsIn Denmark, treating doctors now have access to their patients' pharmacy records through a real-time online electronic database What this study adds

  9. Unit-Record Machine Operation: A Suggested Adult Business Education Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

    The course contained in this book was written for training data processing machine operators; it is intended to prepare adults to qualify for an entry-level job. It is not aimed at developing high proficiency on any one machine, but rather at introducing the student to a variety of equipment, and developing an understanding of how the data flow…

  10. Hypoalbuminaemia predicts outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Kempny, Aleksander; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Uebing, Anselm; Rafiq, Isma; Li, Wei; Swan, Lorna; Hooper, James; Donovan, Jackie; Wort, Stephen J; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with acquired heart failure, hypoalbuminaemia is associated with increased risk of death. The prevalence of hypoproteinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia and their relation to outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains, however, unknown. Methods Data on patients with ACHD who underwent blood testing in our centre within the last 14 years were collected. The relation between laboratory, clinical or demographic parameters at baseline and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results A total of 2886 patients with ACHD were included. Mean age was 33.3 years (23.6–44.7) and 50.1% patients were men. Median plasma albumin concentration was 41.0 g/L (38.0–44.0), whereas hypoalbuminaemia (<35 g/L) was present in 13.9% of patients. The prevalence of hypoalbuminaemia was significantly higher in patients with great complexity ACHD (18.2%) compared with patients with moderate (11.3%) or simple ACHD lesions (12.1%, p<0.001). During a median follow-up of 5.7 years (3.3–9.6), 327 (11.3%) patients died. On univariable Cox regression analysis, hypoalbuminaemia was a strong predictor of outcome (HR 3.37, 95% CI 2.67 to 4.25, p<0.0001). On multivariable Cox regression, after adjusting for age, sodium and creatinine concentration, liver dysfunction, functional class and disease complexity, hypoalbuminaemia remained a significant predictor of death. Conclusions Hypoalbuminaemia is common in patients with ACHD and is associated with a threefold increased risk of risk of death. Hypoalbuminaemia, therefore, should be included in risk-stratification algorithms as it may assist management decisions and timing of interventions in the growing ACHD population. PMID:25736048

  11. Hypoalbuminaemia predicts outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kempny, Aleksander; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Uebing, Anselm; Rafiq, Isma; Li, Wei; Swan, Lorna; Hooper, James; Donovan, Jackie; Wort, Stephen J; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-05-01

    In patients with acquired heart failure, hypoalbuminaemia is associated with increased risk of death. The prevalence of hypoproteinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia and their relation to outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains, however, unknown. Data on patients with ACHD who underwent blood testing in our centre within the last 14 years were collected. The relation between laboratory, clinical or demographic parameters at baseline and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. A total of 2886 patients with ACHD were included. Mean age was 33.3 years (23.6-44.7) and 50.1% patients were men. Median plasma albumin concentration was 41.0 g/L (38.0-44.0), whereas hypoalbuminaemia (<35 g/L) was present in 13.9% of patients. The prevalence of hypoalbuminaemia was significantly higher in patients with great complexity ACHD (18.2%) compared with patients with moderate (11.3%) or simple ACHD lesions (12.1%, p<0.001). During a median follow-up of 5.7 years (3.3-9.6), 327 (11.3%) patients died. On univariable Cox regression analysis, hypoalbuminaemia was a strong predictor of outcome (HR 3.37, 95% CI 2.67 to 4.25, p<0.0001). On multivariable Cox regression, after adjusting for age, sodium and creatinine concentration, liver dysfunction, functional class and disease complexity, hypoalbuminaemia remained a significant predictor of death. Hypoalbuminaemia is common in patients with ACHD and is associated with a threefold increased risk of risk of death. Hypoalbuminaemia, therefore, should be included in risk-stratification algorithms as it may assist management decisions and timing of interventions in the growing ACHD population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Developing Methods of Repurposing Electronic Health Record Data for Identification of Older Adults at Risk of Unintentional Falls

    PubMed Central

    Baus, Adam; Zullig, Keith; Long, Dustin; Mullett, Charles; Pollard, Cecil; Taylor, Henry; Coben, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Nationally, nearly 40 percent of community-dwelling adults age 65 and older fall at least once a year, making unintentional falls the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries among this age group. Addressing this public health problem in primary care offers promise. However, challenges in incorporating fall risk screening into primary care result in a problem of missed opportunities for screening, counseling, intervention, and ultimately prevention. Given these barriers, this study examines the potential for the innovative use of routinely collected electronic health record data to provide enhanced clinical decision support in busy, often resource-thin primary care environments. Using de-identified data from a sample of West Virginia primary care centers, we find that it is both feasible and worthwhile to repurpose routinely collected data for the purpose of identification of older adults at risk of falls. Searching of both free-text and semistructured data was particularly valuable. PMID:27134607

  13. Hidden in plain sight: bias towards sick patients when sampling patients with sufficient electronic health record data for research.

    PubMed

    Rusanov, Alexander; Weiskopf, Nicole G; Wang, Shuang; Weng, Chunhua

    2014-06-11

    To demonstrate that subject selection based on sufficient laboratory results and medication orders in electronic health records can be biased towards sick patients. Using electronic health record data from 10,000 patients who received anesthetic services at a major metropolitan tertiary care academic medical center, an affiliated hospital for women and children, and an affiliated urban primary care hospital, the correlation between patient health status and counts of days with laboratory results or medication orders, as indicated by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification (ASA Class), was assessed with a Negative Binomial Regression model. Higher ASA Class was associated with more points of data: compared to ASA Class 1 patients, ASA Class 4 patients had 5.05 times the number of days with laboratory results and 6.85 times the number of days with medication orders, controlling for age, sex, emergency status, admission type, primary diagnosis, and procedure. Imposing data sufficiency requirements for subject selection allows researchers to minimize missing data when reusing electronic health records for research, but introduces a bias towards the selection of sicker patients. We demonstrated the relationship between patient health and quantity of data, which may result in a systematic bias towards the selection of sicker patients for research studies and limit the external validity of research conducted using electronic health record data. Additionally, we discovered other variables (i.e., admission status, age, emergency classification, procedure, and diagnosis) that independently affect data sufficiency.

  14. An Electronic Health Record-based Intervention to Promote Hepatitis C Virus Testing Among Adults Born Between 1945 and 1965: A Cluster-randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Federman, Alex D; Kil, Natalie; Kannry, Joseph; Andreopolous, Evie; Toribio, Wilma; Lyons, Joanne; Singer, Mark; Yartel, Anthony; Smith, Bryce D; Rein, David B; Krauskopf, Katherine

    2017-06-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends one-time hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody testing for "Birth Cohort" adults born during 1945-1965. To examine the impact of an electronic health record (EHR)-embedded best practice alert (BPA) for HCV testing among Birth Cohort adults. Cluster-randomized trial was conducted from April 29, 2013 to March 29, 2014. Ten community and hospital-based primary care practices. Participants were attending physicians and medical residents during 25,620 study-eligible visits. Physicians in all practices received a brief introduction to the CDC testing recommendations. At visits for eligible patients at intervention sites, physicians received a BPA through the EHR to order HCV testing or medical assistants were prompted to post a testing order for the physician. Physicians in control sites did not receive the BPA. HCV testing; the incidence of HCV antibody positive tests was a secondary outcome. Testing rates were greater among Birth Cohort patients in intervention sites (20.2% vs. 1.8%, P<0.0001) and the odds of testing were greater in intervention sites after controlling for imbalances of patient and visit characteristics between comparison groups [odds ratio (OR), 9.0; 95% confidence interval, 7.6-10.7). The adjusted OR of identifying HCV antibody positive patients was also greater in intervention sites (OR, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-11.2). An EHR-embedded BPA markedly increased HCV testing among Birth Cohort patients, but the majority of eligible patients did not receive testing indicating a need for more effective methods to promote uptake.

  15. Care of the adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Perino, B; Trevisan, A; Falchetti, A; Gaia, E; Petrarulo, M

    1993-12-01

    Although no therapeutic breakthrough has taken place, the life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has dramatically increased in the last 20 yrs. Nowadays, more than 80% of the patients outlive 18 yrs of age, with a mean survival age approaching 28 yrs. These favourable results are due mainly to early diagnosis and continuous treatment in specialized centres. The main therapeutic items are: prevention and early treatment of lung infections, mainly due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, drainage of bronchial secretions (postural drainage, forced expiratory techniques, positive-expiratory-pressure mask, autogenic drainage,...), substitutive therapy with pancreatic enzymes and hypercaloric diet. Thus cystic fibrosis is increasingly a disease which involves adults, with many related problems, which span from the difficulties of prescribing an effective antibiotic therapy in cases with multiple resistances, to combining the need for a long daily physiotherapy schedule with school or a working life. Sexual problems and related psychological troubles are an important issue in the management of cystic fibrosis in adult patients, and are accordingly treated.

  16. Acute Myocardial Infarction in Adult Congenital Patients with Bodily Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Buelow, Matthew; Nijhawan, Karan; Gupta, Navdeep; Alla, Venkata; Arora, Rohit R

    2016-12-01

    Children born with congenital malformations of the heart are increasingly surviving into adulthood. This population of patients possesses lesion-specific complication risks while still being at risk for common illnesses. Bodily isomerism or heterotaxy, is a unique clinical entity associated with congenital malformations of the heart which further increases the risk for future cardiovascular complications. We aimed to investigate the frequency of myocardial infarction in adults with bodily isomerism. We utilized the 2012 iteration of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to identify adult inpatient admissions associated with acute myocardial infarction in patients with isomerism. Data regarding demographics, comorbidities and various procedures were collected and compared between those with and without isomerism. A total of 6,907,109 admissions were analyzed with a total of 172,394 admissions being associated with an initial encounter for acute myocardial infarction. The frequency of myocardial infarction did not differ between those with and without isomerism and was roughly 2% in both groups. Similarly, the number of procedures and in-hospital mortality did not differ between the two groups. The frequency and short-term prognosis of acute myocardial infarction is similar in patients with and without isomerism. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A prospective investigation of neurodevelopmental risk factors for adult antisocial behavior combining official arrest records and self-reports.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Angela D; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Koenen, Karestan C; Buka, Stephen L

    2015-09-01

    Neurodevelopmental deficits are postulated to play an important role in the etiology of persistent antisocial behavior (ASB). Yet it remains uncertain as to which particular deficits are most closely associated with ASB. We seek to advance this understanding using prospectively collected data from a birth cohort in which multiple indices of neurodevelopmental functioning and ASB were assessed. Participants (n = 2776) were members of the Providence, Rhode Island cohort of the Collaborative Perinatal Project. Information on demographic and neurodevelopmental variables was collected from pregnancy through age 7. When all offspring had reached 33 years of age an adult criminal record check was conducted. A subset of subjects also self-reported on their engagement in serious ASB. Bivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between each neurodevelopmental factor and adult ASB and test whether associations varied depending on how ASB was ascertained. After controlling for background and contextual characteristics, maternal smoking during pregnancy, lower childhood verbal and performance IQ, and age 7 aggressive/impulsive behavior all significantly increased the odds of adult ASB. Associations were not modified by sex and did not depend on how ASB was assessed. However, while both males and Black participants were more likely to engage in ASB than their respective female and White counterparts, relationships were significantly stronger for official records than for self-reports. Results point to a particular subset of early neurodevelopmental risks for antisocial outcomes in adulthood. Findings also suggest that prior contradictory results are not due to the use of official records versus self-reported outcomes.

  18. Toward secure distribution of electronic health records: quantitative feasibility study on secure E-mail systems for sharing patient records.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Yuichiro; Nogawa, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2005-12-01

    If the quality and efficiency of medical services are to be ensured, electronic health records (EHR) and EHR-supporting infrastructure must be prevalent. Many hospitals, however, have EHR systems for their internal use only, and the standardization process for the exchange of medical information is still in process. This standardization process addresses information security and is considering public key infrastructure (PKI) as one security measure, but PKI is rarely used by medical practioners because of its poor user-friendliness. Here we propose an effective use of the identity-based encryption (IBE) system as a security measure. This system enables us to send encrypted and signed messages without requiring the receiver to get a public key, and it enables us to deliver secured messages to ambiguous receivers like those to whom letters of reference are sent. We evaluated the feasibility of this technology by using the analytic hierarchy process, which is an effective analysis tool when selection and judgment depend on nonquantitative psychological factors, to analyze the results of an experiment in which medical workers used E-mail agents with and without PKI and IBE. We found that medical practioners and researchers avoid using PKI because of its poor user-friendliness and instead use IBE even though it is harder to install. We therefore think IBE would encourage medical institutions to share patient records.

  19. Initial Factors Influencing Duration of Hospital Stay in Adult Patients With Peritonsillar Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Hsi; Su, Hsing-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hou, Yu-Yi; Chang, Kuo-Ping; Chi, Chao-Chuan; Lin, Ming-Yee; Wu, Pi-Hsiung

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To review cases of peritonsillar abscess and investigate the initial clinical factors that may influence the duration of hospitalization. To determine the predictive factors of prolonged hospital stay in adult patients with peritonsillar abscess. Methods Subjects were adults hospitalized with peritonsillar abscess. We retrospectively reviewed 377 medical records from 1990 to 2013 in a tertiary medical center in southern Taiwan. The association between clinical characteristics and the length of hospital stay was analyzed with independent t-test, univariate linear regression and multiple linear regression analysis. Results The mean duration of hospitalization was 6.2±6.0 days. With univariate linear regression, a prolonged hospital stay was associated with several variables, including female gender, older ages, nonsmoking status, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, band forms in white blood cell (WBC) counts, and lower hemoglobin levels. With multiple linear regression analysis, four independent predictors of hospital stay were noted: years of age (P<0.001), history of diabetes mellitus (P<0.001), ratio of band form WBC (P<0.001), and hemoglobin levels (P<0.001). Conclusion In adult patients with peritonsillar abscess, older ages, history of diabetes mellitus, band forms in WBC counts and lower hemoglobin levels were independent predictors of longer hospitalization. PMID:27334514

  20. The impact of ADHD and conduct disorder in childhood on adult delinquency: A 30 years follow-up study using official crime records

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few longitudinal studies have explored lifetime criminality in adults with a childhood history of severe mental disorders. In the present study, we wanted to explore the association between adult delinquency and several different childhood diagnoses in an in-patient population. Of special interest was the impact of disturbance of activity and attention (ADHD) and mixed disorder of conduct and emotions on later delinquency, as these disorders have been variously associated with delinquent development. Methods Former Norwegian child psychiatric in-patients (n = 541) were followed up 19-41 years after hospitalization by record linkage to the National Register of Criminality. On the basis of the hospital records, the patients were re-diagnosed according to ICD-10. The association between diagnoses and other baseline factors and later delinquency were investigated using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results At follow-up, 24% of the participants had been convicted of criminal activity. In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, conduct disorder (RR = 2.0, 95%CI = 1.2-3.4) and hyperkinetic conduct disorder (RR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.6-4.4) significantly increased the risk of future criminal behaviour. Pervasive developmental disorder (RR = 0.4, 95%CI = 0.2-0.9) and mental retardation (RR = 0.4, 95%CI = 0.3-0.8) reduced the risk for a criminal act. Male gender (RR = 3.6, 95%CI = 2.1-6.1) and chronic family difficulties (RR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1-1.5) both predicted future criminality. Conclusions Conduct disorder in childhood was highly associated with later delinquency both alone or in combination with hyperactivity, but less associated when combined with an emotional disorder. ADHD in childhood was no more associated with later delinquency than the rest of the disorders in the study population. Our finding strengthens the assumption that there is no direct association between ADHD and criminality. PMID:21481227

  1. Retrospective record review in proactive patient safety work – identification of no-harm incidents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In contrast to other safety critical industries, well-developed systems to monitor safety within the healthcare system remain limited. Retrospective record review is one way of identifying adverse events in healthcare. In proactive patient safety work, retrospective record review could be used to identify, analyze and gain information and knowledge about no-harm incidents and deficiencies in healthcare processes. The aim of the study was to evaluate retrospective record review for the detection and characterization of no-harm incidents, and compare findings with conventional incident-reporting systems. Methods A two-stage structured retrospective record review of no-harm incidents was performed on a random sample of 350 admissions at a Swedish orthopedic department. Results were compared with those found in one local, and four national incident-reporting systems. Results We identified 118 no-harm incidents in 91 (26.0%) of the 350 records by retrospective record review. Ninety-four (79.7%) no-harm incidents were classified as preventable. The five incident-reporting systems identified 16 no-harm incidents, of which ten were also found by retrospective record review. The most common no-harm incidents were related to drug therapy (n = 66), of which 87.9% were regarded as preventable. Conclusions No-harm incidents are common and often preventable. Retrospective record review seems to be a valuable tool for identifying and characterizing no-harm incidents. Both harm and no-harm incidents can be identified in parallel during the same record review. By adding a retrospective record review of randomly selected records to conventional incident-reporting, health care providers can gain a clearer and broader picture of commonly occurring, no-harm incidents in order to improve patient safety. PMID:23876023

  2. Thyroid gland diseases in adult patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vondra, K; Vrbikova, J; Dvorakova, K

    2005-12-01

    This review concerns the relation between most frequent thyroid gland diseases and diabetes mellitus in adult patients. Special attention is paid to autoimmune thyroiditis, Graves' disease, thyroid autoimmunity in pregnant diabetic women, and iodine metabolism. We focused on mechanisms leading to coexistence of both endocrine disorders, and on distinctions in the prevalence, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients. The prevalence of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients is 2-3 times higher than in nondiabetic subjects; it raises with age, and is strongly influenced by female gender and autoimmune diabetes. Clinical relevance of thyroid diseases, especially in diabetic patients, significantly increases if it is associated with deteriorated function, which always cause a number problems with metabolic compensation of diabetes. Most serious consequences are increased frequency of hypoglycaemia in hypothyroidism and development of potentially life-threatening ketoacidosis in thyrotoxicosis. In spite of that, little attention is paid to the diagnosis of thyroid diseases in diabetics, as they are diagnosed in only about half of the patients. At the end, we provide recommendations for the thyroid disease screening and diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus based on our experience.

  3. Musical ear syndrome in adult cochlear implant patients.

    PubMed

    Low, W-K; Tham, C A; D'Souza, V-D; Teng, S-W

    2013-09-01

    Except for a single case report, musical ear syndrome in cochlear implantees has not been studied. We aimed to study the prevalence and nature of musical ear syndrome among adult cochlear implant patients, as well as the effect on their emotional well-being. STUDY DESIGN, PATIENTS AND INTERVENTION: A cross-sectional survey of patients aged 18 years and above who had received cochlear implants for profound hearing loss between 1997 and 2010. Of the 82 patients studied, 18 (22 per cent) were found to have experienced musical ear syndrome. Seven and 11 patients had musical ear syndrome prior to and after cochlear implantation, respectively. The character of musical ear syndrome symptoms was described as instrumental music (n = 2), singing (6) or both (10). Fourteen patients reported an adverse emotional effect, with three expressing ‘intolerance’. In this study, 22 per cent of cochlear implantees experienced musical ear syndrome. These symptoms affected patients’ emotional state, but most coped well. Musical ear syndrome can occur prior to and after cochlear implantation.

  4. Updates in vaccination: Recommendations for adult inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudrey, Khadija; Salvaggio, Michelle; Ahmed, Aftab; Mahmood, Sultan; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Treatment regimens for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) incorporate the use of a variety of immunosuppressive agents that increase the risk of infections. Prevention of many of these infections can be achieved by the timely and judicious use of vaccinations. IBD patients tend to be under-immunized. Some of the contributing factors are lack of awareness regarding the significance of vaccinating IBD patients, misperception about safety of vaccinations in immunocompromised patients, ambiguity about the perceived role of the gastroenterologist in contrast to the primary care physician and unavailability of vaccination guidelines focused on IBD population. In general, immunocompetent IBD patients can be vaccinated using standard vaccination recommendations. However there are special considerations for IBD patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, IBD travelers and pregnant women with IBD. This review discusses current vaccination recommendations with updates for adult IBD patients. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2013 vaccination guidelines with 2014 updates and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations have been highlighted as a primary source of recommendations. PMID:25805924

  5. Notation of Depression in Case Records of Older Adults in Community Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Enola K.

    2012-01-01

    Although significant numbers of social service clients experience mental health problems, virtually no research has examined the responsiveness of social service agencies to mental disorder. This article examines the extent to which client depression is reflected in records of a public social service agency, community long-term care (CLTC). Researchers assessed new, consenting CLTC clients for depression using standardized research criteria in a telephone interview. Agency case records were abstracted to determine the extent to which client depression was noted. Sensitivity and specificity of depression notation were 25.21 percent and 92.80 percent, respectively, indicating that agency records reflected depression for about one in four clients meeting depression criteria. Factors associated with accurate depression notation included cognitive impairments, low social support, psychotropic medications, and mental health treatment. The depression notation rates found are comparable to those in medical settings. Structured screening and assessment might enhance detection of mental disorder for social service clients. PMID:19275120

  6. Group B streptococcal necrotizing pneumonia in a diabetic adult patient.

    PubMed

    Pacha, Andrea; Luna Cian, Ramiro; Bonofiglio, Laura; Solari, Melisa; Strada, Virginia; Suárez, Mariana; Vigliarolo, Laura; Tersigni, Carina; Mollerach, Marta; Lopardo, Horacio

    2017-03-18

    The aim of this report is to describe a rare case of necrotizing pneumonia due to group B Streptococcus serotype III in a relatively young male adult (48 years old) suffering from diabetes. The organism was isolated from his pleural fluid and was only resistant to tetracycline. The patient first received ceftazidime (2g/8h i.v.)+clindamycin (300mg/8h) for 18 days and then he was discharged home and orally treated with amoxicillin clavulanic acid (1g/12h) for 23 days with an uneventful evolution. As in the cases of invasive infection by Streptococcus pyogenes, clindamycin could prevent streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

  7. Lack of recording of systemic lupus erythematosus in the death certificates of lupus patients.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Alén, J; Alarcón, G S; Campbell, R; Fernández, M; Reveille, J D; Cooper, G S

    2005-09-01

    To determine to what extent the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in deceased lupus patients is under-reported in death certificates, and the patient characteristics associated with such an occurrence. The death certificates of 76 of the 81 deceased SLE patients from two US lupus cohorts (LUMINA for Lupus in Minorities: Nature vs Nurture and CLU for Carolina Lupus Study), including 570 and 265 patients, respectively, were obtained from the Offices of Vital Statistics of the states where the patients died (Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas). Both cohorts included patients with SLE as per the American College of Rheumatology criteria, aged > or =16 yr, and disease duration at enrolment of < or =5 yr. The median duration of follow-up in each cohort at the time of these analyses ranged from 38.1 to 53.0 months. Standard univariable analyses were performed comparing patients with SLE recorded anywhere in the death certificate and those without it. A multivariable logistic regression model was performed to identify the variables independently associated with not recording SLE in death certificates. In 30 (40%) death certificates, SLE was not recorded anywhere in the death certificate. In univariable analyses, older age was associated with lack of recording of SLE in death certificates [mean age (standard deviation) 50.9 (15.6) years and 39.1 (18.6) yr among those for whom SLE was omitted and included on the death certificates, respectively, P = 0.005]. Patients without health insurance, those dying of a cardiovascular event and those of Caucasian ethnicity were also more likely to be in the non-recorded group. In the multivariable analysis, variables independently associated with not recording SLE as cause of death were older age [odds ratio = (95% confidence interval) 1.043 (1.005-1.083 per yr increase); P = 0.023] and lack of health insurance [4.649 (1.152-18.768); P = 0.031]. A high proportion of SLE diagnoses are not

  8. Factors affecting ventriculoperitoneal shunt survival in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Farid; Rehman, Abdul; Shamim, Muhammad S.; Bari, Muhammad E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt insertion remains the mainstay of treatment for hydrocephalus despite a high rate of complications. The predictors of shunt malfunction have been studied mostly in pediatric patients. In this study, we report our 11-year experience with VP shunts in adult patients with hydrocephalus. We also assess the various factors affecting shunt survival in a developing country setting. Methods: A retrospective chart analysis was conducted for all adult patients who had undergone shunt placement between the years 2001 and 2011. Kaplan–Meier curves were used to determine the duration from shunt placement to first malfunction and log-rank (Cox–Mantel) tests were used to determine the factors affecting shunt survival. Results: A total of 227 patients aged 18–85 years (mean: 45.8 years) were included in the study. The top four etiologies of hydrocephalus included post-cranial surgery (23.3%), brain tumor or cyst (22.9%), normal pressure hydrocephalus (15%), and intracranial hemorrhage (13.7%). The overall incidence of shunt malfunction was 15.4% with the median time to first shunt failure being 120 days. Etiology of hydrocephalus (P = 0.030) had a significant association with the development of shunt malfunction. Early shunt failure was associated with age (P < 0.001), duration of hospital stay (P < 0.001), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score less than 13 (P = 0.010), excision of brain tumors (P = 0.008), and placement of extra-ventricular drains (P = 0.033). Conclusions: Patients with increased age, prolonged hospital stay, GCS score of less than 13, extra-ventricular drains in situ, or excision of brain tumors were more likely to experience early shunt malfunction. PMID:25722930

  9. Patient and public attitudes towards informed consent models and levels of awareness of Electronic Health Records in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Fiona; Papoutsi, Chrysanthi; Reed, Julie E.; Marston, Cicely; Bell, Derek; Majeed, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    Background The development of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) forms an integral part of the information strategy for the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK, with the aim of facilitating health information exchange for patient care and secondary use, including research and healthcare planning. Implementing EHR systems requires an understanding of patient expectations for consent mechanisms and consideration of public awareness towards information sharing as might be made possible through integrated EHRs across primary and secondary health providers. Objectives To explore levels of public awareness about EHRs and to examine attitudes towards different consent models with respect to sharing identifiable and de-identified records for healthcare provision, research and planning. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was administered to adult patients and members of the public in primary and secondary care clinics in West London, UK in 2011. In total, 5331 individuals participated in the survey, and 3157 were included in the final analysis. Results The majority (91%) of respondents expected to be explicitly asked for consent for their identifiable records to be accessed for health provision, research or planning. Half the respondents (49%) did not expect to be asked for consent before their de-identified records were accessed. Compared with White British respondents, those from all other ethnic groups were more likely to anticipate their permission would be obtained before their de-identified records were used. Of the study population, 59% reported already being aware of EHRs before the survey. Older respondents and individuals with complex patterns of interaction with healthcare services were more likely to report prior awareness of EHRs. Individuals self-identifying as belonging to ethnic groups other than White British, and those with lower educational qualifications were less likely to report being aware of EHRs than White British respondents and

  10. Is the level of institutionalisation found in psychiatric housing services associated with the severity of illness and the functional impairment of the patients? A patient record analysis.

    PubMed

    Valdes-Stauber, Juan; Kilian, Reinhold

    2015-09-14

    In this cross-sectional study, we investigated whether clinical, social, financial, and care variables were associated with different accommodation settings for individuals suffering from severe and persistent mental disorders. Electronic record data of 250 patients who fulfilled the criteria for persistent and severe mental illness were used. Multiple linear regression models were applied to analyse associations between the types and the costs of housing services and the patients' severity of illness, their functional impairment, and their socio-demographic characteristics. We identified 50 patients living at home without need for additional housing support who were receiving outpatient treatment, 41 patients living in the community with outpatient housing support, 23 patients living with foster families for adults, 45 patients living in group homes with 12-h staff cover, 10 patients living in group homes with 24-h staff, and 81 patients living in psychiatric nursing homes. While this housing differed largely in the level of institutionalisation and also in the costs of accommodation, these differences were not related to a patient's severity of disease or in their functional impairment. In particular, patients living in nursing homes had a slightly higher level of functioning compared to those living in the community without welfare housing services. Only where patients were subject to guardianship was there a significant association with an increased level of institutionalisation. Our study suggests that the level of institutionalisation and the associated costs of welfare housing services do not accurately reflect the severity of illness or the level of functional impairment of the patients there are designed to support. The limitations of the study design and the data do not allow for conclusions about causal relationships or generalisation of the findings to other regions. Therefore, further prospective studies are needed to assess the adequacy of the setting

  11. Is visualising ureter before pyeloplasty necessary in adult patients?

    PubMed

    Cakan, M; Yalçinkaya, F; Demirel, F; Satir, A

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to detect whether or not visualising ureter and ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) preoperatively is necessary in adult patients who have primer UPJ obstruction. Between January 1995 to June 1999, 46 renal units in 45 patients with primer UPJ obstruction were evaluated. The patients were separated into 2 groups. In group 1, intravenous pyelography (IVP) and renal scintigraphy were performed to 17 renal units preoperatively. In group 2, in addition to these methods, either retrograde pyelography (RGP) or antegrade pyelography (AGP) were performed to 29 renal units. Renal/bladder sonogram was used in patients with poor renal function in IVP or in renal scintigraphy. All the operations were performed through a flank incision. In group 2, additional information was gained for 8 (27.5%) of the renal units preoperatively. No additional information for this group found intraoperatively. In group 1, we found additional information in 4 (23.53%) of the units intraoperatively. All the pathologies in both groups were corrected intraoperatively. Double-J (D-J) stent was used in 6 (35.29%) of the units in group 1 and 8 (27.58%) of the units in group 2 intraoperatively (p > 0.05). In group 2, 4 (13.79%) preoperative complications were seen due to RGP and they were treated either medically or conservatively. In the early postoperative period, a complication observed in 1 (5.88%) of the patients in group 1 and 1 of the patients in group 2 (3.44%) (p > 0.05). The first patient was treated with inserting D-J and the latter one was treated conservatively. In the 3rd postoperative month, success rate was found to be 94.11% in group 1 and 96.55% in group 2 (p > 0.05). Additional pathologies in adult patients with primer UPJ obstruction can be corrected intraoperatively through a flank incision. Therefore, imaging of ureter and UPJ may not be necessary in these patients.

  12. Predicting Future Suicide Attempts Among Adolescent and Emerging Adult Psychiatric Emergency Patients.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Adam G; Czyz, Ewa K; King, Cheryl A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to longitudinally examine specific characteristics of suicidal ideation in combination with histories of suicide attempts and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) to best evaluate risk for a future attempt among high-risk adolescents and emerging adults. Participants in this retrospective medical record review study were 473 (53% female; 69% Caucasian) consecutive patients, ages 15 to 24 years (M=19.4 years) who presented for psychiatric emergency services during a 9-month period. These patients' medical records, including a clinician-administered Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale, were coded at the index visit and at future visits occurring within the next 18 months. Logistic regression models were used to predict suicide attempts during this period. Socioeconomic status, suicidal ideation severity (i.e., intent, method), suicidal ideation intensity (i.e., frequency, controllability), a lifetime history of suicide attempt, and a lifetime history of NSSI were significant independent predictors of a future suicide attempt. Suicidal ideation added incremental validity to the prediction of future suicide attempts above and beyond the influence of a past suicide attempt, whereas a lifetime history of NSSI did not. Sex moderated the relationship between the duration of suicidal thoughts and future attempts (predictive for male patients but not female). Results suggest value in incorporating both past behaviors and current thoughts into suicide risk formulation. Furthermore, suicidal ideation duration warrants additional examination as a potential critical factor for screening assessments evaluating suicide risk among high-risk samples, particularly for male patients.

  13. Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records: Exploring Recommendations for Successful Implementation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Urowitz, Sara; Apatu, Emma; DeLenardo, Claudette; Eysenbach, Gunther; Harth, Tamara; Pai, Howard; Leonard, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Background Providing patients with access to their electronic health records offers great promise to improve patient health and satisfaction with their care, as well to improve professional and organizational approaches to health care. Although many benefits have been identified, there are many questions about best practices for the implementation of patient accessible Electronic Health Records (EHRs). Objectives To develop recommendations to assist health care organizations in providing patients with access to EHRs in a meaningful, responsible, and responsive manner. Methods A Patient Accessible Electronic Health Record (PAEHR) Workshop was held with nationally and internationally renowned experts to explore issues related to providing patient access to the EHR and managing institutional change. Results The PAEHR Workshop was attended by 45 participants who discussed recommendations for the implementation of patient accessible EHRs. Recommendations were discussed under four subject domains: (1) providing patient access to the EHR, (2) maintaining privacy and confidentiality related to the PAEHR, (3) patient education and navigation of the PAEHR, and (4) strategies for managing institutional change. The discussion focused on the need for national infrastructure, clear definitions for privacy, security and confidentiality, flexible, interoperable solutions, and patient and professional education. In addition, there was a strong call for research into all domains of patient accessible EHRs to ensure the adoption of evidence-based practices. Conclusions Patient access to personal health information is a fundamental issue for patient engagement and empowerment. Health care professionals and organizations should consider the potential benefits and risks of patient access when developing EHR strategies. Flexible, standardized, and interoperable solutions must be integrated with outcomes-based research to activate effectively patients as partners in their health care

  14. Ontogeny and the fossil record: what, if anything, is an adult dinosaur?

    PubMed

    Hone, David W E; Farke, Andrew A; Wedel, Mathew J

    2016-02-01

    Identification of the ontogenetic status of an extinct organism is complex, and yet this underpins major areas of research, from taxonomy and systematics to ecology and evolution. In the case of the non-avialan dinosaurs, at least some were reproductively mature before they were skeletally mature, and a lack of consensus on how to define an 'adult' animal causes problems for even basic scientific investigations. Here we review the current methods available to determine the age of non-avialan dinosaurs, discuss the definitions of different ontogenetic stages, and summarize the implications of these disparate definitions for dinosaur palaeontology. Most critically, a growing body of evidence suggests that many dinosaurs that would be considered 'adults' in a modern-day field study are considered 'juveniles' or 'subadults' in palaeontological contexts.

  15. Notation of Depression in Case Records of Older Adults in Community Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Enola K.

    2008-01-01

    Although significant numbers of social service clients experience mental health problems, virtually no research has examined the responsiveness of social service agencies to mental disorder. This article examines the extent to which client depression is reflected in records of a public social service agency, community long-term care (CLTC).…

  16. Notation of Depression in Case Records of Older Adults in Community Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Enola K.

    2008-01-01

    Although significant numbers of social service clients experience mental health problems, virtually no research has examined the responsiveness of social service agencies to mental disorder. This article examines the extent to which client depression is reflected in records of a public social service agency, community long-term care (CLTC).…

  17. How good is New South Wales admitted patient data collection in recording births?

    PubMed

    Lam, Mary K

    2011-01-01

    This record linkage study aims to examine the coding concordance of delivery outcome and discharge status between the New South Wales (NSW) Midwives Data Collection (MDC) and Admitted Patients Data Collection (APDC) as well as factors that contribute to hospital births not being recorded in the APDC. Births recorded in the APDC and MDC datasets for the calendar year 2005 were used for analysis. Births registered in the NSW Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages for the same period were used as validation. Descriptive analysis was used to examine coding concordance between the APDC and MDC datasets for matched records, and logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with hospital births not being included in the APDC. A total of 90,585 unique births were recorded in the MDC for the calendar year 2005. A total of 79,173 confirmed hospital births were matched to corresponding records in the APDC; 2,249 (3%) confirmed hospital births were not found in the APDC. For unmatched records, logistic regression analyses showed that the level of obstetric hospital in which babies were born was a significant factor associated with information not being recorded in the APDC. As compared with local, small isolated, and small metropolitan hospitals (Levels 1 to 3 hospitals), larger tertiary hospitals (Levels 4 to 6) and private hospitals had decreased odds of hospital births not being recorded in the APDC. For matched records, 95% and 99% of records were found to be coded consistently between the APDC and MDC datasets for outcome of delivery and discharge status respectively. With a high level of coding concordance between the APDC and MDC datasets and only a small percentage of hospital births not being recorded in the APDC, the obstetrics subset of the APDC dataset was found to be of good quality.

  18. Cyclic seizures in critically ill patients: Clinical correlates, DC recordings and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Lecio F; Gilmore, Emily J; Petroff, Ognen A; Sivaraju, Adithya; Rampal, Nishi; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Gaspard, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    To describe EEG and clinical correlates, DC recordings and prognostic significance of cyclic seizures (CS). We reviewed our prospective continuous EEG database to identify patients with CS, controls with non-cyclic status epilepticus (SE) and controls without seizure matched for age and etiology. EEG was reviewed with DC settings. 39/260 (15%) patients with electrographic seizures presented with CS. These patients were older (62 vs. 54years; p=0.04) and more often had acute or progressive brain injury (77% vs. 52%; p=0.03) than patients with non-cyclic SE and had a lower level of consciousness, were more severely ill, than matched controls. CS almost always had focal onset, often from posterior regions. Patients with CS trended towards worse prognosis. When available (12 patients), DC recordings showed an infraslow cyclic oscillation of EEG baseline synchronized to the seizures in all cases. CS occur mostly in older patients with acute or progressive brain injury, are more likely to be associated with poor outcome than patients with other forms of nonconvulsive SE, and are accompanied by synchronous oscillations of the EEG baseline on DC recordings. CS are a common form of non-convulsive status epilepticus in critically ill patients and provide further insights into the relationship between infraslow activity and seizures; further study on this relationship may shed light on the mechanisms of seizure initiation and termination. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Meeting the health information needs of prostate cancer patients using personal health records.

    PubMed

    Pai, H H; Lau, F; Barnett, J; Jones, S

    2013-12-01

    There is interest in the use of health information technology in the form of personal health record (phr) systems to support patient needs for health information, care, and decision-making, particularly for patients with distressing, chronic diseases such as prostate cancer (pca). We sought feedback from pca patients who used a phr. For 6 months, 22 pca patients in various phases of care at the BC Cancer Agency (bcca) were given access to a secure Web-based phr called provider, which they could use to view their medical records and use a set of support tools. Feedback was obtained using an end-of-study survey on usability, satisfaction, and concerns with provider. Site activity was recorded to assess usage patterns. Of the 17 patients who completed the study, 29% encountered some minor difficulties using provider. No security breaches were known to have occurred. The two most commonly accessed medical records were laboratory test results and transcribed doctor's notes. Of survey respondents, 94% were satisfied with the access to their medical records, 65% said that provider helped to answer their questions, 77% felt that their privacy and confidentiality were preserved, 65% felt that using provider helped them to communicate better with their physicians, 83% found new and useful information that they would not have received by talking to their health care providers, and 88% said that they would continue to use provider. Our results support the notion that phrs can provide cancer patients with timely access to their medical records and health information, and can assist in communication with health care providers, in knowledge generation, and in patient empowerment.

  20. "Concordance between comorbidity data from patient self-report interviews and medical record documentation"

    PubMed Central

    Corser, William; Sikorskii, Alla; Olomu, Ade; Stommel, Manfred; Proden, Camille; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    Background Comorbidity is an important adjustment measure in research focusing on outcomes such as health status and mortality. One recurrent methodological issue concerns the concordance of comorbidity data obtained from different reporting sources. The purpose of these prospectively planned analyses was to examine the concordance of comorbidity data obtained from patient self-report survey interviews and hospital medical record documentation. Methods Comorbidity data were obtained using survey interviews and medical record entries from 525 hospitalized Acute Coronary Syndrome patients. Frequencies and descriptive statistics of individual and composite comorbidity data from both sources were completed. Individual item agreement was evaluated with simple and weighted kappas, Spearman Rho coefficients for composite scores. Results On average, patients reported more comorbidities during their patient survey interviews (mean = 1.78, SD = 1.99) than providers had documented in medical records (mean = 1.27, SD = 1.43). Higher proportions of positive responses were obtained from self-reports compared to medical records for all conditions except congestive heart failure and renal disease. Older age and higher depressive symptom levels were significantly associated with poorer levels of data concordance. Conclusion These results demonstrate that survey comorbidity data from ACS patients may not be entirely concordat with medical record documentation. In the absence of a gold standard, it is possible that hospital records did not include all pre-admission comorbidities and these patient survey interview methods may need to be refined. Self-report methods to facilitate some patients' complete recall of comorbid conditions may need to be refined by health services researchers. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00416026. PMID:18416841

  1. Cytomegalovirus infections following umbilical cord blood transplantation using reduced intensity conditioning regimens for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Tomoko; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Kami, Masahiro; Yuji, Koichiro; Kusumi, Eiji; Hori, Akiko; Murashige, Naoko; Tanaka, Yuji; Masuoka, Kazuhiro; Wake, Atsushi; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Taniguchi, Shuichi

    2007-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a major complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT); however, we have little information on the clinical features of CMV reactivation after cord blood transplantation using reduced-intensity regimens (RI-CBT) for adults. We reviewed medical records of 140 patients who underwent RI-CBT at Toranomon Hospital between January 2002 and March 2005. All the patients were monitored for CMV-antigenemia weekly, and, if turned positive, received preemptive foscarnet or ganciclovir. Seventy-seven patients developed positive antigenemia at a median onset of day 35 (range, 4-92) after transplant. Median of the maximal number of CMV pp65-positive cells per 50,000 cells was 22 (range, 1-1806). CMV disease developed in 22 patients on a median of day 35 (range, 15-106); 21 had enterocolitis and 1 had adrenalitis. CMV antigenemia had not been detected in 2 patients, when CMV disease was diagnosed. CMV disease was successfully treated using ganciclovir or foscarnet in 14 patients. The other 8 patients died without improvement of CMV disease. In multivariate analysis, grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease was a risk factor of CMV disease (relative risk 3.48, 95% confidential interval 1.47-8.23). CMV reactivation and disease develop early after RI-CBT. CMV enterocolitis may be a common complication after RI-CBT.

  2. The smart card: an ideal tool for a computer-based patient record.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, R; Hildebrand, C; Jung, E

    1995-01-01

    Over the past decades, technology has advanced in all areas. Medical documentation, however, has not altered considerably. This means that medical care is often below standard. This article tries to point out how healthcare could benefit from a computer-based medical record. It also discusses the use of a medical smart card as a computer-based patient record--exemplified by the European DIABCARD-project which develops a chip card for persons with diabetes.

  3. Ileal function in patients with untreated adult coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D B; Kumar, P J; Webb, J P; Lane, A E; Clark, M L; Dawson, A M

    1975-01-01

    A double-lumen perfusion technique has been used to investigate jejunal and ileal absorption of glucose, water, and electrolytes in a group of patients with untreated adult coeliac disease. Correct positioning of the tube was confirmed by measuring the differential jejunal and ileal handling of bicarbonate. Eight control subjects and eight patients with coeliac disease were perfused with an isotonic electrolyte solution containing 50 mM glucose and 25 mM bicarbonate. The group of coeliac patients had impaired jejunal absorption of glucose (P less than 0.001), water (P less than 0.01), sodium (P less than 0.02), and chloride (P greater than 0.05) compared with the control group. In contrast the group of coeliac patients had normal ileal glucose and water absorption and increased ileal sodium (P greater than 0.01) and chloride (P greater than 0.05) absorption compared with the controls. Evidence for ileal adaptation was found in three individual patients who had absorptive values outside 2SD of the normal mean. The results indicate that the distal small intestine in coeliac disease has the ability to adopt to the damage and loss of absorptive capacity in the proximal small intestine. PMID:1132801

  4. A comprehensive Fabry-related pain questionnaire for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Magg, Barbara; Thomas, Phillip; Wiedmann, Silke; Heuschmann, Peter; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Pain may be the earliest symptom in Fabry disease and presents with a distinct phenotype including triggerable pain attacks, evoked pain, pain crises, and chronic pain. Current pain questionnaires do not reflect the special phenotype of Fabry disease-associated pain, which hampers its systematic evaluation as the basis of correct diagnosis and effective treatment. A questionnaire specifically designed to assess Fabry disease-associated pain is thus urgently needed. At the Würzburg Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy (FAZIT), Germany, we developed and validated the first face-to-face Fabry Pain Questionnaire (FPQ) for adult patients. The initial version of the FPQ was tested in a pilot study with 20 consecutive Fabry disease patients. The performance of the revised FPQ was assessed in a first (n=56) and second (n=20) validation phase in consecutive Fabry disease patients. For this, patients were interviewed at baseline and 2 weeks later. We determined the test-retest reliability and validity of the FPQ in comparison to data obtained with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. The FPQ contains 15 questions on the 4 pain phenotypes of Fabry disease (pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain, chronic pain) in childhood and adulthood, on pain development during life with and without enzyme replacement therapy, and on everyday life impairment due to pain. This first disease-specific questionnaire is a valuable tool for baseline and follow-up assessment of pain in Fabry disease patients and may guide treatment in this distinct pain phenotype.

  5. Clinical relevance of rhinovirus infections among adult hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Fica, Alberto; Dabanch, Jeannette; Andrade, Winston; Bustos, Patricia; Carvajal, Ita; Ceroni, Carolina; Triantafilo, Vjera; Castro, Marcelo; Fasce, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is an emerging viral pathogen. To characterize a group of patients admitted due to infection by this agent in a general hospital in Chile. Cases were identified by RT-PCR for 1 year through active surveillance of patients admitted with severe respiratory illness. Diagnosis was not available during hospitalization. Thirty-two cases were identified, 90% were ≥60 years old or had co-morbid conditions. Human rhinovirus-related admissions represented 23.7% of hospitalization due to severe acute respiratory infections among adults and ranked second to influenza (37.8%). Patients presented with pneumonia (68.8%), decompensated chronic lung conditions (21.9%), heart failure or influenza-like illness (6.3% each). Admission to intensive or intermediate care units was required by 31.2% and in-hospital mortality reached 12.5%. A CURB-65 score ≥3 was significantly associated to in-hospital mortality (p<0.05). Most patients received antibiotics (90%). Human rhinovirus infections in elderly patients with co-morbid conditions are associated with hospitalizations, requiring critical or semi-critical antibiotics use. A high CURB-65 score was associated to in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-12-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient.

  7. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3+CD4−CD8− T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient. PMID:27979843

  8. Adult acral cutaneous myofibromas in a patient with generalized morphea.

    PubMed

    English, Joseph C; Derdeyn, Amalie S; Smith, Paula D; Patterson, James W

    2002-06-01

    Myofibroma is the term for a group of solitary or generalized soft tissue tumors that may be located in the skin or within skeletal muscle, bone, and viscera. These tumors occur most commonly in children. However, examples of myofibroma have been reported in adults, in whom they usually present as solitary lesions of the head and neck, trunk, and extremities. "Cutaneous nodules" have been reported in both localized and systemic scleroderma, but to our knowledge, there are no specific reports of myofibromas developing in this patient population. We report a case of acral myofibromas in a patient with generalized cutaneous morphea. This occurrence is of interest in view of the possible role of myofibroblasts in the pathogenesis of scleroderma.

  9. Ensuring Privacy When Integrating Patient-Based Datasets: New Methods and Developments in Record Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adrian P.; Ferrante, Anna M.; Randall, Sean M.; Boyd, James H.; Semmens, James B.

    2017-01-01

    In an era where the volume of structured and unstructured digital data has exploded, there has been an enormous growth in the creation of data about individuals that can be used for understanding and treating disease. Joining these records together at an individual level provides a complete picture of a patient’s interaction with health services and allows better assessment of patient outcomes and effectiveness of treatment and services. Record linkage techniques provide an efficient and cost-effective method to bring individual records together as patient profiles. These linkage procedures bring their own challenges, especially relating to the protection of privacy. The development and implementation of record linkage systems that do not require the release of personal information can reduce the risks associated with record linkage and overcome legal barriers to data sharing. Current conceptual and experimental privacy-preserving record linkage (PPRL) models show promise in addressing data integration challenges. Enhancing and operationalizing PPRL protocols can help address the dilemma faced by some custodians between using data to improve quality of life and dealing with the ethical, legal, and administrative issues associated with protecting an individual’s privacy. These methods can reduce the risk to privacy, as they do not require personally identifying information to be shared. PPRL methods can improve the delivery of record linkage services to the health and broader research community. PMID:28303240

  10. Randomized trial of an electronic personal health record for patients with serious mental illnesses.

    PubMed

    Druss, Benjamin G; Ji, Xu; Glick, Gretl; von Esenwein, Silke A

    2014-03-01

    The authors evaluated the effect of an electronic personal health record on the quality of medical care in a community mental health setting. A total of 170 individuals with a serious mental disorder and a comorbid medical condition treated in a community mental health center were randomly assigned to either a personal health record or usual care. One-year outcomes assessed quality of medical care, patient activation, service use, and health-related quality of life. Patients used the personal health record a mean of 42.1 times during the 1-year intervention period. In the personal health record group, the total proportion of eligible preventive services received increased from 24% at baseline to 40% at the 12-month follow-up, whereas it declined in the usual care group, from 25% to 18%. In the subset of patients with one or more cardiometabolic conditions (N=118), the total proportion of eligible services received improved by 2 percentage points in the personal health record group and declined by 11 percentage points in the usual care group, resulting in a significant difference in change between the two groups. There was an increase in the number of outpatient medical visits, which appeared to explain many of the significant differences in the quality of medical care. Having a personal health record resulted in significantly improved quality of medical care and increased use of medical services among patients. Personal health records could provide a relatively low-cost scalable strategy for improving medical care for patients with comorbid medical and serious mental illnesses.

  11. Physical examination is a poor screening test for abdominal-pelvic injury in adult blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Michetti, Christopher P; Sakran, Joseph V; Grabowski, Jurek G; Thompson, Earl V; Bennett, Kristen; Fakhry, Samir M

    2010-03-01

    To determine if physical examination can reliably detect or exclude abdominal or pelvic injury in adult trauma activation patients. Trauma registry and medical record data were retrospectively reviewed for all adult blunt trauma patients with Glasgow coma scale score>8, from 6/30/05 to 12/31/06. Attending surgeons' dictated admission history and physical examination reports were individually reviewed. Patients' subjective reports of abdominal pain were recorded as present or absent. Exam findings of the lower ribs, abdomen, and pelvis were each separately recorded as positive or negative, and were compared with findings on a subsequent objective evaluation of the abdomen (OEA). "Clinically significant" injuries were defined as those that would change patient management. One thousand six hundred sixty-three patients were studied. Of patients with a negative abdominal exam, 10% had a positive OEA. When abdominal pain was absent, and exam of the lower ribs, abdomen, and pelvis was normal, OEA was positive in 7.6%, and 5.7% had a clinically significant injury. While a positive abdominal exam was predictive of a positive OEA (P<0.01), a negative exam, even when broadened (pain, lower ribs, abdomen, pelvis) did not exclude significant injuries. Ten percent of trauma activation patients with a negative abdominal exam have occult abdominal/pelvic injuries. Even when exam of the lower ribs, abdomen, and pelvis are all negative and abdominal pain is absent, 5.7% have occult injuries that would change management. OEA should be used liberally for adult blunt trauma activation patients regardless of physical exam findings, to avoid missing clinically significant injuries. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Digital audio recordings improve the outcomes of patient consultations: A randomised cluster trial.

    PubMed

    Wolderslund, Maiken; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Holst, René; Axboe, Mette; Ammentorp, Jette

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effects on patients' outcome of the consultations when provided with: a Digital Audio Recording (DAR) of the consultation and a Question Prompt List (QPL). This is a three-armed randomised controlled cluster trial. One group of patients received standard care, while the other two groups received either the QPL in combination with a recording of their consultation or only the recording. Patients from four outpatient clinics participated: Paediatric, Orthopaedic, Internal Medicine, and Urology. The effects were evaluated by patient-administered questionnaires. A total of 4349 patients participated in the study. DAR significantly increased the probability of fulfilling the participants' self-perceived information needs by 4.1% to 6.3%, particularly with regard to test results (OR=1.41, 95%CI: 1.14-1.74, p=0.001) and treatment options (OR=1.39, 95%CI: 1.13-1.71, p=0.002). Additionally, the interventions positively influenced the participants' satisfaction with the treatment, their relationship with the health professional, and their experience of being involved in the decision-making. Providing outpatients with a QPL and DAR of their consultation positively influences the patients' perception of having adequate information after the consultation. The implementation of a QPL and audio recording of consultations should be considered in routine practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparing Patient Outcomes across Payer Types: Implications for Using Hospital Discharge Records to Assess Quality

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Daniel D; Martsolf, Grant R

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explain observed differences in patient outcomes across payer types using hospital discharge records. Specifically, we address two mechanisms: hospital-payer matching versus unobserved patient heterogeneity. Data Source Florida's hospital discharge records (1996–2000) of major surgery patients with private health insurance between the ages of 18 and 65, Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) market penetration data, hospital systems data, and the Area Resource File. Study Design The dependent variable is occurrence of one or more in-hospital complications as identified by the Complication Screening Program. The key independent variable is patients' primary-payer type (HMO, Preferred Provider Organization, and fee-for-service). We estimate five different logistic regression models, each representing a different assumption about the underlying factors that confound the causal relationship between the payer type and the likelihood of experiencing complications. Principal Finding We find that the observed differences in complication rates across payer types are largely driven by unobserved differences in patient health, even after adjusting for case mix using available data elements in the discharge records. Conclusion Because of the limitations inherent to hospital discharge records, making quality comparisons in terms of patient outcomes is challenging. As such, any efforts to assess quality in such a manner must be carried out cautiously. PMID:21689096

  14. Recommended vaccinations for asplenic and hyposplenic adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Grazzini, Maddalena; Niccolai, Giuditta; Paolini, Diana; Varone, Ornella; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Bartalesi, Filippo; Santini, Maria Grazia; Baretti, Simonetta; Bonito, Carlo; Zini, Paola; Mechi, Maria Teresa; Niccolini, Fabrizio; Magistri, Lea; Pulci, Maria Beatrice; Bechini, Angela

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Asplenic or hyposplenic (AH) individuals are particularly vulnerable to invasive infections caused by encapsulated bacteria. Such infections have often a sudden onset and a fulminant course. Infectious diseases (IDs) incidence in AH subjects can be reduced by preventive measures such as vaccination. The aim of our work is to provide updated recommendations on prevention of infectious diseases in AH adult patients, and to supply a useful and practical tool to healthcare workers for the management of these subjects, in hospital setting and in outpatients consultation. A systematic literature review on evidence based measures for the prevention of IDs in adult AH patients was performed in 2015. Updated recommendations on available vaccines were consequently provided. Vaccinations against S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, H. influenzae type b and influenza virus are strongly recommended and should be administered at least 2 weeks before surgery in elective cases or at least 2 weeks after the surgical intervention in emergency cases. In subjects without evidence of immunity, 2 doses of live attenuated vaccines against measles-mumps-rubella and varicella should be administered 4–8 weeks apart from each other; a booster dose of tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis vaccine should be administered also to subjects fully vaccinated, and a 3-dose primary vaccination series is recommended in AH subjects with unknown or incomplete vaccination series (as in healthy people). Evidence based prevention data support the above recommendations to reduce the risk of infection in AH individuals. PMID:27929751

  15. SOEMPI: A Secure Open Enterprise Master Patient Index Software Toolkit for Private Record Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Csaba; Durham, Elizabeth; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Xue, Yuan; Malin, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    To mitigate bias in multi-institutional research studies, healthcare organizations need to integrate patient records. However, this process must be accomplished without disclosing the identities of the corresponding patients. Various private record linkage (PRL) techniques have been proposed, but there is a lack of translation into practice because no software suite supports the entire PRL lifecycle. This paper addresses this issue with the introduction of the Secure Open Enterprise Master Patient Index (SOEMPI). We show how SOEMPI covers the PRL lifecycle, illustrate the implementation of several PRL protocols, and provide a runtime analysis for the integration of two datasets consisting of 10,000 records. While the PRL process is slower than a non-secure setting, our analysis shows the majority of processes in a PRL protocol require several seconds or less and that SOEMPI completes the process in approximately two minutes, which is a practical amount of time for integration. PMID:25954421

  16. Statistical disclosure control architectures for patient records in biomedical information systems.

    PubMed

    Elliot, M; Purdam, K; Smith, D

    2008-02-01

    Patient record data are potentially highly sensitive and their secondary use raises both ethical and data protection issues. Disclosure of patient data could cause serious difficulties for the medical profession and be potentially damaging for individual patients and clinicians. Yet at the same time patient records are a hugely valuable resource in terms of clinical research and patient treatment. A secure, remote access system for such data would therefore provide numerous benefits. In this paper we outline the statistical disclosure risks posed by patient record data in the context of establishing a grid based medical data repository. We review good practice in existing patient databases, outline a scenario model for assessing risk and suggest a new model for statistical disclosure control of patient data. The architecture and the research method we have described have general relevance for any remote data access system where maximizing both data utility and security is a priority, and has specific relevance to medical data and bioinformatics. It can straightforwardly be integrated into data access and analysis tools.

  17. Is patient confidentiality compromised with the electronic health record?: a position paper.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ilse M

    2015-02-01

    In order for electronic health records to fulfill their expected benefits, protection of privacy of patient information is key. Lack of trust in confidentiality can lead to reluctance in disclosing all relevant information, which could have grave consequences. This position paper contemplates whether patient confidentiality is compromised by electronic health records. The position that confidentiality is compromised was supported by the four bioethical principles and argued that despite laws and various safeguards to protect patients' confidentiality, numerous data breaches have occurred. The position that confidentiality is not compromised was supported by virtue ethics and a utilitarian viewpoint and argued that safeguards keep information confidential and the public feels relatively safe with the electronic health record. The article concludes with an ethically superior position that confidentiality is compromised with the electronic health record. Although organizational and governmental ways of enhancing the confidentiality of patient information within the electronic health record facilitate confidentiality, the ultimate responsibility of maintaining confidentiality rests with the individual end-users and their ethical code of conduct. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for nurses calls for nurses to be watchful with data security in electronic communications.

  18. When patients take the initiative to audio-record a clinical consultation.

    PubMed

    van Bruinessen, Inge Renske; Leegwater, Brigit; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2017-08-01

    to get insight into healthcare professionals' current experience with, and views on consultation audio-recordings made on patients' initiative. 215 Dutch healthcare professionals (123 physicians and 92 nurses) working in oncology care completed a survey inquiring their experiences and views. 71% of the respondents had experience with the consultation audio-recordings. Healthcare professionals who are in favour of the use of audio-recordings seem to embrace the evidence-based benefits for patients of listing back to a consultation again, and mention the positive influence on their patients. Opposing arguments relate to the belief that is confusing for patients or that it increases the chance that information is misinterpreted. Also the lack of control they have over the recording (fear for misuse), uncertainty about the medico-legal status, inhibiting influence on the communication process and feeling of distrust was mentioned. For almost one quarter of respondents these arguments and concerns were reason enough not to cooperate at all (9%), to cooperate only in certain cases (4%) or led to doubts about cooperation (9%). the many concerns that exist among healthcare professionals need to be tackled in order to increase transparency, as audio-recordings are expected to be used increasingly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Electronic patient records for dental school clinics: more than paperless systems.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Jane C; Zeller, Gregory G; Shah, Chhaya

    2002-05-01

    The Electronic Patient Record (EPR) or "computer-based medical record" is defined by the Patient Record Institute as "a repository for patient information with one health-care enterprise that is supported by digital computer input and integrated with other information sources." The information technology revolution coupled with everyday use of computers in clinical dentistry has created new demand for electronic patient records. Ultimately, the EPR should improve health care quality. The major short-term disadvantage is cost, including software, equipment, training, and personnel time involved in the associated business process re-engineering. An internal review committee with expertise in information technology and/or database management evaluated commercially available software in light of the unique needs of academic dental facilities. This paper discusses their deficiencies and suggests areas for improvement. The dental profession should develop a more common record with standard diagnostic codes and clinical outcome measures to make the EPR more useful for clinical research and improve the quality of care.

  20. Development and initial validation of a content taxonomy for patient records in general dentistry.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Amit; Hernandez, Pedro; Thyvalikakath, Thankam; Ye, Harold; Song, Mei; Schleyer, Titus

    2013-12-01

    Develop and validate an initial content taxonomy for patient records in general dentistry. Phase 1 - obtain 95 de-identified patient records from 11 general dentists in the United States. Phase 2 - extract individual data fields (information items), both explicit (labeled) and implicit (unlabeled), from records, and organize into categories mirroring original field context. Phase 3 - refine raw list of information items by eliminating duplicates/redundancies and focusing on general dentistry. Phase 4 - validate all items regarding inclusion and importance using a two-round Delphi study with a panel of 22 general dentists active in clinical practice, education, and research. Analysis of 76 patient records from 9 dentists, combined with previous work, yielded a raw list of 1509 information items. Refinement reduced this list to 1107 items, subsequently rated by the Delphi panel. The final model contained 870 items, with 761 (88%) rated as mandatory. In Round 1, 95% (825) of the final items were accepted, in Round 2 the remaining 5% (45). Only 45 items on the initial list were rejected and 192 (or 17%) remained equivocal. Grounded in the reality of clinical practice, our proposed content taxonomy represents a significant advance over existing guidelines and standards by providing a granular and comprehensive information representation for general dental patient records. It offers a significant foundational asset for implementing an interoperable health information technology infrastructure for general dentistry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Forensic revolution need maintenance of dental records of patients by the dentists: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anamika; Mishra, Gaurav; Bhutani, Hemant; Hoshing, Chetan; Bhalla, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: With the growth of forensic odontology, dental records have become an essential source of information, especially for medicolegal cases in general practice. It is mandated by the law that every dentist must keep some kind of records for every patient they treat. After the death of an individual, remnants of teeth are usually damaged at the last among all body parts. Dental records assist in personal identification in cases of mass disasters, criminal investigations, and medicolegal issues. However, in India, rules for maintaining dental records are not very strictly followed. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge regarding the maintenance of dental records among dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh. Materials and Methods: Data collection was performed via a questionnaire. The study population responded to the questions pertaining to knowledge regarding forensic odontology methods and the mode of maintaining dental records in their regular practice through a personal interview. A descriptive analysis was carried out for the data. The data were summarized and analyzed using the statistical software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 18.0. Results: A very low percentage (22%) of the dentists were seen to be maintaining records on a regular basis. Seventy-eight percent of the dentists were not maintaining any records. Conclusion: This study clearly indicates that the dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh need to be properly trained for any kind of forensic and medicolegal needs. PMID:27583219

  2. Patch Clamp Recordings on Intact Dorsal Root Ganglia from Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kerui; Ohara, Peter T; Jasmin, Luc

    2016-09-29

    Patch clamp studies from dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) neurons have increased our understanding of the peripheral nervous system. Currently, the majority of recordings are conducted on dissociated DRG neurons, which is a standard preparation for most laboratories. Neuronal properties, however, can be altered by axonal injury resulting from enzyme digestion used in acquiring dissociated neurons. Further, dissociated neuron preparations cannot fully represent the microenvironment of the DRG since loss of contact with satellite glial cells that surround the primary sensory neurons is an unavoidable consequence of this method. To overcome the limitations in using conventional dissociated DRG neurons for patch clamp recordings, in this report we describe a method to prepare intact DRGs and conduct patch clamp recordings on individual primary sensory neurons ex vivo. This approach permits the fast and straightforward preparation of intact DRGs, mimicking in vivo conditions by keeping DRG neurons associated with their surrounding satellite glial cells and basement membrane. Furthermore, the method avoids axonal injury from manipulation and enzyme digestion such as when dissociating DRGs. This ex vivo preparation can additionally be used to study the interaction between primary sensory neurons and satellite glial cells.

  3. Pragmatic Randomized, Controlled Trial of Patient Navigators and Enhanced Personal Health Records in CKD.

    PubMed

    Navaneethan, Sankar D; Jolly, Stacey E; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Nakhoul, Georges; Konig, Victoria; Hyland, Jennifer; Burrucker, Yvette K; Dann, Priscilla Davis; Tucky, Barbara H; Sharp, John; Nally, Joseph V

    2017-09-07

    Patient navigators and enhanced personal health records improve the quality of health care delivered in other disease states. We aimed to develop a navigator program for patients with CKD and an electronic health record-based enhanced personal health record to disseminate CKD stage-specific goals of care and education. We also conducted a pragmatic randomized clinical trial to compare the effect of a navigator program for patients with CKD with enhanced personal health record and compare their combination compared with usual care among patients with CKD stage 3b/4. Two hundred and nine patients from six outpatient clinics (in both primary care and nephrology settings) were randomized in a 2×2 factorial design into four-study groups: (1) enhanced personal health record only, (2) patient navigator only, (3) both, and (4) usual care (control) group. Primary outcome measure was the change in eGFR over a 2-year follow-up period. Secondary outcome measures included acquisition of appropriate CKD-related laboratory measures, specialty referrals, and hospitalization rates. Median age of the study population was 68 years old, and 75% were white. At study entry, 54% of patients were followed by nephrologists, and 88% were on renin-angiotensin system blockers. After a 2-year follow-up, rate of decline in eGFR was similar across the four groups (P=0.19). Measurements of CKD-related laboratory parameters were not significantly different among the groups. Furthermore, referral for dialysis education and vascular access placement, emergency room visits, and hospitalization rates were not statistically significant different between the groups. We successfully developed a patient navigator program and an enhanced personal health record for the CKD population. However, there were no differences in eGFR decline and other outcomes among the study groups. Larger and long-term studies along with cost-effectiveness analyses are needed to evaluate the role of patient navigators and

  4. [Psychological alterations in patients with adult celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Martínez Cerezo, Francisco J; Castillejo, Gemma; Guillen, Núria; Morente, Vanessa; Simó, Josep M; Tena, Francisco J; Marsal, Joan; Pascual, Domingo

    2014-04-01

    Patients with recently-diagnosed adult celiac disease were evaluated with the Gastrointestinal Symptom rating Scale (GSRS) and Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI) to evaluate their psychological alterations, the association between any alterations and gastrointestinal symptoms, and their outcome after starting a gluten-free diet. The patients underwent nutritional assessment and then started a gluten-free diet; they were reassessed 6 months later. Quantitative variables are expressed as the median and 25th-75th percentiles. We included 21 patients, 17 women and 4 mena, with a mean age of 43 years (31-47). The results of histological analysis were compatible with Marsh I lesions in 6 patients, Marsh IIIa in 6 and Marsh IIIb in 9. At baseline, 8 patients showed severe psychological distress, 4 showed moderate distress and 9 showed no distress. The GSRS score was 34 (17-43) and the PGWBI was 64 (48-87), with a significant correlation between the 2 indexes (rho=-.58, P=.006). At 6 months, 3 patients had severe psychological distress, 5 had moderate distress, 9 showed no distress and 4 showed psychological well-being. The GSRS score at 6 months was 13 (8-17) and the PGWBI was 83 (68-95) (P<.05 compared with baseline data for the 3 indicators). The 6 axes of the PGWBI showed significant improvement. At 6 months, no correlation was found between the GSRS and PGWBI. Patients with celiac disease have psychological alterations whose intensity is related to gastrointestinal symptoms. These symptoms improve after the start of a gluten-free diet. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  5. Nutritional parameters associated with prolonged hospital stay among ambulatory adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Caccialanza, Riccardo; Klersy, Catherine; Cereda, Emanuele; Cameletti, Barbara; Bonoldi, Alberto; Bonardi, Chiara; Marinelli, Maurizia; Dionigi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Background Comprehensive evaluations of the nutritional parameters associated with length of hospital stay are lacking. We investigated the association between malnutrition and length of hospital stay in a cohort of ambulatory adult patients. Methods From September 2006 to June 2009, we systematically evaluated 1274 ambulatory adult patients admitted to hospital for medical or surgical treatment. We evaluated the associations between malnutrition and prolonged hospital stay (> 17 days [> 75th percentile of distribution]) using multivariable log-linear models adjusted for several potential nutritional and clinical confounders recorded at admission and collected during and at the end of the hospital stay. Results Nutritional factors associated with a prolonged hospital stay were a Nutritional Risk Index score of less than 97.5 (relative risk [RR] 1.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–2.06) and an in-hospital weight loss of 5% or greater (RR 1.60, 95% CI 1.30–1.97). Sensitivity analysis of data for patients discharged alive and who had a length of stay of at least three days (n = 1073) produced similar findings (adjusted RR 1.51, 95% CI 1.20–1.89, for Nutritional Risk Index score < 97.5). A significant association was also found with in-hospital starvation of three or more days (RR 1.14, 95% CI 1.01–1.28). Interpretation Nutritional risk at admission was strongly associated with a prolonged hospital stay among ambulatory adult patients. Another factor associated with length of stay was worsening nutritional status during the hospital stay, whose cause–effect relationship with length of stay should be clarified in intervention trials. Clinicians need to be aware of the impact of malnutrition and of the potential role of worsening nutritional status in prolonging hospital stay. PMID:20940233

  6. Patient Experiences With Full Electronic Access to Health Records and Clinical Notes Through the My HealtheVet Personal Health Record Pilot: Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Erin; Tuepker, Anais; Press, Nancy A; Nazi, Kim M; Turvey, Carolyn L; Nichol, W. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background Full sharing of the electronic health record with patients has been identified as an important opportunity to engage patients in their health and health care. The My HealtheVet Pilot, the initial personal health record of the US Department of Veterans Affairs, allowed patients and their delegates to view and download content in their electronic health record, including clinical notes, laboratory tests, and imaging reports. Objective A qualitative study with purposeful sampling sought to examine patients’ views and experiences with reading their health records, including their clinical notes, online. Methods Five focus group sessions were conducted with patients and family members who enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot at the Portland Veterans Administration Medical Center, Oregon. A total of 30 patients enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot, and 6 family members who had accessed and viewed their electronic health records participated in the sessions. Results Four themes characterized patient experiences with reading the full complement of their health information. Patients felt that seeing their records positively affected communication with providers and the health system, enhanced knowledge of their health and improved self-care, and allowed for greater participation in the quality of their care such as follow-up of abnormal test results or decision-making on when to seek care. While some patients felt that seeing previously undisclosed information, derogatory language, or inconsistencies in their notes caused challenges, they overwhelmingly felt that having more, rather than less, of their health record information provided benefits. Conclusions Patients and their delegates had predominantly positive experiences with health record transparency and the open sharing of notes and test results. Viewing their records appears to empower patients and enhance their contributions to care, calling into question common provider concerns about the effect of full

  7. OBAYA (obesity and adverse health outcomes in young adults): feasibility of a population-based multiethnic cohort study using electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although obesity is a risk factor for many chronic diseases, we have only limited knowledge of the magnitude of these associations in young adults. A multiethnic cohort of young adults was established to close current knowledge gaps; cohort demographics, cohort retention, and the potential influence of migration bias were investigated. Methods For this population-based cross-sectional study, demographics, and measured weight and height were extracted from electronic medical records of 1,929,470 patients aged 20 to 39 years enrolled in two integrated health plans in California from 2007 to 2009. Results The cohort included about 84.4% of Kaiser Permanente California members in this age group who had a medical encounter during the study period and represented about 18.2% of the underlying population in the same age group in California. The age distribution of the cohort was relatively comparable to the underlying population in California Census 2010 population, but the proportion of women and ethnic/racial minorities was slightly higher. The three-year retention rate was 68.4%. Conclusion These data suggest the feasibility of our study for medium-term follow-up based on sufficient membership retention rates. While nationwide 6% of young adults are extremely obese, we know little to adequately quantify the health burden attributable to obesity, especially extreme obesity, in this age group. This cohort of young adults provides a unique opportunity to investigate associations of obesity-related factors and risk of cancer in a large multiethnic population. PMID:22909293

  8. Looking forward in records of young adults convicted of sexual homicide, rape, or molestation as youth: risks for reoffending.

    PubMed

    Busch, Kenneth G; Zagar, Robert John; Grove, William M; Hughes, John Russell; Arbit, Jack; Bussell, Robert E; Bartikowski, Boris

    2009-02-01

    To assess the risks predicting reoffense, 223 Rapists (M age = 14.2 yr., SD = 1.5; 25 girls, 198 boys) were matched with 223 Nonviolent Delinquents; risks were analyzed using logistic regression. The one predictor was prior court contacts (OR = 1.55e+12; AUC = .99, 95% CI = .98-.99). 223 Molesters were similarly matched with 223 Nonviolent Delinquents; this comparison yielded three predictors: previous court contacts (OR = 4.55e+23), poorer executive function (OR = 2.01), and lower social maturity (OR = .97; AUC = .98, 95% CI = .97-.99). Records for all cases (now M age = 24.2 yr., SD = 1.4) were reviewed forward 10 years and youth were classified into groups: Sexual Homicidal (1%, n = 7), Delinquent Rapists Later Adult Rapists (11%, n = 73), Delinquent Rapists (21%, n = 144), Delinquent Molesters Later Adult Molesters (10%, n = 69), Delinquent Molesters (23%, n = 153), Nonviolent Delinquent Later Nonviolent Adult Criminals (7%, n = 45), and Nonviolent Delinquents (27%, n = 178). Comparison of Sexual Homicidal cases (n = 7) with their matched Controls (n = 7) yielded one predictor, poorer executive function (AUC = .89, 95% CI = .71-.93). When Sexual Homicidal cases were matched with Nonviolent Delinquents, predictors were low social maturity and prior court contacts (AUC = .81, 95% CI = .64-.93).

  9. A Matter of Time: The Influence of Recording Context on EEG Spectral Power in Adolescents and Young Adults with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Kitsune, Glenn L; Cheung, Celeste H M; Brandeis, Daniel; Banaschewski, Tobias; Asherson, Philip; McLoughlin, Gráinne; Kuntsi, Jonna

    2015-07-01

    Elevated theta or theta/beta ratio is often reported in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the consistency across studies and the relation to hypoarousal are increasingly questioned. Reports of elevated delta related to maturational lag and of attenuated beta activity are less well replicated. Some critical inconsistencies could relate to differences in recording context. We examined if resting-state EEG power or global field synchronization (GFS) differed between recordings made at the beginning and end of a 1.5 h testing session in 76 adolescents and young adults with ADHD, and 85 controls. In addition, we aimed to examine the effect of IQ on any potential group differences. Both regional and midline electrodes yielded group main effects for delta, trends in theta, but no differences in alpha or theta/beta ratio. An additional group difference in beta was detected when using regions. Group by time interactions in delta and theta became significant when controlling for IQ. The ADHD group had higher delta and theta power at time-1, but not at time-2, whereas beta power was elevated only at time-2. GFS did not differ between groups or condition. We show some ADHD-control differences on EEG spectral power varied with recording time within a single recording session, with both IQ and electrode selection having a small but significant influence on observed differences. Our findings demonstrate the effect of recording context on resting-state EEG, and highlight the importance of accounting for these variables to ensure consistency of results in future studies.

  10. Fever of unknown origin: Most frequent causes in adults patients.

    PubMed

    Popovska-Jovicić, Biljana; Canović, Predrag; Gajović, Olgica; Raković, Ivana; Mijailović, Zeljko

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin (FUO) includes more than 200 different diseases and conditions. The aim of this study was to identify the most frequent causes of FUO among adult patients according to gender and age. The study included 74 patients examined from June 2010 to June 2013 at the Infectious Disease Clinic, Clinical Center Kragujevac in Serbia, according to the defined criteria for FUO. The patients were divided according to the diagnosis into four groups: infectious, malignant, rheumatic and "other diseases". A cause of febricity could not be estabilshed in a portion of subjects, and they comprised the group of undiagnosed cases. Infectious diseases were dominant in the study, followed by rheumatic diseases, which were most frequently found in women and the elderly. The diseases recognised as the most common causes of febricity were subacute thyroiditis, subacute endocarditis, Still's disease, rheumatic polymyalgia with or without temporal arteritis, and cytomegalovirus infection. In 44% of the patients, the final diagnosis was composed of only six clinical entities. The importance of establishing the diagnosis of rheumatic disease is especially emphasised, in line with other authors' research indicating the number of these diseases is on the rise. The diagnostic approach to FUO should always be directed to the known frequency of diseases.

  11. Supraventricular Arrhythmias in Patients with Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Malmborg, Helena

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of patients with congenital heart disease survive to adulthood; such prolonged survival is related to a rapid evolution of successful surgical repairs and modern diagnostic techniques. Despite these improvements, corrective atrial incisions performed at surgery still lead to subsequent myocardial scarring harbouring a potential substrate for macro-reentrant atrial tachycardia. Macroreentrant atrial tachycardias are the most common (75 %) type of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) in patients with adult congenital heart disease (ACHD). Patients with ACHD, atrial tachycardias and impaired ventricular function – important risk factors for sudden cardiac death (SCD) – have a 2–9 % SCD risk per decade. Moreover, ACHD imposes certain considerations when choosing antiarrhythmic drugs from a safety aspect and also when considering catheter ablation procedures related to the inherent cardiac anatomical barriers and required expertise. Expert recommendations for physicians managing these patients are therefore mandatory. This review summarises current evidence-based developments in the field, focusing on advances in and general recommendations for the management of ACHD, including the recently published recommendations on management of SVT by the European Heart Rhythm Association. PMID:28835834

  12. Respiratory pattern in an