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Sample records for adult patients requiring

  1. Caring for adult patients who require nasogastric feeding tubes.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kristine

    Nasogastric tubes provide a safe means of delivering nutrition support to many patients in hospital and the community. Insertion and care of these tubes will be familiar to many nurses. Evidence has shown that misplaced tubes, either on insertion or during use, can cause serious harm or even death to patients. This article explores the safety challenges posed during the insertion and maintenance of nasogastric tubes. Guidance and evidence should provide nurses with the knowledge, skills and reassurance to manage these tubes safely.

  2. Energy requirements of adult cats.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, Emma N; Thomas, David G; Morris, Penelope J; Hawthorne, Amanda J

    2010-04-01

    A meta-analysis was carried out in order to establish the energy requirements of adult cats. Publications that identified cat body weight (BW) were used to generate allometric relationships between energy requirements and BW of healthy adult cats, using log-log linear regression. Energy requirements were expressed in kcal/kg BW to be consistent with those reported by the National Research Council. Mean maintenance energy requirements were 55.1 (se 1.2) kcal/kg BW (115 treatment groups). Three allometric equations were identified to predict the energy requirements for maintenance of BW in the cat based on BW: light (53.7 kcal/kg BW- 1.061), normal (46.8 kcal/kg BW- 1.115) and heavy (131.8 kcal/kg BW- 0 .366). When reported on lean mass, the allometric equation revealed maintenance requirements were 58.4 kcal/kg lean mass- 1.140 (adjusted R2 0.694; thirty-six treatment groups). The present review suggests that values for maintenance energy requirements based on BW alone may not be an accurate prediction and more detailed information on the age, sex and neuter status, BW and composition would enhance the ability to interpret the maintenance energy requirements of cats.

  3. Identification of a Neurologic Scale that Optimizes EMS Detection of Older Adult Traumatic Brain Injury Patients who Require Transport to a Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Erin B; Shah, Manish N; Jones, Courtney MC; Cushman, Jeremy T; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Gillespie, Suzanne M; Cheng, Julius D; Dozier, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Objective We sought to identify a scale or components of a scale that optimize detection of older adult TBI patients who require transport to a trauma center, regardless of mechanism. Methods We assembled a consensus panel consisting of nine experts in geriatric emergency medicine, prehospital medicine, trauma surgery, geriatric medicine, and TBI, as well as prehospital providers, to evaluate the existing scales used to identify TBI. We reviewed the relevant literature and solicited group feedback to create a list of candidate scales and criteria for evaluation. Using the nominal group technique, scales were evaluated by the expert panel through an iterative process until consensus was achieved. Results We identified 15 scales for evaluation. The panel’s criteria for rating the scales included: ease of administration, prehospital familiarity with scale components, feasibility of use with older adults, time to administer, and strength of evidence for their performance in the prehospital setting. After review and discussion of aggregated ratings, the panel identified the Simplified Motor Scale, GCS–Motor Component, and AVPU (alert, voice, pain, unresponsive) as the strongest scales but determined that none meet all EMS provider and patient needs due to poor usability and lack of supportive evidence. The panel proposed that a dichotomized decision scheme that includes domains of the top-rated scales — level of alertness (alert vs. not alert) and motor function (obeys commands vs. does not obey) — may be more effective in identifying older adult TBI patients who require transport to a trauma center in the prehospital setting. Conclusions Existing scales to identify TBI are inadequate to detect older adult TBI patients who require transport to a trauma center. A new algorithm, derived from elements of previously established scales, has potential to guide prehospital providers in improving the triage of older adult TBI patients, but needs further evaluation prior

  4. Updating stored memory requires adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pereira, Irene; Carrión, Ángel M

    2015-09-11

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis appears to influence hippocampal functions, such as memory formation for example. While adult hippocampal neurogenesis is known to be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and consolidation processes, the role of such immature neurons in memory reconsolidation, a process involved in the modification of stored memories, remains unclear. Here, using a novel fast X-ray ablation protocol to deplete neurogenic cells, we have found that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is required to update object recognition stored memory more than to reinforce it. Indeed, we show that immature neurons were selectively recruited to hippocampal circuits during the updating of stored information. Thus, our data demonstrate a new role for neurogenesis in cognitive processes, adult hippocampal neurogenesis being required for the updating of stored OR memories. These findings suggest that manipulating adult neurogenesis may have a therapeutic application in conditions associated with traumatic stored memory, for example.

  5. Updating stored memory requires adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Pereira, Irene; Carrión, Ángel M

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis appears to influence hippocampal functions, such as memory formation for example. While adult hippocampal neurogenesis is known to be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and consolidation processes, the role of such immature neurons in memory reconsolidation, a process involved in the modification of stored memories, remains unclear. Here, using a novel fast X-ray ablation protocol to deplete neurogenic cells, we have found that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is required to update object recognition stored memory more than to reinforce it. Indeed, we show that immature neurons were selectively recruited to hippocampal circuits during the updating of stored information. Thus, our data demonstrate a new role for neurogenesis in cognitive processes, adult hippocampal neurogenesis being required for the updating of stored OR memories. These findings suggest that manipulating adult neurogenesis may have a therapeutic application in conditions associated with traumatic stored memory, for example. PMID:26358557

  6. Teaching the adult ostomy patient.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, H S

    2001-01-01

    Ostomy education is based on principles of adult learning, including assessment of the learners' readiness, ability, and need to learn. Such teaching incorporates specific strategies designed to promote cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning and strategies to overcome potential cultural barriers. In addition, modifications may be included to meet the needs of aged or disabled patients who have cognitive deficits or low literacy skills. Finally, ostomy education must include an evaluation of its effectiveness. This article reviews general guidelines for planning, implementing, and evaluating patient education for adult patients with ostomies.

  7. Thiamin requirement of the adult human.

    PubMed

    Sauberlich, H E; Herman, Y F; Stevens, C O; Herman, R H

    1979-11-01

    Young adult male subjects maintained on a metabolic ward were fed diets providing controlled intakes of thiamin and either 2800 or 3600 kcal. The higher level of calories was attained by an increased intake of carbohydrates. Constant weights were maintained by the subjects by adjusting daily activity and exercise schedules. Thiamin requirements were evaluated in terms of erythrocyte transketolase activity and urinary excretion of the vitamin. The results of the study revealed that a relationship exists between thiamin requirement and caloric intake and expenditure. Thus, when the calories being utilized were derived primarily from carbohydrate sources, the minimum adult male requirement for thiamin appeared to be 0.30 mg of thiamin per 1000 kcal. Urinary excretion of thiamin and erythrocyte transketolase activity appear to be reasonably reliable reflections of thiamin intakes and thiamin nutritional status. The use of these measurements in nutrition surveys appears justified. The microbiological assay (Lactobacillus viridescens) for measuring thiamin levels in urine samples appears to be a somewhat more sensitive but valid procedure as an alternate for the thiochrome method. Judged from the results of this study, the recommended intake for the adult human of 0.40 mg of thiamin per 1000 kcal by FAO/WHO and the recommended allowance of 0.5 mg per 1000 kcal by the Food and Nutrition Board of the NAS-NRC appear reasonable and amply allow for biological variations and other factors that may influence the requirement for this vitamin.

  8. A randomized trial to assess the utility of preintubation adult fiberoptic bronchoscope assessment in patients for thoracic surgery requiring one-lung ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Nayana; Tarwade, Pritee; Shetmahajan, Madhavi; Pramesh, C. S.; Jiwnani, Sabita; Mahajan, Abhishek; Purandare, Nilendu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Confirmation of placement of Double lumen endobronchial tubes (DLETT) and bronchial blockers (BBs) with the pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB) is the most preferred practice worldwide. Most centers possess standard adult FOBs, some, particularly in developing countries might not have access to the pediatric-sized devices. We have evaluated the role of preintubation airway assessment using the former, measuring the distance from the incisors to the carina and from carina to the left and right upper lobe bronchus in deciding the depth of insertion of the lung isolation device. Methods: The study was a randomized, controlled, double-blind trial consisting of 84 patients (all >18 years) undergoing thoracic surgery over a 12-month period. In the study group (n = 38), measurements obtained during FOB with the adult bronchoscope decided the depth of insertion of the lung isolation device. In the control group (n = 46), DLETTs and BBs were placed blindly followed by clinical confirmation by auscultation. Selection of the type and size of the lung isolation device was at the discretion of the anesthesiologist conducting the case. In all cases, pediatric FOB was used to confirm accurate placement of devices. Results: Of 84 patients (DLETT used in 76 patients; BB used in 8 patients), preintubation airway measurements significantly improved the success rate of optimal placement of lung isolation device from 25% (11/44) to 50% (18/36) (P = 0.04). Our incidence of failed device placement at initial insertion was 4.7% (4/84). Incidence of malposition was 10% (8/80) with 4 cases in each group. The incidence of suboptimal placement was lower in the study group at 38.9% (14/36) versus 65.9% (29/44). Conclusions: Preintubation airway measurements with the adult FOB reduces airway manipulations and improves the success rate of optimal placement of DLETT and BB. PMID:27052065

  9. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  10. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  11. Characterisation of Escherichia coli isolates from the blood of haematological adult patients with bacteraemia: translocation from gut to blood requires the cooperation of multiple virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, B; Śledzińska, A; Szemiako, K; Samet, A; Nowicki, B; Kur, J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether there are unique pathotypes of Escherichia coli capable of transmission from the gastrointestinal tract to the vascular bed. The study included E. coli strains isolated from clinical materials collected from 115 patients suffering from haematologic malignancies diagnosed with bacteraemia. The genotyping techniques established that 89 E. coli isolates from the blood had the same genotype as the E. coli from the patient's bowel. The presence of 21 genes encoding virulence factors typical of various E. coli pathotypes and their relationship with the phylogenetic group was established. One-dimensional analysis showed that the focG gene occurred more frequently in the control bowel group, while the ampicillin-resistant afa/dr E. coli were associated with bacteraemia. Blood isolates with the highest occurrence of virulence factors belonged to pathogenic group B2 and non-pathogenic group A. The co-occurrence of multiple genes encoding papC, sfa, usp and cnf1 virulence factors probably predisposes E. coli to translocation from the gastrointestinal tract to the vascular bed in the group of patients with haematologic malignancies. Based on clustering analysis, dominance of the most virulent strains assigned to the cluster with seven virulence factors encoded by the following genes, papC, sfaD/E, cnf1, usp, agn43, hlyA and iutA, was found. The obtained results enforce the previously proposed concept of bowel-blood translocation and further expand our hypothesis by defining the unique virulence characteristics of E. coli isolates, which predispose them to bowel colonisation or translocation and bacteraemia in this group of patients.

  12. Primary Care for the Older Adult Patient: Common Geriatric Issues and Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Katherine; Shi, Sandra; Kiraly, Carmela

    2016-06-01

    Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the US population and the majority of older adults are women. Primary care for the older adult patient requires a wide variety of skills, reflecting the complexity and heterogeneity of this patient population. Individualizing care through consideration of patients' goals, medical conditions, and prognosis is paramount. Quality care for the older adult patient requires familiarity with common geriatric syndromes, such as dementia, falls, and polypharmacy. In addition, developing the knowledge and communication skills necessary for complex care and end-of-life care planning is essential.

  13. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  14. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  15. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Requiring Hospitalization among U.S. Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S.; Self, W.H.; Wunderink, R.G.; Fakhran, S.; Balk, R.; Bramley, A.M.; Reed, C.; Grijalva, C.G.; Anderson, E.J.; Courtney, D.M.; Chappell, J.D.; Qi, C.; Hart, E.M.; Carroll, F.; Trabue, C.; Donnelly, H.K.; Williams, D.J.; Zhu, Y.; Arnold, S.R.; Ampofo, K.; Waterer, G.W.; Levine, M.; Lindstrom, S.; Winchell, J.M.; Katz, J.M.; Erdman, D.; Schneider, E.; Hicks, L.A.; McCullers, J.A.; Pavia, A.T.; Edwards, K.M.; Finelli, L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Community-acquired pneumonia is a leading infectious cause of hospitalization and death among U.S. adults. Incidence estimates of pneumonia confirmed radio-graphically and with the use of current laboratory diagnostic tests are needed. METHODS We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among adults 18 years of age or older in five hospitals in Chicago and Nashville. Patients with recent hospitalization or severe immunosuppression were excluded. Blood, urine, and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for culture, serologic testing, antigen detection, and molecular diagnostic testing. Study radiologists independently reviewed chest radiographs. We calculated population-based incidence rates of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization according to age and pathogen. RESULTS From January 2010 through June 2012, we enrolled 2488 of 3634 eligible adults (68%). Among 2320 adults with radiographic evidence of pneumonia (93%), the median age of the patients was 57 years (interquartile range, 46 to 71); 498 patients (21%) required intensive care, and 52 (2%) died. Among 2259 patients who had radio-graphic evidence of pneumonia and specimens available for both bacterial and viral testing, a pathogen was detected in 853 (38%): one or more viruses in 530 (23%), bacteria in 247 (11%), bacterial and viral pathogens in 59 (3%), and a fungal or mycobacterial pathogen in 17 (1%). The most common pathogens were human rhinovirus (in 9% of patients), influenza virus (in 6%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (in 5%). The annual incidence of pneumonia was 24.8 cases (95% confidence interval, 23.5 to 26.1) per 10,000 adults, with the highest rates among adults 65 to 79 years of age (63.0 cases per 10,000 adults) and those 80 years of age or older (164.3 cases per 10,000 adults). For each pathogen, the incidence increased with age. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia

  16. Energy Requirements of Adult Dogs: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, Emma N.; Thomas, David G.; Cave, Nicholas J.; Morris, Penelope J.; Butterwick, Richard F.; German, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to determine the maintenance energy requirements of adult dogs. Suitable publications were first identified, and then used to generate relationships amongst energy requirements, husbandry, activity level, methodology, sex, neuter status, dog size, and age in healthy adult dogs. Allometric equations for maintenance energy requirements were determined using log-log linear regression. So that the resulting equations could readily be compared with equations reported by the National Research Council, maintenance energy requirements in the current study were determined in kcal/kg0.75 body weight (BW). Ultimately, the data of 70 treatment groups from 29 publications were used, and mean (± standard deviation) maintenance energy requirements were 142.8±55.3 kcal.kgBW−0.75.day−1. The corresponding allometric equation was 81.5 kcal.kgBW−0.93.day−1 (adjusted R2 = 0.64; 70 treatment groups). Type of husbandry had a significant effect on maintenance energy requirements (P<0.001): requirements were greatest in racing dogs, followed by working dogs and hunting dogs, whilst the energy requirements of pet dogs and kennel dogs were least. Maintenance energy requirements were less in neutered compared with sexually intact dogs (P<0.001), but there was no effect of sex. Further, reported activity level tended to effect the maintenance energy requirement of the dog (P = 0.09). This review suggests that estimating maintenance energy requirements based on BW alone may not be accurate, but that predictions that factor in husbandry, neuter status and, possibly, activity level might be superior. Additionally, more information on the nutrient requirements of older dogs, and those at the extremes of body size (i.e. giant and toy breeds) is needed. PMID:25313818

  17. Energy requirements of adult dogs: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, Emma N; Thomas, David G; Cave, Nicholas J; Morris, Penelope J; Butterwick, Richard F; German, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to determine the maintenance energy requirements of adult dogs. Suitable publications were first identified, and then used to generate relationships amongst energy requirements, husbandry, activity level, methodology, sex, neuter status, dog size, and age in healthy adult dogs. Allometric equations for maintenance energy requirements were determined using log-log linear regression. So that the resulting equations could readily be compared with equations reported by the National Research Council, maintenance energy requirements in the current study were determined in kcal/kg(0.75) body weight (BW). Ultimately, the data of 70 treatment groups from 29 publications were used, and mean (± standard deviation) maintenance energy requirements were 142.8±55.3 kcal·kgBW(-0.75)·day(-1). The corresponding allometric equation was 81.5 kcal·kgBW(-0.9)·day(-1) (adjusted R2 = 0.64; 70 treatment groups). Type of husbandry had a significant effect on maintenance energy requirements (P<0.001): requirements were greatest in racing dogs, followed by working dogs and hunting dogs, whilst the energy requirements of pet dogs and kennel dogs were least. Maintenance energy requirements were less in neutered compared with sexually intact dogs (P<0.001), but there was no effect of sex. Further, reported activity level tended to effect the maintenance energy requirement of the dog (P = 0.09). This review suggests that estimating maintenance energy requirements based on BW alone may not be accurate, but that predictions that factor in husbandry, neuter status and, possibly, activity level might be superior. Additionally, more information on the nutrient requirements of older dogs, and those at the extremes of body size (i.e. giant and toy breeds) is needed.

  18. Energy requirements of adult dogs: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, Emma N; Thomas, David G; Cave, Nicholas J; Morris, Penelope J; Butterwick, Richard F; German, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to determine the maintenance energy requirements of adult dogs. Suitable publications were first identified, and then used to generate relationships amongst energy requirements, husbandry, activity level, methodology, sex, neuter status, dog size, and age in healthy adult dogs. Allometric equations for maintenance energy requirements were determined using log-log linear regression. So that the resulting equations could readily be compared with equations reported by the National Research Council, maintenance energy requirements in the current study were determined in kcal/kg(0.75) body weight (BW). Ultimately, the data of 70 treatment groups from 29 publications were used, and mean (± standard deviation) maintenance energy requirements were 142.8±55.3 kcal·kgBW(-0.75)·day(-1). The corresponding allometric equation was 81.5 kcal·kgBW(-0.9)·day(-1) (adjusted R2 = 0.64; 70 treatment groups). Type of husbandry had a significant effect on maintenance energy requirements (P<0.001): requirements were greatest in racing dogs, followed by working dogs and hunting dogs, whilst the energy requirements of pet dogs and kennel dogs were least. Maintenance energy requirements were less in neutered compared with sexually intact dogs (P<0.001), but there was no effect of sex. Further, reported activity level tended to effect the maintenance energy requirement of the dog (P = 0.09). This review suggests that estimating maintenance energy requirements based on BW alone may not be accurate, but that predictions that factor in husbandry, neuter status and, possibly, activity level might be superior. Additionally, more information on the nutrient requirements of older dogs, and those at the extremes of body size (i.e. giant and toy breeds) is needed. PMID:25313818

  19. Carboplatin dosing for adult Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yuichi; Shimokata, Tomoya; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-02-01

    Carboplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug that has been long used to treat many types of solid cancer. Because the clearance of carboplatin strongly correlates with the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), its dosage is calculated with the Calvert formula on the basis of the patient's GFR to achieve the target area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve (AUC) for each patient. However, many lines of evidence from previous clinical studies should be interpreted with caution because different methods were used to estimate drug clearance and derive the dosage of carboplatin. There is a particularly high risk of carboplatin overdosing when the dosage is determined on the basis of standardized serum creatinine values. When deciding the dose of carboplatin for adult Japanese patients, preferred methods to assess renal function instead of directly measuring GFR include (1) 24-h urinary collection-based creatinine clearance adjusted by adding 0.2 mg/dl to the serum creatinine concentration measured by standardized methods, and (2) equation-based GFR (eGFR) with a back calculation to units of ml/min per subject. Given the limitations of serum creatinine-based GFR estimations, the GFR or creatinine clearance should be directly measured in each patient whenever possible. To ensure patient safety and facilitate a medical-team approach, the single most appropriate method available at each institute or medical team should be consistently used to calculate the dose of carboplatin with the Calvert formula.

  20. ACG Clinical Guideline: Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    McClave, Stephen A; DiBaise, John K; Mullin, Gerard E; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-03-01

    The value of nutrition therapy for the adult hospitalized patient is derived from the outcome benefits achieved by the delivery of early enteral feeding. Nutritional assessment should identify those patients at high nutritional risk, determined by both disease severity and nutritional status. For such patients if they are unable to maintain volitional intake, enteral access should be attained and enteral nutrition (EN) initiated within 24-48 h of admission. Orogastric or nasogastric feeding is most appropriate when starting EN, switching to post-pyloric or deep jejunal feeding only in those patients who are intolerant of gastric feeds or at high risk for aspiration. Percutaneous access should be used for those patients anticipated to require EN for >4 weeks. Patients receiving EN should be monitored for risk of aspiration, tolerance, and adequacy of feeding (determined by percent of goal calories and protein delivered). Intentional permissive underfeeding (and even trophic feeding) is appropriate temporarily for certain subsets of hospitalized patients. Although a standard polymeric formula should be used routinely in most patients, an immune-modulating formula (with arginine and fish oil) should be reserved for patients who have had major surgery in a surgical ICU setting. Adequacy of nutrition therapy is enhanced by establishing nurse-driven enteral feeding protocols, increasing delivery by volume-based or top-down feeding strategies, minimizing interruptions, and eliminating the practice of gastric residual volumes. Parenteral nutrition should be used in patients at high nutritional risk when EN is not feasible or after the first week of hospitalization if EN is not sufficient. Because of their knowledge base and skill set, the gastroenterologist endoscopist is an asset to the Nutrition Support Team and should participate in providing optimal nutrition therapy to the hospitalized adult patient.

  1. Atlantoaxial Rotatory Fixation in Adults Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sei Woong; Moon, Seung Myung; Choi, Sun Kil

    2009-01-01

    Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation (AARF) in adult is a rare disorder that occurs followed by a trauma. The patients were presented with painful torticollis and a typical 'cock robin' position of the head. The clinical diagnosis is generally difficult and often made in the late stage. In some cases, an irreducible or chronic fixation develops. We reported a case of AARF in adult patient which was treated by immobilization with conservative treatment. A 25-year-old female was presented with a posterior neck pain and limitation of motion of cervical spine after a traffic accident. She had no neurological deficit but suffered from severe defect on the scalp and multiple thoracic compression fractures. Plain radiographs demonstrated torticollis, lateral shift of odontoid process to one side and widening of one side of C1-C2 joint space. Immobilization with a Holter traction were performed and analgesics and muscle relaxants were given. Posterior neck pain and limitation of the cervical spine's motion were resolved. Plain cervical radiographs taken at one month after the injury showed that torticollis disappeared and the dens were in the midline position. The authors reported a case of type I post-traumatic AARF that was successfully treated by immobilization alone. PMID:19444353

  2. How many adults with temporal epilepsy have a mild course and do not require epilepsy surgery?

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ronquillo, Lizbeth; Buckley, Samantha; Ladino, Lady Diana; Wu, Adam; Moien-Afshari, Farzad; Rizvi, Syed Aa; Téllez-Zenteno, Jose F

    2016-06-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common type of drug-resistant epilepsy in adults and commonly requires surgical treatment. While an overwhelming preponderance of literature supports the notion that a large percentage of patients with TLE benefit from surgery, there is a paucity of outcome data on patients who demonstrate a sustained response to pharmacological treatment. In this study, we present an adult cohort of patients with TLE, with the purpose of identifying the proportion of patients with a mild course of the disease, as well as potential risk factors. A prospective cohort study of all patients with TLE assessed and followed by the Saskatchewan Epilepsy Program, from 1 March 2007 to Jan 29(th) 2014. Patients were dichotomized as having a mild (seizure freedom without surgical intervention) or severe (surgical intervention required and/or failure to achieve seizure remission) course. Descriptive statistics, odds ratios and confidence intervals were calculated to identify predictors of seizure freedom. The cohort consisted of 159 patients. Mean patient age at last follow-up visit was 46±14.4 (range: 19-88) years. Mean follow-up period was 43.4±22.6 (6 to 84) months. Forty-six patients (29%) demonstrated mild-course TLE while 113 (71%) had a severe course of TLE. Patients with a mild course of TLE were more likely to be older (p = 0.002), have late-onset epilepsy (p < 0.001) with shorter evolution (p < 0.001). A good response to the first antiepileptic drug (OR: 6.8; 95% CI: 2.5-19; p < 0.001) was associated with a mild course of TLE. Although a majority of patients with TLE eventually require surgery, operative treatment is not necessary for all patients. This study identifies prognostic factors that may help patients and clinicians characterize long-term outcome. PMID:27100050

  3. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Kacerovsky-Bielesz, Gertrud; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes education has gained a critical role in diabetes care. The empowerment of patients aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification. Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations.

  4. Amelogenesis imperfecta - lifelong management. Restorative management of the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; McDonnell, S T; Iram, S; Chan, M F W-Y

    2013-11-01

    The biggest challenge restorative dentists face in rehabilitating patients with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is trying to restore aesthetics, function and occlusal stability while keeping the treatment as conservative as possible. The goals of treatment should be to prolong the life of the patient's own teeth and avoid or delay the need for extractions and subsequent replacement with conventional fixed, removable or implant retained prostheses. In order to achieve these goals a stepwise approach to treatment planning is required starting with the most conservative but aesthetically acceptable treatment. This article discusses the management of AI and presents the various treatment options available for restoring the adult patient who presents to the dentist with AI. PMID:24201615

  5. Approach to the Patient: The Adult With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Wiebke

    2013-01-01

    The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia is steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). When the nonclassical (mild) form is included, 21OHD is the most common genetic disease in human beings. With the advent of pharmaceutical preparation of glucocorticoids starting in the 1960s and newborn screening starting in the 1990s, the majority of children with 21OHD are reaching adulthood, which has yielded a cohort of patients with, in essence, a new disease. Only recently have some data emerged from cohorts of adults with 21OHD, and in some centers, experience with the management of these patients is growing. These patients suffer from poor health, infertility, characteristic tumors in the adrenal glands and gonads, and consequences of chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Their care is fragmented and inconsistent, and many stop taking their medications out of frustration. Internal medicine residents and endocrinology fellows receive little training in their care, which further discourages their seeking medical attention. Adults with 21OHD have a different physiology from patients with Addison's disease or other androgen excess states, and their needs are different than those of young children with 21OHD. Consequently, their care requires unorthodox treatment and monitoring strategies foreign to most endocrine practitioners. Our goal for this article is to review their physiology, complications, and needs in order to develop rational and effective treatment and monitoring strategies. PMID:23837188

  6. Oral Alimentation in Neonatal and Adult Populations Requiring High-Flow Oxygen via Nasal Cannula.

    PubMed

    Leder, Steven B; Siner, Jonathan M; Bizzarro, Matthew J; McGinley, Brian M; Lefton-Greif, Maureen A

    2016-04-01

    Use of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula (HFO2-NC) is increasingly common in intensive care unit (ICU) settings. Despite the critical interface between respiration and swallowing, and the high acuity of patients in ICUs, the impact of HFO2-NC on feeding and swallowing is unknown. The present prospective, single-center, cohort study investigated the impact of HFO2-NC use on oral alimentation in neonatal and adult ICU patients. Oral alimentation status was evaluated in 100 consecutive ICU inpatients (50 neonatal and 50 adult) requiring HFO2-NC. Participant characteristics, respiratory support, successful initiation of oral feeding in neonates, and successful resumption of oral feeding in adults were recorded. Seventeen of 50 (34 %) neonates requiring HFO2-NC were deemed developmentally and medically appropriate by the neonatologist and nursing to begin oral alimentation. All 17 (100 %) were successful with initiation of oral feedings. Thirty-three of 50 (66 %) continued nil per os due to prematurity or medical conditions precluding oral alimentation at time of data collection. Thirty-nine of 50 (78 %) adults requiring HFO2-NC were deemed medically appropriate by the intensivist and nursing to resume oral alimentation (n = 34) or with a functional swallow without aspiration on FEES (n = 5). All 39 (100 %) resumed oral alimentation successfully. Eleven of 50 (22 %) continued nil per os due to severe respiratory issues precluding both swallow testing and oral alimentation at time of data collection. All developmentally and medically appropriate neonatal and adult patients requiring HFO2-NC were successful with either the introduction or resumption of oral alimentation. Patients requiring HFO2-NC who are identified as having feeding or swallowing issues should be referred for swallowing evaluations using the same criteria as patients who do not require HFO2-NC, as it is not the use of HFO2-NC but rather patient-specific determinants of feeding and swallowing

  7. Oral Alimentation in Neonatal and Adult Populations Requiring High-Flow Oxygen via Nasal Cannula.

    PubMed

    Leder, Steven B; Siner, Jonathan M; Bizzarro, Matthew J; McGinley, Brian M; Lefton-Greif, Maureen A

    2016-04-01

    Use of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula (HFO2-NC) is increasingly common in intensive care unit (ICU) settings. Despite the critical interface between respiration and swallowing, and the high acuity of patients in ICUs, the impact of HFO2-NC on feeding and swallowing is unknown. The present prospective, single-center, cohort study investigated the impact of HFO2-NC use on oral alimentation in neonatal and adult ICU patients. Oral alimentation status was evaluated in 100 consecutive ICU inpatients (50 neonatal and 50 adult) requiring HFO2-NC. Participant characteristics, respiratory support, successful initiation of oral feeding in neonates, and successful resumption of oral feeding in adults were recorded. Seventeen of 50 (34 %) neonates requiring HFO2-NC were deemed developmentally and medically appropriate by the neonatologist and nursing to begin oral alimentation. All 17 (100 %) were successful with initiation of oral feedings. Thirty-three of 50 (66 %) continued nil per os due to prematurity or medical conditions precluding oral alimentation at time of data collection. Thirty-nine of 50 (78 %) adults requiring HFO2-NC were deemed medically appropriate by the intensivist and nursing to resume oral alimentation (n = 34) or with a functional swallow without aspiration on FEES (n = 5). All 39 (100 %) resumed oral alimentation successfully. Eleven of 50 (22 %) continued nil per os due to severe respiratory issues precluding both swallow testing and oral alimentation at time of data collection. All developmentally and medically appropriate neonatal and adult patients requiring HFO2-NC were successful with either the introduction or resumption of oral alimentation. Patients requiring HFO2-NC who are identified as having feeding or swallowing issues should be referred for swallowing evaluations using the same criteria as patients who do not require HFO2-NC, as it is not the use of HFO2-NC but rather patient-specific determinants of feeding and swallowing

  8. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  9. Requirements development for a patient computing system.

    PubMed

    Wald, J S; Pedraza, L A; Reilly, C A; Murphy, M E; Kuperman, G J

    2001-01-01

    Critical parts of the software development life cycle are concerned with eliciting, understanding, and managing requirements. Though the literature on this subject dates back for several decades, practicing effective requirements development remains a current and challenging area. Some projects flourish with a requirements development process (RDP) that is implicit and informal, but this approach may be overly risky, particularly for large projects that involve multiple individuals, groups, and systems over time. At Partners HealthCare System in Boston, Massachusetts, we have applied a more formal approach for requirements development to the Patient Computing Project. The goal of the project is to create web-based software that connects patients electronically with their physician's offices and has the potential to improve care efficiency and quality. It is a large project, with over 500 function points. Like most technological innovation, the successful introduction of this system requires as much attention to understanding the business needs and workflow details as it does to technical design and implementation. This paper describes our RDP approach, and key business requirements discovered through this process. We believe that a formal RDP is essential, and that informatics as a field must include proficiencies in this area. PMID:11825282

  10. Origins for the estimations of water requirements in adults.

    PubMed

    Vivanti, A P

    2012-12-01

    Water homeostasis generally occurs without conscious effort; however, estimating requirements can be necessary in settings such as health care. This review investigates the derivation of equations for estimating water requirements. Published literature was reviewed for water estimation equations and original papers sought. Equation origins were difficult to ascertain and original references were often not cited. One equation (% of body weight) was based on just two human subjects and another equation (ml water/kcal) was reported for mammals and not specifically for humans. Other findings include that some equations: for children were subsequently applied to adults; had undergone modifications without explicit explanation; had adjusted for the water from metabolism or food; and had undergone conversion to simplify application. The primary sources for equations are rarely mentioned or, when located, lack details conventionally considered important. The sources of water requirement equations are rarely made explicit and historical studies do not satisfy more rigorous modern scientific method. Equations are often applied without appreciating their derivation, or adjusting for the water from food or metabolism as acknowledged by original authors. Water requirement equations should be used as a guide only while employing additional means (such as monitoring short-term weight changes, physical or biochemical parameters and urine output volumes) to ensure the adequacy of water provision in clinical or health-care settings.

  11. User requirements for a patient scheduling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W.

    1979-01-01

    A rehabilitation institute's needs and wants from a scheduling system were established by (1) studying the existing scheduling system and the variables that affect patient scheduling, (2) conducting a human-factors study to establish the human interfaces that affect patients' meeting prescribed therapy schedules, and (3) developing and administering a questionnaire to the staff which pertains to the various interface problems in order to identify staff requirements to minimize scheduling problems and other factors that may limit the effectiveness of any new scheduling system.

  12. [Bacterial parotitis in an immunocompromised patient in adult ICU].

    PubMed

    Vassal, O; Bernet, C; Wallet, F; Friggeri, A; Piriou, V

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial parotitis is a common childhood disease with a favorable outcome. Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently involved pathogen. Clinical presentation in adult patients can be misleading, Onset occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities, making diagnosis difficult--particularly in ICU. Different pathogens are found in adults with worse outcomes observed. We report here the case of a critically ill patient and discuss diagnosis and management of bacterial parotitis.

  13. Preoperative Thromboelastometry as a Predictor of Transfusion Requirements during Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fayed, Nirmeen; Mourad, Wessam; Yassen, Khaled; Görlinger, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability to predict transfusion requirements may improve perioperative bleeding management as an integral part of a patient blood management program. Therefore, the aim of our study was to evaluate preoperative thromboelastometry as a predictor of transfusion requirements for adult living donor liver transplant recipients. Methods The correlation between preoperative thromboelastometry variables in 100 adult living donor liver transplant recipients and intraoperative blood transfusion requirements was examined by univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis. Thresholds of thromboelastometric parameters for prediction of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), fresh frozen plasma (FFP), platelets, and cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements were determined with receiver operating characteristics analysis. The attending anesthetists were blinded to the preoperative thromboelastometric analysis. However, a thromboelastometry-guided transfusion algorithm with predefined trigger values was used intraoperatively. The transfusion triggers in this algorithm did not change during the study period. Results Univariate analysis confirmed significant correlations between PRBCs, FFP, platelets or cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements and most thromboelastometric variables. Backward stepwise logistic regression indicated that EXTEM coagulation time (CT), maximum clot firmness (MCF) and INTEM CT, clot formation time (CFT) and MCF are independent predictors for PRBC transfusion. EXTEM CT, CFT and FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for FFP transfusion. Only EXTEM and INTEM MCF were independent predictors of platelet transfusion. EXTEM CFT and MCF, INTEM CT, CFT and MCF as well as FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for cryoprecipitate transfusion. Thromboelastometry-based regression equation accounted for 63% of PRBC, 83% of FFP, 61% of cryoprecipitate, and 44% of platelet transfusion requirements. Conclusion Preoperative thromboelastometric analysis is

  14. Pediatric Patient Blood Management Programs: Not Just Transfusing Little Adults.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchika; Cushing, Melissa M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell transfusions are a common life-saving intervention for neonates and children with anemia, but transfusion decisions, indications, and doses in neonates and children are different from those of adults. Patient blood management (PBM) programs are designed to assist clinicians with appropriately transfusing patients. Although PBM programs are well recognized and appreciated in the adult setting, they are quite far from standard of care in the pediatric patient population. Adult PBM standards cannot be uniformly applied to children, and there currently is significant variation in transfusion practices. Because transfusing unnecessarily can expose children to increased risk without benefit, it is important to design PBM programs to standardize transfusion decisions. This article assesses the key elements necessary for a successful pediatric PBM program, systematically explores various possible pediatric specific blood conservation strategies and the current available literature supporting them, and outlines the gaps in the evidence suggesting need for further/improved research. Pediatric PBM programs are critically important initiatives that not only involve a cooperative effort between pediatric surgery, anesthesia, perfusion, critical care, and transfusion medicine services but also need operational support from administration, clinical leadership, finance, and the hospital information technology personnel. These programs also expand the scope for high-quality collaborative research. A key component of pediatric PBM programs is monitoring pediatric blood utilization and assessing adherence to transfusion guidelines. Data suggest that restrictive transfusion strategies should be used for neonates and children similar to adults, but further research is needed to assess the best oxygenation requirements, hemoglobin threshold, and transfusion strategy for patients with active bleeding, hemodynamic instability, unstable cardiac disease, and cyanotic cardiac

  15. Pediatric Patient Blood Management Programs: Not Just Transfusing Little Adults.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchika; Cushing, Melissa M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell transfusions are a common life-saving intervention for neonates and children with anemia, but transfusion decisions, indications, and doses in neonates and children are different from those of adults. Patient blood management (PBM) programs are designed to assist clinicians with appropriately transfusing patients. Although PBM programs are well recognized and appreciated in the adult setting, they are quite far from standard of care in the pediatric patient population. Adult PBM standards cannot be uniformly applied to children, and there currently is significant variation in transfusion practices. Because transfusing unnecessarily can expose children to increased risk without benefit, it is important to design PBM programs to standardize transfusion decisions. This article assesses the key elements necessary for a successful pediatric PBM program, systematically explores various possible pediatric specific blood conservation strategies and the current available literature supporting them, and outlines the gaps in the evidence suggesting need for further/improved research. Pediatric PBM programs are critically important initiatives that not only involve a cooperative effort between pediatric surgery, anesthesia, perfusion, critical care, and transfusion medicine services but also need operational support from administration, clinical leadership, finance, and the hospital information technology personnel. These programs also expand the scope for high-quality collaborative research. A key component of pediatric PBM programs is monitoring pediatric blood utilization and assessing adherence to transfusion guidelines. Data suggest that restrictive transfusion strategies should be used for neonates and children similar to adults, but further research is needed to assess the best oxygenation requirements, hemoglobin threshold, and transfusion strategy for patients with active bleeding, hemodynamic instability, unstable cardiac disease, and cyanotic cardiac

  16. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  17. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    duTreil, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. PMID:25093002

  18. Treating the older adult dental patient: what are the issues of concern?

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Roseann; Vanderlinde, Michele Alexis

    2009-11-01

    Just as aging successfully requires a multifaceted approach that includes full engagement in life, maintenance of high physical and cognitive function, and avoidance of disease and related disability, so does the care of adult patients. This geriatric treatment model suggests that understanding the psychosocial, behavioral, and medical presentation of the older patient may prove to be the key to the ultimate success of the dental/oral treatment arrived at collaboratively by the dentist and the older patient.

  19. Mediastinal Tuberculosis in an Adult Patient with Cystic Fibrosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Morand, Philippe C.; Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Carlotti, Agnès; Desmazes-Dufeu, Nadine; Farhi, David; Martin, Clémence; Kanaan, Reem; Mangialavori, Luigi; Palangié, Estelle; Dusser, Daniel; Poyart, Claire; Hubert, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is rarely observed in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We report the first case of mediastinal TB, associated with leg pain and skin rash, in an adult patient with CF, and discuss factors suggestive of TB in the course of CF. PMID:21106788

  20. [Lung pneumatocele in adult patient - case report].

    PubMed

    Dzian, A; Fúčela, I; Hamžík, J; Huťka, Z; Stiegler, P

    2012-12-01

    Lung pneumatoceles are characterized by a thin-walled air-filled cavity present in lung parenchyma. Mostly they are the result of acute bronchopneumonia after spontaneous drainage of altered lung parenchyma with subsequent development and progression of cavities due to ventile mechanism. This disease is more prevalent in infants and young children, it is rather rare in adults. In the present case report, videothoracoscopy resection of lung pneumatocele of the right lower lobe was performed a 43-years old man. The operation was indicated for the presence of chronic persisting and progressing pneumatocele as a preventive measure of pneumatocele complications. PMID:23448707

  1. Nutritional Intake in Adult Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Susan; Snetselaar, Linda; Hall, Beth; Stone, Roslyn A.; Kim, Sunghee; Piraino, Beth; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    Background Research pertaining to the nutritional intake of hemodialysis patients is limited. Purpose Describe the nutritional quality of foods consumed by hemodialysis patients and variation by day of the week. Methods Dietary recalls were obtained from 22 hemodialysis patients and analyzed using the Nutrition Data System for Research. Results Few statistically significant differences were found by day of the week, but several dietary deficits were noted. Conclusion The data suggest poor intake of calories, protein, and several vitamins and minerals, as well as excess sodium consumption, but little variation by day of the week. Additional research is needed. PMID:25104876

  2. [Invasive candidiasis in critically ill adult patient].

    PubMed

    Tobar A, Eduardo; Silva O, Francisco; Olivares C, Roberto; Gaete G, Pablo; Luppi N, Mario

    2011-02-01

    Invasive infections by Candida strains are a relevant pathology in critically ill patients. Candida should be considered where a high risk of infection is present for a critical early diagnosis. Despite the incorporation of new drugs in the therapeutic armamentarium over the last decade, mortality remains high. The key in improving clinical outcomes of these patients are the use of early effective therapies that offer coverage against different strains of Candida: C. albicans and non-albicans. Recent international guidelines suggest empiric therapy with echinocandins in suspected invasive candidiasis in this patient population. This group of drugs adequately documented clinical efficacy and safe use in these patients. The emergence of new echinocandins could improve access to these drugs by reducing their cost.

  3. Practical fluoride and remineralization protocols for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Daniel C N; Wefel, James S; Caughman, W Frank

    2004-12-01

    There is a wealth of information on preventive measures and procedures that can be used to care for paediatric and adolescent patients. However, few studies have been conducted in adult or geriatric populations, and an understanding of preventive and non-surgical treatment regimens for these patients is lacking. Traditionally, caries incidence is high among risk groups of low income, low dental IQ and certain ethnic subgroups, but we are now witnessing a high incidence of caries among middle-income and healthy adult patients with an imbalance of protective factors and cariogenic factors. We will direct our attention to the adult population and attempt to address some of the most common questions. PMID:15736834

  4. Dreaming during anaesthesia in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Kate; Skrzypek, Hannah

    2007-09-01

    Dreaming during anaesthesia is defined as any recalled experience (excluding awareness) that occurred between induction of anaesthesia and the first moment of consciousness upon emergence. Dreaming is a commonly-reported side-effect of anaesthesia. The incidence is higher in patients who are interviewed immediately after anaesthesia (approximately 22%) than in those who are interviewed later (approximately 6%). A minority of dreams, which include sensory perceptions obtained during anaesthesia, provide evidence of near-miss awareness. These patients may have risk factors for awareness and this type of dreaming may be prevented by depth of anaesthesia monitoring. Most dreaming however, occurs in younger, fitter patients, who have high home dream recall, who receive propofol-based anaesthesia and who emerge rapidly from anaesthesia. Their dreams are usually short and pleasant, are related to work, family and recreation, are not related to inadequate anaesthesia and probably occur during recovery. Dreaming is a common, fascinating, usually pleasant and harmless phenomenon.

  5. Pyridoxine deficiency in adult patients with status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Dave, Hina N; Eugene Ramsay, Richard; Khan, Fawad; Sabharwal, Vivek; Irland, Megan

    2015-11-01

    An 8-year-old girl treated at our facility for superrefractory status epilepticus was found to have a low pyridoxine level at 5 μg/L. After starting pyridoxine supplementation, improvement in the EEG for a 24-hour period was seen. We decided to look at the pyridoxine levels in adult patients admitted with status epilepticus. We reviewed the records on patients admitted to the neurological ICU for status epilepticus (SE). Eighty-one adult patients were identified with documented pyridoxine levels. For comparison purposes, we looked at pyridoxine levels in outpatients with epilepsy (n=132). Reported normal pyridoxine range is >10 ng/mL. All but six patients admitted for SE had low normal or undetectable pyridoxine levels. A selective pyridoxine deficiency was seen in 94% of patients with status epilepticus (compared to 39.4% in the outpatients) which leads us to believe that there is a relationship between status epilepticus and pyridoxine levels.

  6. Complications and benefits of intrahospital transport of adult Intensive Care Unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Harish, M. M.; Janarthanan, S.; Siddiqui, Suhail Sarwar; Chaudhary, Harish K.; Prabu, Natesh R.; Divatia, Jigeeshu V.; Kulkarni, Atul Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The transport of critically ill patients for procedures or tests outside the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is potentially hazardous; hence, the transport process must be organized and efficient. Plenty of data is available on pre- and inter-hospital transport of patients; the data on intrahospital transport of patients are limited. We audited the complications and benefits of intrahospital transport of critically ill patients in our tertiary care center over 6 months. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty adult critically ill cancer patients transported from the ICU for either diagnostic or therapeutic procedure over 6 months were included. The data collected include the destination, the accompanying person, total time spent outside the ICU, and any adverse events and adverse change in vitals. Results: Among the 120 adult patients, 5 (4.1%) required endotracheal intubation, 5 (4.1%) required intercostal drain placement, and 20 (16.7%) required cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Dislodgement of central venous catheter occurred in 2 (1.6%) patients, drain came out in 3 (2.5%) patients, orogastric tube came out in 1 (0.8%) patient, 2 (1.6%) patients self-extubated, and in one patient, tracheostomy tube was dislodged. The adverse events were more in patients who spent more than 60 min outside the ICU, particularly requirement of CPR (18 [25%] vs. 2 [4.2%], ≤60 min vs. >60 min, respectively) with P < 0.05. Transport led to change in therapy in 32 (26.7%) patients. Conclusion: Transport in critically ill cancer patients is more hazardous and needs adequate pretransport preparations. Transport in spite being hazardous may lead to a beneficial change in therapy in a significant number of patients. PMID:27630455

  7. Low Literacy Levels in Adults: Implications for Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Evelyn

    1999-01-01

    Health-education materials often require reading levels higher than that of many patients. Nurses need awareness of the prevalence of low literacy and the ability to assess reading levels so they can develop appropriate patient-education materials. (SK)

  8. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B.; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H.; Bel, Elisabeth H.D.; ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×109 L−1) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×109 L−1) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7–8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1–8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice. PMID:27730197

  9. Uninsured patients require creative discharge plans.

    PubMed

    2012-04-01

    Case managers are being challenged to find a discharge destination for patients who are uninsured or underinsured and who need services after hospitalization.These patients often stay in the hospital longer than necessary, at the hospital's expense. Case managers should develop a network of community resources that can assist with care for unfunded patients after discharge. In some cases, it makes sense for the hospital to pay for a lower level of care rather than keeping patients in acute care beds that could be occupied by paying patients. Case managers often are under pressure to move patients through the continuum of care, making it a challenge to create an effective discharge plan for patients with limited financial resources. Many unfunded patients are eligible for financial assistance with their healthcare needs, but they aren't aware of it and don't know how to apply.

  10. Peculiarities of Anxiety Score Distribution in Adult Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Blank, Mikhail; Blank, Olga; Myasnikova, Ekaterina; Denisova, Daria

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present research is to investigate and analyze possible peculiarities of the psychological state of cancer patients undergoing treatment. Scores characterizing the trait and state anxiety were acquired using the Integrative Anxiety Test from four groups: adults with no appreciable disease, pregnant women, cancer patients examined during the specific antitumor treatment, and cancer patients brought into lasting clinical remission. Statistical analysis of the testing results revealed the bimodal type of the distribution of scores. The only statistically significant exception was the distribution of the state anxiety scores in cancer patients undergoing treatment that was clearly unimodal. PMID:26176239

  11. Newborn human skin fibroblasts senesce in vitro without acquiring adult growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of human fibroblasts were prepared from chest skin obtained either from newborns (less than 3 months old) or adults (more than 35 years old) and maintained in vitro until they senesced. Adult cells grew logarithmically in medium supplemented with whole blood serum but not with platelet-poor plasma. Early passage cells obtained from newborns grew equally well in either plasma- or serum-supplemented medium. The difference in growth factor requirements between adult and newborn cells persisted through the lifespan of the cells; i.e., newborn cells did not develop adult hormonal requirements when maintained in culture. Thus, in vitro cellular aging can be distinguished from some types of differentiation.

  12. Improvement with Duloxetine in an Adult ADHD Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourjman, Smadar Valerie; Bilodeau, Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and disabling disorder among adults and is treated with stimulant and non stimulant medication. Objective: To report the case of a patient with ADHD showing good clinical response to duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI). Case…

  13. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  14. Neuropsychological profile of adult patients with nonsymptomatic occipital lobe epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Leonilda; Santangelo, Gabriella; Improta, Ilaria; Vitale, Carmine; Meo, Roberta; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    To explore the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile in adult patients affected by nonsymptomatic (cryptogenic and idiopathic) occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE), with normal intelligence, we enrolled 20 adult patients with nonsymptomatic OLE and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent neuropsychiatric assessment scales, and standardized neuropsychological tests tapping memory, executive functions, constructional, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, patients performed significantly worse than controls on several tests tapping complex visuospatial skills and frontal lobe functions. The analysis of single patients' performance revealed that a significantly higher number of OLE patients achieved age- and education-adjusted pathological scores on three tests (Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Freehand Copying of Drawings Test, color-word interference task of Stroop test) with respect to controls. Patients did not differ from control subjects on neuropsychiatric aspects. The direct comparison between OLE subtypes showed that cryptogenetic OLE patients tended to achieve lower scores than idiopathic OLE patients on most tests, but no difference between the two groups was fully significant. In summary, patients with nonsymptomatic OLE can be affected by clinically relevant impairments in selected neuropsychological domains: complex visuospatial skills and executive functions. It could be speculated that frontal and visuospatial cognitive deficits might be the result of epileptic activity spreading within a neural network that includes structures far beyond the occipital lobe.

  15. Food hypersensitivity among adult patients: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R; Delgado, J; Quiralte, J; Blanco, C; Carrillo, T

    1996-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity (FH) is lesser frequent among adult patients than in childhood. Foods implicated in hypersensitivity reactions vary with sociocultural and diet habits from a geographic place to other. We studied 142 adult patients sensitized to foods, among 7698 patients visited at our Outpatient Clinic. Hundred and twenty patients referred clinical symptoms after consumption of one or more foods consistently. From the latest, 107 patients (89.2%) were atopics (92 of them sensitizes to dust mites) and 54 (45%) referred atopic familiar background. Most frequent recorded symptoms were: urticaria/angioedema 84 cases (70%), oral syndrome 65 (54%), asthma 48 (37%) and anaphylaxis 33 patients (27.5%). Shellfish sensitization occurred in 50 patients, fresh fruits in 33 and nuts in 29 cases. Shrimp (48 patients), squid (33), kiwi (14), papaya (14), avocado (13) and banana (12 cases) were the most frequent causes of FH. Significant statistical association between foods and inhalants was observed for fresh fruits and latex (p < 0.001), fresh fruits and pollens (p < 0.01), and shellfish and Blatta germanica (p < 0.001). Prevalence of FH among patients at our Area is around 1.6%. Tropical fruits, as other kind of fruits, seem to share common IgE-epitopes to pollens. High prevalence of shellfish and cockroach hypersensitivity could be more easily developed by previous domestic mites sensitization.

  16. Patient-specific FDG dosimetry for adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, Erin

    Fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical in Positron Emission Tomography, with applications in neurology, cardiology, and oncology. Despite its routine use worldwide, the radiation absorbed dose estimates from FDG have been based primarily on data obtained from two dogs studied in 1977 and 11 adults (most likely males) studied in 1982. In addition, the dose estimates calculated for FDG have been centered on the adult male, with little or no mention of variations in the dose estimates due to sex, age, height, weight, nationality, diet, or pathological condition. Through an extensive investigation into the Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema for calculating absorbed doses, I have developed a simple patient-specific equation; this equation incorporates the parameters necessary for alterations to the mathematical values of the human model to produce an estimate more representative of the individual under consideration. I have used this method to determine the range of absorbed doses to FDG from the collection of a large quantity of biological data obtained in adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants. Therefore, a more accurate quantification of the dose to humans from FDG has been completed. My results show that per unit administered activity, the absorbed dose from FDG is higher for infants compared to adults, and the dose for adult women is higher than for adult men. Given an injected activity of approximately 3.7 MBq kg-1, the doses for adult men, adult women, and full-term newborns would be on the order of 5.5, 7.1, and 2.8 mSv, respectively. These absorbed doses are comparable to the doses received from other nuclear medicine procedures.

  17. Sabril® registry 5-year results: Characteristics of adult patients treated with vigabatrin.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Gregory; Faught, Edward; Foroozan, Rod; Pellock, John M; Sergott, Robert C; Shields, W Donald; Ziemann, Adam; Dribinsky, Yekaterina; Lee, Deborah; Torri, Sarah; Othman, Feisal; Isojarvi, Jouko

    2016-03-01

    Vigabatrin (Sabril®), approved in the US in 2009, is currently indicated as adjunctive therapy for refractory complex partial seizures (rCPS) in patients ≥ 10 years old who have responded inadequately to several alternative treatments and as monotherapy for infantile spasms (IS) in patients 1 month to 2 years of age. Because of reports of vision loss following vigabatrin exposure, FDA approval required a risk evaluation mitigation strategy (REMS) program. Vigabatrin is only available in the US through Support, Help, And Resources for Epilepsy (SHARE), which includes a mandated registry. This article describes 5 years of demographic and treatment exposure data from adult patients (≥ 17 years old) in the US treated with vigabatrin and monitored in the ongoing Sabril® registry. Registry participation is mandatory for all US Sabril® prescribers and patients. A benefit-risk assessment must be documented by the physician for a patient to progress to maintenance therapy, defined as 1 month of vigabatrin treatment for patients with IS and 3 months for patients with rCPS. Ophthalmologic assessments must be documented during and after completion of therapy. As of August 26, 2014, a total of 6823 patients were enrolled in the registry, of which 1200 were adults at enrollment. Of these patients, 1031 (86%) were naïve to vigabatrin. The majority of adult patients (n=783, 65%) had previously been prescribed ≥ 4 AEDs, and 719 (60%) were receiving ≥ 3 concomitant AEDs at vigabatrin initiation. Prescribers submitted an initial ophthalmological assessment form for 863 patients; an ophthalmologic exam was not completed for 300 (35%) patients and thus, were considered exempted from vision testing. Of these patients, 128 (43%) were exempted for neurologic disabilities. Clinicians discontinued treatment in 8 patients because of visual field deficits (VFD) (5 patients naïve to vigabatrin and 3 patients previously exposed). Based on Kaplan-Meier survival estimates, it is

  18. A snapshot of the adult spina bifida patient – high incidence of urologic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Joceline S.; Greiman, Alyssa; Casey, Jessica T.; Mukherjee, Shubhra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To describe the urologic outcomes of contemporary adult spina bifida patients managed in a multidisciplinary clinic. Material and methods A retrospective chart review of patients seen in our adult spina bifida clinic from January 2004 to November 2011 was performed to identify urologic management, urologic surgeries, and co-morbidities. Results 225 patients were identified (57.8% female, 42.2% male). Current median age was 30 years (IQR 27, 36) with a median age at first visit of 25 years (IQR 22, 30). The majority (70.7%) utilized clean intermittent catheterization, and 111 patients (49.3%) were prescribed anticholinergic medications. 65.8% had urodynamics performed at least once, and 56% obtained appropriate upper tract imaging at least every other year while under our care. 101 patients (44.9%) underwent at least one urologic surgical procedure during their lifetime, with a total of 191 procedures being performed, of which stone procedures (n = 51, 26.7%) were the most common. Other common procedures included continence procedures (n = 35, 18.3%) and augmentation cystoplasty (n = 29, 15.2%). Only 3.6% had a documented diagnosis of chronic kidney disease and 0.9% with end-stage renal disease. Conclusions Most adult spina bifida patient continue on anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. A large percentage of patients required urologic procedures in adulthood. Patients should be encouraged to utilize conservative and effective bladder management strategies to reduce their risk of renal compromise. PMID:27123330

  19. Design Considerations for Patient Portal Adoption by Low-Income, Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Latulipe, Celine; Gatto, Amy; Nguyen, Ha T.; Miller, David P.; Quandt, Sara A.; Bertoni, Alain G.; Smith, Alden; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an interview study investigating facilitators and barriers to adoption of patient portals among low-income, older adults in rural and urban populations in the southeastern United States. We describe attitudes of this population of older adults and their current level of technology use and patient portal use. From qualitative analysis of 36 patient interviews and 16 caregiver interviews within these communities, we derive themes related to benefits of portals, barriers to use, concerns and desired features. Based on our initial findings, we present a set of considerations for designing the patient portal user experience, aimed at helping healthcare clinics to meet U.S. federally-mandated ‘meaningful use’ requirements. PMID:27077140

  20. Laterality of mental imagery generation and operation: tests with brain-damaged patients and normal adults.

    PubMed

    Hatta, T; Koike, M; Langman, P

    1994-08-01

    The relationships between hemispheric function and components of the imagery process were examined in patients with unilateral right and left brain damage and in intact adult subjects. In the image generation condition, subjects were required to mentally generate Katakana letters corresponding to Hiragana letters displayed on a CRT. The results for the intact adults suggested a left hemisphere superiority, but the unilaterally brain-damaged subjects showed no hemispheric difference in this task. In the imagery operation task (transformation or lateral translation), subjects were asked to find a genuine Kanji among distractors (pseudo-Kanji) that were constructed from two Kanji radicals (themselves real Kanji) that were either displayed in reverse order or shifted apart. The results for both intact adults and patients with unilateral brain damage suggest the superiority of the right hemisphere. PMID:7525640

  1. Juvenile Hormone Is Required in Adult Males for Drosophila Courtship

    PubMed Central

    Wijesekera, Thilini P.; Saurabh, Sumit; Dauwalder, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Hormone (JH) has a prominent role in the regulation of insect development. Much less is known about its roles in adults, although functions in reproductive maturation have been described. In adult females, JH has been shown to regulate egg maturation and mating. To examine a role for JH in male reproductive behavior we created males with reduced levels of Juvenile Hormone Acid O-Methyl Transferase (JHAMT) and tested them for courtship. JHAMT regulates the last step of JH biosynthesis in the Corpora Allata (CA), the organ of JH synthesis. Males with reduced levels of JHAMT showed a reduction in courtship that could be rescued by application of Methoprene, a JH analog, shortly before the courtship assays were performed. In agreement with this, reducing JHAMT conditionally in mature flies led to courtship defects that were rescuable by Methoprene. The same result was also observed when the CA were conditionally ablated by the expression of a cellular toxin. Our findings demonstrate that JH plays an important physiological role in the regulation of male mating behavior. PMID:27003411

  2. Optimal serum phenylalanine for adult patients with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Okano, Yoshiyuki; Nagasaka, Hironori

    2013-12-01

    High serum phenylalanine in adult patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) causes neuropsychological and psychosocial problems that can be resolved by phenylalanine-restricted diet. Therefore, PKU patients must continue to adhere to phenylalanine-restricted diet for life, although the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life has yet to be established. The purpose of this review was to establish the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life of PKU patients. We evaluated oxidative stress status, nitric oxide metabolism, cholesterol-derived oxysterols, vitamin D and bone status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adult PKU patients according to serum phenylalanine level. Oxidative stress increased markedly at serum phenylalanine of 700-800 μmol/L. Serum phenylalanine higher than 700-850 μmol/L correlated with the disturbance of nitric oxide regulatory system. Adult PKU patients had poor vitamin D status and exhibited predominance of bone resorption over bone formation. In the brain, the levels of 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a marker of brain cholesterol elimination, were low at serum phenylalanine levels exceeding 650 μmol/L. MRI studies showed high signal intensity in deep white matter on T2-weighted and FLAIR images of PKU patients with serum phenylalanine greater than 500 μmol/L, with decreased apparent diffusion coefficients. Changes in most parameters covering the entire body organs in adult PKU were almost acceptable below 700-800 μmol/L of phenylalanine level. However, the optimal serum phenylalanine level should be 500 μmol/L or less in later life for the brain to be safe.

  3. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General requirements for adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards §...

  4. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General requirements for adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards §...

  5. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General requirements for adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards §...

  6. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General requirements for adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards §...

  7. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Rehabilitation rooms or an area for individual and group treatments for occupational therapy, physical therapy... two staff, and barrier free. (8) Adequate storage space. There should be space to store arts and...). Physical therapy 5 (per participant). Office, if required 120 Occupational therapy 5 (per...

  8. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Rehabilitation rooms or an area for individual and group treatments for occupational therapy, physical therapy... two staff, and barrier free. (8) Adequate storage space. There should be space to store arts and...). Physical therapy 5 (per participant). Office, if required 120 Occupational therapy 5 (per...

  9. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Rehabilitation rooms or an area for individual and group treatments for occupational therapy, physical therapy... two staff, and barrier free. (8) Adequate storage space. There should be space to store arts and...). Physical therapy 5 (per participant). Office, if required 120 Occupational therapy 5 (per...

  10. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Rehabilitation rooms or an area for individual and group treatments for occupational therapy, physical therapy... two staff, and barrier free. (8) Adequate storage space. There should be space to store arts and...). Physical therapy 5 (per participant). Office, if required 120 Occupational therapy 5 (per...

  11. 38 CFR 59.160 - Adult day health care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Rehabilitation rooms or an area for individual and group treatments for occupational therapy, physical therapy... two staff, and barrier free. (8) Adequate storage space. There should be space to store arts and...). Physical therapy 5 (per participant). Office, if required 120 Occupational therapy 5 (per...

  12. Infective Dermatitis in an Adult Patient With HTLV-1

    PubMed Central

    Riveros, Rosalba; Medina, Raquel; Morel, Maida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Infective dermatitis is a chronic exudative eczematous eruption presenting in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)–infected people. It presents with relapsing erythematous, scaly, and crusted lesions affecting simultaneously the scalp, external ear, retroauricular area, eyelid, paranasal skin, neck axilla, and groin. Superimposed Staphylococcus and Streptococcus infection are common. It mainly affects children and exceptionally adults, and there are only a few published cases. The authors present the first reported case in Paraguay of an adult patient who had symptoms of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1–associated progressive tropical spastic paraparesis, and 6 years after the onset of the neurological symptoms, the patient developed infective dermatitis lesions on the skin, with frequent exacerbations since then. PMID:26588341

  13. Organ doses to adult patients for chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to estimate organ doses for chest CT examinations using volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) data as well as accounting for patient weight. Methods: A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator) was used to compute organ doses for a 70 kg patient undergoing chest CT examinations, as well as volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) in a body CT dosimetry phantom at the same CT technique factors. Ratios of organ dose to CTDI{sub vol} (f{sub organ}) were generated as a function of anatomical location in the chest for the breasts, lungs, stomach, red bone marrow, liver, thyroid, liver, and thymus. Values of f{sub organ} were obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV for 1, 4, 16, and 64 slice CT scanners from two vendors. For constant CT techniques, we computed ratios of dose in water phantoms of differing diameter. By modeling patients of different weights as equivalent water cylinders of different diameters, we generated factors that permit the estimation of the organ doses in patients weighing between 50 and 100 kg who undergo chest CT examinations relative to the corresponding organ doses received by a 70 kg adult. Results: For a 32 cm long CT scan encompassing the complete lungs, values of f{sub organ} ranged from 1.7 (thymus) to 0.3 (stomach). Organs that are directly in the x-ray beam, and are completely irradiated, generally had f{sub organ} values well above 1 (i.e., breast, lung, heart, and thymus). Organs that are not completely irradiated in a total chest CT scan generally had f{sub organ} values that are less than 1 (e.g., red bone marrow, liver, and stomach). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV resulted in modest increases in f{sub organ} for the heart (9%) and thymus (8%), but resulted in larger increases for the breast (19%) and red bone marrow (21%). Adult patient chests have been modeled by water cylinders with diameters between

  14. Depression in adult patients with biotin responsive basal ganglia disease.

    PubMed

    Bubshait, Dalal K; Rashid, Asif; Al-Owain, Mohammed A; Sulaiman, Raashda A

    2016-01-01

    Biotin responsive basal ganglia disease (BBGD), is a potentially treatable inherited metabolic disorder which clinically presents as sub-acute encephalopathy in children. Early diagnosis and treatment of this disorder results in good clinical recovery in childhood. However, there is no report in the literature on the long term outcome of these treated patients in adult life. We report two patients with BBGD who were metabolically stable on treatment and developed depression later in life. These cases highlight the association of depression with basal ganglia disorders and demonstrate that depression is the potential long term complication of BBGD.

  15. Vaccination of Adult Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca; Antunes, Ana Margarida; Gruner, Heidi; Riso, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the Portuguese vaccination program 50th anniversary it seems appropriate to review vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Controversial issues as regards the association between autoimmune diseases, infections, and vaccines are discussed as well as vaccine safety and efficacy issues as regards chronic immunosuppressant (IS) drug therapy. After a brief overview of national policies, specific recommendations are made as regards vaccination for adult patients with SLE with a particular focus on current IS therapy and unmet needs. PMID:27069477

  16. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  17. Study of inhaler technique in asthma patients: differences between pediatric and adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Manríquez, Pablo; Acuña, Ana María; Muñoz, Luis; Reyes, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Inhaler technique comprises a set of procedures for drug delivery to the respiratory system. The oral inhalation of medications is the first-line treatment for lung diseases. Using the proper inhaler technique ensures sufficient drug deposition in the distal airways, optimizing therapeutic effects and reducing side effects. The purposes of this study were to assess inhaler technique in pediatric and adult patients with asthma; to determine the most common errors in each group of patients; and to compare the results between the two groups. Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Using a ten-step protocol, we assessed inhaler technique in 135 pediatric asthma patients and 128 adult asthma patients. Results: The most common error among the pediatric patients was failing to execute a 10-s breath-hold after inhalation, whereas the most common error among the adult patients was failing to exhale fully before using the inhaler. Conclusions: Pediatric asthma patients appear to perform most of the inhaler technique steps correctly. However, the same does not seem to be true for adult patients. PMID:26578130

  18. Perioperative analgesic requirements in severely obese adolescents and young adults undergoing laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted gastric sleeve resection

    PubMed Central

    Joselyn, Anita; Bhalla, Tarun; McKee, Christopher; Pepper, Victoria; Diefenbach, Karen; Michalsky, Marc; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: One of the major advantages for patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery as compared to an open surgical procedure is the improved recovery profile and decreased opioid requirements in the perioperative period. There are no definitive studies comparing the analgesic requirements in patients undergoing two different types of minimally invasive procedure. This study retrospectively compares the perioperative analgesic requirements in severely obese adolescents and young adults undergoing laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted, laparoscopic gastric sleeve resection. Materials and Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval, the medication administration records of all severely obese patients who underwent gastric sleeve resection were retrospectively reviewed. Intra-operative analgesic and adjuvant medications administered, postoperative analgesic requirements, and visual analog pain scores were compared between those undergoing a laparoscopic procedure versus a robotic-assisted procedure. Results: This study cohort included a total of 28 patients who underwent gastric sleeve resection surgery with 14 patients in the laparoscopic group and 14 patients in the robotic-assisted group. Intra-operative adjuvant administration of both intravenous acetaminophen and ketorolac was similar in both groups. Patients in the robotic-assisted group required significantly less opioid during the intra-operative period as compared to patients in the laparoscopic group (0.15 ± 0.08 mg/kg vs. 0.19 ± 0.06 mg/kg morphine, P = 0.024). Cumulative opioid requirements for the first 72 postoperative h were similar in both the groups (0.64 ± 0.25 vs. 0.68 ± 0.27 mg/kg morphine, P = NS). No difference was noted in the postoperative pain scores. Conclusion: Although intraoperative opioid administration was lower in the robotic-assisted group, the postoperative opioid requirements, and the postoperative pain scores were similar in both groups. PMID:26543465

  19. Are daily routine chest radiographs necessary after pulmonary surgery in adult patients?

    PubMed Central

    Reeb, Jeremie; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Olland, Anne; Massard, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether daily routine (DR) chest radiographs (CXRs) are necessary after pulmonary surgery in adult patients. Of the 66 papers found using a report search, seven presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. Four of these seven studies specifically addressed post-cardiothoracic adult patients. Three of these seven studies addressed intensive care unit (ICU) patients and included post-cardiothoracic adult patients in well-designed studies. Six of these seven studies compared the DR CXRs strategy to the clinically indicated, on-demand (OD) CXRs strategy. Another study analysed the clinical impact of ceasing to perform the DR, postoperative, post-chest tubes removal CXRs. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, study type, group studied, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are given. We conclude that, on the whole, the seven studies are unanimously in favour of forgoing DR CXRs after lung resection and advocate OD CXRs. One study suggested that hypoxic patients could benefit from a DR CXRs strategy, while other studies failed to identify any subgroup for whom performing DR CXRs was beneficial. Indeed, DR CXRs, commonly taken after thoracic surgery, have poor diagnostic and therapeutic value. Eliminating them for adult patients having undergone thoracic surgery significantly decreases the number of CXRs per patient without increasing mortality rates, length of hospital stays (LOSs), readmission rates and adverse events. Hence, current evidence shows that DR CXRs could be forgone after lung resection because OD CXRs, recommended by clinical monitoring, have a better impact on management and have not been proved to negatively affect patient outcomes. Moreover, an OD CXRs strategy lowers the cost of care. Nevertheless, an OD CXRs strategy requires close clinical monitoring by experienced surgeons and dedicated intensivists. However

  20. Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-05-01

    Patient falls within hospitals have been identified as serious but largely preventable incidents, particularly among older adult patients. Previous literature has explored intrinsic factors associated with patient falls, but literature identifying possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls is lacking. This study seeks to identify patient motions and activities along with associated environmental design factors in a patient bathroom and clinician zone setting that may lead to falls. A motion capture experiment was conducted in a laboratory setting on 27 subjects over the age of seventy using scripted tasks and mockups of the bathroom and clinician zone of a patient room. Data were post-processed using Cortex and Visual3D software. A potential fall was characterized by a set of criteria based on the jerk of the upper body׳s center of mass (COM). Results suggest that only motion-related factors, particularly turning, pushing, pulling, and grabbing, contribute most significantly to potential falls in the patient bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute significantly in the clinician zone. Future work includes identifying and changing precise environmental design factors associated with these motions for an updated patient room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup. PMID:26920507

  1. Clofarabine in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-04

    Solid Tumors; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Adult; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Adult; Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Adult

  2. Minocycline treatment results in reduced oral steroid requirements in adult asthma.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Ammar; Gloria, C J; Taningco, Gladys; Hammerschlag, Margaret R; Weiss, Steven; Gelling, Maureen; Roblin, Patricia M; Joks, Rauno

    2008-01-01

    The tetracycline antibiotics have pleiotropic anti-inflammatory properties that may explain their therapeutic benefit in rheumatoid arthritis and acne. As these agents suppress both cellular and humoral immune responses, they may be of benefit in treating asthma and other allergic disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine whether minocycline therapy of asthma has steroid sparing effects beyond its inherent antibiotic properties. Adult asthmatic patients (n = 17) were treated with minocycline 150 mg p.o. twice daily or placebo for 8 weeks in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. Patients were evaluated for clinical improvement in oral steroid requirements, spirometry, and symptom scores (Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire). They underwent assessment for preexisting infection (CT facial sinuses, Chlamydia pneumoniae nasopharyngeal culture, and C. pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae serology). Minocycline use was associated with a 30% reduction in mean daily prednisone use compared with placebo (8.8 mg versus 14.4 mg, respectively; p = 0.02). Pulmonary function testing showed improvement in forced vital capacity (FVC; percent predicted; p = 0.03) and improvement in actual FVC and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (percent predicted) approached statistical significance (p = 0.05 and 0.08, respectively). Minocycline treatment was associated with significant improvement in asthma symptoms brought on by environmental triggers (p = 0.01). This preliminary study of minocycline therapy showed oral steroid-sparing properties for those with moderate persistent and severe persistent asthma.

  3. Arrhythmias in Adult Congenital Patients With Bodily Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gupta, Navdeep; Buelow, Matthew; Alla, Venkata; Arora, Rohit R; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-02-01

    There are an increasing number of adults with congenital heart disease, some of whom have bodily isomerism. Bodily isomerism or heterotaxy is a unique clinical entity associated with congenital malformations of the heart which further increases the risk for future cardiovascular complications. We aimed to investigate the frequency of arrhythmias in adults with bodily isomerism. We utilized the 2012 iteration of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to identify adult inpatient admissions associated with arrhythmias in patients with isomerism. Data regarding demographics, comorbidities, and various procedures were collected and compared between those with and without isomerism. A total of 6,907,109 admissions were analyzed with a total of 861 being associated isomerism. The frequency of arrhythmias was greater in those with isomerism (20.8 vs. 15.4 %). Those with isomerism were also more five times more likely to undergo invasive electrophysiology studies. Length and cost of hospitalization for patients with arrhythmias also tended to be greater in those with isomerism. Mortality did not differ between the two groups. Arrhythmias are more prevalent in those with isomerism, with a majority of arrhythmias in isomerism being atrial. Those with isomerism and arrhythmias also tended to have greater length and cost of hospitalization.

  4. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  5. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  6. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  7. Adult cystic fibrosis patients' experiences of primary care consultations: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Lowton, Karen; Ballard, Karen D

    2006-01-01

    Background ‘Expert patient’ programmes have been introduced in the UK as a new approach to chronic disease management for the 21st century. The average survival age of those with cystic fibrosis (CF) has steadily increased such that the majority of those with the condition now live into adulthood. Currently, specialist CF centres deliver the core of medical care, with primary care providing access to prescribed medicines, referral to other services, and care of non-CF needs, however, it is necessary to provide a more comprehensive service for adult CF patients, involving both specialist centres and primary care. To date, little is known about these expert patients' experiences of primary care. Aim To investigate how young adults with CF perceive and experience primary healthcare services. Design of study Qualitative study. Setting One specialist CF centre in southeast England. Method Interview study of 31 patients with CF, aged 18 years or over. Results Adults with CF consult in primary care on two distinct levels: as lay and expert patients. When consulting as experts, patients tend to operate as consumers of health care and perceive a satisfactory doctor–patient relationship to be influenced by three factors: GPs' understanding of how people live with CF, GPs' ability to prescribe certain specialist medications, and sensitive management of the cost of health care for adults with CF. A doctor–patient relationship based on trust and understanding is seen as desirable, but requires that these factors are addressed both by the GP and the patient. Conclusion Expert patient policy has focused on the role of patients with common chronic conditions in secondary and tertiary care, with little consideration of how adults with rare chronic illness and their GPs manage health problems that can be addressed in primary care. Enabling easy access to holistic care, as well as establishing successful trusting relationships with people with long-term rare conditions, is a

  8. Hypoalbuminaemia predicts outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Kempny, Aleksander; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Uebing, Anselm; Rafiq, Isma; Li, Wei; Swan, Lorna; Hooper, James; Donovan, Jackie; Wort, Stephen J; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with acquired heart failure, hypoalbuminaemia is associated with increased risk of death. The prevalence of hypoproteinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia and their relation to outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains, however, unknown. Methods Data on patients with ACHD who underwent blood testing in our centre within the last 14 years were collected. The relation between laboratory, clinical or demographic parameters at baseline and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results A total of 2886 patients with ACHD were included. Mean age was 33.3 years (23.6–44.7) and 50.1% patients were men. Median plasma albumin concentration was 41.0 g/L (38.0–44.0), whereas hypoalbuminaemia (<35 g/L) was present in 13.9% of patients. The prevalence of hypoalbuminaemia was significantly higher in patients with great complexity ACHD (18.2%) compared with patients with moderate (11.3%) or simple ACHD lesions (12.1%, p<0.001). During a median follow-up of 5.7 years (3.3–9.6), 327 (11.3%) patients died. On univariable Cox regression analysis, hypoalbuminaemia was a strong predictor of outcome (HR 3.37, 95% CI 2.67 to 4.25, p<0.0001). On multivariable Cox regression, after adjusting for age, sodium and creatinine concentration, liver dysfunction, functional class and disease complexity, hypoalbuminaemia remained a significant predictor of death. Conclusions Hypoalbuminaemia is common in patients with ACHD and is associated with a threefold increased risk of risk of death. Hypoalbuminaemia, therefore, should be included in risk-stratification algorithms as it may assist management decisions and timing of interventions in the growing ACHD population. PMID:25736048

  9. Hepatic resection for giant haemangioma in a patient with a contemporaneous adult polycystic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Levi Sandri, G B; Lai, Q; Melandro, F; Guglielmo, N; Garofalo, M; Morabito, V; Cirelli, C; Lucatelli, P; Di Laudo, M; Rossi, M; Berloco, P B

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic resection for giant haemangioma in a patient with a contemporaneous adult polycystic liver disease. According to Gigot classification, and to the characteristics of haemangioma surgery in these patients can be considered safe. We report the case of a 55 year-old man affected by an adult polycystic liver disease (PCLD) and a contemporaneous symptomatic haemangioma of the III segment. At the preoperative imaging scans, APCLD was classified in a type II grading according to Gigot classification. The patient underwent surgery: a wedge resection of the III segment with the exportation of the haemangioma and a fenestration of a large cyst placed in the VIII segment were performed. Post-operative course was regular and the patient was discharged uneventfully in post-operative 9th day, with a total regress of the initial symptoms. APCLD and haemangioma are two benign conditions that do not require surgery except if they cause important symptoms, such as pain. The good clinical conditions of the patient, the moderate gravity of the APCLD and the particular exofitic localisation of the cavernous haemangioma gave us the possibility to make a safe surgery for the patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported in literature in which a liver resection for haemangioma in patient with APCLD was performed. In conclusion, liver resection for haemangioma is not contraindicated, mainly if it is symptomatic, even in the contemporaneous presence of an APCLD.

  10. Updates in vaccination: Recommendations for adult inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudrey, Khadija; Salvaggio, Michelle; Ahmed, Aftab; Mahmood, Sultan; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Treatment regimens for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) incorporate the use of a variety of immunosuppressive agents that increase the risk of infections. Prevention of many of these infections can be achieved by the timely and judicious use of vaccinations. IBD patients tend to be under-immunized. Some of the contributing factors are lack of awareness regarding the significance of vaccinating IBD patients, misperception about safety of vaccinations in immunocompromised patients, ambiguity about the perceived role of the gastroenterologist in contrast to the primary care physician and unavailability of vaccination guidelines focused on IBD population. In general, immunocompetent IBD patients can be vaccinated using standard vaccination recommendations. However there are special considerations for IBD patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, IBD travelers and pregnant women with IBD. This review discusses current vaccination recommendations with updates for adult IBD patients. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2013 vaccination guidelines with 2014 updates and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations have been highlighted as a primary source of recommendations. PMID:25805924

  11. Severe chronic primary neutropenia in adults: report on a series of 108 patients.

    PubMed

    Sicre de Fontbrune, Flore; Moignet, Aline; Beaupain, Blandine; Suarez, Felipe; Galicier, Lionel; Socié, Gérard; Varet, Bruno; Coppo, Paul; Michel, Marc; Pautas, Cécile; Oksenhendler, Eric; Lengline, Etienne; Terriou, Louis; Moreau, Philippe; Chantepie, Sylvain; Casadevall, Nicole; Michot, Jean Marie; Gardembas, Martine; Michallet, Mauricette; Croisille, Laure; Audrain, Marie; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Donadieu, Jean; Lamy, Thierry

    2015-10-01

    Severe chronic primary neutropenia (CPN) is a rare entity, and long-term outcome and risk factors for infections in severe CPN adults have not been described to date. We report the characteristics and outcomes of 108 severe adult CPN patients enrolled in a multi-institutional observational study. Severe CPN adults were mostly female (78%), and median age at diagnosis was 28.3 years. Diagnosis was fortuitous in 62% of cases. The median absolute neutrophil count (ANC) at diagnosis was 0.4 × 10(9)/L, and median ANC without granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) during follow-up was 0.5 × 10(9)/L. Twenty-three of 66 (34.8%) evaluable patients had neutrophil autoantibodies, and 6 of 47 (12.8%) a T-cell clone. The presence of neutrophil autoantibodies or T-cell clone was not associated with any specific clinical or biological characteristics. No death or hematologic malignancies occurred, and 44 severe bacterial infections were reported in 27 patients with a median follow-up of 8.3 years. Fifty patients received G-CSF either sporadically (n = 24) or continuously (n = 26) and responded (96%). Nineteen patients received immunosuppressive therapies: overall response (OR) was 41%, and median duration of response was 3 months. At diagnosis, the only predictive factor for the occurrence of severe bacterial infections was an ANC count below 0.2 × 10(9)/L (OR, 0.76). Severe CPN in adults is characterized by a female predominance and a benign outcome with a low rate of severe bacterial infections and no secondary malignancies. G-CSF is efficient and well tolerated but is not required in a majority of patients. PMID:26261239

  12. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Roland N.

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed. PMID:27096868

  13. Competencies for the Nurse Practitioner Working with Adult Urology Patients.

    PubMed

    Quallich, Susanne A; Bumpus, Sherry M; Lajiness, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    The role of the nurse practitioner (NP) has expanded into specialty domains. This document proposes 24 competencies specific to the urology NP, which are also consistent with the recommendations of National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) and compliment the American Urologic Association (AUA) 2014 white paper on the incorporation of advanced practice providers in urology practices. It describes three levels of practice and experience progression for the urology NP working with adult patients, independent of specific clinical setting. These urology-specific competencies supplement and complement the core competencies and population-focused competencies of generalist nurse practitioners.

  14. Salmonella typhimurium meningitis in an adult patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Swe, K Swe; Nagel, G; Van der Westhuizen, M; Hoosen, A A

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella meningitis is an unusual complication of Salmonella sepsis and occurs mainly in children. A rare case of Salmonella typhimurium meningitis occurring in an adult HIV positive man who presented with a history of fever and diarrhoea is reported. On examination he was dehydrated, and had oral thrush, weakness of lower limbs and neck stiffness. A septic diagnostic screen was performed and he was commenced on empiric intravenous cefotaxime therapy for meningitis. S typhimurium was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid and blood culture specimens. It was non-lactose fermenting, oxidase negative, H(2)S positive and motile. Cefotaxime was continued for 14 days and the patient responded without neurological sequelae. PMID:17158637

  15. Care of the adult patient with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ross, Whitney Trotter; Olsen, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome have an increased risk for many conditions, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, infections, and osteoporosis, and endocrine, neurological, orthopedic, auditory, and ophthalmic disorders. They also are at increased risk for abuse and human rights violations and receive fewer screenings and interventions than the population without Down syndrome. In this literature review, the most common health conditions associated with Down syndrome are examined, along with the topics of sexual abuse, menstrual hygiene, contraception, and human rights. Clinical guidelines for this population are summarized in an effort to assist practicing physicians in improving their provision of health care to the adult patient with Down syndrome.

  16. Factors affecting ventriculoperitoneal shunt survival in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Farid; Rehman, Abdul; Shamim, Muhammad S.; Bari, Muhammad E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt insertion remains the mainstay of treatment for hydrocephalus despite a high rate of complications. The predictors of shunt malfunction have been studied mostly in pediatric patients. In this study, we report our 11-year experience with VP shunts in adult patients with hydrocephalus. We also assess the various factors affecting shunt survival in a developing country setting. Methods: A retrospective chart analysis was conducted for all adult patients who had undergone shunt placement between the years 2001 and 2011. Kaplan–Meier curves were used to determine the duration from shunt placement to first malfunction and log-rank (Cox–Mantel) tests were used to determine the factors affecting shunt survival. Results: A total of 227 patients aged 18–85 years (mean: 45.8 years) were included in the study. The top four etiologies of hydrocephalus included post-cranial surgery (23.3%), brain tumor or cyst (22.9%), normal pressure hydrocephalus (15%), and intracranial hemorrhage (13.7%). The overall incidence of shunt malfunction was 15.4% with the median time to first shunt failure being 120 days. Etiology of hydrocephalus (P = 0.030) had a significant association with the development of shunt malfunction. Early shunt failure was associated with age (P < 0.001), duration of hospital stay (P < 0.001), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score less than 13 (P = 0.010), excision of brain tumors (P = 0.008), and placement of extra-ventricular drains (P = 0.033). Conclusions: Patients with increased age, prolonged hospital stay, GCS score of less than 13, extra-ventricular drains in situ, or excision of brain tumors were more likely to experience early shunt malfunction. PMID:25722930

  17. Acoustical criteria for hospital patient rooms: Resolving competing requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Bennett M.

    2003-10-01

    The acoustical criteria for patient rooms in hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation facilities may be based on several needs. One important requirement is that noise levels in the room be conducive to restful sleep. Also, caregivers must have easy auditory and visual access to the patients, and be able to hear vital sign monitor alarms. This often means that patient rooms are located near central nurse stations and that patient room doors are left open. Further, the recently published federal privacy standards developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HSS) under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) require that ``appropriate physical safeguards'' be put in place to protect the confidentiality of patient health information. The simultaneous and competing requirements for speech privacy, caregiver access, and good sleeping conditions present a serious acoustical challenge to health care facility designers. Specific facility design issues and potential solution strategies are presented.

  18. Anemia, Blood Transfusion Requirements and Mortality Risk in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults Requiring Acute Medical Admission to Hospital in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoff, Andrew D.; Lawn, Stephen D.; Schutz, Charlotte; Burton, Rosie; Boulle, Andrew; Cobelens, Frank J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Background. Morbidity and mortality remain high among hospitalized patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa despite widespread availability of antiretroviral therapy. Severe anemia is likely one important driver, and some evidence suggests that blood transfusions may accelerate HIV progression and paradoxically increase short-term mortality. We investigated the relationship between anemia, blood transfusions, and mortality in a South African district hospital. Methods. Unselected consecutive HIV-infected adults requiring acute medical admission to a Cape Town township district hospital were recruited. Admission hemoglobin concentrations were used to classify anemia severity according to World Health Organization/AIDS Clinical Trials Group criteria. Vital status was determined at 90 days, and Cox regression analyses were used to determine independent predictors of mortality. Results. Of 585 HIV-infected patients enrolled, 578 (98.8%) were included in the analysis. Anemia was detected in 84.8% of patients and was severe (hemoglobin, 6.5–7.9 g/dL) or life-threatening (hemoglobin, <6.5 g/dL) in 17.3% and 13.3%, respectively. Within 90 days of the date of admission, 13.5% (n = 78) patients received at least 1 blood transfusion with red cell concentrate and 77 (13.3%) patients died. In univariable analysis, baseline hemoglobin and receipt of blood transfusion were associated with increased mortality risk. However, in multivariable analysis, neither hemoglobin nor receipt of a blood transfusion were independently associated with greater mortality risk. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome-defining illnesses other than tuberculosis and impaired renal function independently predicted mortality. Conclusions. Newly admitted HIV-infected adults had a high prevalence of severe or life-threatening anemia and blood transfusions were frequently required. However, after adjustment for confounders, blood transfusions did not confer an

  19. A comprehensive Fabry-related pain questionnaire for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Magg, Barbara; Thomas, Phillip; Wiedmann, Silke; Heuschmann, Peter; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Pain may be the earliest symptom in Fabry disease and presents with a distinct phenotype including triggerable pain attacks, evoked pain, pain crises, and chronic pain. Current pain questionnaires do not reflect the special phenotype of Fabry disease-associated pain, which hampers its systematic evaluation as the basis of correct diagnosis and effective treatment. A questionnaire specifically designed to assess Fabry disease-associated pain is thus urgently needed. At the Würzburg Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy (FAZIT), Germany, we developed and validated the first face-to-face Fabry Pain Questionnaire (FPQ) for adult patients. The initial version of the FPQ was tested in a pilot study with 20 consecutive Fabry disease patients. The performance of the revised FPQ was assessed in a first (n=56) and second (n=20) validation phase in consecutive Fabry disease patients. For this, patients were interviewed at baseline and 2 weeks later. We determined the test-retest reliability and validity of the FPQ in comparison to data obtained with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. The FPQ contains 15 questions on the 4 pain phenotypes of Fabry disease (pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain, chronic pain) in childhood and adulthood, on pain development during life with and without enzyme replacement therapy, and on everyday life impairment due to pain. This first disease-specific questionnaire is a valuable tool for baseline and follow-up assessment of pain in Fabry disease patients and may guide treatment in this distinct pain phenotype.

  20. Drugs in oral surgery. Brief guidelines for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Grassi, R F; Pappalardo, S; De Benedittis, M; Petruzzi, M; Giannetti, L; Cappello, V; Baglio, O A

    2004-06-01

    Drugs administrable in oral surgery for adult patients are antiseptics-antibiotics, antiinflammatory-analgesics and sedative-hypnotics. Such drugs can be administered before, during or after oral surgery. Sedative-hypnotics can be administered before or during oral surgery in order to control the patient's anxiety. Anti-inflammatory-analgesics, on the other hand, can be administered before or after oral surgery to lower edema and pain. For this purpose, FANS are the most commonly used drugs but, in more traumatic oral surgery, the administration of a single pre-surgery dose of corticosteroids is suitable. As regards, antibiotics have to be given from 15 min to 1 h before oral surgery and continued or otherwise for 24-48 h depending on the dosage. post-surgery infection onset, in fact, is higher within 3 h after oral surgery.

  1. Shock wave lithotripsy in patients requiring anticoagulation or antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Alsaikhan, Bader; Andonian, Sero

    2011-02-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) remains the only truly minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of upper tract nephrolithiasis. Recently, there has been a recent rise in the patients on antiplatelet agents. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to review the literature available regarding SWL in these high-risk patients requiring anti-coagulation therapy. Alternative therapies to SWL are also presented.

  2. Living donor liver transplantation in an adult patient with situs inversus totalis

    PubMed Central

    Yankol, Yücel; Mecit, Nesimi; Kanmaz, Turan; Acarlı, Koray; Kalayoğlu, Münci

    2015-01-01

    Situs inversus totalis (SIT) is a rare congenital anomaly, and liver transplantation (LT) in an adult SIT patient is extremely rare. Liver transplantation in a SIT patient is also technically challenging due to reversed anatomical structures. Here we present the case of an 18-year-old female with SIT in whom left lobe living donor LT was performed. The patient suffered from cirrhosis due to autoimmune hepatitis. The recipient and donor are doing well without complications 20 months after LT. Situs inversus totalis should not be considered a contraindication for LT. If possible, use of a living donor left lobe graft for LT is more feasible than a living donor right lobe graft. It is also technically easier than using deceased donor full-size liver graft in SIT patients who require liver transplantation. PMID:26668533

  3. Intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Heller, Axel R

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids contained in fish oils have shown efficacy in the treatment of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases due to their pleiotropic effects on inflammatory cell signalling pathways. In a variety of experimental and clinical studies, omega-3 fatty acids attenuated hyperinflammatory conditions and induced faster recovery. This chapter will shed light on the effects of intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients and will discuss clinical data and recent meta-analyses on the topic. While significant beneficial effects on infection rates and the lengths of ICU and hospital stays have concordantly been identified in three recent meta-analyses on non-ICU surgical patients, the level of evidence is not so clear for critically ill patients. Three meta-analyses published in 2012 or 2013 explored data on the ICU population. Although the present data suggest the consideration of enteral nutrition enriched with fish oil, borage oil and antioxidants in mild to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, only one of the three meta-analyses found a trend (p = 0.08) of lower mortality in ICU patients receiving intravenous omega-3 fatty acids. Two of the meta-analyses indicated a significantly shorter hospital stay (5.17-9.49 days), and one meta-analysis found a significant reduction in ICU days (1.92). As a result of these effects, cost savings were postulated. Unlike in surgical patients, the effects of fish oil on infection rates were not found to be statistically significant in ICU patients, and dose-effect relationships were not established for any cohort. Thus, obvious positive secondary outcome effects with intravenous fish oil have not yet been shown to transfer to lower mortality in critically ill patients. There is a need for adequately powered, well-planned and well-conducted randomized trials to give clear recommendations on the individual utility and dosage of intravenous omega-3 fatty acids in critical illness. PMID:25471809

  4. The metabolic consequences of thyroxine replacement in adult hypopituitary patients.

    PubMed

    Filipsson Nyström, Helena; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Kourides, Ione; Popovic, Vera; Koltowska-Häggström, Maria; Jonsson, Björn; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2012-12-01

    The metabolic consequences of thyroxine replacement in patients with central hypothyroidism (CH) need to be evaluated. The aim was to examine the outcome of thyroxine replacement in CH. Adult hypopituitary patients (n = 1595) with and without CH from KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database) were studied before and after 2 years of GH replacement. CH patients (CH, n = 1080) were compared with TSH sufficient patients (TSHsuff n = 515) as one group and divided by thyroxine dose/kg/day into tertiles (CHlow-mid-high). Anthropometry, fasting glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure, lipids, IGF-I SDS, quality of life and morbidity were studied. Analyses were standardized for gender, age, number and types of pituitary insufficiencies, stimulated GH peak, age at GH deficiency onset, aetiologies and, when appropriate, for weight and GH dose. At baseline, TSHsuff patients did not differ from CH or CHmid in any outcome. CHlow (≤ 1.18 μg thyroxine/kg/day) had increased weight, BMI and larger waist circumference (WC), CHhigh (≥ 1.58 μg thyroxine/kg/day) had lower weight, BMI, WC and IGF-I than TSHsuff and compared to their predicted weights, BMIs and WCs. For every 0.1 μg/kg/day increase of thyroxine dose, body weight decreased 1.0 kg, BMI 0.3 kg/m(2), and WC 0.65 cm. The GH sensitivity of the CH group was higher (0.76 ± 0.56 SDS/mg GH) than that of TSHsuff patients (0.58 ± 0.64 SDS/mg GH), P < 0.001. The middle thyroxine dose (1.19-1.57 μg/kg/day) seems to be the most physiological. This is equivalent to 70, 100, 125 μg thyroxine/day for hypopituitary patients of 50, 70 or 90 kg weight, respectively.

  5. A Systematic Review of Music Therapy Practice and Outcomes with Acute Adult Psychiatric In-Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. Review Methods A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. Results 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. Conclusions No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to

  6. Estimation of effective doses to adult and pediatric patients from multislice computed tomography: A method based on energy imparted

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Tzedakis, Antonis; Karantanas, Apostolos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-10-15

    The purpose of this study is to provide a method and required data for the estimation of effective dose (E) values to adult and pediatric patients from computed tomography (CT) scans of the head, chest abdomen, and pelvis, performed on multi-slice scanners. Mean section radiation dose (d{sub m}) to cylindrical water phantoms of varying radius normalized over CT dose index free-in-air (CTDI{sub F}) were calculated for the head and body scanning modes of a multislice scanner with use of Monte Carlo techniques. Patients were modeled as equivalent water phantoms and the energy imparted ({epsilon}) to simulated pediatric and adult patients was calculated on the basis of measured CTDI{sub F} values. Body region specific energy imparted to effective dose conversion coefficients (E/{epsilon}) for adult male and female patients were generated from previous data. Effective doses to patients aged newborn to adult were derived for all available helical and axial beam collimations, taking into account age specific patient mass and scanning length. Depending on high voltage, body region, and patient sex, E/{epsilon} values ranged from 0.008 mSv/mJ for head scans to 0.024 mSv/mJ for chest scans. When scanned with the same technique factors as the adults, pediatric patients absorb as little as 5% of the energy imparted to adults, but corresponding effective dose values are up to a factor of 1.6 higher. On average, pediatric patients absorb 44% less energy per examination but have a 24% higher effective dose, compared with adults. In clinical practice, effective dose values to pediatric patients are 2.5 to 10 times lower than in adults due to the adaptation of tube current. A method is provided for the calculation of effective dose to adult and pediatric patients on the basis of individual patient characteristics such as sex, mass, dimensions, and density of imaged anatomy, and the technical features of modern multislice scanners. It allows the optimum selection of scanning

  7. Different Requirement for Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Limb Regeneration of Larval and Adult Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Maruoka, Tamae; Ochi, Haruki; Aruga, Akio; Ohgo, Shiro; Ogino, Hajime; Tamura, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Background In limb regeneration of amphibians, the early steps leading to blastema formation are critical for the success of regeneration, and the initiation of regeneration in an adult limb requires the presence of nerves. Xenopus laevis tadpoles can completely regenerate an amputated limb at the early limb bud stage, and the metamorphosed young adult also regenerates a limb by a nerve-dependent process that results in a spike-like structure. Blockage of Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibits the initiation of tadpole limb regeneration, but it remains unclear whether limb regeneration in young adults also requires Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Methodology/Principal Findings We expressed heat-shock-inducible (hs) Dkk1, a Wnt antagonist, in transgenic Xenopus to block Wnt/β-catenin signaling during forelimb regeneration in young adults. hsDkk1 did not inhibit limb regeneration in any of the young adult frogs, though it suppressed Wnt-dependent expression of genes (fgf-8 and cyclin D1). When nerve supply to the limbs was partially removed, however, hsDkk1 expression blocked limb regeneration in young adult frogs. Conversely, activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by a GSK-3 inhibitor rescued failure of limb-spike regeneration in young adult frogs after total removal of nerve supply. Conclusions/Significance In contrast to its essential role in tadpole limb regeneration, our results suggest that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is not absolutely essential for limb regeneration in young adults. The different requirement for Wnt/β-catenin signaling in tadpoles and young adults appears to be due to the projection of nerve axons into the limb field. Our observations suggest that nerve-derived signals and Wnt/β-catenin signaling have redundant roles in the initiation of limb regeneration. Our results demonstrate for the first time the different mechanisms of limb regeneration initiation in limb buds (tadpoles) and developed limbs (young adults) with reference to nerve-derived signals

  8. Burns ITU admissions: length of stay in specific levels of care for adult and paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Maan, Zeshaan N; Frew, Quentin; Din, Asmat H; Unluer, Zeynep; Smailes, Sarah; Philp, Bruce; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Dziewulski, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Prediction of total length of stay (LOS) for burns patients based on the total burn surface area (TBSA) is well accepted. Total LOS is a poor measure of resource consumption. Our aim was to determine the LOS in specific levels of care to better inform resource allocation. We performed a retrospective review of LOS in intensive treatment unit (ITU), burns high dependency unit (HDU) and burns low dependency unit (LDU) for all patients requiring ITU admission in a regional burns service from 2003 to 2011. During this period, our unit has admitted 1312 paediatric and 1445 adult patients to our Burns ITU. In both groups, ITU comprised 20% of the total LOS (mean 0.23±0.02 [adult] and 0.22±0.02 [paediatric] days per %burn). In adults, 33% of LOS was in HDU (0.52±0.06 days per %burn) and 48% (0.68±0.06 days per %burn) in LDU, while in children, 15% of LOS was in HDU (0.19±0.03 days per %burn) and 65% in LDU (0.70±0.06 days per %burn). When considering Burns ITU admissions, resource allocation ought to be planned according to expected LOS in specific levels of care rather than total LOS. The largest proportion of stay is in low dependency, likely due to social issues.

  9. Cervical column morphology in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Petri, Niels; Kjaer, Inger; Svanholt, Palle

    2008-10-01

    Cervical column morphology was examined in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and compared with the cervical morphology of an adult control group with neutral occlusion, normal craniofacial morphology, and no history of sleep apnoea. The sleep apnoea group consisted of 91 patients, 16 females aged 29-59 years (mean 49.4 years) and 75 males aged 27-65 years (mean 49.0 years). All patients were diagnosed with OSA by overnight polysomnography. The control group consisted of 21 subjects, 15 females aged 23-40 years (mean 29.2 years) and 6 males aged 25-44 years (mean 32.8 years). From each individual, a visual assessment of the cervical column was performed on the radiograph. Differences in the cervical column morphology, between the genders and the groups were assessed by Fisher's exact test and the effect of age by logistic regression analysis. In the OSA group, 46.2 per cent had fusion anomalies of the cervical column and 5.5 per cent a posterior arch deficiency. Fusion anomalies occurred in 26.4 per cent as fusions between two cervical vertebrae. Block fusions occurred in 12.1 per cent and occipitalization in 14.3 per cent. A posterior arch deficiency occurred in 2.2 per cent as a partial cleft of C1 and in 3.3 per cent as dehiscence of C3 and C4. No statistical gender differences were found in the occurrence of morphological characteristics of the cervical column. The fusion anomalies of the cervical column occurred significantly more often in the OSA group. The results indicate that the morphological deviations of the upper cervical vertebrae play a role in the phenotypical subdivision and diagnosis of OSA.

  10. The Effects of Physical Education Requirements on Physical Activity of Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Derrick

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if requiring multiple credits of high school physical education for graduation has an impact on promoting physical activity in young adults. Participants in this study (N=361) were surveyed concerning their high school physical education experiences and current performance of physical activity. Results…

  11. Blueprint for Implementing New Processes in Acute Care: Rescuing Adult Patients With Intraosseous Access.

    PubMed

    Chreiman, Kristen M; Kim, Patrick K; Garbovsky, Lyudmila A; Schweickert, William D

    2015-01-01

    The intraosseous (IO) access initiative at an urban university adult level 1 trauma center began from the need for a more expeditious vascular access route to rescue patients in extremis. The goal of this project was a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving to increase access of IO catheters to rescue patients in all care areas. The initiative became a collaborative effort between nursing, physicians, and pharmacy to embark on an acute care endeavor to standardize IO access. This is a descriptive analysis of processes to effectively develop collaborative strategies to navigate hospital systems and successfully implement multilayered initiatives. Administration should empower nurse to advance their practice to include IO for patient rescue. Intraosseous access may expedite resuscitative efforts in patients in extremis who lack venous access or where additional venous access is required for life-saving therapies. Limiting IO dwell time may facilitate timely definitive venous access. Continued education and training by offering IO skill laboratory refreshers and annual e-learning didactic is optimal for maintaining proficiency and knowledge. More research opportunities exist to determine medication safety and efficacy in adult patients in the acute care setting. PMID:26352658

  12. Utilization of a Preemptive, Multimodal Analgesic Regimen in Adult Ambulatory Septoplasty Patients: A Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brett; Stanik-Hutt, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a quality improvement project designed to decrease postoperative pain, decrease post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), decrease time in the recovery room, and increase patient satisfaction in adult ambulatory septoplasty patients using a multimodal, preemptive analgesic regimen. The project was conducted in a community hospital setting with nine operating rooms, and a twenty one bed recovery room. Project participants included certified registered nurse anesthetists, anesthesiologists, operating room nurses, recovery room nurses, and otolaryngology surgeons. Following a period of departmental education, adult patients scheduled for outpatient septoplasty surgery received a preoperative regimen of medications that included gabapentin, celecoxib, and acetaminophen. Using a pre-post test design, (intervention group n = 17, non-intervention group n = 17) data was collected from patient and analyzed using SPSS version 18.0. The change in practice resulted in a significant decrease in pain scores in the recovery room and on discharge from the recovery room. In addition, patients who received the preemptive regimen also required significantly fewer opioid medications and were ready to be discharged from the recovery room in less time.

  13. Nutritional care of the obese adult burn patient: a U.K. Survey and literature review.

    PubMed

    Goutos, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an emerging healthcare problem and affects an increasing number of burn patients worldwide. An email survey questionnaire was constructed and distributed among the 16 U.K. burn services providing adult inpatient facilities to investigate nutritional practices in obese thermally injured patients. Responses received from all dieticians invited to participate in the study were analyzed, and a relevant literature review of key aspects of nutritional care is presented. The majority of services believe that obese patients warrant a different nutritional approach with specific emphasis to avoid overfeeding. The most common algebraic formulae used to calculate calorific requirements include the Schofield, Henry, and modified Penn State equations. Indirect calorimetry despite being considered the "criterion standard" tool to calculate energy requirements is not currently used by any of the U.K. burn services. Gastric/enteral nutrition is initiated within 24 hours of admission in the services surveyed, and a variety of different practices were noted in terms of fasting protocols before procedures requiring general anesthesia/sedation. Hypocaloric regimens for obese patients are not supported by the majority of U.K. facilities, given the limited evidence base supporting their use. The results of this survey outline the wide diversity of dietetic practices adopted in the care of obese burn patients and reveal the need for further study to determine optimal nutritional strategies.

  14. Attachment and Parenting in Adult Patients with Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Angelo; Caroppo, Emanuele; Fabi, Elisa; Proietti, Serena; Gennaro, Giancarlo Di; Meldolesi, Giulio Nicolò; Martinotti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background: The literature suggests that dysfunctional parenting and insecure attachment may increase risk of anxiety-related psychopathology. This study aimed at testing the association between anxiety disorders, attachment insecurity and dysfunctional parenting while controlling for factors usually not controlled for in previous studies, such as gender, age, and being ill. Methods: A sample of 32 non-psychotic inpatients with SCID-I diagnosis of an anxiety disorder, either alone or in comorbidity, was compared with two age- and sex-matched control groups consisting of 32 non-clinical participants and 32 in-patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Study measures included the Experience in Close Relationships questionnaire (ECR) and the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI). Results: The patients with anxiety disorders scored significantly higher on attachment-related anxiety and avoidance than patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and non-clinical participants. These findings were independent of comorbidity for mood disorders. ECR scores did not differ among diagnostic subgroups (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, other anxiety disorders). Patients with anxiety disorders scored significantly lower on PBI mother’s care and borderline significantly lower on PBI father's care than patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Conclusions: Although limitations such as the relatively small sample size and the cross-sectional nature suggest caution in interpreting these findings, they are consistent with the few previous adult studies performed on this topic and corroborate Bowlby's seminal hypothesis of a link between negative attachment-related experiences, attachment insecurity, and clinical anxiety. Attachment theory provides a useful theoretical framework for integrating research findings from several fields concerning the development of anxiety disorders and for planning therapeutic interventions. PMID:24155770

  15. Severe Acquired Toxoplasmosis in Immunocompetent Adult Patients in French Guiana

    PubMed Central

    Carme, B.; Bissuel, F.; Ajzenberg, D.; Bouyne, R.; Aznar, C.; Demar, M.; Bichat, S.; Louvel, D.; Bourbigot, A. M.; Peneau, C.; Neron, P.; Dardé, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    The most common presentation of symptomatic postnatally acquired toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients is painless cervical adenopathy. Acute visceral manifestations are associated in rare cases. We report 16 cases of severe primary toxoplasmosis diagnosed in French Guiana during a 6.5-year period. All of the subjects were immunocompetent adults hospitalized with clinical presentations consisting of a marked, nonspecific infectious syndrome accompanied by an altered general status with at least one visceral localization, mainly pulmonary involvement (14 cases). Acute toxoplasmosis was diagnosed according to the results of serological tests suggestive of recent primary infection and the absence of an alternative etiology. Recovery was rapid following specific antitoxoplasmosis treatment. Thirteen of the 16 patients had consumed game in the 2 weeks before the onset of the symptoms, and in eight cases the game was considered to have been undercooked. Toxoplasma strains, which were virulent in mice, were isolated from three patients. Microsatellite analysis showed that all of these isolates exhibited an atypical multilocus genotype, with one allele found only for isolates of this region. PMID:12409371

  16. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.820 What are the eligibility requirements for adults...

  17. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.820 What are the eligibility requirements for adults...

  18. Humidification during mechanical ventilation in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Al Ashry, Haitham S; Modrykamien, Ariel M

    2014-01-01

    Humidification of inhaled gases has been standard of care in mechanical ventilation for a long period of time. More than a century ago, a variety of reports described important airway damage by applying dry gases during artificial ventilation. Consequently, respiratory care providers have been utilizing external humidifiers to compensate for the lack of natural humidification mechanisms when the upper airway is bypassed. Particularly, active and passive humidification devices have rapidly evolved. Sophisticated systems composed of reservoirs, wires, heating devices, and other elements have become part of our usual armamentarium in the intensive care unit. Therefore, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of action of each of these devices, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, becomes a necessity for the respiratory care and intensive care practitioner. In this paper, we review current methods of airway humidification during invasive mechanical ventilation of adult patients. We describe a variety of devices and describe the eventual applications according to specific clinical conditions.

  19. Humidification during Mechanical Ventilation in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Al Ashry, Haitham S.; Modrykamien, Ariel M.

    2014-01-01

    Humidification of inhaled gases has been standard of care in mechanical ventilation for a long period of time. More than a century ago, a variety of reports described important airway damage by applying dry gases during artificial ventilation. Consequently, respiratory care providers have been utilizing external humidifiers to compensate for the lack of natural humidification mechanisms when the upper airway is bypassed. Particularly, active and passive humidification devices have rapidly evolved. Sophisticated systems composed of reservoirs, wires, heating devices, and other elements have become part of our usual armamentarium in the intensive care unit. Therefore, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of action of each of these devices, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, becomes a necessity for the respiratory care and intensive care practitioner. In this paper, we review current methods of airway humidification during invasive mechanical ventilation of adult patients. We describe a variety of devices and describe the eventual applications according to specific clinical conditions. PMID:25089275

  20. [Comparison of serum trace element spectrum of liver cancer patients and healthy adults].

    PubMed

    Yin, D Z

    1990-05-01

    The contents of 15 trace elements in the sera of 30 liver cancer patients and 30 healthy adults were assayed by ICP-AES method. The data obtained were analysed by routine statistical tests, multi-variate discrimination analysis, multi-variate stepwise regression analysis and non-linear mapping algorithm. The results showed that the contents of copper, vanadium, cadmium, stannum, cobalt, nickel in liver cancer patients were significantly higher than those in healthy adults. The serum trace element spectrum of liver cancer patients was different from that of healthy adults. Hence, the liver cancer patients could be differentiated from healthy adults by serum trace element spectrum. PMID:2249593

  1. Adult patients with Fontan circulation: What we know and how to manage adults with Fontan circulation?

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    Most of patients after the Fontan operation can reach their adulthood, however, the management strategy for this complex pathophysiology has not been yet established. In general, elevated central venous pressure (CVP) and low cardiac output (CO) due to impaired ventricular preload characterize the Fontan circulation and the ideal hemodynamics could be a combination of a lower CVP with a higher CO. Thus, preserved functional systemic ventricle with low pulmonary artery resistance is thought to be crucial for better long-term outcome. However, on the other hand, because of the unique hemodynamics, these patients have significantly higher incidence of complications, sequelae, and even mortality. The major complications are supraventricular arrhythmias, heart failure, and Fontan-related problems, including protein-losing enteropathy and pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae, both of which are refractory to the treatments, and most of these "Fontan inconveniences" increase as patients age. In addition, one of the recent emerging problems is Fontan-associated liver disease that includes liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, women with Fontan circulation also reach childbearing age and there have been increasing numbers of reports showing a high incidence of pregnancy-associated complications. All these problems may be a part of "Fontan inconveniences" because most of the current Fontan patients are still "young" i.e. in their twenties or thirties and it may be not surprising that more new Fontan-associated pathophysiology emerges as patients age. Recent evidence reminds us of the concept that adult Fontan pathophysiology is not just a cardiovascular disease, rather, a multiorgan disease with many interactions between cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular organs. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory to take care of and anticipate the better long-term outcome. PMID:27134136

  2. Population Pharmacokinetics of Benznidazole in Adult Patients with Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldasoro, E.; Guerrero, L.; Posada, E.; Serret, N.; Mejía, T.; Urbina, J. A.; Gascón, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to build a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model to characterize benznidazole (BNZ) pharmacokinetics in adults with chronic Chagas disease. This study was a prospective, open-label, single-center clinical trial approved by the local ethics committee. Patients received BNZ at 2.5 mg/kg of body weight/12 h (Abarax, Elea Laboratory, Argentina) for 60 days. Plasma BNZ samples were taken several times during the study and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-visible detection (HPLC-UV). The popPK analysis was done with NONMEMv.7.3. Demographic and biological data were tested as covariates. Intraindividual, interoccasion, and residual variabilities were modeled. Internal and external validations were completed to assess the robustness of the model. Later on, simulations were performed to generate BNZ concentration-time course profiles for different dosage regimens. A total of 358 plasma BNZ concentrations from 39 patients were included in the analysis. A one-compartment PK model characterized by clearance (CL/F) and the apparent volume of distribution (V/F), with first-order absorption (Ka) and elimination, adequately described the data (CL/F, 1.73 liters/h; V/F, 89.6 liters; and Ka, 1.15 h−1). No covariates were found to be significant for CL/F and V/F. Internal and external validations of the final model showed adequate results. Data from simulations revealed that a dose of 2.5 mg/kg/12 h might lead to overexposure in most patients. A lower dose (2.5 mg/kg/24 h) was able to achieve trough BNZ plasma concentrations within the accepted therapeutic range of 3 to 6 mg/liter. In summary, we developed a population PK model for BNZ in adults with chronic Chagas disease. Dosing simulations showed that a BNZ dose of 2.5 mg/kg/24 h will adequately keep BNZ trough plasma concentrations within the recommended target range for the majority of patients. (This study has been registered at EudraCT under number 2011

  3. Radiation Enterocolitis Requiring Surgery in Patients With Gynecological Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Iraha, Shiro; Ogawa, Kazuhiko . E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp; Moromizato, Hidehiko; Shiraishi, Masayuki; Nagai, Yutaka; Samura, Hironori; Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Adachi, Genki; Tamaki, Wakana; Hirakawa, Makoto; Kamiyama, Kazuya; Inamine, Morihiko; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Aoki, Yoichi; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To identify the characteristics, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery in patients with gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The records of 1,349 patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The majority of the patients (88%) were treated with 50 Gy or 50.4 Gy pelvic irradiation in conventional fractionations with anteroposterior fields. Results: Forty-eight patients (3.6%) developed radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery. Terminal ileum was the most frequent site (50%) and most of the lesions had stenosis or perforation. On univariate analysis, previous abdominopelvic surgery, diabetes mellitus (DM), smoking and primary site had an impact on the complications, and on multivariate analysis, abdominopelvic surgery, DM, and smoking were independent predictors of the complications requiring surgery. After the surgical intervention, the frequency of Grade 2 or more bleeding was significantly lower in patients treated with intestinal resection in addition to decompression than those treated with intestinal decompression alone. Conclusions: Severe radiation enterocolitis requiring surgery usually occurred at the terminal ileum and was strongly correlated with previous abdominopelvic surgery, DM, and smoking. Concerning the management, liberal resection of the affected bowel appears to be the preferable therapy.

  4. Patient Accounting Systems: Are They Fit with the Users' Requirements?

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Haleh; Nazemi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A patient accounting system is a subsystem of a hospital information system. This system like other information systems should be carefully designed to be able to meet users' requirements. The main aim of this research was to investigate users' requirements and to determine whether current patient accounting systems meet users' needs or not. Methods This was a survey study, and the participants were the users of six patient accounting systems used in 24 teaching hospitals. A stratified sampling method was used to select the participants (n = 216). The research instruments were a questionnaire and a checklist. The mean value of ≥3 showed the importance of each data element and the capability of the system. Results Generally, the findings showed that the current patient accounting systems had some weaknesses and were able to meet between 70% and 80% of users' requirements. Conclusions The current patient accounting systems need to be improved to be able to meet users' requirements. This approach can also help to provide hospitals with more usable and reliable financial information. PMID:26893945

  5. Poly-methyl pentene oxygenators have improved gas exchange capability and reduced transfusion requirements in adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Khoshbin, Espeed; Roberts, Neil; Harvey, Chris; Machin, David; Killer, Hilliary; Peek, Giles J; Sosnowski, Andrzej W; Firmin, Richard K

    2005-01-01

    The performance of poly-methyl pentene (PMP) oxygenators (Medos Hilite 7000LT) was compared with that of silicone membrane (SM) oxygenators (Medtronic 1-4500-2A) for adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Forty consecutive patients were selected retrospectively pre- and post-introduction of PMP oxygenators. They were selected according to the dates they received ECMO and were separated into two equal groups with similar backgrounds. The flow path resistance, gas and heat exchange efficiency, consumption of coagulation factors and platelets, blood transfusion requirements, and incidence of clots for each oxygenator type was assessed. Adult PMP oxygenators showed lower blood path resistance than SM oxygenators. However, lower consumption of blood products in these oxygenators was a direct result of their smaller surface area and heparin coated design, reducing contact activation of coagulation factors. These oxygenators are noticeably smaller, require lower priming volumes, and have better gas exchange capability than SM oxygenators. They showed greater stability and preservation of coagulation factors and platelets compared with SM oxygenators. They also had the advantage of a functioning integrated heat exchanger. Using a single PMP oxygenator in the first instance may be adequate for the majority of patients and would significantly reduce red blood cell consumption during ECMO.

  6. Evaluating an Online Cognitive Training Platform for Older Adults: User Experience and Implementation Requirements.

    PubMed

    Haesner, Marten; Steinert, Anika; O'Sullivan, Julie Lorraine; Weichenberger, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Decline of cognitive function is a part of aging. However, intensive cognitive training can improve important cognitive functions, such as attention and working memory. Because existing systems are not older adult-friendly and are usually not based on scientific evidence, an online platform was developed for cognitive training with information and communication features and evaluated in an 8-week field test. In a randomized clinical trial with 80 older adults, findings from log data analysis and questionnaires revealed a good use of the online platform. Communication or assistive features were not used often. Good usability ratings were given to the cognitive exercises. Subjective improvements of cognitive functions due to the training were reported. The current article presents concrete requirements and recommendations for deploying cognitive training software in older adult residential homes.

  7. Discovery and Validation of Prognostic Biomarker Models to Guide Triage among Adult Dengue Patients at Early Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Thein, Tun-Linn; Naim, Ahmad Nazri Mohamed; Ling, Ling; Chow, Angelia; Chen, Mark I-Cheng; Ooi, Eng Eong; Leo, Yee Sin; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue results in a significant public health burden in endemic regions. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommended the use of warning signs (WS) to stratify patients at risk of severe dengue disease in 2009. However, WS is limited in stratifying adult dengue patients at early infection (Day 1–3 post fever), who require close monitoring in hospitals to prevent severe dengue. The aim of this study is to identify and validate prognostic models, built with differentially expressed biomarkers, that enable the early identification of those with early dengue infection that require close clinical monitoring. Methods RNA microarray and protein assays were performed to identify differentially expressed biomarkers of severity among 92 adult dengue patients recruited at early infection from years 2005–2008. This comprised 47 cases who developed WS after first presentation and required hospitalization (WS+Hosp), as well as 45 controls who did not develop WS after first presentation and did not require hospitalization (Non-WS+Non-Hosp). Independent validation was conducted with 80 adult dengue patients recruited from years 2009–2012. Prognostic models were developed based on forward stepwise and backward elimination estimation, using multiple logistic regressions. Prognostic power was estimated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results The WS+Hosp group had significantly higher viral load (P<0.001), lower platelet (P<0.001) and lymphocytes counts (P = 0.004) at early infection compared to the Non-WS+Non-Hosp group. From the RNA microarray and protein assays, the top single RNA and protein prognostic models at early infection were CCL8 RNA (AUC:0.73) and IP-10 protein (AUC:0.74), respectively. The model with CCL8, VPS13C RNA, uPAR protein, and with CCL8, VPS13C RNA and platelets were the best biomarker models for stratifying adult dengue patients at early infection, with sensitivity and specificity up to 83% and 84

  8. Differential requirement for irf8 in formation of embryonic and adult macrophages in zebrafish

    DOE PAGES

    Shiau, Celia E.; Kaufman, Zoe; Meireles, Ana M.; Talbot, William S.

    2015-01-23

    Interferon regulatory factor 8 (Irf8) is critical for mammalian macrophage development and innate immunity, but its role in teleost myelopoiesis remains incompletely understood. Specifically, genetic tools to analyze the role of irf8 in zebrafish macrophage development at larval and adult stages are lacking. In this study, we generated irf8 null mutants in zebrafish using TALEN-mediated targeting. Our analysis defines different requirements for irf8 at different stages. irf8 is required for formation of all macrophages during primitive and transient definitive hematopoiesis, but not during adult-phase definitive hematopoiesis starting at 5-6 days postfertilization. At early stages, irf8 mutants have excess neutrophils andmore » excess cell death in pu.1-expressing myeloid cells. Macrophage fates were recovered in irf8 mutants after wildtype irf8 expression in neutrophil and macrophage lineages, suggesting that irf8 regulates macrophage specification and survival. In juvenile irf8 mutant fish, mature macrophages are present, but at numbers significantly reduced compared to wildtype, indicating an ongoing requirement for irf8 after embryogenesis. As development progresses, tissue macrophages become apparent in zebrafish irf8 mutants, with the possible exception of microglia. Our study defines distinct requirement for irf8 in myelopoiesis before and after transition to the adult hematopoietic system.« less

  9. Do all mechanically ventilated pediatric patients require continuous capnography?

    PubMed

    Hamel, Donna S; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2006-09-01

    With most patients in modern ICUs requiring mechanical ventilation, any technology that may lead to more optimal ventilatory strategies would be invaluable in the management of critically ill patients. The focus of most ventilator strategies is protecting the lung from the deleterious effects of mechanical ventilation. Every effort is made to minimize the duration of mechanical ventilation while optimizing the potential for successful extubation. A concise organized plan based on objective criteria that is adjusted to meet changes in patient status is clearly recommended. Continuous capnographic monitoring provides clinicians with clear, precise, objective data that may prove beneficial in the design and implementation of mechanical ventilatory strategies. There are no clear-cut methods for achieving the optimal ventilator strategy for a specific patient. Although guidelines and management theories exist throughout the medical literature, in practice, they often merely serve as loose guidelines. The dynamic properties of an acutely ill patient make the management of mechanical ventilation an ongoing process requiring clinical assessment and planning by multidisciplinary members of the patient care team. Comprehensive evaluation of ventilatory management strategies and patient responses must be made by a collaborative effort of physicians, respiratory care practitioners, and nurses. An objective, consistent approach to the overall management is essential. Although still controversial, it is the authors' opinion that volumetric capnograph provides the data necessary to establish adequate gas delivery, optimal PEEP, and effective ventilation with the least amount of mechanical assistance, regardless of clinician or institutional preferences. PMID:16952808

  10. Requirements of older adults for a daily use of an internet-based cognitive training platform.

    PubMed

    Haesner, Marten; O'Sullivan, Julie L; Gövercin, Mehmet; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth

    2015-03-01

    A decline of cognitive abilities is a part of normal human ageing. However, recent research has demonstrated that an enriched environment can have a beneficial impact on cognitive function in old age. Accordingly, mentally and socially active lifestyles are associated with less cognitive decline in old age. Specific interventions such as computerized cognitive training programs for older adults are also known to have a positive effect on the level of cognitive functioning. Therefore, online platforms combining cognitive training with web 2.0 features may yield multiple benefits for older users. However, to date only little research exists on technological acceptance and media use in this age-group especially for cognitively-impaired seniors. Therefore, in order to assess specific preferences and potential barriers of older adults regarding a web-based platform for cognitive training, we conducted qualitative interviews with 12 older adults. Half of the participants were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Most importantly, our results show that cognitive exercises should incorporate themes and topics older adults are interested in. Additional communication features could serve as ideal methods for increasing user motivation. Furthermore, we derived eight critical requirements of older adults concerning daily use of a web-based cognitive training platform. Implications for future research and development are discussed.

  11. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-08-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  12. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  13. Relationship between perceived sleep and polysomnography in older adult patients

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Silva, Mayra; Bazzana, Caroline Moreira; de Souza, Altay Lino; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Tufik, Sergio; Lucchesi, Lígia M.; Lopes, Guiomar Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Aging is a multifactorial process that elicits changes in the duration and quality of sleep. Polysomnography is considered to be the standard examination for the analysis of sleep and consists of the simultaneous recording of selected physiological variables during sleep. Objective The objective of this study was to use polysomnography to compare sleep reported by senior citizens. Methods We selected 40 patients, both male and female, with ages ranging from 64 to 89 years from the Center for the Study of Aging at the Federal University of São Paulo. Patients answered questions about sleep on the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment and underwent polysomnography. Results The results were compared, and agreement between perceived sleep and polysomnography was found in several areas. There was an association between difficulty sleeping and sleep onset latency (p=0.015), waking up at night with sleep onset latency (p=0.005), total sleep time with daytime sleepiness (0.005) and snoring (0.027), sleep efficiency with sleepiness (0.004), snoring (0.033) and pause in breathing (p=0.024), awakenings with snoring (p=0.012) and sleep apnea with pauses in breathing (p=0.001). Conclusion These results suggest that the older adult population have a good perception of their sleep. The questionnaires aimed at this population should be used as an alternative to polysomnography. PMID:26483948

  14. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD.

  15. The Nuclear Receptor TLX Is Required for Gliomagenesis within the Adult Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yuhua; Niu, Wenze; Qin, Song; Downes, Michael; Burns, Dennis K.

    2012-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) continually generate functional neurons in the adult brain. Due to their ability to proliferate, deregulated NSCs or their progenitors have been proposed as the cells of origin for a number of primary central nervous system neoplasms, including infiltrating gliomas. The orphan nuclear receptor TLX is required for proliferation of adult NSCs, and its upregulation promotes brain tumor formation. However, it is unknown whether TLX is required for gliomagenesis. We examined the genetic interactions between TLX and several tumor suppressors, as well as the role of TLX-dependent NSCs during gliomagenesis, using mouse models. Here, we show that TLX is essential for the proliferation of adult NSCs with a single deletion of p21, p53, or Pten or combined deletion of Pten and p53. While brain tumors still form in Tlx mutant mice, these tumors are less infiltrative and rarely associate with the adult neurogenic niches, suggesting a non-stem-cell origin. Taken together, these results indicate a critical role for TLX in NSC-dependent gliomagenesis and implicate TLX as a therapeutic target to inhibit the development of NSC-derived brain tumors. PMID:23028043

  16. Using Adult Learning Concepts To Assist Patients in Completing Advance Directives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Rose Mary

    2000-01-01

    Advance directives that enable individuals to control their health care are underused due to lack of patient knowledge. Nurses can teach patients about them using adult learning principles, transformation theory, and skills for learning how to learn. (SK)

  17. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases--EULAR recommendations for pediatric and adult patients].

    PubMed

    Müller-Ladner, Claudia; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2012-10-01

    Since patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases are prone to infectious complications--on one hand due to the rheumatic disease itself, on the other hand due to the immunosuppressive therapy--vaccination is an essential tool to prevent these infectious complications. Although there exist several recommendations for the vaccination of immunocompromised patients, many questions still remain for the distinct clinical situations of patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases. In addition, there are several questions concerning the safety and efficacy of various vaccinations, especially with regard to live-attenuated vaccines. Therefore, EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) assembled two expert panels to clarify as much of these clinical problems as possible. After extensive literature review and evidence grading, the expert panels published recommendations for the vaccination of adult and pediatric patients, which are outlined in this review article.

  18. Cystic Fibrosis below the Diaphragm: Abdominal Findings in Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Lisa P; McEvoy, Sinead H; Ni Mhurchu, Elaine; Gibney, Robert G; McMahon, Colm J; Heffernan, Eric J; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disease in the white population. Mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene on chromosome 7 results in production of abnormally viscous mucus and secretions in the lungs of patients with CF. A similar pathologic process occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and hepatobiliary system. Inspissated mucus causes luminal obstruction and resultant clinical and radiologic complications associated with the disease process. Pancreatic involvement can result in exocrine and endocrine insufficiency, pancreatic atrophy, fatty replacement, or lipomatous pseudohypertrophy. Acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic calcification, cysts, and cystosis also occur. Hepatic manifestations include hepatic steatosis, focal biliary and multilobular cirrhosis, and portal hypertension. Biliary complications include cholelithiasis, microgallbladder, and sclerosing cholangitis. The entire digestive tract can be involved. Distal ileal obstruction syndrome, intussusception, appendicitis, chronic constipation, colonic wall thickening, fibrosing colonopathy, pneumatosis intestinalis, gastroesophageal reflux, and peptic ulcer disease have been described. Renal manifestations include nephrolithiasis and secondary amyloidosis. The educational objectives of this review are to reveal the abdominal manifestations of CF to facilitate focused analysis of cross-sectional imaging in adult patients. Life expectancy in patients with CF continues to improve because of a combination of aggressive antibiotic treatment, improved emphasis on nutrition and physiotherapy, and development of promising new CF transmembrane conductance regulator modulators. As lung function and survival improve, extrapulmonary conditions, including hepatic and gastrointestinal malignancy, will be an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality. Awareness of the expected abdominal manifestations of CF may assist radiologists in identifying

  19. Information security requirements in patient-centred healthcare support systems.

    PubMed

    Alsalamah, Shada; Gray, W Alex; Hilton, Jeremy; Alsalamah, Hessah

    2013-01-01

    Enabling Patient-Centred (PC) care in modern healthcare requires the flow of medical information with the patient between different healthcare providers as they follow the patient's treatment plan. However, PC care threatens the stability of the balance of information security in the support systems since legacy systems fall short of attaining a security balance when sharing their information due to compromises made between its availability, integrity, and confidentiality. Results show that the main reason for this is that information security implementation in discrete legacy systems focused mainly on information confidentiality and integrity leaving availability a challenge in collaboration. Through an empirical study using domain analysis, observations, and interviews, this paper identifies a need for six information security requirements in legacy systems to cope with this situation in order to attain the security balance in systems supporting PC care implementation in modern healthcare.

  20. Risks of suicidality in adult patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Sherifa A; Elserogy, Yaser BE; Abdou, Madleen A; Abdellah, Mostafa M

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and risks of suicidality in a group of patients with epilepsy. METHODS: Included were 200 adult patients and 100 matched healthy subjects. The clinical interview using The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition), Beck Depression Inventory (2nd edition) (BDI-II), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised Rating Scale testings were used for diagnosis and assessment of severity of psychiatric symptoms. Blood concentrations of serotonin, catecholamines and dopamine were also measured. RESULTS: Suicidality was reported in 35% (compared to 9% for controls), of them 80%, 72.86%, 55.71% and 52.9% had depression, anxiety, obsession and aggression respectively. Patients with suicidality had higher scores of BDI-II (P = 0.0001), HAM-A (P = 0.0001), and Y-BOCS (P = 0.037) and lower scores of psychotic (P = 0.0001) and extroversion (P = 0.025) personality traits. Regardless the presence or absence of suicidality, patients with epilepsy had low serotonin (P = 0.006), noradrenaline (P = 0.019) and adrenaline (P = 0.0001) levels. With suicidality, significant correlations were identified between: (1) age and scores of BDI-II (r = 0.235, P = 0.0001) and HAM-A (r = 0.241, P = 0.046); (2) age at onset and concentrations of noradrenaline (r = -0.502, P = 0.024); (3) duration of illness and scores of BDI-II (r = 0.247, P = 0.041), Y-BOCS (r = 0.270, P = 0.025) and neurotic personality trait (r = -0.284, P = 0.018); and (4) doses of antiepileptic drugs and scores of psychotic personality traits (r = -0.495, P = 0.006 for carbamazepine; r = -0.508, P = 0.0001 for valproate). CONCLUSION: This is the first study which systematically estimated the prevalence and risks of suicidality in a homogenous group of patients with epilepsy. This study emphasizes the importance of epilepsy itself as a risk for suicidality and not its treatment. PMID

  1. Thoracic Aorta 3D Hemodynamics in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Bradley D.; van Ooij, Pim; Barker, Alex J.; Carr, Maria; Gabbour, Maya; Schnell, Susanne; Jarvis, Kelly B.; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael; Rigsby, Cynthia; Robinson, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the 3D hemodynamics in the thoracic aorta of pediatric and young adult bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) patients. Methods 4D flow MRI was performed in 30 pediatric and young adult BAV patients (age: 13.9 ± 4.4 (range: [3.4, 20.7]) years old, M:F = 17:13) as part of this Institutional Review Board-approved study. Nomogram-based aortic root Z-scores were calculated to assess aortic dilatation and degree of aortic stenosis (AS) severity was assessed on MRI. Data analysis included calculation of time-averaged systolic 3D wall shear stress (WSSsys) along the entire aorta wall, and regional quantification of maximum and mean WSSsys and peak systolic velocity (velsys) in the ascending aorta (AAo), arch, and descending aorta (DAo). The 4D flow MRI AAo velsys was also compared with echocardiography peak velocity measurements. Results There was a positive correlation with both mean and max AAo WSSsys and peak AAo velsys (mean: r = 0.84, P < 0.001, max: r = 0.94, P < 0.001) and AS (mean: rS = 0.43, P = 0.02, max: rS = 0.70, P < 0.001). AAo peak velocity was significantly higher when measured with echo compared with 4D flow MRI (2.1 ± 0.98 m/s versus 1.27 ± 0.49 m/s, P < 0.001). Conclusion In pediatric and young adult patients with BAV, AS and peak ascending aorta velocity are associated with increased AAo WSS, while aortic dilation, age, and body surface area do not significantly impact AAo hemodynamics. Prospective studies are required to establish the role of WSS as a risk-stratification tool in these patients. PMID:25644073

  2. Rasch Measurement in the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adult Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Luis; Roset, Montse; Badia, Xavier

    2001-01-01

    Tested the metric properties of a Spanish version of the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA) questionnaire through Rasch analysis with a sample of 356 adult patients in Spain. Results suggest that the Spanish AGHDA could be a useful complement of the clinical evaluation of growth hormone deficiency patients at group and…

  3. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  4. Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults in the United Arab Emirates: Clinical Features and Factors Related to Insulin-Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Maddaloni, Ernesto; Lessan, Nader; Al Tikriti, Alia; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Pozzilli, Paolo; Barakat, Maha T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To describe and to characterize clinical features of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) compared to type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the UAE. Methods In this cross-sectional study a dataset including 18,101 subjects with adult-onset (>30 years) diabetes was accessed. 17,072 subjects fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Data about anthropometrics, demographics, autoantibodies to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase (GADA) and to Islet Antigen 2 (anti-IA2), HbA1c, cholesterol and blood pressure were extracted. LADA was diagnosed according to GADA and/or anti-IA2 positivity and time to insulin therapy. Results 437 (2.6%) patients were identified as LADA and 34 (0.2%) as classical type 1 diabetes in adults. Mean age at diagnosis, BMI, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure and HbA1c significantly differed between, LADA, type 2 and type 1 diabetes, LADA showing halfway features between type 2 and type 1 diabetes. A decreasing trend for age at diagnosis and waist circumference was found among LADA subjects when subdivided by positivity for anti-IA2, GADA or for both antibodies (p=0.013 and p=0.011 for trend, respectively). There was a gradual downward trend in autoantibody titre in LADA subjects requiring insulin within the first year from diagnosis to subjects not requiring insulin after 10 years of follow-up (p<0.001). Conclusions This is the first study describing the clinical features of LADA in the UAE, which appear to be different from both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, we showed that the clinical phenotype of LADA is dependent on different patterns of antibody positivity, influencing the time to insulin requirement. PMID:26252955

  5. Abdominal injury patterns in patients with seatbelt signs requiring laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Seema; Adileh, Mohamed; Almogy, Gidon; Bala, Miklosh

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We analyzed our series of patients with seatbelt signs (bruising) that underwent laparotomy in order to correlate injury pattern with clinical course and outcome. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients with seatbelt signs presenting to the level 1 Trauma Unit between 2005 and 2010 was performed. We evaluated the nature of injuries during laparotomy associated with seatbelt signs and their treatment and complications. Results: There were 41 patients, 25 (61%) male, with a median age of 26 years. Median injury severity score (ISS) was 25 (range 6–66) and overall mortality was 10% (four patients). Patients were classified into three groups according to time from injury to surgery. Median time to surgery for the immediate group (n = 12) was 1.05 h, early group (n = 22) was 2.7 h, and delayed group (n = 7) was 19.5 h. Patients in the immediate group tended to have solid organ injuries; whereas, patients in the delayed group had bowel injury. Patients with solid organ injuries were found to be more seriously injured and had higher mortality (P < 0.01) and morbidity compared with patients with the “classic” bowel injury pattern associated with a typical seatbelt sign. Conclusion: Our data suggest that there is a cohort of patients with seatbelt injury who have solid organ injury requiring urgent intervention. Solid organ injuries associated with malpositioned seatbelts lying higher on the abdomen tend to result in hemodynamic instability necessitating immediate surgery. They have more postoperative complications and a greater mortality. Seatbelt signs should be accurately documented after any car crash. PMID:25400391

  6. [Treatment of acute coronary syndrome in older adults and high-risk patients."When the going gets tough…"].

    PubMed

    Bassanelli, Giorgio; Morici, Nuccia; De Luca, Leonardo; De Servi, Stefano; Savonitto, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    The increasing life expectancy in older adults and the better survival of patients with multiple pathologies require the capability to treat complex clinical conditions with an increased risk of iatrogenic complications. Nevertheless, recent improvements in the pharmacological and interventional treatment of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) have promoted a shift from therapeutic nihilism to a more active management of complex ACS cases. Despite the paucity of specific randomized clinical trials, observational studies seem to show benefit of an early invasive treatment in these patients. This approach requires close cooperation of clinical intensivists, interventional cardiologists and cardiovascular surgeons either in a specialized heart center or in a network of hospitals. PMID:26442976

  7. Antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis in adult and child patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Fouzan, Afnan F.; Al-Shinaiber, Rafif M.; Al-Baijan, Refal S.; Al-Balawi, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate dentists’ knowledge regarding the prevention of infective endocarditis in Saudi Arabia and their implementation of the 2007 American Heart Association guidelines. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, in March 2014, 801 dentists who practice in different regions of Saudi Arabia completed a questionnaire regarding the need for antibiotic prophylaxis for specific cardiac conditions and specific dental procedures, prophylaxis regimens in adults and children, and recommendations for patients on chronic antibiotics, and in dental emergencies. The data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) and independent t-tests, and a p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The total knowledge level regarding antibiotic prophylaxis among all participants was 52.2%, with a significant difference between dentists who graduated before and after 2007. Comparing the level of knowledge among different dental specialists, surgeons and periodontists had the highest level of knowledge regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis. Amoxicillin was prescribed as the drug of choice by 63.9% of the participants. Conclusion: This study emphasized the need for continuous education and for formal inclusion of the guidelines in the students’ curriculum, as well as for strategic placement of the guidelines in locations throughout dental clinics. PMID:25935175

  8. Outcomes of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under chronic hemodialysis requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and patients without ESRD in acute kidney injury requiring CRRT: a single-center study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yeon Soon; Lee, Junseop; Shin, Ho Sik; Rim, Hark

    2012-10-01

    In most continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) studies, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients were excluded and the outcomes of patients with ESRD treated with chronic hemodialysis (HD) were unknown. The purposes of this study were to (1) evaluate short-term patient survival and (2) compare the survival of conventional HD patients needing CRRT with the survival of non-ESRD patients in acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring CRRT. We evaluated adults (>18 years) requiring CRRT who were treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) at Kosin University Gospel Hospital from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2010. A total of 100 (24 ESRD, 76 non-ESRD) patients underwent CRRT during the study period. Patients were divided into two major groups: patients with ESRD requiring chronic dialysis and patients without ESRD (non-ESRD) with AKI. We compared the survival of conventional HD patients requiring CRRT with the survival of non-ESRD patients in AKI requiring CRRT. For non-ESRD patients, the 90-day survival rate was 41.6%. For ESRD patients, the 90-day survival rate was 55.3%. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analyses demonstrated that conventional HD was not a significant predictor of mortality (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.334, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.063-1.763, P = 0.196), after adjustment for age, gender, presence of sepsis, APACHE score, use of vasoactive drugs, number of organ failures, ultrafiltration rate, and arterial pH. The survival rates of non-ESRD and ESRD patients requiring CRRT did not differ; ESRD with conventional HD patients may be not a significant predictor of mortality.

  9. Homeostatic plasticity mechanisms are required for juvenile, but not adult, ocular dominance plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, Adam; Cheetham, Claire E. J.; Fox, Kevin; Sengpiel, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in the visual cortex is a classic model system for understanding developmental plasticity, but the visual cortex also shows plasticity in adulthood. Whether the plasticity mechanisms are similar or different at the two ages is not clear. Several plasticity mechanisms operate during development, including homeostatic plasticity, which acts to maintain the total excitatory drive to a neuron. In agreement with this idea, we found that an often-studied substrain of C57BL/6 mice, C57BL/6JOlaHsd (6JOla), lacks both the homeostatic component of OD plasticity as assessed by intrinsic signal imaging and synaptic scaling of mEPSC amplitudes after a short period of dark exposure during the critical period, whereas another substrain, C57BL/6J (6J), exhibits both plasticity processes. However, in adult mice, OD plasticity was identical in the 6JOla and 6J substrains, suggesting that adult plasticity occurs by a different mechanism. Consistent with this interpretation, adult OD plasticity was normal in TNFα knockout mice, which are known to lack juvenile synaptic scaling and the homeostatic component of OD plasticity, but was absent in adult α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II;T286A (αCaMKIIT286A) mice, which have a point mutation that prevents autophosphorylation of αCaMKII. We conclude that increased responsiveness to open-eye stimulation after monocular deprivation during the critical period is a homeostatic process that depends mechanistically on synaptic scaling during the critical period, whereas in adult mice it is mediated by a different mechanism that requires αCaMKII autophosphorylation. Thus, our study reveals a transition between homeostatic and long-term potentiation–like plasticity mechanisms with increasing age. PMID:22232689

  10. Clinical features and outcomes of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis pathologic variants in Korean adult patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies have shown that clinical characteristics and outcomes differ depending on pathologic variants of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). However, these are not well defined in Asian populations. Methods This retrospective study evaluated clinical features and outcomes of pathologic FSGS variants in 111 adult patients between January 2004 and December 2012. Primary outcome was the composite of doubling of baseline serum creatinine concentrations (D-SCr) or onset of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Secondary outcome included complete (CR) or partial remission (PR). Results There were 70 (63.1%), 20 (18.0%), 17 (15.3%), 3 (2.7%), and 1 (0.9%) patients with not-otherwise specified (NOS), tip, perihilar, cellular, and collapsing variants, respectively. At presentation, nephrotic-range proteinuria occurred more commonly in tip lesion than in other variants. The overall 5-year renal survival rate was 76.8%. During a median follow-up of 34.5 months, only 1 (5.0%) patient with a tip lesion reached the composite end point compared to 2 (11.8%) and 12 (17.1%) patients in perihilar and NOS variants, but this difference was not statistically significant in an adjusted Cox model. However, tip lesion was associated with a significantly increased probability of achieving CR (P = 0.044). Conclusion Similar to other populations, Korean adult patients with FSGS have distinct clinical features with the exception of a rare frequency of cellular and collapsing variants. Although pathologic variants were not associated with overall outcome, the tip variant exhibited favorable outcome in terms of achieving remission. Further studies are required to delineate long-term outcome and response to treatment of the pathologic variants. PMID:24666814

  11. Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function in the adult mouse main olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Steve; Sickles, Heather M.; DeLeonardis, Chris; Alcaraz, Ana; Gridley, Thomas; Lin, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Notch receptors are expressed in neurons and glia in the adult nervous system, but why this expression persists is not well-understood. Here we examine the role of the Notch pathway in the postnatal mouse main olfactory system, and show evidence consistent with a model where Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function. In the absence of Notch2, the laminar nature of these glial-like cells is disrupted. Hes1, Hey1, and Six1, which are downstream effectors of the Notch pathway, are down-regulated, and cytochrome P450 and Glutathione S-transferase (GST) expression by sustentacular cells is reduced. Functional levels of GST activity are also reduced. These disruptions are associated with increased olfactory sensory neuron degeneration. Surprisingly, expression of Notch3 is also down-regulated. This suggests the existence of a feedback loop where expression of Notch3 is initially independent of Notch2, but requires Notch2 for maintained expression. While the Notch pathway has previously been shown to be important for promoting gliogenesis during development, this is the first demonstration that the persistent expression of Notch receptors is required for maintaining glial function in adult. PMID:18155189

  12. Effects of flooring on required coefficient of friction: Elderly adult vs. middle-aged adult barefoot gait.

    PubMed

    Rozin Kleiner, Ana Francisca; Galli, Manuela; Araujo do Carmo, Aline; Barros, Ricardo M L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of flooring on barefoot gait according to age and gender. Two groups of healthy subjects were analyzed: the elderly adult group (EA; 10 healthy subjects) and the middle-aged group (MA; 10 healthy subjects). Each participant was asked to walk at his or her preferred speed over two force plates on the following surfaces: 1) homogeneous vinyl (HOV), 2) carpet, 3) heterogeneous vinyl (HTV) and 4) mixed (in which the first half of the pathway was covered by HOV and the second by HTV). Two force plates (Kistler 9286BA) embedded in the data collection room floor measured the ground reaction forces and friction. The required coefficient of friction (RCOF) was analyzed. For the statistical analysis, a linear mixed-effects model for repeated measures was performed. During barefoot gait, there were differences in the RCOF among the flooring types during the heel contact and toe-off phases. Due to better plantar proprioception during barefoot gait, the EA and MA subjects were able to distinguish differences among the flooring types. Moreover, when the EA were compared with the MA subjects, differences could be observed in the RCOF during the toe-off phase, and gender differences in the RCOF could also be observed during the heel contact phase in barefoot gait. PMID:25959329

  13. Effects of flooring on required coefficient of friction: Elderly adult vs. middle-aged adult barefoot gait.

    PubMed

    Rozin Kleiner, Ana Francisca; Galli, Manuela; Araujo do Carmo, Aline; Barros, Ricardo M L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of flooring on barefoot gait according to age and gender. Two groups of healthy subjects were analyzed: the elderly adult group (EA; 10 healthy subjects) and the middle-aged group (MA; 10 healthy subjects). Each participant was asked to walk at his or her preferred speed over two force plates on the following surfaces: 1) homogeneous vinyl (HOV), 2) carpet, 3) heterogeneous vinyl (HTV) and 4) mixed (in which the first half of the pathway was covered by HOV and the second by HTV). Two force plates (Kistler 9286BA) embedded in the data collection room floor measured the ground reaction forces and friction. The required coefficient of friction (RCOF) was analyzed. For the statistical analysis, a linear mixed-effects model for repeated measures was performed. During barefoot gait, there were differences in the RCOF among the flooring types during the heel contact and toe-off phases. Due to better plantar proprioception during barefoot gait, the EA and MA subjects were able to distinguish differences among the flooring types. Moreover, when the EA were compared with the MA subjects, differences could be observed in the RCOF during the toe-off phase, and gender differences in the RCOF could also be observed during the heel contact phase in barefoot gait.

  14. A comparative evaluation of the Airtraq and King Vision video laryngoscope as an intubating aid in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Qazi Ehsan; Amir, Syed Hussain; Jamil, Shaista; Ahmad, Sarfaraz

    2015-01-01

    Airtraq has been shown to improve ease of intubation in patients with normal and difficult airway. King Vision video laryngoscope is a newly introduced intubating device with an attached monitor. We here hypothesized that the King Vision video laryngoscope with channeled blade performs better during intubation as compared to Airtraq. In this study, we performed a comparison between the King Vision video laryngoscope and the Airtraq with regard to time needed for intubation, number of attempts required to intubate, and complications. Fifty ASA grade I and II adult patients posted for a routine surgical procedure were randomly divided into two groups of 25 patients each. All patients were anesthetized using similar techniques. The time required to intubate patients was significantly shorter when the King Vision video laryngoscope with channeled blade was used as compared to the Airtraq (p < 0.05). The number of attempts to successfully intubate patients was also significantly lower (p < 0.05) for the King Vision video laryngoscope than for the Airtraq. The use of the Kings Vision video laryngoscope with channeled blade should be encouraged in difficult intubation situations in adult patients with a mouth opening of more than 18 mm.

  15. Occupational Outcome in Adult ADHD: Impact of Symptom Profile, Comorbid Psychiatric Problems, and Treatment--A Cross-Sectional Study of 414 Clinically Diagnosed Adult ADHD Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halmoy, Anne; Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Gillberg, Christopher; Haavik, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of symptom profile, comorbid psychiatric problems, and treatment on occupational outcome in adult ADHD patients. Method: Adult ADHD patients (N = 414) responded to questionnaires rating past and present symptoms of ADHD, comorbid conditions, treatment history, and work status. Results: Of the patients, 24%…

  16. On Site Training for Adult Day Care Program Aides that Meet State Certification Requirements and National Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medley, Pamilea

    This document describes a practicum that was conducted to develop a training program appropriate for adult day care program aides that would meet Oklahoma state certification requirements and national standards. The training curriculum for use in delivering onsite competency-based training to students studying to become adult day care program…

  17. Comparison of Selected Requirements for the Ph.D. and Ed.D. in Adult Education in North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Barbara J.; Carl, Linda

    A survey was conducted for the Graduate Student Section of the Adult Education Association to determine the differences in requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) and the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degrees in adult education. Of forty-three institutions identified as offering both degrees, forty participated in answering the…

  18. Open Source Patient-Controlled Analgesic Pump Requirements Documentation.

    PubMed

    Larson, Brian R; Hatcliff, John; Chalin, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic nature of the medical domain is driving a need for continuous innovation and improvement in techniques for developing and assuring medical devices. Unfortunately, research in academia and communication between academics, industrial engineers, and regulatory authorities is hampered by the lack of realistic non-proprietary development artifacts for medical devices. In this paper, we give an overview of a detailed requirements document for a Patient-Controlled Analgesic (PCA) pump developed under the US NSF's Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Scholar-in-Residence (SIR) program. This 60+ page document follows the methodology outlined in the US Federal Aviation Administrations (FAA) Requirements Engineering Management Handbook (REMH) and includes a domain overview, use cases, statements of safety & security requirements, and formal top-level system architectural description. Based on previous experience with release of a requirements document for a cardiac pacemaker that spawned a number of research and pedagogical activities, we believe that the described PCA requirements document can be an important research enabler within the formal methods and software engineering communities.

  19. Outcomes in adult scoliosis patients who undergo spinal fusion stopping at L5 compared with extension to the sacrum.

    PubMed

    Sardar, Zeeshan M; Ouellet, Jean A; Fischer, Dena J; Skelly, Andrea C

    2013-10-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale Adult scoliosis is a common disorder that is associated with significantly higher pain, functional impairment, and effect on quality of life than those without scoliosis. Surgical spinal fusion has led to quantifiable improvement in patient's quality of life. However, for patients undergoing long lumbar fusion, the decision to stop the fusion at L5 or to extend to S1, particularly if the L5-S1 disc is healthy, remains controversial. Objective The aim of the study is to evaluate if fusion stopping at L5 increases the comparative rates of revision, correction loss, and/or poor functional outcomes compared with extension to the sacrum in adult scoliosis patients who require spinal fusion surgery. Materials and Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse Database and bibliographies of key articles that evaluated adult scoliosis patients who required spinal fusion surgery and compared outcomes for fusions to the sacrum versus stopping at L5. Articles were included on the basis of predetermined criteria and were appraised using a predefined quality-rating scheme. Results From 111 citations, 26 articles underwent full-text review, and 3 retrospective cohort studies met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. Revision rates in subjects who underwent spinal fusion to L5 (20.8-23.5%) were lower in two studies compared with those with fusion extending to the sacrum (19.0-58.3%). Studies that assessed deformity correction used different measures, making comparison across studies difficult. No significant differences were found in patient-reported functional outcomes across two studies that used different measures. Conclusion The limited data available suggest that differences in revision rates did not consistently reach statistical significance across studies that compared spinal fusion to L5 versus extension to sacrum in adult scoliosis patients.

  20. Histopathological Characteristics of Distal Middle Cerebral Artery in Adult and Pediatric Patients with Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    TAKAGI, Yasushi; HERMANTO, Yulius; TAKAHASHI, Jun C; FUNAKI, Takeshi; KIKUCHI, Takayuki; MINEHARU, Yohei; YOSHIDA, Kazumichi; MIYAMOTO, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a unique progressive steno-occlusive disease of the distal ends of bilateral internal arteries and their proximal branches. The difference in clinical symptoms between adult and children MMD patients has been well recognized. In this study, we sought to investigate the phenomenon through histopathological study. Fifty-one patients underwent surgical procedures for treatment of standard indications of MMD at Kyoto University Hospital. Fifty-nine specimens of MCA were obtained from MMD patients during the surgical procedures. Five MCA samples were also obtained in the same way from control patients. The samples were analyzed by histopathological methods. In this study, MCA specimens from MMD patients had significantly thinner media and thicker intima than control specimens. In subsequent analysis, adult (≥ 20 years) patients had thicker intima of MCA compared to pediatric (< 20 years) patients. There is no difference in internal elastic lamina pathology between adult and pediatric patients. Our results indicated that the pathological feature of MMD in tunica media occurs in both adult and pediatric patients. However, the MMD feature in tunica intima of MCA is more prominent in adult patients. Further analysis from MCA specimens and other researches are necessary to elucidate the pathophysiology of MMD. PMID:27087193

  1. Adjuvant Therapies and Patient and Tumor Characteristics Associated With Survival of Adult Patients With Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Andrew R.; Sabolch, Aaron; Jolly, Shruti; Miller, Barbra S.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare malignant endocrine neoplasia. Studies regarding outcome and prognostic factors rely on fairly small studies. Here we summarize the experience with patients with a diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma from a large tertiary referral center. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify prognostic factors in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma and evaluate adjuvant treatment strategies. Design: Patient data were collected in a retrospective single-center study. Epidemiological, patient, and tumor characteristics were analyzed for prognostic factors regarding overall and recurrence-free survival in Cox regression models (multivariable and univariable). Results: Three hundred ninety-one adult patients with the diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma were identified. Median overall survival was 35.2 months. Cortisol production [hazard ratio (HR) 1.4, HR 1.5], tumor stage (HR stage 3 of 2.1 and 2.1, HR stage 4 of 4.8), and tumor grade (HR 2.4 and 2.0) were identified as negative prognostic factors (HR for death, HR for recurrence). Mitotane therapy increases recurrence-free survival, an effect that was significantly further improved by adjuvant radiation therapy but did not impact overall survival. Patients with open adrenalectomy had improved overall survival. Conclusions: This study increases the evidence for adverse risk factors (cortisol production, high tumor stage, and high tumor grade) and suggests the following therapy approach: adrenocortical carcinoma patients should be treated with open adrenalectomy. Adjuvant therapy, particularly mitotane therapy in conjunction with radiation, should be considered to delay tumor recurrence. PMID:24302750

  2. Requirement of matrix metalloproteinase-1 for intestinal homeostasis in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shin-Hae; Park, Joung-Sun; Kim, Young-Shin; Chung, Hae-Young; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2012-03-10

    Stem cells are tightly regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic signals as well as the extracellular matrix (ECM) for tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), proteolytic enzymes, modulate the turnover of numerous substrates, including cytokine precursors, growth factors, and ECM molecules. However, the roles of MMPs in the regulation of adult stem cells are poorly understood. In the present study, we utilize the Drosophila midgut, which is an excellent model system for studying stem cell biology, to show that Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). The results showed that Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut and that its expression increases with age and with exposure to oxidative stress. Mmp1 knockdown or Timp-overexpressing flies and flies heterozygous for a viable, hypomorphic Mmp1 allele increased ISC proliferation in the gut, as shown by staining with an anti-phospho-histone H3 antibody and BrdU incorporation assays. Reduced Mmp1 levels induced intestinal hyperplasia, and the Mmp1depletion-induced ISC proliferation was rescued by the suppression of the EGFR signaling pathway, suggesting that Mmp1 regulates ISC proliferation through the EGFR signaling pathway. Furthermore, adult gut-specific knockdown and whole-animal heterozygotes of Mmp1 increased additively sensitivity to paraquat-induced oxidative stress and shortened lifespan. Our data suggest that Drosophila Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation for maintenance of gut homeostasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1-related ISC proliferation is associated with EGFR signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 in the gut is required for the intestinal homeostasis and longevity.

  3. Connective tissue diseases, arthritis require special patient counseling.

    PubMed

    Neinstein, L S; Katz, B

    1985-07-01

    protected from developing rheumatoid arthritis because of suppressed autoimmune response, but no significant benefit is evident when OCs are used in therapy for active arthritis. Physical disabilities in arthritis patients may limit use of barrier methods which require finger dexterity for insertion or removal. PMID:12280147

  4. Recommendations for the transition of patients with ADHD from child to adult healthcare services: a consensus statement from the UK adult ADHD network.

    PubMed

    Young, Susan; Adamou, Marios; Asherson, Philip; Coghill, David; Colley, Bill; Gudjonsson, Gisli; Hollis, Chris; McCarthy, Jane; Müller, Ulrich; Paul, Moli; Pitts, Mark; Arif, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this consensus statement was to discuss transition of patients with ADHD from child to adult healthcare services, and formulate recommendations to facilitate successful transition. An expert workshop was convened in June 2012 by the UK Adult ADHD Network (UKAAN), attended by a multidisciplinary team of mental health professionals, allied professionals and patients. It was concluded that transitions must be planned through joint meetings involving referring/receiving services, patients and their families. Negotiation may be required to balance parental desire for continued involvement in their child's care, and the child's growing autonomy. Clear transition protocols can maintain standards of care, detailing relevant timeframes, responsibilities of agencies and preparing contingencies. Transition should be viewed as a process not an event, and should normally occur by the age of 18, however flexibility is required to accommodate individual needs. Transition is often poorly experienced, and adherence to clear recommendations is necessary to ensure effective transition and prevent drop-out from services. PMID:27561259

  5. Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM): A Quick Reading Test for Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peggy W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a reading recognition test called Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) that is designed to identify low literacy levels in patients. Notes that information thus obtained is useful in directing patient-physician communications and in promoting patient understanding of commonly used oral and written medical information. (SR)

  6. Differential requirements for Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 during adult myogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bryantsev, Anton L.; Baker, Phillip W.; Lovato, TyAnna L.; Jaramillo, MaryAnn S.; Cripps, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Identifying the genetic program that leads to formation of functionally and morphologically distinct muscle fibers is one of the major challenges in developmental biology. In Drosophila, the Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 (MEF2) transcription factor is important for all types of embryonic muscle differentiation. In this study we investigated the role of MEF2 at different stages of adult skeletal muscle formation, where a diverse group of specialized muscles arises. Through stage- and tissue- specific expression of Mef2 RNAi constructs, we demonstrate that MEF2 is critical at the early stages of adult myoblast fusion: mutant myoblasts are attracted normally to their founder cell targets, but are unable to fuse to form myotubes. Interestingly, ablation of Mef2 expression at later stages of development showed MEF2 to be more dispensable for structural gene expression: after myoblast fusion, Mef2 knockdown did not interrupt expression of major structural gene transcripts, and myofibrils were formed. However, the MEF2-depleted fibers showed impaired integrity and a lack of fibrillar organization. When Mef2 RNAi was induced in muscles following eclosion, we found no adverse effects of attenuating Mef2 function. We conclude that in the context of adult myogenesis, MEF2 remains an essential factor, participating in control of myoblast fusion, and myofibrillogenesis in developing myotubes. However, MEF2 does not show a major requirement in the maintenance of muscle structural gene expression. Our findings point to the importance of a diversity of regulatory factors that are required for the formation and function of the distinct muscle fibers found in animals. PMID:22008792

  7. Reduced Capacity in a Dichotic Memory Test for Adult Patients with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dige, Niels; Maahr, Eija; Backenroth-Ohsako, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether a dichotic memory test would reveal deficits in short-term working-memory recall and long-term memory recall in a group of adult patients with ADHD. Methods: A dichotic memory test with ipsilateral backward speech distraction in an adult ADHD group (n = 69) and a control group (n = 66) is used to compare performance…

  8. Comparing illness presentation, treatment and functioning between patients with adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Christy Lai-Ming; Li, Adrienne Wing-Yee; Leung, Chung-Ming; Chang, Wing-Chung; Chan, Sherry Kit-Wa; Lee, Edwin Ho-Ming; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai

    2014-12-30

    Studies have shown that early- and adult-onset schizophrenia patients differ in pre-morbid traits, illness presentation, psychopathology, and prognosis. We aimed to compare adult-onset patients (age range 26-55 years) with an adolescent-onset cohort (15-25 years) in demographics, illness presentation and functioning at baseline. Participants were from two territory-wide early intervention services for adolescent-onset (n=671) and adult-onset psychosis patients (n=360) in Hong Kong. The adolescent-onset cohort had their initial psychotic episode from 2001-2003; retrospective data collection was done through systematic case note review. The adult-onset cohort was recruited for a larger interventional study from 2009-2011; information was collected via face-to-face interviews. Adult-onset psychosis was significantly associated with more females, more smokers, more non-local birth, more full-time employment, better functioning, poorer medication adherence, more psychiatric hospitalization and fewer with schizophrenia than adolescent-onset psychosis (mean age: 20.4). The effect sizes were small, except for medication adherence where a robust effect was found. No group difference in DUP was found. The finding that adult-onset patients had better functioning challenges the view that adolescent- and adult-onset psychoses share a similar prognostic trajectory. Implications for adapting intervention processes for adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis are discussed.

  9. Symptoms and socio-economic impact of ependymoma on adult patients: results of the Adult Ependymoma Outcomes Project 2.

    PubMed

    Walbert, Tobias; Mendoza, Tito R; Vera-Bolaños, Elizabeth; Acquaye, Alvina; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-01-01

    Ependymoma is a rare central nervous system tumor of adults. Reports of patient symptoms, interference patterns and costs encountered by patients and families are limited. Adult ependymoma patients completed the online Ependymoma Outcomes Questionnaire II. The survey assesses disease and functional status as well as socio-economic factors. Descriptive statistics were used to report disease characteristics as well as economic and social impact. Independent samples t test was used to test if differences exist between high- and low-income groups in terms of symptom severity. Correlations were calculated between symptoms and cost estimates. 86 international patients participated (male = 50 %). The economic analysis focused on 78 respondents from the US. 48 % were employed and 55 % earned ≥$60,000. Tumors were located in the brain (44 %), spine (44 %) or both (12 %). Spine patients compared to brain patients reported significantly worse pain (4.4 versus 2.2, p < .003), numbness (5.3 versus 2.2, p < .001), fatigue (5.1 versus 3.6, p < .03), changes in bowel patterns (3.8 versus 1.4, p < .003) and weakness (4.2 versus 2.1, p < .006). Brain patients compared with spine patients had increased lack of appetite (.4 versus 2, p < .014). Patients with lower income (≤$59,999) had more problems concentrating (p < .024) and worse cognitive module severity scores (p < .024). Estimated average monthly out-of-pocket spending was $168 for medical co-pays and $59 for prescription medication. Patients with ependymoma are highly affected by their symptoms. Spinal patients report higher severity of symptoms. Patients in the lower income group report significantly higher severity of cognitive symptoms independent of disease site.

  10. Symptoms and socio-economic impact of ependymoma on adult patients: results of the Adult Ependymoma Outcomes Project 2.

    PubMed

    Walbert, Tobias; Mendoza, Tito R; Vera-Bolaños, Elizabeth; Acquaye, Alvina; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-01-01

    Ependymoma is a rare central nervous system tumor of adults. Reports of patient symptoms, interference patterns and costs encountered by patients and families are limited. Adult ependymoma patients completed the online Ependymoma Outcomes Questionnaire II. The survey assesses disease and functional status as well as socio-economic factors. Descriptive statistics were used to report disease characteristics as well as economic and social impact. Independent samples t test was used to test if differences exist between high- and low-income groups in terms of symptom severity. Correlations were calculated between symptoms and cost estimates. 86 international patients participated (male = 50 %). The economic analysis focused on 78 respondents from the US. 48 % were employed and 55 % earned ≥$60,000. Tumors were located in the brain (44 %), spine (44 %) or both (12 %). Spine patients compared to brain patients reported significantly worse pain (4.4 versus 2.2, p < .003), numbness (5.3 versus 2.2, p < .001), fatigue (5.1 versus 3.6, p < .03), changes in bowel patterns (3.8 versus 1.4, p < .003) and weakness (4.2 versus 2.1, p < .006). Brain patients compared with spine patients had increased lack of appetite (.4 versus 2, p < .014). Patients with lower income (≤$59,999) had more problems concentrating (p < .024) and worse cognitive module severity scores (p < .024). Estimated average monthly out-of-pocket spending was $168 for medical co-pays and $59 for prescription medication. Patients with ependymoma are highly affected by their symptoms. Spinal patients report higher severity of symptoms. Patients in the lower income group report significantly higher severity of cognitive symptoms independent of disease site. PMID:25359395

  11. Motivation of adult female patients seeking orthodontic treatment: an application of Q-methodology

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xia; Cai, Jiaxin; Lin, Beibei; Yao, Linjie; Lin, Feiou

    2015-01-01

    Background Motivation is the impetus for patients to seek orthodontic treatment, affecting adherence, treatment outcomes, and satisfaction. The aim of this study was to assess the motivation of adult female patients seeking orthodontic treatment, and classify the patients according to their motivations. Methods This study used Q-methodology as the main tool. Q-samples were collected and categorized (35 items). Forty-two adult female patients were interviewed before treatment as the P-sample, and their responses were categorized into the Q-methodology grid. Participants were asked to rank-order a set of 35 statements (Q-sample) from “agree most” to “disagree most” (Q-sorting). The finished Q-grids were analyzed using PQ method 2.35. Results Four main factors were identified based on how adult female patients ranked statements: factor 1, patients who focus on their self-perception of their appearance; factor 2, patients who are concerned about the esthetics and function of their teeth; factor 3, patients who are easily influenced by others; factor 4, patients who want to improve their confidence and avoid negative thoughts caused by their teeth. The remaining patients who had other views did not match any of the above four groups. Conclusion The motivations of adult female patients seeking orthodontic treatment are complex. This study found that most adult female patients fell into one of four typical factor groups. Our findings may improve the adherence of adult female patients by developing a more ideal treatment program. PMID:25709410

  12. Living longer with adult high-grade glioma: setting a research agenda for patients and their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Russell, Bethany; Collins, Anna; Dally, Michael; Dowling, Anthony; Gold, Michelle; Murphy, Michael; Philip, Jennifer

    2014-10-01

    The long-term survival of patients with adult high-grade glioma (HGG) remains poor, but for those who do live longer functional status and neurocognitive ability may be influenced by residual or recurrent tumour, or treatment-related complications. The aim of this review was to examine the current literature regarding the quality of life and experience of patients living longer with adult HGG and their caregivers, with a view to understanding the burden of treatment on patient abilities and deficits over time. Medline, PsychINFO and CINAHL databases were searched for the core concept of HGG in combination with an aspect of quality of long-term survival. Key findings of the 12 included studies were identified and synthesised thematically. There is a paucity of dedicated studies which have investigated the experiences of this cohort. The strength of existing literature is limited by the systematic exclusion of the poorest functioning patients and the under-representation of caregiver perspectives. Discrepancies in how patients view their quality of life were highlighted, despite consistent findings of significant physical and functional impairment. This review confirmed the presence of important differences between patient and caregiver views regarding patient abilities following treatment. Caregiver burden was found to be high, due to multiple dynamic and relentless stressors. The true experience of patients living longer with adult HGG and their caregivers remains unclear, particularly for patients with poorer neurocognitive and functional outcomes. Further research is required to clarify and replicate findings, explore discrepancies between patient and caregiver views, and to specifically investigate how caregiver needs and experiences may evolve over time. PMID:24980038

  13. Reduced intensity conditioning followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for adult patients with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Anthony S.; Palmer, Joycelynne M.; O'Donnell, Margaret R.; Kogut, Neil M.; Spielberger, Ricardo T.; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Tsai, Ni-Chun; Senitzer, David; Snyder, David S.; Thomas, Sandra H.; J.Forman, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with high-risk features has a poor prognosis in adults despite aggressive chemotherapy. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) is a lower toxicity alternative for high-risk patients requiring hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), however it has not been widely used for ALL. We conducted a retrospective study of 24 high-risk adult ALL patients who received an RIC regimen of fludarabine/melphalan prior to allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant between 6/14/02 and 6/15/07 at City of Hope. Indications for the RIC regimen were: 1) age 50 or older (42%), 2) compromised organ function (54%), or 3) recipient of a previous HCT (37.5%). Patients had a median age of 47.5 years and the median follow-up was 28.5 months for living patients. Both overall survival and disease-free survival at two years was 61.5%. Relapse incidence was 21.1% and non-relapse mortality was 21.5% at two years. cGVHD developed in 86% of evaluable patients. In this series, no significant correlations were made between outcomes and patient age, presence of Philadelphia chromosome, relatedness of donor source or prior HCT. These high survival rates for high-risk ALL patients following RIC HCT may offer a promising option for patients not eligible for a standard myeloablative transplant. PMID:19822300

  14. Hemorrhagic Cystitis Requiring Bladder Irrigation is Associated with Poor Mortality in Hospitalized Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raup, Valary T.; Potretzke, Aaron M.; Manley, Brandon J.; Brockman, John A.; Bhayani, Sam B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the overall prognosis of post-stem cell transplant inpatients who required continuous bladder irrigation (CBI) for hematuria. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of adult stem cell transplant recipients who received CBI for de novo hemorrhagic cystitis as inpatients on the bone marrow transplant service at Washington University from 2011-2013. Patients who had a history of genitourinary malignancy and/or recent surgical urologic intervention were excluded. Multiple variables were examined for association with death. Results: Thirty-three patients met our inclusion criteria, with a mean age of 48 years (23-65). Common malignancies included acute myelogenous leukemia (17/33, 57%), acute lymphocytic leukemia (3/33, 10%), and peripheral T cell lymphoma (3/33, 10%). Median time from stem cell transplant to need for CBI was 2.5 months (0 days-6.6 years). All patients had previously undergone chemotherapy (33/33, 100%) and 14 had undergone prior radiation therapy (14/33, 42%). Twenty-eight patients had an infectious disease (28/33, 85%), most commonly BK viremia (19/33, 58%), cytomegalovirus viremia (17/33, 51%), and bacterial urinary tract infection (8/33, 24%). Twenty-two patients expired during the same admission as CBI treatment (22/33 or 67% of total patients, 22/28 or 79% of deaths), with a 30-day mortality of 52% and a 90-day mortality of 73% from the start of CBI. Conclusions: Hemorrhagic cystitis requiring CBI is a symptom of severe systemic disease in stem cell transplant patients. The need for CBI administration may be a marker for mortality risk from a variety of systemic insults, rather than directly attributable to the hematuria. PMID:26742970

  15. Intraoperative Core Temperature Patterns, Transfusion Requirement, and Hospital Duration in Patients Warmed with Forced Air

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhuo; Honar, Hooman; Sessler, Daniel I.; Dalton, Jarrod E.; Yang, Dongsheng; Panjasawatwong, Krit; Deroee, Armin F.; Salmasi, Vafi; Saager, Leif; Kurz, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Core temperature patterns in patients warmed with forced-air remain poorly characterized. Also unknown is the extent to which transient and mild intraoperative hypothermia contributes to adverse outcomes in broad populations. Methods We evaluated esophageal (core) temperatures in 58,814 adults having surgery lasting >60 min who were warmed with forced air. Independent associations between hypothermic exposure and transfusion requirement and duration of hospitalization was evaluated. Results In every percentile subgroup, core temperature decreased during the first hour and subsequently increased. The mean lowest core temperature during the first hour was 35.7 ± 0.6°C. Sixty-four percent of the patients reached a core temperature threshold of <36°C 45 min after induction; 29% reached a core temperature threshold of <35.5°C. Nearly half the patients had continuous core temperatures <36°C for more than an hour, and 20% of the patients were <35.5°C for more than an hour. Twenty percent of patients had continuous core temperatures <36°C for more than 2 h, and 8% of the patients were below 35.5°C for more than 2 h. Hypothermia was independently associated with both transfusion and duration of hospitalization, although prolongation of hospitalization was small. Conclusions Even in actively warmed patients, hypothermia is routine in the first hour of anesthesia. Thereafter, average core temperatures progressively increase. Nonetheless, intraoperative hypothermia was common, and often prolonged. Hypothermia was associated with increased transfusion requirement which is consistent with numerous randomized trials. PMID:25603202

  16. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy for treatment of adult hydrocephalus: long-term follow-up of 163 patients.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Albert M; Bezchlibnyk, Yarema B; Yong, Heather; Koshy, Dilip; Urbaneja, Geberth; Hader, Walter J; Hamilton, Mark G

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The efficacy of endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) for the treatment of pediatric hydrocephalus has been extensively reported in the literature. However, ETV-related long-term outcome data are lacking for the adult hydrocephalus population. The objective of the present study was to assess the role of ETV as a primary or secondary treatment for hydrocephalus in adults. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective chart review of all adult patients (age ≥ 18 years) with symptomatic hydrocephalus treated with ETV in Calgary, Canada, over a span of 20 years (1994-2014). Patients were dichotomized into a primary or secondary ETV cohort based on whether ETV was the initial treatment modality for the hydrocephalus or if other CSF diversion procedures had been previously attempted respectively. Primary outcomes were subjective patient-reported clinical improvement within 12 weeks of surgery and the need for any CSF diversion procedures after the initial ETV during the span of the study. Categorical and actuarial data analysis was done to compare the outcomes of the primary versus secondary ETV cohorts. RESULTS A total of 163 adult patients with symptomatic hydrocephalus treated with ETV were identified and followed over an average of 98.6 months (range 0.1-230.4 months). All patients presented with signs of intracranial hypertension or other neurological symptoms. The primary ETV group consisted of 112 patients, and the secondary ETV consisted of 51 patients who presented with failed ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts. After the initial ETV procedure, clinical improvement was reported more frequently by patients in the primary cohort (87%) relative to those in the secondary ETV cohort (65%, p = 0.001). Additionally, patients in the primary ETV group required fewer reoperations (p < 0.001), with cumulative ETV survival time favoring this primary ETV cohort over the course of the follow-up period (p < 0.001). Fifteen patients required repeat ETV, with all but

  17. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy for treatment of adult hydrocephalus: long-term follow-up of 163 patients.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Albert M; Bezchlibnyk, Yarema B; Yong, Heather; Koshy, Dilip; Urbaneja, Geberth; Hader, Walter J; Hamilton, Mark G

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The efficacy of endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) for the treatment of pediatric hydrocephalus has been extensively reported in the literature. However, ETV-related long-term outcome data are lacking for the adult hydrocephalus population. The objective of the present study was to assess the role of ETV as a primary or secondary treatment for hydrocephalus in adults. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective chart review of all adult patients (age ≥ 18 years) with symptomatic hydrocephalus treated with ETV in Calgary, Canada, over a span of 20 years (1994-2014). Patients were dichotomized into a primary or secondary ETV cohort based on whether ETV was the initial treatment modality for the hydrocephalus or if other CSF diversion procedures had been previously attempted respectively. Primary outcomes were subjective patient-reported clinical improvement within 12 weeks of surgery and the need for any CSF diversion procedures after the initial ETV during the span of the study. Categorical and actuarial data analysis was done to compare the outcomes of the primary versus secondary ETV cohorts. RESULTS A total of 163 adult patients with symptomatic hydrocephalus treated with ETV were identified and followed over an average of 98.6 months (range 0.1-230.4 months). All patients presented with signs of intracranial hypertension or other neurological symptoms. The primary ETV group consisted of 112 patients, and the secondary ETV consisted of 51 patients who presented with failed ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts. After the initial ETV procedure, clinical improvement was reported more frequently by patients in the primary cohort (87%) relative to those in the secondary ETV cohort (65%, p = 0.001). Additionally, patients in the primary ETV group required fewer reoperations (p < 0.001), with cumulative ETV survival time favoring this primary ETV cohort over the course of the follow-up period (p < 0.001). Fifteen patients required repeat ETV, with all but

  18. Patient-based estimation of organ dose for a population of 58 adult patients across 13 protocol categories

    SciTech Connect

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to provide a comprehensive patient-specific organ dose estimation across a multiplicity of computed tomography (CT) examination protocols. Methods: A validated Monte Carlo program was employed to model a common CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). The organ and effective doses were estimated from 13 commonly used body and neurological CT examination. The dose estimation was performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso phantoms (35 male, 23 female, mean age 51.5 years, mean weight 80.2 kg). The organ dose normalized by CTDI{sub vol} (h factor) and effective dose normalized by the dose length product (DLP) (k factor) were calculated from the results. A mathematical model was derived for the correlation between the h and k factors with the patient size across the protocols. Based on this mathematical model, a dose estimation iPhone operating system application was designed and developed to be used as a tool to estimate dose to the patients for a variety of routinely used CT examinations. Results: The organ dose results across all the protocols showed an exponential decrease with patient body size. The correlation was generally strong for the organs which were fully or partially located inside the scan coverage (Pearson sample correlation coefficient (r) of 0.49). The correlation was weaker for organs outside the scan coverage for which distance between the organ and the irradiation area was a stronger predictor of dose to the organ. For body protocols, the effective dose before and after normalization by DLP decreased exponentially with increasing patient's body diameter (r > 0.85). The exponential relationship between effective dose and patient's body diameter was significantly weaker for neurological protocols (r < 0.41), where the trunk length was a slightly stronger predictor of effective dose (0.15 < r < 0.46). Conclusions: While the most accurate estimation of a patient dose requires specific modeling of the patient

  19. Patient-based estimation of organ dose for a population of 58 adult patients across 13 protocol categories

    PubMed Central

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to provide a comprehensive patient-specific organ dose estimation across a multiplicity of computed tomography (CT) examination protocols. Methods: A validated Monte Carlo program was employed to model a common CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). The organ and effective doses were estimated from 13 commonly used body and neurological CT examination. The dose estimation was performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso phantoms (35 male, 23 female, mean age 51.5 years, mean weight 80.2 kg). The organ dose normalized by CTDIvol (h factor) and effective dose normalized by the dose length product (DLP) (k factor) were calculated from the results. A mathematical model was derived for the correlation between the h and k factors with the patient size across the protocols. Based on this mathematical model, a dose estimation iPhone operating system application was designed and developed to be used as a tool to estimate dose to the patients for a variety of routinely used CT examinations. Results: The organ dose results across all the protocols showed an exponential decrease with patient body size. The correlation was generally strong for the organs which were fully or partially located inside the scan coverage (Pearson sample correlation coefficient (r) of 0.49). The correlation was weaker for organs outside the scan coverage for which distance between the organ and the irradiation area was a stronger predictor of dose to the organ. For body protocols, the effective dose before and after normalization by DLP decreased exponentially with increasing patient's body diameter (r > 0.85). The exponential relationship between effective dose and patient's body diameter was significantly weaker for neurological protocols (r < 0.41), where the trunk length was a slightly stronger predictor of effective dose (0.15 < r < 0.46). Conclusions: While the most accurate estimation of a patient dose requires specific modeling of the patient

  20. Optimizing Management of Patients with Adult T Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yared, Jean A.; Kimball, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly important that medical oncologists, hematologists, and hematopathologists recognize and accurately diagnose adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. There is no uniform standard of treatment of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma, and clinical trials remain critical to improving outcomes. Here we present one management approach based on the recent advances in treatment for adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma patients. PMID:26610571

  1. Ossicular Erosion in Patients Requiring Surgery for Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Ghodrat; Naderpour, Masoud; Mousaviagdas, Mehrnoosh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the condition of the ossicular chain in patients requiring surgery for cholesteatoma. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective analysis, the destruction of the individual and combined bony structures of the ear was described in 166 patients with cholesteatoma who went through surgery in our Otology Center between 2003 and 2009. Results: Total (55.4%) or partial (30.7%) erosion of the incus was the most common pathology. In some cases, the long process (25.9%) and the body of incus (4.8%) were also involved. Erosion of the stapes superstructure occurred more commonly than a total loss of the bone (40.9% vs. 25.9%). Erosion of the malleus was least common. Completely intact ossicles were present in 5.5% of cases. Total ossicular erosion with an intact footplate (18.7%) and incudostapedial erosion (18%) was the most common combination of ossicular erosion. All patients with incudostapedial erosion had advanced disease (85% with multiple site involvement). Conclusion: Widespread cholesteatoma results in greater ossicular erosion and poor hearing outcomes. PMID:24303397

  2. Prognostic factors and survival in late adolescent and adult patients with small round cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Eralp, Yeşim; Bavbek, Sevil; Başaran, Mert; Kaytan, Esra; Yaman, Fulya; Bilgiç, Bilge; Darendeliler, Emin; Onat, Haluk

    2002-08-01

    The primary objective of this study is to review the clinical characteristics of 25 patients in the adult and late adolescent age group, diagnosed and treated with small round cell tumors involving soft tissues (extraosseous Ewing sarcoma, rhabdo-myosarcoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor, and undiffer-entiated small round cell tumors). Additionally, survival and prognostic factors influencing the outcome with multimodality treatment are evaluated. There were 19 males (76%) and 6 females (24%). The median age was 26 years (range: 15-56 years). In 9 patients (36%), the tumor was located at an extremity, whereas 16 patients (64%) had central localizations. Tumor size was larger than 10 cm in 7 patients (29.2%). Six patients (24%) had metastatic disease. Twelve patients (48%) received radiation and 16 patients (64%) underwent surgery. Among the resected tumors, 2 were resected with contaminated margins (12.5%), whereas 2 were radically resected and 12 (75%) were resected with wide margins. All patients were given a median of 4 cycles of multiagent chemotherapy (1-14 cycles). With preoperative chemotherapy, complete regression (CR) of the tumor was achieved in 6 patients (24%). In 4 patients (16%), a partial response was obtained. After the completion of multimodality treatment, 12 patients (48%) had a CR. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for the entire group was 25.0 +/- 10.8% at 1 year and 30.5 +/- 15.5% at 3 years, respectively. Nonmetastatic disease, wide and radical resection, and presence of CR to multimodality treatment were associated with a significantly longer PFS and OS by univariate analysis. By multivariate analysis, CR to multimodality treat-ment was the only independent predictive factor for a longer OS (p: 0.0036, relative risk [RR]: 23.6, 95% CI: 2.8; 198.7) and metastatic presentation was the only independent factor predic-tive for a shorter PFS (p: 0.017, RR. 15, 95% CI: 1.6; 141.2). Large-scale, multicenter studies are required for

  3. Clinical Assessment of Spatiotemporal Gait Parameters in Patients and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Item-Glatthorn, Julia F.; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial and temporal characteristics of human walking are frequently evaluated to identify possible gait impairments, mainly in orthopedic and neurological patients1-4, but also in healthy older adults5,6. The quantitative gait analysis described in this protocol is performed with a recently-introduced photoelectric system (see Materials table) which has the potential to be used in the clinic because it is portable, easy to set up (no subject preparation is required before a test), and does not require maintenance and sensor calibration. The photoelectric system consists of series of high-density floor-based photoelectric cells with light-emitting and light-receiving diodes that are placed parallel to each other to create a corridor, and are oriented perpendicular to the line of progression7. The system simply detects interruptions in light signal, for instance due to the presence of feet within the recording area. Temporal gait parameters and 1D spatial coordinates of consecutive steps are subsequently calculated to provide common gait parameters such as step length, single limb support and walking velocity8, whose validity against a criterion instrument has recently been demonstrated7,9. The measurement procedures are very straightforward; a single patient can be tested in less than 5 min and a comprehensive report can be generated in less than 1 min. PMID:25406522

  4. Use of Patient Portals: Personal Health Information Management in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Turner, Anne; Osterhage, Katie; Joe, Jonathan; Hartzler, Andrea; Lin, Lorelei; Demiris, George

    2015-01-01

    The personal health information management (PHIM) of older adults is poorly understood. We describe initial results from the SOARING (Studying Older Adults & Researching Information Needs and Goals) study at the University of Washington, a participatory design investigation of PHIM in older adults. We conducted in-depth interviews with older adults (n=71) living in a variety of residential settings. A surprising 21% of participants reported using patient portals. Another 17% of participants reported prior use or anticipated use of portals in the future. We identified preferences and needs as well as barriers and facilitators to portal use. Our findings indicate that patient portals designed to target the specific needs for older adults can suport PHIM. We offer recommendations for expanded research. PMID:26262280

  5. Long-acting Reversible Contraception for Adolescents and Young Adults: Patient and Provider Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kavanaugh, Megan L.; Frohwirth, Lori; Jerman, Jenna; Popkin, Ronna; Ethier, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Study objective To describe and explore provider- and patient-level perspectives regarding long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) for teens and young adults (ages 16-24). Methods Data collection occurred between June – December 2011. We first conducted telephone interviews with administrative directors at 20 publicly funded facilities that provide family planning services. At six of these sites, we conducted a total of six focus group discussions (FGDs) with facility staff and forty-eight in-depth interviews (IDIs) with facility clients ages 16-24. Results Staff in the FGDs did not generally equate being a teen with ineligibility for IUDs. In contrast to staff, one quarter of the young women did perceive young age as rendering them ineligible. Clients and staff agreed that the “forgettable” nature of the methods and their duration were some of LARC’s most significant advantages. They also agreed that fear of pain associated with both insertion and removal and negative side effects were disadvantages. Some aspects of IUDs and implants were perceived as advantages by some clients but disadvantages by others. Common challenges to providing LARC-specific services to younger patients included extra time required to counsel young patients about LARC methods, outdated clinic policies requiring multiple visits to obtain IUDs, and a perceived higher removal rate among young women. The most commonly cited strategy for addressing many of these challenges was securing supplementary funding to support the provision of these services to young patients. Conclusion Incorporating young women’s perspectives on LARC methods into publicly funded family planning facilities’ efforts to provide these methods to a younger population may increase their use among young women. PMID:23287602

  6. Pre-Exercise Participation Cardiovascular Screening in a Heterogeneous Cohort of Adult Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kenjale, Aarti A.; Hornsby, Whitney E.; Crowgey, Theresa; Thomas, Samantha; Herndon, James E.; Khouri, Michel G.; Lane, Amy R.; Bishop, Caroline E.; Eves, Neil D.; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent of pre-exercise participation (“preparticipation”) health screening in a heterogeneous cohort of adult cancer patients. Methods. Patients (n = 413) with histologically confirmed solid or hematologic malignancy were categorized into preparticipation health screening risk stratification based on American College Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommendations. Risk of an exercise-related event was evaluated during a symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) with 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG). Results. Participant risk was categorized as low risk (n = 59, 14%), moderate risk (n = 217, 53%), and high risk (n = 137, 33%). Mean peak oxygen consumption was 21.7 ± 6.7 mL/kg−1 per minute−1 or 19.5 ± 21.7% below age- and sex-predicted sedentary values. No major serious adverse events or fatal events were observed during CPET procedures. A total of 31 positive ECG tests were observed, for an event rate of 8%. ACSM risk stratification did not predict the risk of a positive test. Age, statin use, antiplatelet therapy use, cardiovascular disease, prior treatment with anthracycline or radiation therapy, and being sedentary were predictors of a positive test (all p < .10). Conclusion. The patient risk-stratification profile strongly suggests that the use of formalized preparticipation health screening is required in all oncology scenarios; however, risk of an exercise-induced event is low, suggesting that the use of exercise testing is not required for pre-exercise clearance in the majority of patients. PMID:25061091

  7. Screening for coeliac disease in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: myths, facts and controversy.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Sjoerd F; Tushuizen, Maarten E; von Blomberg, Boudewina M E; Bontkes, Hetty J; Mulder, Chris J; Simsek, Suat

    2016-01-01

    This review aims at summarizing the present knowledge on the clinical consequences of concomitant coeliac disease (CD) in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The cause of the increased prevalence of CD in T1DM patients is a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Current screening guidelines for CD in adult T1DM patients are not uniform. Based on the current evidence of effects of CD on bone mineral density, diabetic complications, quality of life, morbidity and mortality in patients with T1DM, we advise periodic screening for CD in adult T1DM patients to prevent delay in CD diagnosis and subsequent CD and/or T1DM related complications. PMID:27478507

  8. Rules for improving pharmacotherapy in older adult patients: part 2 (rules 6-10).

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2015-03-01

    The population of older adult patients in the United States is growing each year. Appropriate pharmacotherapy has allowed many older patients to live longer and maintain healthy lives. Unfortunately, the inappropriate utilization of medications can be harmful to older adult patients. Inappropriate pharmacotherapy may lead to overusing medications and polypharmacy. Polypharmacy can contribute to a higher incidence of adverse effects, increase the risk of dangerous drug interactions, cause noncompliance with appropriate medication use, and significantly increase the cost of health care. The polypharmacy issue with geriatric patients has been described as an epidemic and this issue must be addressed. This review provides objective rules that may help prevent polypharmacy. Consideration of these rules when prescribing, dispensing, and caring for older adult patients will improve the overall pharmacotherapy regimens instituted by healthcare providers. PMID:25772047

  9. Gingival juvenile xanthogranuloma in an adult patient: case report with immunohistochemical analysis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alberto; Sant'Ana, Eduardo; Lawall, Melaine A; Consolaro, Maria Fernanda M O; Bacchi, Carlos Eduardo

    2009-02-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis (nonLCH). It is a benign and self-healing disorder that generally affects infants and children. Oral lesions in adult patients are rare, although the microscopic findings are similar to those observed in other locations. A 56-year-old white man presented with a chief complaint of a gingival mass that had appeared 6 months before and had grown slowly. An intraoral examination revealed the presence of a solitary, softened gingival mass affecting the mandibular lingual gingiva at the right central incisor area. A biopsy of the lesion showed multiple large macrophages and numerous giant cells of Touton type. The immunohistochemistry positivity for CD68, fascin, factor XIIIa, alpha-antitrypsin and negativity for S-100, beta-actin, CD1a, and desmin confirmed the diagnosis of JXG. The occurrence of adult oral JXG is extremely rare. It is a nonLCH that may present variable clinical and microscopic aspects, which leads to a diversity of clinical misdiagnoses. A precise diagnosis of these lesions requires an accurate evaluation of clinical, microscopic, and immunohistochemical features.

  10. Cited2 is required for the maintenance of glycolytic metabolism in adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Jinwei; Li, Qiang; Tang, Fangqiang; Puchowitz, Michelle A; Fujioka, Hisashi; Dunwoodie, Sally L; Danielpour, David; Yang, Yu-Chung

    2014-01-15

    Mammalian adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment and display a distinct metabolic phenotype compared with their progenitors. It has been proposed that HSCs generate energy mainly through anaerobic glycolysis in a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (Pdk)-dependent manner. Cited2 is an essential regulator for HSC quiescence, apoptosis, and function. Herein, we show that conditional deletion of Cited2 in murine HSCs results in elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, decreased cellular glutathione content, increased mitochondrial activity, and decreased glycolysis. At the molecular level, Cited2 deficiency significantly reduced the expression of genes involved in metabolism, such as Pdk2, Pdk4, and lactate dehydrogenases B and D (LDHB and LDHD). Cited2-deficient HSCs also exhibited increased Akt signaling, concomitant with elevated mTORC1 activity and phosphorylation of FoxOs. Further, inhibition of PI3/Akt, but not mTORC1, partially rescued the repression of Pdk4 caused by deletion of Cited2. Altogether, our results suggest that Cited2 is required for the maintenance of adult HSC glycolytic metabolism likely through regulating Pdk2, Pdk4, LDHB, LDHD, and Akt activity. PMID:24083546

  11. Agrin and Synaptic Laminin Are Required to Maintain Adult Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Melanie A.; Valdez, Gregorio; Tapia, Juan C.; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Sanes, Joshua R.

    2012-01-01

    As synapses form and mature the synaptic partners produce organizing molecules that regulate each other’s differentiation and ensure precise apposition of pre- and post-synaptic specializations. At the skeletal neuromuscular junction (NMJ), these molecules include agrin, a nerve-derived organizer of postsynaptic differentiation, and synaptic laminins, muscle-derived organizers of presynaptic differentiation. Both become concentrated in the synaptic cleft as the NMJ develops and are retained in adulthood. Here, we used mutant mice to ask whether these organizers are also required for synaptic maintenance. Deletion of agrin from a subset of adult motor neurons resulted in the loss of acetylcholine receptors and other components of the postsynaptic apparatus and synaptic cleft. Nerve terminals also atrophied and eventually withdrew from muscle fibers. On the other hand, mice lacking the presynaptic organizer laminin-α4 retained most of the synaptic cleft components but exhibited synaptic alterations reminiscent of those observed in aged animals. Although we detected no marked decrease in laminin or agrin levels at aged NMJs, we observed alterations in the distribution and organization of these synaptic cleft components suggesting that such changes could contribute to age-related synaptic disassembly. Together, these results demonstrate that pre- and post-synaptic organizers actively function to maintain the structure and function of adult NMJs. PMID:23056392

  12. Season of birth is associated with adult body mass index in patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Soreca, Isabella; Cheng, Yu; Frank, Ellen; Fagiolini, Andrea; Kupfer, David J

    2013-05-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors, such as abdominal obesity and obesity in general, are very prevalent among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). Although long-term use of psychotropic medications is an important determinant of these risk factors, other evidence suggests that early development may interact with the mood disorder diathesis to exponentially increase the risk of obesity. The goal of our study was to test whether season of birth is associated with adult body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity in individuals with bipolar disorder. We compared season of birth effects on BMI in 375 adult patients with bipolar disorder and 196 adult patients with unipolar major depression. We found a significant season of birth effect on BMI in patients with bipolar disorder, but not unipolar. In patients with bipolar disorder, season of birth was also associated with waist circumference, with a stronger effect in males. Season of birth affects adult BMI and waist circumference in patients with bipolar disorder, but not in patients with unipolar depression. Our results suggest that early environmental factors, yet to be identified, interact with specific neurobiological features of bipolar disorder to determine stable traits and disease risk factors in adult life. PMID:23445513

  13. Ultrasound-Guided Forearm Nerve Blocks: A Novel Application for Pain Control in Adult Patients with Digit Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Patricia Javedani, Parisa; Amini, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Phalanx fractures and interphalangeal joint dislocations commonly present to the emergency department. Although these orthopedic injuries are not complex, the four-point digital block used for anesthesia during the reduction can be painful. Additionally, cases requiring prolonged manipulation or consultation for adequate reduction may require repeat blockade. This case series reports four patients presenting after mechanical injuries resulting in phalanx fracture or interphalangeal joint dislocations. These patients received an ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block of the forearm with successful subsequent reduction. To our knowledge, use of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks of the forearm for anesthesia in reduction of upper extremity digit injuries in adult patients in the emergency department setting has not been described before. PMID:27555971

  14. Planarian MBD2/3 is required for adult stem cell pluripotency independently of DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Jaber-Hijazi, Farah; Lo, Priscilla J K P; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Foster, Jeremy M; Benner, Jack S; Tejada Romero, Belen; Chen, Chen; Malla, Sunir; Solana, Jordi; Ruzov, Alexey; Aziz Aboobaker, A

    2013-12-01

    Planarian adult stem cells (pASCs) or neoblasts represent an ideal system to study the evolution of stem cells and pluripotency as they underpin an unrivaled capacity for regeneration. We wish to understand the control of differentiation and pluripotency in pASCs and to understand how conserved, convergent or divergent these mechanisms are across the Bilateria. Here we show the planarian methyl-CpG Binding Domain 2/3 (mbd2/3) gene is required for pASC differentiation during regeneration and tissue homeostasis. The genome does not have detectable levels of 5-methylcytosine (5(m)C) and we find no role for a potential DNA methylase. We conclude that MBD proteins may have had an ancient role in broadly controlling animal stem cell pluripotency, but that DNA methylation is not involved in planarian stem cell differentiation.

  15. Planarian MBD2/3 is required for adult stem cell pluripotency independently of DNA methylation☆

    PubMed Central

    Jaber-Hijazi, Farah; Lo, Priscilla J.K.P.; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Foster, Jeremy M.; Benner, Jack S.; Tejada Romero, Belen; Chen, Chen; Malla, Sunir; Solana, Jordi; Ruzov, Alexey; Aziz Aboobaker, A.

    2013-01-01

    Planarian adult stem cells (pASCs) or neoblasts represent an ideal system to study the evolution of stem cells and pluripotency as they underpin an unrivaled capacity for regeneration. We wish to understand the control of differentiation and pluripotency in pASCs and to understand how conserved, convergent or divergent these mechanisms are across the Bilateria. Here we show the planarian methyl-CpG Binding Domain 2/3 (mbd2/3) gene is required for pASC differentiation during regeneration and tissue homeostasis. The genome does not have detectable levels of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and we find no role for a potential DNA methylase. We conclude that MBD proteins may have had an ancient role in broadly controlling animal stem cell pluripotency, but that DNA methylation is not involved in planarian stem cell differentiation. PMID:24063805

  16. Nutrition in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Hebuterne, Xavier; Filippi, Jerome; Schneider, Stephane M

    2014-01-01

    Seventy five percent of hospitalized patients with Crohn's disease suffer from malnutrition. One third of Crohn's disease patients have a body mass index below 20. Sixty percent of Crohn's disease patients have sarcopenia. However some inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients are obese or suffer from sarcopenic-obesity. IBD patients have many vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, which can lead to important consequences such as hyperhomocysteinemia, which is associated with a higher risk of thromboembolic disease. Nutritional deficiencies in IBD patients are the result of insufficient intake, malabsorption and protein-losing enteropathy as well as metabolic disturbances directly induced by the chronic disease and its treatments, in particular corticosteroids. Screening for nutritional deficiencies in chronic disease patients is warranted. Managing the deficiencies involves simple nutritional guidelines, vitamin supplements, and nutritional support in the worst cases. PMID:25266810

  17. Epilepsy in Adults with Supratentorial Glioblastoma: Incidence and Influence Factors and Prophylaxis in 184 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuli; Zhang, Junchen; Zhang, Shaohui; Fu, Xiangping

    2016-01-01

    Aim To analyze the incidence of epilepsy in adult patients with supratentorial glioblastoma, assess the factors influencing the development of epilepsy in these cases, and evaluate patients’ response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a series of 184 patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the 184 adult patients diagnosed with supratentorial glioblastoma. All subjects were treated within our hospital and subsequently died between 2003 and 2013. The incidence of epilepsy was assessed before and after initial resection and reexamined every 2 months thereafter. We evaluated the efficacy of prophylactic AEDs in this patient population based on the gathered incidence data. Results Of 184 patients, 43 (23.37%) were diagnosed with epilepsy before their initial resection. The total incidence of epilepsy (both pre- and postoperative) was 68.48%. The prevalence of active epilepsy reached over 80% in patients with epilepsy and survival of greater than 13 months postoperatively. Patients with glioblastoma in the frontal and/or temporal lobes had a higher prevalence of epilepsy. In the 43 patients with preoperative epilepsy, total resection of glioblastoma resulted in significantly lower seizure frequency. Patients who received epilepsy prophylaxis with AEDs for at least 6 months had significantly fewer seizures and higher Karnofsky scores than those receiving AEDs for less than one month or not at all. Conclusion The incidence of epilepsy in adult patients with glioblastoma was high and responded poorly to AEDs in the short term. However, when taken for longer periods, AEDs can reduce the frequency of seizures in patients with glioblastoma. PMID:27438472

  18. VERTEBRAL OSTEOMYELITIS IN ADULT PATIENTS--CHARACTERISTICS AND OUTCOME.

    PubMed

    Mustapić, Matej; Višković, Klaudija; Borić, Igor; Marjan, Domagoj; Zadravec, Dijana; Begovac, Josip

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess disease characteristics and outcome in patients with vertebral osteomyelitis (VO). A two medical centre retrospective cohort study was performed by chart review after discharge of 110 patients with confirmed VO treated during a 5-year period. Patients were divided in two groups: patients with uncomplicated VO and patients with complicated VO. All patients underwent clinical and biological examinations and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the same protocol. Patients with complicated VO were significantly older (p = 0.038). They were longer treated with antibiotics parenterally (p = 0.047) and more often surgically (p < 0.001). In these patients, high Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score was more often observed (p = 0.024), as well as liver cirrhosis (p = 0.013) and degenerative spine disease (p = 0.007) as comorbidities. Patients with advanced MRI changes of VO had a modified CCI score of 2 or more (p = 0.006). They more often experienced neurological deficit (p = 0.021). Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated bacterium from blood and tissue samples. Advanced MRI changes and complicated VO were more often observed in patients with high CCI score due to impaired immune system caused by chronic comorbid disease(s) or modulation of immunity with medications. High CCI scores were more frequently associated with positive blood cultures due to bacteremia because of impaired immunity. Patients with complicated VO were longer treated with antibiotics parenterally and more often surgically treated for phlegmon and abscess formation. Liver cirrhosis and degenerative spine disease, which were more often found in patients with complicated VO, obviously impacted the course of the disease. PMID:27333712

  19. Effects of neurofeedback on adult patients with psychiatric disorders in a naturalistic setting.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Eun-Jin; Koo, Bon-Hoon; Seo, Wan-Seok; Lee, Jun-Yeob; Choi, Joong-Hyeon; Song, Shin-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Few well-controlled studies have considered neurofeedback treatment in adult psychiatric patients. In this regard, the present study investigates the characteristics and effects of neurofeedback on adult psychiatric patients in a naturalistic setting. A total of 77 adult patients with psychiatric disorders participated in this study. Demographic data and neurofeedback states were retrospectively analyzed, and the effects of neurofeedback were evaluated using clinical global impression (CGI) and subjective self-rating scales. Depressive disorders were the most common psychiatric disorders (19; 24.7 %), followed by anxiety disorders (18; 23.4 %). A total of 69 patients (89.6 %) took medicine, and the average frequency of neurofeedback was 17.39 ± 16.64. Neurofeedback was applied to a total of 39 patients (50.6 %) more than 10 times, and 48 patients (62.3 %) received both β/SMR and α/θ training. The discontinuation rate was 33.8 % (26 patients). There was significant difference between pretreatment and posttreatment CGI scores (<.001), and the self-rating scale also showed significant differences in depressive symptoms, anxiety, and inattention (<.001). This is a naturalistic study in a clinical setting, and has several limitations, including the absence of a control group and a heterogenous sample. Despite these limitations, the study demonstrates the potential of neurofeedback as an effective complimentary treatment for adult patients with psychiatric disorders.

  20. Operative and nonoperative treatment options for ACL tears in the adult patient: a conceptual review.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Matava, Matthew J

    2013-11-01

    Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is common among athletic individuals. Both nonoperative and operative treatment options exist. The optimal treatment of an adult with an ACL tear depends on several patient-specific factors, including age, occupation, and desired activity level. In less active patients with sedentary jobs, nonoperative management, consisting of physical therapy, bracing, and activity modification can yield successful results. In active patients who want to resume participation in jumping, cutting, or pivoting sports, patients who have physically demanding occupations, or patients who fail a trial of nonoperative management, ACL reconstruction is recommended. Reconstruction utilizing autograft tissue is preferred over allograft, especially in the younger athlete, but allograft tissue is a reasonable option in the older (aged > 40 years) and less active adult, as well. Successful results have been achieved with both patellar tendon and hamstring grafts. The optimal treatment in adult patients with ACL tears should be based on careful consideration of the patient's goals for return to activity, knee-specific comorbidities, such as coexistent meniscal pathology or osteoarthritis, and his or her willingness to follow a detailed rehabilitation regimen. Our article provides an overview of current nonoperative and operative treatment options for adults with ACL tears, considers the outcomes of both nonoperative and operative strategies, and provides general recommendations as to the ideal management for a given patient. PMID:24231595

  1. Borderline typical symptoms in adult patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Alexandra; Feige, Bernd; Hesslinger, Bernd; Scheel, Corinna; Ebert, Dieter; Matthies, Swantje; Limberger, Matthias F; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Bohus, Martin; Lieb, Klaus

    2009-05-01

    Adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD) share several clinical features, e.g. emotional lability and impulsivity. This study aimed to delineate differences and similarities between ADHD and BPD with respect to borderline typical symptomatology and gender specifics. Borderline symptomatology was assessed in 60 adult patients with ADHD with the borderline symptom list (BSL) and compared to both 60 gender- and age-matched BPD patients and control subjects. The BSL is a standardized instrument including 95 items on 7 subscales (self-perception, affect regulation, self-destruction, dysphoria, loneliness, intrusions and hostility). Adult ADHD patients showed significantly higher BSL total scores and all of the seven subscales compared to healthy controls (p < 0.001) but lower scores than BPD patients (p < 0.001). With respect to the seven subscales, the largest differences between ADHD and BPD patients were found with respect to self-destruction (d = 1.12) and affect dysregulation (d = 0.90), whereas the smallest difference was found with respect to loneliness (d = 0.36). In females, the BSL subscales "loneliness" and "hostility" did not differentiate between BPD and ADHD. Borderline typical symptoms are common in adult patients with ADHD but seem to be less pronounced than in patients with BPD. Females with ADHD and BPD share more clinical features than males. However, symptoms of self-destruction and affect dysregulation appear to be more severe in BPD patients.

  2. Effects of neurofeedback on adult patients with psychiatric disorders in a naturalistic setting.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Eun-Jin; Koo, Bon-Hoon; Seo, Wan-Seok; Lee, Jun-Yeob; Choi, Joong-Hyeon; Song, Shin-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Few well-controlled studies have considered neurofeedback treatment in adult psychiatric patients. In this regard, the present study investigates the characteristics and effects of neurofeedback on adult psychiatric patients in a naturalistic setting. A total of 77 adult patients with psychiatric disorders participated in this study. Demographic data and neurofeedback states were retrospectively analyzed, and the effects of neurofeedback were evaluated using clinical global impression (CGI) and subjective self-rating scales. Depressive disorders were the most common psychiatric disorders (19; 24.7 %), followed by anxiety disorders (18; 23.4 %). A total of 69 patients (89.6 %) took medicine, and the average frequency of neurofeedback was 17.39 ± 16.64. Neurofeedback was applied to a total of 39 patients (50.6 %) more than 10 times, and 48 patients (62.3 %) received both β/SMR and α/θ training. The discontinuation rate was 33.8 % (26 patients). There was significant difference between pretreatment and posttreatment CGI scores (<.001), and the self-rating scale also showed significant differences in depressive symptoms, anxiety, and inattention (<.001). This is a naturalistic study in a clinical setting, and has several limitations, including the absence of a control group and a heterogenous sample. Despite these limitations, the study demonstrates the potential of neurofeedback as an effective complimentary treatment for adult patients with psychiatric disorders. PMID:25740085

  3. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma in paediatric and young adult patients.

    PubMed

    Turner, Suzanne D; Lamant, Laurence; Kenner, Lukas; Brugières, Laurence

    2016-05-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a heterogeneous disease of debateable origin that, in children, is largely anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive with aberrant ALK activity induced following the formation of chromosomal translocations. Whilst the survival rates for this disease are relatively high, a significant proportion (20-40%) of patients suffer disease relapse, in some cases on multiple occasions and therefore suffer the toxic side-effects of combination chemotherapy. Traditionally, patients are treated with a combination of agents although recent data from relapse patients have suggested that low risk patients might benefit from single agent vinblastine and, going forward, the addition of ALK inhibitors to the therapeutic regimen may have beneficial consequences. There are also a plethora of other drugs that might be advantageous to patients with ALCL and many of these have been identified through laboratory research although the decision as to which drugs to implement in trials will not be trivial. PMID:26913827

  4. Parental substance abuse, reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Christopher; Whitfield, Keith; Sudhakar, Shiv; Pearce, Michele; Byrd, Goldie; Wood, Mary; Feliu, Miriam; Leach-Beale, Brittani; DeCastro, Laura; Whitworth, Elaine; Abrams, Mary; Jonassaint, Jude; Harrison, M. Ojinga; Mathis, Markece; Scott, Lydia; Johnson, Stephanie; Durant, Lauren; Holmes, Anita; Presnell, Katherine; Bennett, Gary; Shelby, Rebecca; Robinson, Elwood

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing interest from a social learning perspective in understanding the role of parental factors on adult health behaviors and health outcomes. Our review revealed no studies, to date, that have evaluated the effects of parental substance abuse on reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). We explored the effects of parental substance (alcohol or drug) abuse on reports of the sensory, affective and summary indices of pain in 67 adult patients, mean age 38.9 (13.5), with SCD. We also explored the effects of parental substance abuse on psychopathology associated with pain and active coping. Twenty-four percent of patients reported that their parent(s) abused substances. Patients whose parent(s) were characterized as substance abusers reported greater sensory (p=0.02), affective (p=0.01) and summary (VAS; p=0.02) indices of pain as compared to their counterparts, whose parent(s) were not characterized as substance abusers. Patients did not differ in average age, education or the propensity to respond in a socially acceptable manner. There was a significant trend towards patients who characterized their parents as abusers scoring higher than their counterparts on active coping. We propose a Social Learning Theory to explain the current findings and suggest a need for additional prospective research to simultaneously explore biological (genetic) and social factors that influence the interpretation, experience and reporting of chronic pain in adult patients with chronic disease. PMID:16573309

  5. Mesenteric calcified cystic lymphangioma in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Yavuz; Albayrak, Fatih; Arslan, Serdar; Calik, Ilknur

    2011-06-01

    Abdominal cystic lymphangiomas are rare congenital benign malformations of the lymphatic system. To the best of our knowledge, only 6 mesenteric calcified cystic lymphangiomas have ever been reported. We herein describe a woman who presented to our hospital with stomachache that had been continuous for approximately 8 months. An abdominal computed tomography showed a cystic lesion. In the exploration, the cyst was totally excised. Based on the histomorphological data, a case of "calcified cystic lymphangioma" was diagnosed. Although mesenteric lymphangiomas are rare, especially in adults, they should be considered as a possible cause of abdominal pain. Treatment is surgical with resection of the mass, sometimes including resection of adjacent bowel.

  6. How to Conduct the Patient Interview. Communicating successfully with patients requires strategy, flexibility and practice.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mike

    2015-10-01

    As community paramedicine and other nonemergent initiatives become commonplace in EMS, caregivers are going to need communication skills that go beyond SAMPLE checklists. A minimalist approach to dialogue with patients, considered preferred if not essential in what was once almost exclusively a light-and-sirens environment, isn't acceptable when prehospital interventions require a thorough understanding not only of chief complaints, but also how the physical part of illness and injury is framed by the patient's environment. Be considerate, be as thorough as time permits, and pay attention! Next time we'll talk about interviewing prospective employees. PMID:26554214

  7. Optimizing Survival Outcomes For Adult Patients With Nontraumatic Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julianna

    2016-10-01

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed.

  8. Patient satisfaction and ethnic identity among American Indian older adults.

    PubMed

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Kunovich, Robert M; Jacobsen, Clemma; Goldberg, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Work in the field of culturally competent medical care draws on studies showing that minority Americans often report lower satisfaction with care than White Americans and recommends that providers should adapt care to patients' cultural needs. However, empirical evidence in support of cultural competence models is limited by reliance upon measurements of racial rather than ethnic identity and also by a near-total neglect of American Indians. This project explored the relationship between ethnic identity and satisfaction using survey data collected from 115 chronically ill American Indian patients >or=50 years at a Cherokee Nation clinic. Satisfaction scores were high overall and comparable to those found in the general population. Nevertheless, analysis using hierarchical linear modeling showed that patients' self-rated American Indian ethnic identity was significantly associated with satisfaction. Specifically, patients who rated themselves high on the measure of American Indian ethnic identity reported reduced scores on satisfaction with health care providers' social skill and attentiveness, as compared to those who rated themselves lower. Significant associations remained after controlling for patients' sex, age, education, marital status, self-reported health, wait time, and number of previous visits. There were no significant associations between patients' American Indian ethnic identity and satisfaction with provider's technical skill and shared decision-making. Likewise, there were no significant associations between satisfaction and a separate measure of White American ethnic identity, although a suggestive trend was observed for satisfaction with provider's social skill. Our findings demonstrate the importance of including measures of ethnic identity in studies of medical satisfaction in racial minority populations. They support the importance of adapting care to patient's cultural needs, and they highlight the particular significance of interpersonal

  9. Patient satisfaction and ethnic identity among American Indian older adults.

    PubMed

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Kunovich, Robert M; Jacobsen, Clemma; Goldberg, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Work in the field of culturally competent medical care draws on studies showing that minority Americans often report lower satisfaction with care than White Americans and recommends that providers should adapt care to patients' cultural needs. However, empirical evidence in support of cultural competence models is limited by reliance upon measurements of racial rather than ethnic identity and also by a near-total neglect of American Indians. This project explored the relationship between ethnic identity and satisfaction using survey data collected from 115 chronically ill American Indian patients >or=50 years at a Cherokee Nation clinic. Satisfaction scores were high overall and comparable to those found in the general population. Nevertheless, analysis using hierarchical linear modeling showed that patients' self-rated American Indian ethnic identity was significantly associated with satisfaction. Specifically, patients who rated themselves high on the measure of American Indian ethnic identity reported reduced scores on satisfaction with health care providers' social skill and attentiveness, as compared to those who rated themselves lower. Significant associations remained after controlling for patients' sex, age, education, marital status, self-reported health, wait time, and number of previous visits. There were no significant associations between patients' American Indian ethnic identity and satisfaction with provider's technical skill and shared decision-making. Likewise, there were no significant associations between satisfaction and a separate measure of White American ethnic identity, although a suggestive trend was observed for satisfaction with provider's social skill. Our findings demonstrate the importance of including measures of ethnic identity in studies of medical satisfaction in racial minority populations. They support the importance of adapting care to patient's cultural needs, and they highlight the particular significance of interpersonal

  10. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Ho; Maratovich, Mussin Nadiar; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver (UESL) is rare primary hepatic sarcoma and is known to occur in pediatric patients. This case is the UESL occurred in a 51-year old male patient. Multilocular cystic lesion was composed of primitive spindle cells without specific differentiation. This rare case would help to review differential diagnosis of primary sarcoma in liver and cystic neoplasm of the liver. PMID:27377912

  11. Successful cord blood transplantation in an adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kowata, Shugo; Fujishima, Yukiteru; Suzuki, Yuzo; Tsukushi, Yasuhiko; Oyake, Tatsuo; Togawa, Ryou; Oyama, Kotaro; Ikai, Akio; Ito, Shigeki; Ishida, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in surgical corrections and supportive care for congenital heart disease have resulted in increasing numbers of adult survivors who may develop hematological malignancies. Treatments including chemotherapy for such patients may cause serious hemodynamic or cardiac complications, especially in those receiving stem cell transplantation. We present a 29-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and congenital heart disease. She had been diagnosed with pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum at birth, and the anomaly was surgically corrected according to the Fontan technique at age 9 years. Her induction chemotherapy required modifications due to poor cardiac status with Fontan circulation. However, after surgical procedures including total cavopulmonary connection and aortic valve replacement at first complete remission, her cardiac status was significantly improved. Subsequently, she underwent cord blood stem cell transplantation at the third complete remission. She required intensive supportive care for circulatory failure as a pre-engraftment immune reaction and stage III acute graft versus host disease of the gut, but recovered from these complications. She was discharged on day 239, and remained in complete remission at 1-year post-transplantation. PMID:27599417

  12. Patients with detectable cocaethylene are more likely to require intensive care unit admission after trauma.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Sage E; Sutijono, Darrell; Moon, Cynthia H; Subramanian, Ramanand A; Calaycay, Jim; Rushbrook, Julie I; Zehtabchi, Shahriar

    2010-11-01

    Cocaethylene (CE) is a toxic metabolite that is formed after simultaneous consumption of cocaine and ethanol. This potent stimulant is more toxic than cocaine and has a longer half-life. The deleterious hemodynamic and cardiovascular effects of CE have been proven in animal models. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of CE on clinical outcomes after trauma. We prospectively enrolled adult (≥13 years) trauma patients requiring admission. Predictor variables were age, sex, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score, base deficit, and toxicology groups (ethanol alone, cocaine alone, CE, and none). The outcomes examined were mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and length of hospital stay (LOS). We used nonparametric tests to compare continuous variables and χ² test to compare categorical data. We constructed a logistic regression to identify variables that could predict mortality and ICU admission. We enrolled 417 patients (74% male; 70% blunt injury; median age, 40 [range, 13-95]; overall mortality, 2.2%). Urine toxicology and serum ethanol level screens classified patients into the following groups: 13.4% ethanol only, 4.1% cocaine only, 8.9% CE, and 46% none. Mortality and LOS were not statistically different among the groups. In logistic regression analysis, none of the variables were statistically significant in predicting mortality. However, the presence of CE significantly increased the likelihood of ICU admission (odds ratio, 5.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-22). The presence of detectable CE in the urine does not increase the mortality or LOS in trauma patients requiring admission but does increase the likelihood of ICU admission. PMID:20825763

  13. Female Patients Require a Higher Propofol Infusion Rate for Sedation.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shigeru; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Honda, Yuka; Ishii-Maruhama, Minako; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Sedation may minimize physiologic and behavioral stress responses. In our facility, the infusion rate of propofol is adjusted according to the bispectral index (BIS) in all cases of implant-related surgery; multivariate analysis of retrospective data enabled us to extract independent factors that affect the dose of propofol in sedation that are considered useful indicators for achieving adequate sedation. The study population comprised all patients undergoing implant-related surgery under intravenous sedation in Okayama University Hospital from April 2009 to March 2013. The infusion rate of propofol was adjusted to maintain the BIS value at 70-80. The outcome was the average infusion rate of propofol, and potential predictor variables were age, sex, body weight, treatment time, and amount of midazolam. Independent variables that affected the average infusion rate of propofol were extracted with multiple regression analysis. One hundred twenty-five subjects were enrolled. In the multiple regression analysis, female sex was shown to be significantly associated with a higher average infusion rate of propofol. Females may require a higher infusion rate of propofol than males to achieve adequate sedation while undergoing implant-related surgery. PMID:27269663

  14. Female Patients Require a Higher Propofol Infusion Rate for Sedation.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shigeru; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Honda, Yuka; Ishii-Maruhama, Minako; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Sedation may minimize physiologic and behavioral stress responses. In our facility, the infusion rate of propofol is adjusted according to the bispectral index (BIS) in all cases of implant-related surgery; multivariate analysis of retrospective data enabled us to extract independent factors that affect the dose of propofol in sedation that are considered useful indicators for achieving adequate sedation. The study population comprised all patients undergoing implant-related surgery under intravenous sedation in Okayama University Hospital from April 2009 to March 2013. The infusion rate of propofol was adjusted to maintain the BIS value at 70-80. The outcome was the average infusion rate of propofol, and potential predictor variables were age, sex, body weight, treatment time, and amount of midazolam. Independent variables that affected the average infusion rate of propofol were extracted with multiple regression analysis. One hundred twenty-five subjects were enrolled. In the multiple regression analysis, female sex was shown to be significantly associated with a higher average infusion rate of propofol. Females may require a higher infusion rate of propofol than males to achieve adequate sedation while undergoing implant-related surgery.

  15. 42 CFR 3.210 - Required disclosure of patient safety work product to the Secretary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Required disclosure of patient safety work product... HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS PATIENT SAFETY ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Confidentiality and Privilege Protections of Patient Safety Work Product § 3.210 Required disclosure of...

  16. 42 CFR 3.210 - Required disclosure of patient safety work product to the Secretary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Required disclosure of patient safety work product... HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS PATIENT SAFETY ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Confidentiality and Privilege Protections of Patient Safety Work Product § 3.210 Required disclosure of...

  17. 42 CFR 3.210 - Required disclosure of patient safety work product to the Secretary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Required disclosure of patient safety work product... HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS PATIENT SAFETY ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Confidentiality and Privilege Protections of Patient Safety Work Product § 3.210 Required disclosure of...

  18. 42 CFR 3.210 - Required disclosure of patient safety work product to the Secretary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Required disclosure of patient safety work product... HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS PATIENT SAFETY ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Confidentiality and Privilege Protections of Patient Safety Work Product § 3.210 Required disclosure of...

  19. 42 CFR 3.210 - Required disclosure of patient safety work product to the Secretary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Required disclosure of patient safety work product... HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS PATIENT SAFETY ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Confidentiality and Privilege Protections of Patient Safety Work Product § 3.210 Required disclosure of...

  20. Large B-cell lymphomas in adolescents and young adults in comparison to adult patients: a matched-control analysis in 55 patients.

    PubMed

    Coso, Diane; Garciaz, Sylvain; Esterni, Benjamin; Broussais-Guillaumot, Florence; Ivanov, Vadim; Aurran-Schleinitz, Thérèse; Schiano, Jean-Marc; Stoppa, Anne-Marie; Chetaille, Bruno; Blaise, Didier; Vey, Norbert; Bouabdallah, Réda

    2014-08-01

    The aim of our study was to assess whether large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) in adolescents and young adults (AYA) should be considered as a clinocopathological entity, and to evaluate the prognostic value of age. Fifty-five patients aged > 15-30 years were fully matched to 365 adult patients aged 31-65 years. We found a high incidence of primary mediastinal thymic LBCL subtype (33% vs. 5%), while histological transformation was rare (2% vs. 14%). LBCL in AYA presented with a bulky mediastinal mass (51% vs. 21%), and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) value was significantly higher (73% vs. 54%). The complete response rate to chemotherapy was similar in the two groups. Five-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) of AYA were 73% and 68%, respectively. The matched-control analysis showed no difference for either OS or EFS. LBCL in AYA presents with some critical features which differ from those of older adults. However, the outcome is equivalent to that observed in older patients.

  1. Adherence to pressure garment therapy in adult burn patients.

    PubMed

    Ripper, S; Renneberg, B; Landmann, C; Weigel, G; Germann, G

    2009-08-01

    Pressure garment therapy (PGT) is a generally accepted procedure to prevent hypertrophic scarring after severe burns. Wearing pressure garments is uncomfortable and challenging for the patient and, consequently adherence is low. In order to improve adherence, precise knowledge about the advantages and disadvantages of PGT is necessary. In this study we investigated specific aspects which inhibit or reinforce the application of PGT on the patients' part. Twenty-one patients participated in a semi-structured interview concerning their experiences with PGT. The complaints most frequently mentioned were 'physical and functional limitations' caused by the garments, 'additional effort' created by the need to care for garments and 'perceived deficiencies' of the treatment. At the same time, most of the patients reported coping strategies used to persevere with the therapy. Coping can be categorised into 'behavioural' and 'cognitive coping strategies'. Besides the 'expectation of success', 'emotional' as well as 'practical support' and experiencing 'good outcome' were motivating factors for the patients. Based on the analyses of limitations and resources, recommendations for future interventions enhancing adherence are outlined.

  2. Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Hepatic Artery Stenosis in Adult and Pediatric Patients After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Maruzzelli, Luigi; Miraglia, Roberto Caruso, Settimo; Milazzo, Mariapina; Mamone, Giuseppe; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous endovascular techniques for the treatment of hepatic artery stenosis (HAS) occurring after liver transplantation (LT) in adult and pediatrics patients. From February 2003 to March 2009, 25 patients (15 adults and 10 children) whose developed HAS after LT were referred to our interventional radiology unit. Technical success was achieved in 96% (24 of 25) of patients. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was performed in 13 patients (7 children), and stenting was performed in 11 patients (2 children). After the procedure, all patients were followed-up with liver function tests, Doppler ultrasound, and/or computed tomography. Mean follow-up was 15.8 months (range 5 days to 58 months). Acute hepatic artery thrombosis occurred immediately after stent deployment in 2 patients and was successfully treated with local thrombolysis. One patient developed severe HA spasm, which reverted after 24 h. After the procedure, mean trans-stenotic pressure gradient decreased from 30.5 to 6.2 mmHg. Kaplan-Meyer curve of HA primary patency was 77% at 1 and 2 years. During the follow-up period, 5 patients (20%) had recurrent stenosis, and 2 patients (8.3%) had late thrombosis. Two of 7 patients with stenosis/thrombosis underwent surgical revascularization (n = 1) and liver retransplantation (n = 1). Six (25%) patients died during follow-up, but overall mortality was not significantly different when comparing patients having patent hepatic arteries with those having recurrent stenosis/thrombosis. There were no significant differences in recurrent stenosis/thrombosis and mortality comparing patients treated by PTA versus stenting and comparing adult versus pediatric status. Percutaneous interventional treatment of HAS in LT recipients is safe and effective and decreases the need for surgical revascularization and liver retransplantation. However, the beneficial effects for survival are not clear, probably because

  3. Kidney transplantation in an adult patient with VACTERL association.

    PubMed

    Cimen, Sertac; Nantais, Jordan; Guler, Sanem; Lawen, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheoesophageal, renal, and limb birth defects (VACTERL) association is a rare, non-random constellation of congenital abnormalities among which urinary tract anomalies can be included. In the presence of these anomalies, patients are suspected to have a higher rate of renal failure than average. We report a case of a 22-year-old woman with VACTERL association and consequent end stage renal failure. A live-related kidney transplant was carried out successfully and the postoperative course was uncomplicated. The patient had immediate graft function. Risk factors that may complicate kidney transplant surgery in this patient population as well as considerations relevant to peritransplant management are discussed. PMID:26106170

  4. [Background factors in the detection of drug-resistant bacteria in adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis].

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Michio

    2014-02-01

    In the treatment of adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis, it has been assumed that subjects over 65 years of age or living with children attending a day nursery, are at higher risk for infection with drug-resistant bacteria. However there are few reports which have discussed the relationship between those risk factors and adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis. I investigated the association between adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis living with children attending a day nursery and gender, ages, and frequency of detection of drug-resistant bacteria. From 2010 to 2012, a total of 598 adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis were enrolled. The majority of the study subjects were women, and the largest 10-year age group was 30-39 years. By sex, a greater proportion of the female subjects than the male subjects lived with children attending a day nursery. By age, the proportion of subjects who lived with children attending a day nursery was significantly higher in the 30-39-year age group than other age groups. Drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and ampicillin (ABPC)-resistant Haemophilus influenzae were detected at significantly higher rates in subjects with children attending a day nursery than in those without. There were no significant difference in drug-resistant bacteria detection between subjects over 65 years of age, and under 65 years. These findings suggested that living with children attending a day nursery is a risk factor and source of infection by drug-resistant organisms that may cause intra-familial infections of adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis. These results suggested we must ask adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis whether they are living with children attending a day nursery or not, when we plan their treatment strategy.

  5. Adult patients' adjustability to orthodontic appliances. Part I: a comparison between Labial, Lingual, and Invisalign™.

    PubMed

    Shalish, Miri; Cooper-Kazaz, Rena; Ivgi, Inbal; Canetti, Laura; Tsur, Boaz; Bachar, Eytan; Chaushu, Stella

    2012-12-01

    This prospective study examined the adult patient's perception of recovery after insertion of three types of orthodontic appliances: Buccal, Lingual and Invisalign. The sample consisted of sixty-eight adult patients (45 females and 23 males) who comprised three groups: 28 Buccal, 19 Lingual, and 21 Invisalign patients. After appliance insertion, patients completed a Health-Related Quality of Life questionnaire daily for the first week and again on day 14, in order to assess patients' perception of pain and analgesic consumption. In addition, four areas of dysfunction were assessed: oral dysfunction, eating disturbances, general activity parameters, and oral symptoms. Lingual appliance was associated with more severe pain and analgesic consumption, the greatest oral and general dysfunction, and the most difficult and longest recovery. The Invisalign patients complained of relatively high levels of pain in the first days after insertion; however this group was characterized by the lowest level of oral symptoms and by a similar level of general activity disturbances and oral dysfunction compared to the Buccal appliance. Many Lingual and some Buccal patients did not reach a full recovery from their eating difficulties by the end of the study period. The present study provides information to adult patients and clinicians assisting them in choosing the most appropriate treatment modality in relation to Health-Related Quality of Life parameters.

  6. Underdiagnosis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Adult Patients: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Javier; Anand, Ernie; Casillas, Marta; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To raise awareness of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as an underdiagnosed, undertreated, often comorbid, and debilitating condition in adults. Data Sources: PubMed was searched using combinations of keywords, including ADHD, adult, diagnosis, identify, prevalence, and comorbid, to find articles published between 1976 and 2013. Study Selection: In total, 99 articles were selected for inclusion on the basis of their relevance to the objective and importance to and representation of ADHD research, including international guidelines for adults with ADHD. Results: In a large proportion of children with ADHD, symptoms persist into adulthood. However, although adults with ADHD often experience chaotic lifestyles, with impaired educational and vocational achievement and higher risks of substance abuse and imprisonment, many remain undiagnosed and/or untreated. ADHD is usually accompanied by other psychiatric comorbidities (such as major depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, and alcohol abuse). Indeed, adults with ADHD are more likely to present to a psychiatric clinic for treatment of their comorbid disorders than for ADHD, and their ADHD symptoms are often mistaken for those of their comorbidities. Untreated ADHD in adults with psychiatric comorbidities leads to poor clinical and functional outcomes for the patient even if comorbidities are treated. Effective treatment of adults’ ADHD improves symptoms, emotional lability, and patient functioning, often leading to favorable outcomes (eg, safer driving, reduced criminality). A few medications have now been approved for use in adults with ADHD, while a multimodal approach involving psychotherapy has also shown promising results. Conclusions General psychiatrists should familiarize themselves with the symptoms of ADHD in adults in order to diagnose and manage ADHD and comorbidities appropriately in these patients. PMID:25317367

  7. Similarities and differences between pediatric and adult patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Tarr, T; Dérfalvi, B; Győri, N; Szántó, A; Siminszky, Z; Malik, A; Szabó, A J; Szegedi, G; Zeher, M

    2015-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease with highest prevalence among women of childbearing age. However, children younger than 16 years also can develop SLE (childhood-onset lupus/juvenile-type SLE). The aim of our study was to compare the clinical course of adult and pediatric-onset SLE. Data from 342 adult patients followed at the University of Debrecen, Hungary, and 79 children documented in the Hungarian National Pediatric SLE registry were analyzed using hospital medical records. Organ manifestations, laboratory parameters, and immunoserological characteristics were reviewed and the results were evaluated using SPSS for Windows software.Gender distribution was not significantly different between groups with disease starting in childhood vs adulthood. The prevalence of the following manifestations was significantly higher for pediatric than for adult-onset disease including: lupus nephritis (43% pediatric vs 26.4% for adult-onset), hematological disorders (57% vs 36.4%), photosensitivity (20% vs 9%), butterfly rash (61% vs 35.5%) and mucosal ulceration (11.4% vs 4%). For adult-onset SLE, neurological symptoms (30% vs 6%) and polyarthritis (86% vs 68%) occurred significantly more frequently than in children. Anti-SSA, anti-SSB and antiphospholipid antibodies were detected at significantly higher levels in adult-onset patients compared to those in pediatrics. Children were more commonly given high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin treatment (6.3% vs 0.6%) and mycophenolate mofetil (15.2% vs 5.3%) than adults.These results suggest that pediatric and adult-onset SLE differ in multiple aspects, and it is important to recognize these differences for optimal treatment and prognosis of these patients.

  8. The Drosophila Couch Potato Gene: An Essential Gene Required for Normal Adult Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bellen, H. J.; Vaessin, H.; Bier, E.; Kolodkin, A.; D'Evelyn, D.; Kooyer, S.; Jan, Y. N.

    1992-01-01

    Through enhancer detection screens we have isolated 14 insertions in an essential gene that is expressed in embryonic sensory mother cells (SMC), in most cells of the mature embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS), and in glial cells of the PNS and the central nervous system (CNS). Embryos homozygote for amorphic alleles die, but show no obvious defects in their cuticle, PNS or CNS. The gene has been named couch potato (cpo) because several insertional alleles alter adult behavior. Homozygous hypomorphic cpo flies recover slowly from ether anaesthesia, show aberrant flight behavior, fail to move toward light and do not exhibit normal negative geotactic behavior. However, the flies are able to groom and walk, and some are able to fly when prodded, indicating that not all processes required for behavior are severely affected. A molecular analysis shows that the 14 insertions are confined to a few hundred nucleotides which probably contain key regulatory sequences of the gene. The orientation of these insertions and their position within this DNA fragment play an important role in the couch potato phenotype. In situ hybridization to whole mount embryos suggest that some insertions affect the levels of transcription of cpo in most cells in which it is expressed. PMID:1644278

  9. Orthotopic Heart Transplantation in an Adult Patient with Heterotaxy Syndrome: Surgical Implications.

    PubMed

    González-López, María-Teresa; Pérez-Caballero-Martínez, Ramón; Amoros-Rivera, Carlos; Zamorano-Serrano, José; Pita-Fernández, Ana-María; Gil-Jaurena, Juan-Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Modified techniques for orthotopic heart transplantation are mandatory when complex congenital anomalies are associated in adult patients. An unusual case of a heterotaxy syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy following mitral ring annuloplasty is presented in a 62-year-old male. Orthotopic cardiac transplantation was performed by using a modified operative strategy: selective peripheral and central venous cannulation according to the thoraco-abdominal venous challenges, biatrial technique, and preservation of venous drainage via the native coronary sinus. We discuss the anatomical features of heterotaxy in adult patients and surgical approaches when heart transplantation is needed. PMID:26450654

  10. Severe metabolic acidosis in adult patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lo Cascio, Christian M; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Kohler, Malcolm; Fehr, Thomas; Bloch, Konrad E

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive paresis, respiratory failure and premature death. Long-term positive pressure ventilation can improve quality of life and survival, but previously unrecognized complications may arise. We analyzed the characteristics of severe metabolic acidosis occurring in 8 of 55 DMD patients, of 20-36 years of age, observed over a 5-year period. All patients were on positive pressure ventilation and were being treated for chronic constipation. Before admission, they had had a reduced intake of fluids and food. Upon examination, they were severely ill, dyspneic and suffering from abdominal discomfort. Metabolic acidosis with a high anion gap was noted in 5 of the 8 patients and with a normal anion gap in the other 3. They all recovered after the administration of fluids and nutrition, the regulation of bowel movements and treatment with antibiotics, as appropriate. Metabolic acidosis is a life-threatening, potentially preventable complication in older DMD patients. Early recognition, subsequent administration of fluids, nutrition and antibiotics and regulation of bowel movements seem to be essential.

  11. Dose reduction and image quality optimizations in CT of pediatric and adult patients: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, P.-H.; Lee, C.-L.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, Y.-J.; Jeon, S.-S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to easily and rapidly perform numerous acquisitions, possibly leading to a marked increase in the radiation dose to individual patients. Technical options dedicated to automatically adjusting the acquisition parameters according to the patient's size are of specific interest in pediatric radiology. A constant tube potential reduction can be achieved for adults and children, while maintaining a constant detector energy fluence. To evaluate radiation dose, the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was calculated based on the CT dose index (CTDI) measured using an ion chamber, and image noise and image contrast were measured from a scanned image to evaluate image quality. The dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) was calculated from the radiation dose, image noise, and image contrast measured from a scanned image. The noise derivative (ND) is a quality index for dose efficiency. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kVp were used to compute the average photon energy. Image contrast and the corresponding contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined for lesions of soft tissue, muscle, bone, and iodine relative to a uniform water background, as the iodine contrast increases at lower energy (i.e., k-edge of iodine is 33 keV closer to the beam energy) using mixed water-iodine contrast normalization (water 0, iodine 25, 100, 200, and 1000 HU, respectively). The proposed values correspond to high quality images and can be reduced if only high-contrast organs are assessed. The potential benefit of lowering the tube voltage is an improved CNRD, resulting in a lower radiation dose and optimization of image quality. Adjusting the tube potential in abdominal CT would be useful in current pediatric radiography, where the choice of X-ray techniques generally takes into account the size of the patient as well as the need to balance the conflicting requirements of diagnostic image quality and radiation dose

  12. Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status, Race, and Mortality in Young Adult Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Michelle M.; Crews, Deidra C.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Anderson, Cheryl A.M.; Ephraim, Patti L.; Cook, Courtney; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2014-01-01

    Young blacks receiving dialysis have an increased risk of death compared with whites in the United States. Factors influencing this disparity among the young adult dialysis population have not been well explored. Our study examined the relation of neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and racial differences in mortality in United States young adults receiving dialysis. We merged US Renal Data System patient-level data from 11,027 black and white patients ages 18–30 years old initiating dialysis between 2006 and 2009 with US Census data to obtain neighborhood poverty information for each patient. We defined low SES neighborhoods as those neighborhoods in US Census zip codes with ≥20% of residents living below the federal poverty level and quantified race differences in mortality risk by level of neighborhood SES. Among patients residing in low SES neighborhoods, blacks had greater mortality than whites after adjusting for baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, rurality, and access to care factors. This difference in mortality between blacks and whites was significantly attenuated in higher SES neighborhoods. In the United States, survival between young adult blacks and whites receiving dialysis differs by neighborhood SES. Additional studies are needed to identify modifiable factors contributing to the greater mortality among young adult black dialysis patients residing in low SES neighborhoods. PMID:24925723

  13. Neighborhood socioeconomic status, race, and mortality in young adult dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Johns, Tanya S; Estrella, Michelle M; Crews, Deidra C; Appel, Lawrence J; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Ephraim, Patti L; Cook, Courtney; Boulware, L Ebony

    2014-11-01

    Young blacks receiving dialysis have an increased risk of death compared with whites in the United States. Factors influencing this disparity among the young adult dialysis population have not been well explored. Our study examined the relation of neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and racial differences in mortality in United States young adults receiving dialysis. We merged US Renal Data System patient-level data from 11,027 black and white patients ages 18-30 years old initiating dialysis between 2006 and 2009 with US Census data to obtain neighborhood poverty information for each patient. We defined low SES neighborhoods as those neighborhoods in U.S. Census zip codes with ≥20% of residents living below the federal poverty level and quantified race differences in mortality risk by level of neighborhood SES. Among patients residing in low SES neighborhoods, blacks had greater mortality than whites after adjusting for baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, rurality, and access to care factors. This difference in mortality between blacks and whites was significantly attenuated in higher SES neighborhoods. In the United States, survival between young adult blacks and whites receiving dialysis differs by neighborhood SES. Additional studies are needed to identify modifiable factors contributing to the greater mortality among young adult black dialysis patients residing in low SES neighborhoods.

  14. Comparison of human growth hormone products' cost in pediatric and adult patients. A budgetary impact model.

    PubMed

    Bazalo, Gary R; Joshi, Ashish V; Germak, John

    2007-09-01

    We assessed the economic impact to the United States payer of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) utilization, comparing the relative dosage efficiency of marketed pen-based and vial-based products in a pediatric and in an adult population. A budgetary impact model calculated drug costs based on product waste and cost. Waste was the difference between prescribed dose, based on patient weight, and actual delivered dose, based on dosing increments and maximum deliverable dose for pens and a fixed-percent waste as derived from the literature for vials. Annual wholesale acquisition costs were calculated based upon total milligrams delivered, using a daily dose of 0.03 mg/kg for pediatric patients and 0.016 mg/kg for adults. Total annual drug costs were compared for two scenarios: 1) a product mix based on national market share and 2) restricting use to the product with lowest waste. Based on the literature, waste for each vial product was 23 percent. Among individual pens, waste was highest for Humatrope 24 mg (19.5 percent pediatric, 14.3 percent adult) and lowest for Norditropin Nordi-Flex 5 mg (1.1 percent pediatric, 1 percent adult). Restricting use to the brand with least waste (Norditropin), compared to national product share mix, resulted in a 10.2 percent reduction in annual pediatric patient cost from $19,026 to $17,089 and an 8 percent reduction in annual adult patient cost from $24,099 to $22,161. We concluded that pen delivery systems result in less waste than vial and syringe. Considering all approved delivery systems, Norditropin resulted in the least product waste and lower annual patient cost for both pediatric and adult populations.

  15. Use of caries preventive agents on adult patients compared to pediatric patients by general practitioners: findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Williams, O. Dale; Ritchie, Lloyd K.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that caries prevention reduces caries in adults. This study tested the frequency of recommended caries prevention agents for children compared to adult patients. Methods This study surveyed 467 Dental Practice-Based Research Network general dentists who practice within the United States and treat both pediatric and adult patients. Dentists were asked the percentage of their patients who are administered or recommended dental sealants, in-office and at-home fluoride, chlorhexidine rinse, and xylitol gum. Results Adults were less likely to receive in-office caries preventive agents compared to pediatric patients. However, the rate of recommendation for at-home preventive regimens was very similar. Dentists with a conservative approach to caries treatment were the most likely to use caries prevention at similar rates in adults as in children. In addition, practices with a greater number of patients with dental insurance were significantly less likely to provide in-office fluoride or sealants to adult patients than to their pediatric patients. Conclusion In-office caries prevention agents are more commonly used by general dentists for their pediatric patients compared to their adult patients. Practice Implications Some general dentists should consider providing additional in-office prevention agents for their adult patients who are at increased risk for dental caries. PMID:20516100

  16. Vaccination recommendations for adult patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tanrıöver, Mine Durusu; Akar, Servet; Türkçapar, Nuran; Karadağ, Ömer; Ertenli, İhsan; Kiraz, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases in any age group can be successfully prevented through immunization. Protection provided through immunization in childhood decreases over the years. Immunization in adulthood is important because of the growing elderly population, chronic diseases, and globalization. Recommendations on this subject are being constantly updated through scientific guidelines. Immunization in adulthood is also important in rheumatology. There is an increased risk not only of infection in rheumatic diseases but also of infections being more severe. Most infections, and their frequently observed complications, are among those diseases that can be prevented through immunization. The type of immunization, immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy received by the patient, disease activity, and presence of chronic diseases affect the immunization process in patients with rheumatic diseases. This review will consider the immunization process followed in rheumatic diseases and also refer to its application.

  17. Adolescent and young adult patients with cancer: a milieu of unique features.

    PubMed

    Sender, Leonard; Zabokrtsky, Keri B

    2015-08-01

    Adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer are a unique category of patients who, depending on age at time of diagnosis, might receive treatment from oncologists specializing either in the treatment of children or adults. In the USA, AYA oncology generally encompasses patients 15-39 years of age. AYA patients with cancer typically present with diseases that span the spectrum from 'paediatric' cancers (such as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia [ALL] and brain tumours) to 'adult' tumours (such as breast cancer and melanoma), as well as cancers that are largely unique to their age group (such as testicular cancer and bone tumours). Research indicates that outcomes of AYA patients with cancer are influenced not only by the treatment provided, but also by factors related to 'host' biology. In addition to the potential biological and cancer-specific differences between AYAs and other patients with cancer, AYA patients also often have disparate access to clinical trials and suffer from a lack of age-appropriate psychosocial support services and health services, which might influence survival as well as overall quality of life. In this Review, these issues are discussed, with a focus on two types of AYA cancer--ALL and melanoma--highlighting findings arising from the use of emerging technologies, such as whole-genome sequencing. PMID:26011488

  18. Restoration of portal flow using a pericholedochal varix in adult living donor liver transplantation for patients with total portosplenomesenteric thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok-Bog; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Hwang, Shin; Kim, Ki-Hun; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Park, Gil-Chun; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Namkoong, Jung-Man; Park, Hyung-Woo; Park, Yo-Han

    2014-05-01

    In total portosplenomesenteric thrombosis patients, cavoportal hemitransposition (CPHT) is indicated but rarely applicable for adult-to-adult (A-to-A) living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) because partial liver graft requires splanchno-portal inflow for liver graft regeneration. If intra- & peri-pancreatic collaterals draining into pericholedochal varix were present, pericholedochal varix may provide splanchnic blood flow to the transplanted liver and also relieve recipient's portal hypertension. To date, however, there is no successful report using pericholedochal varix in liver transplantation (LT). We successfully performed A-to-A LDLTs using pericholedochal varix for those 2 patients. The surgical strategies are followings: (a) dissection of hepatic hilum to isolate left hepatic artery using for arterial reconstruction of implanted right lobe graft, (b) en-mass clamping of the undissected remaining hilum if we can leave adequate length of stump from the clamping site, and then hilum is divided, (c) delay the donor hepatectomy until the feasibility of the recipient operation is confirmed. Portal flow was established between the sizable pericholedochal varix (caliber > 1cm) and graft portal vein, but the individually designed approaches were used for each patients. Currently, they have been enjoying normal life on posttransplant 92 and 44 months respectively. In conclusion, enlarged pericholedochal varix in patients with totally obliterated splanchnic veins might be an useful inflow to restore portal flow and secure good outcome in A-to-A LDLT. AASLD.

  19. Advancing Adult Workforce Skills: Opportunities and Requirements for State Action. EQW Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, David W.

    State programs offer greatest promise for practical strategic actions to enhance the quality of the nation's adult work force. Three steps in the recursive process that create a model of state action are as follows: (1) documentation of the platform for action, which consists of current adult work force attributes and current institutional…

  20. Loss of olfactory function and nutritional status in vital older adults and geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Nicole; de Roon, Margot; van Campen, Jos P C M; Kremer, Stefanie; Boesveldt, Sanne

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the association of olfactory function and nutritional status in vital older adults and geriatric patients. Three hundred forty-five vital (mean age 67.1 years) and 138 geriatric older adults (mean age 80.9 years) were included. Nutritional status was assessed using the mini nutritional assessment-short form. The Sniffin' Sticks was used to measure olfactory function. Eleven percentage of the vital older adults were at risk of malnutrition, whereas 60% of the geriatric participants were malnourished or at risk. Only 2% of the vital older adults were anosmic, compared with 46% of the geriatric participants. Linear regression demonstrated a significant association (P = 0.015) between olfactory function and nutritional status in the geriatric subjects. However, this association became insignificant after adjustment for confounders. Both crude and adjusted analysis in the vital older adults did not show a significant association. The results indicate that, in both groups of elderly, there is no direct relation between olfactory function and nutritional status. We suggest that a decline in olfactory function may still be considered as one of the risk-factors for malnutrition in geriatric patients-once co-occurring with other mental and/or physical problems that are more likely to occur in those patients experience.

  1. Upper and Lower Urinary Tract Outcomes in Adult Myelomeningocele Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Veenboer, Paul W.; Bosch, J. L. H. Ruud; van Asbeck, Floris W. A.; de Kort, Laetitia M. O.

    2012-01-01

    Background The introduction of sophisticated treatment of bladder dysfunction and hydrocephalus allows the majority of SB patients to survive into adulthood. However, no systematic review on urological outcome in adult SB patients is available and no follow-up schemes exist. Objectives To systematically summarize the evidence on outcome of urinary tract functioning in adult SB patients. Methods A literature search in PubMed and Embase databases was done. Only papers published in the last 25 years describing patients with open SB with a mean age >18 years were included. We focused on finding differences in the treatment strategies, e.g., clean intermittent catheterization and antimuscarinic drugs versus early urinary diversion, with regard to long-term renal and bladder outcomes. Results A total of 13 articles and 5 meeting abstracts on urinary tract status of adult SB patients were found describing a total of 1564 patients with a mean age of 26.1 years (range 3–74 years, with a few patients <18 years). All were retrospective cohort studies with relatively small and heterogeneous samples with inconsistent reporting of outcome; this precluded the pooling of data and meta-analysis. Total continence was achieved in 449/1192 (37.7%; range 8–85%) patients. Neurological level of the lesion and hydrocephalus were associated with incontinence. Renal function was studied in 1128 adult patients. In 290/1128 (25.7%; range 3–81.8%) patients some degree of renal damage was found and end-stage renal disease was seen in 12/958 (1.3%) patients. Detrusor-sphincter dyssynergy and detrusor-overactivity acted as adverse prognostic factors for the development of renal damage. Conclusions These findings should outline follow-up schedules for SB patients, which do not yet exist. Since renal and bladder deterioration continues beyond adolescence, follow-up of these individuals is needed. We recommend standardization in reporting the outcome of urinary tract function in adult SB

  2. Neuropsychological assessment of adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Müller, Bernhard W; Gimbel, Karla; Keller-Pliessnig, Anett; Sartory, Gudrun; Gastpar, Markus; Davids, Eugen

    2007-03-01

    Adults with persistent attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may show cognitive deficits as compared to healthy control subjects. The aim of this study was to compare a sample of adult outpatients with ADHD on medication to healthy controls on a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment battery. Thirty adults with ADHD under stable psychopharmacological treatment and 27 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and IQ were assessed with ten tests measuring performance with regard to attention, memory, executive function, and fine motor control. Lower performance in patients as compared to controls was found in tests of verbal and visual memory, speed of visuo-motor search, set shifting, and divided attention. Indicators of response inhibition and simple response speed were less affected. Adults with ADHD show indicators of lowered cognitive performance under medication. These are related more to memory and attention under high mental load than to response inhibition or simple attention or motor performance.

  3. Childhood sexual and physical abuse in adult patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ogata, S N; Silk, K R; Goodrich, S; Lohr, N E; Westen, D; Hill, E M

    1990-08-01

    Experiences of abuse and neglect were assessed in 24 adults diagnosed as having borderline personality disorder according to the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline Patients and in 18 depressed control subjects without borderline disorder. Significantly more of the borderline patients than depressed patients reported childhood sexual abuse, abuse by more than one person, and both sexual and physical abuse. There were no between-group differences for rates of neglect or physical abuse without sexual abuse. A stepwise logistic regression revealed that derealization, diagnostic group, and chronic dysphoria were the best predictors of childhood sexual abuse in this group of patients.

  4. Memory reorganization in adult brain: observations in three patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gleissner, Ulrike; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Elger, Christian Erich

    2002-02-01

    We present three patients with left-sided temporal lobe epilepsy who exhibited preoperatively a neuropsychological pattern characteristic for interhemispheric language transfer (marked nonverbal memory deficits, relatively preserved verbal memory and language performance). The Wada test indicated atypical language dominance in two patients, but one patient was clearly left hemispheric language dominant. All patients showed a marked recovery of nonverbal memory after left-sided surgery. Results are discussed with respect to memory transfer and plasticity for memory functions in the adult brain. PMID:11904242

  5. Hospital Triage System for Adult Patients Using an Influenza-Like Illness Scoring System during the 2009 Pandemic—Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Diaz, Esteban; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Gomez-Abundis, Gerardo F.; Briseño-Ramirez, Jaime; Perez-Gomez, Hector Raul; Lopez-Gatell, Hugo; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M.; Ramírez, Ernesto; López, Irma; Iguala, Miguel; Chapela, Ietza Bojórquez; Zavala, Ethel Palacios; Hernández, Mauricio; Stuart, Tammy L.; Villarino, Margarita Elsa; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Waterman, Steve; Uyeki, Timothy; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Background Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged during 2009. To help clinicians triage adults with acute respiratory illness, a scoring system for influenza-like illness (ILI) was implemented at Hospital Civil de Guadalajara, Mexico. Methods A medical history, laboratory and radiology results were collected on emergency room (ER) patients with acute respiratory illness to calculate an ILI-score. Patients were evaluated for admission by their ILI-score and clinicians' assessment of risk for developing complications. Nasal and throat swabs were collected from intermediate and high-risk patients for influenza testing by RT-PCR. The disposition and ILI-score of those oseltamivir-treated versus untreated, clinical characteristics of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) patients versus test-negative patients were compared by Pearson's Χ2, Fisher's Exact, and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Results Of 1840 ER patients, 230 were initially hospitalized (mean ILI-score = 15), and the rest were discharged, including 286 ambulatory patients given oseltamivir (median ILI-score = 11), and 1324 untreated (median ILI-score = 5). Fourteen (1%) untreated patients returned, and 3 were hospitalized on oseltamivir (median ILI-score  = 19). Of 371 patients tested by RT-PCR, 104 (28%) had pandemic influenza and 42 (11%) had seasonal influenza A detected. Twenty (91%) of 22 imaged hospitalized pandemic influenza patients had bilateral infiltrates compared to 23 (38%) of 61 imaged hospital test-negative patients (p<0.001). One patient with confirmed pandemic influenza presented 6 days after symptom onset, required mechanical ventilation, and died. Conclusions The triaging system that used an ILI-score complimented clinicians' judgment of who needed oseltamivir and inpatient care and helped hospital staff manage a surge in demand for services. PMID:20498718

  6. Multidimensional Clinical Phenotyping of an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Douglas J.; Bailey, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease resulting from mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene and has major manifestations in the sino-pulmonary, and gastro-intestinal tracts. Clinical phenotypes were generated using 26 common clinical variables to generate classes that overlapped quantiles of lung function and were based on multiple aspects of CF systemic disease. Methods The variables included age, gender, CFTR mutations, FEV1% predicted, FVC% predicted, height, weight, Brasfield chest xray score, pancreatic sufficiency status and clinical microbiology results. Complete datasets were compiled on 211 subjects. Phenotypes were identified using a proximity matrix generated by the unsupervised Random Forests algorithm and subsequent clustering by the Partitioning around Medoids (PAM) algorithm. The final phenotypic classes were then characterized and compared to a similar dataset obtained three years earlier. Findings Clinical phenotypes were identified using a clustering strategy that generated four and five phenotypes. Each strategy identified 1) a low lung health scores phenotype, 2) a younger, well-nourished, male-dominated class, 3) various high lung health score phenotypes that varied in terms of age, gender and nutritional status. This multidimensional clinical phenotyping strategy identified classes with expected microbiology results and low risk clinical phenotypes with pancreatic sufficiency. Interpretation This study demonstrated regional adult CF clinical phenotypes using non-parametric, continuous, ordinal and categorical data with a minimal amount of subjective data to identify clinically relevant phenotypes. These studies identified the relative stability of the phenotypes, demonstrated specific phenotypes consistent with published findings and identified others needing further study. PMID:25822311

  7. Home management of the adult patient with leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, J E; Held, D M

    1982-12-01

    The many changes that have occurred within the medical profession and among the public are taking long-term care out of the hospital and placing it back into the home. Attitudes toward cancer have altered, as seen by the rapid growth of the oncology specialty as well as the willingness of the community to allow those with cancer to return to a viable status. Even the individual who must face end-stage disease can now rest comfortably in the privacy of his or her own home, surrounded by loved ones. Improved nutritional efforts during periods of active therapy are reducing the side effects and improving the tolerance of highly cytotoxic drugs. Thus, acute episodes of treatment are shortened, allowing for earlier discharge. Individuals are demanding accurate information regarding their disease and its treatment. Patients are catalysts for their own recovery as they become more active participants in their care. Some are even choosing not to undergo suggested therapies and are returning home to put their lives in order and let disease processes take their natural course, even until death. As for leukemia, more supportive measures such as blood component therapy and evaluative work-ups are being offered on an outpatient basis. Patients are learning self-care measures to counteract or minimize side effects to chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Thus, overwhelming infection is of less risk and hospitalization is shortened. Infection, especially from Staphylococcus aureus, still remains a major cause of death of patients with leukemia. However, one must consider how prevalent this organism is in the hospital environment. Home care management is improving; care can be as comprehensive as one might need or receive in the hospital setting. PMID:6924785

  8. Clinical Trials of Adult Stem Cell Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Bang, Oh Young

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is considered a potential regenerative strategy for patients with neurologic deficits. Studies involving animal models of ischemic stroke have shown that stem cells transplanted into the brain can lead to functional improvement. With current advances in the understanding regarding the effects of introducing stem cells and their mechanisms of action, several clinical trials of stem cell therapy have been conducted in patients with stroke since 2005, including studies using mesenchymal stem cells, bone marrow mononuclear cells, and neural stem/progenitor cells. In addition, several clinical trials of the use of adult stem cells to treat ischemic stroke are ongoing. This review presents the status of our understanding of adult stem cells and results from clinical trials, and introduces ongoing clinical studies of adult stem cell therapy in the field of stroke.

  9. Pharmacological interventions for ADHD: how do adolescent and adult patient beliefs and attitudes impact treatment adherence?

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to medication can be problematic for patients, especially so for patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Effective medications are available for the treatment of ADHD; however, nonadherence rates for ADHD medication range from 13.2%–64%. The reasons for nonadherence can be complex. This review aims to look at how the beliefs and attitudes of adolescents and adults impact ADHD treatment adherence. PMID:25284990

  10. Strategies for a schizophrenic patient who required aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Rika; Shimada, Yasuyuki; Yaku, Hitoshi; Kitamura, Nobuo

    2005-01-01

    An aortic valve was replaced in a schizophrenic patient with violent behaviour. The usual protocol was altered and strategies to prevent accidents before and after surgery were devised. Minimally invasive surgery, administering sedation during the critical recovery period, and therapeutic use of communication as a psychological intervention were effective strategies. The patient recovered well and was discharged on day 14 after surgery.

  11. Epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus: institutional experience with 2001 patients.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Sun, Hai; Guthikonda, Bharat; Notarianni, Christina; Nanda, Anil

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Adult-onset hydrocephalus is not commonly discussed in the literature, especially regarding its demographic distribution. In contrast to pediatric hydrocephalus, which is related to a primary CSF pathway defect, its development in adults is often secondary to other pathologies. In this study, the authors investigated the epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus as it pertains to different etiologies and in reference to age, sex, and race distributions. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical notes of 2001 patients with adult-onset hydrocephalus who presented to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center within a 25-year span. Significant differences between the groups were analyzed by a chi-square test; p < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS The overall mean (± SEM) incidence of adult hydrocephalus in this population was 77 ± 30 per year, with a significant increase in incidence in the past decade (55 ± 3 [1990-2003] vs 102 ± 6 [2004-2015]; p < 0.0001). Hydrocephalus in a majority of the patients had a vascular etiology (45.5%) or was a result of a tumor (30.2%). The incidence of hydrocephalus in different age groups varied according to various pathologies. The incidence was significantly higher in males with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (p = 0.03) or head injury (p = 0.01) and higher in females with pseudotumor cerebri (p < 0.0001). In addition, the overall incidence of hydrocephalus was significantly higher in Caucasian patients (p = 0.0002) than in those of any other race. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge of the demographic variations in adult-onset hydrocephalus is helpful in achieving better risk stratification and better managing the disease in patients. For general applicability, these results should be validated in a large-scale meta-analysis based on a national population database.

  12. Epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus: institutional experience with 2001 patients.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Sun, Hai; Guthikonda, Bharat; Notarianni, Christina; Nanda, Anil

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Adult-onset hydrocephalus is not commonly discussed in the literature, especially regarding its demographic distribution. In contrast to pediatric hydrocephalus, which is related to a primary CSF pathway defect, its development in adults is often secondary to other pathologies. In this study, the authors investigated the epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus as it pertains to different etiologies and in reference to age, sex, and race distributions. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical notes of 2001 patients with adult-onset hydrocephalus who presented to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center within a 25-year span. Significant differences between the groups were analyzed by a chi-square test; p < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS The overall mean (± SEM) incidence of adult hydrocephalus in this population was 77 ± 30 per year, with a significant increase in incidence in the past decade (55 ± 3 [1990-2003] vs 102 ± 6 [2004-2015]; p < 0.0001). Hydrocephalus in a majority of the patients had a vascular etiology (45.5%) or was a result of a tumor (30.2%). The incidence of hydrocephalus in different age groups varied according to various pathologies. The incidence was significantly higher in males with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (p = 0.03) or head injury (p = 0.01) and higher in females with pseudotumor cerebri (p < 0.0001). In addition, the overall incidence of hydrocephalus was significantly higher in Caucasian patients (p = 0.0002) than in those of any other race. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge of the demographic variations in adult-onset hydrocephalus is helpful in achieving better risk stratification and better managing the disease in patients. For general applicability, these results should be validated in a large-scale meta-analysis based on a national population database. PMID:27581317

  13. Sonic hedgehog cascade is required for penile postnatal morphogenesis, differentiation, and adult homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Podlasek, Carol A; Zelner, David J; Jiang, Hong Bin; Tang, Yi; Houston, John; McKenna, Kevin E; McVary, Kevin T

    2003-02-01

    The penis is unique in that it undergoes morphogenesis and differentiation primarily in the postnatal period. For complex structures such as the penis to be made from undifferentiated precursor cells, proliferation, differentiation, and patterning are required. This process involves coordinated activity of multiple signals. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) forms part of a regulatory cascade that is essential for growth and morphogenesis of many tissues. It is hypothesized that the penis utilizes regulatory mechanisms similar to those of the limb and accessory sex organs to pattern penile postnatal morphogenesis and differentiation and that the Shh cascade is critical to this process. To test this hypothesis, Shh, BMP-4, Ptc, and Hoxa-10 localization and function were examined in Sprague-Dawley rat penes by means of quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. These genes were expressed in the penis during postnatal morphogenesis in a spatially and temporally restricted manner in adjacent layers of the corpora cavernosal sinusoids. The function of Shh and BMP-4 is to establish and maintain corpora cavernosal sinusoids. The data suggest that Ptc and Hoxa-10 are also important in penile morphogenesis. The continuing function of Shh and targets of its signaling in maintaining penile homeostasis in the adult is significant because disruption of Shh signaling affects erectile function. This is the first report that demonstrates the significant role that Shh plays in establishing and maintaining penile homeostasis and how this relates to erectile function. These studies provide valuable insight that may be applied to improve treatment options for erectile dysfunction. PMID:12533405

  14. Adults Living with Limited Literacy and Chronic Illness: Patient Education Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Judy; Taylor, Maurice C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how Canadian adults living with limited literacy and chronic illness made meaning of their patient education experiences. The study used a hermeneutic phenomenological research design and employed three data sources over a nine-month period. Data was interpreted and analyzed as it was collected,…

  15. Successful treatment of ileocolic intussusception with air enema reduction in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Satoshi; Kanemura, Takashi; Yokouchi, Yukako; Kamiichi, Hideo; Kiriu, Nobuaki; Koike, Yuji

    2014-05-01

    Intussusception is a rare condition in adults, representing only 1% of all bowel obstructions. In adult cases, operative explorations are recommended to treat the bowel obstruction and to diagnose underlying diseases. The objective of the current case report was to describe the successful treatment of ileocolic intussusception with air enema reduction in an adult patient. A previously healthy 21-year-old woman had a 20-hour history of colicky abdominal pain and vomiting and was diagnosed as having idiopathic ileocolic intussusception by abdominal computed tomography. We treated the patient with air enema reduction under fluoroscopic guidance instead of an operative procedure. She received oxygen and intravenous midazolam to provide some degree of pain relief. Air was carefully pumped manually into the rectum, and the air pressure was monitored with a manometer. Because of air leakage from the rectum through the void to the outside the body, we continued to provide air to maintain the air pressure between 40 and 60 mm Hg. Three minutes after initiation of the air enema, when the patient experienced increasing abdominal pain and vomiting, the pressure was temporarily increased to greater than 100 mm Hg, and the air reached the terminal ileum. We considered the reduction successful and confirmed it with an abdominal ultrasound examination. We believe that air enema reduction is effective for treating idiopathic intussusception within 24 hours of symptom onset in young, previously healthy adult patients.

  16. Oral dexmedetomidine for preoperative sedation in an adult uncooperative autistic patient.

    PubMed

    Konia, Mojca Remskar

    2016-11-01

    We describe preoperative sedation with oral dexmedetomidine 5 mcg/kg in an uncooperative adult with autism and developmental delay. The sedation with oral dexmedetomidine achieved good sedation level (Ramsey 4-5), allowing for calm transfer of the patient to the operating room and uneventful induction of anesthesia. PMID:27687341

  17. The relationships among separation anxiety disorder, adult attachment style and agoraphobia in patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Pini, Stefano; Abelli, Marianna; Troisi, Alfonso; Siracusano, Alberto; Cassano, Giovanni B; Shear, Katherine M; Baldwin, David

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that separation anxiety disorder occurs more frequently in adults than children. It is unclear whether the presence of adult separation anxiety disorder (ASAD) is a manifestation of anxious attachment, or a form of agoraphobia, or a specific condition with clinically significant consequences. We conducted a study to examine these questions. A sample of 141 adult outpatients with panic disorder participated in the study. Participants completed standardized measures of separation anxiety, attachment style, agoraphobia, panic disorder severity and quality of life. Patients with ASAD (49.5% of our sample) had greater panic symptom severity and more impairment in quality of life than those without separation anxiety. We found a greater rate of symptoms suggestive of anxious attachment among panic patients with ASAD compared to those without ASAD. However, the relationship between ASAD and attachment style is not strong, and adult ASAD occurs in some patients who report secure attachment style. Similarly, there is little evidence for the idea that separation anxiety disorder is a form of agoraphobia. Factor analysis shows clear differentiation of agoraphobic and separation anxiety symptoms. Our data corroborate the notion that ASAD is a distinct condition associated with impairment in quality of life and needs to be better recognized and treated in patients with panic disorder.

  18. Adult/Patient Nutrition Education Materials. January 1982-October 1989. Quick Bibliography Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updegrove, Natalie A.

    This publication contains abstracts of books, articles, and research studies on the subject of adult patient nutrition. The materials offer dietary guidelines for mature individuals with a variety of ailments. The citations in this bibliography were entered in the "Agricola" database between January, 1979 and October, 1989. (JD)

  19. An Examination of Intimate Partner Violence and Psychological Stressors in Adult Abortion Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Gretchen E.; Otis, Melanie D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an exploratory study examining the relationship between intimate partner violence and psychological stressors in a sample of 188 adult abortion patients. Results indicate the almost 15% of respondents report a history of abuse by the coconceiving partner. In addition, women who reported having had one or…

  20. Lessons Learned While Providing Group Counseling for Adult Patients with Metastatic Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Jack A.; Cumbia, Gilbert G.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a review of lessons learned in dealing with unique problems encountered while providing group counseling for adult patients with metastatic cancer. Discusses problems, institutional policies, personal biases, and logistics associated with forming, establishing, maintaining, conducting and assessing the outcomes of group counseling with…

  1. Experts' recommendations for the management of adult patients with cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruno; Bastien, Olivier; Karim, Bendjelid; Benjelid, Karim; Cariou, Alain; Chouihed, Tahar; Combes, Alain; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Megarbane, Bruno; Plaisance, Patrick; Ouattara, Alexandre; Spaulding, Christian; Splaulding, Christian; Teboul, Jean-Louis; Vanhuyse, Fabrice; Boulain, Thierry; Kuteifan, Kaldoun

    2015-12-01

    Unlike for septic shock, there are no specific international recommendations regarding the management of cardiogenic shock (CS) in critically ill patients. We present herein recommendations for the management of cardiogenic shock in adults, developed with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system by an expert group of the French-Language Society of Intensive Care (Société de Réanimation de Langue Française (SRLF)), with the participation the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Cardiology Society (SFC), the French Emergency Medicine Society (SFMU), and the French Society of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (SFCTCV). The recommendations cover 15 fields of application such as: epidemiology, myocardial infarction, monitoring, vasoactive drugs, prehospital care, cardiac arrest, mechanical assistance, general treatments, cardiac surgery, poisoning, cardiogenic shock complicating end-stage cardiac failure, post-shock treatment, various etiologies, and medical care pathway. The experts highlight the fact that CS is a rare disease, the management of which requires a multidisciplinary technical platform as well as specialized and experienced medical teams. In particular, each expert center must be able to provide, at the same site, skills in a variety of disciplines, including medical and interventional cardiology, anesthesia, thoracic and vascular surgery, intensive care, cardiac assistance, radiology including for interventional vascular procedures, and a circulatory support mobile unit. PMID:26152849

  2. Changes in Quality of Life in 7 Older Adult Patients Receiving Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Russell, David G.; Kimura, Melissa N.; Cowie, Harriet R.; de Groot, Caroline M.M.; McMinn, Elise A.P.; Sherson, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case series is to report on symptomatic and quality of life (QoL) changes in 7 older adult chiropractic patients who were receiving care using Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique (AMCT). Clinical Features Seven patients were selected from 2 chiropractic offices in Auckland, New Zealand. Patients were included if they were older adults receiving AMCT care and for whom at least 2 QoL assessments had been performed. The patients, aged 69-80 years, primarily received care for a variety of musculoskeletal complaints. Intervention and Outcomes The patients reported improvements in their presenting complaints as well as a number of nonmusculoskeletal symptoms. Each patient demonstrated clinical improvements in their RAND 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) results. The average improvement in QoL measured using a SF-36 questionnaire was 8.0 points in the physical component and 4.1 points in the mental component. Four cases had a second progress evaluation using the SF-36 and showed an overall improvement of 5.2 in the physical and 9.8 in the mental components from baseline. Conclusion This case series describes an improvement in QoL, as measured by the SF-36 instrument, as well as subjectively reported improvements in both musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal symptoms in 7 older adults receiving chiropractic care. PMID:27069434

  3. Best Practices in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Focus on Asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    Boissel, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of asparaginase in chemotherapy regimens to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has had a positive impact on survival in pediatric patients. Historically, asparaginase has been excluded from most treatment protocols for adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients because of perceived toxicity in this population, and this is believed to have contributed to poorer outcomes in these patients. However, retrospective analyses over the past 12 years have shown that 2-, 5-, and 7-year overall survival of AYA patients is significantly improved with pediatric versus adult protocols. The addition of asparaginase to adult protocols yielded high rates of first remission and improved survival. However, long-term survival remains lower compared with what has been seen in pediatrics. The notion that asparaginase is poorly tolerated by AYA patients has been challenged in multiple studies. In some, but not all, studies, the incidences of hepatic and pancreatic toxicities were higher in AYA patients, whereas the rates of hypersensitivity reactions did not appear to differ with age. There is an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events, and management with anti-coagulation therapy is recommended. Overall, the risk of therapy-related mortality is low. Together, this suggests that high-intensity pediatric protocols offer an effective and tolerable approach to treating ALL in the AYA population. PMID:26421220

  4. Interventions That Affect Gastrointestinal Motility in Hospitalized Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Asrani, Varsha M.; Yoon, Harry D.; Megill, Robin D.; Windsor, John A.; Petrov, Maxim S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility is a common complication in acute, critically ill, postoperative, and chronic patients that may lead to impaired nutrient delivery, poor clinical, and patient-reported outcomes. Several pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions to treat GI dysmotility were investigated in dozens of clinical studies. However, they often yielded conflicting results, at least in part, because various (nonstandardized) definitions of GI dysmotility were used and methodological quality of studies was poor. While a universally accepted definition of GI dysmotility is yet to be developed, a systematic analysis of data derived from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials may provide robust data on absolute and relative effectiveness of various interventions as the study outcome (GI motility) was assessed in the least biased manner. To systematically review data from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials to determine and compare the effectiveness of interventions that affect GI motility. Three electronic databases (MEDLINE, SCOPUS, and EMBASE) were searched. A random effects model was used for meta-analysis. The summary estimates were reported as mean difference (MD) with the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI). A total of 38 double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials involving 2371 patients were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review. These studies investigated a total of 20 different interventions, of which 6 interventions were meta-analyzed. Of them, the use of dopamine receptor antagonists (MD, −8.99; 95% CI, −17.72 to −0.27; P = 0.04) and macrolides (MD, −26.04; 95% CI, −51.25 to −0.82; P = 0.04) significantly improved GI motility compared with the placebo group. The use of botulism toxin significantly impaired GI motility compared with the placebo group (MD, 5.31; 95% CI, −0.04 to 10.67; P = 0.05). Other interventions (dietary factors, probiotics, hormones) did

  5. [Benefits and risks of urologic laparoscopic surgery in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Safarík, L; Novák, K; Závada, J; Bízová, S; Stolz, J; Sedlácek, J; Dvorácek, J; Vraný, M

    2003-12-01

    The paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of the laparoscopic operations, the number of which steadily rises in urology. The laparoscopic surgery is considered to be a benefit regarding the short postoperative hospital stay, painless postoperative course, and virtually non-existing postoperative paralytic ileus. As disadvantage are deemed the long learning curve for the operating personal, and high economical costs, which could be cut down only if short off-work period in productive population is included. In the paper, the pathophysiological guidelines are outlined and emphasized during the laparoscopic operation, which the surgical and anesthesiological teams have to have in mind. On the own cohort of patients, the numbers and types of operations are described, which have been done at our department.

  6. Intrusion of incisors in adult patients with marginal bone loss.

    PubMed

    Melsen, B; Agerbaek, N; Markenstam, G

    1989-09-01

    Elongated and spaced incisors are common problems in patients suffering from severe periodontal disease. Thirty patients characterized by marginal bone loss and deep overbite were treated by intrusion of incisors. Three different methods for intrusion were applied: (1) J hooks and extraoral high-pull headgear, (2) utility arches, (3) intrusion bent into a loop in a 0.17 x 0.25-inch wire, and (4) base arch as described by Burstone. The intrusion was evaluated from the displacement of the apex, incision, and the center of resistance of the most prominent or elongated central incisor. Change in the marginal bone level and the amount of root resorption were evaluated on standardized intraoral radiographs. The pockets were assessed by standardized probing and the clinical crown length was measured on study casts. The results showed that the true intrusion of the center of resistance varied from 0 to 3.5 mm and was most pronounced when intrusion was performed with a base arch. The clinical crown length was generally reduced by 0.5 to 1.0 mm. The marginal bone level approached the cementoenamel junction in all but six cases. All cases demonstrated root resorption varying from 1 to 3 mm. The total amount of alveolar support--that is, the calculated area of the alveolar wall--was unaltered or increased in 19 of the 30 cases. The dependency of the results on the oral hygiene, the force distribution, and the perioral function was evaluated in relation to the individual cases. It was obvious that intrusion was best performed when (1) forces were low (5 to 15 gm per tooth) with the line of action of the force passing through or close to the center of resistance, (2) the gingiva status was healthy, and (3) no interference with perioral function was present.

  7. Dietary Intake In Adult Female Coeliac Disease Patients In Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Mičetić-Turk, Dušanka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The aim of the study was to assess dietary intake of coeliac disease (CD) patients and to determine if they are meeting the dietary reference values for a balanced diet. Subjects/Methods 40 women with CD, aged from 23 to 76 participated in our study. Total daily intake was assessed by a three-day food diary. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) was calculated using Harris-Benedict equation. Considering physical activity level (PAL) 1.4, the recommended total energy expenditure (TEE) value was determined. The data was evaluated with professional evaluation software Prodi and statistically analysed. Results 40 participants returned the food diary. The average energy intake was significantly too low to ensure the meeting of all-day energy needs (p<0.05). The meals contained a recommended proportion of protein, but a statistically significantly higher proportion of fat (p<0.05), lower proportion of carbohydrates and a significantly lower intake of dietary fibre (p<0.05). Regarding macro-, micro- elements and vitamins, there was a significant lack in the intake of calcium and iodine, folic acid, vitamin D and vitamin A (p<0.05), meanwhile iron intake was at the lower limit of the recommended intake, whereas zinc, potassium and vitamin K intake were significantly higher according to the recommended values, but were comparable with the intake of the general population in the Central European area. Conclusion Even in subjects with adequate or low daily energy intake, their meals contained too much fat, too few carbohydrates and dietary fibre as well as inorganic substances. The patients with CD should get regular nutritional monitoring and education on the quality and balance of a gluten-free diet. PMID:27284377

  8. Hospital utilization patterns and costs for adult sickle cell patients in Illinois.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, K; Karrison, T; Koshy, M; Patel, A; Friedmann, P; Cassel, C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine population size, demographic characteristics, hospital utilization patterns, the specialties of physicians providing care, and costs for hospitalized adult sickle cell patients in Illinois. METHODS: A statewide, administrative dataset for the two-year period from january 1992 through December 1993 was analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: There were 8403 admissions among 1189 individual sickle cell patients for the two-year period. Eighty-five percent of patients resided in the Chicago metropolitan area. The median age of the 1189 patients was 29; two-thirds had Medicaid or Medicare coverage. Emergency departments were the primary source of admissions (85.7%). The most common admitting diagnosis was painful crisis (97.4%), and average length of stay was four days. The median number of admissions per patient was three; most patients (85%) used only one or two hospitals. A small group used more than four hospitals and accounted for 23% of statewide admissions. Primary care physicians cared for most patients, and total hospitalization charges were more than $59 million. CONCLUSIONS: In Illinois the adult sickle cell population is concentrated in major urban centers, primarily the Chicago metropolitan area. These patients accounted for approximately 8400 admissions and more than $59 million in hospital charges during the two-year study period. A small group of patients used multiple hospitals and accounted for more than 23% of total hospitalization charges. This study shows the necessity of and provides a useful framework for developing targeted programs for adult sickle cell patients as well as for training physicians to efficiently provide comprehensive health care services for this population. PMID:9018288

  9. Privacy and security requirements of distributed computer based patient records.

    PubMed

    Moehr, J R

    1994-02-01

    Privacy and security issues increase in complexity as we move from the conventional patient record to the computer based patient record (CPR) supporting patient care and to cross-institutional networked CPRs. The privacy and security issues surrounding the CPR are outlined. Measures for privacy and security protection are summarized. It is suggested that we lack a key component of an information sharing culture. We need means for semantic indexing in the form of a metadata base at the level of the instantiation of a data base rather than at the level of its schemas.

  10. Clinical management of needle-phobia patients requiring acupuncture therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, D P; Lu, G P

    1999-01-01

    Both acupuncture and hypnosis have their distinct applications in the health profession, but combining acupuncture therapy with hypnosis has rarely been done for the purpose of therapeutic treatment, perhaps because few clinicians have proper training in both disciplines. For needle phobic patients, acupuncture treatment can be a dreadful experience, as multiple needles are usually used. It is stressful for both clinicians and patients when the patients are put in an extremely apprehensive state. Our research for combining both acupuncture and hypnosis has revealed that synergy does exist in both, and that hypnosis does augment the effect of acupuncture, resulting in better treatment outcomes. Since many acupuncture patients who are needle phobic do not return for further treatment even though acupuncture has rendered good therapeutic results for them, stress reduction with hypnosis is, therefore, a welcome complimentary adjunct that would enable them to return for further needed acupuncture treatment if and when the factor of fear of the needle is removed. PMID:10768416

  11. Assessment and treatment of insomnia in adult patients with alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kirk J

    2015-06-01

    Insomnia in patients with alcohol dependence has increasingly become a target of treatment due to its prevalence, persistence, and associations with relapse and suicidal thoughts, as well as randomized controlled studies demonstrating efficacy with behavior therapies and non-addictive medications. This article focuses on assessing and treating insomnia that persists despite 4 or more weeks of sobriety in alcohol-dependent adults. Selecting among the various options for treatment follows a comprehensive assessment of insomnia and its multifactorial causes. In addition to chronic, heavy alcohol consumption and its effects on sleep regulatory systems, contributing factors include premorbid insomnia; co-occurring medical, psychiatric, and other sleep disorders; use of other substances and medications; stress; environmental factors; and inadequate sleep hygiene. The assessment makes use of history, rating scales, and sleep diaries as well as physical, mental status, and laboratory examinations to rule out these factors. Polysomnography is indicated when another sleep disorder is suspected, such as sleep apnea or periodic limb movement disorder, or when insomnia is resistant to treatment. Sobriety remains a necessary, first-line treatment for insomnia, and most patients will have some improvement. If insomnia-specific treatment is needed, then brief behavioral therapies are the treatment of choice, because they have shown long-lasting benefit without worsening of drinking outcomes. Medications work faster, but they generally work only as long as they are taken. Melatonin agonists; sedating antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics; and benzodiazepine receptor agonists each have their benefits and risks, which must be weighed and monitored to optimize outcomes. Some relapse prevention medications may also have sleep-promoting activity. Although it is assumed that treatment for insomnia will help prevent relapse, this has not been firmly established. Therefore

  12. Assessment and treatment of insomnia in adult patients with alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kirk J

    2015-06-01

    Insomnia in patients with alcohol dependence has increasingly become a target of treatment due to its prevalence, persistence, and associations with relapse and suicidal thoughts, as well as randomized controlled studies demonstrating efficacy with behavior therapies and non-addictive medications. This article focuses on assessing and treating insomnia that persists despite 4 or more weeks of sobriety in alcohol-dependent adults. Selecting among the various options for treatment follows a comprehensive assessment of insomnia and its multifactorial causes. In addition to chronic, heavy alcohol consumption and its effects on sleep regulatory systems, contributing factors include premorbid insomnia; co-occurring medical, psychiatric, and other sleep disorders; use of other substances and medications; stress; environmental factors; and inadequate sleep hygiene. The assessment makes use of history, rating scales, and sleep diaries as well as physical, mental status, and laboratory examinations to rule out these factors. Polysomnography is indicated when another sleep disorder is suspected, such as sleep apnea or periodic limb movement disorder, or when insomnia is resistant to treatment. Sobriety remains a necessary, first-line treatment for insomnia, and most patients will have some improvement. If insomnia-specific treatment is needed, then brief behavioral therapies are the treatment of choice, because they have shown long-lasting benefit without worsening of drinking outcomes. Medications work faster, but they generally work only as long as they are taken. Melatonin agonists; sedating antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics; and benzodiazepine receptor agonists each have their benefits and risks, which must be weighed and monitored to optimize outcomes. Some relapse prevention medications may also have sleep-promoting activity. Although it is assumed that treatment for insomnia will help prevent relapse, this has not been firmly established. Therefore

  13. Molecular Diagnostic Experience of Whole-Exome Sequencing in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Jennifer E.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; James, Regis A.; Bainbridge, Matthew; Niu, Zhiyv; Wang, Xia; Dhar, Shweta; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Akdemir, Zeynep H.C.; Gambin, Tomasz; Xia, Fan; Person, Richard E.; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Shaw, Chad A.; Sutton, V. Reid; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Muzny, Donna; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Plon, Sharon E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Whole exome sequencing (WES) is increasingly used as a diagnostic tool in medicine, but prior reports focus on predominantly pediatric cohorts with neurologic or developmental disorders. We describe the diagnostic yield and characteristics of whole exome sequencing in adults. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of consecutive WES reports for adults from a diagnostic laboratory. Phenotype composition was determined using Human Phenotype Ontology terms. Results Molecular diagnoses were reported for 17.5% (85/486) of adults, lower than a primarily pediatric population (25.2%; p=0.0003); the diagnostic rate was higher (23.9%) in those 18–30 years of age compared to patients over 30 years (10.4%; p=0.0001). Dual Mendelian diagnoses contributed to 7% of diagnoses, revealing blended phenotypes. Diagnoses were more frequent among individuals with abnormalities of the nervous system, skeletal system, head/neck, and growth. Diagnostic rate was independent of family history information, and de novo mutations contributed to 61.4% of autosomal dominant diagnoses. Conclusion Early WES experience in adults demonstrates molecular diagnoses in a substantial proportion of patients, informing clinical management, recurrence risk and recommendations for relatives. A positive family history was not predictive, consistent with molecular diagnoses often revealed by de novo events, informing the Mendelian basis of genetic disease in adults. PMID:26633545

  14. Urinary tract infections in adult general practice patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Kochen, Michael M

    2002-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are symptomatic infections of the urinary tract, mainly caused by the bacterium Escherichia coli. One in two women suffers from a UTI at least once in her life. The young and sexually active are particulaly affected, but it is also seen in elderly, postmenopausal women. The likelihood of recurrence is high. Diagnosis is made with regard to typical complaints and the presence of leucocytes and nitrites in the urine. A culture is unnecessary in most cases. Uncomplicated UTI should be distinguished from complicated UTI, which has a risk of severe illness. The treatment of choice--short-term therapy with trimethoprim or nitrofurantoin--is successful in over 80% of the cases. Co-trimoxazol fluoroquinolones or cephalsporins are not considered first-choice drugs. There are indications that general practitioners' (GPs') management of UTI is not always optimal, specifically concerning diagnostic tests, the application of second-choice antibiotics, and the length of prescribed treatment courses. Many points relevant to GPs requirefurther research, such as epidemiology and resistance of urinary pathogens in the community and natural history of UTI, as well as optimal management in elderly or complicated patients and men. PMID:12236281

  15. Prospective Safety Surveillance of GH-Deficient Adults: Comparison of GH-Treated vs Untreated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Mark L.; Xu, Rong; Crowe, Brenda J.; Robison, Leslie L.; Erfurth, Eva Marie; Kleinberg, David L.; Zimmermann, Alan G.; Woodmansee, Whitney W.; Cutler, Gordon B.; Chipman, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: In clinical practice, the safety profile of GH replacement therapy for GH-deficient adults compared with no replacement therapy is unknown. Objective: The objective of this study was to compare adverse events (AEs) in GH-deficient adults who were GH-treated with those in GH-deficient adults who did not receive GH replacement. Design and Setting: This was a prospective observational study in the setting of US clinical practices. Patients and Outcome Measures: AEs were compared between GH-treated (n = 1988) and untreated (n = 442) GH-deficient adults after adjusting for baseline group differences and controlling the false discovery rate. The standardized mortality ratio was calculated using US mortality rates. Results: After a mean follow-up of 2.3 years, there was no significant difference in rates of death, cancer, intracranial tumor growth or recurrence, diabetes, or cardiovascular events in GH-treated compared with untreated patients. The standardized mortality ratio was not increased in either group. Unexpected AEs (GH-treated vs untreated, P ≤ .05) included insomnia (6.4% vs 2.7%), dyspnea (4.2% vs 2.0%), anxiety (3.4% vs 0.9%), sleep apnea (3.3% vs 0.9%), and decreased libido (2.1% vs 0.2%). Some of these AEs were related to baseline risk factors (including obesity and cardiopulmonary disease), higher GH dose, or concomitant GH side effects. Conclusions: In GH-deficient adults, there was no evidence for a GH treatment effect on death, cancer, intracranial tumor recurrence, diabetes, or cardiovascular events, although the follow-up period was of insufficient duration to be conclusive for these long-term events. The identification of unexpected GH-related AEs reinforces the fact that patient selection and GH dose titration are important to ensure safety of adult GH replacement. PMID:23345098

  16. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, Nathalie; Huynh, Anne; Maury, Sébastien; Tabrizi, Reza; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; Thomas, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Coiteux, Valérie; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Hichri, Yosr; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Graux, Carlos; Chalandon, Yves; Blaise, Didier; Schanz, Urs; Lhéritier, Véronique; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-04-16

    Because a pediatric-inspired Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL) protocol yielded a markedly improved outcome in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, we aimed to reassess the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients treated in the GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. In all, 522 patients age 15 to 55 years old and presenting with at least 1 conventional high-risk factor were candidates for SCT in first complete remission. Among these, 282 (54%) received a transplant in first complete remission. At 3 years, posttransplant cumulative incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse-free survival (RFS) were estimated at 19.5%, 15.5%, and 64.7%, respectively. Time-dependent analysis did not reveal a significant difference in RFS between SCT and no-SCT cohorts. However, SCT was associated with longer RFS in patients with postinduction minimal residual disease (MRD) ≥10(-3) (hazard ratio, 0.40) but not in good MRD responders. In B-cell precursor ALL, SCT also benefitted patients with focal IKZF1 gene deletion (hazard ratio, 0.42). This article shows that poor early MRD response, in contrast to conventional ALL risk factors, is an excellent tool to identify patients who may benefit from allogeneic SCT in the context of intensified adult ALL therapy. Trial GRAALL-2003 was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027; GRAALL-2005 was registered as #NCT00327678. PMID:25587040

  17. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, Nathalie; Huynh, Anne; Maury, Sébastien; Tabrizi, Reza; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; Thomas, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Coiteux, Valérie; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Hichri, Yosr; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Graux, Carlos; Chalandon, Yves; Blaise, Didier; Schanz, Urs; Lhéritier, Véronique; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-04-16

    Because a pediatric-inspired Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL) protocol yielded a markedly improved outcome in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, we aimed to reassess the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients treated in the GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. In all, 522 patients age 15 to 55 years old and presenting with at least 1 conventional high-risk factor were candidates for SCT in first complete remission. Among these, 282 (54%) received a transplant in first complete remission. At 3 years, posttransplant cumulative incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse-free survival (RFS) were estimated at 19.5%, 15.5%, and 64.7%, respectively. Time-dependent analysis did not reveal a significant difference in RFS between SCT and no-SCT cohorts. However, SCT was associated with longer RFS in patients with postinduction minimal residual disease (MRD) ≥10(-3) (hazard ratio, 0.40) but not in good MRD responders. In B-cell precursor ALL, SCT also benefitted patients with focal IKZF1 gene deletion (hazard ratio, 0.42). This article shows that poor early MRD response, in contrast to conventional ALL risk factors, is an excellent tool to identify patients who may benefit from allogeneic SCT in the context of intensified adult ALL therapy. Trial GRAALL-2003 was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027; GRAALL-2005 was registered as #NCT00327678.

  18. Theory of mind deficit in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chiavarino, Claudia; Bianchino, Claudia; Brach-Prever, Silvia; Riggi, Chiara; Palumbo, Luigi; Bara, Bruno G; Bosco, Francesca M

    2015-10-01

    This article provides the first assessment of theory of mind, that is, the ability to reason about mental states, in adult patients with congenital heart disease. Patients with congenital heart disease and matched healthy controls were administered classical theory of mind tasks and a semi-structured interview which provides a multidimensional evaluation of theory of mind (Theory of Mind Assessment Scale). The patients with congenital heart disease performed worse than the controls on the Theory of Mind Assessment Scale, whereas they did as well as the control group on the classical theory-of-mind tasks. These findings provide the first evidence that adults with congenital heart disease may display specific impairments in theory of mind.

  19. Associations between adult attachment characteristics, medical burden, and life satisfaction among older primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Kirchmann, Helmut; Nolte, Tobias; Runkewitz, Kristin; Bayerle, Lisa; Becker, Simone; Blasczyk, Verena; Lindloh, Julia; Strauss, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    We investigated whether attachment security, measured by the Adult Attachment Prototype Rating (AAPR), was correlated with life satisfaction, independent of sociodemographic characteristics, medical burden, and age-related coping strategies in a sample of 81 patients (69-73 years) recruited from the register of a general primary care practice. Furthermore, we examined whether patients classified as AAPR-secure reported better adjustment to medical burden in terms of higher life satisfaction than did insecure patients. Attachment security was independently related to life satisfaction. Moreover, the association between medical burden and lower life satisfaction was significantly stronger for insecure than for secure participants. Our findings indicate that interventions to improve attachment security or coping processes related to attachment could help older adults retain life satisfaction.

  20. Gender differences among young adult cancer patients: a study of blogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bora; Gillham, David

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has increasing relevance and practical use as a tool to support cancer care. For example, health support Web sites are now widely used to connect specific groups of patients who may otherwise have remained isolated, and understanding their health-related online behaviors will help in the development of more effective health support Web sites. This article examined blogs written by young adults affected by cancer and in particular examined the gender differences in these blog entries through content analysis. The results showed there is little difference in blog content between genders. This suggests that the blog environment could lessen the gender-typical behaviors often expected by society and may provide an outlet for young adult cancer patients to more freely share their cancer-related experiences, at the same time providing an opportunity for social connection. This is particularly significant for male patients who are known to inhibit their emotions as well as the expression of their health concerns.

  1. Clinical and MRI findings of cerebellar agenesis in two living adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Gelal, Fazıl Mustafa; Kalaycı, Tuğçe Özlem; Çelebisoy, Mehmet; Karakaş, Levent; Akkurt, Hülya Erdoğan; Koç, Feray

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar agenesis (CA) is an extremely rare entity. We present two adult patients with CA. The 61-year-old man had ataxia, dysarthria, abnormalities in cerebellar tests, severe cognitive impairment, and moderate mental retardation. The 26-year-old woman had dysmetria, dysdiadochokinesia, and dysarthria as well as mild cognitive impairment and mild mental retardation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed complete absence of the cerebellum with small residual vermis. Brainstem was hypoplastic and structures above tentorium were normal. Supratentorial white matter bundles were unaffected in diffusion tensor tractography. Only few adult patients with CA have so far been published. These cases show that patients with CA present with a variety of developmental, clinical, and mental abnormalities; and emphasize the role of the cerebellum in normal motor, language, and mental development. PMID:27293341

  2. Different cryopreservation requirements in foetal versus adult skin cells from an endangered mammal, the Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    León-Quinto, Trinidad; Simón, Miguel A; Cadenas, Rafael; Martínez, Africa; Serna, Arturo

    2014-04-01

    Cryobanking somatic foetal cells acquire much relevance in endangered species for biodiversity conservation purposes. Such cells could be later used to reintroduce the lost genes into the breeding pool, by inducing pluripotency and/or nuclear transfer if necessary. Since requirements for preserving foetal cells are not always the same as for adult ones, we evaluated the cryosensitivity of foetal skin cells in comparison with adult ones from the critically endangered Iberian lynx. Responses to cryoinjury were analyzed in both thawed cell types by means of cell viability and functionality (by analyzing their membrane integrity, metabolic activity, glycosaminoglycan content and proliferative activity). Freezing media included the permeating cryoprotectant Me2SO, either alone or along with the non-permeating cryoprotectant sucrose at 0.1 or 0.2M. When Me2SO was the only cryoprotectant, survival rate fell in thawed foetal cells to 54±4% (against 89±6% for thawed adult ones) and both proliferative and metabolic activities remained significantly lower than values for thawed adult cells. However, the combination of sucrose (both 0.1 as 0.2) and Me2SO in foetal cells significantly increased their survival rates (to 71±4% and 73±5%, respectively), proliferative activities (partially at day 7 and completely at day 14 after thawing) and metabolic activities. Our findings clearly show a difference between foetal and adult cells concerning their cryopreservation sensitivity and requirements, as well as their recovery time after thawing. These results are of relevance for the cryopreservation of foetal and adult cells from the Iberian lynx and could be also useful for other mammals.

  3. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Vancomycin in Adult Patients Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Moore, J N; Healy, J R; Thoma, B N; Peahota, M M; Ahamadi, M; Schmidt, L; Cavarocchi, N C; Kraft, W K

    2016-09-01

    The literature on the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy is sparse. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for vancomycin in ECMO patients was developed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling on the concentration-time profiles of 14 ECMO patients who received intravenous vancomycin. Model selection was based on log-likelihood criterion, goodness of fit plots, and scientific plausibility. Identification of covariates was done using a full covariate model approach. The pharmacokinetics of vancomycin was adequately described with a two-compartment model. Parameters included clearance of 2.83 L/hr, limited central volume of distribution 24.2 L, and low residual variability 0.67%. Findings from the analysis suggest that standard dosing recommendations for vancomycin in non-ECMO patients are adequate to achieve therapeutic trough concentrations in ECMO patients. This further shows that ECMO minimally affects the PK of vancomycin in adults including in higher-weight patients. PMID:27639260

  4. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Vancomycin in Adult Patients Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Healy, JR; Thoma, BN; Peahota, MM; Ahamadi, M; Schmidt, L; Cavarocchi, NC; Kraft, WK

    2016-01-01

    The literature on the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy is sparse. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for vancomycin in ECMO patients was developed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling on the concentration–time profiles of 14 ECMO patients who received intravenous vancomycin. Model selection was based on log‐likelihood criterion, goodness of fit plots, and scientific plausibility. Identification of covariates was done using a full covariate model approach. The pharmacokinetics of vancomycin was adequately described with a two‐compartment model. Parameters included clearance of 2.83 L/hr, limited central volume of distribution 24.2 L, and low residual variability 0.67%. Findings from the analysis suggest that standard dosing recommendations for vancomycin in non‐ECMO patients are adequate to achieve therapeutic trough concentrations in ECMO patients. This further shows that ECMO minimally affects the PK of vancomycin in adults including in higher‐weight patients. PMID:27639260

  5. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe Artemether Pharmacokinetics in Adult and Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen; Heimbach, Tycho; Jain, Jay Prakash; Awasthi, Rakesh; Hamed, Kamal; Sunkara, Gangadhar; He, Handan

    2016-10-01

    Artemether is co-administered with lumefantrine as part of a fixed-dose combination therapy for malaria in both adult and pediatric patients. However, artemether exposure is higher in younger infants (1-3 months) with a lower body weight (<5 kg) as compared to older infants (3-6 months) with a higher body weight (≥5 to <10 kg), children, and adults. In contrast, lumefantrine exposure is similar in all age groups. This article describes the clinically observed artemether exposure data in pediatric populations across various age groups (1 month to 12 years) and body weights (<5 or ≥5 kg) using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) mechanistic models. A PBPK model was developed using artemether physicochemical, biopharmaceutic, and metabolic properties together with known enzyme ontogeny and pediatric physiology. The model was verified using clinical data from adult patients after multiple doses of oral artemether, and was then applied to simulate the exposure in children and infants. The simulated PBPK concentration-time profiles captured observed clinical data. Consistent with the clinical data, the PBPK model simulations indicated a higher artemether exposure for younger infants with lower body weight. A PBPK model developed for artemether reliably described the clinical data from adult and pediatric patients. PMID:27506269

  6. Differential requirement for irf8 in formation of embryonic and adult macrophages in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Shiau, Celia E.; Kaufman, Zoe; Meireles, Ana M.; Talbot, William S.

    2015-01-23

    Interferon regulatory factor 8 (Irf8) is critical for mammalian macrophage development and innate immunity, but its role in teleost myelopoiesis remains incompletely understood. Specifically, genetic tools to analyze the role of irf8 in zebrafish macrophage development at larval and adult stages are lacking. In this study, we generated irf8 null mutants in zebrafish using TALEN-mediated targeting. Our analysis defines different requirements for irf8 at different stages. irf8 is required for formation of all macrophages during primitive and transient definitive hematopoiesis, but not during adult-phase definitive hematopoiesis starting at 5-6 days postfertilization. At early stages, irf8 mutants have excess neutrophils and excess cell death in pu.1-expressing myeloid cells. Macrophage fates were recovered in irf8 mutants after wildtype irf8 expression in neutrophil and macrophage lineages, suggesting that irf8 regulates macrophage specification and survival. In juvenile irf8 mutant fish, mature macrophages are present, but at numbers significantly reduced compared to wildtype, indicating an ongoing requirement for irf8 after embryogenesis. As development progresses, tissue macrophages become apparent in zebrafish irf8 mutants, with the possible exception of microglia. Our study defines distinct requirement for irf8 in myelopoiesis before and after transition to the adult hematopoietic system.

  7. Psychosocial issues affecting adults with congenital heart disease: one patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Livecchi, Tracy A

    2004-12-01

    This article addresses a number of psychosocial issues that advance practice nurses and other health care providers should be aware of when working with patients who have congenital heart disease. If not properly addressed, particularly during adolescence, these issues can have a strong impact on a person's medical care and over-all quality of life. This article includes information from medical literature, conversations with adult patients, and my own experiences as both a patient with congenital heart disease and as a clinical social worker.

  8. Screening adult tuberculosis patients for diabetes mellitus in Ebeye, Republic of the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Nasa, J N; Brostrom, R; Ram, S; Kumar, A M V; Seremai, J; Hauma, M; Paul, I A; Langidrik, J R

    2014-06-21

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the screening of adult TB patients for diabetes (DM) using glycated haemoglobin (HbA1C) in Ebeye, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Of 62 patients registered between July 2010 and December 2012, 28 (45%) had DM. The only significant difference in baseline characteristics between those with and those without DM was higher age in those with DM. Two-month sputum smears and cultures were also not different between the two groups. Despite the limited sample size, this study shows that screening TB patients for DM in Ebeye is feasible and worthwhile and that it should be continued.

  9. Screening adult tuberculosis patients for diabetes mellitus in Ebeye, Republic of the Marshall Islands

    PubMed Central

    Brostrom, R.; Ram, S.; Kumar, A. M. V.; Seremai, J.; Hauma, M.; Paul, I. A.; Langidrik, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the screening of adult TB patients for diabetes (DM) using glycated haemoglobin (HbA1C) in Ebeye, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Of 62 patients registered between July 2010 and December 2012, 28 (45%) had DM. The only significant difference in baseline characteristics between those with and those without DM was higher age in those with DM. Two-month sputum smears and cultures were also not different between the two groups. Despite the limited sample size, this study shows that screening TB patients for DM in Ebeye is feasible and worthwhile and that it should be continued. PMID:26477288

  10. The safe practice of CT coronary angiography in adult patients in UK imaging departments.

    PubMed

    Harden, S P; Bull, R K; Bury, R W; Castellano, E A; Clayton, B; Hamilton, M C K; Morgan-Hughes, G J; O'Regan, D; Padley, S P G; Roditi, G H; Roobottom, C A; Stirrup, J; Nicol, E D

    2016-08-01

    Computed tomography coronary angiography is increasingly used in imaging departments in the investigation of patients with chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease. Due to the routine use of heart rate controlling medication and the potential for very high radiation doses during these scans, there is a need for guidance on best practice for departments performing this examination, so the patient can be assured of a good quality scan and outcome in a safe environment. This article is a summary of the document on 'Standards of practice of computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) in adult patients' published by the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) in December 2014.

  11. Comprehensive Orthodontic Treatment of Adult Patient with Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Leiva Villagra, Noemí; Muñoz Domon, Miguel; Véliz Méndez, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present full orthodontic treatment of an operated cleft lip adult patient. Case Report. An 18-year-old patient consulted for severe crowded teeth. He comes from a poor family. At that time he already had four operations (velum, palate, lip, and myringotomy). Treatment included maxillary expansion, tooth extraction, and fixed orthodontic, as well as kinesiology and speech therapy treatment. A multidisciplinary approach allowed us to achieve successfully an excellent result for this patient and gave him a harmonic smile and an optimal function without orthognathic surgery. Two years after treatment, occlusion remains stable. PMID:25544903

  12. Comprehensive orthodontic treatment of adult patient with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Leiva Villagra, Noemí; Muñoz Domon, Miguel; Véliz Méndez, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present full orthodontic treatment of an operated cleft lip adult patient. Case Report. An 18-year-old patient consulted for severe crowded teeth. He comes from a poor family. At that time he already had four operations (velum, palate, lip, and myringotomy). Treatment included maxillary expansion, tooth extraction, and fixed orthodontic, as well as kinesiology and speech therapy treatment. A multidisciplinary approach allowed us to achieve successfully an excellent result for this patient and gave him a harmonic smile and an optimal function without orthognathic surgery. Two years after treatment, occlusion remains stable.

  13. Atherosclerotic adult Moya-Moya disease in a patient with hyperhomocysteinaemia.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, P; Grasso, M; Lentini, A; Destefanis, E; Bosco, G; Caprioli, M; Bradac, G B; Bergui, M

    2007-03-01

    Moya-Moya is a rare cerebrovascular occlusive disease characterized by bilateral stenosis or occlusion at the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and abnormal vascular network at the base of the brain, named "moya-moya". In children, Moya-Moya disease usually presents with ischemic cerebrovascular events, mainly TIA or lacunar stroke, leading to mental deterioration. In adults, especially in females, it presents with intracranial haemorrhages. We describe the case of an adult patient with an atherosclerotic Moya-Moya disease which presented with a cerebral borderzone infarction.

  14. Post-embryonic nerve-associated precursors to adult pigment cells: genetic requirements and dynamics of morphogenesis and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Budi, Erine H; Patterson, Larissa B; Parichy, David M

    2011-05-01

    The pigment cells of vertebrates serve a variety of functions and generate a stunning variety of patterns. These cells are also implicated in human pathologies including melanoma. Whereas the events of pigment cell development have been studied extensively in the embryo, much less is known about morphogenesis and differentiation of these cells during post-embryonic stages. Previous studies of zebrafish revealed genetically distinct populations of embryonic and adult melanophores, the ectotherm homologue of amniote melanocytes. Here, we use molecular markers, vital labeling, time-lapse imaging, mutational analyses, and transgenesis to identify peripheral nerves as a niche for precursors to adult melanophores that subsequently migrate to the skin to form the adult pigment pattern. We further identify genetic requirements for establishing, maintaining, and recruiting precursors to the adult melanophore lineage and demonstrate novel compensatory behaviors during pattern regulation in mutant backgrounds. Finally, we show that distinct populations of latent precursors having differential regenerative capabilities persist into the adult. These findings provide a foundation for future studies of post-embryonic pigment cell precursors in development, evolution, and neoplasia.

  15. Acute post-disaster medical needs of patients with diabetes: emergency department use in New York City by diabetic adults after Hurricane Sandy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David C; Gupta, Vibha K; Carr, Brendan G; Malik, Sidrah; Ferguson, Brandy; Wall, Stephen P; Smith, Silas W; Goldfrank, Lewis R

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the acute impact of disasters on diabetic patients, we performed a geospatial analysis of emergency department (ED) use by New York City diabetic adults in the week after Hurricane Sandy. Research design and methods Using an all-payer claims database, we retrospectively analyzed the demographics, insurance status, and medical comorbidities of post-disaster ED patients with diabetes who lived in the most geographically vulnerable areas. We compared the patterns of ED use among diabetic adults in the first week after Hurricane Sandy's landfall to utilization before the disaster in 2012. Results In the highest level evacuation zone in New York City, postdisaster increases in ED visits for a primary or secondary diagnosis of diabetes were attributable to a significantly higher proportion of Medicare patients. Emergency visits for a primary diagnosis of diabetes had an increased frequency of certain comorbidities, including hypertension, recent procedure, and chronic skin ulcers. Patients with a history of diabetes visited EDs in increased numbers after Hurricane Sandy for a primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction, prescription refills, drug dependence, dialysis, among other conditions. Conclusions We found that diabetic adults aged 65 years and older are especially at risk for requiring postdisaster emergency care compared to other vulnerable populations. Our findings also suggest that there is a need to support diabetic adults particularly in the week after a disaster by ensuring access to medications, aftercare for patients who had a recent procedure, and optimize their cardiovascular health to reduce the risk of heart attacks. PMID:27547418

  16. Adjuvant chemotherapy in adult medulloblastoma: is it an option for average-risk patients?

    PubMed

    Franceschi, E; Bartolotti, M; Paccapelo, A; Marucci, G; Agati, R; Volpin, L; Danieli, D; Ghimenton, C; Gardiman, M P; Sturiale, C; Poggi, R; Mascarin, M; Balestrini, D; Masotto, B; Brandes, A A

    2016-06-01

    The standard treatment in children with average-risk medulloblastoma (MB) is reduced-dose radiotherapy (RT) followed by chemotherapy. However, in adults, there is no agreement on the use of adjuvant chemotherapy. We performed a retrospective analysis of adult MB patients with average-risk disease, defined as no postsurgical residual (or ≤1.5 cm(2)) and no metastatic disease (M0). Main inclusion criteria were: age >16 years, post-surgical treatment with craniospinal irradiation with or without adjuvant chemotherapy (cisplatin and etoposide ± cyclophosphamide). From 1988 to 2012 were accrued 43 average-risk MB patients treated with surgery and adjuvant RT. Fifteen (34.9 %) patients received also chemotherapy: 7 before RT, 5 after RT, and 3 before and after RT. Reasons to administer chemotherapy were presence of residual disease (even if ≤1.5 cm) and delay in RT. After a median follow up time of 10 years (range: 8-13), median survival was 18 years (95 % CI 9-28) in patients who receive RT alone, and was not reached in patients treated with RT plus chemotherapy. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years were 100 %, 78.6 % (95 % CI 60.0-97.2 %) and 60.2 % (95 % CI 36.9-83.5 %), in patients treated with RT alone, and 100, 100 and 100 %, in patients treated with RT plus chemotherapy (p = 0.079). Our findings suggest a role for adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of average-risk MB adult patients. Further improvements might drive to add chemotherapy in average-risk setting with less favourable biological signatures (i.e., non-WNT group).

  17. [Screening for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adult patients in primary care].

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Enric; Cañisá, Anna; Caballero, Antònia; Piñol-Moreso, Josep Lluís

    2013-05-01

    AIMS. To estimate the proportion of adult patients in primary care with a positive screening test for attention deficit hyper-activity disorder (ADHD) and to analyse their characteristics. PATIENTS AND METHODS. A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed in nine primary care clinics in the province of Tarragona. The sample consisted of 432 consecutive patients in primary care who visited for any reason, with ages ranging from 18 to 55 years. Screening for ADHD was carried out by means of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS). Data about functional impact (Sheehan Disability Inventory) were obtained and a review of the patient records provided data concerning psychiatric comorbidity and the consumption of psychopharmaceuticals. RESULTS. The percentage of positive results in the screening tests was 19.9% (95% CI = 16.4-23.9%). Taking into account the sensitivity and specificity of the ASRS, the 'real' prevalence was estimated to be 12.5% (95% CI = 8.2-16.8%). None of these patients were diagnosed or treated for ADHD. Positive screening tests are associated with occupational, social and familial dysfunction, and greater perceived stress. There is also a higher level of comorbidity with affective disorders and substance abuse, as well as greater use of psychopharmaceuticals. CONCLUSIONS. Screening for ADHD in adult patients in primary care gives rise to a notably high proportion of positive screening test results, which suggests that there could be a significant prevalence of patients with ADHD. These data contrast with the absence of this diagnosis in the patient records. Further research is needed to determine the usefulness of the diagnosis of ADHD and the possible role that must be played by primary care.

  18. Social determinants and health-related dimensions of quality of life in adult patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Dolatkhah, R; Fakhari, A; Pezeshki, M Z; Shabanlouei, R; Tavassoli, N; Gholchin, M

    2014-05-01

    The availability of safe and effective factor replacement therapies, in persons with haemophilia (PWH), has in some countries answered the basic need for treatment of these patients. The findings suggest that adult patients who have always been on prophylaxis reported significantly better physical functioning, and thus better quality of life. This study is designed to evaluate the QoL in adult PWH, by focusing on social determinants of QoL and their relationship with health-related dimensions, in Tabriz, Iran. The survey instrument was a self-report 36 items questionnaire, 'A36 Hemofilia - QoL', which is a disease-specific questionnaire for the assessment of the health-related QoL in adults living with haemophilia. A total of 100 haemophilia A and B patients, aged over 17 years participated in this study within 1 year. QoL total score was 71.88 (±26.89 SD). Patients who treat in our Hemophilia Treatment Center, had better QoL score (P = 0.000), and education has a significant impact on the social aspects of QoL (P = 0.18). The QoL was very poor in urban area in contrast to patients who lived in the city (54.45 vs. 74.21 respectively). Single patients have a better QoL than married patients (76.56 vs. 68.50 respectively). Our results showed that low education and lack of awareness of the diseases among PWH lead to reduce of QoL and more disease complications. More and wider treatment and psychological care for improving quality of life of these patients are seriously recommended.

  19. Id2 IS REQUIRED FOR SPECIFICATION OF DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS DURING ADULT OLFACTORY NEUROGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Havrda, Matthew C.; Harris, Brent T.; Mantani, Akio; Ward, Nora M.; Paolella, Brenton R.; Cuzon, Verginia C.; Yeh, Hermes H.; Israel, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the biology of adult neural stem cells has important implications for nervous system development and may contribute to our understanding of neurodegenerative disorders and their treatment. We have characterized the process of olfactory neurogenesis in adult mice lacking Inhibitor of DNA Binding 2 (Id2). We found a diminished olfactory bulb containing reduced numbers of granular and periglomerular neurons with a distinct paucity of dopaminergic periglomerular neurons. While no deficiency of the stem cell compartment was detectable, migrating neuroblasts in Id2−/− mutant mice prematurely undergo astroglial differentiation within a disorganized rostral migratory stream. Further, when evaluated in vitro loss of Id2 results in decreased proliferation of neural progenitors and decreased expression of the Hes1 and Mash1 transcription factors, known mediators of neuronal differentiation. These data support a novel role for sustained Id2 expression in migrating neural progenitors mediating olfactory dopaminergic neuronal differentiation in adult animals. PMID:19109490

  20. Congenital intestinal malrotation in adolescent and adult patients: a 12-year clinical and radiological survey.

    PubMed

    Husberg, Britt; Salehi, Karin; Peters, Trevor; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Michanek, Margareta; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Strigård, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Congenital intestinal malrotation is mainly detected in childhood and caused by incomplete rotation and fixation of the intestines providing the prerequisites for life-threatening volvulus of the midgut. The objective of this study was to evaluate a large cohort of adult patients with intestinal malrotation. Thirty-nine patients, 15-67 years, were diagnosed and admitted to a university setting with congenital intestinal malrotation 2002-2013. The patients were divided into three age groups for stratified evaluation. Medical charts were scrutinized, and clinical outcome of surgery was reviewed. Twelve patients presented as emergency cases, whereas 27 were admitted as elective cases. Diagnosis was established in 33 patients who underwent radiological investigation and in the remaining 6 during surgery. A Ladd's operation was performed in 31 symptomatic patients; a conservative strategy was chosen in eight cases. Volvulus was more common in the younger age group. Twenty-six surgically treated patients were available for telephone interview, 1-12 years after surgery. All patients, except one, regarded their general condition improved to a high degree (n = 18) or with some reservation (n = 7). Twelve patients suffered remaining abdominal pain of a chronic and diffuse character. Due to recurrence of malrotation six patients were reoperated. Symptomatic malrotation occurs in both children and the adult population. Improved awareness and an accurately performed CT scan can reveal the malformation and enable surgical treatment. A Ladd's procedure relieved most patients from their severe complaints even when a history of several years of suffering existed. PMID:27026938

  1. Clinical Profiles and Short-Term Outcomes of Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis in Adult Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hong-Qi; Zhao, Wen-Cong; Yang, Wei-Min; Li, Yong-Li; Sun, Zhi-Kun; Chen, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder that predominantly affects children. Previous studies have mostly involved children in Western developed countries. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed the clinical profiles of ADEM in adult Chinese patients. Results ADEM occurred during summer and autumn in about two-thirds of the 42 included patients. Prior infection was found in five patients and no preimmunization was recorded. The most frequent clinical presentations were alterations in consciousness (79%) and behavior changes (69%), followed by motor deficits (64%) and fever (50%). About one-quarter (26%) of the patients showed positive results for oligoclonal bands, and about half of them exhibited increases in the IgG index and 24-hour IgG synthesis rate. Magnetic resonance imaging showed white- and gray-matter lesions in 83% and 23% of the patients, respectively. Steroids were the main treatment, and full recovery occurred in 62% of the patients, with residual focal neurological deficits recorded in a few patients. After a mean follow-up period of 3.4 years, two patients exhibited recurrence and one patient exhibited a multiphasic course. One patient was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). Conclusions With the exception of the seasonal distribution pattern and prior vaccine rate, the clinical profiles of ADEM in adult Chinese patients are similar to those in pediatric populations. No specific markers are available for distinguishing ADEM from MS at the initial presentation. Careful clinical evaluations, cerebrospinal fluid measurements, and neuroradiological examinations with long-term follow-up will aid the correct diagnosis of ADEM. PMID:27449911

  2. Recurrent ossifying fibroma of the maxillary sinus in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Cabibi, D; Speciale, R; Lorusso, F

    2013-02-01

    In some aspects, the terminology of fibro-osseous lesions of the head remain equivocal. The WHO classification suggested to group cemento-ossifying fibroma and ossifying fibroma under the term "ossifying fibroma". Based on the different age of onset, localization and risk of recurrence, two types have been described: "juvenile ossifying fibroma", with early age of onset, which needs to be treated with wide surgical resection due to the high risk of recurrence; and "adult ossifying fibroma", arising in adult patients, with low recurrence rate, properly treated by conservative surgery. We describe a case of an "adult ossifying fibroma" of a 57-year-old woman with several relapses, for whom conservative therapy was inadequate. We think that the "early" age of onset should not be included among the essential characteristics of ossifying fibroma with a high risk of recurrence. PMID:23858945

  3. Solitary intraosseous myofibroma of the tibia in an adult patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, S.; Kosashvili, Y.; Sidon, E.; Fichman, S.; Cohen, N.; Velkes, S.

    2014-01-01

    Myofibromas are mesenchymal tumors showing myofibroblastic differentiation and found most frequently in the head and neck region. While several cases of myofibromas have been reported in adults, they have not been described in long bones of the appendicular skeleton. We describe an otherwise healthy young woman who presented with a progressive incapacitating pain in her right shin. Imaging studies revealed a well-circumscribed osteolytic lesion with slight marginal sclerosis confined to the proximal tibia metaphysis, without a soft tissue component. Surgical intervention was performed and histological examination identified a myofibroma. This case represents an extremely rare occurrence of an intraosseous myofibroma involving a long bone in an adult patient. Although solitary myofibroma is a rare lesion in the skeletal bones of adults we believe it should be included in the differential diagnosis of a solitary lytic mass in bone, especially if it is associated with pain. PMID:26909302

  4. The Imagination Inflation Effect in Healthy Older Adults and Patients with Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Maureen K.; Deason, Rebecca G.; Reynolds, Erin; Tat, Michael J.; Flannery, Sean; Solomon, Paul R.; Vassey, Elizabeth A.; Budson, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The imagination inflation effect is a type of memory distortion defined as an increased tendency to falsely remember that an item has been seen, or an action has been performed, when it has only been imagined. For patients with very mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD), susceptibility to the imagination inflation effect could have significant functional consequences in daily life. Method We assessed whether patients with very mild AD were more or less susceptible to the imagination inflation effect when compared to healthy older adults. In the first session, participants were read an action statement such as “fill the pillbox” and engaged in one of three activities: listened to the statement being read, performed the action, or imagined performing the action. During the second session, participants imagined action statements from the first session as well as new action statements. During the recognition test, participants were asked to determine whether action statements were or were not performed during the first session. Results We found that imagining performing actions increased the tendency of patients with very mild AD to falsely recall the action as having been performed to an extent similar to that of healthy older adults. Conclusion We concluded that, similar to healthy older adults, patients with very mild AD were susceptible to the imagination inflation effect, which we attributed to difficulties with source monitoring and reliance on familiarity. PMID:25893972

  5. Childhood trauma and adult interpersonal relationship problems in patients with depression and anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although a plethora of studies have delineated the relationship between childhood trauma and onset, symptom severity, and course of depression and anxiety disorders, there has been little evidence that childhood trauma may lead to interpersonal problems among adult patients with depression and anxiety disorders. Given the lack of prior research in this area, we aimed to investigate characteristics of interpersonal problems in adult patients who had suffered various types of abuse and neglect in childhood. Methods A total of 325 outpatients diagnosed with depression and anxiety disorders completed questionnaires on socio-demographic variables, different forms of childhood trauma, and current interpersonal problems. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) was used to measure five different forms of childhood trauma (emotional abuse, emotional neglect, physical abuse, physical neglect, and sexual abuse) and the short form of the Korean-Inventory of Interpersonal Problems Circumplex Scale (KIIP-SC) was used to assess current interpersonal problems. We dichotomized patients into two groups (abused and non-abused groups) based on CTQ score and investigated the relationship of five different types of childhood trauma and interpersonal problems in adult patients with depression and anxiety disorders using multiple regression analysis. Result Different types of childhood abuse and neglect appeared to have a significant influence on distinct symptom dimensions such as depression, state-trait anxiety, and anxiety sensitivity. In the final regression model, emotional abuse, emotional neglect, and sexual abuse during childhood were significantly associated with general interpersonal distress and several specific areas of interpersonal problems in adulthood. No association was found between childhood physical neglect and current general interpersonal distress. Conclusion Childhood emotional trauma has more influence on interpersonal problems in adult patients with

  6. The reliance on visual feedback control by older adults is highlighted in tasks requiring precise endpoint placement and precision grip.

    PubMed

    Coats, Rachel O; Wann, John P

    2011-09-01

    There is an ongoing debate as to whether a greater degree of sensory-motor control is required to maintain skills as humans progress to be septuagenarians. Here, we investigate the dependence of older participants upon vision to execute skilled prehension movements. In a first experiment, participants were required to place a small, round peg in one of three randomly cued holes. A mirror apparatus was used to create conditions where they could always see the target locations, but vision of their hand approaching the target could be removed, and we explored end position accuracy. In a second experiment, we examined the ability of participants to precisely control their grasp action under conditions where they could see the objects but not their hands completing the action. The results showed that in Experiment 1, the older adults undershot the target in their primary submovement and hence had to move further in their secondary movement to achieve their goal. In Experiment 2, the older adults spent longer in the final adjustment phase (a near zero velocity phase at the end of the reach) when vision of the hand was unavailable. These findings suggest that older adults are indeed more reliant on visual feedback than the young in tasks that require precise manual control, and this clarifies conflicting accounts in the prior literature.

  7. Intellectual differences between schizophrenic patients and normal controls across the adult lifespan.

    PubMed

    Kondel, Tejinder K; Mortimer, Ann M; Leeson, Verity C; Laws, Keith R; Hirsch, Steven R

    2003-12-01

    A debate persists about whether IQ declines during the duration of schizophrenia or whether an early deficit remains static across the lifespan. To examine this, we measured estimated current IQ (Quick Test Revised: QTR) and estimated premorbid IQ (National Adult Reading Test: NART) in schizophrenic patients (n=110) and matched healthy controls (n=71) across a wide age range (20-88). Age correlated negatively with NART and QTR IQ for schizophrenic patients, but not for controls. A subset of 23 schizophrenic patients was also retested on the NART after 4 years to determine NART stability and they showed no significant change. We propose that the lower NART IQ in older patients reflects a lower 'starting point' and that this may be related to lower educational opportunities in older patients.

  8. Autoantibody profile and clinical characteristics in a cohort of Chinese adult myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yu; Li, Hai-Feng; Skeie, Geir Olve; Romi, Fredrik; Hao, Hong-Jun; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Xiang; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2016-09-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder with heterogeneity. Antibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), titin and ryanodine receptor (RyR) were examined in 437 adult Chinese MG patients. The AChR, MuSK, titin and RyR antibodies were found in 82.2%, 2.3%, 28.4% and 23.8% of all patients. Autoantibody profiles vary among different MG subgroups. Thymoma MG patients had high frequencies of AChR (99.2%), titin (50.8%) and RyR antibodies (46.9%). The titin and RyR antibodies also showed high frequencies in late onset patients (54.4% and 33.3%, respectively). These two antibodies may indicate an underlying thymoma when combined. The patients with titin and RyR antibodies tend to have more severe disease and worse outcome, and may need more active immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:27609275

  9. Screening and risk factors of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in critically ill adult patients receiving enteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Malnutrition is a frequent problem associated with detrimental clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. To avoid malnutrition, most studies focus on the prevention of inadequate nutrition delivery, whereas little attention is paid to the potential role of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). In this trial, we aim to evaluate the prevalence of EPI and identify its potential risk factors in critically ill adult patients without preexisting pancreatic diseases. Methods In this prospective cross-sectional study, we recruited 563 adult patients with critical illnesses. All details of the patients were documented, stool samples were collected three to five days following the initiation of enteral nutrition, and faecal elastase 1 (FE-1) concentrations were assayed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Blood samples were also taken to determine serum amylase and lipase activity. Results The percentages of recruited patients with EPI (FE-1 concentration <200 μg/g) and severe EPI (FE-1 concentration <100 μg/g) were 52.2% and 18.3%, respectively. The incidences of steatorrhea were significantly different (P < 0.05) among the patients without EPI, with moderate EPI (FE-1 concentration = 100 to 200 μg/g) and severe EPI (FE-1 concentration < 100 μg/g). Both multivariate logistic regression analysis and z-tests indicated that the occurrence of EPI was closely associated with shock, sepsis, diabetes, cardiac arrest, hyperlactacidemia, invasive mechanical ventilation and haemodialysis. Conclusions More than 50% of critically ill adult patients without primary pancreatic diseases had EPI, and nearly one-fifth of them had severe EPI. The risk factors for EPI included shock, sepsis, diabetes, cardiac arrest, hyperlactacidemia, invasive mechanical ventilation and haemodialysis. Trial registration NCT01753024 PMID:23924602

  10. Retrosigmoid Craniotomy for Auditory Brainstem Implantation in Adult Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 2.

    PubMed

    Puram, Sidharth V; Herrmann, Barbara; Barker, Fred G; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-12-01

    Objective To report our technique and experience using a retrosigmoid craniotomy approach for auditory brainstem implantation (ABI) placement in adult neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients. Design Retrospective case series. Setting Single-center study, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. Participants All NF2 patients who underwent evaluation at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital from 2009 to 2013 were reviewed. Six cases of retrosigmoid craniotomy for ABI surgery in five adult NF2 patients were identified. The clinical history, operative course, and outcomes in these patients were reviewed. Main Outcome Measures Postoperative complications and audiological outcomes. Results Indications for ABI surgery were profound hearing loss associated with growth or treatment of bilateral vestibular schwannomas. In all cases, a retrosigmoid craniotomy was performed for tumor resection and ABI placement without complication. Electrode placement was confirmed intraoperatively using electrical-evoked auditory brainstem responses. The ABI was activated in the awake patient 4 to 6 weeks postoperatively. Audiological testing was used to evaluate sound detection and speech perception with the ABI. There were no cases of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Conclusion Retrosigmoid craniotomy is a safe and effective means to provide access to the cochlear nucleus for ABI placement following tumor resection in the adult NF2 patient. Preliminary data indicate that this approach has few complications while offering benefits for hearing. The retrosigmoid craniotomy should be considered a reasonable alternative to the traditional translabyrinthine approach for placement of the ABI in deaf patients who are not candidates for the cochlear implant. PMID:27054058

  11. Diagnostic value of symptoms and laboratory data for pertussis in adolescent and adult patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several symptoms are classically thought to be suggestive of pertussis in children, but the diagnostic value of these symptoms in adolescent and adult patients is unclear. We evaluated the accuracy of the clinical findings for the early presumptive diagnosis of pertussis in adolescent and adult patients. Furthermore, we measured fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) with regard to whether we could distinguish eosinophilic inflammation of the airway and pertussis. FeNO is not expected to be associated with pertussis. Methods We compared 183 cases with laboratory-confirmed pertussis using serology and polymerase chain reaction and 1,132 cases without laboratory-confirmed pertussis. Results Among pertussis patients, paroxysmal cough was common with 90% sensitivity, but the specificity was low (25%). Posttussive vomiting and whoop were less common (sensitivity 25% and 19%, respectively), but both showed greater specificity for pertussis (80% and 86%, respectively). Posttussive gagging was observed with intermediate frequency and provided greater specificity (49% and 77%, respectively). Pertussis cases were most frequent between May and August with a peak in June. The mean FeNO value for the pertussis patients was 18.2 ± 9.2 ppb, which was significantly lower than that in asthma patients (56.9 ± 20.3 ppb, p <0.001). The most useful definition was posttussive vomiting and/or gagging, and a plus normal FeNO value, which had a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 70%. Conclusions Clinical symptoms and laboratory data are of limited value in making the diagnosis of pertussis, and it was clinically difficult to differentiate adolescent and adult patients with or without pertussis. However, pertussis should be considered if patients have posttussive vomiting and/or gagging and a normal FeNO concentration. PMID:23496900

  12. Peptic ulcer as a risk factor for postherpetic neuralgia in adult patients with herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Lan, Kuo-Mao; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Tseng, Su-Feng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of herpes zoster. Identifying predictors for postherpetic neuralgia may help physicians screen herpes zoster patients at risk of postherpetic neuralgia and undertake preventive strategies. Peptic ulcer has been linked to immunological dysfunctions and malnutrition, both of which are predictors of postherpetic neuralgia. The aim of this retrospective case-control study was to determine whether adult herpes zoster patients with peptic ulcer were at greater risk of postherpetic neuralgia. Adult zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and postherpetic neuralgia patients were automatically selected from a medical center's electronic database using herpes zoster/postherpetic neuralgia ICD-9 codes supported with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Consequently, medical record review was performed to validate the diagnostic codes and all pertaining data including peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and ulcerogenic medications. Because no standard pain intensity measurement exists, opioid usage was used as a proxy measurement for moderate to severe pain. In total, 410 zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and 115 postherpetic neuralgia patients were included. Multivariate logistic regressions identified 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain as independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia. Among etiologies of peptic ulcer, H. pylori infection and usage of non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were significantly associated with the increased risk of postherpetic neuralgia; conversely, other etiologies were not significantly associated with the postherpetic neuralgia risk. In conclusion, 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain are independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia in adult herpes zoster patients.

  13. Prognostic impact of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at complete remission in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Short, Nicholas J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Jabbour, Elias J; O'Brien, Susan M; Faderl, Stefan; Burger, Jan A; Garris, Rebecca; Qiao, Wei; Huang, Xuelin; Jain, Nitin; Konopleva, Marina; Kadia, Tapan M; Daver, Naval; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge E; Ravandi, Farhad

    2016-06-01

    In acute myelogenous leukemia, the persistent detection of abnormal cytogenetics at complete remission (ACCR) is associated with inferior outcomes. However, the prognostic significance of ACCR in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is unknown. We evaluated 272 adult patients with ALL and abnormal cytogenetics at baseline who were treated with frontline induction chemotherapy, achieved complete remission (CR) and had cytogenetic analysis performed at the time of CR. ACCR was observed in 26 patients (9.6%). Median relapse-free survival was 22 months (95% CI, 12 months to not reached) for patients with ACCR vs. 48 months (range, 30-125 months) in patients with normal cytogenetics at CR (NCCR; P = 0.31). Median overall survival also did not differ significantly between the ACCR (99 months [range, 17 months to not reached]) and NCCR groups (67 months [range, 47 months to not reached], P = 0.86). The specificity of ACCR for minimal residual disease (MRD) positivity by multi-parameter flow cytometry (MFC) was 43%, and there was overall poor correlation between these two methods for the detection of residual disease. When patients were stratified by MRD status, the presence or absence of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at CR did not add additional prognostic information. This study suggests that there is poor association between MRD assessment by MFC and the presence or absence of cytogenetic abnormalities at CR in adult patients with ALL. ACCR was not associated with adverse outcomes in ALL and did not add additional prognostic information when MRD status by MFC was known. PMID:26800008

  14. Time to treatment benefit for adult patients with Fabry disease receiving agalsidase β: data from the Fabry Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alberto; Abiose, Ademola; Bichet, Daniel G; Cabrera, Gustavo; Charrow, Joel; Germain, Dominique P; Hopkin, Robert J; Jovanovic, Ana; Linhart, Aleš; Maruti, Sonia S; Mauer, Michael; Oliveira, João P; Patel, Manesh R; Politei, Juan; Waldek, Stephen; Wanner, Christoph; Yoo, Han-Wook; Warnock, David G

    2016-01-01

    Background Agalsidase β is a form of enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease, a genetic disorder characterised by low α-galactosidase A activity, accumulation of glycosphingolipids and life-threatening cardiovascular, renal and cerebrovascular events. In clinical trials, agalsidase β cleared glycolipid deposits from endothelial cells within 6 months; clearance from other cell types required sustained treatment. We hypothesised that there might be a ‘lag time’ to clinical benefit after initiating agalsidase β treatment, and analysed the incidence of severe clinical events over time in patients receiving agalsidase β. Methods The incidence of severe clinical events (renal failure, cardiac events, stroke, death) was studied in 1044 adult patients (641 men, 403 women) enrolled in the Fabry Registry who received agalsidase β (average dose 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks) for up to 5 years. Results The incidence of all severe clinical events was 111 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 84 to 145) during the first 6 months. After 6 months, the incidence decreased and remained stable within the range of 40–58 events per 1000 patient-years. The largest decrease in incidence rates was among male patients and those aged ≥40 years when agalsidase β was initiated. Conclusions Contrary to the expected increased incidence of severe clinical events with time, adult patients with Fabry disease had decreased incidence of severe clinical events after 6 months treatment with agalsidase β 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Trial registration number NCT00196742. PMID:26993266

  15. Summer at Oxford Requires Academic Rigor from U.S. Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stacy E.

    1987-01-01

    American universities are sponsoring overseas academic programs designed for their alumni and other adults. The programs last for 2 or 3 weeks, make money and cement cross-cultural academic ties. A program run by the University of California at Berkeley is described. (MLW)

  16. V-ATPase Proton Pumping Activity Is Required for Adult Zebrafish Appendage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Joana; Aires, Rita; Becker, Jörg D.; Jacinto, António; Certal, Ana C.; Rodríguez-León, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ion channels and transporters generates ion-specific fluxes that encode electrical and/or chemical signals with biological significance. Even though it is long known that some of those signals are crucial for regeneration, only in recent years the corresponding molecular sources started to be identified using mainly invertebrate or larval vertebrate models. We used adult zebrafish caudal fin as a model to investigate which and how ion transporters affect regeneration in an adult vertebrate model. Through the combined use of biophysical and molecular approaches, we show that V-ATPase activity contributes to a regeneration-specific H+ ef`flux. The onset and intensity of both V-ATPase expression and H+ efflux correlate with the different regeneration rate along the proximal-distal axis. Moreover, we show that V-ATPase inhibition impairs regeneration in adult vertebrate. Notably, the activity of this H+ pump is necessary for aldh1a2 and mkp3 expression, blastema cell proliferation and fin innervation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of V-ATPase during adult vertebrate regeneration. PMID:24671205

  17. V-ATPase proton pumping activity is required for adult zebrafish appendage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Joana; Aires, Rita; Becker, Jörg D; Jacinto, António; Certal, Ana C; Rodríguez-León, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ion channels and transporters generates ion-specific fluxes that encode electrical and/or chemical signals with biological significance. Even though it is long known that some of those signals are crucial for regeneration, only in recent years the corresponding molecular sources started to be identified using mainly invertebrate or larval vertebrate models. We used adult zebrafish caudal fin as a model to investigate which and how ion transporters affect regeneration in an adult vertebrate model. Through the combined use of biophysical and molecular approaches, we show that V-ATPase activity contributes to a regeneration-specific H+ ef`flux. The onset and intensity of both V-ATPase expression and H+ efflux correlate with the different regeneration rate along the proximal-distal axis. Moreover, we show that V-ATPase inhibition impairs regeneration in adult vertebrate. Notably, the activity of this H+ pump is necessary for aldh1a2 and mkp3 expression, blastema cell proliferation and fin innervation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of V-ATPase during adult vertebrate regeneration.

  18. Song decrystallization in adult zebra finches does not require the song nucleus NIf.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arani; Mooney, Richard

    2009-08-01

    In adult male zebra finches, transecting the vocal nerve causes previously stable (i.e., crystallized) song to slowly degrade, presumably because of the resulting distortion in auditory feedback. How and where distorted feedback interacts with song motor networks to induce this process of song decrystallization remains unknown. The song premotor nucleus HVC is a potential site where auditory feedback signals could interact with song motor commands. Although the forebrain nucleus interface of the nidopallium (NIf) appears to be the primary auditory input to HVC, NIf lesions made in adult zebra finches do not trigger song decrystallization. One possibility is that NIf lesions do not interfere with song maintenance, but do compromise the adult zebra finch's ability to express renewed vocal plasticity in response to feedback perturbations. To test this idea, we bilaterally lesioned NIf and then transected the vocal nerve in adult male zebra finches. We found that bilateral NIf lesions did not prevent nerve section-induced song decrystallization. To test the extent to which the NIf lesions disrupted auditory processing in the song system, we made in vivo extracellular recordings in HVC and a downstream anterior forebrain pathway (AFP) in NIf-lesioned birds. We found strong and selective auditory responses to the playback of the birds' own song persisted in HVC and the AFP following NIf lesions. These findings suggest that auditory inputs to the song system other than NIf, such as the caudal mesopallium, could act as a source of auditory feedback signals to the song motor network.

  19. Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine Guidelines on Preoperative Screening and Assessment of Adult Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Frances; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Nagappa, Mahesh; Opperer, Mathias; Cozowicz, Crispiana; Patrawala, Sara; Lam, David; Kumar, Anjana; Joshi, Girish P; Fleetham, John; Ayas, Najib; Collop, Nancy; Doufas, Anthony G; Eikermann, Matthias; Englesakis, Marina; Gali, Bhargavi; Gay, Peter; Hernandez, Adrian V; Kaw, Roop; Kezirian, Eric J; Malhotra, Atul; Mokhlesi, Babak; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Stierer, Tracey; Wappler, Frank; Hillman, David R; Auckley, Dennis

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine guideline on preoperative screening and assessment of adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is to present recommendations based on the available clinical evidence on the topic where possible. As very few well-performed randomized studies in this field of perioperative care are available, most of the recommendations were developed by experts in the field through consensus processes involving utilization of evidence grading to indicate the level of evidence upon which recommendations were based. This guideline may not be appropriate for all clinical situations and all patients. The decision whether to follow these recommendations must be made by a responsible physician on an individual basis. Protocols should be developed by individual institutions taking into account the patients' conditions, extent of interventions and available resources. This practice guideline is not intended to define standards of care or represent absolute requirements for patient care. The adherence to these guidelines cannot in any way guarantee successful outcomes and is rather meant to help individuals and institutions formulate plans to better deal with the challenges posed by perioperative patients with OSA. These recommendations reflect the current state of knowledge and its interpretation by a group of experts in the field at the time of publication. While these guidelines will be periodically updated, new information that becomes available between updates should be taken into account. Deviations in practice from guidelines may be justifiable and such deviations should not be interpreted as a basis for claims of negligence. PMID:27442772

  20. Prevalence of celiac disease in adult patients with refractory functional dyspepsia: Value of routine duodenal biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Giangreco, Emiliano; D’agate, Cinzia; Barbera, Carmelo; Puzzo, Lidia; Aprile, Giuseppe; Naso, Pietro; Bonanno, Giacomo; Russo, Francesco Paolo; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Incarbone, Salvatore; Trama, Giuseppe; Russo, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in adult patients referred to an open access gastroenterology clinic in the south of Italy and submitted to esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) for evaluation of refractory functional dyspepsia. METHODS: Seven hundred and twenty six consecutive dyspeptic patients (282 male, 444 female; mean age 39.6 years, range 18-75 years) with unexplained prolonged dyspepsia were prospectively enrolled. Duodenal biopsies were taken and processed by standard staining. Histological evaluation was carried out according to the Marsh-Oberhuber criteria. RESULTS: The endoscopic findings were: normal in 61.2%, peptic lesions in 20.5%, malignancies in 0.5%, miscellaneous in 16.7%. CD was endoscopically diagnosed in 8 patients (1.1%), histologically in 15 patients (2%). The endoscopic features alone showed a sensitivity of 34.8% and specificity of 100%, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 100% and a negative predictive value (NPP) of 97.9%. CONCLUSION: This prospective study showed that CD has a high prevalence (1:48) in adult dyspeptic patients and suggests the routine use of duodenal biopsy in this type of patient undergoing EGD. PMID:19058330

  1. The effects of phenytoin and sodium valproate on the periodontal health of adult epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Seymour, R A; Smith, D G; Turnbull, D N

    1985-07-01

    The periodontal health of 30 adult epileptic patients treated with either sodium valproate or phenytoin was compared with a control group (n = 15) of otherwise healthy patients. The 3 groups were matched for age and sex. Patients on phenytoin therapy showed significantly higher plaque scores (P less than 0.05), gingival index (P less than 0.05) and pocketing (P less than 0.05) than patients in the control group. The % of gingival hyperplasia was significantly higher (P less than 0.05) in the phenytoin-treated patients than those on sodium valproate or in the control group. However, patients on phenytoin therapy had significantly less bone loss than those on sodium valproate (P less than 0.05) or in the control group (P less than 0.01). No significant differences were observed between the sodium valproate group and the control group on any of the parameters assessed. The results from this study would suggest that sodium valproate has no unwanted effects on periodontal health and may be considered a safe alternative, regarding the periodontal aspects, to phenytoin for the treatment of adult onset epilepsy.

  2. Clinicopathologic analysis of isolated hematuria in child/adolescent and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, GuangLei; Zhu, Jun; Song, MingHui; Ma, Lu; Pan, Tao; Yang, Qi; Zhang, WenSheng

    2015-12-01

    To our knowledge, no in-depth clinicopathologic study of isolated hematuria (IH) is currently available. To address this gap, we analyzed the clinicopathologic features of IH as it manifests in child/adolescent and adult patients. The clinical data and pathological types of 543 IH patients who underwent renal pathological examinations from January 2005 to June 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical manifestations differed among the age groups: children/adolescents exhibited the highest percentage of mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (41.78%), whereas adults showed the highest percentage of immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) (52.39%). In addition, the percentage of IH patients who were classified according to clinical pathology differed from that of patients who were classified according to renal pathological type. Patients with IgAN who were found to have minimal proteinuria had more severe IH. For IH patients, especially those with a small amount of proteinuria, renal biopsy should be performed as early as possible in order to develop a long-term treatment plan and prognosis evaluation. PMID:27003766

  3. The views of patients, mentors and adult field nursing students on patients' participation in student nurse assessment in practice.

    PubMed

    McMahon-Parkes, Kate; Chapman, Linda; James, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, changes to undergraduate nursing curricula in the United Kingdom have been coupled with increasing expectations that service users be involved in assessment of student nurses. These factors lead to the development of a tool to facilitate gathering of feedback from patients/carers on the competency of adult field student nurses in practice. This study evaluated experiences of those involved in the process of using the feedback tool. Using an exploratory qualitative research design, four patients, four mentors and five pre-registration adult field nursing students were interviewed. Thematic analysis of the data identified three interconnecting themes; value of the patient's voice, caring and protection, and authenticity of feedback. A sub-theme of timing of giving feedback was also identified. Patients felt they should be involved in giving feedback, were comfortable in doing so, and felt best placed to judge students' performance in several aspects of care. Students and mentors shared these opinions. Additionally they felt service user feedback potentially helped improve students' competence and confidence, and facilitated mentors in their assessment of students' professional values, communication and interpersonal skills. However, mentors were more reticent about the possibility of receiving feedback from service users on their own practice.

  4. The views of patients, mentors and adult field nursing students on patients' participation in student nurse assessment in practice.

    PubMed

    McMahon-Parkes, Kate; Chapman, Linda; James, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, changes to undergraduate nursing curricula in the United Kingdom have been coupled with increasing expectations that service users be involved in assessment of student nurses. These factors lead to the development of a tool to facilitate gathering of feedback from patients/carers on the competency of adult field student nurses in practice. This study evaluated experiences of those involved in the process of using the feedback tool. Using an exploratory qualitative research design, four patients, four mentors and five pre-registration adult field nursing students were interviewed. Thematic analysis of the data identified three interconnecting themes; value of the patient's voice, caring and protection, and authenticity of feedback. A sub-theme of timing of giving feedback was also identified. Patients felt they should be involved in giving feedback, were comfortable in doing so, and felt best placed to judge students' performance in several aspects of care. Students and mentors shared these opinions. Additionally they felt service user feedback potentially helped improve students' competence and confidence, and facilitated mentors in their assessment of students' professional values, communication and interpersonal skills. However, mentors were more reticent about the possibility of receiving feedback from service users on their own practice. PMID:26347448

  5. Use of the adult attachment projective picture system in psychodynamic psychotherapy with a severely traumatized patient.

    PubMed

    George, Carol; Buchheim, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The following case study is presented to facilitate an understanding of how the attachment information evident from Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) assessment can be integrated into a psychodynamic perspective in making therapeutic recommendations that integrate an attachment perspective. The Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) is a valid representational measure of internal representations of attachment based on the analysis of a set of free response picture stimuli designed to systematically activate the attachment system (George and West, 2012). The AAP provides a fruitful diagnostic tool for psychodynamic-oriented clinicians to identify attachment-based deficits and resources for an individual patient in therapy. This paper considers the use of the AAP with a traumatized patient in an inpatient setting and uses a case study to illustrate the components of the AAP that are particularly relevant to a psychodynamic conceptualization. The paper discusses also attachment-based recommendations for intervention.

  6. First Case of Lung Abscess due to Salmonella enterica Serovar Abony in an Immunocompetent Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Dendrinos, John; Nikitiadis, Emanuel; Vrioni, Georgia; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, nontyphoidal Salmonella species predominantly cause a self-limited form of gastroenteritis, while they infrequently invade or cause fatal disease. Extraintestinal manifestations of nontyphoidal Salmonella infections are not common and mainly occur among individuals with specific risk factors; among them, focal lung infection is a rare complication caused by nontyphoidal Salmonella strains typically occurring in immunocompromised patients with prior lung disease. We describe the first case of a localized lung abscess formation in an immunocompetent healthy female adult due to Salmonella enterica serovar Abony. The patient underwent lobectomy and was discharged after full clinical recovery. This case report highlights nontyphoidal Salmonellae infections as a potential causative agent of pleuropulmonary infections even in immunocompetent healthy adults. PMID:27429814

  7. Use of the adult attachment projective picture system in psychodynamic psychotherapy with a severely traumatized patient

    PubMed Central

    George, Carol; Buchheim, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The following case study is presented to facilitate an understanding of how the attachment information evident from Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) assessment can be integrated into a psychodynamic perspective in making therapeutic recommendations that integrate an attachment perspective. The Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) is a valid representational measure of internal representations of attachment based on the analysis of a set of free response picture stimuli designed to systematically activate the attachment system (George and West, 2012). The AAP provides a fruitful diagnostic tool for psychodynamic-oriented clinicians to identify attachment-based deficits and resources for an individual patient in therapy. This paper considers the use of the AAP with a traumatized patient in an inpatient setting and uses a case study to illustrate the components of the AAP that are particularly relevant to a psychodynamic conceptualization. The paper discusses also attachment-based recommendations for intervention. PMID:25140164

  8. First Case of Lung Abscess due to Salmonella enterica Serovar Abony in an Immunocompetent Adult Patient.

    PubMed

    Pitiriga, Vassiliki; Dendrinos, John; Nikitiadis, Emanuel; Vrioni, Georgia; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, nontyphoidal Salmonella species predominantly cause a self-limited form of gastroenteritis, while they infrequently invade or cause fatal disease. Extraintestinal manifestations of nontyphoidal Salmonella infections are not common and mainly occur among individuals with specific risk factors; among them, focal lung infection is a rare complication caused by nontyphoidal Salmonella strains typically occurring in immunocompromised patients with prior lung disease. We describe the first case of a localized lung abscess formation in an immunocompetent healthy female adult due to Salmonella enterica serovar Abony. The patient underwent lobectomy and was discharged after full clinical recovery. This case report highlights nontyphoidal Salmonellae infections as a potential causative agent of pleuropulmonary infections even in immunocompetent healthy adults. PMID:27429814

  9. Quality Measures for the Care of Adult Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, R. Nisha; Collop, Nancy A.; Jacobowitz, Ofer; Thomas, Sherene M.; Quan, Stuart F.; Aronsky, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent disorder associated with a multitude of adverse outcomes when left untreated. There is significant heterogeneity in the evaluation and management of OSA resulting in variation in cost and outcomes. Thus, the goal for developing these measures was to have a way to evaluate the outcomes and reliability of the processes involved with the standard care approaches used in the diagnosis and management of OSA. The OSA quality care measures presented here focus on both outcomes and processes. The AASM commissioned the Adult OSA Quality Measures Workgroup to develop quality care measures aimed at optimizing care for adult patients with OSA. These quality care measures developed by the Adult OSA Quality Measures Workgroup are an extension of the original Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approved Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) measures group for OSA. The measures are based on the available scientific evidence, focus on public safety, and strive to improve quality of life and cardiovascular outcomes for individual OSA patients. The three outcomes that were selected were as follows: (1) improve disease detection and categorization; (2) improve quality of life; and (3) reduce cardiovascular risk. After selecting these relevant outcomes, a total of ten process measures were chosen that could be applied and assessed for the purpose of accomplishing these outcomes. In the future, the measures described in this document may be reported through the PQRS in addition to, or as a replacement for, the current OSA measures group. The overall objective for the development of these measures is that implementation of these quality measures will result in improved patient outcomes, reduce the public health burden of OSA, and provide a measurable standard for evaluating and managing OSA. Citation: Aurora RN, Collop NA, Jacobowitz O, Thomas SM, Quan SF, Aronsky AJ. Quality measures for the care of adult patients with

  10. NCICT: a computational solution to estimate organ doses for pediatric and adult patients undergoing CT scans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Bolch, Wesley E; Moroz, Brian E; Folio, Les

    2015-12-01

    We developed computational methods and tools to assess organ doses for pediatric and adult patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations. We used the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference pediatric and adult phantoms combined with the Monte Carlo simulation of a reference CT scanner to establish comprehensive organ dose coefficients (DC), organ absorbed dose per unit volumetric CT Dose Index (CTDIvol) (mGy/mGy). We also developed methods to estimate organ doses with tube current modulation techniques and size specific dose estimates. A graphical user interface was designed to obtain user input of patient- and scan-specific parameters, and to calculate and display organ doses. A batch calculation routine was also integrated into the program to automatically calculate organ doses for a large number of patients. We entitled the computer program, National Cancer Institute dosimetry system for CT(NCICT). We compared our dose coefficients with those from CT-Expo, and evaluated the performance of our program using CT patient data. Our pediatric DCs show good agreements of organ dose estimation with those from CT-Expo except for thyroid. Our results support that the adult phantom in CT-Expo seems to represent a pediatric individual between 10 and 15 years rather than an adult. The comparison of CTDIvol values between NCICT and dose pages from 10 selected CT scans shows good agreements less than 12% except for two cases (up to 20%). The organ dose comparison between mean and modulated mAs shows that mean mAs-based calculation significantly overestimates dose (up to 2.4-fold) to the organs in close proximity to lungs in chest and chest-abdomen-pelvis scans. Our program provides more realistic anatomy based on the ICRP reference phantoms, higher age resolution, the most up-to-date bone marrow dosimetry, and several convenient features compared to previous tools. The NCICT will be available for research purpose in the near future.

  11. Urticaria and dermographism in patients with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Ayabe, Liliane Akemi; Brandt, Hebert Roberto Clivati; Romiti, Ricardo; Maruta, Celina W

    2012-08-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) patients typically present with arthralgia, fever, lymphadenopathy and a transient salmon maculopapular rash. Only approximately 25 cases of AOSD with urticaria were described in the literature. In this article, the authors report three additional cases of AOSD with urticarial and dermographic lesions who had a good clinical response to glucocorticoid and antihistamines. A review of the literature concerning this issue is also herein written.

  12. A systematic review of hospitalization resulting from medicine-related problems in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamid, Abdullah; Ghaleb, Maisoon; Aljadhey, Hisham; Aslanpour, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    Aims Medicine-related problems (MRPs) represent a major issue leading to hospitalization, especially in adult and elderly patients. The aims of this review are to investigate the prevalence, causes and major risk factors for MRPs leading to hospitalization in adult patients and to identify the main medicine classes involved. Methods Studies were identified through electronic searches of Medline, Embase, Scopus and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts between January 2000 and May 2013. A systematic review was conducted of both retrospective and prospective studies. Studies included were those involving hospitalization resulting from MRPs in adults (≥18 years old), whereas studies excluded were those investigating drug misuse and abuse and studies investigating MRPs in hospitalized patients. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 20. Results Forty-five studies were identified, including 21 that investigated hospitalization resulting from adverse drug reactions, six studies that investigated hospitalization due to adverse drug events and 18 studies that investigated hospitalization due to MRPs. The median prevalence rates of hospitalization resulting from adverse drug reactions, adverse drug events and MRPs were 7% (interquartile range, 2.4–14.9%), 4.6% (interquartile range, 2.85–16.6%) and 12.1% (interquartile range, 6.43–22.2%), respectively. The major causes contributing to MRPs were adverse drug reactions and noncompliance. In addition, the major risk factors associated with MRPs were old age, polypharmacy and comorbidities. Moreover, the main classes of medicines implicated were medicines used to treat cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Conclusions Hospitalization due to MRPs had a high prevalence, in the range of 4.6–12.1%. Most MRPs encountered were prevalent among adult patients taking medicines for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. PMID:24283967

  13. Requiring elderly patients to give signed consent for influenza vaccine. Does it affect acceptance?

    PubMed Central

    Charles, J.; Lewis, J.

    1994-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether requiring signed consent before influenza vaccination affected vaccine acceptance by elderly patients. Previous influenza vaccination was determined by chart review. All subjects agreed to sign the consent. Requiring signed consent did not affect influenza vaccine acceptance in this population. Mailed reminder letters and information packages in patients' charts significantly increased vaccination rates. PMID:8199503

  14. Differences of Sagittal Lumbosacral Parameters between Patients with Lumbar Spondylolysis and Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jin; Peng, Bao-Gan; Li, Yong-Chao; Zhang, Nai-Yang; Yang, Liang; Li, Duan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have suggested an association between elevated pelvic incidence (PI) and the development of lumbar spondylolysis. However, there is still lack of investigation for Han Chinese people concerning the normal range of spinopelvic parameters and relationship between abnormal sagittal parameters and lumbar diseases. The objective of the study was to investigate sagittal lumbosacral parameters of adult lumbar spondylolysis patients in Han Chinese population. Methods: A total of 52 adult patients with symptomatic lumbar spondylolysis treated in the General Hospital of Armed Police Force (Beijing, China) were identified as the spondylolysis group. All the 52 patients were divided into two subgroups, Subgroup A: 36 patients with simple lumbar spondylolysis, and Subgroup B: 16 patients with lumbar spondylolysis accompanying with mild lumbar spondylolisthesis (slip percentage <30%). Altogether 207 healthy adults were chosen as the control group. All patients and the control group took lumbosacral lateral radiographs. Seven sagittal lumbosacral parameters, including PI, pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), lumbar lordosis (LL), L5 incidence, L5 slope, and sacral table angle (STA), were measured in the lateral radiographs. All the parameters aforementioned were compared between the two subgroups and between the spondylolysis group and the control group with independent-sample t-test. Results: There were no statistically significant differences of all seven sagittal lumbosacral parameters between Subgroup A and Subgroup B. PI, PT, SS, and LL were higher (P < 0.05) in the spondylolysis group than those in the control group, but STA was lower (P < 0.001) in the spondylolysis group. Conclusions: Current study results suggest that increased PI and decreased STA may play important roles in the pathology of lumbar spondylolysis in Han Chinese population. PMID:27174324

  15. Reduced transcription of TCOF1 in adult cells of Treacher Collins syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder caused by frameshift deletions or duplications in the TCOF1 gene. These mutations cause premature termination codons, which are predicted to lead to mRNA degradation by nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Haploinsufficiency of the gene product (treacle) during embryonic development is the proposed molecular mechanism underlying TCS. However, it is still unknown if TCOF1 expression levels are decreased in post-embryonic human cells. Methods We have estimated TCOF1 transcript levels through real time PCR in mRNA obtained from leucocytes and mesenchymal cells of TCS patients (n = 23) and controls (n = 18). Mutational screening and analysis of NMD were performed by direct sequencing of gDNA and cDNA, respectively. Results All the 23 patients had typical clinical features of the syndrome and pathogenic mutations were detected in 19 of them. We demonstrated that the expression level of TCOF1 is 18-31% lower in patients than in controls (p < 0.05), even if we exclude the patients in whom we did not detect the pathogenic mutation. We also observed that the mutant allele is usually less abundant than the wild type one in mesenchymal cells. Conclusions This is the first study to report decreased expression levels of TCOF1 in TCS adult human cells, but it is still unknown if this finding is associated to any phenotype in adulthood. In addition, as we demonstrated that alleles harboring the pathogenic mutations have lower expression, we herein corroborate the current hypothesis of NMD of the mutant transcript as the explanation for diminished levels of TCOF1 expression. Further, considering that TCOF1 deficiency in adult cells could be associated to pathologic clinical findings, it will be important to verify if TCS patients have an impairment in adult stem cell properties, as this can reduce the efficiency of plastic surgery results during rehabilitation of these patients. PMID:20003452

  16. Marital Status and Fertility in Adult Iranian Patients with β-Thalassemia Major.

    PubMed

    Miri-Aliabad, Ghasem; Fadaee, Mahsoumeh; Khajeh, Ali; Naderi, Majid

    2016-03-01

    Expecting a family is an important component and a great goal for better quality of life for most of adults with β-thalassemia major. The aim of the present study was to examine the marital status of adults with β-thalassemia major. This cross-sectional study examined the marital status of patients with transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia aged over 15 years. Patients' demographic characteristics including age, gender, marital status, duration of marriage, divorce, having or not having children and spouse's health status were recorded. Information about the disease including cardiac and endocrine complications, ferritin level, splenectomy and viral hepatitis were also recorded. Of 228 patients with transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia major aged over 15 years who were treated at this medical center, 32 (14 %) were married. The mean age of married patients was 25.18 ± 4.74 years. Among the married patients, 8 (25 %) were females and 24 (75 %) patients were males. The mean age of marriage was 22.76 ± 4.16 years. The minimum and maximum marriage age was 15 and 33 years, respectively. The median duration of marriage was one year with the range from 3 months to 11 years. Only 8 (25 %) patients (one female and seven males) had children. Therapeutic advances have led to significantly increased survival and improved quality of life and fertility of patients with β-thalassemia major. According to the results, 14 % of patients over 15 years were married which was slightly higher as compared with other similar studies. PMID:26855517

  17. Patient transitions relevant to individuals requiring ongoing ventilatory assistance: A Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Louise; Fowler, Robert A; Goldstein, Roger; Katz, Sherri; Leasa, David; Pedersen, Cheryl; McKim, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Various terms, including ‘prolonged mechanical ventilation’ (PMV) and ‘long-term mechanical ventilation’ (LTMV), are used interchangeably to distinguish patient cohorts requiring ventilation, making comparisons and timing of clinical decision making problematic. OBJECTIVE: To develop expert, consensus-based criteria associated with care transitions to distinguish cohorts of ventilated patients. METHODS: A four-round (R), web-based Delphi study with consensus defined as >70% was performed. In R1, participants listed, using free text, criteria perceived to should and should not define seven transitions. Transitions comprised: T1 – acute ventilation to PMV; T2 – PMV to LTMV; T3 – PMV or LTMV to acute ventilation (reverse transition); T4 – institutional to community care; T5 – no ventilation to requiring LTMV; T6 – pediatric to adult LTMV; and T7 – active treatment to end-of-life care. Subsequent Rs sought consensus. RESULTS: Experts from intensive care (n=14), long-term care (n=14) and home ventilation (n=10), representing a variety of professional groups and geographical areas, completed all Rs. Consensus was reached on 14 of 20 statements defining T1 and 21 of 25 for T2. ‘Physiological stability’ had the highest consensus (97% and 100%, respectively). ‘Duration of ventilation’ did not achieve consensus. Consensus was achieved on 13 of 18 statements for T3 and 23 of 25 statements for T4. T4 statements reaching 100% consensus included: ‘informed choice’, ‘patient stability’, ‘informal caregiver support’, ‘caregiver knowledge’, ‘environment modification’, ‘supportive network’ and ‘access to interprofessional care’. Consensus was achieved for 15 of 17 T5, 16 of 20 T6 and 21 of 24 T7 items. CONCLUSION: Criteria to consider during key care transitions for ventilator-assisted individuals were identified. Such information will assist in furthering the consistency of clinical care plans, research trials

  18. “PHE in Action”: Development and Modeling of an Intervention to Improve Patient Engagement among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Julia; Graffigna, Guendalina

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic conditions among older adults constitutes a major public health problem. Thus, changes in lifestyles are required to prevent secondary conditions and sustain good care practices. While patient engagement received great attention in the last years as key strategy to solve this issue, to date no interventions exist to sustain the engagement of older chronic patients toward their health management. This study describes the design, development, and optimization of PHEinAction, a theoretically-driven intervention program to increase patient engagement in older chronic populations and consequently to foster healthy changes that can help reduce risks of health problems. The development process followed the UK Medical Research Council's (MRC) guidelines and involved selecting the theoretical base for the intervention, identifying the relevant evidence-based literature, and conducting exploratory research to qualitatively evaluate program's feasibility, acceptability, and comprehension. The result was a user-endorsed intervention designed to improve older patients' engagement in health management based on the theoretical framework of the Patient Health Engagement (PHE) model. The intervention program, which emerged from this process, consisted of 2 monthly face-to-face 1-h sessions delivered by a trained facilitator and one brief telephonic consultation, and aimed to facilitate a range of changes for patient engagement (e.g., motivation to change, health information seeking and use, emotional adjustment, health behaviors planning). PHEinAction is the first example of a theoretically-based patient engagement intervention designed for older chronic targets. The intervention program is based on psychological theory and evidence; it facilitates emotional, psychological, and behavioral processes to support patient engagement and lifestyle change and maintenance. It provides estimates of the extent to which it could help high-risk groups

  19. “PHE in Action”: Development and Modeling of an Intervention to Improve Patient Engagement among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Julia; Graffigna, Guendalina

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic conditions among older adults constitutes a major public health problem. Thus, changes in lifestyles are required to prevent secondary conditions and sustain good care practices. While patient engagement received great attention in the last years as key strategy to solve this issue, to date no interventions exist to sustain the engagement of older chronic patients toward their health management. This study describes the design, development, and optimization of PHEinAction, a theoretically-driven intervention program to increase patient engagement in older chronic populations and consequently to foster healthy changes that can help reduce risks of health problems. The development process followed the UK Medical Research Council's (MRC) guidelines and involved selecting the theoretical base for the intervention, identifying the relevant evidence-based literature, and conducting exploratory research to qualitatively evaluate program's feasibility, acceptability, and comprehension. The result was a user-endorsed intervention designed to improve older patients' engagement in health management based on the theoretical framework of the Patient Health Engagement (PHE) model. The intervention program, which emerged from this process, consisted of 2 monthly face-to-face 1-h sessions delivered by a trained facilitator and one brief telephonic consultation, and aimed to facilitate a range of changes for patient engagement (e.g., motivation to change, health information seeking and use, emotional adjustment, health behaviors planning). PHEinAction is the first example of a theoretically-based patient engagement intervention designed for older chronic targets. The intervention program is based on psychological theory and evidence; it facilitates emotional, psychological, and behavioral processes to support patient engagement and lifestyle change and maintenance. It provides estimates of the extent to which it could help high-risk groups

  20. Adolescents and adults affected by Cornelia de Lange syndrome: A report of 73 Italian patients.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Milena; Decimi, Valentina; Bettini, Laura Rachele; Maitz, Silvia; Gervasini, Cristina; Masciadri, Maura; Ajmone, Paola; Kullman, Gaia; Dinelli, Marco; Panceri, Roberto; Cereda, Anna; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare genetic condition related to mutation of various cohesion complex related genes. Its natural history is quite well characterized as regard pediatric age. Relatively little information is available regarding the evolution of the disease in young-adult age. In medical literature, only one specific study has been published on this topic. We report on our experience on 73 Italian CdLS patients (40 males and 33 females) with and age range from 15 to 49 years. Our results confirm the previous study indicating that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the main medical problem of these patients in childhood and young-adult age. Other medical features that should be considered in the medical follow-up are tendency to overweight/frank obesity, constipation, discrepancy of limbs' length, epilepsy, hearing, and visual problems. Behavioral problems are particularly frequent as well. For this reason, every source of hidden pain should be actively searched for in evaluating a patient showing such a disorder. Finally, recommendations for medical follow-up in adult age are discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27164219

  1. Demographic, clinical and laboratory findings among adult and pediatric patients hospitalized with dengue in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Velasco, John Mark S; Alera, Ma Theresa P; Ypil-Cardenas, Charity Ann; Dimaano, Efren M; Jarman, Richard G; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Yoon, In-Kyu; Cummings, Derek A; Mammen, Mammen P

    2014-03-01

    We evaluated the differences in demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings between adult and pediatric patients hospitalized with dengue fever. Ninety patients with dengue infection admitted at San Lazaro Hospital (SLH), Manila from September 2005 to January 2006 were included in the study. The cases were laboratory-confirmed to have dengue infection. The majority of dengue cases (92%) had secondary dengue infection (median age = 18, age range: 2-37) while the remainder (8%) had a primary dengue infection (median age = 12, age range: 7-22). Nearly all the patients (99%) had dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Sixty-five of the cases (72%) had serotype data: 2 (3%) were dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1) (median age = 17), 12 (18%) had DENV-2 (median age = 17.5), 38 (59%) had DENV-3 (median age = 16) and 13 (20%) had DENV-4 (median age = 18). The initial signs, symptoms and laboratory results except hematocrit (p = 0.02) and hemoglobin (p = 0.02) did not differ significantly between adults and children. During the study period, half the cases were adults (218 years; n = 45) and half were children (<18 years; n = 45). The ages of cases ranged from 2 to 37 years (median = 17 years) and the peak incidence was 15-19 years. Dengue is often considered as a pediatric disease. Additional studies are needed to determine if an age shift is occurring and where.

  2. Cytomegalovirus infection-associated fulminant hepatitis in an immunocompetent adult requiring emergency living-donor liver transplantation: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Yu, Young-Dong; Park, Gil-Chun; Park, Pyoung-Jae; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Shin; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Kim, Ki-Hun; Moon, Deog-Bok; Ha, Tae-Yong; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2013-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is usually self-limiting in healthy adults, but it can lead to significant complications. This report presents the case of an immunocompetent adult with fulminant hepatitis caused by a CMV infection requiring emergency living-donor liver transplantation. A 39-year-old female with persistent fever for 6 weeks was referred for fulminant hepatitis, but the underlying etiology was not identified. Rapid deterioration of consciousness led to an emergency living-donor liver transplant using a modified right lobe graft. She showed increasing CMV antigenemia after surgery and the explant liver pathology showed massive hepatic necrosis with positive staining for CMV protein. Treatment with ganciclovir improved the graft liver function and her general condition recovered. This report presents a rare case of CMV-associated fulminant hepatitis which led to emergency liver transplantation. Although CMV is rare, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with severe hepatitis, even immunocompetent patients, after other more common etiologies have been excluded.

  3. An Adult Patient with Ocular Myasthenia and Unusually Long Spontaneous Remission

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashel, Jasem; Rashad, Hanaa M.; Rousseff, Rossen T.

    2014-01-01

    A male patient developed ocular myasthenia gravis (MG) at the age of 33. He was anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (anti-AChR Ab) negative. He received cholinesterase blocker for 5 months and went into a complete clinical remission that lasted untreated for 17 years. He relapsed recently with ocular symptoms only. He is now anti-AChR Ab positive and SFEMG is abnormal in a facial muscle. The patient is controlled with steroids. He had one of the longest spontaneous remissions reported in the natural history of MG, particularly unusual for an adult with the disease. PMID:24822137

  4. Nonextraction treatment of upper canine-premolar transposition in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Shingo; Kuroda, Yasuko

    2005-05-01

    This article reports the successful treatment of a unilateral maxillary canine and first premolar transposition without the extraction of the premolar in an adult patient. A female patient, 21 years and three months of age, had moderate crowding in the upper arch with complete transposition of the canine and first premolar. After distal movement of the upper molars with a lingual arch and headgear appliance, the upper left first premolar and canine were transposed. Thirty-eight months after the placement of preadjusted appliances, the transposed canine and premolar were reordered in the proper positions. The total active treatment period was 49 months. After two years of retention, the occlusion is generally stable.

  5. Contemporary Concepts in the Young Adult Hip Patient: Periacetabular Osteotomy for Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Coobs, Benjamin R; Xiong, Ao; Clohisy, John C

    2015-07-01

    The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy, as originally described by Dr. Reinhold Ganz, is an effective treatment for symptomatic acetabular dysplasia in the pre-arthritic young adult hip. This technique has experienced several recent modifications in an attempt to optimize the clinical outcomes of these patients. We will review the clinical presentation of acetabular dysplasia, indications for surgery, contemporary refinements in technique and clinical results following periacetabular osteotomy. In well-selected patients, this reconstructive osteotomy should be considered safe and effective in alleviating pain and improving hip function. PMID:25865812

  6. Evaluation and Surgical Management of the Overcorrected Clubfoot Deformity in the Adult Patient.

    PubMed

    Burger, Dawid; Aiyer, Amiethab; Myerson, Mark S

    2015-12-01

    Adult patients presenting with an overcorrected clubfoot often have had a posteromedial release. They present later in life and have compensated quite well despite the development of deformity. Minor trauma may lead to the onset of acute symptoms. A spectrum of deformity exists. Key features include a dorsally subluxated navicular, a dorsal bunion from overpull of the tibialis anterior tendon, valgus of the ankle or hindfoot or both, and a flattop talus. This article details the diagnostic approach to the overcorrected clubfoot patient and options for management of the various components of the deformity. PMID:26589080

  7. Neurologic complications in adult living donor liver transplant patients: an underestimated factor?

    PubMed

    Saner, Fuat Hakan; Gensicke, Julia; Olde Damink, Steven W M; Pavlaković, Goran; Treckmann, Juergen; Dammann, Marc; Kaiser, Gernot M; Sotiropoulos, Georgios C; Radtke, Arnold; Koeppen, Susanne; Beckebaum, Susanne; Cicinnati, Vito; Nadalin, Silvio; Malagó, Massimo; Paul, Andreas; Broelsch, Christoph E

    2010-02-01

    Liver transplantation is the only curative treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. Neurological complications (NC) are increasingly reported to occur in patients after cadaveric liver transplantation. This retrospective cohort study aims to evaluate the incidence and causes of NC in living donor liver transplant (LDLT) patients in our transplant center. Between August 1998 and December 2005, 121 adult LDLT patients were recruited into our study. 17% of patients experienced NC, and it occurred significantly more frequently in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (42%) and autoimmune hepatitis (43%) as compared with patients with hepatitis B or C (9/10%, P = 0.013). The most common NC was encephalopathy (47.6%) followed by seizures (9.5%). The choice of immunosuppression by calcineurin inhibitor (Tacrolimus or Cyclosporin A) showed no significant difference in the incidence of NC (19 vs. 17%). The occurrence of NC did not influence the clinical outcome, since mortality rate, median ICU stay and length of hospital stay were similar between the two groups. Most patients who survived showed a nearly complete recovery of their NC. NCs occur in approximately 1 in 6 patients after LDLT and seem to be predominantly transient in nature, without major impact on clinical outcome. PMID:19727899

  8. Patient safety climate strength: a concept that requires more attention

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Liane; Gilin Oore, Debra

    2016-01-01

    Background When patient safety climate (PSC) surveys are used in healthcare, reporting typically focuses on PSC level (mean or per cent positive scores). This paper explores how an additional focus on PSC strength can enhance the utility of PSC survey data. Setting and participants 442 care providers from 24 emergency departments (EDs) across Canada. Methods We use anonymised data from the Can-PSCS PSC instrument collected in 2011 as part of the Qmentum accreditation programme. We examine differences in climate strength across EDs using the Rwg(j) and intraclass correlation coefficients measures of inter-rater agreement. Results Across the six survey dimensions, median Rwg(j) was sufficiently high to support shared climate perceptions (0.64–0.83), but varied widely across the 24 ED units. We provide an illustrative example showing vastly different climate strength (Rwg(j) range=0.17–0.86) for units with an equivalent level of PSC (eg, climate mean score=3). Conclusions Most PSC survey results focus solely on climate level. To facilitate improvement in PSC, we advocate a simple, holistic safety climate profile including three metrics: climate level (using mean or per cent positive climate scores), climate strength (using the Rwg(j), or SD as a proxy) and the shape of the distribution (using histograms to see the distribution of scores within units). In PSC research, we advocate paying attention to climate strength as an important variable in its own right. Focusing on PSC level and strength can further understanding of the extent to which PSC is a key variable in the domain of patient safety. PMID:26453636

  9. Prevalence of human norovirus and Clostridium difficile coinfections in adult hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Stokely, Janelle N; Niendorf, Sandra; Taube, Stefan; Hoehne, Marina; Young, Vincent B; Rogers, Mary AM; Wobus, Christiane E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human norovirus (HuNoV) and Clostridium difficile are common causes of infectious gastroenteritis in adults in the US. However, limited information is available regarding HuNoV and C. difficile coinfections. Our study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of HuNoV and C. difficile coinfections among adult patients in a hospital setting and disease symptomatology. Study design and setting For a cross-sectional analysis, 384 fecal samples were tested for the presence of C. difficile toxins from patients (n=290), whom the provider suspected of C. difficile infections. Subsequent testing was then performed for HuNoV genogroups I and II. Multinomial logistic regression was performed to determine symptoms more frequently associated with coinfections. Results The final cohort consisted of the following outcome groups: C. difficile (n=196), C. difficile + HuNoV coinfection (n=40), HuNoV only (n=12), and neither (n=136). Coinfected patients were more likely to develop nausea, gas, and abdominal pain and were more likely to seek treatment in the winter season compared with individuals not infected or infected with either pathogen alone. Conclusion Our study revealed that patients with coinfection are more likely to experience certain gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular abdominal pain, suggesting an increased severity of disease symptomatology in coinfected patients. PMID:27418856

  10. Violent behaviour from young adults and the parents of paediatric patients in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Pich, Jacqueline; Hazelton, Michael; Kable, Ashley

    2013-07-01

    Violence in healthcare is a significant issue and one that is increasing in prevalence globally. Nurses have been identified as the professional group at most risk, with patients the main source of this violence. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of Australian ED nurses with episodes of patient-related violence from young adults (16-25years of age) and the parents of paediatric patients. Data analysis of semi-structured interviews led to the identification of antecedents to episodes of violence and behaviours specific to these two groups of interest. These behaviours included: "performing" and attention-seeking behaviours and violent behaviours including both verbal and physical abuse. Antecedents discussed by participants included: parental emotions and alcohol and substance abuse. Overall the results speak to a working environment where participants regularly feel unsafe. Violence in the ED is perceived to occur frequently and to such an extent that participants have become resigned to expect and accept it as part of their job. The role played by distinct groups such as young adults and the parents of paediatric patients must be acknowledged and this knowledge used along with other known risk factors to help identify patients at risk of potential violence. PMID:23063841

  11. The use of arts and crafts in the rehabilitation of the adult burn patient.

    PubMed

    Sanford, S L; Cash, S H; Nelson, C

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into one small aspect of occupational therapy: the use of arts and crafts in the rehabilitation of the adult burn patient. While burn care literature is plentiful, that related specifically to occupational therapy treatment of burn patients is scarce. A survey was mailed to occupational therapists in 165 burn units across the United States. Responses to survey questions indicate that a majority of respondents (73%%) do not use arts and crafts in the rehabilitation of adult burn patients, while 26%% do use these modalities. Those respondents who do use arts and crafts stated that they use leatherwork, painting, and woodworking most frequently. Therapists who do not use arts and crafts indicated that their primary reasons for not doing so were the acutely ill status of the patients and wound drainage/sterility issues. The entire scope of occupational therapy treatment of burn patients deserves greater attention as it is a challenging and rapidly-evolving area of practice. PMID:23947587

  12. Environmental enrichment requires adult neurogenesis to facilitate the recovery from psychosocial stress

    PubMed Central

    Schloesser, R J; Lehmann, M; Martinowich, K; Manji, H K; Herkenham, M

    2010-01-01

    The subgranular zone of the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus contains a pool of neural stem cells that continuously divide and differentiate into functional granule cells. It has been shown that production of new hippocampal neurons is necessary for amelioration of stress-induced behavioral changes by antidepressants in animal models of depression. The survival of newly born hippocampal neurons is decreased by chronic psychosocial stress and increased by exposure to enriched environments. These observations suggest the existence of a link between hippocampal neurogenesis, stress-induced behavioral changes, and the beneficial effects of enriched environment. To show causality, we subjected transgenic mice with conditionally suppressed neurogenesis to psychosocial stress followed by environmental enrichment. First, we showed that repeated social defeat coupled with chronic exposure to an aggressor produces robust and quantifiable indices of submissive and depressive-like behaviors; second, subsequent exposure to an enriched environment led to extinction of the submissive phenotype, while animals exposed to an impoverished environment retained the submissive phenotype; and third, enrichment was not effective in reversing the submissive and depressive-like behaviors in transgenic mice lacking neurogenesis. Our data show two main findings. First, living in an enriched environment is highly effective in extinguishing submissive behavioral traits developed during chronic social stress, and second, these effects are critically dependent on adult neurogenesis, indicating that beneficial behavioral adaptations are dependent on intact adult neurogenesis. PMID:20308988

  13. Applications of Nasal High-Flow Oxygen Therapy in Critically ill Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    Porhomayon, Jahan; El-Solh, Ali A; Pourafkari, Leili; Jaoude, Philippe; Nader, Nader D

    2016-10-01

    The use of nasal high-flow oxygen therapy (NHFOT) has become increasingly common in hospitals across Europe, Asia, and North America. These high utility devices provide an efficient and comfortable access points for providing supplemental oxygen to patients with variety of respiratory disorders. They are relatively easy to set up, and clinicians and patients alike give very positive feedback about their ease of use and comfort for patients in the hospital setting. However, it remains uncertain whether NHFOT improves patient survival or even reduces respiratory complications. Outcome data in adult populations are few and frequently underpowered to guide physicians for their widespread use in hospital setting. In this article, we present a review of the current technology and available studies pertinent to NHFOT. PMID:27142658

  14. Restructuring a rehabilitation program for older adults: effects on patient outcomes and staff perspectives.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jennifer; Hopper, Tammy

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods research study was to examine the impact of organizational change on patient outcomes and staff experiences in a rehabilitation program for older adults. Program restructuring focused on reducing patient length of stay and increasing admissions to the rehabilitation program. Study findings revealed that patients admitted after restructuring, as compared to the time period just prior, experienced shorter lengths of stay yet made similar progress towards rehabilitation goals. The average discharge Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores between the two time periods were not significantly different. Yet FIM efficiency scores improved after the restructuring. With this reorganization, rehabilitation staff reported working harder to help patients achieve satisfactory outcomes, although initially staff reported lower morale. Findings extend the current literature and have practical implications for health care professionals interested in facilitating successful organizational change.

  15. Applications of Nasal High-Flow Oxygen Therapy in Critically ill Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    Porhomayon, Jahan; El-Solh, Ali A; Pourafkari, Leili; Jaoude, Philippe; Nader, Nader D

    2016-10-01

    The use of nasal high-flow oxygen therapy (NHFOT) has become increasingly common in hospitals across Europe, Asia, and North America. These high utility devices provide an efficient and comfortable access points for providing supplemental oxygen to patients with variety of respiratory disorders. They are relatively easy to set up, and clinicians and patients alike give very positive feedback about their ease of use and comfort for patients in the hospital setting. However, it remains uncertain whether NHFOT improves patient survival or even reduces respiratory complications. Outcome data in adult populations are few and frequently underpowered to guide physicians for their widespread use in hospital setting. In this article, we present a review of the current technology and available studies pertinent to NHFOT.

  16. Increased pulmonary alveolar-capillary permeability in patients at risk for adult respiratory distress syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tennenberg, S.D.; Jacobs, M.P.; Solomkin, J.S.; Ehlers, N.A.; Hurst, J.M.

    1987-04-01

    Two methods for predicting adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were evaluated prospectively in a group of 81 multitrauma and sepsis patients considered at clinical high risk. A popular ARDS risk-scoring method, employing discriminant analysis equations (weighted risk criteria and oxygenation characteristics), yielded a predictive accuracy of 59% and a false-negative rate of 22%. Pulmonary alveolar-capillary permeability (PACP) was determined with a radioaerosol lung-scan technique in 23 of these 81 patients, representing a statistically similar subgroup. Lung scanning achieved a predictive accuracy of 71% (after excluding patients with unilateral pulmonary contusion) and gave no false-negatives. We propose a combination of clinical risk identification and functional determination of PACP to assess a patient's risk of developing ARDS.

  17. Treatment non-adherence in teenage and young adult patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Kondryn, Helena J; Edmondson, Claire L; Hill, Jonathan; Eden, Tim O B

    2011-01-01

    Adhering to treatment can be a significant issue for many patients diagnosed with chronic health conditions and this has been reported to be greater during the adolescent years. However, little is known about treatment adherence in teenage and young adult (TYA) patients with cancer. To increase awareness of the adherence challenges faced by these patients, we have reviewed the published work. The available evidence suggests that a substantial proportion of TYA patients with cancer do have difficulties, with reports that up to 63% of patients do not adhere to their treatment regimens. However, with inconsistent findings across studies, the true extent of non-adherence for these young patients is still unclear. Furthermore, it is apparent that there are many components of the cancer treatment regimen that have yet to be assessed in relation to patient adherence. Factors that have been shown to affect treatment adherence in TYA patients include patient emotional functioning (depression and self-esteem), patient health beliefs (perceived illness severity and vulnerability), and family environment (parental support and parent-child concordance). Strategies that foster greater patient adherence are also identified. These strategies are multifactorial, targeting not only the patient, but the health professional, family, and treatment regimen. This review highlights the lack of interventional studies addressing treatment adherence in TYA patients with cancer, with only one such intervention being identified: a video game intervention focusing on behavioural issues related to cancer treatment and care. Methodological issues in measuring adherence are addressed and suggestions for improving the design of future adherence studies highlighted, of which there is a great need.

  18. Psychometric evaluation of the Sheehan Disability Scale in adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Coles, Theresa; Coon, Cheryl; DeMuro, Carla; McLeod, Lori; Gnanasakthy, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Inattention and impulsivity symptoms are common among adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which can lead to difficulty concentrating, restlessness, difficulty completing tasks, disorganization, impatience, and impulsiveness. Many adults with ADHD find it difficult to focus and prioritize. Resulting outcomes, such as missed deadlines and forgotten engagements, may ultimately impact the ability to function at work, school, home, or in a social environment. The European Medicines Agency guidelines for evaluating medicinal products for ADHD recommend inclusion of both functional outcomes, such as school, social, or work functioning, and outcomes related to symptoms of ADHD in clinical studies of novel medication primary efficacy endpoints. Due to its performance in other disease areas and the relevance of its items as evidenced by content validity analyses, the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) was chosen to assess functional impairment in ADHD. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the SDS, used as a brief measure of functional impairment in a number of psychiatric disorders, in adult patients with ADHD. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the reliability of the SDS (based on Cronbach's coefficient alpha and test-retest reliability), its validity (construct and known-groups validity), and its ability to detect change in this patient population. This study also established a preliminary responder definition for the SDS in this study population to determine when change can be considered clinically beneficial in a clinical trial setting. The psychometric results support the use of the SDS subscales (items 1-3) and total score (sum of items 1-3) in an ADHD population. In addition, the evaluation provides evidence for a three-point preliminary responder definition for the SDS and further evidence of its responsiveness in adults with ADHD. Altogether, the results indicate that the SDS is a

  19. Evaluation of the influence of pulmonary hypertension in ultra-fast-track anesthesia technique in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Paulo Sérgio; Cartacho, Márcio Portugal Trindade; de Castro, Casimiro Cardoso; Salgado Filho, Marcello Fonseca; Brandão, Antônio Carlos Aguiar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of pulmonary hypertension in the ultra-fast-track anesthesia technique in adult cardiac surgery. Methods A retrospective study. They were included 40 patients divided into two groups: GI (without pulmonary hypertension) and GII (with pulmonary hypertension). Based on data obtained by transthoracic echocardiography. We considered as the absence of pulmonary hypertension: a pulmonary artery systolic pressure (sPAP) <36 mmHg, with tricuspid regurgitation velocity <2.8 m/s and no additional echocardiographic signs of PH, and PH as presence: a sPAP >40 mmHg associated with additional echocardiographic signs of PH. It was established as influence of pulmonary hypertension: the impossibility of extubation in the operating room, the increase in the time interval for extubation and reintubation the first 24 hours postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate analyzes were performed when necessary. Considered significant a P value <0.05. Results The GI was composed of 21 patients and GII for 19. All patients (100%) were extubated in the operating room in a medium time interval of 17.58±8.06 min with a median of 18 min in GII and 17 min in GI. PH did not increase the time interval for extubation (P=0.397). It required reintubation of 2 patients in GII (5% of the total), without statistically significant as compared to GI (P=0.488). Conclusion In this study, pulmonary hypertension did not influence on ultra-fast-track anesthesia in adult cardiac surgery. PMID:27163419

  20. Acute Alcohol Use and Injury Patterns in Young Adult Prehospital Patients.

    PubMed

    Barton, David J; Tift, Frank W; Cournoyer, Lauren E; Vieth, Julie T; Hudson, Korin B

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine if acute alcohol consumption is associated with differences in injury pattern among young adult patients with traumatic injuries presenting to emergency medical services (EMS). A cross-sectional, retrospective review of prehospital patient care reports (PCRs) was conducted evaluating injured patients who presented to a collegiate EMS agency from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2012. Included patients were age 18-24 y and sustained an injury within the previous 24 h. PCRs were reviewed independently by two abstractors to determine if the patient was documented to have acutely consumed alcohol proximate to his/her injury. Primary and secondary sites of regional body injury were recorded. Injury severity was recorded using the Revised Trauma Score (RTS). The association between primary injury site and acute alcohol use was assessed using a chi-square test. Multiple logistic regression was used to control for sex in predicting injury type. Of 440 injured patients, 135 (30.6%) had documented alcohol use prior to injury. Acute alcohol consumption altered the overall pattern of regional injury (p < 0.001). Alcohol users were more likely to present with injury secondary to assault, fall/trip, and unknown mechanism of injury (p < 0.001, all comparisons). RTS scores were statistically lower in the alcohol group (p < 0.001), although the clinical significance of this is unclear. Controlling for sex, acute alcohol consumption predicted increased risk of head/neck injury 5.59-fold (p < 0.001). Acute alcohol use in collegiate EMS patients appears to alter injury patterns in young adults and increases risk of head/neck injury. EMS providers in similar agencies should consider these trends when assessing and treating injured college-aged patients. PMID:27002348

  1. Novel Munc13–4 mutations in children and young adult patients with haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, A; Cannella, S; Bossi, G; Gallo, F; Trizzino, A; Pende, D; Dieli, F; Bruno, G; Stinchcombe, J C; Micalizzi, C; De Fusco, C; Danesino, C; Moretta, L; Notarangelo, L D; Griffiths, G M; Aricò, M

    2006-01-01

    Familial haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterised by constitutive defects in cellular cytotoxicity resulting in fever, hepatosplenomegaly and cytopenia, and the outcome is fatal unless treated by chemoimmunotherapy followed by haematopoietic stem‐cell transplantation. Since 1999, mutations in the perforin gene giving rise to this disease have been identified; however, these account only for 40% of cases. Lack of a genetic marker hampers the diagnosis, suitability for transplantation, selection of familial donors, identification of carriers, genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis. Mutations in the Munc13–4 gene have recently been described in patients with FHL. We sequenced the Munc13–4 gene in all patients with haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis not due to PRF1 mutations. In 15 of the 30 families studied, 12 novel and 4 known Munc13–4 mutations were found, spread throughout the gene. Among novel mutations, 2650C→T introduced a stop codon; 441del A, 532del C, 3082del C and 3226ins G caused a frameshift, and seven were mis sense mutations. Median age of diagnosis was 4 months, but six patients developed the disease after 5 years of age and one as a young adult of 18 years. Involvement of central nervous system was present in 9 of 15 patients, activity of natural killer cells was markedly reduced or absent in 13 of 13 tested patients. Chemo‐immunotherapy was effective in all patients. Munc13–4 mutations were found in 15 of 30 patients with FHL without PRF1 mutations. Because these patients may develop the disease during adolescence or even later, haematologists should include FHL2 and FHL3 in the differential diagnosis of young adults with fever, cytopenia, splenomegaly and hypercytokinaemia. PMID:16825436

  2. Introduction of a Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis Protocol for Older Adult Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed Central

    Croxford, Anna; Clare, Adam; McCurdy, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Hospital-Acquired venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. In psychiatric patients these risks are increased due to multiple factors including poor mobility, restraint, catatonia, sedation, and conventional antipsychotic use. Diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric patients presenting with signs and symptoms of a VTE can be delayed due to a patient's communication difficulties, non-compliance, or attribution of symptoms to a psychosomatic cause. However, despite the increased risk, approved VTE prophylaxis protocols are infrequently used on Psychiatric wards. On one Older Adult Psychiatric Ward, two patients presented with VTE (a fatal pulmonary embolism and a symptomatic deep vein thrombosis) over a 6 month period demonstrating the necessity for prophylactic assessment. A baseline audit over 3 months showed that 63-83% of patients on the ward had received no assessment of VTE risk, on any given week, although this improved slightly following the critical incidents. A VTE prophylaxis protocol, based on NICE guidance for VTE risk assessment in Medical and Surgical patients, was developed with consideration given to additional Psychiatric risk factors. This took the form of a pro-forma with a tick-box design that included mobility assessment, VTE risk factors, bleeding risk factors, and guidance on prescribing decisions. This was implemented on an Older Adult Psychiatric ward and prophylaxis was provided to those meeting the threshold. Weekly audit of all pro-formas (including assessments completed within 48 hours of admission and prophylaxis prescription) was conducted after the pro-forma introduction from 1st February 2013 to 24th May 2013. Frequency of assessments increased after protocol implementation with between 36% and 85% of all patients being assessed for VTE risk post intervention. Fluctuations in numbers assessed may have related to ward pressures, staff changes, and practicalities of pro-forma use. After

  3. Spontaneous gram-negative bacillary meningitis in adult patients: characteristics and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spontaneous meningitis caused by gram-negative bacilli in adult patients is uncommon and poorly characterized. Our objective is to describe and compare the characteristics and the outcome of adult patients with spontaneous gram-negative bacilli meningitis (GNBM) and spontaneous meningitis due to other pathogens. Methods Prospective single hospital-based observational cohort study conducted between 1982 and 2006 in a university tertiary hospital in Barcelona (Spain). The Main Outcome Measure: In-hospital mortality. Results Gram-negative bacilli meningitis was diagnosed in 40 (7%) of 544 episodes of spontaneous acute bacterial meningitis. The most common pathogens were Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas species. On admission, characteristics associated with spontaneous gram-negative bacilli meningitis by multivariate modeling were advanced age, history of cancer, nosocomial acquisition of infection, urinary tract infection as distant focus of infection, absence of rash, hypotension, and a high cerebrospinal fluid white-cell count. Nine (23%) episodes were acquired in the hospital and they were most commonly caused by Pseudomonas. The in-hospital mortality rate was 53%. The mortality rate was higher among patients with Gram-negative bacillary meningitis than among those with other bacterial meningitis and their risk of death was twenty times higher than among patients infected with Neisseria meningitidis (odds ratio 20.47; 95% confidence interval 4.03-103.93; p<0.001). Conclusions Gram-negative bacilli cause 9% of spontaneous bacterial meningitis of known etiology in adults. Characteristics associated with GNBM include advanced age, history of cancer, nosocomial acquisition, and urinary tract infection as distant focus of infection. The mortality rate is higher among patients with gram-negative bacillary meningitis than among those with other bacterial meningitides. PMID:24079517

  4. Clinical characteristics, prognostic factors, and outcomes of adult patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Otrock, Zaher K; Eby, Charles S

    2015-03-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare clinical syndrome characterized by the activation of the mononuclear phagocytic system. The diagnosis of HLH in adults is challenging not only because the majority of the reported data are from pediatric patients, but also because HLH occurs in many disease entities. This study reports the clinical and laboratory findings and prognostic factors of adult HLH in a large cohort managed at a single medical center from 2003 to 2014. Seventy-three patients met the HLH-2004 diagnostic criteria. The median age was 51 years (range, 18-82 years); 41 (56.2%) were male. Patients manifested fever, cytopenias, and elevated ferritin in >85% of cases. Likely causes of HLH were as follows: 30 (41.1%) infections, 21 (28.8%) malignancies, 5 (6.8%) attributed to autoimmune disorders, 1 (1.4%) primary immunodeficiency, 2 (2.7%) post solid organ transplantation, and 13 (17.8%) idiopathic. The median overall survival was 7.67 months. Patients with malignancy-associated HLH had a markedly worse survival compared with patients with non-malignancy-associated HLH (median overall survival 1.13 vs. 46.53 months, respectively; P < 0.0001). In a multivariable analysis, malignancy (hazard ratio = 12.22; 95% CI: 2.53-59.02; P = 0.002) correlated with poor survival. Ferritin >50,000 µg/L correlated with 30-day mortality. Survival after a diagnosis of HLH is dismal, especially among those with malignancy-associated HLH. The development of a registry for adults with HLH would improve our understanding of this syndrome, validate diagnostic criteria, and help develop effective treatment strategies. PMID:25469675

  5. Psychosocial Information Requirements for Multimorbid Breast Cancer Patients in Breast Centres in North Rhine Westphalia

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, C.; Ansmann, L.; Ernstmann, N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The importance of breast cancer patients (BPs) being supplied with sufficient information is well known. This study investigated the unfulfilled psychosocial information requirements of multimorbid BPs. Methods: This study records the unfulfilled psychosocial information requirements of 4166 patients, who were treated at one of the fifty breast centres in North Rhine Westphalia. The Cologne patient questionnaire for breast cancer 2.0 included in the postal survey following hospital stays records the information requirements using an adapted version of the “Cancer patient information needs” scale. Through a univariate analysis using the χ2 test, it was investigated whether multimorbid BPs had significantly different psychosocial information requirements than BPs without further concomitant illnesses. Results: In general, it transpired that BPs had relatively low unfulfilled information requirements regarding work (20.7 %), everyday life (26.8 %), illness (27.4 %) and treatment (35.7 %), though such requirements were higher when it came to health-related behaviour (54.2 %). Multimorbid BPs had significantly lower unfulfilled information requirements regarding work and significantly larger ones regarding treatment in comparison to BPs without concomitant illnesses. Renal diseases and concomitant mental illnesses were associated with particularly high information requirements (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The results of our study should clarify the complexity and heterogeneity of information requirements of breast cancer patients in oncological care and should help to design the supply of information to be more patient-oriented. PMID:26257407

  6. Translating personality psychology to help personalize preventive medicine for young adult patients.

    PubMed

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E; Belsky, Daniel W; Hancox, Robert J; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-03-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by health care reform will soon increase demands on primary care physicians. Physicians will face more young adult patients, which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the present study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults' personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the cohort of 1,000 individuals from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study (Moffitt, Caspi, Rutter, & Silva, 2001), we show that very brief measures of young adults' personalities predicted their midlife physical health across multiple domains (metabolic abnormalities, cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function, periodontal disease, and systemic inflammation). Individuals scoring low on the traits of Conscientiousness and Openness to Experience went on to develop poorer health even after accounting for preexisting differences in education, socioeconomic status, smoking, obesity, self-reported health, medical conditions, and family medical history. Moreover, personality ratings from peer informants who knew participants well, and from a nurse and receptionist who had just met participants for the first time, predicted health decline from young adulthood to midlife despite striking differences in level of acquaintance. Personality effect sizes were on par with other well-established health risk factors such as socioeconomic status, smoking, and self-reported health. We discuss the potential utility of personality measurement to function as an inexpensive and accessible tool for health care professionals to personalize preventive medicine. Adding personality information to existing health care electronic infrastructures could also advance personality theory by generating opportunities to examine how personality processes influence doctor-patient communication, health service use, and patient

  7. Functional MRI evidence for language plasticity in adult epileptic patients: Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, Emilie; Baciu, Monica; Pichat, Cédric; Kahane, Philippe; Le Bas, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    The present fMRI study explores the cerebral reorganisation of language in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, according to the age of seizures onset (early or late) and the hippocampal sclerosis (associated or not). Seven right-handed control volunteers and seven preoperative adult epileptic patients performed a rhyme decision (language condition) and a visual detection (control condition) tasks in visually presented words and unreadable characters, respectively. All patients were left hemisphere dominant for language. Appropriate statistical analyses provided the following preliminary results: (1) patients compared with healthy subjects showed lower degree of hemispheric lateralization with supplementary involvement of the right hemisphere; (2) the degree of hemispheric specialization depends on the considered region; (3) patients with early seizures show signs of temporal and parietal reorganization more frequently than patients with late onset of seizures; (4) patients with early seizures show a tendency for intra-hemispheric frontal reorganisation; (5) associated hippocampal sclerosis facilitates the inter-hemispheric shift of temporal activation. Although our patients were left hemisphere predominant for language, the statistical analyses indicated that the degree of lateralization was significantly lower than in healthy subjects. This result has been considered as the indication of atypical lateralization of language. PMID:18728818

  8. Activity limitation and exertional dyspnea in adult asthmatic patients: What do we know?

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, François; Garcia, Gilles; Ninane, Vincent; Laveneziana, Pierantonio

    2016-08-01

    Limitation of activity is the most cited symptom described by uncontrolled asthma patients. Assessment of activity limitation can be undertaken through several ways, more or less complex, subjective or objective. Yet little is known about the link between patients sensations and objective measurements. The present review reports the current knowledge regarding activity limitation and symptom perception (i.e., exertional dyspnea) in adult patients with asthma. This work is based on references indexed by PubMed, irrespective of the year of publication. Overall, patients with stable asthma do not have a more sedentary lifestyle than healthy subjects. However, during a cycle ergometric test, the maximal load is reduced when FEV1, FVC and muscle strengths are decreased. Additionally, during the six-minute walking test, mild asthma patients walk less than healthy subjects even if the minimal clinically important difference is not reached. The major complaint of asthma patients when exercising is dyspnea that is mainly related to the inspiratory effort and also to dynamic hyperinflation in some circumstances. Finally, the administration of bronchodilator does not improve the ventilatory pattern and the exercise capacity of asthma patients and little is known on its effect on exertional dyspnea. The present review allows to conclude that until now there is no gold standard test allowing the objective assessment of "activity limitation and exertional dyspnea" in asthma patients. PMID:27492522

  9. Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine Guidelines on Preoperative Screening and Assessment of Adult Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Memtsoudis, Stavros G.; Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Nagappa, Mahesh; Opperer, Mathias; Cozowicz, Crispiana; Patrawala, Sara; Lam, David; Kumar, Anjana; Joshi, Girish P.; Fleetham, John; Ayas, Najib; Collop, Nancy; Doufas, Anthony G.; Eikermann, Matthias; Englesakis, Marina; Gali, Bhargavi; Gay, Peter; Hernandez, Adrian V.; Kaw, Roop; Kezirian, Eric J.; Malhotra, Atul; Mokhlesi, Babak; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Stierer, Tracey; Wappler, Frank; Hillman, David R.; Auckley, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine guideline on preoperative screening and assessment of adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is to present recommendations based on the available clinical evidence on the topic where possible. As very few well-performed randomized studies in this field of perioperative care are available, most of the recommendations were developed by experts in the field through consensus processes involving utilization of evidence grading to indicate the level of evidence upon which recommendations were based. This guideline may not be appropriate for all clinical situations and all patients. The decision whether to follow these recommendations must be made by a responsible physician on an individual basis. Protocols should be developed by individual institutions taking into account the patients’ conditions, extent of interventions and available resources. This practice guideline is not intended to define standards of care or represent absolute requirements for patient care. The adherence to these guidelines cannot in any way guarantee successful outcomes and is rather meant to help individuals and institutions formulate plans to better deal with the challenges posed by perioperative patients with OSA. These recommendations reflect the current state of knowledge and its interpretation by a group of experts in the field at the time of publication. While these guidelines will be periodically updated, new information that becomes available between updates should be taken into account. Deviations in practice from guidelines may be justifiable and such deviations should not be interpreted as a basis for claims of negligence. PMID:27442772

  10. Modeling Fluid Resuscitation by Formulating Infusion Rate and Urine Output in Severe Thermal Burn Adult Patients: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qizhi; Li, Wei; Zou, Xin; Dang, Yongming; Wu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Acute burn injuries are among the most devastating forms of trauma and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Appropriate fluid resuscitation after severe burn, specifically during the first 48 hours following injury, is considered as the single most important therapeutic intervention in burn treatment. Although many formulas have been developed to estimate the required fluid amount in severe burn patients, many lines of evidence showed that patients still receive far more fluid than formulas recommend. Overresuscitation, which is known as “fluid creep,” has emerged as one of the most important problems during the initial period of burn care. If fluid titration can be personalized and automated during the resuscitation phase, more efficient burn care and outcome will be anticipated. In the present study, a dynamic urine output based infusion rate prediction model was developed and validated during the initial 48 hours in severe thermal burn adult patients. The experimental results demonstrated that the developed dynamic fluid resuscitation model might significantly reduce the total fluid volume by accurately predicting hourly urine output and has the potential to aid fluid administration in severe burn patients. PMID:26090415

  11. Long-Term Effects of Exercise Training and Hyperalimentation in Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Severe Pulmonary Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heijerman, Harry G. M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study, with 10 adult patients with cystic fibrosis, found that the improvement in lung function and ergometry parameters obtained by a short in-patient training program could be maintained on an out-patient basis through a voluntary self-treatment program. (DB)

  12. Thrombopoietin receptor agonists for preparing adult patients with immune thrombocytopenia to splenectomy: results of a retrospective, observational GIMEMA study.

    PubMed

    Zaja, Francesco; Barcellini, Wilma; Cantoni, Silvia; Carpenedo, Monica; Caparrotti, Giuseppe; Carrai, Valentina; Di Renzo, Nicola; Santoro, Cristina; Di Nicola, Massimo; Veneri, Dino; Simonetti, Federico; Liberati, Anna M; Ferla, Valeria; Paoloni, Francesca; Crea, Enrico; Volpetti, Stefano; Tuniz, Enrica; Fanin, Renato

    2016-05-01

    In patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) refractory to corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG), splenectomy may result at higher risk of peri-operative complications and, for this reason, potentially contraindicated. The thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TPO-RAs) romiplostim and eltrombopag have shown high therapeutic activity in primary ITP, but data of efficacy and safety regarding their use in preparation for splenectomy are missing. Thirty-one adult patients, median age 50 years, with corticosteroids and/or IVIG refractory persistent and chronic ITP who were treated with TPO-RAs (romiplostim= 24; eltrombopag= 7) with the aim to increase platelet count and allow a safer execution of splenectomy were retrospectively evaluated. Twenty-four patients (77%) responded to the use of TPO-RAs with a median platelet count that increased from 11 × 10(9) /L before starting TPO-RAs to 114 × 10(9) /L pre-splenectomy, but a concomitant treatment with corticosteroids and/or IVIG was required in 19 patients. Twenty-nine patients underwent splenectomy while two patients who responded to TPO-RAs subsequently refused surgery. Post-splenectomy complications were characterized by two Grade 3 thrombotic events (1 portal vein thrombosis in the patient with previous history of HCV hepatitis and 1 pulmonary embolism), with a platelet count at the time of thrombosis of 260 and 167 × 10(9) /L, respectively and one Grade 3 infectious event. TPO-RAs may represent a therapeutic option to improve platelet count and reduce the risk of peri-operative complications in ITP candidates to splenectomy. An increased risk of post-splenectomy thromboembolic events cannot be ruled out and thromboprophylaxis with low-molecular weight heparin is generally recommended.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Novel Plant Cell-Expressed Taliglucerase Alfa in Adult and Pediatric Patients with Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Richat; Park, Glen; Damle, Bharat; Chertkoff, Raul; Alon, Sari

    2015-01-01

    Taliglucerase alfa is a beta-glucocerebrosidase enzyme replacement therapy approved in the United States, Israel, and other countries for treatment of Type 1 Gaucher disease in adults, and is the first approved plant cell—expressed recombinant protein. In this report, taliglucerase alfa pharmacokinetics were assessed in adult and pediatric patients with Gaucher disease from separate multicenter trials of 30 Units/kg and 60 Units/kg doses infused every 2 weeks. Serial blood samples were obtained from adult patients following single-dose administration on day 1 (n = 26) and multiple doses at week 38 (n = 29), and from pediatric patients following administration of multiple doses of taliglucerase alfa for 10–27 months (n = 10). In both adult and pediatric patients, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to last measureable concentration (AUC0-t), and from time zero to infinity (AUC0-∞) were higher after 60 Units/kg dose than 30 Units/kg dose. No tendency for accumulation or change in taliglucerase alfa pharmacokinetic parameters over time from day 1 to week 38 was observed with repeated doses of 30 or 60 Units/kg in adults. After multiple doses, mean (range) dose-normalized pharmacokinetic parameters were similar for adult versus pediatric patients receiving 60 Units/kg: Cmax expressed in ng/mL/mg was 42.4 (14.5–95.4) in adults and 46.6 (34.4–68.4) in pediatric patients, AUC0 t expressed in ng•h/mL/mg was 63.4 (26.3–156) in adults and 63.9 (39.8–85.1) in pediatric patients, t1/2 expressed in minutes was 34.8 (11.3–104) in adults and 31.5 (18.0–42.9) in pediatric patients and total body clearance expressed in L/h was 19.9 (6.25–37.9) in adults and 17.0 (11.7–24.9) in pediatric patients. These pharmacokinetic data extend the findings of taliglucerase alfa in adult and pediatric patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov. NCT00376168 (in adults); NCT01411228 (in children) PMID

  14. Levomilnacipran extended-release: a review of its use in adult patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2014-11-01

    Oral levomilnacipran extended-release (ER) [Fetzima™], the more active enantiomer of milnacipran, is the most recent serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor to be approved in the USA for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder (MDD). MDD is characterized by depression and impairment of cognitive, social and work functioning. Once-daily levomilnacipran ER 40-120 mg was an effective and generally well-tolerated treatment in adults with MDD participating in 8-week phase III trials and a 1-year extension study. After 8 weeks, levomilnacipran ER treatment was associated with significantly greater and clinically meaningful improvements in depressive symptoms than placebo treatment and, in general, higher Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale responder rates and greater improvements in functional outcomes than placebo. The efficacy of levomilnacipran ER was maintained during the extension study, with no new safety signals detected; ongoing postmarketing evidence should more fully define the long-term safety of levomilnacipran ER. In the absence of head-to-head clinical trials, the relative position of levomilnacipran ER to that of other antidepressants remains to be determined. In the meantime, it is a useful addition to pharmacological options for the treatment of adult patients with MDD. This article summarizes the clinical use of oral levomilnacipran ER in adults with MDD, and briefly reviews the pharmacological properties of levomilnacipran. PMID:25270036

  15. Jejunal lymphangioma: an unusual cause of intussusception in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Limaiem, F; Khalfallah, T; Marsaoui, L; Bouraoui, S; Lahmar, A; Mzabi, S

    2015-03-01

    Adult intussusception is a relatively rare clinical entity. Almost 90% of cases of intussusception in adults are secondary to a pathologic condition that serves as a lead point. Lymphangioma of the small bowel is an unusual tumour that has been rarely reported to cause intussusception. In this paper, we present a rare case of adult intussusception due to jejunal lymphangioma. A 22-year-old female patient with a medical history significant for anaemia presented with intermittent colicky abdominal pain, diarrhoea and oedema of the inferior limbs for the past three months. Ultrasonography and CT scan revealed a typical target sign with dilated intestinal loops. At laparotomy, a jejuno-jejunal intussusception was found. Partial resection of the jejunum was performed. Macroscopic examination of the surgical specimen revealed a pedunculated polyp measuring 2 cm in diameter. Histological sections of the polyp revealed in the lamina propria and submucosal layer of the jejunum several markedly dilated thin-walled lymphatic spaces lined with single layers of flat endothelial cells. The final pathologic diagnosis was submucosal lymphangioma. This case report indicates that intussusception, although rare in adults, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. Moreover, it should be taken into consideration that lymphangioma is one of the possible lesions that can cause intussusception.

  16. Evaluation of shunt flow by multiplane transesophageal echocardiography in adult patients with isolated patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih-Tai; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Hsieh, I-Chang; Chang, Hern-Jia; Chern, Ming-Shyan; Lin, Fun-Chung; Wu, Delon

    2002-11-01

    The role of multiplane (M) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in the diagnosis of isolated patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in adults and its effectiveness in the assessment of the pulmonary to systemic flow ratio were evaluated and compared with those obtained from cardiac catheterization examination. Eleven consecutive patients, ranging from 17 to 56 years old (mean of 29.5 +/- 12.0), with clinically suspected PDA were subjects of this study. A complete transthoracic echocardiographic study was performed in each patient before MTEE. MTEE with Doppler color flow mapping showed clear visualization of a ductal structure between the descending aorta and pulmonary artery with a continuous turbulent mosaic flow suggestive of PDA in all 11 patients. The pulmonary/systemic flow and vascular resistance ratios obtained by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization correlated well (r = 0.8732, P =.0004; r = 0.623, P =.04, respectively). This study demonstrated that MTEE combined with transthoracic echocardiography examination is an accurate noninvasive means in the diagnosis of PDA and assessment of the pulmonary to systemic flow and vascular resistance ratios in adult patients.

  17. Follicular lymphoma in young adults: a clinicopathological and molecular study of 200 patients.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Ivison X; Domeny-Duarte, Pollyanna; Wludarski, Sheila C L; Natkunam, Yasodha; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2013-09-01

    Follicular lymphoma is clinically heterogenous, and therefore necessitates the identification of prognostic markers to stratify risk groups and optimize clinical management. It is relatively rare in patients younger than 40 years, and the clinicopathologic characteristics and biological behavior in this age group are poorly understood. In the current study, samples from a cohort of 200 patients between 19 and 40 years were evaluated retrospectively with respect to clinical, histologic, and genetic features. These were then correlated with clinical outcome. The median age at presentation was 35 years with a slight female prepoderance (56%). Most of the cases are presented with nodal disease (90%). Concomitant follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were observed in 7 (4%) patients. Immunohistologic studies showed the expression of CD10 (91%), BCL6 (97%), BCL2 (95%), MUM1/IRF4 (12%), MDM2 (17%), and CD23 (25%). BCL2 rearrangement was present in 74%, and BCL6 in 20%. The estimated overall survival of patients was 13 years (mean). The presence of anemia, elevated lactose dehydrogenase, bone marrow involvement, and high-risk follicular lymphoma international prognostic index correlated with adverse overall survival. Our findings revealed that follicular lymphoma in young adults demonstrate similarities with that of older adults, including the frequency of presentation at various anatomic sites, grade, and adverse prognostic factors.

  18. Ratio of C-Reactive Protein to Albumin Predicts Muscle Mass in Adult Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Tong; Wu, Pei-Yu; Chen, Hsi-Hsien; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Hsu, Yung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the ratio of C-reactive protein to albumin (CRP–Alb ratio) is associated with clinical outcomes in patients with disease. We examined the predictive value of this ratio in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). In this cross-sectional study, 91 eligible adult HD patients were analyzed, and the correlation between the CRP–Alb ratio and skeletal muscle mass normalized for body weight (SMM/wt; estimated using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer) was investigated. The mean age of the study participants was 54.9 ± 6.6 years (ranging from 27 to 64 years); 43 (47.2%) were men. The mean values for the SMM/wt were 39.1% ± 5.4%. The CRP–Alb ratio was found to be negatively correlated with SMM/wt (r = −0.33, P = 0.002) and creatinine (r = −0.20, P = 0.056). All the univariate significant and nonsignificant relevant covariates were selected for multivariable stepwise regression analysis. We determined that the homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance and CRP–Alb ratio were independent risk determinants for SMM/wt (βHOMA-IR = −0.18 and βCRP–Alb ratio = −3.84, adjusted R2 = 0.32). This study indicated that the CRP–Alb ratio may help clinicians in predicting muscle mass in adult patients undergoing HD. PMID:27768746

  19. Management of acne vulgaris with hormonal therapies in adult female patients.

    PubMed

    Husein-ElAhmed, Husein

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common condition affecting up of 93% of adolescents. Although rare, this disease may persist in adulthood. In adult women with acne (those older than 25 years old), this condition is particularly relevant because of the refractory to conventional therapies, which makes acne a challenge for dermatologists in this group of patients. In order to its potential risk for chronicity and the involvement of visible anatomical sites such as face and upper torso, acne has been associated with a wide spectrum of psychological and social dysfunction such as depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, somatization, and social inhibition. In particular, adult women with acne have been shown to be adversely impacted by the effect of acne on their quality of life. For the last four decades, dermatologists have used hormonal therapies for the management of acne vulgaris in adult women, which are considered a rational choice given the severity and chronicity of this condition in this group of patients. The aim of this work is to review the hormonal drugs for management of acne.

  20. Characteristics, Risk Factors, and Treatment Practices of Known Adult Hypertensive Patients in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamdan, N.; Saeed, A.; Kutbi, A.; Choudhry, A. J.; Nooh, R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence, risk factors, characteristics, and treatment practices of known adult hypertensives in Saudi Arabia. Methods. Cross-sectional community-based study using the WHO stepwise approach. Saudi adults were randomly chosen from Primary Health Care Centers catchment areas. Data was collected using a questionnaire which included sociodemographic data, history of hypertension, risk factors, treatment practices, biochemical and anthropometric measurements. Collected data was cheeked, computer fed, and analysed using SPSS V17. Results. Out of 4719 subjects (99.2% response), 542 (11.5%) subjects were known hypertensives or detected by health workers in the past 12 months. Hypertension was significantly associated with age, gender, geographical location, education, employment, diabetes, physical inactivity, excess body weight, and ever smoking. Multiple logistic analysis controlling for age showed that significant predictors of hypertension were diabetes mellitus, ever smoking, obesity, and hypercholesteremia. Several treatment modalities and practices were significantly associated with gender, age, education, and occupation. About 74% were under prescribed treatment by physicians, 62% on dietary modification, 37% attempted weight reduction, 27% performed physical exercise, and less than 7% used herbs, consulted traditional healers or quitted smoking. Income was not significantly associated with any treatment modality or patient practices. Conclusion. Hypertension (known and undetected) is a major chronic health problem among adults in Saudi Arabia. Many patients' practices need changes. A comprehensive approach is needed to prevent, early detect, and control the disease targeting, the risk factors, and predictors identified. PMID:21318133

  1. Pituitary Dysfunction in Adult Patients after Cranial Radiotherapy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kokshoorn, Nieke E.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; Neelis, Karen J.; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Pereira, Alberto M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Cranial radiotherapy is an important cause of hypopituitarism. The prevalence of hypopituitarism varies considerably between studies. Objective: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of reported prevalences of hypopituitarism in adults radiated for nonpituitary tumors. Data Sources: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library to identify potentially relevant studies. Study Selection: Studies were eligible for inclusion with the following criteria: 1) cranial radiotherapy for nonpituitary tumors and/or total body irradiation for hematological malignancies; 2) adult population (>18 yr old); and 3) report on endocrine evaluation. Data Extraction: Data review was done by two independent reviewers. Besides extraction of baseline and treatment characteristics, also endocrine tests, definitions, and cutoff values used to define pituitary insufficiency were extracted. Results: Eighteen studies with a total of 813 patients were included. These included 608 patients treated for nasopharyngeal cancer (75%) and 205 for intracerebral tumors. The total radiation dose ranged from 14 to 83 and 40 to 97 Gy for nasopharyngeal and intracerebral tumors, respectively. The point prevalence of any degree of hypopituitarism was 0.66 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.55–0.76]. The prevalence of GH deficiency was 0.45 (95% CI, 0.33–0.57); of LH and FSH, 0.3 (95% CI, 0.23–0.37); of TSH, 0.25 (95% CI, 0.16–0.37); and of ACTH, 0.22 (95% CI, 0.15–0.3), respectively. The prevalence of hyperprolactinemia was 0.34 (95% CI, 0.15–0.6). There were no differences between the effects of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal vs. for intracerebral tumors. Conclusion: Hypopituitarism is prevalent in adult patients after cranial radiotherapy for nonpituitary tumors. Therefore, all patients treated by cranial radiotherapy should have structured periodical assessment of pituitary functions. PMID:21613351

  2. Discrepancy between use of lean body mass or nitrogen balance to determine protein requirements for adult cats.

    PubMed

    Laflamme, Dorothy P; Hannah, Steven S

    2013-08-01

    This study was undertaken to contrast the minimum protein intake needed to maintain nitrogen balance or lean body mass (LBM) in adult cats using a prospective evaluation of 24 adult, neutered male cats fed one to three different diets. Following a 1-month baseline period during which all cats consumed a 34% protein diet, cats were fed a 20% (LO), 26% (MOD) or 34% (HI) protein diet for 2 months. During the baseline period and following the 2-month feeding period, nitrogen balance was assessed using a 96-h complete collection of urine and feces, and LBM was assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Weight loss increased in a linear manner with decreasing protein intake (P <0.01), despite no significant difference in calorie intake. Linear regression of the data indicated that approximately 1.5 g protein/kg (2.1 g/kg(0.75)) body weight is needed to maintain nitrogen balance, while 5.2 g protein/kg (7.8 g/kg(0.75)) body weight is needed to maintain LBM. This study provides evidence that nitrogen balance studies are inadequate for determining optimum protein requirements. Animals, including cats, can adapt to low protein intake and maintain nitrogen balance while depleting LBM. Loss of LBM and an associated reduction in protein turnover can result in compromised immune function and increased morbidity. Current Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) and National Research Council (NRC) standards for protein adequacy may not provide adequate protein to support LBM. The minimum daily protein requirement for adult cats appears to be at least 5.2 g/kg (7.8 g/kg(0.75)) body weight, well in excess of current AAFCO and NRC recommendations. Further research is needed to determine the effect, if any, of body condition, age and gender on protein requirements. PMID:23362342

  3. Culturally competent approaches to diagnosing ADHD in Hispanic adults and overcoming cultural issues with patients and families.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Juan

    2015-05-01

    Hispanics in the United States are a diverse population with different countries of origin and a wide range of English language proficiency, socioeconomic and immigration status, values, and traditions. Clinicians must combine what they know about treating adult ADHD in general with a culturally competent understanding of the special needs of Hispanic patients in order to provide effective and accessible treatment. Strategies to treat Hispanic adults may include clear communication during the patient's interview, assessment of comorbid conditions, and affordable treatment options.

  4. Management and outcomes of small bowel obstruction in older adult patients: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Jeremy E.; Bailey, Jonathan G.; Davis, Philip J.B.; Johnson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this research was to examine the morbidity, mortality and rate of recurrent bowel obstruction associated with the treatment of small bowel obstruction (SBO) in older adults. Methods We prospectively enrolled all patients 70 years or older with an SBO who were admitted to a tertiary care teaching centre between Jul. 1, 2011, and Sept. 30, 2012. Data regarding presentation, investigations, treatment and outcomes were collected. Results Of the 104 patients admitted with an SBO, 49% were managed nonoperatively and 51% underwent surgery. Patients who underwent surgery experienced more complications (64% v. 27%, p = 0.002) and stayed in hospital longer (10 v. 3 d, p < 0.001) than patients managed nonoperatively. Nonoperative management was associated with a high rate of recurrent SBO: 31% after a median follow-up of 17 months. Of the patients managed operatively, 60% underwent immediate surgery and 40% underwent surgery after attempted nonoperative management. Patients in whom nonoperative management failed underwent surgery after a median of 2 days, and 89% underwent surgery within 5 days. The rate of bowel resection was high (29%) among those who underwent delayed surgery. Surgery after failed nonoperative management was associated with a mortality of 14% versus 3% for those who underwent immediate surgery; however, this difference was not significant. Conclusion These data suggest that some elderly patients with SBO may be waiting too long for surgery. PMID:25421079

  5. Patient compliance and supportive periodontal therapy: Study among young adults of Namakkal district

    PubMed Central

    Gokulanathan, Subramanium; Balan, Natarajan; Aravind, Ramaraj Jayabalan; Thangavelu, Kavin

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the patient compliance to supportive and maintenance periodontal therapy and to determine the reason for noncompliance among young adult patients of Namakkal district, India. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 400 patients who underwent periodontal therapy and subsequently recalled for supportive and maintenance periodontal treatment in the Department of Periodontics, Vivekanandha Dental College for Women, Namakkal. Patients age group 25-35 years and of both gender were equally selected and grouped by occupation and socioeconomic status. According to their compliance with appointments, they are categorized as complete compliance, partially compliance and insufficient or noncompliance. Noncompliance and partially compliance patients were contacted and asked to rate their experience and reason for noncompliance. Results: In this study, 80% of patients showed complete compliance and were regular for supportive periodontal therapy appointments. Women were more regular in maintaining recall appointments than men. Salaried employers showed 84.3% complete compliance, while self-employed personals showed 77% complete compliance and 75% of nonworking personals were regular to the appointment schedule. Noncompliance person has quoted lack of time and forgetting the appointment date as a major reason for missed appointments. Conclusions: This study recommends the need for improvement in communication skills of practitioners and weekend appointment for patient undergoing periodontal maintenance therapy. PMID:25210365

  6. Predictors of loss to follow-up in antiretroviral treatment for adult patients in the Oromia region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Megerso, Abebe; Garoma, Sileshi; Eticha, Tolosa; Workineh, Tilaye; Daba, Shallo; Tarekegn, Mihretu; Habtamu, Zelalem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It is known that antiretroviral treatment (ART) reduces mortality from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome related causes. Patient’s lost to follow-up (LTFU) in this treatment poses a paramount problem to the public and health care services. Information on predictors of loss to follow-up is scarce in this study area and similar settings. Therefore, this study aimed at identifying correlates of loss to follow-up in ART among adult patients in the Oromia region of Ethiopia. Methods A case–control study was conducted between February 2015 and April 2015 using medical records. The stratified sampling technique was used to select health facilities. The number of patient records to be included in the study was proportionally allocated to each stratum based on their patient proportion in the regional data. Specific health facilities from which to include the records were randomly selected from a list of the health facilities per stratum. All adult patient records registered as LTFU (416) in the selected health facilities during the 12-month period prior to the data collection date, and 832 patients with good adherence to ART were included. Data were double-entered into Epi Info 7 and analyzed using SPSS 20. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression were used to report the results. Qualitative data were thematically analyzed using open code computer software. Results Age 15–24 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 19.82 95% CI: 6.80, 57.73); day laborers (AOR, 5.36; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.23, 8.89), rural residents (AOR, 2.35; 95% CI: 1.45, 3.89), World Health Organization clinical stage IV (AOR, 2.29; 95% CI: 1.45, 3.62), baseline CD4 <350 cells/mL (AOR, 2.06; 95% CI: 1.36, 3.13), suboptimal adherence to ART (AOR, 7.42; 95% CI: 1.87, 29.41), were factors which increased the risk of loss to follow-up in ART. Conclusion Multiple risk factors, both socioeconomic and clinical, were associated with loss to follow-up. Attention is required to

  7. Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for cardiogenic shock due to myocarditis in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Matteo; Banfi, Carlo; Grinberg, Daniel; Koffel, Catherine; Bendjelid, Karim; Robin, Jacques; Giraud, Raphaël; Obadia, Jean François

    2016-07-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the heart muscle with established histological, immunological and immunohistochemical diagnostic criteria. Different triggers could be advocated as possible etiologies of myocarditis such as viral and non-viral infections, medications, systemic autoimmune diseases and toxic reactions. The spectrum of clinical presentations of myocarditis is broad and varies from subclinical asymptomatic courses to refractory cardiogenic shock. The prognosis of patients with myocarditis depends mainly on the severity of clinical presentation. In particular, myocarditis patients developing cardiogenic shock refractory to optimal maximal medical treatment may benefit from the use of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) as a temporary mechanical circulatory support (MCS). The aim of the present report is to offer a review of the most important articles of the literature showing the results of VA-ECMO in the specific setting of cardiogenic shock due to myocarditis in adult patients. PMID:27499982

  8. Myotonia and flaccid dysarthria in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    de Swart, B J M; van Engelen, B G M; van de Kerkhof, J P B M; Maassen, B

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To specify and quantify possible defects in speech execution in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Methods: Studies on speech production were done on 30 mildly affected patients with myotonic dystrophy. Special attention was paid to myotonia. Because muscle activity can result in a decrease of myotonia, speech characteristics were measured before and after warm up. The possibility that warming up causes increased weakness was also assessed. Results: As with other motor skills, a warm up effect was found in speech production, resulting in an increase in repetition rate and a decrease in variability of repetition rate. Signs of fatigue did not occur. Conclusions: Warming up is valuable for patients with myotonic dystrophy in reducing the influence of myotonia on speech production. PMID:15377703

  9. Parachute mitral valve with severe mitral regurgitation in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Espinola-Zavaleta, Nilda; Chugh, Reema; Ramírez, Gabriela Meléndez

    2012-05-01

    Parachute mitral valve (PMV) is rarely seen in the adult population, in isolation or in association with other congenital heart defects, since most patients may have had milder lesions previously that were asymptomatic early in life, or were not detected due to lack of a comprehensive examination. We report a case of an 18-year-old woman with a history of exertional dyspnea, atypical chest pain, and cough for about 1 year. The echocardiographic examination identified a PMV with severe mitral regurgitation associated with bicuspid aortic valve and coarctation of the aorta. Most patients present with mitral stenosis of varying degree of severity, and rarely present with severe mitral regurgitation as seen in our patient.

  10. Renal histology in two adult patients with type I glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Obara, K; Saito, T; Sato, H; Ogawa, M; Igarashi, Y; Yoshinaga, K

    1993-02-01

    Two adult patients with type I glycogen storage disease (I-GSD) had chronic renal disease with heavy proteinuria. Renal biopsies showed focal glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, tubular atrophy or vacuolation, and prominent arteriosclerosis. Marked glomerular hypertrophy was demonstrated histometrically. Oil red O staining in one patient revealed numerous lipid deposits in the glomerular mesangium, tubular epithelial cells and interstitium. Electron microscopy in the other patient revealed diffuse thickening of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and lipid droplets within the mesangium. The glomerular hypertrophy, thickening of the GBM, and subsequent sclerosis were similar to those in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. These findings may explain the similarities between the natural histories of renal involvement in the two disorders. Particularly, glomerular hypertrophy may be a key step leading to glomerular sclerosis, which is the predominant finding I-GSD. Hyperlipidemia, which is commonly seen in I-GSD, may also accelerate the glomerular sclerosing process.

  11. Dose coefficients in pediatric and adult abdominopelvic CT based on 100 patient models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Paulson, Erik K.; Samei, Ehsan

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown the feasibility of estimating patient dose from a CT exam using CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose (denoted as h), DLP-normalized-effective dose (denoted as k), and DLP-normalized-risk index (denoted as q). However, previous studies were limited to a small number of phantom models. The purpose of this work was to provide dose coefficients (h, k, and q) across a large number of computational models covering a broad range of patient anatomy, age, size percentile, and gender. The study consisted of 100 patient computer models (age range, 0 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 2-180 kg) including 42 pediatric models (age range, 0 to 16 y.o.; weight range, 2-80 kg) and 58 adult models (age range, 18 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 57-180 kg). Multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) were included. A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which h, k, and q were derived. The relationships between h, k, and q and patient characteristics (size, age, and gender) were ascertained. The differences in conversion coefficients across the scanners were further characterized. CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose (h) showed an exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For organs within the image coverage, the average differences of h across scanners were less than 15%. That value increased to 29% for organs on the periphery or outside the image coverage, and to 8% for distributed organs, respectively. The DLP-normalized-effective dose (k) decreased exponentially with increasing patient size. For a given gender, the DLP-normalized-risk index (q) showed an exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The average differences in k and q across scanners were 8% and 10%, respectively. This study demonstrated that the knowledge of patient information and CTDIvol/DLP values may

  12. Effect of Ambrisentan on Exercise Capacity in Adult Patients After the Fontan Procedure.

    PubMed

    Cedars, Ari M; Saef, Joshua; Peterson, Linda R; Coggan, Andrew R; Novak, Eric L; Kemp, Debra; Ludbrook, Philip A

    2016-05-01

    The Fontan operation is a common end point for children born with a single functional ventricle. Fontan patients typically experience physiological deterioration leading to transplant or death in their third or fourth decades of life. This deterioration is partially attributable to progressive increases in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and as such endothelin receptor antagonists, which are known to decrease pulmonary vascular resistance, have been proposed as potentially beneficial in this population. We conducted a single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of 12 weeks of ambrisentan therapy (10 mg per day) versus placebo to test the hypothesis that endothelin receptor antagonism will improve cardiopulmonary exercise test parameters and 36-item short form (SF-36) assessed quality of life in adult Fontan patients. Twenty-eight patients entered the trial, 19 patients completed the protocol. Ambrisentan therapy improved peak oxygen consumption by 1.7 ml/kg/min in patients who achieved a respiratory exchange ratio of >0.95 (p = 0.05) and decreased the slope of the ventilatory equivalent ratio for oxygen (-2.8, p = 0.019) in all completers. It did not change SF-36 physical function score compared with placebo (p = 0.28). Ambrisentan therapy resulted in a decrease in (-1.4 g/dl, p <0.001) with no change in liver or renal function. Therapy was generally well tolerated, with no greater rate of side effects than placebo. In conclusion, ambrisentan is well tolerated and improves exercise capacity in adult Fontan patients. PMID:27063478

  13. Exergaming in older adults: A scoping review and implementation potential for patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Strömberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical activity can improve exercise capacity, quality of life and reduce mortality and hospitalization in patients with heart failure (HF). Adherence to exercise recommendations in patients with HF is low. The use of exercise games (exergames) might be a way to encourage patients with HF to exercise especially those who may be reluctant to more traditional forms of exercise. No studies have been conducted on patients with HF and exergames. Aim: This scoping review focuses on the feasibility and influence of exergames on physical activity in older adults, aiming to target certain characteristics that are important for patients with HF to become more physically active. Methods: A literature search was undertaken in August 2012 in the databases PsychInfo, PUBMED, Scopus, Web of Science and CINAHL. Included studies evaluated the influence of exergaming on physical activity in older adults. Articles were excluded if they focused on rehabilitation of specific limbs, improving specific tasks or describing no intervention. Fifty articles were found, 11 were included in the analysis. Results: Exergaming was described as safe and feasible, and resulted in more energy expenditure compared to rest. Participants experienced improved balance and reported improved cognitive function after exergaming. Participants enjoyed playing the exergames, their depressive symptoms decreased, and they reported improved quality of life and empowerment. Exergames made them feel more connected with their family members, especially their grandchildren. Conclusion: Although this research field is small and under development, exergaming might be promising in order to enhance physical activity in patients with HF. However, further testing is needed. PMID:24198306

  14. Comparision of clinical and histopathological results of hyalomatrix usage in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Erbatur, Serkan; Coban, Yusuf Kenan; Aydın, Engin Nasuhi

    2012-01-01

    Clinical and histopathological results of the hyaluronic acid skin substitute treatment of the patients who admitted to Inonu University Medical Faculty Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery clinic between january 2011 and march 2012 were evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups. HA were used for treatment of Hypertrophic scar (HS) or Keloid (K) in 10 patients of the first group. Skin biopsies obtained at peroperative and postoperative 3rd month were subjected to histopathologic examination in this group. In the second group, 10 patients with full thickness soft tissue loss secondary to burns, trauma or excisional reasons were also treated with HA application. Vancouver scar scale were used to determine the scar quality in both groups. Mean age was 25. 2 ± 10.2 and mean follow-up duration was 6.3±3.6 months in group 1. Preoperative and postoperative VSS scores in group 1 were 10.7±1.16 and 6.2±0.91, respectively. This difference was statistically significant (p<0,005). No HS or K development was seen in any patient in group 2 during the following period. Collagenisation scores of preoperative skin biopsies were significantly higher than postoperative scores (p<0,0001).Vascularisation scores of preoperative skin biopsies were significantly lower than postoperative scores (p<0,00001). The use of HA skin substitute in adults for treatment of HS or K provided the desired clinical healing in the 6 months’ follow-up periods. At the same time, HA application as an alternative to other treatment modalities led to a durable skin coverage in full thickness tissue loss in adult patients. PMID:23071910

  15. Osteoarticular Infections Caused by Non-Aspergillus Filamentous Fungi in Adult and Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Taj-Aldeen, Saad J.; Rammaert, Blandine; Gamaletsou, Maria; Sipsas, Nikolaos V.; Zeller, Valerie; Roilides, Emmanuel; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Miller, Andy O.; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Walsh, Thomas J.; Lortholary, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarticular mycoses due to non-Aspergillus moulds are uncommon and challenging infections. A systematic literature review of non-Aspergillus osteoarticular mycoses was performed using PUBMED and EMBASE databases from 1970 to 2013. Among 145 patients were 111 adults (median age 48.5 [16–92 y]) and 34 pediatric patients (median age 7.5 [3–15 y]); 114 (79.7%) were male and 88 (61.9%) were immunocompromised. Osteomyelitis was due to direct inoculation in 54.5%. Trauma and puncture wounds were more frequent in children (73.5% vs 43.5%; P = 0.001). Prior surgery was more frequent in adults (27.7% vs 5.9%; P = 0.025). Vertebral (23.2%) and craniofacial osteomyelitis (13.1%) with neurological deficits predominated in adults. Lower limb osteomyelitis (47.7%) and knee arthritis (67.8%) were predominantly seen in children. Hyalohyphomycosis represented 64.8% of documented infections with Scedosporium apiospermum (33.1%) and Lomentospora prolificans (15.8%) as the most common causes. Combined antifungal therapy and surgery was used in 69% of cases with overall response in 85.8%. Median duration of therapy was 115 days (range 5–730). When voriconazole was used as single agent for treatment of hyalohyphomycosis and phaeohyphomycosis, an overall response rate was achieved in 94.1% of cases. Non-Aspergillus osteoarticular mycoses occur most frequently in children after injury and in adults after surgery. Accurate early diagnosis and long-course therapy (median 6 mo) with a combined medical-surgical approach may result in favorable outcome. PMID:26683917

  16. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults: A French Nationwide Study Enrolling 41 Patients.

    PubMed

    Audemard-Verger, A; Descloux, E; Ponard, D; Deroux, A; Fantin, B; Fieschi, C; John, M; Bouldouyre, A; Karkowsi, L; Moulis, G; Auvinet, H; Valla, F; Lechiche, C; Davido, B; Martinot, M; Biron, C; Lucht, F; Asseray, N; Froissart, A; Buzelé, R; Perlat, A; Boutboul, D; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V; Isnard, S; Bienvenu, B

    2016-05-01

    Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies.A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis.Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15-67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1-10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35% (n = 14

  17. Outcome of patients with ventricular assist devices and acute renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaltenmaier, B; Pommer, W; Kaufmann, F; Hennig, E; Molzahn, M; Hetzer, R

    2000-01-01

    The significance of acute renal failure (ARF) for patients treated with a ventricular assist device (VAD) is uncertain. There is little information on the outcome of patients who require renal replacement therapy during treatment with a VAD. A retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the impact of renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy on such patients. Studied were 227 patients who were supplied with a VAD at the German Heart Institute Berlin. Fifty-five patients required renal replacement therapy during treatment with a VAD. These were compared with patients not needing renal replacement therapy (ARF and non-ARF groups). Significant differences for the end points of survival, heart transplantation, and discharge from hospital were observed in patients with ARF (p < 0.01). Survival was then analyzed according to indications for treatment with a VAD (bridge to transplantation or cardiac recovery after cardiotomy, transplantation, myocardial infarction, myocarditis, and endocarditis). Survival for bridge-to-transplantation patients was clearly influenced in a negative way by ARF (p < 0.01). For cardiac recovery patients, only a small difference in survival was observed (p = 0.05). We conclude that ARF is a negative predictor for bridge-to-transplantation patients. For cardiac recovery patients the impact of ARF on survival is marginally significant.

  18. Impact of hydrocortisone hemisuccinate use on outcome of severe scorpion-envenomed adult patients.

    PubMed

    Bahloul, Mabrouk; Chaari, Anis; Dammak, Hassen; Ben Algia, Najla; Medhioub, Fatma; Ben Hamida, Chokri; Chelly, Hedi; Bouaziz, Mounir

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze if the infusion of hydrocortisone hemisuccinate improve outcome in severe scorpion-envenomated adult patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU). Pairwise retrospective case-control study with 1:1 matching was designed. Patients were defined as cases when they received hydrocortisone hemisuccinate (as alone steroids) during hospitalization and as controls when they did not received any steroids. Patients were matched according to age, severity factors at admission represented by the presence of pulmonary edema and grades of severity of scorpion envenomation, and scorpion antivenom administration. Eighty-four patients were included as follows: 42 patients in the cases group and 42 patients in the control group. The mean age (±SD) was 40±21 years, ranging from 16 to 90 years. Moreover, 67 (80%) patients have a systemic inflammatory response syndrome on ICU admission. The comparison between cases group and control group showed that age is not significantly different. There were the same proportions of patients with pulmonary edema in 2 groups. Moreover, 23 (54%) patients in case group and 23 (54%) in the control group received scorpion antivenom (P>0.05). The mean temperature on admission was also not significantly different. The presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome was again not significantly different between 2 groups. The comparison of outcome of the 2 groups showed that the use of mechanical ventilation and its duration, the ICU stay length, and ICU mortality was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Although our study has some limitations, it confirms that the use of hydrocortisone hemisuccinate in severe scorpion-envenomed patients did not improve their outcome. PMID:23584312

  19. Antipsychotic Medication Prescribing Practices Among Adult Patients Discharged From State Psychiatric Inpatient Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    HOLLEN, VERA; SCHACHT, LUCILLE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to explore antipsychotic medication prescribing practices in a sample of 86,034 patients discharged from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals and to find the prevalence of patients discharged with no antipsychotic medications, on antipsychotic monotherapy, and on antipsychotic polypharmacy. For patients discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the study explored the adjusted rates of antipsychotic polypharmacy, the reasons patients were discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the proportion of antipsychotic polypharmacy by mental health disorder, and the characteristics associated with being discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed all discharges for adult patients (18 to 64 y of age) from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals between January 1 and December 31, 2011. The relationship among variables was explored using χ2, t test, and analysis of variance. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Results: The prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was 12%. Of the discharged patients receiving at least 1 antipsychotic medication (adjusted rate), 18% were on antipsychotic polypharmacy. The strongest predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy being prescribed were having a diagnosis of schizophrenia and a length of stay of 90 days or more. Patients were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy primarily to reduce their symptoms. Conclusions: Antipsychotic polypharmacy continues at a high enough rate to affect nearly 10,000 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia each year in state psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Further analysis of the clinical presentation of these patients may highlight particular aspects of the illness and its previous treatment that are contributing to practices outside the best-practice guideline. An increased understanding of trend data, patient characteristics, and national benchmarks provides an opportunity for

  20. Evaluation of safety and efficacy of zonisamide in adult patients with partial, generalized, and combined seizures: an open labeled, noncomparative, observational Indian study

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Amitabh; Ravat, Sangeeta; Srinivasan, Avathvadi Venkatesan; Shetty, Ashutosh; Kumar, Vivek; Achtani, Renu; Mathur, Vivek Narain; Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Bajpai, Veeresh; Manjunath, Nanjappa C; Narayana, Randhi Venkata; Mehta, Suyog

    2016-01-01

    A prospective, multicentric, noncomparative open-label observational study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy zonisamide in Indian adult patients for the treatment of partial, generalized, or combined seizures. A total of 655 adult patients with partial, generalized, or combined seizures from 30 centers across India were recruited after initial screening. Patients received 100 mg zonisamide as initiating dose as monotherapy/adjunctive therapy for 24 weeks, with titration of 100 mg every 2 weeks if required. Adverse events, responder rates, and seizure freedom were observed every 4 weeks. Efficacy and safety were also assessed using Clinicians Global Assessment of Response to Therapy and Patients Global Assessment of Tolerability to Therapy, respectively. Follow-up was conducted for a period of 24 weeks after treatment initiation. A total of 655 patients were enrolled and received the treatment and 563 completed the evaluation phase. A total of 20.92% of patients received zonisamide as monotherapy or alternative monotherapy and 59.85% patients received zonisamide as first adjunctive therapy. Compared with baseline, 41.22% of patients achieved seizure freedom and 78.6% as responder rate at the end of 24 week study. Most commonly reported adverse events were loss of appetite, weight loss, sedation, and dizziness, but discontinuation due to adverse events of drug was seen in 0.92% of patients. This open label real-world study suggests that zonisamide is an effective and well-tolerated antiepileptic drug in Indian adults for treatment of partial, generalized as well as combined seizures type. No new safety signals were observed. PMID:27013882

  1. Autistic-like traits in adult patients with mood disorders and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Junko; Kamio, Yoko; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Ota, Miho; Teraishi, Toshiya; Hori, Hiroaki; Nagashima, Anna; Takei, Reiko; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder often co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. Although a high prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms has been identified in the pediatric psychiatric population of normal intelligence, there are no reports from adult psychiatric population. This study examined whether there is a greater prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms in patients with adult-onset psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia, and whether such an association is independent of symptom severity. The subjects were 290 adults of normal intelligence between 25 and 59 years of age (MDD, n=125; bipolar disorder, n=56; schizophrenia, n=44; healthy controls, n=65). Autistic-like traits/symptoms were measured using the Social Responsiveness Scale for Adults. Symptom severity was measured using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and/or the Young Mania Rating Scale. Almost half of the clinical subjects, except those with remitted MDD, exhibited autistic-like traits/symptoms at levels typical for sub-threshold or threshold autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, the proportion of psychiatric patients that demonstrated high autistic-like traits/symptoms was significantly greater than that of healthy controls, and not different between that of remitted or unremitted subjects with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. On the other hand, remitted subjects with MDD did not differ from healthy controls with regard to the prevalence or degree of high autistic-like traits/symptoms. A substantial proportion of adults with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed high autistic-like traits/symptoms independent of symptom severity, suggesting a shared pathophysiology among autism spectrum disorder and these psychiatric disorders. Conversely, autistic-like traits among subjects with MDD were associated with the depressive symptom severity. These findings suggest the importance of

  2. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle Erin; Rosten, Patty; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Lai, Courteney; Humphries, R Keith

    2016-01-01

    Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1's importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1's functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA)26Sor(tm1(Cre/ERT)Nat)/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre)1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1's role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation. PMID:26986211

  3. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michelle Erin; Rosten, Patty; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Lai, Courteney; Humphries, R. Keith

    2016-01-01

    Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1’s importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1’s functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA)26Sortm1(Cre/ERT)Nat/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre)1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1’s role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation. PMID:26986211

  4. Long-term consumption of oats in adult celiac disease patients.

    PubMed

    Kaukinen, Katri; Collin, Pekka; Huhtala, Heini; Mäki, Markku

    2013-11-01

    Many celiac disease patients tolerate oats, but limited data are available on its long-term consumption. This was evaluated in the present study, focusing on small-bowel mucosal histology and gastrointestinal symptoms in celiac adults maintaining a strict gluten-free diet with or without oats. Altogether 106 long-term treated celiac adults were enrolled for this cross-sectional follow-up study. Daily consumption of oats and fiber was assessed, and small-bowel mucosal morphology and densities of CD3+, αβ+ and γσ+ intraepithelial lymphocytes determined. Gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed by a validated Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale questionnaire. Seventy (66%) out of the 106 treated celiac disease patients had consumed a median of 20 g of oats (range 1-100 g) per day for up to eight years; all consumed oat products bought from general stores. Daily intake and long-term consumption of oats did not result in small-bowel mucosal villous damage, inflammation, or gastrointestinal symptoms. Oat-consumers had a significantly higher daily intake of fiber than those who did not use oats. Two thirds of celiac disease patients preferred to use oats in their daily diet. Even long-term ingestion of oats had no harmful effects.

  5. Efficacy of alendronate for preventing collapse of femoral head in adult patients with nontraumatic osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yu-Cai; Luo, Ru-Bin; Lin, Tiao; Zhong, Hui-Ming; Shi, Jian-Bin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current review was to determine the efficacy of alendronate for preventing collapse of femoral head in adult patients with nontraumatic avascular osteonecrosis of femoral head (ANFH). Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 305 hips were included in this review, of which 3 studies investigated alendronate versus control/placebo and the other 2 studies compared the combination of alendronate and extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) with ESWT alone. Our results suggested that even the patients with extensive necrosis encountered much less collapse in the alendronate group than control group. In these RCTs, their data also indicated a positive short- and middle-term efficacy of alendronate treatment in joint function improvement and hip pain diminishment. With the presence of the outlier study, only insignificant overall efficacy of alendronate could be observed with substantial heterogeneities. In addition, we did not find any additive benefits of alendronate in combination with ESWT for preventing collapse compared to ESWT alone. In conclusion, there is still lack of strong evidence for supporting application of alendronate in adult patients with nontraumatic ANFH, which justified that large scale, randomized, and double-blind studies should be developed to demonstrate the confirmed efficacies, detailed indication, and optimized strategy of alendronate treatment.

  6. Common reasons for hospitalization among adult patients with diabetes in a private medical college in Kathmandu.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, P; Pathak, U N; Subedi, N

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is one of the important non communicable disease affecting the adult populations around the world. Incidence of diabetes increasing in South Asia. Nepal is also experiencing increasing in diabetes disease burden. Diabetes mellitus is one of the important causes of hospital admission in the western world. In this study we evaluated the causes of hospital admission amongst diabetic population. Most common cause is of diagnosis is some forms of infections commonest (20%) being urinary tract infections. Ten out of total 69 patients had septicemia. Six patients out of 69 had sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis only one patient presented with metabolic complications of diabetes i.e. diabetic ketoacidosis. Coronary artery disease with heart failure was present in 14 patients. Five patients had diabetic nephropathy and 3 had retinopathy. This shows that infections is the major cause of hospital admission for diabetics followed by heart failure. Tuberculosis is important diagnosis in person with diabetes. This study shows more female patients get admitted and amongst admitted patents glycemic control is poor. This signify that women had more complications than male counter parts. PMID:24579542

  7. The Neuropsychological Course of Acute Delirium in Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beglinger, Leigh J.; Mills, James A.; Vik, Stacie M.; Duff, Kevin; Denburg, Natalie L.; Weckmann, Michelle T.; Paulsen, Jane S.; Gingrich, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Although delirium is a common medical comorbidity with altered cognition as its defining feature, few publications have addressed the neuropsychological prodrome, profile, and recovery of patients tested during delirium. We characterize neuropsychological performance in 54 hemapoietic stem cell/bone marrow transplantation (BMT) patients shortly before, during, and after delirium and in BMT patients without delirium and 10 healthy adults. Patients were assessed prospectively before and after transplantation using a brief battery. BMT patients with delirium performed more poorly than comparisons and those without delirium on cross-sectional and trend analyses. Deficits were in expected areas of attention and memory, but also in psychomotor speed and learning. The patients with delirium did not return to normative “average” on any test during observation. Most tests showed a mild decline in the visit before delirium, a sharp decline with delirium onset, and variable performance in the following days. This study adds to the few investigations of neuropsychological performance surrounding delirium and provides targets for monitoring and early detection; Trails A and B, RBANS Coding, and List Recall may be useful for delirium assessment. PMID:21183605

  8. Three-dimensional nasal morphology in cleft lip and palate operated adult patients.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Sforza, Chiarella; Dellavia, Claudia; Vizzotto, Laura; Carù, Armando

    2003-10-01

    Nasal morphology was assessed three-dimensionally in 18 cleft lip and palate operated patients aged 19 to 27 years, and in 161 sex- and age-matched control subjects. Comparisons were performed by Student t and Watson-Williams' tests. No differences were found in nasal volume or surface. Nasal width, alar base width, and inferior width of the nostrils were significantly larger in male patients than in the reference men. The nasal bridge was shorter. Similar differences were found in the female patients. In addition, the right nostril was larger and the nasal height shorter. In men, the nasolabial and the nasal tip angles were smaller in the patients than in the reference subjects, whereas the facial convexity angle was larger in the patients. In conclusion, the nose of adult operated cleft lip and palate patients differed from that of normal control subjects. Surgical corrections of the cleft lip and palate failed to provide a completely normal appearance. The methods might be used to indicate where additional procedures might be performed to approximate a reference population.

  9. Prevalence of coeliac disease among adult patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Farahid, O H; Khawaja, N; Shennak, M M; Batieha, A; El-Khateeb, M; Ajlouni, K

    2014-02-11

    The prevalence of coeliac disease among patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism has not been studied before in Jordan and other Arab countries. A cross-sectional record-based review was made of all adult autoimmune hypothyroidism patients who attended a referral centre in Jordan, during an 8-month period. Coeliac disease in these patients was diagnosed by the attending physician based on positive serological tests for anti-endomysial antibodies IgA and IgG followed by duodenal biopsy to confirm the diagnosis of coeliac disease. Of 914 patients recruited, 117 (12.8%) were seropositive for coeliac disease. Of 87 seropositive patients who underwent duodenal biopsy, 39 had positive histological findings of coeliac disease (44.8%). Extrapolating from these findings the overall rate of coeliac disease among autoimmune hypothyroidism patients was estimated to be 5.7%. In multivariate logistic regression coeliac disease was significantly associated with older age (> 40 years), presence of other autoimmune diseases, vitamin B12 deficiency and anaemia.

  10. Influence of Occupational Status on the Quality of Life of Chinese Adult Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiang-Min; Ding, Cheng-Yun; Wang, Ning; Xu, Cheng-Feng; Chen, Ze-Jie; Wang, Qin; Yao, Qin; Wang, Fu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological disorders. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of occupational status on the quality of life of Chinese adult patients with epilepsy. Methods: This study surveyed 819 subjects clinically diagnosed with epilepsy for more than 1 year in 11 hospitals in Beijing; 586 were employed (71.55%). All subjects completed the case report form with inquiries on demographic data, social factors, and illness. The patients’ quality of life was assessed using the quality of life in patients with epilepsy-31 items (QOLIE-31) questionnaire. Results: The QOLIE-31 score in the employed group was significantly higher than that in the unemployed group. Furthermore, the scores in all the sections (overall quality of life, energy/fatigue, emotional well-being, seizure worry, cognition, social function, and medication effects) of the employed group were higher than those of the unemployed group. Both the employed and unemployed groups achieved the highest difference in social function. The QOLIE-31 score of students was higher than those of farmers and workers. Both the students and workers scored higher in the quality of life compared with the adult peasants living with epilepsy. The students and farmers showed significant differences in QOLIE-31 score, cognition, emotional well-being, overall quality of life, energy/fatigue, and social function. In contrast, no significant difference was noted in seizure worry and medication effects across the three different kinds of occupation. Conclusion: Occupational status might affect the quality of life of Chinese adult patients with epilepsy, and social function is the most important contributing factor. PMID:27231164

  11. Effects of Force Requirements on Pinch Force Production in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aisha; Gorniak, Stacey L

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies of fine motor control have focused on the ability of participants to match their grip force production to a visually provided template. We investigated differences exhibited in pinch force control during variable force production templates, including sine-, sawtooth-, and square-wave templates. Our results indicate that increased force requirements are associated with increased error rates and a noisier frequency spectrum, consistent with previous studies. Our results also indicate that visual feedback, in the form of template shape, directly affect pinch force production features and motor unit firing patterns, despite the use of consistent baseline force requirements, amplitude changes, and visual signal frequency. This suggests that CNS modulation of motor unit responses can be triggered by basic changes in visual feedback unrelated to force requirements. The potential implications of error compensation based on this study due to aging are also discussed.

  12. Nail involvement in adult patients with plaque-type psoriasis: prevalence and clinical features*

    PubMed Central

    Schons, Karen Regina Rosso; Beber, André Avelino Costa; Beck, Maristela de Oliveira; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a disease of worldwide distribution with a prevalence of 1 to 3%. Nail psoriasis is estimated in 50% of patients with psoriasis, and in the presence of joint involvement, it can reach 80%. OBJECTIVE: To study the nail changes - and their clinical implications - presented by patients with psoriasis vulgaris under surveillance in a university hospital from the south of Brazil. METHODS: his cross-sectional study evaluated 65 adult patients from January 2012 to March 2013. Cutaneous severity was assessed according to the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). The Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI) was used to evaluate patient's nails. The diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis was established according to the Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR). RESULTS: The prevalence of NP was 46.1%. These patients had a median [interquartilic range (IQR)] NAPSI of 1 (0-15). A total of 63.3% of patients reported aesthetic discomfort or functional impairment related to their nails. Onycholysis was the most common feature (80%). When compared with patients without nail involvement, patients with NP had lower mean age at psoriasis onset [21 (18-41) vs. 43 (30-56) years, p=0,001]; longer disease duration [15.5 (10-24) vs. 6 (2-12) years, p=0.001]; higher PASI [9.2 (5-17) vs. 3.7 (2-10), p=0.044], higher frequency of psoriatic arthritis (43.3 vs. 3.7, p = 0.002) and more often reported family history of psoriasis (40% vs. 7.4%, p = 0.011). CONCLUSION: Onycholysis was the most frequent finding and most patients feel uncomfortable with the psoriatic nail changes that they experience. PMID:26131859

  13. IgE Sensitization Profiles Differ between Adult Patients with Severe and Moderate Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Catharina; Lupinek, Christian; Lundeberg, Lena; Crameri, Reto; Valenta, Rudolf; Scheynius, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex chronic inflammatory disease where allergens can act as specific triggering factors. Aim To characterize the specificities of IgE-reactivity in patients with AD to a broad panel of exogenous allergens including microbial and human antigens. Methodology Adult patients with AD were grouped according to the SCORAD index, into severe (n = 53) and moderate AD (n = 126). As controls 43 patients were included with seborrhoeic eczema and 97 individuals without history of allergy or skin diseases. Specific IgE reactivity was assessed in plasma using Phadiatop®, ImmunoCap™, micro-arrayed allergens, dot-blotted recombinant Malassezia sympodialis allergens, and immune-blotted microbial and human proteins. Results IgE reactivity was detected in 92% of patients with severe and 83% of patients with moderate AD. Sensitization to cat allergens occurred most frequently, followed by sensitization to birch pollen, grass pollen, and to the skin commensal yeast M. sympodialis. Patients with severe AD showed a significantly higher frequency of IgE reactivity to allergens like cat (rFel d 1) and house dust mite (rDer p 4 and 10), to Staphylococcus aureus, M. sympodialis, and to human antigens. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the frequencies of IgE reactivity to the grass pollen allergens rPhl p 1, 2, 5b, and 6 between the two AD groups. Furthermore the IgE reactivity profile of patients with severe AD was more spread towards several different allergen molecules as compared to patients with moderate AD. Conclusion We have revealed a hitherto unknown difference regarding the molecular sensitization profile in patients with severe and moderate AD. Molecular profiling towards allergen components may provide a basis for future investigations aiming to explore the environmental, genetic and epigenetic factors which could be responsible for the different appearance and severity of disease phenotypes in AD. PMID:27228091

  14. Taste Bud-Derived BDNF Is Required to Maintain Normal Amounts of Innervation to Adult Taste Buds.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingbin; Ohman-Gault, Lisa; Ma, Liqun; Krimm, Robin F

    2015-01-01

    Gustatory neurons transmit chemical information from taste receptor cells, which reside in taste buds in the oral cavity, to the brain. As adult taste receptor cells are renewed at a constant rate, nerve fibers must reconnect with new taste receptor cells as they arise. Therefore, the maintenance of gustatory innervation to the taste bud is an active process. Understanding how this process is regulated is a fundamental concern of gustatory system biology. We speculated that because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for taste bud innervation during development, it might function to maintain innervation during adulthood. If so, taste buds should lose innervation when Bdnf is deleted in adult mice. To test this idea, we first removed Bdnf from all cells in adulthood using transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Ubiquitin promoter. When Bdnf was removed, approximately one-half of the innervation to taste buds was lost, and taste buds became smaller because of the loss of taste bud cells. Individual taste buds varied in the amount of innervation each lost, and those that lost the most innervation also lost the most taste bud cells. We then tested the idea that that the taste bud was the source of this BDNF by reducing Bdnf levels specifically in the lingual epithelium and taste buds. Taste buds were confirmed as the source of BDNF regulating innervation. We conclude that BDNF expressed in taste receptor cells is required to maintain normal levels of innervation in adulthood.

  15. Bmp15 Is an Oocyte-Produced Signal Required for Maintenance of the Adult Female Sexual Phenotype in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Dranow, Daniel B; Hu, Kevin; Bird, April M; Lawry, S Terese; Adams, Melissa T; Sanchez, Angelica; Amatruda, James F; Draper, Bruce W

    2016-09-01

    Although the zebrafish is a major model organism, how they determine sex is not well understood. In domesticated zebrafish, sex determination appears to be polygenic, being influenced by multiple genetic factors that may vary from strain to strain, and additionally can be influenced by environmental factors. However, the requirement of germ cells for female sex determination is well documented: animals that lack germ cells, or oocytes in particular, develop exclusively as males. Recently, it has been determined that oocytes are also required throughout the adult life of the animal to maintain the differentiated female state. How oocytes control sex differentiation and maintenance of the sexual phenotype is unknown. We therefore generated targeted mutations in genes for two oocyte produced signaling molecules, Bmp15 and Gdf9 and here report a novel role for Bmp15 in maintaining adult female sex differentiation in zebrafish. Females deficient in Bmp15 begin development normally but switch sex during the mid- to late- juvenile stage, and become fertile males. Additionally, by generating mutations in the aromatase cyp19a1a, we show that estrogen production is necessary for female development and that the function of Bmp15 in female sex maintenance is likely linked to the regulation of estrogen biosynthesis via promoting the development of estrogen-producing granulosa cells in the oocyte follicle.

  16. Bmp15 Is an Oocyte-Produced Signal Required for Maintenance of the Adult Female Sexual Phenotype in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kevin; Lawry, S. Terese; Sanchez, Angelica; Amatruda, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Although the zebrafish is a major model organism, how they determine sex is not well understood. In domesticated zebrafish, sex determination appears to be polygenic, being influenced by multiple genetic factors that may vary from strain to strain, and additionally can be influenced by environmental factors. However, the requirement of germ cells for female sex determination is well documented: animals that lack germ cells, or oocytes in particular, develop exclusively as males. Recently, it has been determined that oocytes are also required throughout the adult life of the animal to maintain the differentiated female state. How oocytes control sex differentiation and maintenance of the sexual phenotype is unknown. We therefore generated targeted mutations in genes for two oocyte produced signaling molecules, Bmp15 and Gdf9 and here report a novel role for Bmp15 in maintaining adult female sex differentiation in zebrafish. Females deficient in Bmp15 begin development normally but switch sex during the mid- to late- juvenile stage, and become fertile males. Additionally, by generating mutations in the aromatase cyp19a1a, we show that estrogen production is necessary for female development and that the function of Bmp15 in female sex maintenance is likely linked to the regulation of estrogen biosynthesis via promoting the development of estrogen-producing granulosa cells in the oocyte follicle. PMID:27642754

  17. Taste Bud-Derived BDNF Is Required to Maintain Normal Amounts of Innervation to Adult Taste Buds123

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingbin; Ohman-Gault, Lisa; Ma, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gustatory neurons transmit chemical information from taste receptor cells, which reside in taste buds in the oral cavity, to the brain. As adult taste receptor cells are renewed at a constant rate, nerve fibers must reconnect with new taste receptor cells as they arise. Therefore, the maintenance of gustatory innervation to the taste bud is an active process. Understanding how this process is regulated is a fundamental concern of gustatory system biology. We speculated that because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for taste bud innervation during development, it might function to maintain innervation during adulthood. If so, taste buds should lose innervation when Bdnf is deleted in adult mice. To test this idea, we first removed Bdnf from all cells in adulthood using transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Ubiquitin promoter. When Bdnf was removed, approximately one-half of the innervation to taste buds was lost, and taste buds became smaller because of the loss of taste bud cells. Individual taste buds varied in the amount of innervation each lost, and those that lost the most innervation also lost the most taste bud cells. We then tested the idea that that the taste bud was the source of this BDNF by reducing Bdnf levels specifically in the lingual epithelium and taste buds. Taste buds were confirmed as the source of BDNF regulating innervation. We conclude that BDNF expressed in taste receptor cells is required to maintain normal levels of innervation in adulthood. PMID:26730405

  18. Taste Bud-Derived BDNF Is Required to Maintain Normal Amounts of Innervation to Adult Taste Buds.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingbin; Ohman-Gault, Lisa; Ma, Liqun; Krimm, Robin F

    2015-01-01

    Gustatory neurons transmit chemical information from taste receptor cells, which reside in taste buds in the oral cavity, to the brain. As adult taste receptor cells are renewed at a constant rate, nerve fibers must reconnect with new taste receptor cells as they arise. Therefore, the maintenance of gustatory innervation to the taste bud is an active process. Understanding how this process is regulated is a fundamental concern of gustatory system biology. We speculated that because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for taste bud innervation during development, it might function to maintain innervation during adulthood. If so, taste buds should lose innervation when Bdnf is deleted in adult mice. To test this idea, we first removed Bdnf from all cells in adulthood using transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Ubiquitin promoter. When Bdnf was removed, approximately one-half of the innervation to taste buds was lost, and taste buds became smaller because of the loss of taste bud cells. Individual taste buds varied in the amount of innervation each lost, and those that lost the most innervation also lost the most taste bud cells. We then tested the idea that that the taste bud was the source of this BDNF by reducing Bdnf levels specifically in the lingual epithelium and taste buds. Taste buds were confirmed as the source of BDNF regulating innervation. We conclude that BDNF expressed in taste receptor cells is required to maintain normal levels of innervation in adulthood. PMID:26730405

  19. Bmp15 Is an Oocyte-Produced Signal Required for Maintenance of the Adult Female Sexual Phenotype in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Dranow, Daniel B; Hu, Kevin; Bird, April M; Lawry, S Terese; Adams, Melissa T; Sanchez, Angelica; Amatruda, James F; Draper, Bruce W

    2016-09-01

    Although the zebrafish is a major model organism, how they determine sex is not well understood. In domesticated zebrafish, sex determination appears to be polygenic, being influenced by multiple genetic factors that may vary from strain to strain, and additionally can be influenced by environmental factors. However, the requirement of germ cells for female sex determination is well documented: animals that lack germ cells, or oocytes in particular, develop exclusively as males. Recently, it has been determined that oocytes are also required throughout the adult life of the animal to maintain the differentiated female state. How oocytes control sex differentiation and maintenance of the sexual phenotype is unknown. We therefore generated targeted mutations in genes for two oocyte produced signaling molecules, Bmp15 and Gdf9 and here report a novel role for Bmp15 in maintaining adult female sex differentiation in zebrafish. Females deficient in Bmp15 begin development normally but switch sex during the mid- to late- juvenile stage, and become fertile males. Additionally, by generating mutations in the aromatase cyp19a1a, we show that estrogen production is necessary for female development and that the function of Bmp15 in female sex maintenance is likely linked to the regulation of estrogen biosynthesis via promoting the development of estrogen-producing granulosa cells in the oocyte follicle. PMID:27642754

  20. Giant rectal polyp prolapse in an adult patient with the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cano-Contreras, Ana Delfina; Meixueiro-Daza, Arturo; Grube-Pagola, Peter; Remes-Troche, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal dominant intestinal polyposis syndrome characterised by the presence of hamartomatous polyps and mucocutaneous pigmentation. Prolapse of the polyps through the anus is an infrequent manifestation in children with PJS, and this complication is extremely rare in adult patients. We report the case of a 30-year-old man recently diagnosed with PJS who was seen at the emergency department because of the abrupt onset of severe anal pain with a foreign body sensation in the anal canal and rectal bleeding.Physical examination revealed a giant prolapsed polyp. PMID:27444139

  1. A Correlational Study of Scoliosis and Trunk Balance in Adult Patients with Mandibular Deviation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Na; Wang, Wenyong; Ding, Yin; Sun, Shiyao

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have confirmed that patients with mandibular deviation often have abnormal morphology of their cervical vertebrae. However, the relationship between mandibular deviation, scoliosis, and trunk balance has not been studied. Currently, mandibular deviation is usually treated as a single pathology, which leads to poor clinical efficiency. We investigated the relationship of spine coronal morphology and trunk balance in adult patients with mandibular deviation, and compared the finding to those in healthy volunteers. 35 adult patients with skeletal mandibular deviation and 10 healthy volunteers underwent anterior X-ray films of the head and posteroanterior X-ray films of the spine. Landmarks and lines were drawn and measured on these films. The axis distance method was used to measure the degree of scoliosis and the balance angle method was used to measure trunk balance. The relationship of mandibular deviation, spine coronal morphology and trunk balance was evaluated with the Pearson correlation method. The spine coronal morphology of patients with mandibular deviation demonstrated an “S” type curve, while a straight line parallel with the gravity line was found in the control group (significant difference, p<0.01). The trunk balance of patients with mandibular deviation was disturbed (imbalance angle >1°), while the control group had a normal trunk balance (imbalance angle <1°). There was a significant difference between the two groups (p<0.01). The degree of scoliosis and shoulder imbalance correlated with the degree of mandibular deviation, and presented a linear trend. The direction of mandibular deviation was the same as that of the lateral bending of thoracolumbar vertebrae, which was opposite to the direction of lateral bending of cervical vertebrae. Our study shows the degree of mandibular deviation has a high correlation with the degree of scoliosis and trunk imbalance, all the three deformities should be clinically evaluated in the

  2. The impact of patient self assessment of deformity on HRQL in adults with scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Tones, Megan J; Moss, Nathan D

    2007-01-01

    Background Body image and HRQL are significant issues for patients with scoliosis due to cosmetic deformity, physical and psychological symptoms, and treatment factors. A selective review of scoliosis literature revealed that self report measures of body image and HRQL share unreliable correlations with radiographic measures and clinician recommendations for surgery. However, current body image and HRQL measures do not indicate which aspects of scoliosis deformity are the most distressing for patients. The WRVAS is an instrument designed to evaluate patient self assessment of deformity, and may show some promise in identifying aspects of deformity most troubling to patients. Previous research on adolescents with scoliosis supports the use of the WRVAS as a clinical tool, as the instrument shares strong correlations with radiographic measures and quality of life instruments. There has been limited use of this instrument on adult populations. Methods The WRVAS and the SF-36v2, a HRQL measure, were administered to 71 adults with scoliosis, along with a form to report age and gender. Preliminary validation analyses were performed on the WRVAS (floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency and collinearity, correlations with the SF-36v2, and multiple regression with the WRVAS total score as the predictor, and SF-36v2 scores as outcomes). Results The psychometric properties of the WRVAS were acceptable. Older participants perceived their deformities as more severe than younger participants. More severe deformities were associated with lower scores on the Physical Component Summary Score of the SF-36v2. Total WRVAS score also predicted Physical Component Summary scores. Conclusion The results of the current study indicate that the WRVAS is a reliable tool to use with adult patients, and that patient self assessment of deformity shared a relationship with physical rather than psychological aspects of HRQL. The current and previous studies concur that revision of the

  3. Cytarabine With or Without SCH 900776 in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Cleft palate and ADULT phenotype in a patient with a novel TP63 mutation suggests lumping of EEC/LM/ADULT syndromes into a unique entity: ELA syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prontera, Paolo; Garelli, Emanuela; Isidori, Ilenia; Mencarelli, Amedea; Carando, Adriana; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Donti, Emilio

    2011-11-01

    Acro-dermato-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome is a rare condition belonging to the group of ectodermal dysplasias caused by TP63 mutations. Its clinical phenotype is similar to ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip/palate (EEC) and limb-mammary syndrome (LMS), and differs from these disorders mainly by the absence of cleft lip and/or palate. We report on a 39-year-old patient who was found to be heterozygous for a c.401G > T (p.Gly134Val) de novo mutation of TP63. This patient had the ADULT phenotype associated with cleft palate. Our findings, rather than extend the clinical spectrum of ADULT syndrome, suggest that cleft palate can no longer be considered an element for differential diagnosis for ADULT, EEC, and LMS. Our data, added to other reports on overlapping phenotypes, support the combining of these three phenotypes into a unique entity that we propose to call "ELA syndrome," which is an acronym of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and palate, limb-mammary, and ADULT syndromes.

  5. Management of Patients with Gastroschisis Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Concurrent Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Alykhan; Benson Ham, P; Wise, Linda J; Daniel, John M; Walters, K Christian; Pipkin, Walter L; Stansfield, Brian; Hatley, Robyn M; Bhatia, Jatinder

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of gastroschisis often requires multiple surgical procedures to re-establish abdominal domain, reduce abdominal contents, and eventually close the abdominal wall. In patients who have concomitant respiratory failure requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), this process becomes further complicated. This situation is rare and only five such cases have been reported in the ECMO registry database. Management of three of the five patients along with results and implications for future care of similar patients is discussed here. Two patients had respiratory failure due to meconium aspiration syndrome and one patient had persistent acidosis as well as worsening pulmonary hypertension leading to the decision of ECMO. The abdominal contents were placed in a spring-loaded silastic silo while on ECMO and primary closure was performed three to six days after the decannulation. All three patients survived and are developmentally appropriate. We recommend avoiding aggressively reducing the abdominal contents and using a silo to conservatively reducing the gastroschisis while the patient is on ECMO therapy. Keeping the intra-abdominal pressure below 20 mm Hg can possibly reduce ECMO days and ventilator time and has been shown to decrease morbidity and mortality. Patients with gastroschisis and respiratory failure requiring ECMO can have good outcomes despite the complexity of required care. PMID:27670556

  6. Reduced-intensity conditioning using fludarabine, melphalan and thiotepa for adult patients undergoing haploidentical SCT

    PubMed Central

    Ciurea, SO; Saliba, R; Rondon, G; Pesoa, S; Cano, P; Fernandez-Vina, M; Qureshi, S; Worth, LL; McMannis, J; Kebriaei, P; Jones, RB; Korbling, M; Qazilbash, M; Shpall, EJ; Giralt, S; de Lima, M; Champlin, RE; Gajewski, J

    2014-01-01

    Haploidentical SCT (HaploSCT) has been most commonly performed using a myeloablative, TBI-based preparative regimen; however, the toxicity with this approach remains very high. We studied the feasibility of a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen in a phase II clinical trial using fludarabine, melphalan and thiotepa and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) for patients with advanced hematological malignancies undergoing T-cell depleted HaploSCT. Twenty-eight patients were entered in the study. Engraftment with donor-derived hematopoiesis was achieved in 78% of patients after a median of 13 days. Six patients experienced primary graft failure, three out of four tested patients had donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA) (P = 0.001). Toxicity included mostly infections. A total of 21 out of 22 patients with AML/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) achieved remission after transplant (16 with relapsed/refractory AML). Five out of the 12 patients (42%) with AML/MDS with <15% BM blasts survived long term as compared with none with more advanced disease (P = 0.03). HaploSCT with this fludarabine, melphalan and thiotepa and ATG RIC is an effective, well-tolerated conditioning regimen for patients with AML/MDS with low disease burden at the time of transplant and allowed a high rate of engraftment in patients without DSA. Patients with overt relapse fared poorly and require novel treatment strategies. PMID:19668237

  7. Hhex is Required at Multiple Stages of Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Goodings, Charnise; Smith, Elizabeth; Mathias, Elizabeth; Elliott, Natalina; Cleveland, Susan M.; Tripathi, Rati M.; Layer, Justin H.; Chen, Xi; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Hamid, Rizwan; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P.

    2015-01-01

    Hhex encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is widely expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. Its enforced expression induces T-cell leukemia and we have implicated it as an important oncogene in early T-cell precursor leukemias where it is immediately downstream of an LMO2-associated protein complex. Conventional Hhex knockouts cause embryonic lethality precluding analysis of adult hematopoiesis. Thus, we induced highly efficient conditional knockout (cKO) using vav-Cre transgenic mice. Hhex cKO mice were viable and born at normal litter sizes. At steady state, we observed a defect in B-cell development that we localized to the earliest B-cell precursor, the pro-B-cell stage. Most remarkably, bone marrow transplantation using Hhex cKO donor cells revealed a more profound defect in all hematopoietic lineages. In contrast, sublethal irradiation resulted in normal myeloid cell repopulation of the bone marrow but markedly impaired repopulation of T- and B-cell compartments. We noted that Hhex cKO stem and progenitor cell populations were skewed in their distribution and showed enhanced proliferation compared to WT cells. Our results implicate Hhex in the maintenance of LT-HSCs and in lineage allocation from multipotent progenitors especially in stress hematopoiesis. PMID:25968920

  8. Hhex is Required at Multiple Stages of Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Goodings, Charnise; Smith, Elizabeth; Mathias, Elizabeth; Elliott, Natalina; Cleveland, Susan M; Tripathi, Rati M; Layer, Justin H; Chen, Xi; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Hamid, Rizwan; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P

    2015-08-01

    Hhex encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is widely expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. Its enforced expression induces T-cell leukemia and we have implicated it as an important oncogene in early T-cell precursor leukemias where it is immediately downstream of an LMO2-associated protein complex. Conventional Hhex knockouts cause embryonic lethality precluding analysis of adult hematopoiesis. Thus, we induced highly efficient conditional knockout (cKO) using vav-Cre transgenic mice. Hhex cKO mice were viable and born at normal litter sizes. At steady state, we observed a defect in B-cell development that we localized to the earliest B-cell precursor, the pro-B-cell stage. Most remarkably, bone marrow transplantation using Hhex cKO donor cells revealed a more profound defect in all hematopoietic lineages. In contrast, sublethal irradiation resulted in normal myeloid cell repopulation of the bone marrow but markedly impaired repopulation of T- and B-cell compartments. We noted that Hhex cKO stem and progenitor cell populations were skewed in their distribution and showed enhanced proliferation compared to WT cells. Our results implicate Hhex in the maintenance of LT-HSCs and in lineage allocation from multipotent progenitors especially in stress hematopoiesis.

  9. PTEN is required to maintain luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Shore, Amy N; Chang, Chi-Hsuan; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Weston, Matthew C; Zhang, Mei; Xin, Li; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    In the mammary gland, PTEN loss in luminal and basal epithelial cells results in differentiation defects and enhanced proliferation, leading to the formation of tumors with basal epithelial characteristics. In breast cancer, PTEN loss is associated with a hormone receptor-negative, basal-like subtype that is thought to originate in a luminal epithelial cell. Here, we show that luminal-specific PTEN loss results in distinct effects on epithelial homeostasis and mammary tumor formation. Luminal PTEN loss increased proliferation of hormone receptor-negative cells, thereby decreasing the percentage of hormone receptor-positive cells. Moreover, luminal PTEN loss led to misoriented cell divisions and mislocalization of cells to the intraluminal space of mammary ducts. Despite their elevated levels of activated AKT, Pten-null intraluminal cells showed increased levels of apoptosis. One year after Pten deletion, the ducts had cleared and no palpable mammary tumors were detected. These data establish PTEN as a critical regulator of luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland, and further show that luminal PTEN loss alone is not sufficient to promote the progression of mammary tumorigenesis.

  10. PTEN is required to maintain luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Shore, Amy N; Chang, Chi-Hsuan; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Weston, Matthew C; Zhang, Mei; Xin, Li; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    In the mammary gland, PTEN loss in luminal and basal epithelial cells results in differentiation defects and enhanced proliferation, leading to the formation of tumors with basal epithelial characteristics. In breast cancer, PTEN loss is associated with a hormone receptor-negative, basal-like subtype that is thought to originate in a luminal epithelial cell. Here, we show that luminal-specific PTEN loss results in distinct effects on epithelial homeostasis and mammary tumor formation. Luminal PTEN loss increased proliferation of hormone receptor-negative cells, thereby decreasing the percentage of hormone receptor-positive cells. Moreover, luminal PTEN loss led to misoriented cell divisions and mislocalization of cells to the intraluminal space of mammary ducts. Despite their elevated levels of activated AKT, Pten-null intraluminal cells showed increased levels of apoptosis. One year after Pten deletion, the ducts had cleared and no palpable mammary tumors were detected. These data establish PTEN as a critical regulator of luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland, and further show that luminal PTEN loss alone is not sufficient to promote the progression of mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:26526198

  11. A multifaceted intervention increases epinephrine use in adult emergency department anaphylaxis patients

    PubMed Central

    Manivannan, Veena; Hess, Erik P.; Bellamkonda, Venkatesh R.; Nestler, David M.; Bellolio, M. Fernanda; Hagan, John B.; Sunga, Kharmene L.; Decker, Wyatt W.; Li, James T.C.; Scanlan-Hanson, Lori N.; Vukov, Samuel C.; Campbell, Ronna L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies have documented inconsistent emergency anaphylaxis care and low compliance with published guidelines. Objective To evaluate anaphylaxis management before and after implementation of an emergency department (ED) anaphylaxis order set and introduction of epinephrine auto-injectors and to measure the effect on anaphylaxis guideline adherence. Methods A cohort study was conducted from April 29, 2008-August 9, 2012. Adult ED patients diagnosed with anaphylaxis were included. ED management, disposition, self-injectable epinephrine prescriptions, allergy follow-up and incidence of biphasic reactions were evaluated. Results The study included 202 patients. Median age of patients was 45.3 years (IQR 31.3 – 56.4); 139 (69%) were female. Patients who presented after order set implementation were more likely to be treated with epinephrine (51% vs. 33%, OR 2.05, 95%CI 1.04- 4.04) and admitted to ED observation unit (EDOU) (65% vs. 44%, OR 2.38, 95%CI 1.23-4.60) and less likely to be dismissed home directly from ED (16% vs. 29%, OR: 0.47, 95%CI 0.22- 1.00). Eleven patients (5%) had a biphasic reaction. Of these, five (46%) had the biphasic reaction in EDOU; one patient was admitted to intensive care unit (ICU). Six patients (55%) had reactions within 6 hours of initial symptom resolution of whom two were admitted to ICU. Conclusion Significantly greater proportions of anaphylaxis patients received epinephrine and were admitted to EDOU after introduction of epinephrine auto-injectors and order set implementation. Slightly over half of the biphasic reactions occurred within recommended observation time of 4-6 hours. These data suggest that the multifaceted approach to changing anaphylaxis management described here improved guideline adherence. PMID:24811020

  12. Radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy for distantly metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in juvenile versus adult patients.

    PubMed

    Kammori, Makoto; Fukumori, Tatsuya; Sugishita, Yoshiyuki; Hoshi, Masae; Shimizu, Kazuo; Yamada, Tetsu

    2015-01-01

    In general, juvenile differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) demonstrate indolent characteristics and favorable prognosis are observed in comparison with many other carcinomas. However, recurrence is frequent, necessitating additional treatment, including radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy. In this report, the probability of recurrence, prognostic factors, treatment, and outcomes in both juvenile- and adult-onset DTC were analyzed and compared. At our institution, a total of 1552 DTC patients underwent thyroidectomy and/or lymph node dissection. The patients included 23 in their teens, 118 in their twenties, and 1412 in their thirties or older. The risk factors for distant metastases for DTC were male gender, follicular carcinoma, size of the PTC primary tumor, cervical lymph node metastases from PTC, and the presence of more than two distant metastatic foci. Patients with the highest risk underwent RAI ablation in line with institutional guidelines. Although the overall outcome in our juvenile patients was excellent, during follow-up, 4 (17.4%) of the 23 patients developed recurrent disease: 91.3% achieved complete remission, 4.35% partial remission, and 4.35% stable disease, with no disease-related deaths. Among the 118 patients in their twenties to thirties, 1 (0.8%) experienced progressive disease and disease-related death. A younger age at diagnosis and less radical primary surgery without subsequent RAI ablation are factors strongly predictive of distant metastases in patients with juvenile-onset DTC. To reduce the rate of relapse and improve surveillance for recurrent disease, total thyroidectomy followed by RAI appears to be the most beneficial initial treatment for patients with high- and intermediate-risk juvenile DTC.

  13. Adult ADHD patient experiences of impairment, service provision and clinical management in England: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence of the unmet needs and experiences of adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in the published scientific literature. This study aimed to explore the experiences of adults in England with ADHD regarding access to diagnostic and treatment services, ADHD-related impairment and to compare experiences between patients diagnosed during adulthood and childhood. Methods In this qualitative study, 30 adults with ADHD were recruited through an ADHD charity (n = 17) and two hospital outpatient clinics for adults with ADHD in England (n = 13). Half of the participants were diagnosed with ADHD during childhood or adolescence and the remainder during adulthood. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and data was analysed using a thematic approach based on Grounded Theory principles. Results Analysis revealed five core themes: ‘An uphill struggle’: the challenge of accessing services, ‘Accumulated Psychosocial Burden and the Impact of ADHD’, ‘Weighing up Costs vs. Benefits of ADHD Pharmacological Treatment’, ‘Value of Non-pharmacological Treatment’ and ‘Barriers to Treatment Adherence’. Accessing services and the challenges associated with securing a definitive diagnosis of ADHD in adulthood was an ‘uphill struggle’, often due to sceptical and negative attitudes towards ADHD by healthcare professionals. ADHD-related impairment had an overwhelmingly chaotic impact on every aspect of patients’ lives and many felt ill equipped to cope. A persistent sense of failure and missed potential from living with the impact of ADHD impairment had led to an accumulated psychosocial burden, especially among those diagnosed from late adolescence onwards. In contrast, positive adjustment was facilitated by a younger age at diagnosis. Although medication was perceived as necessary in alleviating impairment, many felt strongly that by itself, it was inadequate. Additional support in the form of

  14. 75 FR 82277 - Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) Requirements Under the Patient...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 158 RIN 0950-AA06 Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio... ``Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) Requirements Under the Patient Protection... Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) Requirements accurately states...

  15. Hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia in adults: analysis of the clinical outcome of 123 patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kali, Aref; Konoplev, Sergej; Lin, Erpei; Kadia, Tapan; Faderl, Stefan; Ravandi, Farhad; Ayoubi, Mohamad; Brandt, Mark; Cortes, Jorge E.; Kantarjian, Hagop; Borthakur, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypocellular variant of acute myeloid leukemia accounts for less than 10% of all cases of adult acute myeloid leukemia. It is defined by having less than 20 percent of cellular bone marrow in a biopsy at presentation. It is unclear in the literature whether the outcome of hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia differs from that of non-hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia. Design and Methods We retrospectively analyzed all the cases reported to be hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia between 2000 and 2009. A second pathology review was conducted and the diagnosis was confirmed in all cases. Results One hundred twenty-three (9%) patients were identified: patients with hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia were older than those with non-hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.009) and more frequently presented with cytopenias (P<0.001). Forty-one patients with hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia had an antecedent hematologic disorder and 11 patients had received prior chemo-radiotherapy for non-hematopoietic neoplasms. On multivariate analysis, overall survival, remission duration and event-free survival were comparable to those of other patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Conclusions The outcome of hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia does not differ from that of non-hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:22058194

  16. Systemic coagulation and fibrinolysis in patients with or at risk for the adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, A B; Kindt, I; Raijmakers, P G; Hack, C E; Thijs, L G

    1997-12-01

    The authors sought to evaluate the pathogenetic and prognostic role of a procoagulant and hypofibrinolytic state in the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Twenty-two consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for respiratory monitoring (n = 2) or mechanical ventilation (n = 20) were studied, of whom 13 had ARDS and 9 were at risk for the syndrome. Plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin III complexes (TAT), the plasmin-alpha2-antiplasmin complexes (PAP), tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) were measured within 48 h after admission, together with respiratory variables allowing computation of the lung injury score (LIS), and pulmonary microvascular permeability [67Gallium-transferrin pulmonary leak index (PLI)], as measures of pulmonary dysfunction. Blood was also sampled 6-hourly until 2 days after admission. The LIS and PLI were higher in ARDS than at risk patients, in the presence of similar systemic morbidity and mortality. TAT complexes were elevated in a minority of patients of both groups, whereas the PAP, tPA and PAI levels were elevated above normal in the majority of ARDS and at risk patients, but groups did not differ. Neither circulating coagulation nor fibrinolysis variables correlated to either LIS or PLI. Furthermore, the course of haemostatic variables did not relate to outcome. These data indicate that systemic activation of coagulation and impaired fibrinolysis do not play a major role in ARDS development and outcome in patients with acute lung injury.

  17. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among adult dyspeptic patients in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Asrat, D; Nilsson, I; Mengistu, Y; Ashenafi, S; Ayenew, K; Al-Soud, W Abu; Wadström, T; Kassa, E

    2004-03-01

    In developing countries such as Ethiopia, where chronic gastritis and peptic-ulcer disease are the most common endoscopic findings, it is important to study the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroduodenal diseases. Both invasive and non-invasive diagnostic methods were therefore used to investigate 300, consecutive, adult patients with dyspepsia, from the gastrointestinal clinic of Tikur Anbassa University Hospital, Addis Ababa. The apparent overall prevalence of H. pylori infection varied according to the detection method employed. Culture revealed H. pylori in only 69% of the patients but this pathogen appeared more common when rapid urease tests (71%), PCR-denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis (91%), histopathology (81%), silver staining (75%) or stool-antigen tests (81%) were employed. Antibodies to H. pylori were detected, both by enzyme immuno-assay (EIA) and immunoblotting, in approximately 80% of the patients, whether the antigens used were of a reference strain or from a local isolate of H. pylori. When some of the EIA-positive and EIA-negative sera were cross-absorbed with antigens of Campylobacter jejuni and re-tested by EIA, the H. pylori-positive sera remained positive and the negative sera remained negative. Dyspeptic patients in Ethiopia, like most of those previously observed elsewhere in Africa, are often infected with H. pylori. It is important that the management of these patients should not be hampered by the misinterpretation of the African epidemiology of this pathogen.

  18. Gaucher disease type 1: revised recommendations on evaluations and monitoring for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Neal J; Aggio, Mario C; Andersson, Hans C; Andria, Generoso; Charrow, Joel; Clarke, Joe T R; Erikson, Anders; Giraldo, Pilar; Goldblatt, Jack; Hollak, Carla; Ida, Hiroyuki; Kaplan, Paige; Kolodny, Edwin H; Mistry, Pramod; Pastores, Gregory M; Pires, Ricardo; Prakash-Cheng, Ainu; Prakesh-Cheng, Ainu; Rosenbloom, Barry E; Scott, C Ronald; Sobreira, Elisa; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna; Vellodi, Ashok; vom Dahl, Stephan; Wappner, Rebecca S; Zimran, Ari

    2004-10-01

    For patients with type 1 Gaucher disease, challenges to patient care posed by clinical heterogeneity, variable progression rates, and potential permanent disability that can result from untreated or suboptimally treated hematologic, skeletal, and visceral organ involvement dictate a need for comprehensive, serial monitoring. An updated consensus on minimum recommendations for effective monitoring of all adult patients with type 1 Gaucher disease has been developed by the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Registry coordinators. These recommendations provide a schedule for comprehensive and reproducible evaluation and monitoring of all clinically relevant aspects of this disease. The initial assessment should include confirmation of deficiency of beta-glucocerebrosidase, genotyping, and a complete family medical history. Other assessments to be performed initially and at regular intervals include a complete physical examination, patient-reported quality of life using the SF-36 survey, and assessment of hematologic (hemoglobin and platelet count), visceral, and skeletal involvement, and biomarkers. Specific radiologic imaging techniques are recommended for evaluating visceral and skeletal pathology. All patients should undergo comprehensive regular assessment, the frequency of which depends on treatment status and whether therapeutic goals have been achieved. Additionally, reassessment should be performed whenever enzyme therapy dose is altered, or in case of significant clinical complication. PMID:15468046

  19. Successful pregnancy and delivery in a patient with adult GH deficiency: role of GH replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Satoko; Wakasugi, Takanobu; Yagi, Kunimasa; Ohnishi, Akitsu; Ito, Naoko; Takeda, Yoshiyu; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2011-01-01

    Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) is a recently recognized endocrine disorder characterized by low peak GH levels during provocative tests. The AGHD has a negative impact on bone mineral density, skeletal muscle strength, physical capacity and psychosocial well-being. Furthermore, the girls with GHD have delayed pubertal development, and in adulthood present a condition of subfertility. Treatment for AGHD with GH replacement therapy has been officially approved since 2006 in Japan. The patient was diagnosed as pituitary dwarfism at age 9. She was treated with GH replacement therapy since diagnosis until her height reached 155cm at age 15. When she was 24 years old, she suffered from clinical symptoms relating to GH deficiency, and she visited our hospital for reintroduction of the therapy to alleviate these clinical symptoms. She has been treated with the replacement therapy since then. The patient's dysmenorrhea improved. And she was found to be 8 weeks pregnant at age 28 years 7 months. We immediately ceased replacement therapy and carefully observed the patient, because it is not indicated for female patient with pregnancy. She delivered a healthy girl at 40 weeks of pregnancy, no recognizable side-effects were observed in either mother or baby. To our knowledge, there are no other reports of a Japanese patient becoming pregnant during GH replacement therapy, and few cases have been reported in other countries. It remains uncertain whether the therapy is safe and essential for fetal development, fertility, and continuation of pregnancy in AGHD subjects.

  20. COGNUTUVE AND NEUROLOGICAL COMPLICATIONS OF BACTERIAL MENINGITIS IN ADULT PATIENTS: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY.

    PubMed

    El-Gindy, Eman M; Ali-Eldin, Fatima A; Bayoumy, Iman; Abdel-Moneim, Lamiaa; Ibrahim, Wesam A

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis is associated with disabling sequelae in a significant proportion of patients. It is associated with high mortality, risk of neuropsychological sequelae and risk of cognitive impairment the purpose of this study is to assess cognitive and neurological complications in adult patients with bacterial meningitis. A total of 45 patients with bacterial meningitis and 16 patients with tuberculous meningitis were enrolled. They were subjected to full medical history taking and clinical examination, full neurological examination on admission and discharge. Mini mental state examination (MMSE) and Wechsler memory scale (WMS) were used to assess cognitive function. The results showed that the ischemic brain insult (87.88%) followed by cranial nerves affection (32.42%) were the commonest neurological complication detected on discharge. Cognitive impairment was detected in 53.66% of patients using MMSE.WMS showed that orientation, information and logical memory were the most common affected. Cognitive and neurological complications were not statistically related to age or etiology (P>0.05). Longer duration until diagnosis (Beta = -.18, p < 0.001), presence of intracranial complications (Beta = -.12, p < 0.005), need for mechanical ventilation (Beta = -.79, p < 0.001) and drug abuse (Beta = -0.11, p < 0.05) were significant predictors of worse outcome assessed by Glasgow outcome score. PMID:26939225

  1. [Affective facial behavior of patients with anxiety disorders during the adult attachment interview: a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Buchheim, Anna; Benecke, Cord

    2007-08-01

    In this study we examined for the first time the difference between patients with an anxiety disorder and healthy controls in their attachment representation and facial affective behavior during the activation of the attachment system. 13 female patients und 14 healthy women were administered with the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI). Facial affective behavior during 6 selected questions of the AAI was coded using the Emotional-Facial-Action-Coding-System (EMFACS). As expected patients with an anxiety disorder, especially panic disorders, were classified significantly more often as insecure-preoccupied with a high proportion of unresolved loss. Against our assumption anxiety patients, independent of their attachment category, did not differ in their facial affective behavior from the control group. A group comparison taking into account diagnosis and attachment status showed that duchenne smile (happiness) was significantly predominant in control subjects classified as secure. Attachment security in healthy subjects, characterized by an overall valuing of positive or negative attachment experiences and coherent discourse in the AAI, was associated with positive facial affectivity. In contrast insecure anxiety patients could be characterized by showing social smile when talking e. g. about former separation experiences from their attachment figures mostly in an incoherent manner. This could be interpreted as a self-regulating defense. Limitations of the study are the small sample size and the heterogeneous clinical group of anxiety disorders.

  2. Autoantibodies in adult patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies in Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Graciela N; Gargiulo, María De Los Ángeles; Pérez, Nicolás; Collado, María Victoria; Suárez, Lorena V; Khoury, Marina; Sarano, Judith F

    2016-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies(IIM) are a heterogeneous group of diseases of the skeletal muscle. On the basis of clinical, serologic and histological differences, they are classified in dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), inclusion body myositis and immunomediated necrotizing myopathy. Autoantibodies directed against nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens are present with variable frequencies among studies. Myositis-specific antibodies (MSAs) are useful in IIM because they contribute to the diagnosis, help to identify different clinical subsets, and have prognostic value. This study aimed to explore the frequency of autoantibodies, especially MSAs, and their relationship with clinical features in adult patients with DM, PM and overlap syndrome. Medical records were reviewed. Myositis-associated antibodies (non-specific) and MSAs (anti Jo-1, PL-7, PL-12, Mi-2 and SRP) were measured using commercial kits. Twelve patients had MSAs, an overall frequency similar to those of international series, but PL-12 and Mi-2 were more frequent than Jo-1, which is the most frequently observed elsewhere. All five patients with Mi-2 had classical DM with a favorable response to treatment. Interstitial pneumonia (n: 4) and/or treatment-refractory disease (n: 3) were found in the presence of anti-PL-12, alone or associated with anti-SRP and/or Jo-1. In conclusion, the coexistence of AEM, a rare finding, was found in three patients. The presence of MSAs aided to the diagnosis of IIM, in particular in those patients without available or conclusive biopsy results.

  3. Autoantibodies in adult patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies in Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Graciela N; Gargiulo, María De Los Ángeles; Pérez, Nicolás; Collado, María Victoria; Suárez, Lorena V; Khoury, Marina; Sarano, Judith F

    2016-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies(IIM) are a heterogeneous group of diseases of the skeletal muscle. On the basis of clinical, serologic and histological differences, they are classified in dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), inclusion body myositis and immunomediated necrotizing myopathy. Autoantibodies directed against nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens are present with variable frequencies among studies. Myositis-specific antibodies (MSAs) are useful in IIM because they contribute to the diagnosis, help to identify different clinical subsets, and have prognostic value. This study aimed to explore the frequency of autoantibodies, especially MSAs, and their relationship with clinical features in adult patients with DM, PM and overlap syndrome. Medical records were reviewed. Myositis-associated antibodies (non-specific) and MSAs (anti Jo-1, PL-7, PL-12, Mi-2 and SRP) were measured using commercial kits. Twelve patients had MSAs, an overall frequency similar to those of international series, but PL-12 and Mi-2 were more frequent than Jo-1, which is the most frequently observed elsewhere. All five patients with Mi-2 had classical DM with a favorable response to treatment. Interstitial pneumonia (n: 4) and/or treatment-refractory disease (n: 3) were found in the presence of anti-PL-12, alone or associated with anti-SRP and/or Jo-1. In conclusion, the coexistence of AEM, a rare finding, was found in three patients. The presence of MSAs aided to the diagnosis of IIM, in particular in those patients without available or conclusive biopsy results. PMID:27295700

  4. Association between frailty and delirium in older adult patients discharged from hospital

    PubMed Central

    Verloo, Henk; Goulet, Céline; Morin, Diane; von Gunten, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Background Delirium and frailty – both potentially reversible geriatric syndromes – are seldom studied together, although they often occur jointly in older patients discharged from hospitals. This study aimed to explore the relationship between delirium and frailty in older adults discharged from hospitals. Methods Of the 221 patients aged >65 years, who were invited to participate, only 114 gave their consent to participate in this study. Delirium was assessed using the confusion assessment method, in which patients were classified dichotomously as delirious or nondelirious according to its algorithm. Frailty was assessed using the Edmonton Frailty Scale, which classifies patients dichotomously as frail or nonfrail. In addition to the sociodemographic characteristics, covariates such as scores from the Mini-Mental State Examination, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale, and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics and details regarding polymedication were collected. A multidimensional linear regression model was used for analysis. Results Almost 20% of participants had delirium (n=22), and 76.3% were classified as frail (n=87); 31.5% of the variance in the delirium score was explained by frailty (R2=0.315). Age; polymedication; scores of the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM), instrumental activities of daily living, and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics; and frailty increased the predictability of the variance of delirium by 32% to 64% (R2=0.64). Conclusion Frailty is strongly related to delirium in older patients after discharge from the hospital. PMID:26848261

  5. Radiographic Parameters in Adult Degenerative Scoliosis and Different Parameters Between Sagittal Balanced and Imbalanced ADS Patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changwei; Yang, Mingyuan; Chen, Yuanyuan; Wei, Xianzhao; Ni, Haijian; Chen, Ziqiang; Li, Jingfeng; Bai, Yushu; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Ming

    2015-07-01

    A retrospective study. To summarize and describe the radiographic parameters of adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS) and explore the radiological parameters which are significantly different in sagittal balanced and imbalanced ADS patients. ADS is the most common type of adult spinal deformity. However, no comprehensive description of radiographic parameters in ADS patients has been made, and few studies have been performed to explore which radiological parameters are significantly different between sagittal balanced and imbalanced ADS patients. Medical records of ADS patients in our outpatient clinic from January 2012 to January 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data including age and sex, and radiographic data including the coronal Cobb angle, location of apical vertebra/disc, convexity of the curve, degree of apical vertebra rotation, curve segments, thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), thoracolumbar kyphosis (TL), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), pelvic incidence (PI), sagittal vertical axis (SVA), and PI minus LL (PI-LL) were reviewed to make comprehensive description of radiographic parameters of ADS. Furthermore, patients were divided into 2 groups according to whether the patients' sagittal plane was balanced: Group A (imbalanced, SVA > 5 cm) and Group B (balanced, SVA  ≤ 5 cm). Demographic and radiological parameters were compared between these 2 groups. A total of 99 patients were included in this study (Group A = 33 and Group B = 66; female = 83 and male = 16; sex ratio = 5:1). The median of age were 67 years (range: 41-92 years). The median of coronal Cobb angle and length of curve was 23 (range: 10-75°) and 5 segments (range: 3-7), respectively. The most common location of apical vertebra was at L2 to L3 (81%) and the median of degree of apical vertebra rotation was 2° (range: 1-3). Our study also showed significant correlations between coronal Cobb angle and curve segments (r = 0.23, P < 0.005) and degree of apical vertebra rotation (r

  6. No Clear Association between Impaired Short-Term or Working Memory Storage and Time Reproduction Capacity in Adult ADHD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mette, Christian; Grabemann, Marco; Zimmermann, Marco; Strunz, Laura; Scherbaum, Norbert; Wiltfang, Jens; Kis, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Objective Altered time reproduction is exhibited by patients with adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It remains unclear whether memory capacity influences the ability of adults with ADHD to reproduce time intervals. Method We conducted a behavioral study on 30 ADHD patients who were medicated with methylphenidate, 29 unmedicated adult ADHD patients and 32 healthy controls (HCs). We assessed time reproduction using six time intervals (1 s, 4 s, 6 s, 10 s, 24 s and 60 s) and assessed memory performance using the Wechsler memory scale. Results The patients with ADHD exhibited lower memory performance scores than the HCs. No significant differences in the raw scores for any of the time intervals (p > .05), with the exception of the variability at the short time intervals (1 s, 4 s and 6 s) (p < .01), were found between the groups. The overall analyses failed to reveal any significant correlations between time reproduction at any of the time intervals examined in the time reproduction task and working memory performance (p > .05). Conclusion We detected no findings indicating that working memory might influence time reproduction in adult patients with ADHD. Therefore, further studies concerning time reproduction and memory capacity among adult patients with ADHD must be performed to verify and replicate the present findings. PMID:26221955

  7. Disturbances of sodium in critically ill adult neurologic patients: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Tisdall, Martin; Crocker, Matthew; Watkiss, Jonathan; Smith, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Disorders of sodium and water balance are common in critically ill adult neurologic patients. Normal aspects of sodium and water regulation are reviewed. The etiology of possible causes of sodium disturbance is discussed in both the general inpatient and the neurologic populations. Areas of importance are highlighted with regard to the differential diagnosis of sodium disturbance in neurologic patients, and management strategies are discussed. Specific discussions of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of cerebral salt wasting syndrome, the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, and central diabetes insipidus are presented, as well as the problems of overtreatment. The importance of diagnosis at an early stage of these diseases is stressed, with a recommendation for conservative management of milder cases.

  8. Case report: An adult-onset type II citrin deficiency patient in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    TANG, LUJIA; CHEN, LIANG; WANG, HAIRONG; DAI, LIHUA; PAN, SHUMING

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25A13) gene may result in neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency and/or adult-onset type II citrullinemia. These conditions are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The current case report describes a 43-year-old man who presented with sudden delirium and upper limb weakness. Upon admission, the patient was fully conscious and alert but later lost consciousness subsequent to a sudden convulsive seizure. Hyperammonemia was detected and analysis of the SLC25A13 gene identified an 851del4 mutation. Thus, the possibility of genetic disease should be considered as a potential cause of the symptoms of patients with altered states of consciousness, such as delirium and loss of consciousness, in cases where the cause of the disturbance is unknown. PMID:27347070

  9. A novel hormone is required for the development of reproductive phenotypes in adult female crabs.

    PubMed

    Zmora, Nilli; Chung, J Sook

    2014-01-01

    The crustacean male-specific androgenic hormone is widely accepted as a key factor in sexual differentiation and in the development of secondary sex characteristics. However, the mechanism by which the plethora of different reproductive strategies are controlled and executed in crustaceans is not known. We discovered in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, a hitherto unknown neurohormone, named crustacean female sex hormone (CFSH), in distinct neurosecretory cells in the eyestalk ganglia. CFSH is highly expressed in females but weakly in males, and its crucial role in developing adult female phenotypes has now been established. CFSH cDNA encodes a 225-amino acid (aa) novel protein composed of a 23-aa predicted signal peptide, 33-aa precursor-related peptide and 167-aa mature protein that did not match any other sequence in GenBank. CFSH RNA interference knockdown by multiple administrations of double-stranded RNA at the prepubertal stage causes abnormal development of brooding and mating systems upon puberty. These systems include a pair of gonopores and an egg attachment system for brooding, comprised of an enlarged semicircular abdomen and ovigerous setae. The ovigerous setae in CFSH knocked-down females were fewer and 50% shorter and the gonopores were either significantly smaller than those of controls, misplaced, or absent. We also identified CFSH in the green crab, Carcinus maenas, a species that shares a similar reproductive strategy with C. sapidus. Together, our data provide the first evidence for the presence of a female hormone in crustaceans and its importance in positively controlling anatomic features associated with brooding and mating systems. From an evolutionary standpoint, the endocrine control supporting a female-specific reproductive strategy, as previously described for many vertebrate species, has now been demonstrated for the first time in crustaceans. PMID:24280057

  10. Improving Medication Knowledge among Older Adults with Heart Failure: A Patient-Centered Approach to Instruction Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Daniel G.; Weiner, Michael; Young, James; Steinley, Douglas; Deer, Melissa; Murray, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether patient-centered instructions for chronic heart failure medications increase comprehension and memory for medication information in older adults diagnosed with chronic heart failure. Design and Methods: Patient-centered instructions for familiar and unfamiliar medications were compared with instructions for the…

  11. A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Study of Coblation versus Dissection Tonsillectomy in Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, Singh; Anand, T S; Payal, Garg; Pranjal, Kulshreshtha

    2012-09-01

    This randomized double blind study was conducted prospectively to determine whether coblation tonsillectomy fared better than the conventional dissection method in terms of postoperative pain, bleeding, and rapidity of healing in adult Indian patients undergoing tonsillectomy. Sixty adult patients undergoing tonsillectomy for benign indications were randomized to have one tonsil removed by subcapsular radiofrequency ablation method and the other by conventional dissection method. The operative time and blood loss was noted for each side. Patients were evaluated at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 h and then on 7th and 20th postoperative day for postoperative pain (by visual analog scale), bleeding, and tonsillar fossa healing. Statistical comparison was done using appropriate tests. The two groups were demographically matched. It took longer to perform the coblation procedure (15 vs 11 min) (P > 0.05). The operative blood loss on the radiofrequency side was 11 ml, vs 34 ml on the conventional side (P = 0.009). 77% patients said that the coblation side was less painful for the overall 20-day recovery period. There were significant differences seen at 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h in terms of postoperative pain scores. Beyond that, the pain was consistently less on the coblation side, but the difference was not significant. There was no case of reactionary or secondary hemorrhage in either arm. The healing took longer on the radiofrequency side. Coblation tonsillectomy is an easy to learn technique with significantly reduced operative blood loss and postoperative pain. Longer operative times maybe further reduced with experience.

  12. Transiently-Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions (teoaes) in Monitoring Adult Cis-Platin Patients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribera, John Everett

    1995-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) reflect the integrity of cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) function. Cis-platin (CDDP) is a potent ototoxic chemotherapeutic agent that tends to destroy or disable OHCs. Therefore, this study was designed to answer the following questions: (1) Can TEOAEs be used in monitoring for ototoxicity in adult VA oncology patients receiving CDDP treatment? (2) If so, how sensitive are TEOAEs in detecting significant changes when compared to Audiometry in a VA population? and (3) Which of several TEOAE measures is the most sensitive to changes in hearing due to CDDP ototoxicity in a VA population?. In Experiment I, VA Medical Center patients were recruited (control group) and tested using a conventional audiometer and the ILO88 Otoacoustic Analyzer on three separate days. Data from this experiment were used to develop change criteria in each of four TEOAE measures (Reproducibility, Compare, 1 kHz Band Analysis, and OAE Response) for Experiment II. Experiment II was of similar design with the exception that the subjects (experimental group) were patients enrolled from the oncology ward and were administered CDDP after the first and second test sessions. Data from both groups and all test measures revealed (1) that there was no ear effect in any of the test conditions, (2) there was a group (drug) effect, and (3) there was a frequency effect at 2 kHz. Audiometry detected changes in 56% of the experimental subjects, while the number of changes varied among the TEOAE measures studied. Compare agreed with Audiometry more often and performed better than any other TEOAE measure in detecting change. Based on these findings, incorporation of Compare into an audiometric test battery to monitor for ototoxicity in the VA population is feasible. There is evidence to suggest that as measurement techniques are refined TEOAE analysis will become a valid test for monitoring of adult CDDP patients.

  13. The Level of Dental Anxiety and Dental Status in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dobros, Katarzyna; Hajto-Bryk, Justyna; Wnek, Anna; Zarzecka, Joanna; Rzepka, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to assess potential correlation between dental anxiety and overall dental status in adult patients, in consideration of the frequency of dental appointments and individual dental hygiene practices. Materials and Methods: Individual dental anxiety levels were assessed with the aid of the Corah’s dental anxiety scale (DAS). The study embraced 112 patients of the University Dental Clinic, Kraków. Following clinical and X-ray exams, respectively, decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) index and dental treatment index (DTI) were computed for each study subject. Results: Mean DAS among the 112 subjects under study was 9.41 standard deviation (SD = 3.36). Mean DMFT value was 15.86 (SD = 7.00), whereas DTI value was 0.76 (SD = 0.27). The number of decayed teeth and an individual dental anxiety level were found to be correlated (r = 0.26). Higher dental anxiety correlated with lower DTI value (r = −0.22) and lesser frequency of dental appointments (r = 0.22). Conclusions: Individual dental anxiety level appears to impact overall dental status, frequency of dental appointments and everyday oral health practices. Every conceivable effort should therefore be undertaken with a view to effectively diminishing dental anxiety levels in the patients. How to cite the article: Dobros K, Hajto-Bryk J, Wnęk A, Zarzecka J, Rzepka D. The level of dental anxiety and dental status in adult patients. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):11-4. PMID:25083026

  14. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F; Long, Daniel J; Bolch, Wesley E; Liu, Bob; Xu, X George

    2015-07-21

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose--a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the 'software as a service (SaaS)' delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose's functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT-two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations.

  15. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F.; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Liu, Bob; Xu, X. George

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose—a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the ‘software as a service (SaaS)’ delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose’s functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT—two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations.

  16. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F; Long, Daniel J; Bolch, Wesley E; Liu, Bob; Xu, X George

    2015-07-21

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose--a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the 'software as a service (SaaS)' delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose's functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT-two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations. PMID:26134511

  17. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of voriconazole and anidulafungin in adult patients with invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Mould, Diane R

    2014-08-01

    To assess the pharmacokinetics (PK) of voriconazole and anidulafungin in patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA) in comparison with other populations, sparse PK data were obtained for 305 adults from a prospective phase 3 study comparing voriconazole and anidulafungin in combination versus voriconazole monotherapy (voriconazole, 6 mg/kg intravenously [IV] every 12 h [q12h] for 24 h followed by 4 mg/kg IV q12h, switched to 300 mg orally q12h as appropriate; with placebo or anidulafungin IV, a 200-mg loading dose followed by 100 mg q24h). Voriconazole PK was described by a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and mixed linear and time-dependent nonlinear (Michaelis-Menten) elimination; anidulafungin PK was described by a two-compartment model with first-order elimination. For voriconazole, the normal inverse Wishart prior approach was implemented to stabilize the model. Compared to previous models, no new covariates were identified for voriconazole or anidulafungin. PK parameter estimates of voriconazole and anidulafungin are in agreement with those reported previously except for voriconazole clearance (the nonlinear clearance component became minimal). At a 4-mg/kg IV dose, voriconazole exposure tended to increase slightly as age, weight, or body mass index increased, but the difference was not considered clinically relevant. Estimated voriconazole exposures in IA patients at 4 mg/kg IV were higher than those reported for healthy adults (e.g., the average area under the curve over a 12-hour dosing interval [AUC0-12] at steady state was 46% higher); while it is not definitive, age and concomitant medications may impact this difference. Estimated anidulafungin exposures in IA patients were comparable to those reported for the general patient population. This study was approved by the appropriate institutional review boards or ethics committees and registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00531479). PMID:24913161

  18. Hippotherapy in Adult Patients with Chronic Brain Disorders: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Hyuk; Kwon, Jeong-Yi; Kim, Tae-Won; Lee, Ji-Young; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of hippotherapy for adult patients with brain disorders. Method Eight chronic brain disorder patients (7 males, mean age 42.4±16.6 years) were recruited. The mean duration from injury was 7.9±7.7 years. The diagnoses were stroke (n=5), traumatic brain disorder (n=2), and cerebral palsy (n=1). Hippotherapy sessions were conducted twice a week for eight consecutive weeks in an indoor riding arena. Each hippotherapy session lasted 30 minutes. All participants were evaluated by the Berg balance scale, Tinetti Performance-Oriented Mobility Assessment, 10 Meter Walking Test, Functional Ambulatory Category, Korean Beck Depression Inventory, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. We performed baseline assessments twice just before starting hippotherapy. We also assessed the participants immediately after hippotherapy and at eight weeks after hippotherapy. Results All participants showed no difference in balance, gait function, and emotion between the two baseline assessments before hippotherapy. During the eight-week hippotherapy program, all participants showed neither adverse effects nor any accidents; all had good compliance. After hippotherapy, there were significant improvements in balance and gait speed in comparison with the baseline assessment (p<0.05), and these effects were sustained for two months after hippotherapy. However, there was no significant difference in emotion after hippotherapy. Conclusion We could observe hippotherapy to be a safe and effective alternative therapy for adult patients with brain disorders in improving balance and gait function. Further future studies are warranted to delineate the benefits of hippotherapy on chronic stroke patients. PMID:23342306

  19. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of voriconazole and anidulafungin in adult patients with invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Mould, Diane R

    2014-08-01

    To assess the pharmacokinetics (PK) of voriconazole and anidulafungin in patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA) in comparison with other populations, sparse PK data were obtained for 305 adults from a prospective phase 3 study comparing voriconazole and anidulafungin in combination versus voriconazole monotherapy (voriconazole, 6 mg/kg intravenously [IV] every 12 h [q12h] for 24 h followed by 4 mg/kg IV q12h, switched to 300 mg orally q12h as appropriate; with placebo or anidulafungin IV, a 200-mg loading dose followed by 100 mg q24h). Voriconazole PK was described by a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and mixed linear and time-dependent nonlinear (Michaelis-Menten) elimination; anidulafungin PK was described by a two-compartment model with first-order elimination. For voriconazole, the normal inverse Wishart prior approach was implemented to stabilize the model. Compared to previous models, no new covariates were identified for voriconazole or anidulafungin. PK parameter estimates of voriconazole and anidulafungin are in agreement with those reported previously except for voriconazole clearance (the nonlinear clearance component became minimal). At a 4-mg/kg IV dose, voriconazole exposure tended to increase slightly as age, weight, or body mass index increased, but the difference was not considered clinically relevant. Estimated voriconazole exposures in IA patients at 4 mg/kg IV were higher than those reported for healthy adults (e.g., the average area under the curve over a 12-hour dosing interval [AUC0-12] at steady state was 46% higher); while it is not definitive, age and concomitant medications may impact this difference. Estimated anidulafungin exposures in IA patients were comparable to those reported for the general patient population. This study was approved by the appropriate institutional review boards or ethics committees and registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00531479).

  20. Immunoglobulin G Subclass Deficiencies in Adult Patients with Chronic Airway Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G subclass deficiency (IgGSCD) is a relatively common primary immunodeficiency disease (PI) in adults. The biological significance of IgGSCD in patients with chronic airway diseases is controversial. We conducted a retrospective study to characterize the clinical features of IgGSCD in this population. This study examined the medical charts from 59 adult patients with IgGSCD who had bronchial asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) from January 2007 to December 2012. Subjects were classified according to the 10 warning signs developed by the Jeffrey Modell Foundation (JMF) and divided into two patient groups: group I (n = 17) met ≥ two JMF criteria, whereas group II (n = 42) met none. IgG3 deficiency was the most common subclass deficiency (88.1%), followed by IgG4 (15.3%). The most common infectious complication was pneumonia, followed by recurrent bronchitis, and rhinosinusitis. The numbers of infections, hospitalizations, and exacerbations of asthma or COPD per year were significantly higher in group I than in group II (P < 0.001, P = 0.012, and P < 0.001, respectively). The follow-up mean forced expiratory volume (FEV1) level in group I was significantly lower than it was at baseline despite treatment of asthma or COPD (P = 0.036). In conclusion, IgGSCD is an important PI in the subset of patients with chronic airway diseases who had recurrent upper and lower respiratory infections as they presented with exacerbation-prone phenotypes, decline in lung function, and subsequently poor prognosis. PMID:27550483

  1. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses in adult patients with Chagas disease treated with a new formulation of benznidazole.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Marisa Liliana; Marson, Maria Elena; Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Mastrantonio, Guido; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel; Altcheh, Jaime; Riarte, Adelina Rosa; Bournissen, Facundo García

    2016-03-01

    Pharmacological treatment of Chagas disease with benznidazole (BNZ) is effective in children in all stages, but it is controversial in chronically infected adults. We report the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in six adult patients with Chagas disease treated with the new BNZ formulation (ABARAX®) in doses between 2.5-5.5 mg/Kg/day. All but one patient had plasmatic BNZ concentrations within the expected range. All patients finalised treatment with nondetectable Trypanosoma cruzi quantitative polymerase chain reaction, which remained nondetectable at the six month follow-up. Our data suggests parasitological responses with the new BNZ and supports the hypothesis that treatment protocols with lower BNZ doses may be effective.

  2. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses in adult patients with Chagas disease treated with a new formulation of benznidazole

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Marisa Liliana; Marson, Maria Elena; Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Mastrantonio, Guido; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel; Altcheh, Jaime; Riarte, Adelina Rosa; Bournissen, Facundo García

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of Chagas disease with benznidazole (BNZ) is effective in children in all stages, but it is controversial in chronically infected adults. We report the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in six adult patients with Chagas disease treated with the new BNZ formulation (ABARAX®) in doses between 2.5-5.5 mg/Kg/day. All but one patient had plasmatic BNZ concentrations within the expected range. All patients finalised treatment with nondetectable Trypanosoma cruziquantitative polymerase chain reaction, which remained nondetectable at the six month follow-up. Our data suggests parasitological responses with the new BNZ and supports the hypothesis that treatment protocols with lower BNZ doses may be effective. PMID:26982179

  3. Intracuff alkalized lidocaine reduces sedative/analgesic requirements for mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Basuni, Ahmed Sobhy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of intracuff alkalized lidocaine on sedative/analgesic requirements for mechanically ventilated patients and its consequence on patient-ventilator interaction. Materials and Methods: A total of 64 patients who expected to require ventilatory support for a period of more than 48 h were randomly assigned to groups S and L. In group S, the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuffs were inflated with normal saline. In group L, the ETT cuffs were inflated with lidocaine 2% and sodium bicarbonate 8.4%. The investigator and the surgical intensive care unit staff were blinded to the nature of cuff-filled solutions. Sedation was maintained with propofol and fentanyl infusions. The total requirements for propofol and fentanyl, frequency and severity of cough and number of ineffective triggering during the first 24 h of mechanical ventilation were recorded. Results: There was a significant reduction (about 30%) in the requirements for propofol and fentanyl in patients who received intracuff alkalinized lidocaine; P < 0.001. The frequency and severity of cough were significantly lower in group L compared with group S and the frequency of ineffective triggering was significantly lower in group L; P < 0.001 for both comparisons. Conclusion: Intracuff alkalized lidocaine increases ETT tolerance and hence, decreases sedatives/analgesics requirements for mechanically ventilated patients. This results in improved patient-ventilator synchronization. PMID:25422600

  4. Aripiprazole (ABILIFY MAINTENA®): a review of its use as maintenance treatment for adult patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Matt; Perry, Caroline M

    2014-07-01

    Aripiprazole (ABILIFY(®)) is an atypical antipsychotic drug that is proposed to act via partial agonism of dopamine D2 receptors. Trials with oral aripiprazole have shown that, compared with some other atypical antipsychotics, aripiprazole is associated with fewer metabolic disturbances and has a favourable cardiovascular tolerability profile. Recently, an intramuscular long-acting injectable (LAI) depot formulation of aripiprazole (ABILIFY MAINTENA(®)) (aripiprazole LAI) has been approved for use as a treatment for schizophrenia in adults. The efficacy of aripiprazole LAI as a maintenance treatment for schizophrenia has been demonstrated in randomized clinical trials. In the trials, aripiprazole LAI was more effective than placebo, and noninferior to oral aripiprazole, in delaying relapse and in reducing relapse rates in schizophrenia. Aripiprazole LAI was generally well tolerated, with a tolerability profile consistent with that of oral aripiprazole. Thus, aripiprazole LAI is a valuable new treatment option for adult patients with schizophrenia. It may be of particular use for patients stable on oral aripiprazole who would prefer, or are likely to benefit from, a long-acting formulation.

  5. Static and dynamic postural control before and after cochlear implantation in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Kluenter, Heinz-Dieter; Lang-Roth, Ruth; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2009-10-01

    On a Balance Master computerized force plate static and dynamic postural control was measured in 24 severe hearing-impaired patients before and after CI surgery, and 19 healthy adults in a prospective study. The test battery consisted of the modified clinical test of sensory interaction on balance, the Rhythmic Weight Shift, the Walk Across, and the Tandem Walk test. Postural control was significantly worse in CI candidates than in healthy adults. In contrast, caloric testing of the vestibular organ was normal in the majority of CI candidates and remained normal after CI surgery. Static and dynamic standing balance parameters remained unchanged after CI surgery for the vast majority of parameters. Male gender and age >51 years were negative risk factors in some balance tasks. The static and dynamic standing balance performance seemed to improve to some degree with longer time interval before the CI surgery. Postural control was impaired but not complained of in many CI candidates before CI surgery and remained impaired after CI surgery although caloric testing is normal in most patients.

  6. Hemodialysis outcomes in a global sample of children and young adult hemodialysis patients: the PICCOLO MONDO cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Maria; Gibson, Keisha; Plattner, Brett; Gipson, Debbie S.; Kotanko, Peter; Marcelli, Daniele; Marelli, Cristina; Etter, Michael; Carioni, Paola; von Gersdorff, Gero; Xu, Xiaoqi; Kooman, Jeroen P.; Xiao, Qingqing; van der Sande, Frank M.; Power, Albert; Picoits-Filho, Roberto; Sylvestre, Lucimary; Westreich, Katherine; Usvyat, Len

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the experience of pediatric and young adult hemodialysis (HD) patients from a global cohort. Methods The Pediatric Investigation and Close Collaborative Consortium for Ongoing Life Outcomes for MONitoring Dialysis Outcomes (PICCOLO MONDO) study provided de-identified electronic information of 3244 patients, ages 0–30 years from 2000 to 2012 in four regions: Asia, Europe, North America and South America. The study sample was categorized into pediatric (≤18 years old) and young adult (19–30 years old) groups based on the age at dialysis initiation. Results For those with known end-stage renal disease etiology, glomerular disease was the most common diagnosis in children and young adults. Using Europe as a reference group, North America [odds ratio (OR) 2.69; CI 1.29, 5.63] and South America (OR 4.21; CI 2.32, 7.63) had the greatest mortality among young adults. North America also had higher rates of overweight, obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, hospitalizations and secondary diabetes compared with all other regions. Initial catheter use was greater for North American (86.4% in pediatric patients and 75.2% in young adults) and South America (80.6% in pediatric patients and 75.9% in young adults). Catheter use at 1-year follow-up was most common in North American children (77.3%) and young adults (62.9%). Asia had the lowest rate of catheter use. For both age groups, dialysis adequacy (equilibrated Kt/V) ranged between 1.4 and 1.5. In Asia, patients in both age groups had significantly longer treatment times than in any other region. Conclusions The PICCOLO MONDO study has provided unique baseline and 1-year follow-up information on children and young adults receiving HD around the globe. This cohort has brought to light aspects of care in these age groups that warrant further investigation. PMID:26985383

  7. Patients' empowerment of their personal health record requires strong traceability to guarantee patients health care security.

    PubMed

    Allaert, François André; Quantin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Giving patients power over their personal health record is an unavoidable evolution in all industrialized countries which will reflect their active participation in the management of their own health. This would lead to patients sharing management with health professionals, which would need traceability of the data provider to maintain trust and transparency. The systematic use of electronic signatures by medical practitioners will be essential to provide sufficient guarantees and to clearly determine who has added what in the PEHR.

  8. Pediatric and Young Adult Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Treated With Preradiation Cisplatin and Docetaxel Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Varan, Ali Ozyar, Enis; Corapcioglu, Funda; Koeksal, Yavuz; Aydin, Burca; Yazici, Nalan; Akyuez, Canan; Bueyuekpamukcu, Muenevver

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results for pediatric and young adult (aged <21 years) patients with nonmetastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with neoadjuvant cisplatin + docetaxel and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma who received diagnoses between 2004 and 2007 were treated with four cycles of cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} + docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1 with premedication every 3 weeks. All patients were treated with fractionated external beam radiotherapy after chemotherapy to a median dose of 59.4 Gy (range, 54-59.4 Gy) to the primary disease and 40 Gy to the supraclavicular field with the clavicles shielded. Five children were monitored with serum EBV DNA quantification at diagnosis, after each cycle of chemotherapy, before radiotherapy, and at follow-up. Results: The median age of the patients was 14 years (range, 9-20 years), with a male:female ratio of 6:4. Stage distribution was as follows: 2 patients had Stage IIb disease, 2 had Stage III, 4 had Stage IVa, and 2 had Stage IVb disease. After cisplatin+docetaxel chemotherapy 1 patient had a complete response, 5 had a partial response, 3 had stable disease, and 1 had disease progression. The 2-year overall survival rate in our series was 90% and the event-free survival rate was 70%. No major chemotherapy toxicity was observed. The EBV DNA titers were higher in 2 of the 5 monitored patients at the time of diagnosis. Conclusion: As neoadjuvant chemotherapy before radiotherapy, the cisplatin+docetaxel combination is safe for use in the treatment of childhood nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  9. Bone disease in adult patients with β-thalassaemia major: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Marina; Forti, Stella; Orsatti, Alessandra; Ulivieri, Fabio Massimo; Airaghi, Lorena; Zanaboni, Laura; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2014-02-01

    Despite the extraordinary improvements carried out in diagnostic and therapeutic management of thalassaemia major over the past few decades, bone demineralization is still a common finding, even in optimally treated patients. The relationships between bone density and several clinical characteristics or hematological markers have been described, and many factors contributing to demineralization have been identified; among them endocrine complications seem to play an important role. Nevertheless, the complex etiological mechanisms of this heterogeneous osteopathy still remains incompletely clarified. While previous studies focused on the characteristics of thalassaemic patients affected from bone demineralization, we conducted a case-control study focused on thalassaemic patients free from bone disease, aimed to detect the distinctive characteristics and any possible protective feature. Among a large cohort of 150 adult patients with β-thalassaemia major, we enrolled 20 patients with normal bone mineralization and 20 patients with osteoporosis matched for gender, BMI, age at first transfusion, serum ferritin and pre-transfusional hemoglobin (Hb) levels. The differences in demographic, clinical and endocrinological profiles were investigated, correcting for physical and hematological features known as confounding variables. The comparison of the two groups for biochemical parameters and endocrine function showed a protective role of normal gonadic function and IGF-1 levels against osteoporosis, and a similar influence of hypoparathyroidism. Treatment-corrected hypothyroidism and diabetes seemed not to affect bone mineralization. In conclusion, from a different perspective our results corroborate the role of endocrinopathies in thalassaemic osteopathy, and once again underline the crucial importance of an early and multi-disciplinary intervention in preventing bone complications in thalassaemic patients. PMID:22179745

  10. Temporal patterns of radiographic infiltration in severely traumatized patients with and without adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K S; Bishop, M H; Stephen, C M; Jorgens, J; Shoemaker, W C; Shori, S K; Ordog, G; Thadepalli, H; Appel, P L; Kram, H B

    1994-05-01

    We prospectively evaluated the patterns of pulmonary structural and functional changes in 100 consecutive surgical intensive care unit trauma patients who had (1) emergent major surgery, (2) a pelvic fracture, or (3) two or more major long bone fractures. For each patient, arterial blood gas measurements (ABGs), central venous pressure (CVP), pulmonary capillary occlusion pressure (PAOP), thoracic compliance, arterial oxygen tension/fraction of inspired oxygen (PAO2/FIO2), pulmonary venous admixture (Qs/Qt), and portable chest roentgenograms were sequentially tracked. The senior staff radiologist interpreted all chest roentgenograms. Pulmonary infiltration was quantitated in each of six fields using a scale ranging from 0 to 4, with 0 being no infiltration and 4 being the maximum. Adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was defined as follows: Qs/Qt > or = 20%, PAO2/FIO2 < 250 or both; dependence on mechanical ventilation for life support for > or = 24 hours; PAOP or CVP or both < 20 mm Hg; and thoracic compliance < 50 mL/cm H2O. Time zero (T0) the time of onset of ARDS, was defined as the time these criteria were met. Eighty-three of 100 study group patients had penetrating injuries, and 17 were admitted with blunt trauma. Fifty-one of 100 patients developed ARDS: 36 of 51 died. Only 4 of 49 (8%) patients without ARDS died. The injured lungs of patients with and without ARDS had similar amounts of infiltration over most measured time intervals. The noninjured lungs of the ARDS patients, however, had significantly greater infiltration than those without ARDS at T0 and over subsequent time intervals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Patient Reported Delays in Seeking Treatment for Tuberculosis among Adult and Pediatric TB Patients and TB Patients Co-Infected with HIV in Lima, Peru: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Soldan, Valerie A.; Alban, Rebecca E.; Dimos Jones, Christy; Powell, Amy R.; Oberhelman, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant public health challenge worldwide, and particularly in Peru with one of the highest incidence rates in Latin America. TB patient behavior has a direct influence on whether a patient will receive timely diagnosis and successful treatment of their illness. Objectives: The objective was to understand the complex factors that can impact TB patient health seeking behavior. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with adult and parents of pediatric patients receiving TB treatment (n = 43), within that group a sub-group was also co-infected with HIV (n = 11). Results: Almost all of the study participants recognized delays in seeking either their child’s or their own diagnosis of their TB symptoms. The principal reasons for treatment-seeking delays were lack of knowledge and confusion of TB symptoms, fear and embarrassment of receiving a TB diagnosis, and a patient tendency to self-medicate prior to seeking formal medical attention. Conclusion: Health promotion activities that target patient delays have the potential to improve individual